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Sample records for desiccant humidity control

  1. Desiccant humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amazeen, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A regenerable sorbent system was investigated for controlling the humidity and carbon dioxide concentration of the space shuttle cabin atmosphere. The sorbents considered for water and carbon dioxide removal were silica gel and molecular sieves. Bed optimization and preliminary system design are discussed along with system optimization studies and weight penalites.

  2. Dehumidification Performance of Hybrid Type Humidity Control System Coupling a Desiccant Rotor in a Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horibe, Akihiko; Takaki, Sadao; Inaba, Hideo; Haruki, Naoto

    Desiccant air-conditioning system is a promising technology because the exhaust heat can be effectively used in the future. We have reported the proposed system that combines a desiccant rotor with a vapor compression refrigerator. The confirmation experiment of stability and the performance was conducted with the experimental prototype. The result showed that it had the performance that was necessary for dehumidification driving in the summer and the humidification driving in the winter. In this report, we examined the influence on humidity controlling performance of the processing air temperature and humidity. As a result, we got high dehumidification efficiency and clarified the dehumidification characteristic in dehumidification driving in the summer. Dehumidification efficiency about 4.0 kg/kWh and COP of the system about 2.0 in summer driving mode were obtained.

  3. Desiccant Humidity Control System Using Waste Heat of Water Source Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kazuki; Mashimo, Kouichi; Takahashi, Mikio; Tanaka, Kitoshi; Toya, Saburo; Tateyama, Ryotaro; Miyamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    The authors hope to develop an air-conditioning system that processes the latent heat load and the sensible heat load separately. This would enable the efficiency of the chilling unit to be improved because the temperature of the chilled water used for cooling would be higher than normal. However, if lukewarm water is used, there is insufficient cooling and dehumidification. Therefore, a dehumidifier such as a desiccant air-conditioning system is needed. Using the waste heat generated when the desiccant air-conditioning system is in operation increases efficiency. The authors are developing a prototype desiccant humidity control system that makes use of the waste heat generated by a water source heat pump. This paper describes the results of an experiment that was conducted for this prototype based on the assumption that it would be installed in an office building. The dehumidification performance achieved was sufficient to process the indoor latent heat load. The prototype was able to adjust the indoor relative humidity from 40% to 60% under conditions in which the indoor latent heat load varied. Humidification without the use of water was possible even in the absence of an indoor latent heat load when the outdoor absolute humidity was 3.5 g/kg' or more.

  4. Desiccant humidity control system. [for space shuttle cabins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunde, P. J.; Kester, F. L.

    1975-01-01

    A water vapor and carbon dioxide sorbent material (designated HS-C) was developed for potential application to the space shuttle and tested at full scale. Capacities of two percent for carbon dioxide and four percent for water vapor were achieved using space shuttle cabin adsorption conditions and a space vacuum for desorption. Performance testing shows that water vapor can be controlled by varying the air process flow, while maintaining the ability to remove carbon dioxide. A 2000 hour life test was successfully completed, as were tests for sensitivity to cleaning solvent vapors, vibration resistance, and flammability. A system design for the space shuttle shows a 200 pound weight advantage over competitive systems and an even larger advantage for longer missions.

  5. Hybrid Type Humidity Control System Coupling a Desiccant Rotor in a Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horibe, Akihiko; Takaki, Sadao; Inaba, Hideo; Haruki, Naoto

    This paper describes a new hybrid humidity control system that combines a desiccant rotor with a vapor compression refrigerator. This rotor uses a kind of advanced sorbent and desorption at low temperature below 50°C is possible. Therefore the rotor can be recovered by exhaust heat of a condenser. Applying the new hybrid system, we installed an experimental prototype and investigated its performance. As a result, dehumidification can be achieved even if the absolute humidity of the processing air is less than 0.002 kg/kg'. This suggests that water can be taken out from the exhausting air to humidify the returning air in winter. Furthermore, dehumidification efficiency is 4.1kg/kWh, system COP1.8 for the processing air 30°C, 62%RH. That corresponds with the summer weather condition. If it is winter, the dehumidification efficiency is 1.9kg/kWh, system COP0.97 for the processing air 22°C, 50%RH.

  6. Solar-Powered, Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Low-Electricity Humidity Control: Report and Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.; Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Miller, J.; Lowenstein, A.; Barker, G.; Slayzak, S.

    2012-11-01

    The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the capabilities of a new high-performance, liquid-desiccant dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) to enhance cooling efficiency and comfort in humid climates while substantially reducing electric peak demand at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), which is 12 miles east of Panama City, Florida.

  7. Evaluation of the desiccation tolerance of blastospores of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomyces)using a lab- scale, air-drying chamber with controlled relative humidity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stabilization of living microbial agents for use as biological control agents is often accomplished through desiccation. The drying process must be conducive to the survival of the living microbial agent during desiccation and storage. Our air-drying studies with liquid culture-produced blasto...

  8. Report Card on Humidity Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, John C.; Bayer, Charlene

    2003-01-01

    Reports on an investigation of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62-1999 on outdoor ventilation rates and space humidity levels for schools. Examined conventional cooling versus desiccant-based systems designed to control indoor humidity levels. Discusses the effectiveness of systems…

  9. Controlling rotary desiccant wheels for dehumidification and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, K.W.; Banks, N.J.

    1996-12-31

    With greater focus on indoor air quality (IAQ) and ventilation, humidity control within spaces such as office buildings, hotels, schools, ice-skating rinks, nursing homes, and operating rooms has become paramount during the past decade. Control of relative humidity (RH) has been linked to increased comfort and the improved health of building occupants. The desiccant wheel process can be utilized in these applications to provide increased dehumidification while introducing minimal additional control parameters, often at lower cost.

  10. An effective desiccant system to regulate the humidity inside the chambers of the solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Vesa-Pekka; Erling, Ida

    2007-11-01

    The most common way to protect moisture-sensitive pharmaceutical powders is to utilize protective packaging. However, the most convenient package materials are all permeable to water molecules to some extent and limited protection is normally achieved with this arrangement even though desiccants are employed. In the present study we introduce a novel system that can regulate the internal humidity of the containers used with solid dosage forms for a desired time at a requested level. Instead of the widely used solid adsorbents the system utilizes saturated salt solutions loaded in desiccant bags made of various polymer materials with appropriate permeation properties. By utilizing salt solutions the size of the desiccant bag can be further reduced. A wide variety of commonly used powder chambers and desiccant bags are tested, proving the effectiveness of the introduced system. PMID:18058320

  11. Evaluation of Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types in the hot-humid climate zone, and examine the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls. As the Building America program researches construction of homes that achieve greater source energy savings over typical mid-1990s construction, proper modeling of whole-house latent loads and operation of humidity control equipment has become a high priority. Long-term high relative humidity can cause health and durability problems in homes, particularly in a hot-humid climate. In this study, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used the latest EnergyPlus tool equipped with the moisture capacitance model to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types: a Building America high-performance home; a mid-1990s reference home; and a 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)-compliant home in hot-humid climate zones. They examined the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls on the high-performance home where the dehumidification equipment energy use can become a much larger portion of whole-house energy consumption. The research included a number of simulated cases: thermostat reset, A/C with energy recovery ventilator, heat exchanger assisted A/C, A/C with condenser reheat, A/C with desiccant wheel dehumidifier, A/C with DX dehumidifier, A/C with energy recovery ventilator, and DX dehumidifier. Space relative humidity, thermal comfort, and whole-house source energy consumption were compared for indoor relative humidity set points of 50%, 55%, and 60%. The study revealed why similar trends of high humidity were observed in all three homes regardless of energy efficiency, and why humidity problems are not necessarily unique in the high-performance home. Thermal comfort analysis indicated that occupants are unlikely to notice indoor humidity problems. The study confirmed that supplemental

  12. Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, A.; Slayzak, S.; Kozubal, E.

    2006-07-01

    A novel liquid-desiccant air conditioner that dries and cools building supply air will transform the use of direct-contact liquid-desiccant systems in HVAC applications, improving comfort, air quality, and providing energy-efficient humidity control.

  13. Effect of supply/regeneration section area ratio on the performance of desiccant wheels in hot and humid climates: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendehboudi, Alireza; Esmaeili, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    Desiccant cooling system is a suitable alternative option for conventional cooling system in humid climates. It is an environmental protection technique for cooling buildings. This study has investigated the effect of supply/regeneration section area ratio on the performance of desiccant wheels in hot and humid climates, using Silica Gel (WSG) and Molecular Sieve (LT3) desiccants. To this end, some parameters such as outlet air humidity ratio, process removed moisture, process outlet temperature, reactivation outlet temperature and reactivation outlet moisture have been examined as a function of rotational speed and inlet air humidity ratio in 1:3, 1:2 and 1:1 split. In this study, desiccant materials are regenerated using a constant regeneration temperature of 80 °C, wheel rotation speed range of 4-12 RPH (revolutions per hour) and variable humidity. The results show that a rise in area ratio causes an increase in process removed moisture, process outlet temperature, reactivation outlet temperature and a drop in reactivation outlet moisture and outlet humidity ratio of process air.

  14. Desiccant systems save money

    SciTech Connect

    Kister, P.

    1996-10-01

    Desiccant systems can save the Navy money through lower utility bills. Traditional vapor compression air conditioning systems are required to remove both sensible heat and latent heat (humidity) by cooling the outside air below the dewpoint in order to condense out water vapor. In some cases the air is then required to be reheated to a comfortable level. This requires large amounts of electricity at peak billing rates. Desiccant systems, on the other hand, use a desiccant to remove moisture from the outside air prior to cooling the air using traditional chillers. The desiccant is then reactivated using natural gas heat. This will shift up to 40 percent of the cooling load of the building to natural gas which in many areas of the country is cheaper than electricity, especially during the peak hours in the summer. It also eliminates inefficient reheating and in most cases the temperature of the building can be raised since dry air is more comfortable at higher temperatures than humid air. Many buildings also require special humidity control which is most effectively and efficiently met using a desiccant system. These buildings include hospitals, commissaries, avionics rooms, BOQ`s and BEQ`s, etc.

  15. Development of a desiccated cadaver delivery system to apply entomopathogenic nematodes for control of soil pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pentomopathogenic nematodes may be more capable of controlling soil pests when they are harbored by desiccated cadavers. A small-scale system was developed from a modified crop seed planter to effectively deliver desiccated nematode-infected cadavers into the soil. The system mainly consists of a me...

  16. Apparatus and methods for humidity control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinauer, William R. (Inventor); Otis, David R. (Inventor); El-Wakil, Mohamed M. (Inventor); Vignali, John C. (Inventor); Macaulay, Philip D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus is provided which controls humidity in a gas. The apparatus employs a porous interface that is preferably a manifolded array of stainless steel tubes through whose porous surface water vapor can pass. One side of the porous interface is in contact with water and the opposing side is in contact with gas whose humidity is being controlled. Water vapor is emitted from the porous surface of the tubing into the gas when the gas is being humidified, and water vapor is removed from the gas through the porous surfaces when the gas is being dehumidified. The temperature of the porous interface relative to the gas temperature determines whether humidification or dehumidification is being carried out. The humidity in the gas is sensed and compared to the set point humidity. The water temperature, and consequently the porous interface temperature, are automatically controlled in response to changes in the gas humidity level above or below the set point. Any deviation from the set point humidity is thus corrected.

  17. Color control in reflection holograms by humidity.

    PubMed

    Wuest, D R; Lakes, R S

    1991-06-10

    A method is presented which permits control of the reconstruction wavelength of reflection holograms and holographic optical elements. This approach makes use of developer and bleach which minimize emulsion shrinkage combined with control of ambient humidity to control the emulsion shrinkage during formation and reconstruction. A simple index matching approach to the elimination of the wood grain effect in reflection holograms is also presented. PMID:20700214

  18. Technical Highlight: Evaluation of Humidity Control Options in Hot-Humid Climate Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-12-01

    This technical highlight describes NREL research to analyze the indoor relative humidity in three home types in the hot-humid climate zone, and examine the impacts of various dehumidification equipment and controls.

  19. STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST

    SciTech Connect

    BENECKE MW

    2010-09-08

    This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is

  20. Hydrophilic membrane-based humidity control.

    PubMed

    Scovazzo, P; Burgos, J; Hoehn, A; Todd, P

    1998-10-14

    A dehumidification system for low gravity plant growth experiments requires the generation of no free-liquid condensate and the recovery of water for reuse. In the systems discussed in this paper, the membrane is a barrier between the humid air phase and a liquid-coolant water phase. The coolant water temperature combined with a transmembrane pressure differential establishes a water flux from the humid air into the coolant water. Building on the work of others, we directly compared different hydrophilic membranes for humidity control. In a direct comparison of the hydrophilic membranes, hollow fiber cellulose ester membranes were superior to metal and ceramic membranes in the categories of condensation flux per surface area, ease of start-up, and stability. However, cellulose ester membranes were inferior to metal membranes in one significant category, durability. Dehumidification systems using mixed cellulose ester membranes failed after operational times of only hours to days. We propose that the ratio of fluid surface area to membrane material area (approximately = membrane porosity) controls the relative performances among membranes. In addition, we clarified design equations for operational parameters such as the transmembrane pressure differential. This technology has several potential benefits related to earth environmental issues including the minimization of airborne pathogen release and higher energy efficiency in air conditioning equipment. Utilizing these study results, we designed, constructed, and flew on the space shuttle missions a membrane-based dehumidification system for a plant growth chamber. PMID:11543067

  1. Desiccant outdoor air preconditioners maximize heat recovery ventilation potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Meckler, M.

    1995-12-31

    Microorganisms are well protected indoors by the moisture surrounding them if the relative humidity is above 70%. They can cause many acute diseases, infections, and allergies. Humidity also has an effect on air cleanliness and causes the building structure and its contents to deteriorate. Therefore, controlling humidity is a very important factor to human health and comfort and the structural longevity of a building. To date, a great deal of research has been done, and is continuing, in the use of both solid and liquid desiccants. This paper introduces a desiccant-assisted system that combines dehumidification and mechanical refrigeration by means of a desiccant preconditioning module that can serve two or more conventional air-conditioning units. It will be demonstrated that the proposed system, also having indirect evaporative cooling within the preconditioning module, can reduce energy consumption and provide significant cost savings, independent humidity and temperature control, and, therefore, improved indoor air quality and enhanced occupant comfort.

  2. Energy and economic assessment of desiccant cooling systems coupled with single glazed air and hybrid PV/thermal solar collectors for applications in hot and humid climate

    SciTech Connect

    Beccali, Marco; Finocchiaro, Pietro; Nocke, Bettina

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the energy and economic performance of desiccant cooling systems (DEC) equipped with both single glazed standard air and hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/t) collectors for applications in hot and humid climates. The use of 'solar cogeneration' by means of PV/t hybrid collectors enables the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, which can be directly used by desiccant air handling units, thereby making it possible to achieve very energy savings. The present work shows the results of detailed simulations conducted for a set of desiccant cooling systems operating without any heat storage. System performance was investigated through hourly simulations for different systems and load combinations. Three configurations of DEC systems were considered: standard DEC, DEC with an integrated heat pump and DEC with an enthalpy wheel. Two kinds of building occupations were considered: office and lecture room. Moreover, three configurations of solar-assisted air handling units (AHU) equipped with desiccant wheels were considered and compared with standard AHUs, focusing on achievable primary energy savings. The relationship between the solar collector's area and the specific primary energy consumption for different system configurations and building occupation patterns is described. For both occupation patterns, sensitivity analysis on system performance was performed for different solar collector areas. Also, this work presents an economic assessment of the systems. The cost of conserved energy and the payback time were calculated, with and without public incentives for solar cooling systems. It is worth noting that the use of photovoltaics, and thus the exploitation of related available incentives in many European countries, could positively influence the spread of solar air cooling technologies (SAC). An outcome of this work is that SAC systems equipped with PV/t collectors are shown to have better performance in terms of

  3. Breadboard CO2 and humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A regenerable CO2 and humidity control system is being developed for potential use on shuttle as an alternate to the baseline lithium hydroxide (LiOH)/condensing heat exchanger system. The system utilizes a sorbent material, designated HS-C, to adsorb CO2 and water vapor from the cabin atmosphere. The material is regenerated by exposing it to space vacuum. A half-size breadboard system, utilizing a flight representative HS-C canister, was designed, built, and performance tested to shuttle requirements for total CO2 and total humidity removal. The use of a new chemical matrix material allowed significant optimization of the system design by packing the HS-C chemical into the core of a heat exchanger which is manifolded to form two separate and distinct beds. Breadboard system performance was proven by parametric testing and simulated mission testing over the full range of shuttle crew sizes and metabolic loadings. Vacuum desorption testing demonstrated considerable savings in previously projected shuttle vacuum duct sizing.

  4. A Humidity Control System with an Adsorption Material and Indoor Air Quality Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Yoshifumi; Ishii, Noriaki

    The present study introduces a humidity control apparatus which can hygienically and automatically maintain the appropriate humidity level of indoor air without either a water supply or drainage system. In humidification, the desiccant takes up water vapor from the outdoor air in the adsorption process, and release it indoors by desorption. Therefore, no water supply is required to humidify. An apparatus having no water supply is more hygienic, because it does not propagate bacteria and does not scatter the calcium and magnesium salts found in the water. In dehumidification, water vapor is removed from the indoor air by the desiccant and is released outdoors by desorption, eliminating the need for a drainage system. The absence of a drainage system also eliminates problems such as water leakage and installation. The performance of a system based on this new method was compared with that of conventional products, whereby the modes of dehumidification, humidification and humidification with ventilation were evaluated. In addition, the new system was tested to reveal the time-dependent charaeteristics of the concentration of indoor odor and the dust collection efficiency.

  5. Breakthrough Video: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) invented a breakthrough technology that improves air conditioning in a novel way—with heat. NREL combined desiccant materials, which remove moisture from the air using heat, and advanced evaporative technologies to develop a cooling unit that uses 90% less electricity and up to 80% less total energy than traditional air conditioning (AC). This solution, called the desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVAP), also controls humidity more effectively to improve the comfort of people in buildings.

  6. Sampling at controlled relative humidity with a cascade impactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliou, Joseph G.; Sorensen, Diana; McMurry, Peter H.

    The design and function of a device that regulates the relative humidity of an ambient aerosol sample is described. We use this RH controller upstream of MOUDI impactors to permit sampling at relative humidities in the 70-80% range. Humidity control is achieved by allowing the aerosol to approach equilibrium with a saturated salt solution. Benefits to sampling with impactors in this relative humidity range include greatly reduced bounce of fine, hygroscopic particles, minimal flow-induced sizing errors, and minimization of uncertainties in measured size distributions due to diurnal variations in relative humidity during sampling. Data from field measurements in a humid environment (Look Rock, TN) and arid environments (Las Vegas, NV and Meadview, AZ) are discussed.

  7. Seminar 14 - Desiccant Enhanced Air Conditioning: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.

    2013-02-01

    This presentation explains how liquid desiccant based coupled with an indirect evaporative cooler can efficiently produce cool, dry air, and how a liquid desiccant membrane air conditioner can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification without the carryover problems of previous generations of liquid desiccant systems. It provides an overview to a liquid desiccant DX air conditioner that can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification to high latent loads without the need for reheat, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems can outperform vapor compression based air conditioning systems in hot and humid climates, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems work, and describes a refrigerant free liquid desiccant based cooling system.

  8. Development of desiccant based air conditioning for hotels and motels. Final report, phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, N.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report contains final reports from two phases of field tests: Phase I at the Marriott Courtyard in West Palm Beach, completed in October 1991, and Phase II at the Walt Disney World Swan Hotel in Orlando, completed in August 1993. The goal was to measure the performance and reliability of the desiccant units. The successfull program proved the value of the gas-fired desiccant technology to the hospitality industry. The desiccant units reduced moisture by 15 to 20% relative humidity. Measurements of temperature, humidity, and wallboard moisture content showed a dramatic reduction in the humidity levels experienced prior to installation of the units and in the control areas without desiccants. Moisture damage was kept in check and remodelling due to it was eliminated.

  9. Trehalose Transporter from African Chironomid Larvae Improves Desiccation Tolerance of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Nilay; Menze, Michael A.; Elmoazzen, Heidi; Vu, Halong; Yarmush, Martin L.; Hand, Steven C.; Toner, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Dry preservation has been explored as an energy-efficient alternative to cryopreservation, but the high sensitivity of mammalian cells to desiccation stress has been one of the major hurdles in storing cells in the desiccated state. An important strategy to reduce desiccation sensitivity involves use of the disaccharide trehalose. Trehalose is known to improve desiccation tolerance in mammalian cells when present on both sides of the cell membrane. Because trehalose is membrane impermeant the development of desiccation strategies involving this promising sugar is hindered. We explored the potential of using a high-capacity trehalose transporter (TRET1) from the African chironomid P. vanderplanki [21] to introduce trehalose into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells and thereby increase desiccation tolerance. When Chinese Hamster Ovary cells (CHO) were stably transfected with TRET1 (CHO-TRET1 cells) and incubated with 0.4 M trehalose for 4 h at 37 °C, a seven-fold increase in trehalose uptake was observed compared to the wild-type CHO cells. Following trehalose loading, desiccation tolerance was investigated by evaporative drying of cells at 14 % relative humidity. After desiccation to 2.60 g of water per gram dry weight, a 170 % increase in viability and a 400 % increase in growth (after 7 days) was observed for CHO-TRET1 relative to control CHO cells. Our results demonstrate the beneficial effect of intracellular trehalose for imparting tolerance to partial desiccation. PMID:22155480

  10. Flight prototype CO2 and humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, K. M.

    1979-01-01

    A regenerable CO2 and humidity control system is presently being developed for potential use on shuttle as an alternative to the baseline lithium hydroxide system. The system utilizes a sorbent material (designated HS-C) to adsorb CO2 and the latent heat load from the cabin atmosphere and desorb the CO2 and water vapor overboard when exposed to a space vacuum, thus reducing the overall vehicle heat rejection load. Continuous operation is achieved by utilizing two beds which are alternatively cycled between adsorption and desorption. The HS-C material process was verified. Design concepts for the auxiliary components for the HS-C prototype system were generated. Performance testing verified system effectiveness in controlling CO2 partial pressure and humidity.

  11. Modeling Validation and Control Analysis for Controlled Temperature and Humidity of Air Conditioning System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jing-Nang; Lin, Tsung-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study constructs an energy based model of thermal system for controlled temperature and humidity air conditioning system, and introduces the influence of the mass flow rate, heater and humidifier for proposed control criteria to achieve the controlled temperature and humidity of air conditioning system. Then, the reliability of proposed thermal system model is established by both MATLAB dynamic simulation and the literature validation. Finally, the PID control strategy is applied for controlling the air mass flow rate, humidifying capacity, and heating, capacity. The simulation results show that the temperature and humidity are stable at 541 sec, the disturbance of temperature is only 0.14°C, 0006 kgw/kgda in steady-state error of humidity ratio, and the error rate is only 7.5%. The results prove that the proposed system is an effective controlled temperature and humidity of an air conditioning system. PMID:25250390

  12. Selection for increased desiccation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster: Additive genetic control and correlated responses for other stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, A.A.; Parsons, P.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Previously we found that Drosophila melanogaster lines selected for increased desiccation resistance have lowered metabolic rate and behavioral activity levels, and show correlated responses for resistance to starvation and a toxic ethanol level. These results were consistent with a prediction that increased resistance to many environmental stresses may be genetically correlated because of a reduction in metabolic energy expenditure. Here we present experiments on the genetic basis of the selection response and extend the study of correlated responses to other stresses. The response to selection was not sex-specific and involved X-linked and autosomal genes acting additively. Activity differences contributed little to differences in desiccation resistance between selected and control lines. Selected lines had lower metabolic rates than controls in darkness when activity was inhibited. Adults from selected lines showed increased resistance to a heat shock, {sup 60}Co-gamma-radiation, and acute ethanol and acetic acid stress. The desiccation, ethanol and starvation resistance of isofemale lines set up from the F2s of a cross between one of the selected and one of the control lines were correlated. Selected and control lines did not differ in ether-extractable lipid content or in resistance to acetone, ether or a cold shock.

  13. Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air-Conditioning (DEVap): Evaluation of a New Concept in Ultra Efficient Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.; Woods, J.; Burch, J.; Boranian, A.; Merrigan, T.

    2011-01-01

    NREL has developed the novel concept of a desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVap) with the objective of combining the benefits of liquid desiccant and evaporative cooling technologies into an innovative 'cooling core.' Liquid desiccant technologies have extraordinary dehumidification potential, but require an efficient cooling sink. DEVap's thermodynamic potential overcomes many shortcomings of standard refrigeration-based direct expansion cooling. DEVap decouples cooling and dehumidification performance, which results in independent temperature and humidity control. The energy input is largely switched away from electricity to low-grade thermal energy that can be sourced from fuels such as natural gas, waste heat, solar, or biofuels.

  14. Influence of Ventilation Ratio on Desiccant Air Conditioning System's Efficiency Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thien Nha; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao; Hamamoto, Yoshinori

    Ventilation air is a concern for engineers since ventilated air controls indoor air contamination; additional ventilation, however, increases the energy consumption of buildings. The study investigates the energy efficiency performance of the desiccant dehumidification air conditioning system in the context of ventilation for a hot-humid climate such as summer in Japan. The investigation focuses on the variable ratio of ventilation air as required by the application of air conditioning system. The COP of the desiccant air conditioning system is determined. The evaluation is subsequently performed by comparing the desiccant based system with the conventional absorption cooling system and the vapor compression cooling system. Based on 12 desiccant rotor simulations, it is found that the desiccant regeneration temperature required varies between 47°C to 85°C as ventilation ratio increases from 0. 0 to 100%, and up to 52. 5°C as the ventilation ratio achieves 14%. The heat required for regenerating desiccant accounts for 55% and higher of the system's total heat consumption; the system is expected to be energy efficient by using wasted heat from the absorption chiller for desiccant regeneration; and its energy efficiency expands as the ratio of ventilation air rises above 15% compared with the conventional absorption cooling system. The energy efficiency also benefits as the ratio rises beyond 70% against the conventional vapor compression cooling system.

  15. Solid desiccant dehumidification systems for residential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, T. J.; Grolmes, M. A.; Epstein, M.

    1985-03-01

    It is shown that gas regenerated desiccant dehumidifiers (GRDD) can be economically superior to vapor compression units in the hot, humid climates of the southeast and south. Altough the first cost of a GRDD unit is significantly higher than a vapor compression dehumidifier, reduced operating costs and savings in the installed cost of smaller air-conditioning units can provide an economic means for effective humidity control. The economic benefits are dependent upon: (1) the number of hours of dehumidifier operation per year; and (2) electricity and natural gas cost differentials. Of secondary importance is the coefficient of performance (COP) of the units. Recommendations for additional research and development for a commercial GRDD product line are outlined.

  16. Thermally Activated Desiccant Technology for Heat Recovery and Comfort

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    Desiccant cooling is an important part of the diverse portfolio of Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) designed for conversion of heat for the purpose of indoor air quality control. Thermally activated desiccant cooling incorporates a desiccant material that undergoes a cyclic process involving direct dehumidification of moist air and thermal regeneration. Desiccants fall into two categories: liquid and solid desiccants. Regardless of the type, solid or liquid, the governing principles of desiccant dehumidification systems are the same. In the dehumidification process, the vapor pressure of the moist air is higher than that of the desiccant, leading to transfer of moisture from the air to the desiccant material. By heating the desiccant, the vapor pressure differential is reversed in the regeneration process that drives the moisture from the desiccant. Figure 1 illustrates a rotary solid-desiccant dehumidifier. A burner or a thermally compatible source of waste heat can provide the required heat for regeneration.

  17. Solar space heating and cooling by selective use of the components of a desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbud, Ihsan Aladdin

    The economic advantages of by-passing various components of a desiccant cooling system under conditions not requiring their use are estimated by evaluating the annual costs of heating and cooling a commercial building in three representative U.S. cities. Life-cycle costs of systems employing solar heat for space heating and desiccant regeneration are compared with those using electric heat. The costs of purchasing and operating heating and desiccant cooling systems, with and without solar heat supply, are compared with those employing conventional heating and vapor compression cooling. The conditions under which commercial buildings can be cooled with desiccant systems at costs competitive with conventional systems are identified. A commercially available vapor compression air conditioner is used as a standard of comparison for energy consumption and room comfort. Heating and cooling requirements of the building are determined by use of the BLAST computer model in a simulation of long term system operation. Performance of the desiccant cooling system and life cycle savings obtained by its use are determined by simulation employing the TRNSYS computer model. TRNSYS compatible subroutines are developed to simulate operation of the desiccant equipment, the building, and the controllers that operate and monitor the system components. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form. This study shows that in the widely different climates represented in Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, by-passing various components in the desiccant cooling system when they are not needed is economically advantageous. Operation cost of the complete system decreased by 47.3% in Los Angeles, by 30.9% in New York City, and by 23.9% in Miami by not operating the desiccant wheel and other elements. The ventilation desiccant cooling system has major economic advantage over conventional systems under conditions of moderate humidity, as in Los Angeles and New York City. In Miami, however

  18. Review of open-cycle desiccant air-conditioning concepts and systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wurm, J.

    1986-08-01

    This paper attempts to overview the development status of desiccant cooling. Over the past 30 years of progressively intensifying attention, this promising technology has become a domain of interest of many research agencies and manufacturing companies. As a result, the market potential for machines based on desiccant processes, particularly in comfort cooling and agricultural applications, is getting close to realization. One of the most important incentives of developing heat-activated, open-cycle desiccant cooling machines (air conditioners) has always been its potential simplicity. Such premise has been deceiving to a degree that in many instances has slowed the progress. However, the persistent analytical and material research brought some desiccant systems close to the marketplace. They provide attractive alternatives to consumers and utilities, offering particularly effective humidity and temperature control in cases of high fresh-air-makeup requirements. The control of bacteria, airborne particulates, as well as CO/sub 2/, combined with effective heating capability make them attractive for controlled-atmosphere agriculture. Finally, the capability of using low-temperature waste heat to drive the cycle becomes an important attribute of a desiccant concept, specifically when combined with a regular vapor-compression cooling machine in energy saving space-conditioning concepts. The presented assessment concludes that, particularly for specialized applications, machines based on open-cycle desiccant cooling processes are very close to playing an important role in the space-conditioning (including comfort control) marketplace.

  19. Control of heat and humidity in German mines

    SciTech Connect

    Schlotte, W.

    1999-07-01

    In order to increase the economic efficiency of West European hard coal, great efforts are being made at present in the coal-producing countries to lower production costs. This aim is to be achieved in Germany, among other things, by a drastic increase in the saleable output per working face up to an average of 10,000 t/d in these cases where very long longwall faces (400 m {+-} 50 m) are possible. With the substantially greater heat input into the air stream which this involves, there is the danger that climatic limits will be exceeded even at longwall faces with lower than average rock temperatures. Working in high temperatures and/or humidities can lead to risky lack of concentration of the miners to heat collapse and extremely dangerous heat stroke. In order to minimize the costs for mine climate control well-proven planning software and climitization technology is necessary for underground workings. With the DMT climate simulation programs, both the dry and the extremely significant humid heat transfer can be calculated and the optimum air cooling system for a mine can be designed with due regard to technical and economic aspects.

  20. Flight prototype CO2 and humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudy, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    A regenerable CO2 and humidity control system is presently being developed for potential use on the space shuttle as an alternative to the baseline lithium hydroxide system. The system utilizes a sorbent material (designated HS-C) to adsorb CO2 and water vapor from the cabin atmosphere and desorb the CO2 and water vapor overboard when exposed to a space vacuum. Continuous operation is achieved by utilizing two beds which are alternately cycled between adsorption and desorption. A shuttle vehicle integration study showed that the HS-C system offers substantial weight advantages compared to the baseline shuttle orbiter expendable lithium hydroxide CO2 removal system for extended missions beyond the nominal design of four men for seven days. This study defined a system packaging envelope in the area presently occupied by the LiOH cartridges.

  1. A regenerable CO2 and humidity control system for Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A regenerable CO2 and humidity control system is presently being developed for potential use on Shuttle as an alternate to the baseline Lithium Hydroxide (LiOH) system. The system utilizes a sorbent material (designated 'HS-C') to adsorb CO2 and water vapor from the cabin atmosphere and desorb the CO2 and water vapor overboard when exposed to a space vacuum. Past development programs concentrated on material development and breadboard system fabrication and testing. The present program calls for the design of a flight prototype system capable of integration into the Shuttle vehicle and the development of major components. This paper will show that a regenerable system utilizing HS-C material trades even with the shuttle LiOH system for the baseline four-man, seven-day mission and offers increased savings up to 448 kg for a seven-man, 30-day mission.

  2. Temperature and humidity control of simulated human breath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. G.; Hendricks, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    Subsystem was developed for breathing metabolic simulator which adjusts temperature and humidity of air to levels of human exhaled breath. Temperature-humidity subsystem is described, consisting of aluminum enclosure with 400 watt heat sheet glued to bottom, vertical separators, inlet connection, and check valve.

  3. Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio

    Solar assisted desiccant coo1ing process is an effective means to reduce a latent heat load of the ventilation air. This paper describes the influences of ambient humidity and sensible heat factor (SHF) of the indoor room on the performance and scale of the desiccant cooling system. Two process configurations termed “ambient air mode” and “mixed air mode” were assumed. At “ambient air mode”, only ambient air is dehumidified and cooled in the desiccant process. The dehumidified air stream is mixed with return air and further cooled in the cooling coil. At “mixed air mode”, ambient air is mixed with return air and this mixed air stream is dehumidified in the desiccant process and cooled at the cooling coil. At “ambient air mode”, ambient air humidity had a significant impact on required amount of dehumidification since humid ambient air entered the desiccant process directly. In this case, higher temperature level and quantity, which is impossible to be supplied from commonly commercialized flat panel solar collectors, was required. At “mixed air mode”, the influence of increase of ambient humidity was not significant since humidity of the air entering the desiccant process became low by mixing with return air. At this mode, it was expected that 70°C of the circulating water and 37m2 of surface area of solar collector could produce a sufficient dehumidifying performance even in high latent heat condition. The contributing ratio of the desiccant wheel was also estimated. The ratio increased in higher latent heat condition due to increase of required amount of dehumidification. The contributing ratio of the thermal wheel became lower due to increase of saturated air temperature in the evaporative cooler.

  4. Sensor and numerical simulator evaluation for porous medium desiccation and rewetting at the intermediate laboratory scale

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Truex, Michael J.

    2012-02-01

    Soil desiccation, in conjunction with surface infiltration control, is considered at the Hanford Site as a potential technology to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. An intermediate-scale experiment was conducted to test the response of a series of instruments to desiccation and subsequent rewetting of porous media. The instruments include thermistors, thermocouple psychrometers, dual-probe heat pulse sensors, heat dissipation units, and humidity probes. The experiment was simulated with the multifluid flow simulator STOMP, using independently obtained hydraulic and thermal porous medium properties. All instrument types used for this experiment were able to indicate when the desiccation front passed a certain location. In most cases the changes were sharp, indicating rapid changes in moisture content, water potential, or humidity. However, a response to the changing conditions was recorded only when the drying front was very close to a sensor. Of the tested instruments, only the heat dissipation unit and humidity probes were able to detect rewetting. The numerical simulation results reasonably match the experimental data, indicating that the simulator captures the pertinent gas flow and transport processes related to desiccation and rewetting and may be useful in the design and analysis of field tests.

  5. Retrofit device and method to improve humidity control of vapor compression cooling systems

    DOEpatents

    Roth, Robert Paul; Hahn, David C.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    2016-08-16

    A method and device for improving moisture removal capacity of a vapor compression system is disclosed. The vapor compression system is started up with the evaporator blower initially set to a high speed. A relative humidity in a return air stream is measured with the evaporator blower operating at the high speed. If the measured humidity is above the predetermined high relative humidity value, the evaporator blower speed is reduced from the initially set high speed to the lowest possible speed. The device is a control board connected with the blower and uses a predetermined change in measured relative humidity to control the blower motor speed.

  6. Desiccant grain applied to the storage of solar drying potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, T.; Richter, I.G.; Pecenka, R.

    1999-09-01

    Sorption storage of solar heat using a layer of wheat as the desiccant was analyzed by means of a deep-bed model. Intended to be applied to solar-assisted in-storage drying of agricultural bulk materials, the probability of the persistence of unfavorable weather periods was quantified statistically for Potsdam for the month of August, as an example. Simulation results demonstrate that a relative humidity of the drying air of 65% can be maintained day and night for weeks without combustion of fossil fuels. Using a simple strategy of control, periods with insufficient solar radiation can be bridged over. The desiccant grain is not endangered by mold growth as a matter of principle. Simple solar air heaters can be used to avoid economic losses due to overdrying and to reduce the danger of decay to a minimum even at unfavorable climatic conditions.

  7. Non-Venting Thermal and Humidity Control for EVA Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Future EVA suits need processes and systems to control internal temperature and humidity without venting water to the environment. This paper describes an absorption-based cooling and dehumidification system as well as laboratory demonstrations of the key processes. There are two main components in the system: an evaporation cooling and dehumidification garment (ECDG) that removes both sensible heat and latent heat from the pressure garment, and an absorber radiator that absorbs moisture and rejects heat to space by thermal radiation. This paper discusses the overall design of both components, and presents recent data demonstrating their operation. We developed a design and fabrication approach to produce prototypical heat/water absorbing elements for the ECDG, and demonstrated by test that these elements could absorb heat and moisture at a high flux. Proof-of-concept tests showed that an ECDG prototype absorbs heat and moisture at a rate of 85 W/ft under conditions that simulate operation in an EVA suit. The heat absorption was primarily due to direct absorption of water vapor. It is possible to construct large, flexible, durable cooling patches that can be incorporated into a cooling garment with this system. The proof-of-concept test data was scaled to calculate area needed for full metabolic loads, thus showing that it is feasible to use this technology in an EVA suit. Full-scale, lightweight absorber/radiator modules have also been built and tested. They can reject heat at a flux of 33 W/ft while maintaining ECDG operation at conditions that will provide a cool and dry environment inside the EVA suit.

  8. Apparatus for investigating the reactions of soft-bodied invertebrates to controlled humidity gradients

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Joshua; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan T.

    2015-01-01

    Background While many studies have assayed behavioral responses of animals to chemical, temperature and light gradients, fewer studies have assayed how animals respond to humidity gradients. Our novel humidity chamber has allowed us to study the neuromolecular basis of humidity sensation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Russell et al. 2014). New Method We describe an easy-to-construct, low-cost humidity chamber to assay the behavior of small animals, including soft-bodied invertebrates, in controlled humidity gradients. Results We show that our humidity-chamber design is amenable to soft-bodied invertebrates and can produce reliable gradients ranging 0.3–8% RH/cm across a 9-cm long x 7.5-cm wide gel-covered arena. Comparison with Existing Method(s) Previous humidity chambers relied on circulating dry and moist air to produce a steep humidity gradient in a small arena (e.g. Sayeed & Benzer, 1996). To remove the confound of moving air that may elicit mechanical responses independent of humidity responses, our chamber controlled the humidity gradient using reservoirs of hygroscopic materials. Additionally, to better observe the behavioral mechanisms for humidity responses, our chamber provided a larger arena. Although similar chambers have been described previously, these approaches were not suitable for soft-bodied invertebrates or for easy imaging of behavior because they required that animals move across wire or fabric mesh. Conclusion The general applicability of our humidity chamber overcomes limitations of previous designs and opens the door to observe the behavioral responses of soft-bodied invertebrates, including genetically powerful C. elegans and Drosophila larvae. PMID:25176025

  9. Performance study of a heat recovery desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabek, Seifennasr; Ben Nasr, Kaouther; Chouikh, Ridha; Guizani, Amenallah

    2015-04-01

    The comparison between the experimental and theoretical simulations of a desiccant cooling system under various climatic conditions (outdoor temperature and relative humidity) on the system performance has been presented. The performance of the system is evaluated using Cooling Capacity (CC) parameter. The system under a typical summer day of hot and humid climate was tested. A remarkable decrease about 40-65% in the specific humidity and with a supply air temperature lower than 25°C of the proposed system was observed. The study is important and helpful to improve the effectiveness of this kind of liquid desiccant system in hot and humid places.

  10. Hands-on Humidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  11. Controlling the Transient Interface Shape and Deposition Profile Left by Desiccation of Colloidal Droplets on Multiple Polymer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, Peter David

    A colloidal suspension is a small constituent of insoluble solid particles suspended in a liquid medium. Control over the wetting, evaporation, and deposition patterns left by colloidal suspensions is valuable in many biological, medical, industrial, and agricultural applications. Understanding the governing principles of wetting and evaporative phenomena of these colloidal suspensions may lead to greater control over resultant deposition patterns. Perhaps the most familiar pattern forms when an initially heterogeneous colloidal suspension leaves a dark ring pattern at the edge of a drop. This pattern is referred to as a coffee-stain and it can be seen from dried droplets of spilled coffee. This coffee-stain effect was first investigated by Deegan et. al. who discovered that these patterns occur when outward radial flows driven by evaporation at the triple contact line dominate over other effects. While the presence of coffee-stain patterns is undesirable in many printing and medical diagnostic processes, it can also be advantageous in the production of low cost transparent conductive films, the deposition of metal vapor, and the manipulation of biological structures. Controlling the interactions between the substrate, liquid, vapor, and particles can lead to control over the size and morphology of evaporative deposition patterns left by aqueous colloidal suspensions. Several methods have been developed to control the evaporation of colloidal suspensions to either suppress or enhance the coffee stain effect. Electrowetting on Dielectric (EWOD) is one promising method that has been used to control colloidal depositions by applying either an AC or DC electric field. EWOD actuation has the potential to dynamically control colloidal deposition left by desiccated droplets to either suppress or enhance the coffee stain effect. It may also allow for independent control of the fluidic interface and deposition of particles via electrowetting and electrokinetic forces

  12. "Self-packaging" desiccant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Desiccant, consisting of water-soluble filler contained in water-permeable elastomeric matrix, absorbs large quantities of water without becoming sticky or releasing corrosive agents. Desiccant may be molded into virtually any shape depending on area of application.

  13. Genes Associated with Desiccation and Osmotic Stress in Listeria monocytogenes as Revealed by Insertional Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hingston, Patricia A; Piercey, Marta J; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2015-08-15

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen whose survival in food processing environments may be associated with its tolerance to desiccation. To probe the molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to adapt to desiccation stress, a transposon library of 11,700 L. monocytogenes mutants was screened, using a microplate assay, for strains displaying increased or decreased desiccation survival (43% relative humidity, 15°C) in tryptic soy broth (TSB). The desiccation phenotypes of selected mutants were subsequently assessed on food-grade stainless steel (SS) coupons in TSB plus 1% glucose (TSB-glu). Single transposon insertions in mutants exhibiting a change in desiccation survival of >0.5 log CFU/cm(2) relative to that of the wild type were determined by sequencing arbitrary PCR products. Strain morphology, motility, and osmotic stress survival (in TSB-glu plus 20% NaCl) were also analyzed. The initial screen selected 129 desiccation-sensitive (DS) and 61 desiccation-tolerant (DT) mutants, out of which secondary screening on SS confirmed 15 DT and 15 DS mutants. Among the DT mutants, seven immotile and flagellum-less strains contained transposons in genes involved in flagellum biosynthesis (fliP, flhB, flgD, flgL) and motor control (motB, fliM, fliY), while others harbored transposons in genes involved in membrane lipid biosynthesis, energy production, potassium uptake, and virulence. The genes that were interrupted in the 15 DS mutants included those involved in energy production, membrane transport, protein metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, oxidative damage control, and putative virulence. Five DT and 14 DS mutants also demonstrated similar significantly (P < 0.05) different survival relative to that of the wild type when exposed to osmotic stress, demonstrating that some genes likely have similar roles in allowing the organism to survive the two water stresses. PMID:26025900

  14. Genes Associated with Desiccation and Osmotic Stress in Listeria monocytogenes as Revealed by Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hingston, Patricia A.; Piercey, Marta J.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen whose survival in food processing environments may be associated with its tolerance to desiccation. To probe the molecular mechanisms used by this bacterium to adapt to desiccation stress, a transposon library of 11,700 L. monocytogenes mutants was screened, using a microplate assay, for strains displaying increased or decreased desiccation survival (43% relative humidity, 15°C) in tryptic soy broth (TSB). The desiccation phenotypes of selected mutants were subsequently assessed on food-grade stainless steel (SS) coupons in TSB plus 1% glucose (TSB-glu). Single transposon insertions in mutants exhibiting a change in desiccation survival of >0.5 log CFU/cm2 relative to that of the wild type were determined by sequencing arbitrary PCR products. Strain morphology, motility, and osmotic stress survival (in TSB-glu plus 20% NaCl) were also analyzed. The initial screen selected 129 desiccation-sensitive (DS) and 61 desiccation-tolerant (DT) mutants, out of which secondary screening on SS confirmed 15 DT and 15 DS mutants. Among the DT mutants, seven immotile and flagellum-less strains contained transposons in genes involved in flagellum biosynthesis (fliP, flhB, flgD, flgL) and motor control (motB, fliM, fliY), while others harbored transposons in genes involved in membrane lipid biosynthesis, energy production, potassium uptake, and virulence. The genes that were interrupted in the 15 DS mutants included those involved in energy production, membrane transport, protein metabolism, lipid biosynthesis, oxidative damage control, and putative virulence. Five DT and 14 DS mutants also demonstrated similar significantly (P < 0.05) different survival relative to that of the wild type when exposed to osmotic stress, demonstrating that some genes likely have similar roles in allowing the organism to survive the two water stresses. PMID:26025900

  15. Thermal analysis of the plant encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation protocol using silica gel as the desiccant.

    PubMed

    Sherlock, Graham; Block, William; Benson, Erica E

    2005-01-01

    The encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation protocol is critically dependent upon the evaporative desiccation step, which must optimise survival with the retention of glass stability on sample cooling and rewarming. Desiccation is usually achieved evaporatively by drying in a sterile airflow. However, chemical desiccation using silica gel has advantages for laboratories that do not have environmental control and/or which are exposed to high relative humidities and risks of microbial contamination. This study characterised thermal profiles of silica gel-desiccated encapsulated shoot-tips of two Ribes species using Differential Scanning Calorimetry. For both species silica gel-desiccation at 16 degrees C for 5 h decreased bead water content from ca. 75 to 28% fresh weight (3.8 to 0.4 g x g(-1) dry weight); further desiccation (for 6 and 7 h) reduced the bead water content to 21% (0.3 g x g(-1) dry weight). These changes in water status altered the thermal properties of beads for both species. After 7 h desiccation over silica gel stable glass transitions were observed on both cooling and rewarming of beads containing meristems. Tg mid-point temperatures ranged from -78 to -51 degrees C (cooling) and from -88 to -54 degrees C (warming) [at cooling and warming rates of 10 and 5 degrees C min(-1), respectively] after 5 to 7 h silica gel-desiccation. Post-cryopreservation viability of both species was ca. 63%. Thermal analysis studies revealed that an encapsulation/dehydration protocol using silica gel as a desiccant should comprise a minimum 5 h drying (at 16 degrees C). This reduces bead moisture content to a critical point (ca. 0.4 g x g(-1) dry weight) at which stable glasses are formed on cooling and rewarming. It is concluded that silica gel has advantages for use as a desiccant for alginate-encapsulated plant meristems by promoting stable vitrification and is useful in laboratories and/or geographical locations where environmental conditions are not under

  16. Expert Meeting: Recommended Approaches to Humidity Control in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.

    2013-07-01

    The topic of this Building America expert meeting was 'Recommended Approaches to Humidity Control in High Performance Homes,' which was held on October 16, 2012, in Westford, MA, and brought together experts in the field of residential humidity control to address modeling issues for dehumidification. The presentations and discussions centered on computer simulation and field experience with these systems, with the goal of developing foundational information to support the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic.

  17. Synergistic interaction between the fungus Beauveria bassiana and desiccant dusts applied against poultry red mites (Dermanyssus gallinae).

    PubMed

    Steenberg, Tove; Kilpinen, Ole

    2014-04-01

    The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae, is a major pest in egg production, feeding on laying hens. Widely used non-chemical control methods include desiccant dusts, although their persistence under field conditions is often short. Entomopathogenic fungi may also hold potential for mite control, but these fungi often take several days to kill mites. Laboratory experiments were carried out to study the efficacy of 3 types of desiccant dusts, the fungus Beauveria bassiana and combinations of the two control agents against D. gallinae. There was significant synergistic interaction between each of the desiccant dusts and the fungus, with observed levels of mite mortality significantly higher than those expected for an additive effect (up to 38 % higher). Synergistic interaction between desiccant dust and fungus was found also when different application methods were used for the fungus and at different levels of relative humidity. Although increased levels of mortality were reached due to the synergistic interaction, the speed of lethal action was not influenced by combining the two components. The persistence of the control agents applied separately or in combination did not change over a period of 4 weeks. Overall, combinations of desiccant dusts and fungus conidia seem to hold considerable promise for future non-chemical control of poultry red mites. PMID:24253584

  18. Humidity assay for studying plant-pathogen interactions in miniature controlled discrete humidity environments with good throughput.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Jiang, Huawei; Sahu, Binod Bihari; Kambakam, Sekhar; Singh, Prashant; Wang, Xinran; Wang, Qiugu; Bhattacharyya, Madan K; Dong, Liang

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a highly economical and accessible approach to generate different discrete relative humidity conditions in spatially separated wells of a modified multi-well plate for humidity assay of plant-pathogen interactions with good throughput. We demonstrated that a discrete humidity gradient could be formed within a few minutes and maintained over a period of a few days inside the device. The device consisted of a freeway channel in the top layer, multiple compartmented wells in the bottom layer, a water source, and a drying agent source. The combinational effects of evaporation, diffusion, and convection were synergized to establish the stable discrete humidity gradient. The device was employed to study visible and molecular disease phenotypes of soybean in responses to infection by Phytophthora sojae, an oomycete pathogen, under a set of humidity conditions, with two near-isogenic soybean lines, Williams and Williams 82, that differ for a Phytophthora resistance gene (Rps1-k). Our result showed that at 63% relative humidity, the transcript level of the defense gene GmPR1 was at minimum in the susceptible soybean line Williams and at maximal level in the resistant line Williams 82 following P. sojae CC5C infection. In addition, we investigated the effects of environmental temperature, dimensional and geometrical parameters, and other configurational factors on the ability of the device to generate miniature humidity environments. This work represents an exploratory effort to economically and efficiently manipulate humidity environments in a space-limited device and shows a great potential to facilitate humidity assay of plant seed germination and development, pathogen growth, and plant-pathogen interactions. Since the proposed device can be easily made, modified, and operated, it is believed that this present humidity manipulation technology will benefit many laboratories in the area of seed science, plant pathology, and plant-microbe biology, where

  19. Energy-efficient regenerative liquid desiccant drying process

    DOEpatents

    Ko, Suk M.; Grodzka, Philomena G.; McCormick, Paul O.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the use of desiccants in conjunction with an open oop drying cycle and a closed loop drying cycle to reclaim the energy expended in vaporizing moisture in harvested crops. In the closed loop cycle, the drying air is brought into contact with a desiccant after it exits the crop drying bin. Water vapor in the moist air is absorbed by the desiccant, thus reducing the relative humidity of the air. The air is then heated by the used desiccant and returned to the crop bin. During the open loop drying cycle the used desiccant is heated (either fossil or solar energy heat sources may be used) and regenerated at high temperature, driving water vapor from the desiccant. This water vapor is condensed and used to preheat the dilute (wet) desiccant before heat is added from the external source (fossil or solar). The latent heat of vaporization of the moisture removed from the desiccant is reclaimed in this manner. The sensible heat of the regenerated desiccant is utilized in the open loop drying cycle. Also, closed cycle operation implies that no net energy is expended in heating drying air.

  20. Low-noise humidity controller for imaging water mediated processes in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gaponenko, I; Gamperle, L; Herberg, K; Muller, S C; Paruch, P

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the construction of a novel low-noise continuous flow humidity controller and its integration with a commercial variable-temperature atomic force microscope fluid cell, allowing precise control of humidity and temperature at the sample during nanoscale measurements. Based on wet and dry gas mixing, the design allows a high mechanical stability to be achieved by means of an ultrasonic atomiser for the generation of water-saturated gas, improving upon previous bubbler-based architectures. Water content in the flow is measured both at the inflow and outflow of the fluid cell, enabling the monitoring of water condensation and icing, and allowing controlled variation of the sample temperature independently of the humidity. To benchmark the performance of the controller, the results of detailed noise studies and time-based imaging of the formation of ice layers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite are shown. PMID:27370461

  1. Low-noise humidity controller for imaging water mediated processes in atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponenko, I.; Gamperle, L.; Herberg, K.; Muller, S. C.; Paruch, P.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the construction of a novel low-noise continuous flow humidity controller and its integration with a commercial variable-temperature atomic force microscope fluid cell, allowing precise control of humidity and temperature at the sample during nanoscale measurements. Based on wet and dry gas mixing, the design allows a high mechanical stability to be achieved by means of an ultrasonic atomiser for the generation of water-saturated gas, improving upon previous bubbler-based architectures. Water content in the flow is measured both at the inflow and outflow of the fluid cell, enabling the monitoring of water condensation and icing, and allowing controlled variation of the sample temperature independently of the humidity. To benchmark the performance of the controller, the results of detailed noise studies and time-based imaging of the formation of ice layers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite are shown.

  2. Dehumidification Performance of Humidity Control System with Double Ventilation Sorbent Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Sadao; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Nishina, Yuki; Inaba, Hideo

    The desiccant air-conditioning will be suitable for effective use of the exhaust heat. We have reported high dehumidification efficiency of the proposed system that is composed of a sorbent rotor and a refrigerating cycle. In this study, to improve the sorption efficiency of the rotor, the double ventilation rotor is proposed. After the processing air is dehumidified at the sorption area 1 of the rotor, the air is cooled and has higher relative humidity. And then, the air is blew into the sorption area 2 from the rotor opposite. The double ventilation characteristics on the influence of the division area of the rotor, the flow rate, the recovery temperature, and the temperature of the air cooler were investigated. As a result, the behavior of the double ventilation rotor is clarified and it is found that the quantity of dehumidification of the rotor is greater in the case of 1:1:2 (sorption(1): sorption(2): desorption ) division rate of the rotor than that of 1:1:1.

  3. Controls on Carbonate Hillslope Morphology in sub-Humid Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Asher, M.; Haviv, I.

    2014-12-01

    The convexity of soil-covered hillslopes has long been recognized to reflect transport mechanisms of regolith. Intense previous research using cosmogenic isotopes and numerical models mostly focused on the influence of tectonics and erosion rates in regions with silicate rocks, generally downplaying the influence of parameters such as climate, chemical denudation rates and dust flux. The goal of the current research is to characterize and understand how hillslope curvature in carbonate rocks (∂2z/∂x2) vary as a function of precipitation and dust flux. The study area is located in the Eastern Mediterranean across a prominent north-to-south gradient in both precipitation (300 to 1000 mm yr-1) and dust flux (150 to 40 g m-2 yr-1). We combine topographic analysis using high resolution data from airborne LiDAR, field measurements, and numerical modeling. The soil creep diffusion coefficient is evaluated using two different methods: (1) Calculated directly at sites with known cosmogenically-derived erosion rate; (2) Estimated using numerical models at snmites with known initial hillslope form at a known point in time such as volcanic cinder cones with known eruption ages. Initial results indicate that soil-mantled, carbonate hillslopes in the sub-humid Eastern Mediterranean are convex and parabolic in form adjacent to the divide and hillslope curvature is strongly correlated with precipitation in an inverse manner. This dependency could reflect: (1) soil creep diffusion coefficients which increase with precipitation, (2) chemical denudation whose relative fraction of the total denudation increases with precipitation, and (3) dust flux which decreases with precipitation. The relative contribution of these 3 components is currently being evaluated. Diffusion coefficients were estimated based on numerical modeling of high-resolution, field-measured, hillslope profiles of several cinder cones, across a rainfall gradient from 600 to 900 mm yr-1, without apparent

  4. Experimental study on performance of celdek packed liquid desiccant dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Asati, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    Dehumidifier is the main component of liquid desiccant dehumidification system. Effect of the inlet parameters on various outlet parameters of the dehumidifier is studied in the present paper with structured pads as packing material and calcium chloride as liquid desiccant to process the air. The outlet parameters are change in specific humidity, mass transfer coefficient, moisture removal rate, air temperature, solution temperature, effectiveness and the corresponding inlet process parameters; mass flow rate of air, temperature of air, temperature and flow rate of desiccant solution. It is observed that mass transfer coefficient and moisture removal rate increase with increasing mass flow rate of the air and desiccant while these parameters decrease with increasing temperature of air and desiccant solution. Dehumidifier effectiveness gets increased with increasing solution flow rate. The present investigations are compared with the results of the researchers in the past.

  5. Degradation of desiccants upon contamination: An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A

    1990-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to quantify the effects of thermal cycling and exposure to contamination on solid desiccant materials that may be used in desiccant cooling systems. A test apparatus was used to thermally cycle several desiccant samples and expose them to ambient or contaminated humid air. The source of contamination was cigarette smoke. Six different solid desiccants were tested: two types of silica gel, activated alumina, activated carbon, molecular sieves, and lithium chloride. The exposed desiccant samples were removed after 0.5, 1, 2, 4, or 11 months of exposure and their moisture capacities were measured. Other tests were conducted to characterize pollutants deposited on the exposed samples or to evaluate impact of exposure on internal structure of the samples. Compared to fresh samples, the capacity loss due to thermal cycling with ambient air was generally 10% to 30%. The capacity loss due to only cigarette smoke was generally between 20% to 50%. 7 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. 3. DETAIL OF RACKS AND TEMPERATURE/HUMIDITY CONTROL SYSTEM IN CURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL OF RACKS AND TEMPERATURE/HUMIDITY CONTROL SYSTEM IN CURING ROOM ON LEVEL 6; LOOKING SOUTHEAST; ENVIRONMENT INSIDE THE CURING ROOM WAS CONTROLLED BY NIAGARA MODEL 87007 SPRAY COOLER AND BUFFALO FORGE CENTRIFUGAL FAN IN BACKGROUND - Rath Packing Company, Cooler Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  7. Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio

    Desiccant cooling processes can supply dry air by using lower temperature heat energy such as waste heat or solar heat. Especially, solar heat is useful heat source for the desiccant cooling since solar heat in summer tends to be surplus. This paper discusses the hourly cooling performance of the solar assisted desiccant cooling system, which consists of a desiccant wheel, a thermal wheel, two evaporative coolers, a cooling coil and flat plate solar water heater, assuming that the cooling system is applied to an office room of 250m3 in volume. The estimation indicated that the surface area needed to satisfy the dehumidifying performance in a sunny day was at least 30m2. Furthermore, surface area of 40m2 or larger provided a surplus dehumidifying performance causing a sensible cooling effect in evaporative cooler. Surface area of 30 m2 did not satisfy the dehumidifying performance required for high humidity condition, over 18.0g/kg(DA). The cooling demand of the cooling coil increased in such humidity condition due to the decrease in the sensible cooling effect of evaporative cooler. Auxiliary heater was required in a cloudy day since the temperature of water supplied from solar water heater of 40m2 did not reach sufficient level.

  8. Temperature and humidity control in indirect calorimeter chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-chamber, indirect calorimeter has been a part of the Environmental Laboratory at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) for over 25 yr. Corrosion of the animal chambers and unreliable temperature control forced either major repairs or complete replacement. There is a strong demand for...

  9. Effective Operation for an Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling Process using a Double-Stage Regeneration of Honeycomb Rotary Dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Akio; Ando, Kouke; Hirose, Tsutomu; Goto, Motonobu; Tuziguchi, Takuya; Okano, Hiroshi

    A double-stage regeneration concept has been applied to a rotary dehumidifier to achieve a high efficient desiccant cooling process. In this concept, regeneration zone of the dehumidifier was divided into two zones. One was pre-regeneration zone where the desiccant rotor was regenerated by warm air heated at the sensible heat exchanger, and the other was heating regeneration zone where the rotor was further regenerated by hot air heated up to the controlled temperature at a heating system. In this paper, the influence of the area ratio of these two zones on the dehumidifying/cooling performance and energy efficiency of this desiccant system were mainly discussed at several levels of the regeneration temperature, supply air velocity and inlet air humidity. Experimental results indicated that the area ratio of the heating regeneration zone should be optimized to produce a sufficient dehumidifying/cooling performance with high energy efficiency, considering humidity requested in supply air. It was also found that the amount of energy input was rather decreased than the decrease of the cooling performance as the area ratio of the heating regeneration zone decreased, and this tendency was more remarkable at higher regeneration temperature. Finally, the double-stage regeneration was confirmed to be an effective operating method for the desiccant cooling process equipped with a otary dehumidifier.

  10. Development of Algorithms for Control of Humidity in Plant Growth Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Thomas A.

    2003-01-01

    Algorithms were developed to control humidity in plant growth chambers used for research on bioregenerative life support at Kennedy Space Center. The algorithms used the computed water vapor pressure (based on measured air temperature and relative humidity) as the process variable, with time-proportioned outputs to operate the humidifier and de-humidifier. Algorithms were based upon proportional-integral-differential (PID) and Fuzzy Logic schemes and were implemented using I/O Control software (OPTO-22) to define and download the control logic to an autonomous programmable logic controller (PLC, ultimate ethernet brain and assorted input-output modules, OPTO-22), which performed the monitoring and control logic processing, as well the physical control of the devices that effected the targeted environment in the chamber. During limited testing, the PLC's successfully implemented the intended control schemes and attained a control resolution for humidity of less than 1%. The algorithms have potential to be used not only with autonomous PLC's but could also be implemented within network-based supervisory control programs. This report documents unique control features that were implemented within the OPTO-22 framework and makes recommendations regarding future uses of the hardware and software for biological research by NASA.

  11. Temperature and Humidity Independent Control Research on Ground Source Heat Pump Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Wang, L. L.

    Taking green demonstration center building air conditioning system as an example, this paper presents the temperature and humidity independent control system combined with ground source heat pump system, emphasis on the design of dry terminal device system, fresh air system and ground source heat pump system.

  12. Using computer models to design gully erosion control structures for humid northern Ethiopia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classic gully erosion control measures such as check dams have been unsuccessful in halting gully formation and growth in the humid northern Ethiopian highlands. Gullies are typically formed in vertisols and flow often bypasses the check dams as elevated groundwater tables make gully banks unstable....

  13. Expert Meeting. Recommended Approaches to Humidity Control in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin

    2013-07-01

    This meeting was held on October 16, 2012, in Westford, MA, and brought together experts in the field of residential humidity control to address modeling issues for dehumidification. The presentations and discussions centered on computer simulation and field experience with these systems, with the goal of developing foundational information to support the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic.

  14. Stability test for amorphous materials in humidity controlled 96-well plates by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Makoto; Tanabe, Hideaki

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to apply near infrared spectrometry (NIR) with chemoinformetrics to predict the change of crystalline properties of indomethacin (IMC) amorphous under various levels of relative humidity storage conditions. Stability test for amorphous and meta-stable polymorphic forms was performed in humidity controlled the modified 96-well quartz plates containing various kinds of saturated salt solutions (0-100% of relative humidity (RH)) by NIR spectroscopy. Amorphous form was obtained melt product to pour into liquid nitrogen and after then ground. Samples were stored at 25°C in the 6-well plates at various levels of RH. The spectra of the powder samples were measured by the reflectance FT-NIR spectrometer. The second derivative spectra of form α showed specific absorption peaks at 4980, 6036, 7296 and 8616 cm-1 and that of form γ showed those at 5020, 5028, 7344, 7428 and 8436 cm-1. After storage at less than 50% RH, the peak intensities at 5020, 5028, 7344, 7428 and 8436 cm-1 of the amorphous solid increased with increasing of storage time. However, the peak intensity at 4980, 6036 and 7296 cm-1 increased at more than 50% RH Please check and confirm the edit. The results suggested that at lower humidity, the IMC amorphous solid transformed into form γ, but it transformed into form α at more than high humidity. It is possible that crystalline stability of the pharmaceutical preparations could be predicted by using humidity controlled 96-well plates and reflectance NIR-chemoinformetric methods. PMID:21942281

  15. Climate and Edaphic Controls on Humid Tropical Forest Tree Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Saatchi, S. S.; Xu, L.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in the magnitude and spatial variations of forest carbon density in tropical regions is due to under sampling of forest structure from inventory plots and the lack of regional allometry to estimate the carbon density from structure. Here we quantify the variation of tropical forest structure by using more than 2.5 million measurements of canopy height from systematic sampling of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) satellite observations between 2004 to 2008 and examine the climate and edaphic variables influencing the variations. We used top canopy height of GLAS footprints (~ 0.25 ha) to grid the statistical mean and 90 percentile of samples at 0.5 degrees to capture the regional variability of large trees in tropics. GLAS heights were also aggregated based on a stratification of tropical regions using soil, elevation, and forest types. Both approaches provided consistent patterns of statistically dominant large trees and the least heterogeneity, both as strong drivers of distribution of high biomass forests. Statistical models accounting for spatial autocorrelation suggest that climate, soil and spatial features together can explain more than 60% of the variations in observed tree height information, while climate-only variables explains about one third of the first-order changes in tree height. Soil basics, including physical compositions such as clay and sand contents, chemical properties such as PH values and cation-exchange capacity, as well as biological variables such as organic matters, all present independent but statistically significant relationships to tree height variations. The results confirm other landscape and regional studies that soil fertility, geology and climate may jointly control a majority of the regional variations of forest structure in pan-tropics and influencing both biomass stocks and dynamics. Consequently, other factors such as biotic and disturbance regimes, not included in this study, may have less influence on

  16. Study on the Efficient Drive of a Desiccant Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jong-Soo; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao

    This paper constructs the static simulation model of a desiccant air conditioning system and gives the guidelines for the efficient drive of the desiccant air conditioning system. The desiccant air conditioning system is composed of a desiccant wheel, a heat exchanger, two evaporative coolers and a heater. The process air and regeneration air are supplied to this system. The desiccant is Silica gel. In the simulation model, two-dimensional model in space is adopted for the desiccant wheel. As the simulation result, it is clarified that optimum outlet temperature of the regeneration air in the heater, rotational speed of the desiccant wheel, the rejected air flow rate of the regeneration air, the process and regeneration air flow rate that maximize COP exist. For example, in case that the regeneration temperature is 63°C and relative humidity is 55% maximum COP is about 0.62.

  17. How worms survive desiccation

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Cihan; Penkov, Sider; Fahmy, Karim; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V.

    2012-01-01

    While life requires water, many organisms, known as anhydrobiotes, can survive in the absence of water for extended periods of time. Although discovered 300 years ago, we know very little about the fascinating phenomenon of anhydrobiosis. In this paper, we summarize our previous findings on the desiccation tolerance of the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer larva. A special emphasis is given to the role of trehalose in protecting membranes against desiccation. We also propose a simple mechanism for this process. PMID:24058825

  18. Advanced desiccant materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czanderna, A. W.; Thomas, T. M.

    1986-05-01

    The long-range goal of this task is to understand the role of surface phenomena in desiccant cooling materials. The background information includes a brief introduction to desiccant cooling systems (DCS) and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The purpose, background, rationale, and long-term technical approach for studying advanced desiccant materials are then treated. Experimental methods for measuring water vapor sorption by desiccants are described, and the rationale is then given for choosing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for measuring sorption isotherms, rates, and cyclic stability. Background information is given about the QCM, including the quartz crystal resonator itself, the support structure for the quartz crystal, and the advantages and limitations of a QCM. The apparatus assembled and placed into operation during CY 1985 is described. The functions of the principal components of the equipment, i.e., the QCM, vacuum system, pressure gauges, residual gas analyzer, constant temperature bath, and data acquisition system, are described as they relate to the water vapor sorption measurements now under way. The criteria for narrowing the potential candidates as advanced desiccant materials for the initial studies are given. Also given is a list of 20 principal candidate materials identified based on the criteria and data available in the literature.

  19. Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A.W.

    1990-12-01

    This research is concerned with solid materials used as desiccants for desiccant cooling systems (DCSs) that process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. Background information includes an introduction to DCSs and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The water vapor sorption performance criteria used for screening the modified polymers prepared include the water sorption capacity from 5% to 80% relative humidity (R.H.), isotherm shape, and rate of adsorption and desorption. Measurements are presented for the sorption performance of modified polymeric advanced desiccant materials with the quartz crystal microbalance. Isotherms of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) taken over a 5-month period show that the material has a dramatic loss in capacity and that the isotherm shape is time dependent. The adsorption and desorption kinetics for PSSA and all the ionic salts of it studied are easily fast enough for commercial DCS applications with a wheel rotation speed of 6 min per revolution. Future activities for the project are addressed, and a 5-year summary of the project is included as Appendix A. 34 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Quality control of specific humidity from surface stations based on EOF and FFT—Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Zou, Xiaolei; Qin, Zhengkun

    2015-09-01

    Comparisons between observations and background fields indicate that amplitude and phase differences in oscillations result in a non-Gaussian distribution in observation minus background vectors (OMB). Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) quality control (QC) and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) quality control are proposed from the perspective of data assimilation and are applied to the surface specific humidity from ground-based stations. The QC results indicate that the standard deviation between observations and background is reduced effectively, and the frequency distribution for the observation increment is closer to a normal distribution. The specific humidity outliers occur primarily in mountainous and coastal regions. Comparing the two QC methods, it is found that the EOF QC performs better than the FFT QC as it can keep large scale of fluctuation information from the original field, preventing these waves from entering into the residual field and being removed by the QC process.

  1. Investigation of humidity control via membrane separation for advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbold, D. D.; Ray, R. J.; Pledger, W. A.; Mccray, S. B.; Brown, M. F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a membrane-based process for dehumidifying the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU). The membrane process promises to be smaller, lighter, and more energy efficient than the other technologies for dehumidification. The dehydration membranes were tested for 90 days at conditions expected to be present in the EMU. The results of these tests indicate that membrane-based technology can effectively control humidity in the EMU.

  2. The relationship between water binding and desiccation tolerance in tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    In an effort to define the nature of desiccation tolerance, a comparison of the water sorption characteristics was made between tissues that were resistant and tissues that were sensitive to desiccation. Water sorption isotherms were constructed for germinated and ungerminated soybean axes and also for fronds of several species of Polypodium with varying tolerance to dehydration. The strength of water binding was determined by van't Hoff as well as D'Arcy/Watt analyses of the isotherms at 5, 15, and/or 25 degrees C. Tissues which were sensitive to desiccation had a poor capacity to bind water tightly. Tightly bound water can be removed from soybean and pea seeds by equilibration at 35 degrees C over very low relative humidities; this results in a reduction in the viability of the seed. We suggest that region 1 water (i.e. water bound with very negative enthalpy values) is an important component of desiccation tolerance.

  3. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Acceptance Testing for Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper will provide a summary of the Node 1 ECLS THC subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for this subsystem.The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper will provide a summary of the Node 1 ECLS THC subsystem design and a detailed discussion of the ISS ECLS Acceptance Testing methodology utilized for this subsystem.

  4. Oxidation and hydration of U3O8 materials following controlled exposure to temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Tamasi, Alison L; Boland, Kevin S; Czerwinski, Kenneth; Ellis, Jason K; Kozimor, Stosh A; Martin, Richard L; Pugmire, Alison L; Reilly, Dallas; Scott, Brian L; Sutton, Andrew D; Wagner, Gregory L; Walensky, Justin R; Wilkerson, Marianne P

    2015-04-21

    Chemical signatures correlated with uranium oxide processing are of interest to forensic science for inferring sample provenance. Identification of temporal changes in chemical structures of process uranium materials as a function of controlled temperatures and relative humidities may provide additional information regarding sample history. In this study, a high-purity α-U3O8 sample and three other uranium oxide samples synthesized from reaction routes used in nuclear conversion processes were stored under controlled conditions over 2-3.5 years, and powder X-ray diffraction analysis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were employed to characterize chemical speciation. Signatures measured from the α-U3O8 sample indicated that the material oxidized and hydrated after storage under high humidity conditions over time. Impurities, such as uranyl fluoride or schoepites, were initially detectable in the other uranium oxide samples. After storage under controlled conditions, the analyses of the samples revealed oxidation over time, although the signature of the uranyl fluoride impurity diminished. The presence of schoepite phases in older uranium oxide material is likely indicative of storage under high humidity and should be taken into account for assessing sample history. The absence of a signature from a chemical impurity, such as uranyl fluoride hydrate, in an older material may not preclude its presence at the initial time of production. LA-UR-15-21495. PMID:25786096

  5. The extraembryonic serosa protects the insect egg against desiccation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Chris G C; Rezende, Gustavo L; Lamers, Gerda E M; van der Zee, Maurijn

    2013-08-01

    Insects have been extraordinarily successful in occupying terrestrial habitats, in contrast to their mostly aquatic sister group, the crustaceans. This success is typically attributed to adult traits such as flight, whereas little attention has been paid to adaptation of the egg. An evolutionary novelty of insect eggs is the serosa, an extraembryonic membrane that enfolds the embryo and secretes a cuticle. To experimentally test the protective function of the serosa, we exploit an exceptional possibility to eliminate this membrane by zerknüllt1 RNAi in the beetle Tribolium castaneum. We analyse hatching rates of eggs under a range of humidities and find dramatically decreasing hatching rates with decreasing humidities for serosa-less eggs, but not for control eggs. Furthermore, we show serosal expression of Tc-chitin-synthase1 and demonstrate that its knock-down leads to absence of the serosal cuticle and a reduction in hatching rates at low humidities. These developmental genetic techniques in combination with ecological testing provide experimental evidence for a crucial role of the serosa in desiccation resistance. We propose that the origin of this extraembryonic membrane facilitated the spectacular radiation of insects on land, as did the origin of the amniote egg in the terrestrial invasion of vertebrates. PMID:23782888

  6. International Space Station Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Verification for Node 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Node 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System is comprised of five subsystems: Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), and Water Recovery and Management (WRM). This paper provides a summary of the nominal operation of the Node 1 THC subsystem design. The paper will also provide a discussion of the detailed Element Verification methodologies for nominal operation of the Node 1 THC subsystem operations utilized during the Qualification phase.

  7. Performance of Desiccant Particle Dispersion Type Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Koichi; Kojima, Hiromitsu

    An investigation of desiccant air conditioning system is performed to demonstrate its performance in a dispersed desiccant particle systems, based on its higher gas solid contacting efficiency and isothermal dehumidification. Particle dispersion is achieved using the risers of a circulating fluidized bed, CFB, or of a pneumatic conveyer. The risers used for dehumidification are 1390 mm in height and 22 mm in diameter. The former is used to evaluate the overall dehumidification performance and the latter is used to measure the axial humidity distribution under 0.88 m/s of a superficial air velocity. Based on the results of the overall performance by changing solid loading rates, Gs, from 0.4 kg/m2s up to 6 kg/m2s, desiccant particle dispersion shows higher performance in dehumidification, while axial humidity distribution shows very rapid adsorption rate in the entrance zone of the riser. Removal of adsorption heat accelerates dehumidification rate compared to the adiabatic process.

  8. Development of a Ventilation and Air-conditioning System using Fixed Bed Desiccant Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Takahiko; Akisawa, Atsushi; Shindoh, Shinji; Masazumi, Godo; Takeshi, Takatsuka; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo

    The study investigated fixed bed desiccant units for ventilation and air-conditioning. The system mainly dehumidifies the outdoor fresh air to be supplied to an air-conditioned room. Hence, the airconditioning load of the air-conditioner in the room can be mitigated. Several adsorbents were compared from the viewpoints of humidity ratio at the outlet of the desiccant unit, dehumidified quantity per unit volume, and dehumidified quantity per unit adsorbent mass. The performance of the desiccant unit was predicted by simulation which was validated by comparison with experiment. The results revealed the most suitable adsorbent to reduce the desiccant unit size. It was also found that the humidity ratio at the outlet of the desiccant unit could be lowered by shortening the dimensionless switching time.

  9. Characterization of a starch based desiccant wheel dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beery, Kyle Edward

    Starch, cellulose, and hemicellulose have an affinity for water, and adsorb water vapor from air. Materials made from combinations of these biobased sugar polymers also have been found to possess adsorptive properties. An interesting possible application of these starch-based adsorbents is the desiccant wheel dehumidifier. The desiccant wheel dehumidifier is used in conjunction with a standard air conditioning system. In this process, ambient air is passed through a stationary section while a wheel packed with desiccant rotates through that section. The desiccant adsorbs humidity (latent load) from the air, and the air conditioning system then cools the air (sensible load). Several starch based adsorbents were developed and tested for adsorptive capacity in a new high throughput screening system. The best formulations from the high throughput screening system, also taking into account economic considerations and structural integrity, were considered for use in the desiccant wheel dehumidifier. A suitable adsorbent was chosen and formulated into a matrix structure for the desiccant wheel system. A prototype desiccant wheel system was constructed and the performance was investigated under varying regeneration temperatures and rotation speeds. The results from the experiments showed that the starch based desiccant wheel dehumidification system does transfer moisture from the inlet process stream to the outlet regeneration stream. The DESSIM model was modified for the starch based adsorbent and compared to the experimental results. Also, the results when the wheel parameters were varied were compared to the predicted results from the model. The results given by the starch based desiccant wheel system show the desired proof of concept.

  10. Promotion of low-humidity proton conduction by controlling hydrophilicity in layered metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Okawa, Hisashi; Shigematsu, Akihito; Ohba, Masaaki; Yamada, Teppei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2012-03-28

    We controlled the hydrophilicity of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to achieve high proton conductivity and high adsorption of water under low humidity conditions, by employing novel class of MOFs, {NR(3)(CH(2)COOH)}[MCr(ox)(3)]·nH(2)O (abbreviated as R-MCr, where R = Me (methyl), Et (ethyl), or Bu (n-butyl), and M = Mn or Fe): Me-FeCr, Et-MnCr, Bu-MnCr, and Bu-FeCr. The cationic components have a carboxyl group that functions as the proton carrier. The hydrophilicity of the cationic ions was tuned by the NR(3) residue to decrease with increasing bulkiness of the residue: {NMe(3)(CH(2)COOH)}(+) > {NEt(3)(CH(2)COOH)}(+) > {NBu(3)(CH(2)COOH)}(+). The proton conduction of the MOFs increased with increasing hydrophilicity of the cationic ions. The most hydrophilic sample, Me-FeCr, adsorbed a large number of water molecules and showed a high proton conductivity of ~10(-4) S cm(-1), even at a low humidity of 65% relative humidity (RH), at ambient temperature. Notably, this is the highest conductivity among the previously reported proton-conducting MOFs that operate under low RH conditions. PMID:22409393

  11. Temperature and humidity control during cooling and dehumidifying by compressor and evaporator fan speed variation

    SciTech Connect

    Krakow, K.I.; Lin, S.; Zeng, Z.S.

    1995-08-01

    The accurate control of temperature and relative humidity during cooling and dehumidifying air-conditioning processes may be achieved by compressor and evaporator fan speed variation. Proportional-integral-differential (PID) control methods are shown to be suitable for attaining compressor and evaporator fan speeds such that the sensible and latent components of the refrigeration system capacity equal the sensible and latent components of the system load. The feasibility of the control method has been verified experimentally. A numerical model of an environmental control system, including refrigeration, space, and PID control subsystems, has been developed. The model is suitable for determining system response to variations of PID coefficient values and to variations of system loads.

  12. Desiccant-Based Combined Systems: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Development and Testing Final Report- Phase 4

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J

    2005-05-06

    This report summarizes the results of a research and development (R&D) program to design and optimize an active desiccant-vapor compression hybrid rooftop system. The primary objective was to combine the strengths of both technologies to produce a compact, high-performing, energy-efficient system that could accommodate any percentage of outdoor air and deliver essentially any required combination of temperature and humidity, or sensible heat ratio (SHR). In doing so, such a product would address the significant challenges imposed on the performance capabilities of conventional packaged rooftop equipment by standards 62 and 90.1 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The body of work completed as part of this program built upon previous R&D efforts supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and summarized by the Phase 3b report ''Active Desiccant Dehumidification Module Integration with Rooftop Packaged HVAC Units'' (Fischer and Sand 2002), in addition to Fischer, Hallstrom, and Sand 2000; Fischer 2000; and Fischer and Sand 2004. All initial design objectives established for this development program were successfully achieved. The performance flexibility desired was accomplished by a down-sized active desiccant wheel that processes only a portion of the supply airflow, which is pre-conditioned by a novel vapor compression cycle. Variable-speed compressors are used to deliver the capacity control required by a system handling a high percentage of outdoor air. An integrated direct digital control system allows for control capabilities not generally offered by conventional packaged rooftop systems. A 3000-cfm prototype system was constructed and tested in the SEMCO engineering test laboratory in Columbia, MO, and was found to operate in an energy-efficient fashion relative to more conventional systems. Most important, the system offered the capability to independently control the supply air temperature and humidity content to

  13. EDITORIAL: Humidity sensors Humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regtien, Paul P. L.

    2012-01-01

    All matter is more or less hygroscopic. The moisture content varies with vapour concentration of the surrounding air and, as a consequence, most material properties change with humidity. Mechanical and thermal properties of many materials, such as the tensile strength of adhesives, stiffness of plastics, stoutness of building and packaging materials or the thermal resistivity of isolation materials, all decrease with increasing environmental humidity or cyclic humidity changes. The presence of water vapour may have a detrimental influence on many electrical constructions and systems exposed to humid air, from high-power systems to microcircuits. Water vapour penetrates through coatings, cable insulations and integrated-circuit packages, exerting a fatal influence on the performance of the enclosed systems. For these and many other applications, knowledge of the relationship between moisture content or humidity and material properties or system behaviour is indispensable. This requires hygrometers for process control or test and calibration chambers with high accuracy in the appropriate temperature and humidity range. Humidity measurement methods can roughly be categorized into four groups: water vapour removal (the mass before and after removal is measured); saturation (the air is brought to saturation and the `effort' to reach that state is measured); humidity-dependent parameters (measurement of properties of humid air with a known relation between a specific property and the vapour content, for instance the refractive index, electromagnetic spectrum and acoustic velocity); and absorption (based on the known relation between characteristic properties of non-hydrophobic materials and the amount of absorbed water from the gas to which these materials are exposed). The many basic principles to measure air humidity are described in, for instance, the extensive compilations by Wexler [1] and Sonntag [2]. Absorption-type hygrometers have small dimensions and can be

  14. Self-desiccation mechanism of high-performance concrete.

    PubMed

    Yang, Quan-Bing; Zhang, Shu-Qing

    2004-12-01

    Investigations on the effects of W/C ratio and silica fume on the autogenous shrinkage and internal relative humidity of high performance concrete (HPC), and analysis of the self-desiccation mechanisms of HPC showed that the autogenous shrinkage and internal relative humidity of HPC increases and decreases with the reduction of W/C respectively; and that these phenomena were amplified by the addition of silica fume. Theoretical analyses indicated that the reduction of RH in HPC was not due to shortage of water, but due to the fact that the evaporable water in HPC was not evaporated freely. The reduction of internal relative humidity or the so-called self-desiccation of HPC was chiefly caused by the increase in mole concentration of soluble ions in HPC and the reduction of pore size or the increase in the fraction of micro-pore water in the total evaporable water (T(r)/T(te) ratio). PMID:15547958

  15. Design of a humidity controlled sample stage for simultaneous conductivity and synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andrew; Beers, Keith M.; Chen, X. Chelsea; Hexemer, Alexander; Pople, John A.; Kerr, John B.; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2013-07-01

    We report on the design and operation of a novel sample stage, used to simultaneously measure X-ray scattering profiles and conductivity of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) surrounded by humid air as a function of temperature and relative humidity. We present data obtained at the Advanced Light Source and Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. We demonstrate precise humidity control and accurate determination of morphology and conductivity over a wide range of temperatures. The sample stage is used to study structure-property relationships of a semi-crystalline block copolymer PEM, sulfonated polystyrene-block-polyethylene.

  16. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    1994-12-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  17. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Potts, M

    1994-01-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  18. Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant-Based Outdoor Air Preconditioning Systems, Final Report: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.

    2001-07-09

    This report summarizes an investigation of the performance of two active desiccant cooling systems that were installed as pilot systems in two locations--a college dormitory and a research laboratory--during the fall of 1999. The laboratory system was assembled in the field from commercially available Trane air-handling modules combined with a standard total energy recovery module and a customized active desiccant wheel, both produced by SEMCO. The dormitory system was a factory-built, integrated system produced by SEMCO that included both active desiccant and sensible-only recovery wheels, a direct-fired gas regeneration section, and a pre-piped Trane heat pump condensing section. Both systems were equipped with direct digital control systems, complete with full instrumentation and remote monitoring capabilities. This report includes detailed descriptions of these two systems, installation details, samples of actual performance, and estimations of the energy savings realized. These pilot sites represent a continuation of previous active desiccant product development research (Fischer, Hallstrom, and Sand 2000; Fischer 2000). Both systems performed as anticipated, were reliable, and required minimal maintenance. The dehumidification/total-energy-recovery hybrid approach was particularly effective in all respects. System performance showed remarkable improvement in latent load handling capability and operating efficiency compared with the original conventional cooling system and with the conventional system that remained in another, identical wing of the facility. The dehumidification capacity of the pilot systems was very high, the cost of operation was very low, and the system was cost-effective, offering a simple payback for these retrofit installations of approximately 5 to 6 years. Most important, the dormitory system resolved numerous indoor air quality problems in the dormitory by providing effective humidity control and increased, continuous ventilation air.

  19. Thermodynamic performance of a hybrid air cycle refrigeration system using a desiccant rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Kyudae; Song, Chan Ho; Kim, Sung Ki; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao

    2013-03-01

    Due to the concern on global warming, the demand for a system using natural refrigerant is increasing and many researches have been devoted to develop systems with natural refrigerants. Among natural refrigerant systems, an air cycle system has emerged as one of alternatives of Freon gas system due to environmentally friendly feature in spite of the inherent low efficiency. To overcome the technical barrier, this study proposed combination of multiple systems as a hybrid cycle to achieve higher efficiency of an air cycle system. The hybrid air cycle adopts a humidity control units such as an adsorber and a desorber to obtain the cooling effect from latent heat as well as sensible heat. To investigate the efficacy of the hybrid air cycle, the cooling performance of a hybrid air cycle is investigated analytically and experimentally. From the simulation result, it is found that COP of the hybrid air cycle is two times higher than that of the conventional air cycle. The experiments are conducted on the performance of the desiccant system according to the rotation speed in the system and displayed the feasibility of the key element in the hybrid air cycle system. From the results, it is shown that the system efficiency can be enhanced by utilization of the exhausted heat through the ambient heat exchanger with advantage of controlling the humidity by the desiccant rotor.

  20. Humidity detection and hygropreference behavior in larvae of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Marc; Hanson, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Water is a critical resource for any terrestrial animal, especially for a soft-bodied insect such as larvae of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta L. (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae). Strategies for coping with a dry environment might include seeking out regions of high relative humidity that reduce desiccative stress, or to find and imbibe liquid water. Desiccated larvae placed in a linear arena with a humidity gradient preferred the humid end, whereas un-desiccated larvae did not. This behavior was not affected by temperature. Ablation or occlusion of the antennae showed that they are required to mediate this behavior. A series of experiments showed that control larvae oriented towards and imbibed liquid water whereas those whose antennae had been occluded with wax did not. Electrophysiological recordings from the lateral basiconic sensillum of the second antennal segment revealed the presence of at least one hygroreceptive unit that greatly increased its firing rate in response to moist air, decreased firing rates in response to dry air, and showed mild post-stimulatory inhibition. PMID:20302460

  1. Solid Desiccant Cooling System Employed with Ventilation Cycle: A Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, H.; Hindoliya, D. A.

    2012-10-01

    For better use of evaporative cooling techniques in humid climate, employment of desiccant cooling system (DCS) can be a suitable option. Desiccant augmented evaporative cooling system may be employed for energy saving in buildings in place of conventional vapour compression based cooling system. This article presents a sensitive analysis of DCS simulated under the humid climate of Mumbai, India. Mathematical computations have been performed using outdoor specific humidity, ambient dry bulb temperature and room supply temperature. A sensitive analysis considering some important forcing parameters was conducted. It was observed that the "effectiveness" of direct evaporative cooler to be predominantly high influencing parameter compared to others, for the performance of DCS.

  2. Lessons Learned from the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Node 1 flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A during December 1998. To date the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has learned a lot of lessons from this module based on its history of approximately two years of acceptance testing on the ground and currently its twelve years on-orbit. This paper will provide an overview of the ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control (THC) subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for this subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for these subsystems based on problems prelaunch, problems encountered on-orbit, and operational problems/concerns. It is hoped that documenting these lessons learned from ISS will help in preventing them in future Programs. 1

  3. Development of an Amine-based System for Combined Carbon Dioxide, Humidity, and Trace Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalette, Tim; Reiss, Julie; Filburn, Tom; Seery, Thomas; Smith, Fred; Perry, Jay

    2005-01-01

    A number of amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) removal systems have been developed for atmosphere revitalization in closed loop life support systems. Most recently, Hamilton Sundstrand developed an amine-based sorbent, designated SA9T, possessing approximately 2-fold greater capacity compared to previous formulations. This new formulation has demonstrated applicability for controlling CO2 levels within vehicles and habitats as well as during extravehicular activity (EVA). System volume is competitive with existing technologies. Further enhancements in system performance can be realized by incorporating humidity and trace contaminant control functions within an amine-based atmosphere revitalization system. A 3-year effort to develop prototype hardware capable of removing CO2, H2O, and trace contaminants from a cabin atmosphere has been initiated. Progress pertaining to defining system requirements and identifying alternative amine formulations and substrates is presented.

  4. Sensitive biomolecule detection in lateral flow assay with a portable temperature-humidity control device.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Feng, Shangsheng; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-05-15

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have currently attracted broad interest for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics, but their application has been restricted by poor quantification and limited sensitivity. While the former has been currently solved to some extent by the development of handheld or smartphone-based readers, the latter has not been addressed fully, particularly the potential influences of environmental conditions (e.g., temperature and relative humidity (RH)), which have not yet received serious attention. The present study reports the use of a portable temperature-humidity control device to provide an optimum environmental requirement for sensitivity improvement in LFAs, followed by quantification by using a smartphone. We found that a RH beyond 60% with temperatures of 55-60°C and 37-40°C produced optimum nucleic acid hybridization and antigen-antibody interaction in LFAs, respectively representing a 10-fold and 3-fold signal enhancement over ambient conditions (25°C, 60% RH). We envision that in the future the portable device could be coupled with a fully integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for sensitive detection of various target analytes in POC settings. PMID:26700582

  5. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.; Schertz, William W.

    1987-01-01

    A composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  6. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.; Schertz, W.W.

    1984-06-06

    This patent discloses a composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  7. Simulation and Optimization of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity levels in a spacesuit is critical to ensuring both the safety and comfort of an astronaut during extra-vehicular activity (EVA). Traditionally, this has been accomplished utilizing non-regenerative lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or regenerative metal oxide (MetOx) canisters which pose a significant weight burden. Although such technology enables air revitalization, the volume requirements to store the waste canisters as well as the mass to transport multiple units become prohibitive as mission durations increase. Consequently, motivation exists toward developing a fully regenerative technology for environmental control. The application of solid amine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to control CO2 and concomitantly manage humidity levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating mission constraints imposed with non-regenerative technologies. Experimental results for full-size and sub-scale test articles have been collected and are described herein. In order to accelerate the developmental efforts, an axially-dispersed plug ow model with an accompanying energy balance has been established and correlated with the experimental data. The experimental and simulation results display good agreement for a variety of ow rates (110-170 SLM), replicated metabolic challenges (100-590 Watts), and atmosphere pressures under consideration for the spacesuit (248 and 760 mm Hg). The relationship between swing adsorption cycles for an outlet criterion of 6.0 mm Hg of CO2 partial pressure has been established for each metabolic challenge. In addition, variable metabolic profiles were imposed on the test articles in order to assess the ability of the technology to transition to new operational constraints. The advent of the model provides the capacity to apply computer-aided engineering practices to support the ongoing efforts to optimize and mature this technology for future application to space

  8. Simulation and Optimization of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity levels in a spacesuit is critical to ensuring both the safety and comfort of an astronaut during extra-vehicular activity (EVA). Traditionally, this has been accomplished utilizing either non-regenerative lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or regenerative but heavy metal oxide (MetOx) canisters which pose a significant weight burden. Although such technology enables air revitalization, the volume requirements to store the waste canisters as well as the mass to transport multiple units become prohibitive as mission durations increase. Consequently, motivation exists toward developing a fully regenerative technology for spacesuit environmental control. The application of solid amine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to control CO2 while concomitantly managing humidity levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating constraints imposed with the traditional technologies. Prototype air revitalization units employing this technology have been fabricated in both a rectangular and cylindrical geometry. Experimental results for these test articles have been collected and are described herein. In order to accelerate the developmental efforts, an axially-dispersed plug flow model with an accompanying energy balance has been established and correlated with the experimental data. The experimental and simulation results display good agreement for a variety of flow rates (110-170 ALM), replicated metabolic challenges (100-590 Watts), and atmosphere pressures under consideration for the spacesuit (248 and 760 mm Hg). The testing and model results lend insight into the operational capabilities of these devices as well as the influence the geometry of the device has on performance. In addition, variable metabolic profiles were imposed on the test articles in order to assess the ability of the technology to transition to new metabolic conditions. The advent of the model provides the capacity to apply

  9. Solar-regenerated desiccant dehumidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haves, P.

    1982-02-01

    The dehumidification requirements of buildings are discussed, and the most suitable desiccant material is identified as silica gel. Several conceptual designs for solar regenerated desiccant dehumidifiers using a solid desiccant are described. The construction and operation of a laboratory experiment to determine the performance of a packed bed of silica gel at low flow rate is described. The experimental results are presented and compared to the predictions of a simple computer model which assumes local equilibrium between the desiccant and the airstream. The simulations used to predict desiccant bed performance and the integration of the desiccant bed simulation with a simulation of the thermal performance of a passively cooled residence are described. Results for an average July day are presented. Sizing relationships derived from the simulation are described, and an economic analysis and recommendations for further work are presented.

  10. Measurement uncertainty of adsorption testing of desiccant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C E; Pesaran, A A

    1988-12-01

    The technique of measurement uncertainty analysis as described in the current ANSI/ASME standard is applied to the testing of desiccant materials in SERI`s Sorption Test Facility. This paper estimates the elemental precision and systematic errors in these tests and propagates them separately to obtain the resulting uncertainty of the test parameters, including relative humidity ({plus_minus}.03) and sorption capacity ({plus_minus}.002 g/g). Errors generated by instrument calibration, data acquisition, and data reduction are considered. Measurement parameters that would improve the uncertainty of the results are identified. Using the uncertainty in the moisture capacity of a desiccant, the design engineer can estimate the uncertainty in performance of a dehumidifier for desiccant cooling systems with confidence. 6 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Experimental investigation of a solar desiccant cooling installation

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdoukan, P.; Wurtz, E.; Joubert, P.

    2009-11-15

    Desiccant cooling is a technique based on evaporative cooling and air dehumidification using desiccant regenerated by thermal energy. It is particularly interesting when it is driven by waste or solar heat making this technique environmentally friendly. In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried on a desiccant air handling unit powered by vacuum-tube solar collectors. First, the components are studied under various operating conditions. Then overall performance of the installation is evaluated over a day for a moderately humid climate with regeneration solely by solar energy. In these conditions the overall efficiency of the solar installation is 0.55 while the thermodynamic coefficient of performance is 0.45 and the performance indicator based on the electrical consumption is 4.5. Finally, the impact of outside and regeneration conditions on the performance indicators is studied. (author)

  12. Thrips domiciles protect larvae from desiccation in an arid environment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Desiccation is a particular risk for small animals in arid environments. In response, many organisms “construct niches,” favorable microenvironments where they spend part or all of their life cycle. Some maintain such environments for their offspring via parental care. Insect eggs are often protected from desiccation by parentally derived gels, casings, or cocoons, but active parental protection of offspring from desiccation has never been demonstrated. Most free-living thrips (Thysanoptera) alleviate water loss via thigmotaxis (crevice seeking). In arid Australia, Acacia thrips (Phlaeothripidae) construct many kinds of niche. Some thrips induce galls; others, like Dunatothrips aneurae, live and breed within “domiciles” made from loosely glued phyllodes. The function of domiciles is unknown; like other constructed niches, they may 1) create favorable microenvironments, 2) facilitate feeding, 3) protect from enemies, or a combination. To test the first 2 alternatives experimentally, field-collected domiciles were destroyed or left intact. Seven-day survival of feeding and nonfeeding larval stages was monitored at high (70–80%) or low (8–10%, approximately ambient) humidity. Regardless of humidity, most individuals survived in intact domiciles, whereas for destroyed domiciles, survival depended on humidity, suggesting parents construct and maintain domiciles to prevent offspring desiccating. Feeding and nonfeeding larvae had similar survival patterns, suggesting the domicile’s role is not nutritional. Outside domiciles, survival at “high” humidity was intermediate, suggesting very high humidity requirements, or energetic costs of wandering outside domiciles. D. aneurae commonly cofound domiciles; cofoundresses may benefit both from shared nestbuilding costs, and from “deferred byproduct mutualism,” that is, backup parental care in case of mortality. PMID:25419084

  13. Control methods and systems for indirect evaporative coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Jason; Kozubal, Erik

    2015-09-22

    A control method for operating an indirect evaporative cooler to control temperature and humidity. The method includes operating an airflow control device to provide supply air at a flow rate to a liquid desiccant dehumidifier. The supply air flows through the dehumidifier and an indirect evaporative cooler prior to exiting an outlet into a space. The method includes operating a pump to provide liquid desiccant to the liquid desiccant dehumidifier and sensing a temperature of an airstream at the outlet of the indirect evaporative cooler. The method includes comparing the temperature of the airstream at the outlet to a setpoint temperature at the outlet and controlling the pump to set the flow rate of the liquid desiccant. The method includes sensing space temperature, comparing the space temperature with a setpoint temperature, and controlling the airflow control device to set the flow rate of the supply air based on the comparison.

  14. The development and testing of a regenerable CO2 and humidity control system for Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A regenerable CO2 and humidity control system is presently being developed for potential use on Shuttle as an alternate to the baseline lithium hydroxide (LiOH) system. The system utilizes a sorbent material (designated 'HS-C') to adsorb CO2 and water vapor from the cabin atmosphere and desorb the CO2 and water vapor overboard when exposed to a space vacuum. Continuous operation is achieved by utilizing two beds which are alternately cycled between adsorption and desorption. This paper presents the significant hardware development and test accomplishments of the past year. A half-size breadboard system utilizing a flight configuration canister was successfully performance tested in simulated Shuttle missions. A vacuum desorption test provided considerable insight into the desorption phenomena and allowed a significant reduction of the Shuttle vacuum duct size. The fabrication and testing of a flight prototype canister and flight prototype vacuum valves have proven the feasibility of these full-size, flight-weight components.

  15. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  16. A simple analytical method to estimate all exit parameters of a cross-flow air dehumidifier using liquid desiccant.

    PubMed

    Bassuoni, M M

    2014-03-01

    The dehumidifier is a key component in liquid desiccant air-conditioning systems. Analytical solutions have more advantages than numerical solutions in studying the dehumidifier performance parameters. This paper presents the performance results of exit parameters from an analytical model of an adiabatic cross-flow liquid desiccant air dehumidifier. Calcium chloride is used as desiccant material in this investigation. A program performing the analytical solution is developed using the engineering equation solver software. Good accuracy has been found between analytical solution and reliable experimental results with a maximum deviation of +6.63% and -5.65% in the moisture removal rate. The method developed here can be used in the quick prediction of the dehumidifier performance. The exit parameters from the dehumidifier are evaluated under the effects of variables such as air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and air to desiccant flow rates. The results show that hot humid air and desiccant concentration have the greatest impact on the performance of the dehumidifier. The moisture removal rate is decreased with increasing both air inlet temperature and desiccant temperature while increases with increasing air to solution mass ratio, inlet desiccant concentration, and inlet air humidity ratio. PMID:25685485

  17. A simple analytical method to estimate all exit parameters of a cross-flow air dehumidifier using liquid desiccant

    PubMed Central

    Bassuoni, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The dehumidifier is a key component in liquid desiccant air-conditioning systems. Analytical solutions have more advantages than numerical solutions in studying the dehumidifier performance parameters. This paper presents the performance results of exit parameters from an analytical model of an adiabatic cross-flow liquid desiccant air dehumidifier. Calcium chloride is used as desiccant material in this investigation. A program performing the analytical solution is developed using the engineering equation solver software. Good accuracy has been found between analytical solution and reliable experimental results with a maximum deviation of +6.63% and −5.65% in the moisture removal rate. The method developed here can be used in the quick prediction of the dehumidifier performance. The exit parameters from the dehumidifier are evaluated under the effects of variables such as air temperature and humidity, desiccant temperature and concentration, and air to desiccant flow rates. The results show that hot humid air and desiccant concentration have the greatest impact on the performance of the dehumidifier. The moisture removal rate is decreased with increasing both air inlet temperature and desiccant temperature while increases with increasing air to solution mass ratio, inlet desiccant concentration, and inlet air humidity ratio. PMID:25685485

  18. Quasielastic neutron scattering with in situ humidity control: Water dynamics in uranyl fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskowiec, A.; Kirkegaard, M. C.; Herwig, K. W.; Trowbridge, L.; Mamontov, E.; Anderson, B.

    2016-03-01

    The structural phase diagram of uranyl fluoride (UO2F2), while incomplete, contains at least one anhydrous crystal structure and a second, zeolite-like structure with the formula [(UO2F2)(H2O)]7 ṡ (H2O)4 that can be produced by adding water to the anhydrous structure. While traditional diffraction measurements can easily differentiate these crystals, additional aqueous structures (in general of the form UO2F2 + xH2O) have been proposed as well. We present results using a novel sample environment setup to intercalate water during a quasielastic neutron scattering measurement over the course of 86 h. Our sample environment allows low-pressure (<2 atm) humid air flow across the sample coupled with a system to control the relative humidity of this air flow between 10% and 70%. The water dynamics in UO2F2 and [(UO2F2)(H2O)]7 ṡ (H2O)4 are sufficiently different to distinguish them, with water in the latter executing a restricted diffusion (D = 2.7 × 10-6 cm2/s) within the structure's accessible pores (r = 3.17 Å) such that the dynamics can be used as a fingerprinting tool. We confirm that water vapor pressure is the driving thermodynamic force for the conversion of the anhydrous structure to [(UO2F2)(H2O)]7 ṡ (H2O)4, and we demonstrate the feasibility of extending this approach to aqueous forms of UO2F2 + xH2O. This method has general applicability to systems in which water content itself is a driving variable for structural or dynamical phase transitions.

  19. Desiccation as a mitigation tool to manage biofouling risks: trials on temperate taxa to elucidate factors influencing mortality rates.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Grant A; Prince, Madeleine; Cahill, Patrick L; Fletcher, Lauren M; Atalah, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The desiccation tolerance of biofouling taxa (adults and early life-stages) was determined under both controlled and 'realistic' field conditions. Adults of the ascidian Ciona spp. died within 24 h. Mortality in the adult blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis occurred within 11 d under controlled conditions, compared with 7 d when held outside. The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was the most desiccation-tolerant taxon tested (up to 34 d under controlled conditions). Biofouling orientated to direct sunlight showed faster mortality rates for all the taxa tested. Mortality in Mytilus juveniles took up to 24 h, compared with 8 h for Ciona, with greater survival at the higher temperature (18.5°C) and humidity (~95% RH) treatment combination. This study demonstrated that desiccation can be an effective mitigation method for a broad range of fouling taxa, especially their early life-stages. Further work is necessary to assess risks from other high-risk species such as algae and cyst forming species. PMID:26691450

  20. Development of Membrane-Based Desiccant Fiber for Vacuum Desiccant Cooling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifan; Rana, Dipak; Lan, Christopher Q; Matsuura, Takeshi

    2016-06-22

    A novel hydrophobic membrane-based desiccant fiber (MDF) was developed by loading lithium chloride into hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. The MDF thus made was then tested for vapor absorption under controlled conditions. Furthermore, an MDF pad, which was made by weaving MDF into a piece of garment, was built into a laboratory vacuum desiccant cooling (VDC) setup, which included the MDF pad as the desiccant layer and a cooling towel saturated with water as the water reservoir, to test the cooling effects at atmospheric pressure and vacuum of 25 in. of Hg. Results indicate that MDF is suitable for applications such as in VDC. Mass and heat transfer of vapor absorption by MDF were also analyzed. PMID:27253330

  1. Desiccation stress induces developmental heterochrony in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Leena; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Banerjee, Kaushik; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-09-01

    Stressful environments are known to perturb developmental patterns in insects. In the purview of desiccation as a stressor, relatively little is known about the developmental consequences linked with desiccation tolerance. In this study, we have particularly focused on the exploration of the temporal profile of postembryonic development in response to desiccation exposure in Drosophila melanogaster and the associated trade-offs. We document a correlation between variations in 20-hydroxyecdysone levels and the altered timing of metamorphic events during the life cycle. Following desiccation, we observed an extension in the larval longevity whereas the duration of the pupal and adult stages was significantly shortened. Alternately, feeding of 20-hydroxyecdysone apparently led to the restoration of the normal temporal pattern of development in the desiccated group. In spite of the desiccation-responsive heterochronic shifts in development, the overall lifespan post recovery remained almost unaltered among the desiccated and undesiccated groups suggesting plasticity in developmental control. This observation reminisces 'canalization-like' phenomenon that buffers alterations in the overall lifespan. We thus identified a desiccationresponsive period in the lifespan of D. melanogaster during which variations in ecdysone levels are capable to alter the temporal course of development. PMID:27581925

  2. Evolution of physical controls for soil moisture in humid and subhumid watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nandita; Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2013-03-01

    The covariability of soil moisture with soil, vegetation, topography, and precipitation is linked by physical relationships. The influence of each of these interdependent physical controls on soil moisture spatial distribution depends on the nature of heterogeneity present in the domain and evolves with time and scale. This paper investigates the effect of three physical controls, i.e., topography (slope), vegetation (type), and soil (texture), on soil moisture spatial distribution in the Little Washita and Walnut Creek watersheds in Oklahoma and Iowa, respectively, at two support scales. Point-support-scale data collected from four soil moisture campaigns (SMEX02, SMEX03, SMEX05, and CLASIC07) and airborne-scale data from three soil moisture campaigns (SGP97, SGP99, and SMEX02) were used in this analysis. The effect of different physical controls on the spatial mean and variability of soil moisture was assessed using Kruskal-Wallis and Shannon entropy respectively. It was found that at both (point and airborne) support scales, nonuniform precipitation (forcing) across the domain can mask the effect of the dominant physical controls on the soil moisture distribution. In order to isolate land-surface controls from the impact of forcing, the effect of precipitation variability was removed. After removing the effect of precipitation variability, it was found that for most soil moisture conditions, soil texture as opposed to vegetation and topography is the dominant physical control at both the point and airborne scales in Iowa and Oklahoma. During a very wet year (2007), however, the effect of topography on the soil moisture spatial variability overrides the effect of soil texture at the point support scale. These findings are valuable for developing any physically based scaling algorithms to upscale or downscale soil moisture between the point and watershed scales in the studied watersheds in humid and subhumid regions of the Great Plains of USA. These results may

  3. Minerals vs. Microbes: Biogeochemical Controls on Carbon Storage in Humid Tropical Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    Humid tropical forest soils contain a substantial portion (~500 Pg) of the terrestrial carbon (C) pool, yet their response to climate change remains unclear due to mechanistic uncertainty in the biogeochemical controls on soil C storage in these ecosystems. Poorly-crystalline minerals have long been known to stabilize soil C, but few studies have explored their relative importance in comparison with other likely controls such as rhizosphere processes, oxygen deficiency (anaerobiosis), and C quality. We examined relationships among soil C and a suite of biogeochemical variables measured in 162 samples from surface soils (ultisols and oxisols) collected over scales of landforms to landscapes (m - km) in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. We measured iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), and manganese (Mn) oxides in 0.5M hydrochloric acid (HCl), sodium citrate/ascorbic acid (CA), and citrate/dithionite (CD) extractions, along with clay content, root biomass, C quality (C/N ratios), and anaerobiosis using HCl-extractable reduced iron (Fe(II)) concentrations as a proxy. We used mixed-effects models to compare the relative importance of the above variables (normalized by mean and standard deviation) as predictors of soil C, with random effects to account for spatial structure. Poorly-crystalline Al oxide concentrations (CA extraction), soil C/N ratio, and Fe(II) concentrations each had highly significant (p < 0.0001) positive relationships with soil C concentrations that conveyed equivalent explanatory power, assessed by comparing standardized regression coefficients. The optimal mixed model explained 82 % of the variation of the residual sum of squares of soil C concentrations, which varied between 2 - 20 % C among samples. Fine root biomass had a weak but significantly positive association with soil C concentrations (p < 0.05), while crystalline Fe oxide concentrations (CD extraction) displayed a negative correlation (p < 0.01), and clay contents had no significant

  4. A simple and versatile 2-dimensional platform to study plant germination and growth under controlled humidity.

    PubMed

    Sizmur, Tom; Lind, Kara R; Benomar, Saida; VanEvery, Hannah; Cademartiri, Ludovico

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple, inexpensive, but remarkably versatile and controlled growth environment for the observation of plant germination and seedling root growth on a flat, horizontal surface over periods of weeks. The setup provides to each plant a controlled humidity (between 56% and 91% RH), and contact with both nutrients and atmosphere. The flat and horizontal geometry of the surface supporting the roots eliminates the gravitropic bias on their development and facilitates the imaging of the entire root system. Experiments can be setup under sterile conditions and then transferred to a non-sterile environment. The system can be assembled in 1-2 minutes, costs approximately 8.78$ per plant, is almost entirely reusable (0.43$ per experiment in disposables), and is easily scalable to a variety of plants. We demonstrate the performance of the system by germinating, growing, and imaging Wheat (Triticum aestivum), Corn (Zea mays), and Wisconsin Fast Plants (Brassica rapa). Germination rates were close to those expected for optimal conditions. PMID:24806462

  5. The Influence of Relative Humidity on Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Flow Control Actuator Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, M.; Thomas, F. O.; Corke, T. C.; Patel, M.

    2012-11-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators possess numerous advantages for flow control applications and have been the focus of several previous studies. Most work has been performed in relatively pristine laboratory settings. In actual flow control applications, however, it is essential to assess the impact of various environmental influences on actuator performance. As a first effort toward assessing a broad range of environmental effects on DBD actuator performance, the influence of relative humidity (RH) is considered. Actuator performance is quantified by force balance measurements of reactive thrust while RH is systematically varied via an ultrasonic humidifier. The DBD plasma actuator assembly, force balance, and ultrasonic humidifier are all contained inside a large, closed test chamber instrumented with RH and temperature sensors in order to accurately estimate the average RH at the actuator. Measurements of DBD actuator thrust as a function of RH for several different applied voltage regimes and dielectric materials and thicknesses are presented. Based on these results, several important design recommendations are made. This work was supported by Innovative Technology Applications Company (ITAC), LLC under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II Contract No. N00014-11-C-0267 issued by the U.S. Department of the Navy.

  6. A Simple and Versatile 2-Dimensional Platform to Study Plant Germination and Growth under Controlled Humidity

    PubMed Central

    Sizmur, Tom; Lind, Kara R.; Benomar, Saida; VanEvery, Hannah; Cademartiri, Ludovico

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple, inexpensive, but remarkably versatile and controlled growth environment for the observation of plant germination and seedling root growth on a flat, horizontal surface over periods of weeks. The setup provides to each plant a controlled humidity (between 56% and 91% RH), and contact with both nutrients and atmosphere. The flat and horizontal geometry of the surface supporting the roots eliminates the gravitropic bias on their development and facilitates the imaging of the entire root system. Experiments can be setup under sterile conditions and then transferred to a non-sterile environment. The system can be assembled in 1-2 minutes, costs approximately 8.78$ per plant, is almost entirely reusable (0.43$ per experiment in disposables), and is easily scalable to a variety of plants. We demonstrate the performance of the system by germinating, growing, and imaging Wheat (Triticum aestivum), Corn (Zea mays), and Wisconsin Fast Plants (Brassica rapa). Germination rates were close to those expected for optimal conditions. PMID:24806462

  7. Relative Humidity Controls Ammonia Loss from Urea Applied to Loblolly Pine

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Miguel L.; Kissel, David E.; Craig, J. R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Vaio, N.; Rema, John A.; Morris, Larry A.

    2010-04-01

    In the United States of America, approximately 600,000 ha of southern pine are fertilized with urea each year, with NH3 volatilization losses ranging from <1% to >50% depending on environmental conditions. Previous work showed that timing of rainfall after urea application plays a significant role in controlling NH3 loss, but the effect of other environmental variables is not well understood. We conducted ten 29-d studies under different environmental conditions during two years to identify important variables controlling NH3 loss from urea applied to loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) at 200 kg N ha-1. Ammonia loss was measured with dynamic chambers that adjusted the rate of air flow through the system based on wind speed at 1 cm above the soil surface. Regression analysis indicated that a variable related to initial water content of the forest floor and a variable related to relative humidity (RH) during the study explained 85 to 94% of the observed variability in NH3 loss. Relatively high initial water content followed by consistently high RH led to large NH3 losses. In contrast, low initial water contents resulted in slow rates of NH3 loss, which increased when elevated RH led to an increase in the water content of the forest floor. These results indicate that RH can play a significant role in NH3 loss by accelerating urea dissolution and by increasing or decreasing the water content of the forest floor, which in turn can affect the rate of urea hydrolysis.

  8. Morphology of U3O8 materials following storage under controlled conditions of temperature and relative humidity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tamasi, Alison L.; Cash, Leigh J.; Mullen, William Tyler; Pugmire, Alison L.; Ross, Amy R.; Ruggiero, Christy E.; Scott, Brian L.; Wagner, Gregory L.; Walensky, Justin R.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.

    2016-07-05

    Changes in the visual characteristics of uranium oxide surfaces and morphology following storage under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity may provide insight into the history of an unknown sample. Sub-samples of three α-U3O8 materials—one that was phase-pure and two that were phase-impure—were stored under controlled conditions for two years. We used scanning electron microscopy to image the oxides before and after storage, and a morphology lexicon was used to characterize the images. Finally, temporal changes in morphology were observed in some sub-samples, and changes were greatest following exposure to high relative humidity.

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis and humidity sensing properties of size-controlled Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2) nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuyi; Lu, Yi; Yuan, Shuai; Shi, Liyi; Zhao, Yin; Zhang, Meihong; Deng, Wei

    2013-04-15

    Size-controlled ZrO2 nanorods were prepared via a facile hydrothermal treatment approach in the presence of NH4F as mineralizer. The effects of the type and concentration of mineralizers on the particle size and dispersibility of ZrO2 nanorods were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption-desorption measurements (BET), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), confirming the essential role of F(-) in tuning the particle size. Humidity sensors based on ZrO2 nanorods with different sizes exhibit different sensitivity depending on their proportion of surface adsorbed oxygen. High sensitivity, linear response, small hysteresis, and rapid response-recovery behavior (5s for adsorption and 38s for desorption) make ZrO2 prepared by our method a good candidate for application in humidity sensor. The complex impedance spectra were used to elucidate its humidity sensing mechanism in detail. PMID:23411357

  10. Assessment of desiccants and their instructions for use in rapid diagnostic tests

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are protected from humidity-caused degradation by a desiccant added to the device packaging. The present study assessed malaria RDT products for the availability, type and design of desiccants and their information supplied in the instructions for use (IFU). Methods Criteria were based on recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO), the European Community (CE) and own observations. Silica gel sachets were defined as self-indicating (all beads coated with a humidity indicator that changes colour upon saturation), partial-indicating (part of beads coated) and non-indicating (none of the beads coated). Indicating silica gel sachets were individually assessed for humidity saturation and (in case of partial-indicating silica gels) for the presence of indicating beads. Results Fifty malaria RDT products from 25 manufacturers were assessed, 14 (28%) products were listed by the “Global Fund Quality Assurance Policy” and 31 (62%) were CE-marked. All but one product contained a desiccant, mostly (47/50, 94%) silica gel. Twenty (40%) RDT products (one with no desiccant and 19 with non-indicating desiccant) did not meet the WHO guidelines recommending indicating desiccant. All RDT products with self- or partial-indicating silica gel (n = 22 and 8 respectively) contained the toxic cobalt dichloride as humidity indicator. Colour change indicating humidity saturation was observed for 8/16 RDT products, at a median incidence of 0.8% (range 0.05%-4.6%) of sachets inspected. In all RDTs with partial-indicating silica gel, sachets with no colour indicating beads were found (median proportion 13.5% (0.6% - 17.8%) per product) and additional light was needed to assess the humidity colour. Less than half (14/30, 47%) IFUs of RDT products with indicating desiccants mentioned to check the humidity saturation before using the test. Information on properties, safety hazards and disposal of the desiccant was not included in

  11. Plant and microbial controls on nitrogen retention and loss in a Humid Tropical Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Templer, P.; Silver, W.; Pett-Ridge, J.; DeAngelis, K.M.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-09-15

    Humid tropical forests are generally characterized by the lack of nitrogen (N) limitation to net primary productivity, yet paradoxically have high potential for N loss. We conducted an intensive field experiment with {sup 15}NH{sub 4} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3} additions to highly weathered tropical forest soils to determine the relative importance of N retention and loss mechanisms. Over half of all the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced from gross mineralization was rapidly converted to NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the process of gross nitrification. During the first 24 h plant roots took up 28 % of the N mineralized, dominantly as NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and were a greater sink for N than soil microbial biomass. Soil microbes were not a significant sink for added {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} or {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -} during the first 24 hr, and only for {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} after 7 d. Patterns of microbial community composition, as determined by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis, were weakly, but significantly correlated with nitrification and denitrification to N{sub 2}O. Rates of dissimilatory NO{sub 3}{sup -} reduction to NH{sub 4}{sup +} (DNRA) were high in this forest, accounting for up to 25 % of gross mineralization and 35 % of gross nitrification. DNRA was a major sink for NO{sub 3}{sup -} which may have contributed to the lower rates of N{sub 2}O and leaching losses. Despite considerable N conservation via DNRA and plant NH{sub 4}{sup +} uptake, the fate of approximately 45% of the NO{sub 3}{sup -} produced and 22% of the NH{sub 4}{sup +} produced were not measured in our fluxes, suggesting that other important pathways for N retention and loss (e.g., denitrification to N{sub 2}) are important in this system. The high proportion of mineralized N that was rapidly nitrified and the fates of that NO{sub 3}{sup -} highlight the key role of gross nitrification as a proximate control on N retention and loss in humid tropical forest soils. Furthermore, our

  12. A humidity controlled Nephelometer system to study the hygroscopic properties of aerosols in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaishya, Aditya; O'Dowd, Colin; Jennings, S. Gerard

    2010-05-01

    A Humidograph system has been designed to study the hygroscopic properties of aerosols for different air-masses and for different seasons in the marine environment. Since ambient marine aerosols are likely to be found in a metastable state, and in accordance with recommendations of WMO/GAW to sample dry aerosol, a drying unit (Nafion based) is placed just after the inlet to dry the aerosols to a relative humidity (RH) < 40% so as not to misinterpret the optical properties of hygroscopic aerosols if they are on the descending branch of the hysteresis curve. The flow after the dryer is split into two, one going to a 3-wavelength TSI-3563 Integrating Nephelometer, and the other to a Gore-Tex based humidifier followed by a single-wavelength TSI-3561 Integrating Nephelometer. The humidifier is used to vary the RH from 40% to 90%. While the TSI-3563 Integrating Nephelometer will operate at RH < 40%, the TSI-3561 Integrating Nephelometer will operate under varying RH conditions. Software developed in LabVIEW is used to control the hardware components and to log the data in a predefined format. Results of the performance of the Humidograph system in the laboratory and at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station are presented.

  13. A prototype carbon dioxide and humidity control system for Shuttle mission extension capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusick, R. J.; Boehm, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes an advanced regenerable carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control system being developed for the NASA Johnson Space Center. The system offers substantial weight advantages in comparison with the baseline Shuttle Orbiter expendable, lithium hydroxide CO2 removal system for extended missions beyond the nominal design of 4 men for 7 days. The regenerable system offers a potential weight savings of 431 kg for a 7-man 30-day mission. A regenerable sorbent material designated as HS-C coadsorbs CO2 and water vapor from the cabin atmosphere and desorbs the CO2 and H2O vapor overboard when exposed to the space vacuum. In addition to a comparison of the regenerable system with the baseline Shuttle expendable system, HS-C mission simulation test results and the flight prototype regenerable system currently being fabricated are presented. The paper shows the integration of the system into the Shuttle Orbiter vehicle; exclusive of cryogenic fuel-cell power expendables, the available packaging envelope is sufficient to stow all expendables necessary for HS-C operation on 30-day extended missions.

  14. The modern office environment desiccates the eyes?

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, P; Nøjgaard, J K; Franck, C; Skov, P

    2006-08-01

    Eye irritation is a common complaint in the office environment. The purpose of this overview is to merge knowledge within indoor air science, ophthalmology, and occupational health to promote understanding eye irritation symptomatology, the cause of which is still partly unknown. High periocular relative humidity appears to protect the pre-corneal tear film against desiccation and sensory irritating pollutants and reduces the development of eye irritation symptoms. This is particularly relevant for intensive computer work, where the pre-corneal tear film is altered resulting in dry spot formation and eye dryness, in addition to enhanced susceptibility towards sensory irritating pollutants. The workplace, thermal conditions, and work schedule (including breaks) should be planned in such a way to help maintain a normal eye blink frequency to minimize alterations of the pre-corneal tear film. The role of relative humidity on eye irritation symptoms should not be underestimated. Multiple short breaks are justified by the beneficial effect on the pre-corneal tear film. In addition, longer breaks in tasks, which require demanding visual work, should be considered. In addition, air temperature as well as certain alkene oxidation products by ozone may worsen eye irritation symptoms, but the latter factor may be smaller at higher relative humidity. PMID:16842606

  15. 4-rotor Desiccant Cooling Process Equipped with a Double Stage Dehumidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Kosuke; Kodama, Akio; Okano, Hiroshi; Asada, Toshinobu

    2-rotor desiccant cooling process consisting of a honeycomb rotor dehumidifier and a sensible heat exchanger is a mainstream of the desiccant cooling process which are practically applied to supermarket, hospital and so on. However, this process cannot produce a sufficient dehumidifying performance in high humidity region. In this study, 4-rotor desiccant cooling process equipped with a double stage dehumidification was proposed and investigated experimentally. In this process, regeneration temperature around 60°C could produce a sufficient dehumidifying performance even at high ambient humidity. “Serial heat supply” mode was considered to improve the heat efficiency by the cascade use of regeneration heat inside the cooling cycle. The dehumidifying performance of the “serial heat supply” mode was only slightly lower than that of a “parallel heat supply” mode at which the same temperature hot air was supplied to the both heaters. However, dehumidifying performance of this “serial heat supply” mode was much higher than that of conventional 2-rotor desiccant cooling process. Furthermore, the desiccant rotors of 0.1m in thickness were mounted to 4-rotor desiccant cooling process in place of the 0.2m desiccant rotors. It was found that the drop of dehumidifying performance of the process equipped with 0.1m desiccant rotors was only by 10 percents comparing with the 0.2m rotor process. Moreover, it was found that optimization of rotation speed of the desiccant rotor was needed to improve the energy efficiency. Regarding the supply point of return air, it was also found that return air should be supplied to the regeneration inlet of the second stage for higher dehumidifying performance.

  16. Testing and Results of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, Summer D.; Broerman, Craig D.; Swickrath, Michael; Anderson, Molly

    2011-01-01

    A principal concern for extravehicular activity (EVA) spacesuits is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O) for the crewmember. The release of CO2 in a confined or unventilated area is dangerous for human health and leads to asphyxiation; therefore, CO2 and H2O control become leading factors in the design and development of the spacesuit. An amine-based CO2 and H2O vapor sorbent for use in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand. The application of solidamine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to concurrently manage CO2 and H2O levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating mission constraints imposed with nonregenerative technologies. Two prototype solid amine-based systems, known as rapid cycle amine (RCA), were designed to continuously remove CO2 and H2O vapor from a flowing ventilation stream through the use of a two-bed amine based, vacuum-swing adsorption system. The Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG) RCA implements radial flow paths, whereas the Hamilton Sundstrand RCA was designed with linear flow paths. Testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment and a reduced-pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads in a closed-loop configuration. This paper presents the experimental results of laboratory testing for a full-size and a sub-scale test article. The testing described here characterized and evaluated the performance of each RCA unit at the required Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) operating conditions. The test points simulated a range of crewmember metabolic rates. The experimental results demonstrated the ability of each RCA unit to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O from a closed loop ambient or sub-ambient atmosphere.

  17. The Sigma Factor AlgU (AlgT) Controls Exopolysaccharide Production and Tolerance towards Desiccation and Osmotic Stress in the Biocontrol Agent Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0

    PubMed Central

    Schnider-Keel, Ursula; Lejbølle, Kirsten Bang; Baehler, Eric; Haas, Dieter; Keel, Christoph

    2001-01-01

    A variety of stress situations may affect the activity and survival of plant-beneficial pseudomonads added to soil to control root diseases. This study focused on the roles of the sigma factor AlgU (synonyms, AlgT, RpoE, and ς22) and the anti-sigma factor MucA in stress adaptation of the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0. The algU-mucA-mucB gene cluster of strain CHA0 was similar to that of the pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas syringae. Strain CHA0 is naturally nonmucoid, whereas a mucA deletion mutant or algU-overexpressing strains were highly mucoid due to exopolysaccharide overproduction. Mucoidy strictly depended on the global regulator GacA. An algU deletion mutant was significantly more sensitive to osmotic stress than the wild-type CHA0 strain and the mucA mutant were. Expression of an algU′-′lacZ reporter fusion was induced severalfold in the wild type and in the mucA mutant upon exposure to osmotic stress, whereas a lower, noninducible level of expression was observed in the algU mutant. Overexpression of algU did not enhance tolerance towards osmotic stress. AlgU was found to be essential for tolerance of P. fluorescens towards desiccation stress in a sterile vermiculite-sand mixture and in a natural sandy loam soil. The size of the population of the algU mutant declined much more rapidly than the size of the wild-type population at soil water contents below 5%. In contrast to its role in pathogenic pseudomonads, AlgU did not contribute to tolerance of P. fluorescens towards oxidative and heat stress. In conclusion, AlgU is a crucial determinant in the adaptation of P. fluorescens to dry conditions and hyperosmolarity, two major stress factors that limit bacterial survival in the environment. PMID:11722923

  18. Integrated CO2, Humidity and Thermal Control by Membrane Gas Absorption, Results of Breadboard Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel, C.; Eckhard, F.; Feron, P. H. M.; Savage, C. J.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane gas absorption for the removal of CO2 in manned spacecrafts is subject of study by Stork and TNO for many years. The system is based on the combination of membrane separation and gas absorption. The air is fed along one side of a hydrophobic membrane and diffuses through the membrane after which the CO2 is selectively absorbed by an absorption liquid. Great advantage is that the system not only can be used to remove the carbon dioxide but also can be applied to control the relative humidity and temperature of the cabin atmosphere. Absorption of moisture and heat is achieved by cooling the absorption liquid below the dewpoint temperature of the gas stream. In the studies, the Crew Transfer Vehicle is used as a basis. Compared to the planned h/w for this vehicle, an air conditioning system, consisting of a condensing heat exchanger, LiOH cartridges to remove the carbon dioxide and a water evaporator assembly, the MGA/MGD has a large volume and a small mass advantage. The absorption liquid circulates through the spacecraft thermal control loop, replacing the coolant water. This set-up has two advantages. At first, by increasing the absorption liquid temperature the CO2 desorption rate in the desorber is favoured and secondly, should additional heat rejection aside from the basic heat rejection system be required (off nominal case), this can be established by dumping extra water via the desorption module, using the associated heat of vaporisation. Control of the water desorption rate is achieved by adjusting the permeate pressure with the throttle valve. In the nominal case the water absorption rate is equal to the desorption rate. The CO2 absorption capacity of the absorption liquid is restored in a desorption unit. This process is based on pervaporation. On one side of the membrane the absorption liquid is fed, on the other side a reduced pressure is maintained. Due to this pressure difference a driving force for water vapour and CO2 is created. The water

  19. Review of Desiccant Dehumidification Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A. A.

    1994-10-01

    This paper overviews applications of desiccant technology for dehumidifying commercial and institutional buildings. Because of various market, policy, and regulatory factors, this technology is especially attractive for dehumidification applications in the I990s.

  20. Testing and Results of Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillin, Summer; Broerman, Craig; Swickrath, Mike; Anderson, Molly

    2010-01-01

    A principal concern for extravehicular activity (EVA) space suits is the capability to control carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity (H2O) for the crewmember. The release of CO2 in a confined or unventilated area is dangerous for human health and leads to asphyxiation; therefore, CO2 and H2O become leading factors in the design and development of the spacesuit. An amine-based CO2 and H2O vapor sorbent for use in pressure-swing re-generable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand. The application of solid-amine materials with vacuum swing adsorption technology has shown the capacity to concurrently manage CO2 and H2O levels through a fully regenerative cycle eliminating mission constraints imposed with non-regenerative technologies. Two prototype solid amine-based systems, known as rapid cycle amine (RCA), were designed to continuously remove CO2 and H2O vapor from a flowing ventilation stream through the use of a two-bed amine based, vacuum-swing adsorption system. The Engineering and Science Contract Group (ESCG) RCA is the first RCA unit implementing radial flow paths, whereas the Hamilton Sundstrand RCA was designed with linear flow paths. Testing was performed in a sea-level pressure environment and a reduced-pressure environment with simulated human metabolic loads in a closed-loop configuration. This paper presents the experimental results of laboratory testing for a full-size and a sub-scale test article. The testing described here characterized and evaluated the performance of each RCA unit at the required Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) operating conditions. The test points simulated a range of crewmember metabolic rates. The experimental results demonstrate the ability of each RCA unit to sufficiently remove CO2 and H2O from a closed loop ambient or subambient atmosphere.

  1. Humidity-modulated phase control and nanoscopic transport in supramolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Lingwood, Mark D; Goswami, Mithun; Kidd, Bryce E; Hernandez, Jaime J; Rosenthal, Martin; Ivanov, Dimitri A; Perlich, Jan; Zhang, Heng; Zhu, Xiaomin; Möller, Martin; Madsen, Louis A

    2014-03-20

    Supramolecular assembly allows for enhanced control of bulk material properties through the fine modulation of intermolecular interactions. We present a comprehensive study of a cross-linkable amphiphilic wedge molecule based on a sulfonated trialkoxybenzene with a sodium counterion that forms liquid crystalline (LC) phases with ionic nanochannel structures. This compound exhibits drastic structural changes as a function of relative humidity (RH). Our combined structural, dynamical, and transport studies reveal deep and novel information on the coupling of water and wedge molecule transport to structural motifs, including the significant influence of domain boundaries within the material. Over a range of RH values, we employ (23)Na solid-state NMR on the counterions to complement detailed structural studies by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. RH-dependent pulsed-field-gradient (PFG) NMR diffusion studies on both water and the wedge amphiphiles show multiple components, corresponding to species diffusing within LC domains as well as in the domain boundaries that compose 10% of the material. The rich transport and dynamical behaviors described here represent an important window into the world of supramolecular soft materials, carrying implications for optimization of these materials in many venues. Cubic phases present at high RH show fast transport of water (2 × 10(-10) m(2)/s), competitive with that observed in benchmark polymeric ion conductors. Understanding the self-assembly of these supramolecular building blocks shows promise for generating cross-linked membranes with fast ion conduction for applications such as next-generation batteries. PMID:24555816

  2. Desiccation tolerance in Anopheles coluzzii: the effects of spiracle size and cuticular hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Arcaz, Arthur C; Huestis, Diana L; Dao, Adama; Yaro, Alpha S; Diallo, Moussa; Andersen, John; Blomquist, Gary J; Lehmann, Tovi

    2016-06-01

    The African malaria mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii range over forests and arid areas, where they withstand dry spells and months-long dry seasons, suggesting variation in their desiccation tolerance. We subjected a laboratory colony (G3) and wild Sahelian mosquitoes during the rainy and dry seasons to desiccation assays. The thoracic spiracles and amount and composition of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of individual mosquitoes were measured to determine the effects of these traits on desiccation tolerance. The relative humidity of the assay, body water available, rate of water loss and water content at death accounted for 88% of the variation in desiccation tolerance. Spiracle size did not affect the rate of water loss or desiccation tolerance of the colony mosquitoes, as was the case for the total CHCs. However, six CHCs accounted for 71% of the variation in desiccation tolerance and three accounted for 72% of the variation in the rate of water loss. Wild A. coluzzii exhibited elevated desiccation tolerance during the dry season. During that time, relative thorax and spiracle sizes were smaller than during the rainy season. A smaller spiracle size appeared to increase A. coluzzii's desiccation tolerance, but was not statistically significant. Seasonal changes in CHC composition were detected in Sahelian A. coluzzii Stepwise regression models suggested the effect of particular CHCs on desiccation tolerance. In conclusion, the combination of particular CHCs along with the total amount of CHCs is a primary mechanism conferring desiccation tolerance in A. coluzzii, while variation in spiracle size might be a secondary mechanism. PMID:27207644

  3. Desiccation tolerance in Anopheles coluzzii: the effects of spiracle size and cuticular hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Arcaz, Arthur C.; Huestis, Diana L.; Dao, Adama; Yaro, Alpha S.; Diallo, Moussa; Andersen, John; Blomquist, Gary J.; Lehmann, Tovi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The African malaria mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii range over forests and arid areas, where they withstand dry spells and months-long dry seasons, suggesting variation in their desiccation tolerance. We subjected a laboratory colony (G3) and wild Sahelian mosquitoes during the rainy and dry seasons to desiccation assays. The thoracic spiracles and amount and composition of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) of individual mosquitoes were measured to determine the effects of these traits on desiccation tolerance. The relative humidity of the assay, body water available, rate of water loss and water content at death accounted for 88% of the variation in desiccation tolerance. Spiracle size did not affect the rate of water loss or desiccation tolerance of the colony mosquitoes, as was the case for the total CHCs. However, six CHCs accounted for 71% of the variation in desiccation tolerance and three accounted for 72% of the variation in the rate of water loss. Wild A. coluzzii exhibited elevated desiccation tolerance during the dry season. During that time, relative thorax and spiracle sizes were smaller than during the rainy season. A smaller spiracle size appeared to increase A. coluzzii's desiccation tolerance, but was not statistically significant. Seasonal changes in CHC composition were detected in Sahelian A. coluzzii. Stepwise regression models suggested the effect of particular CHCs on desiccation tolerance. In conclusion, the combination of particular CHCs along with the total amount of CHCs is a primary mechanism conferring desiccation tolerance in A. coluzzii, while variation in spiracle size might be a secondary mechanism. PMID:27207644

  4. Revisiting the Phoenix TECP data: Implications for regolith control of near-surface humidity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Chevrier, Vincent F.

    2015-06-01

    We analyze the recalibrated in situ humidity measurements by the Phoenix lander, which landed at 68.2°N, 234.3°E and operated from Ls 78° through Ls 148°, ∼152 sols. Vapor pressures demonstrate significant day-night variations with values ranging from 0.005 Pa to 0.37 Pa, an order of magnitude lower than previously reported, and evening derived enthalpies less than that for a purely ice deposition-driven process, suggesting other water vapor sinks may contribute to the near-surface humidity at the martian polar regions.

  5. Desiccation tolerance of recalcitrant Theobroma cacao embryonic axes: the optimal drying rate and its physiological basis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y; Sun, W Q

    2000-11-01

    Recalcitrant seed axes were reported to survive to lower water contents under fast-drying conditions. The present study was to examine the hypothesis that drying rate and dehydration duration could interact to determine desiccation tolerance through different physico-chemical mechanisms. The effect of drying rate on desiccation tolerance of Theobroma cacao seed axes at 16 degrees C was examined. Rapid-drying at low relative humidity (RH) and slow-drying at high RH were more harmful to cocoa axes, because electrolyte leakage began to increase and axis viability began to decrease at high water contents. Maximum desiccation tolerance was observed with intermediate drying rates at RH between 88% and 91%, indicating the existence of an optimal drying rate or optimal desiccation duration. This maximum level of desiccation tolerance for cocoa axes (corresponding to a critical water potential of -9 MPa) was also detected using the equilibration method, in which axes were dehydrated over a series of salt solutions or glycerol solutions until the equilibrium. These data confirmed that the physiological basis of the optimal drying rate is related to both mechanical stress during desiccation and the length of desiccation duration during which deleterious reactions may occur. The optimal drying rate represents a situation where combined damages from mechanical and metabolic stresses become minimal. PMID:11113169

  6. Properties of a new liquid desiccant solution - Lithium chloride and calcium chloride mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Ertas, A.; Anderson, E.E.; Kiris, I. )

    1992-09-01

    Desiccants, broadly classified as solid and liquid desiccants, have the property of extracting and retaining moisture from air brought into contact with them. By using either type, moisture in the air is removed and the resulting dry air can be used for air-conditioning or drying purposes. Because of its properties, lithium chloride is the most stable liquid desiccant and has a large dehydration concentration (30% to 45%), but its cost is relatively high ($9.00-13.00 per kg). It is expected that lithium chloride will reduce the relative humidity to as low as 15%. Calcium chloride is the cheapest (45 cents per kg) and most readily available desiccant, but it has the disadvantage of being unstable depending on the air inlet conditions and the concentration of the desiccant in the solution. To stabilize calcium chloride and to decrease the high cost of lithium chloride, the two can be mixed in different weight combinations. The main objective of this research is to measure the physical properties of different combinations of this mixture such as density, viscosity, and vapor pressure which are necessary for analysis of heat and mass transfer in a packed tower desiccant-air contact system. The solubility of this new liquid desiccant under certain temperature-concentrations will also be studied.

  7. Desiccation tolerance in resurrection plants: new insights from transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dinakar, Challabathula; Bartels, Dorothea

    2013-01-01

    Most higher plants are unable to survive desiccation to an air-dried state. An exception is a small group of vascular angiosperm plants, termed resurrection plants. They have evolved unique mechanisms of desiccation tolerance and thus can tolerate severe water loss, and mostly adjust their water content with the relative humidity in the environment. Desiccation tolerance is a complex phenomenon and depends on the regulated expression of numerous genes during dehydration and subsequent rehydration. Most of the resurrection plants have a large genome and are difficult to transform which makes them unsuitable for genetic approaches. However, technical advances have made it possible to analyze changes in gene expression on a large-scale. These approaches together with comparative studies with non-desiccation tolerant plants provide novel insights into the molecular processes required for desiccation tolerance and will shed light on identification of orphan genes with unknown functions. Here, we review large-scale recent transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies that have been performed in desiccation tolerant plants and discuss how these studies contribute to understanding the molecular basis of desiccation tolerance. PMID:24348488

  8. A packed bed dehumidifier/regenerator for solar air conditioning with liquid desiccants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factor, H. M.; Grossman, G.

    1980-01-01

    A packed column air-liquid contactor has been studied in application to air dehumidification and regeneration in solar air conditioning with liquid desiccants. A theoretical model has been developed to predict the performance of the device under various operating conditions. Computer simulations based on the model are presented which indicate the practical range of air to liquid flux ratios and associated changes in air humidity and desiccant concentration. An experimental apparatus has been constructed and experiments performed with Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) and Lithium Bromide as desiccants. MEG experiments have yielded inaccurate results and have pointed out some practical problems associated with the use of Glycols. LiBr experiments show very good agreement with the theoretical model. Preheating of the air is shown to greatly enhance desiccant regeneration. The packed column yields good results as a dehumidifier/regenerator, provided pressure drop can be reduced with the use of suitable packing.

  9. Accurate calibration and control of relative humidity close to 100% by X-raying a DOPC multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yicong; Ghosh, Sajal K.; Bera, Sambhunath; Jiang, Zhang; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Lurio, Laurence B.; Sinha, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Here in this study, we have designed a compact sample chamber that can achieve accurate and continuous control of the relative humidity (RH) in the vicinity of 100%. A 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) multilayer can be used as a humidity sensor by measuring its inter-layer repeat distance (d-spacing) via X-ray diffraction. We convert from DOPC d-spacing to RH according to a theory given in the literature and previously measured data of DOPC multilamellar vesicles in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solutions. This curve can be used for calibration of RH close to 100%, a regime where conventional sensors do not have sufficient accuracy. We demonstrate that this control method can provide RH accuracies of 0.1 to 0.01%, which is a factor of 10–100 improvement compared to existing methods of humidity control. Our method provides fine tuning capability of RH continuously for a single sample, whereas the PVP solution method requires new samples to be made for each PVP concentration. The use of this cell also potentially removes the need for an X-ray or neutron beam to pass through bulk water if one wishes to work close to biologically relevant conditions of nearly 100% RH.

  10. Accurate calibration and control of relative humidity close to 100% by X-raying a DOPC multilayer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Yicong; Ghosh, Sajal K.; Bera, Sambhunath; Jiang, Zhang; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Lurio, Laurence B.; Sinha, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Here in this study, we have designed a compact sample chamber that can achieve accurate and continuous control of the relative humidity (RH) in the vicinity of 100%. A 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) multilayer can be used as a humidity sensor by measuring its inter-layer repeat distance (d-spacing) via X-ray diffraction. We convert from DOPC d-spacing to RH according to a theory given in the literature and previously measured data of DOPC multilamellar vesicles in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solutions. This curve can be used for calibration of RH close to 100%, a regime where conventional sensors do not have sufficient accuracy. We demonstratemore » that this control method can provide RH accuracies of 0.1 to 0.01%, which is a factor of 10–100 improvement compared to existing methods of humidity control. Our method provides fine tuning capability of RH continuously for a single sample, whereas the PVP solution method requires new samples to be made for each PVP concentration. The use of this cell also potentially removes the need for an X-ray or neutron beam to pass through bulk water if one wishes to work close to biologically relevant conditions of nearly 100% RH.« less

  11. Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

    1991-07-01

    The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Slow dehydration promotes desiccation and freeze tolerance in the Antarctic midge Belgica antarctica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adaptations to low moisture availability are arguably as important as cold resistance for polar terrestrial invertebrates, especially because water, in the form of ice, is biologically inaccessible for much of the year. Desiccation responses under ecologically realistic soil humidity conditions – t...

  13. The evolution of desiccation-tolerance in angiosperm plants, a rare yet common phenomenon!

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a minute proportion of angiosperm species, rehydrating foliage can revive from airdryness or even from equilibration with air of ~0% relative humidity. Such desiccation tolerance is known from vegetative cells of some species of algae and of major groups close to the evolutionary path of the angi...

  14. High Efficiency Liquid-Desiccant Regenerator for Air Conditioning and Industrial Drying

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Lowenstein

    2005-12-19

    Over 2 quads of fossil fuels are used each year for moisture removal. This includes industrial and agricultural processes where feedstocks and final products must be dried, as well as comfort conditioning of indoor spaces where the control of humidity is essential to maintaining healthy, productive and comfortable working conditions. Desiccants, materials that have a high affinity for water vapor, can greatly reduce energy use for both drying and dehumidification. An opportunity exists to greatly improve the competitiveness of advanced liquid-desiccant systems by increasing the efficiency of their regenerators. It is common practice within the chemical process industry to use multiple stage boilers to improve the efficiency of thermal separation processes. The energy needed to regenerate a liquid desiccant, which is a thermal separation process, can also be reduced by using a multiple stage boiler. In this project, a two-stage regenerator was developed in which the first stage is a boiler and the second stage is a scavenging-air regenerator. The only energy input to this regenerator is the natural gas that fires the boiler. The steam produced in the boiler provides the thermal energy to run the second-stage scavenging-air regenerator. This two-stage regenerator is referred to as a 1?-effect regenerator. A model of the high-temperature stage of a 1?-effect regenerator for liquid desiccants was designed, built and successfully tested. At nominal operating conditions (i.e., 2.35 gpm of 36% lithium chloride solution, 307,000 Btu/h firing rate), the boiler removed 153 lb/h of water from the desiccant at a gas-based efficiency of 52.9 % (which corresponds to a COP of 0.95 when a scavenging-air regenerator is added). The steam leaving the boiler, when condensed, had a solids concentration of less than 10 ppm. This low level of solids in the condensate places an upper bound of about 6 lb per year for desiccant loss from the regenerator. This low loss will not create

  15. Academics explore humidity's benefits.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Dave

    2008-11-01

    The effects of humidification on hospital superbugs are being explored by some of the UK's top academics, in what Dave Mortimer, national sales manager for Vapac Humidity Control, explains are the UK's first such studies. PMID:19044148

  16. The limits and frontiers of desiccation-tolerant life.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Peter

    2005-11-01

    Drying to equilibrium with the air is lethal to most species of animals and plants, making drought (i.e., low external water potential) a central problem for terrestrial life and a major cause of agronomic failure and human famine. Surprisingly, a wide taxonomic variety of animals, microbes, and plants do tolerate complete desiccation, defined as water content below 0.1 g H(2)O g(-1) dry mass. Species in five phyla of animals and four divisions of plants contain desiccation-tolerant adults, juveniles, seeds, or spores. There seem to be few inherent limits on desiccation tolerance, since tolerant organisms can survive extremely intense and prolonged desiccation. There seems to be little phylogenetic limitation of tolerance in plants but may be more in animals. Physical constraints may restrict tolerance of animals without rigid skeletons and to plants shorter than 3 m. Physiological constraints on tolerance in plants may include control by hormones with multiple effects that could link tolerance to slow growth. Tolerance tends to be lower in organisms from wetter habitats, and there may be selection against tolerance when water availability is high. Our current knowledge of limits to tolerance suggests that they pose few obstacles to engineering tolerance in prokaryotes and in isolated cells and tissues, and there has already been much success on this scientific frontier of desiccation tolerance. However, physical and physiological constraints and perhaps other limits may explain the lack of success in extending tolerance to whole, desiccation-sensitive, multicellular animals and plants. Deeper understanding of the limits to desiccation tolerance in living things may be needed to cross this next frontier. PMID:21676818

  17. Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant Modules Designed to Integrate with Standard Unitary Rooftop Package Equipment - Final Report: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J

    2004-03-15

    This report summarizes the investigation of two active desiccant module (ADM) pilot site installations initiated in 2001. Both pilot installations were retrofits at existing facilities served by conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems that had encountered frequent humidity control, indoor air quality (IAQ), and other operational problems. Each installation involved combining a SEMCO, Inc., ADM (as described in Fischer and Sand 2002) with a standard packaged rooftop unit built by the Trane Company. A direct digital control (DDC) system integral to the ADM performed the dual function of controlling the ADM/rooftop combination and facilitating data collection, trending, and remote performance monitoring. The first installation involved providing preconditioned outdoor air to replace air exhausted from the large kitchen hood and bathrooms of a Hooters restaurant located in Rome, Georgia. This facility had previously added an additional rooftop unit in an attempt to achieve occupant comfort without success. The second involved conditioning the outdoor air delivered to each room of a wing of the Mountain Creek Inn at the Callaway Gardens resort. This hotel, designed in the ''motor lodge'' format with each room opening to the outdoors, is located in southwest Georgia. Controlling the space humidity always presented a serious challenge. Uncomfortable conditions and musty odors had caused many guests to request to move to other areas within the resort. This is the first field demonstration performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory where significant energy savings, operating cost savings, and dramatically improved indoor environmental conditions can all be claimed as the results of a retrofit desiccant equipment field installation. The ADM/rooftop combination installed at the restaurant resulted in a reduction of about 34% in the electricity used by the building's air-conditioning system. This represents a reduction of approximately 15% in

  18. Analysis of Heat and Mass Transfer in a Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Murase, Sousuke; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao; Okajima, Jirou; Matsuoka, Fumio

    The study aims at clarifying the local heat and mass transfer in the desiccant rotor, and at obtaining the design aspects of high efficient desiccant rotor and operation method. In the paper, theoretical analysis is performed for rotary dehumidifier. Both surface diffusion and mass transfer coefficient are considered in the model. It is examined that the results of calculation agree well with the experimental data. The local temperature, humidity and the amount of adsorbed water vapor are calculated. It is clarified that temperature and humidity of air in the rotor change clockwise between each inlet air condition on the psychrometric chart. The outlet temperature and humidity distribution of the rotor is clarified in the system showing the optimum rotor speed. Furthermore, it is clarified that local desorption rate is higher than adsorption rate. It is attributed to the increase of mass transfer coefficient and surface diffusivity of the rotor during desorption process. And, it is clarified that the influence of surface diffusion on amount of adsorbed water vapor is much larger than that of mass transfer coefficient.

  19. Viscosity controls humidity dependence of N2O5 uptake to citric acid aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržinić, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Berkemeier, T.; Türler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous loss of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to aerosol particles has a significant impact on the night-time nitrogen oxide cycle and therefore the oxidative capacity in the troposphere. Using a 13N short-lived radioactive tracer method, we studied the uptake kinetics of N2O5 on citric acid aerosol particles as a function of relative humidity (RH). The results show that citric acid exhibits lower reactivity than similar dicarboxylic and polycarboxylic acids, with uptake coefficients between ∼ 3 × 10-4-∼ 3 × 10-3 depending on humidity (17-70 % RH). At RH above 50 %, the magnitude and the humidity dependence can be best explained by the viscosity of citric acid as compared to aqueous solutions of simpler organic and inorganic solutes and the variation of viscosity with RH and, hence, diffusivity in the organic matrix. Since the diffusion rates of N2O5 in highly concentrated citric acid solutions are not well established, we present four different parameterizations of N2O5 diffusivity based on the available literature data or estimates for viscosity and diffusivity of H2O. Above 50 % RH, uptake is consistent with the reacto-diffusive kinetic regime whereas below 50 % RH, the uptake coefficient is higher than expected from hydrolysis of N2O5 within the bulk of the particles, and the uptake kinetics is most likely limited by loss on the surface only. This study demonstrates the impact of viscosity in highly oxidized and highly functionalized secondary organic aerosol material on the heterogeneous chemistry of N2O5 and may explain some of the unexpectedly low loss rates to aerosol derived from field studies.

  20. Enclosed Chambers for Humidity Control And Sample Containment in Fiber Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Kendall, A.; Tanaka, M.; Weissman, J.S.; Stubbs, G.

    2009-05-26

    A chamber and stretch frame for making fibers for diffraction is described. The chamber is made from a simple plastic cuvette with silicon nitride windows. It is suitable for maintaining constant humidity during fiber drying and data collection, and allows stretching of the fiber and exposure to magnetic fields during sample preparation. If necessary, it provides primary containment for toxic and infectious biological materials. The chamber has been used in fiber diffraction experiments with filamentous plant viruses and a yeast prion protein, and is shown to produce excellent orientation and to maintain hydration and order at the molecular level.

  1. Enclosed chambers for humidity control and sample containment in fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Kendall, A.; Tanaka, M.; Weissman, J.S.; Stubbs, G.

    2008-11-03

    A chamber and stretch frame for making fibers for diffraction is described. The chamber is made from a simple plastic cuvette with silicon nitride windows. It is suitable for maintaining constant humidity during fiber drying and data collection, and allows stretching of the fiber and exposure to magnetic fields during sample preparation. If necessary, it provides primary containment for toxic and infectious biological materials. The chamber has been used in fiber diffraction experiments with filamentous plant viruses and a yeast prion protein, and is shown to produce excellent orientation and to maintain hydration and order at the molecular level.

  2. Seasonal changes in humidity impact drought resistance in tropical Drosophila leontia: testing developmental effects of thermal versus humidity changes.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam

    2014-03-01

    Drosophila leontia is native to highly humid equatorial tropical habitats but its desiccation sensitivity (~10h) is not consistent with its abundance during the drier autumn season in the subtropical regions. We have tested the effects of developmental acclimation on desiccation resistance and water balance related traits of D. leontia collected during rainy and autumn seasons. The isofemale lines of seasonal populations were reared under ecologically relevant growth temperatures (18 or 26 °C) or humidity conditions (35 or 85% RH) but tested at different times under identical experimental conditions. The larvae as well as flies reared under two thermal conditions (18 or 26 °C) showed no effect on desiccation related traits as well as storage and utilization of energy metabolites. In contrast, for D. leontia reared under low humidity (35% RH), significant changes at larval as well adult stages include increase in the desiccation resistance as well as cuticular lipid quantity, reduced levels of rate of body water loss, higher storage of carbohydrates but lower rate of utilization of carbohydrates as compared with flies reared at high humidity (85% RH). D. leontia has responded to rearing under low humidity conditions by increasing its desiccation resistance but not due to changes in the growth temperatures. These laboratory observations on seasonal populations highlight differences due to rearing conditions but not due to seasons. Further, direct analysis of wild-caught seasonal populations has shown trends similar to developmental acclimation effects. For wild caught flies, there are significant seasonal differences i.e. higher desiccation resistance as well as cuticular lipid quantity but reduced rate of water loss for autumn than rainy season flies. Thus, our laboratory observations are relevant for understanding seasonal adaptations of natural populations of tropical D. leontia to wet-dry conditions in the wild. PMID:24345458

  3. Theoretical study of the effect of liquid desiccant mass flow rate on the performance of a cross flow parallel-plate liquid desiccant-air dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Abdulrahman Th.; Mat, Sohif Bin; Sulaiman, M. Y.; Sopian, K.; Al-abidi, Abduljalil A.

    2013-11-01

    A computer simulation using MATLAB is investigated to predict the distribution of air stream parameters (humidity ratio and temperature) as well as desiccant parameters (temperature and concentration) inside the parallel plate absorber. The present absorber consists of fourteen parallel plates with a surface area per unit volume ratio of 80 m2/m3. Calcium chloride as a liquid desiccant flows through the top of the plates to the bottom while the air flows through the gap between the plates making it a cross flow configuration. The model results show the effect of desiccant mass flow rate on the performance of the dehumidifier (moisture removal and dehumidifier effectiveness). Performance comparisons between present cross-flow dehumidifier and another experimental cross-flow dehumidifier in the literature are carried out. The simulation is expected to help in optimizing of a cross flow dehumidifier.

  4. Advanced solar/gas desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huskey, B.; Sharp, J.; Venero, A.; Yen, M.

    1982-02-01

    A desiccant cooling system with significantly higher thermal efficiency than current state of the art desiccant systems is studied. The findings and data are based on extensive computer modeling and actual operating test results of an experimental breadboard unit employing an approach developed for the separation of moisture from an airstream using solid desiccants (silica gel). The results confirmed the theoretical concept of efficiency improvement over desiccant concepts and validated the computer model used for sizing and simulating the desiccant process. The results also identified specific components and areas of the system needing improvements such as air seals, wheel drive mechanisms, air distribution and materials.

  5. Acoustic Humidity Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Kwack, Eug Y.; Venkateshan, Shakkottai

    1990-01-01

    Industrial humidity sensor measures volume fraction of water in air via its effect on speed of sound. Only portion of sensor exposed to sensed atmosphere is pair of stainless-steel tubes, one containing dry air and other containing moist air. Counters measure intervals between reflected pulses. Sensor rugged enough for use in harsh environments like those used to control drying of paper in paper mills, where most humidity sensors do not survive.

  6. Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air-Conditioning: Demonstrated Performance and Cost Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.; Lowenstein, A.

    2014-09-01

    Cooling loads must be dramatically reduced when designing net-zero energy buildings or other highly efficient facilities. Advances in this area have focused primarily on reducing a building's sensible cooling loads by improving the envelope, integrating properly sized daylighting systems, adding exterior solar shading devices, and reducing internal heat gains. As sensible loads decrease, however, latent loads remain relatively constant, and thus become a greater fraction of the overall cooling requirement in highly efficient building designs, particularly in humid climates. This shift toward latent cooling is a challenge for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Traditional systems typically dehumidify by first overcooling air below the dew-point temperature and then reheating it to an appropriate supply temperature, which requires an excessive amount of energy. Another dehumidification strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove water from air more efficiently; however, these systems are large and increase fan energy consumption due to the increased airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors. A third dehumidification strategy involves high flow liquid desiccant systems. These systems require a high maintenance separator to protect the air distribution system from corrosive desiccant droplet carryover and so are more commonly used in industrial applications and rarely in commercial buildings. Both solid desiccant systems and most high-flow liquid desiccant systems (if not internally cooled) add sensible energy which must later be removed to the air stream during dehumidification, through the release of sensible heat during the sorption process.

  7. Single-crystal and humidity-controlled powder diffraction study of the breathing effect in a metal-organic framework upon water adsorption/desorption.

    PubMed

    Aríñez-Soriano, Javier; Albalad, Jorge; Vila-Parrondo, Christian; Pérez-Carvajal, Javier; Rodríguez-Hermida, Sabina; Cabeza, Aurelio; Juanhuix, Jordi; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2016-05-26

    Herein we report a study on water adsorption/desorption-triggered single-crystal to single-crystal transformations in a MOF, by single-crystal and humidity-controlled powder X-ray diffraction and water-sorption measurements. We identified a gate-opening effect at a relative humidity of 85% upon water adsorption, and a gate-closure effect at a relative humidity of 55 to 77% upon water desorption. This reversible breathing effect between the "open" and the "closed" structures of the MOF involves the cleavage and formation of several coordination bonds. PMID:27228426

  8. A generic protocol for protein crystal dehydration using the HC1b humidity controller.

    PubMed

    Lobley, Carina M C; Sandy, James; Sanchez-Weatherby, Juan; Mazzorana, Marco; Krojer, Tobias; Nowak, Radosław P; Sorensen, Thomas L

    2016-05-01

    Dehydration may change the crystal lattice and affect the mosaicity, resolution and quality of X-ray diffraction data. A dehydrating environment can be generated around a crystal in several ways with various degrees of precision and complexity. This study uses a high-precision crystal humidifier/dehumidifier to provide an airstream of known relative humidity in which the crystals are mounted: a precise yet hassle-free approach to altering crystal hydration. A protocol is introduced to assess the impact of crystal dehydration systematically applied to nine experimental crystal systems. In one case, that of glucose isomerase, dehydration triggering a change of space group from I222 to P21212 was observed. This observation is supported by an extended study of the behaviour of the glucose isomerase crystal structure during crystal dehydration. PMID:27139626

  9. Impact of Residential Mechanical Ventilation on Energy Cost and Humidity Control

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing whole house mechanical ventilation as part of the Building Ameerica program's systems engineered approach to constructing housing has been an important subject of the program's research. Ventilation in residential buildings is one component of an effective, comprehensive strategy for creation and maintenance of a comfortable and healthy indoor air environment. The study described in this report is based on building energy modeling with an important focus on the indoor humidity impacts of ventilation. The modeling tools used were EnergyPlus version 7.1 (E+) and EnergyGauge USA (EGUSA). Twelve U.S. cities and five climate zones were represented. A total of 864 simulations (2*2*3*3*12= 864) were run using two building archetypes, two building leakage rates, two building orientations, three ventilation systems, three ventilation rates, and twelve climates.

  10. Impact of Residential Mechanical Ventilation on Energy Cost and Humidity Control

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.

    2014-01-01

    The DOE Building America program has been conducting research leading to cost effective high performance homes since the early 1990's. Optimizing whole house mechanical ventilation as part of the program's systems engineered approach to constructing housing has been an important subject of the program's research. Ventilation in residential buildings is one component of an effective, comprehensive strategy for creation and maintenance of a comfortable and healthy indoor air environment. The study described in this white paper is based on building energy modeling with an important focus on the indoor humidity impacts of ventilation. The modeling tools used were EnergyPlus version 7.1 (E+) and EnergyGauge USA (EGUSA). Twelve U.S. cities and five climate zones were represented. A total of 864 simulations (2*2*3*3*12= 864) were run using two building archetypes, two building leakage rates, two building orientations, three ventilation systems, three ventilation rates, and twelve climates.

  11. A generic protocol for protein crystal dehydration using the HC1b humidity controller

    PubMed Central

    Lobley, Carina M. C.; Sandy, James; Sanchez-Weatherby, Juan; Mazzorana, Marco; Krojer, Tobias; Nowak, Radosław P.; Sorensen, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration may change the crystal lattice and affect the mosaicity, resolution and quality of X-ray diffraction data. A dehydrating environment can be generated around a crystal in several ways with various degrees of precision and complexity. This study uses a high-precision crystal humidifier/dehumidifier to provide an airstream of known relative humidity in which the crystals are mounted: a precise yet hassle-free approach to altering crystal hydration. A protocol is introduced to assess the impact of crystal dehydration systematically applied to nine experimental crystal systems. In one case, that of glucose isomerase, dehydration triggering a change of space group from I222 to P21212 was observed. This observation is supported by an extended study of the behaviour of the glucose isomerase crystal structure during crystal dehydration. PMID:27139626

  12. Hydroclimatic controls on non-stationary stream water ages in humid tropical catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkel, Christian; Geris, Josie; Molina, Maria Jose; Mendez, Carlos; Arce, Rafael; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Streams in humid tropical countries provide a wide range of ecosystem services, yet a good understanding of their hydrological functioning is severely limited by lack of data. The transit time of water is a fundamental characteristic of catchment functioning and can often be related to water quality dynamics, thus providing potentially important information for water managers in these environments. In this study, we applied the widely used lumped convolution integral model in a moving window approach to acknowledge the time-variance of transit time distributions (TTD) and resulting moments such as the mean transit time (MTT). We show that for a two-year (2012-2014) rainfall-runoff stable isotope record from almost daily sampling in a humid tropical 30 km2 catchment in southern Costa Rica, the MTTs are generally short (< one year), but exhibit distinct inter and intra-annual patterns. The drier year (2012-13), which was under the influence of El-Niño causing less precipitation, exhibited MTTs up to one year. In contrast, the wetter year (2013-14) resulted in MTT estimates <100 days. Similar patterns were found at an intra-annual scale: the dry season MTTs were on average 185 days and only 15 days during the wet season. This can be explained by high rainfall volumes (> 3m/year) and events occurring throughout the year, the seasonality of rainfall and distinct moisture origin (Pacific, Atlantic and land surface), the likely dominance of quick near-surface flow paths and relatively low subsurface storage of the underlying volcanic and sedimentary rocks. The moisture origin of rainfall was found to be the most dominant driver of time-variable TTDs as indicated by the changing average wind directions following the transition from the dry into the wet season. This isotope study revealed a highly dynamic system that is likely to be sensitive to environmental change.

  13. Adsorption / Desorption Behavior of Water Vapor in an Adsorbent Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor onto desiccant rotor has been investigated to improve the desiccant cooling system by means of computer simulation. In this paper, we paid attention to the relationship between the equilibrium amount of water adsorbed onto the desiccant material and the relative humidity, that is adsorption isotherm as a principal characteristic feature of adsorbent. Considering actual adsorbents, five types of adsorption isotherms were assumed to clarify the influence of adsorption isotherm on the dehumidifying performance. After the investigation on the influences of some operating conditions on the dehumidifying performance at each selected adsorption isotherm, it was found that higher dehumidifying performance and reduction of length of desiccant rotor could be achieved by selecting appropriate adsorption isotherm. It was also predicted that S-shaped adsorption isotherm which is raised sharply at relative humidity around 15 % could produce the lowest air humidity at regeneration air temperature 80 °C. Moreover influence of the intraparticle diffusion coefficient which significantly influence on the adsorption / desorption rate was discussed choosing two adsorption isotherm from the above five isotherms. It seems that effective range of the intraparticle diffusion coefficient for the significant improvement of the dehumidifying performance was strongly influenced by the shape of adsorption isotherm.

  14. Control of Relative Air Humidity as a Potential Means to Improve Hygiene on Surfaces: A Preliminary Approach with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zoz, Fiona; Iaconelli, Cyril; Lang, Emilie; Iddir, Hayet; Guyot, Stéphane; Grandvalet, Cosette; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Relative air humidity fluctuations could potentially affect the development and persistence of pathogenic microorganisms in their environments. This study aimed to characterize the impact of relative air humidity (RH) variations on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium persisting on food processing plant surfaces. To assess conditions leading to the lowest survival rate, four strains of L. monocytogenes (EGDe, CCL500, CCL128, and LO28) were exposed to different RH conditions (75%, 68%, 43% and 11%) with different drying kinetics and then rehydrated either progressively or instantaneously. The main factors that affected the survival of L. monocytogenes were RH level and rehydration kinetics. Lowest survival rates between 1% and 0.001% were obtained after 3 hours of treatment under optimal conditions (68% RH and instantaneous rehydration). The survival rate was decreased under 0.001% after prolonged exposure (16h) of cells under optimal conditions. Application of two successive dehydration and rehydration cycles led to an additional decrease in survival rate. This preliminary study, performed in model conditions with L. monocytogenes, showed that controlled ambient RH fluctuations could offer new possibilities to control foodborne pathogens in food processing environments and improve food safety. PMID:26840373

  15. Characterizing moisture-dependent mechanical properties of organic materials: humidity-controlled static and dynamic nanoindentation of wood cell walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertinetti, Luca; Hangen, Ude D.; Eder, Michaela; Leibner, Petra; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Nanoindentation is an ideal technique to study local mechanical properties of a wide range of materials on the sub-micron scale. It has been widely used to investigate biological materials in the dry state; however, their properties are strongly affected by their moisture content, which until now has not been consistently controlled. In the present study, we developed an experimental set-up for measuring local mechanical properties of materials by nanoindentation in a controlled environment of relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The significance of this new approach in studying biological materials was demonstrated for the secondary cell wall layer (S2) in Spruce wood (Picea abies). The hardness of the cell wall layer decreased from an average of approximately 0.6 GPa at 6% RH down to approximately 0.2 GPa at 79% RH, corresponding to a reduction by a factor of 3. Under the same conditions, the indentation modulus also decreased by about 40%. The newly designed experimental set-up has a strong potential for a variety of applications involving the temperature- and humidity-dependent properties of biological and artificial organic nanocomposites.

  16. Rapid desiccation hardening changes the cuticular hydrocarbon profile of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Stinziano, Joseph R; Sové, Richard J; Rundle, Howard D; Sinclair, Brent J

    2015-02-01

    The success of insects in terrestrial environments is due in large part to their ability to resist desiccation stress. Since the majority of water is lost across the cuticle, a relatively water-impermeable cuticle is a major component of insect desiccation resistance. Cuticular permeability is affected by the properties and mixing effects of component hydrocarbons, and changes in cuticular hydrocarbons can affect desiccation tolerance. A pre-exposure to a mild desiccation stress increases duration of desiccation survival in adult female Drosophila melanogaster, via a decrease in cuticular permeability. To test whether this acute response to desiccation stress is due to a change in cuticular hydrocarbons, we treated male and female D. melanogaster to a rapid desiccation hardening (RDH) treatment and used gas chromatography to examine the effects on cuticular hydrocarbon composition. RDH led to reduced proportions of unsaturated and methylated hydrocarbons compared to controls in females, but although RDH modified the cuticular hydrocarbon profile in males, there was no coordinated pattern. These data suggest that the phenomenon of RDH leading to reduced cuticular water loss occurs via an acute change in cuticular hydrocarbons that enhances desiccation tolerance in female, but not male, D. melanogaster. PMID:25460832

  17. Design and Testing of a Controller for the Martian Atmosphere Pressure and Humidity Instrument DREAMS-P/H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapani Nikkanen, Timo; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri

    2013-04-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA), driven by the goal of performing a soft landing on Mars, is planning to launch the Entry, descent and landing Demonstrator Module (EDM)[1] simultaneously with the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) as a part of the ExoMars program towards Mars in 2016. As a secondary objective, the EDM will gather meteorological data and observe the electrical environment of the landing site with its Dust characterisation, Risk assessment, and Environmental Analyser on the Martian Surface (DREAMS). The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) is participating in the project by designing, building and testing a pressure and a humidity instrument for Mars, named DREAMS-P and DREAMS-H, respectively. The instruments are based on previous FMI designs, including ones flown on board the Huygens, Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory.[2] Traditionally, the FMI pressure and humidity instruments have been controlled by an FPGA. However, the need to incorporate more autonomy and modifiability into instruments, cut the development time and component costs, stimulated interest to study a Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Microcontroller Unit (MCU) based instrument design. Thus, in the DREAMS-P/H design, an automotive MCU is used as the instrument controller. The MCU has been qualified for space by tests in and outside FMI. The DREAMS-P/H controller command and data interface utilizes a RS-422 connection to receive telecommands from and to transmit data to the Central Electronics Unit (CEU) of the DREAMS science package. The two pressure transducers of DREAMS-P and one humidity transducer of DREAMS-H are controlled by a single MCU. The MCU controls the power flow for each transducer and performs pulse counting measurements on sensor and reference channels to retrieve scientific data. Pressure and humidity measurements are scheduled and set up according to a configuration table assigned to each transducer. The configuration tables can be modified during the flight. The whole

  18. Tailoring the grooved texture of electrospun polystyrene nanofibers by controlling the solvent system and relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanjun; Huang, Chen; Jin, Xiangyu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have successfully fabricated electrospun polystyrene (PS) nanofibers having a diameter of 326 ± 50 nm with a parallel grooved texture using a mixed solvent of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). We discovered that solvent system, solution concentration, and relative humidity were the three key factors to the formation of grooved texture and the diameter of nanofibers. We demonstrated that grooved nanofibers with desired properties (e.g., different numbers of grooves, widths between two adjacent grooves, and depths of grooves) could be electrospun under certain conditions. When THF/DMF ratio was higher than 2:1, the formation mechanism of single grooved texture should be attributed to the formation of voids on the jet surface at the early stage of electrospinning and subsequent elongation and solidification of the voids into a line surface structure. When THF/DMF ratio was 1:1, the formation mechanism of grooved texture should be ascribed to the formation of wrinkled surface on the jet surface at the early stage of electrospinning and subsequent elongation into a grooved texture. Such findings can serve as guidelines for the preparation of grooved nanofibers with desired secondary morphology. PMID:25114643

  19. Tailoring the grooved texture of electrospun polystyrene nanofibers by controlling the solvent system and relative humidity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have successfully fabricated electrospun polystyrene (PS) nanofibers having a diameter of 326 ± 50 nm with a parallel grooved texture using a mixed solvent of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). We discovered that solvent system, solution concentration, and relative humidity were the three key factors to the formation of grooved texture and the diameter of nanofibers. We demonstrated that grooved nanofibers with desired properties (e.g., different numbers of grooves, widths between two adjacent grooves, and depths of grooves) could be electrospun under certain conditions. When THF/DMF ratio was higher than 2:1, the formation mechanism of single grooved texture should be attributed to the formation of voids on the jet surface at the early stage of electrospinning and subsequent elongation and solidification of the voids into a line surface structure. When THF/DMF ratio was 1:1, the formation mechanism of grooved texture should be ascribed to the formation of wrinkled surface on the jet surface at the early stage of electrospinning and subsequent elongation into a grooved texture. Such findings can serve as guidelines for the preparation of grooved nanofibers with desired secondary morphology. PMID:25114643

  20. Closed cycle desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernev, D. I.; Emerson, D. T.

    1986-10-01

    The breadboard prototype of a closed cycle desiccant cooling system was designed, constructed and its performance tested. The system combines the sorption properties of solid zeolite/refrigerant vapor pairs with the principle of regenerative heat exchangers. Since solid zeolites are difficult to move in vacuum tight containers and in order to avoid intermittent operation, the desiccant is housed in two separate containers which are alternately heated and cooled by a heat transfer fluid. Using the principle of energy regeneration, the heat removed from the container being cooled is recycled in the container being heated. The breadboard system, with 90 pounds of zeolite, demonstrated a recycling efficiency of 75%, while the system capacity was 2,000 Btu/hr. This significantly increased the system thermal Coefficient of Performance (COP) to 1.1 at ARI conditions from the single container thermal COP of 0.4.

  1. Field Test and Performance Verification: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Installed in a School - Final Report: Phase 4A

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J

    2005-12-21

    This report summarizes the results of a field verification pilot site investigation that involved the installation of a hybrid integrated active desiccant/vapor-compression rooftop heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) unit at an elementary school in the Atlanta Georgia area. For years, the school had experienced serious humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) problems that had resulted in occupant complaints and microbial (mold) remediation. The outdoor air louvers of the original HVAC units had been closed in an attempt to improve humidity control within the space. The existing vapor compression variable air volume system was replaced by the integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) system that was described in detail in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report published in 2004 (Fischer and Sand 2004). The IADR system and all space conditions have been monitored remotely for more than a year. The hybrid system was able to maintain both the space temperature and humidity as desired while delivering the outdoor air ventilation rate required by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Standard 62. The performance level of the IADR unit and the overall system energy efficiency was measured and found to be very high. A comprehensive IAQ investigation was completed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute before and after the system retrofit. Before-and-after data resulting from this investigation confirmed a significant improvement in IAQ, humidity control, and occupant comfort. These observations were reported by building occupants and are echoed in a letter to ORNL from the school district energy manager. The IADR system was easily retrofitted in place of the original rooftop system using a custom curb adapter. All work was completed in-house by the school's maintenance staff over one weekend. A subsequent cost analysis completed for the school district by the design engineer of record concluded that the IADR system

  2. Photovoltaic-electrodialysis regeneration method for liquid desiccant cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiu-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Song

    2009-12-15

    Liquid desiccant cooling system (LDCS) is an (a novel) air-conditioning system with good energy saving potential. Regenerator is the power centre for LDCS. Currently, the regeneration process is always fuelled by thermal energy. Nevertheless, this regeneration pattern has some disadvantages in that its performance will become poor when the surrounding atmosphere is of high humidity, and the heat provided for regeneration will be unfavourable to the following dehumidification process. To ameliorate that, a new regeneration method is proposed in this paper: a membrane regenerator is employed to regenerate the liquid desiccant in an electrodialysis way; while solar photovoltaic generator is adopted to supply electric power for this process. Analysis has been made about this new regeneration method and the result reveals: this new manner achieves good stability with the immunity against the adverse impact from the outside high humidity; its performance is much higher than that of the thermal regeneration manner while putting aside the low efficiency of the photovoltaic system. Besides, purified water can be obtained in company with the regeneration process. (author)

  3. Controlling Growth Rates of Protein Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, Frederick T.; Herren, Blair J.

    1987-01-01

    Apparatus enables control of humidity in chamber to control rates of growth of crystalline samples of protein. Size of drop of solution from which protein is grown made larger or smaller by condensation or evaporation of water. Situated between desiccant and water source, drop of protein solution shrinks or swells, according to which valve operator opens. Growing protein crystal viewed through polarizing film. Readily adapted to automation.

  4. Development of a Ventilation and Air-conditioning System using Fixed Bed Desiccant Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Takahiko; Akisawa, Atsushi; Ueda, Yuki; Shindoh, Shinji; Godo, Masazumi; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    The study investigated fixed bed desiccant units for ventilation and air-conditioning. The role of the system is the dehumidification of the outdoor fresh air to be supplied to an air-conditioned room. Hence, the latent heat load of the air-conditioner in the room can be mitigated. The system consisted of two pairs of a desiccant unit and a heat storage unit. The microwave irradiation to the desiccant unit was examined as a candidate of the regeneration method of the system, and the performance of the microwave regeneration was compared with that of the hot air regeneration in terms of the supply air humidity ratio, outdoor air based COP, and the process air temperatures. The results revealed the effects of the switching time and the irradiation timing on the performance of the microwave irradiation.

  5. Numerical investigation of transient heat and mass transfer in a parallel-flow liquid-desiccant absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Gerardo

    2010-12-01

    Liquid desiccant systems have received significant attention as a way to reduce latent loads. Tests of liquid desiccant systems in humid climates have shown significant reductions in energy consumption. As moisture in the air is absorbed at the dehumidifier, the temperature of the liquid desiccant increases due to the addition of heat from the enthalpy of condensation of the water vapor. Thus, the coupled effects of heat and mass transfer are relevant for these applications. A two-dimensional mathematical model of the transient heat and mass transfer for an absorber where a thin film of liquid desiccant flows down its walls and dehumidifies the air in parallel-flow configuration is developed and the dynamics of the modeled system are analyzed.

  6. Analytical determination of PID coefficients for temperature and humidity control during cooling and dehumidifying by compressor and evaporator fan speed variation

    SciTech Connect

    Krakow, K.I.; Lin, S.; Zeng, Z.S.

    1995-08-01

    A linearized analysis of temperature and relative humidity control using proportional-integral-differential (PID) controls to vary compressor motor speed and evaporator fan speed enables analytical determination of suitable PID coefficients. The PID coefficients are related to refrigeration system performance parameters and the volume of the conditioned space. Analytical determination of coefficients may eliminate or supplement trial-and-error methods. System response characteristics--damping ratios and periods--are related to PID coefficients, sampling intervals, performance parameters of a refrigeration system, and the volume of a conditioned space. Two control strategies are possible in order to control space temperature and relative humidity simultaneously. One strategy controls temperature by varying compressor speed and controls relative humidity by varying evaporator fan speed. The other strategy controls temperature by varying evaporator fan speed and controls relative humidity by varying compressor fan speed The first strategy was successfully implemented experimentally as well as by simulation. The second strategy was not successfully implemented due to an adverse interaction between the two control systems.

  7. Kinetic Interpretation of Water Vapor Adsorption-Desorption Behavior of a Desiccant Rotor Showing S-shaped Adsorption Isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kumiko; Oshima, Kazunori; Takewaki, Takahiko; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor containing an iron aluminophosphate type zeolite FAM-Z01 (Functional Adsorbent Material Zeolite 01) was experimentally investigated for humidity swing. This rotor exhibited an S-shaped adsorption isotherm with its temperature dependence. Humidity swing, using a small piece of the rotor, could be usefully applied to interpret adsorption / desorption mechanisms by observing their rates. The most significant finding was that the adsorption / desorption rates in humidity swing could be described by the amount of adsorption, temperature and amplitude of the humidity swing, not by cycle time. Also, using the liner driving force (LDF) model, the overall mass transfer coefficient changed with the elapse of time or with the amount of adsorbed water. This implied that the LDF model, considering constant value of the overall mass transfer coefficient, was probably unable to explain the water adsorption / desorption behavior of FAM-Z01 desiccant rotor.

  8. Desiccant cooling system performance: A simple approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, M.; Grolmes, M. A.

    1982-10-01

    The wave nature of heat and mass transfer in fixed desiccant bed adsorption is explained. A simple algebraic model of wave motion under single low desiccant bed operation is developed and applied to the prediction of the performance potential of the overall desiccant cooling system. The model is used to explain the increase in cooling system performance that is realized through the use of mixed inert desiccant material adsorption beds. The response of cooling system performance to changes in external process conditions is examined and conclusions are drawn relative to optimization of system characteristics.

  9. Comparative Expression Profiling of Desiccation Tolerant and Sensitive Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought tolerance and desiccation tolerance have often been cited as manifestations of the same mechanism: desiccation tolerance being the extreme form of drought tolerance. However, there is a fundamental difference between drought and desiccation tolerance; drought tolerance mechanisms include way...

  10. Aquatic insects dealing with dehydration: do desiccation resistance traits differ in species with contrasting habitat preferences?

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, Josefa; Millán, Andrés; Bilton, David T.; Arribas, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Desiccation resistance shapes the distribution of terrestrial insects at multiple spatial scales. However, responses to drying stress have been poorly studied in aquatic groups, despite their potential role in constraining their distribution and diversification, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions. Methods We examined desiccation resistance in adults of four congeneric water beetle species (Enochrus, family Hydrophilidae) with contrasting habitat specificity (lentic vs. lotic systems and different salinity optima from fresh- to hypersaline waters). We measured survival, recovery capacity and key traits related to desiccation resistance (fresh mass, % water content, % cuticle content and water loss rate) under controlled exposure to desiccation, and explored their variability within and between species. Results Meso- and hypersaline species were more resistant to desiccation than freshwater and hyposaline ones, showing significantly lower water loss rates and higher water content. No clear patterns in desiccation resistance traits were observed between lotic and lentic species. Intraspecifically, water loss rate was positively related to specimens’ initial % water content, but not to fresh mass or % cuticle content, suggesting that the dynamic mechanism controlling water loss is mainly regulated by the amount of body water available. Discussion Our results support previous hypotheses suggesting that the evolution of desiccation resistance is associated with the colonization of saline habitats by aquatic beetles. The interespecific patterns observed in Enochrus also suggest that freshwater species may be more vulnerable than saline ones to drought intensification expected under climate change in semi-arid regions such as the Mediterranean Basin.

  11. Trehalose as an indicator of desiccation stress in Drosophila melanogaster larvae: A potential marker of anhydrobiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Thorat, Leena J.; Gaikwad, Sushama M.; Nath, Bimalendu B.

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report confirming anhydrobiosis in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis and accumulation in larvae that hydrolyzed on rehydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis in concert with the enzymes involved in trehalose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of trehalose hydrolysis in presence of a specific trehalase inhibitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose proposed as a reliable marker for biomonitoring of climate change studies. -- Abstract: In the current scenario of global climate change, desiccation is considered as one of the major environmental stressors for the biota exposed to altered levels of ambient temperature and humidity. Drosophila melanogaster, a cosmopolitan terrestrial insect has been chosen as a humidity-sensitive bioindicator model for the present study since its habitat undergoes frequent stochastic and/or seasonally aggravated dehydration regimes. We report here for the first time the occurrence of anhydrobiosis in D. melanogaster larvae by subjecting them to desiccation stress under laboratory conditions. Larvae desiccated for ten hours at <5% relative humidity could enter anhydrobiosis and could revive upon rehydration followed by resumption of active metabolism. As revealed by FTIR and HPLC analyzes, our findings strongly indicated the synthesis and accumulation of trehalose in the desiccating larvae. Biochemical measurements pointed out the desiccation-responsive trehalose metabolic pathway that was found to be coordinated in concert with the enzymes trehalose 6-phosphate synthase and trehalase. Further, an inhibitor-based experimental approach using deoxynojirimycin, a specific trehalase inhibitor, demonstrated the pivotal role of trehalose in larval anhydrobiosis of D. melanogaster. We therefore propose trehalose as a potential marker for the assessment of anhydrobiosis in Drosophila. The present findings thus add

  12. Transcriptional Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Desiccation and Rehydration†

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinder; Kumar, Deept; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Singhal, Vibha; Jervis, Jody; Garst, James F.; Slaughter, Stephen M.; DeSantis, Andrea M.; Potts, Malcolm; Helm, Richard F.

    2005-01-01

    A transcriptional analysis of the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4743 to controlled air-drying (desiccation) and subsequent rehydration under minimal glucose conditions was performed. Expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and the glyoxylate cycle was observed to increase during drying and remained in this state during the rehydration phase. When the BY4743 expression profile for the dried sample was compared to that of a commercially prepared dry active yeast, strikingly similar expression changes were observed. The fact that these two samples, dried by different means, possessed very similar transcriptional profiles supports the hypothesis that the response to desiccation is a coordinated event independent of the particular conditions involved in water removal. Similarities between “stationary-phase-essential genes” and those upregulated during desiccation were also noted, suggesting commonalities in different routes to reduced metabolic states. Trends in extracellular and intracellular glucose and trehalose levels suggested that the cells were in a “holding pattern” during the rehydration phase, a concept that was reinforced by cell cycle analyses. Application of a “redescription mining” algorithm suggested that sulfur metabolism is important for cell survival during desiccation and rehydration. PMID:16332871

  13. Two Hymenophyllaceae species from contrasting natural environments exhibit a homoiochlorophyllous strategy in response to desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    Flores-Bavestrello, Alejandra; Król, Marianna; Ivanov, Alexander G; Hüner, Norman P A; García-Plazaola, José Ignacio; Corcuera, Luis J; Bravo, León A

    2016-02-01

    Hymenophyllaceae is a desiccation tolerant family of Pteridophytes which are poikilohydric epiphytes. Their fronds are composed by a single layer of cells and lack true mesophyll cells and stomata. Although they are associated with humid and shady environments, their vertical distribution varies along the trunk of the host plant with some species inhabiting the drier sides with a higher irradiance. The aim of this work was to compare the structure and function of the photosynthetic apparatus during desiccation and rehydration in two species, Hymenophyllum dentatum and Hymenoglossum cruentum, isolated from a contrasting vertical distribution along the trunk of their hosts. Both species were subjected to desiccation and rehydration kinetics to analyze frond phenotypic plasticity, as well as the structure, composition and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Minimal differences in photosynthetic pigments were observed upon dehydration. Measurements of ϕPSII (effective quantum yield of PSII), ϕNPQ (quantum yield of the regulated energy dissipation of PSII), ϕNO (quantum yield of non-regulated energy dissipation of PSII), and TL (thermoluminescence) indicate that both species convert a functional photochemical apparatus into a structure which exhibits maximum quenching capacity in the dehydrated state with minimal changes in photosynthetic pigments and polypeptide compositions. This dehydration-induced conversion in the photosynthetic apparatus is completely reversible upon rehydration. We conclude that H. dentatum and H. cruentum are homoiochlorophyllous with respect to desiccation stress and exhibited no correlation between inherent desiccation tolerance and the vertical distribution along the host tree trunk. PMID:26720213

  14. Soil desiccation rate integration into empirical dust emission models for polymer suppressant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sunyoung; Inyang, Hilary I; De Brito Galvão, T C; Mbamalu, Godwin E

    2006-04-30

    Dust constitutes an environmental and human health menace in many regions of the world. The rate of soil desiccation is a significant determinant of the availability of fine soil particles for entrainment in air as dust. Dust suppressants such as polymer solutions can reduce soil desiccation rate, thereby reducing dust emission factor. Herein, a dust emission estimation methodology that involves the integration of desiccation time curves to find the average desiccation rate is formulated. This is combined with soil characteristics, stressor (environmental and possibly vehicle) characteristics and liquid content in soil to estimate potential emission factors. Using this methodology, the dust suppression potential of aqueous polyethylene oxide (PEO) solution was investigated experimentally with Na-montmorillonite (Na-mmt) as the model dust-generating material. PEO with a molecular weight of 8 x 10(6) and at aqueous concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 10 g/L, was mixed with 10 g of Na-mmt (surface area=31.82+/-0.22 m2/g) and desiccated for 700 h in a specially designed chamber at 25 degrees C and 30% relative humidity. The results show that generally, aqueous PEO is superior to distilled water as a dust suppressant for Na-mmt at concentrations in the range of 0.5-2.0 g/L. The experimental data obtained are introduced into the formulated estimation methodology, and potential emissions of dust from PEO-admixed Na-mmt are determined. PMID:16442727

  15. Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2011-02-23

    The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

  16. Analysis of solar desiccant systems and concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, R.

    1981-05-01

    The modeling of desiccant systems is described. Computer programs for predicting the performance of silica gel beds in single-blow situations and in cyclically operating desiccant cooling systems (DESSIM) are presented. The single-blow model has been validated and shows excellent agreement with experimental data. Experimental data published by Koh are shown along with the corresponding prediction using DESSIM.

  17. Monitoring Vadose Zone Desiccation with Geophysical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2013-05-01

    Soil desiccation was recently field tested as a potential vadose zone remediation technology. Desiccation removes water from the vadose zone and significantly decreases the aqueous-phase permeability of the desiccated zone, thereby decreasing movement of moisture and contaminants. The 2-D and 3-D distribution of moisture content reduction over time provides valuable information for desiccation operations and for determining when treatment goals have been reached. This type of information can be obtained through use of geophysical methods. Neutron moisture logging, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography, and cross-hole ground penetrating radar approaches were evaluated with respect to their ability to provide effective spatial and temporal monitoring of desiccation during a treatability study conducted in the vadose zone of the DOE Hanford Site in WA.

  18. Options of desiccant cooling and dehumidification technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kweller, E. ); Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The recent CFC issue regarding the depleting of ozone layer and the greenhouse effect has become an impetus in research and development work for non-CFC air conditioning alternatives. Desiccant cooling is considered a good candidate for replacement of vapor compression chillers. A review of the present status of the desiccant based systems indicate that the technology has significantly advanced in recent years, and has become one of the most promising alternatives. New and better desiccants have been developed and novel cycles and more efficient system designs have been studied. As a result, the thermal coefficient of performance (COP) of desiccant cooling systems has been revised from around 0.6 to 1.0 or higher. These advances coupled with potentially reduced production cost could become very competitive with conventional systems in the near future. This study gives a review of the present status of desiccant materials, system designs, and computer models. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  19. [Desiccation tolerance in seeds of Prosopisferox and Pterogyne nitens (Fabaceae)].

    PubMed

    Morandini, Marcelo Nahuel; Giamminola, Eugenia Mabel; de Viana, Marta Leonor

    2013-03-01

    The high number of endemisms and species diversity together with the accelerated biodiversity loss by deforestation, especially in North Western Argentina, points out the need to work on species conservation combining ex situ and in situ strategies. The aim of this work was to study the desiccation tolerance in seeds of P ferox and P nitens for long term ex situ conservation at the Germplasm Bank of Native Species (BGEN) of the National University of Salta (Argentina). The fruits were collected from ten individuals in P ferox at the National Park Los Cardones and from two sites (Orán and Rivadavia) for P nitens. Desiccation tolerance was assessed following previous established methodologies. The moisture content (MC) of the seeds was determined by keeping them in oven at 103 degreeC and weighting the samples at different intervals till constant weight. Germination essays were carried out with two treatments (control and scarification), with different seed MC (fresh, 10-12%, 3-5%) and in desiccated seeds (3-5% MC) stored six months at -20 degreeC. The MC in P ferox seeds was 14.2% and 10% in P nitens, for both populations studied. Percentage germination in P ferox was higher in the scarification treatments (<82%). The difference between treatments increased with the reduction in MC and the storage for six months at -20 degreeC. Fresh seeds of P nitens do not need scarification treatment, but it is required with the reduction in MC and storage. Mean germination percentage of desiccated seeds stored six months at -20 degreeC was similar in both populations and greater than 82%.We concluded that both species are probably orthodox because seeds tolerated desiccation to 3-5% and storage for six months at -20 degree C. PMID:23894986

  20. Performance Characterization and Simulation of Amine-Based Vacuum Swing Adsorption Units for Spacesuit Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Watts,Carly; Anderson, Molly; McMillin, Summer; Boerman, Craig; Colunga, Aaron; Vogel, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Controlling carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) concentrations in the vapor phase of a space suit is critical to ensuring an astronauts safety, comfortability, and capability to perform extra-vehicular activity (EVA) tasks. Historically, this has been accomplished using lithium hydroxide (LiOH) and metal oxides (MetOx). Lithium hydroxide is a consumable material and requires priming with water before it becomes effective at removing carbon dioxide. MetOx is regenerable through a power-intensive thermal cycle but is significantly heavier on a volume basis than LiOH. As an alternative, amine-based vacuum swing beds are under aggressive development for EVA applications which control atmospheric concentrations of both CO2 and H2O through a fully-regenerative process. The current concept, referred to as the rapid cycle amine (RCA), has resulted in numerous laboratory prototypes. Performance of these prototypes have been assessed and documented from experimental and theoretical perspectives. To support developmental efforts, a first principles model has also been established for the vacuum swing adsorption technology. The efforts documented herein summarize performance characterization and simulation results for several variable metabolic profiles subjected to the RCA. Furthermore, a variety of control methods are explored including timed swing cycles, instantaneous CO2 feedback control, and time-averaged CO2 feedback control. A variety of off-nominal tests are also explored including high/low suit temperatures, increasingly high humidity cases, and dynamic pressure cases simulating the suit pre-breathe protocol. Consequently, this work builds on efforts previous efforts to fully bound the performance of the rapid cycle amine under a variety of nominal and off-nominal conditions.

  1. Light, temperature, and desiccation effects on photosynthetic activity, and drought-induced ultrastructural changes in the green alga Klebsormidium dissectum (Streptophyta) from a high alpine soil crust.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Ulf; Holzinger, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Members of the cosmopolitan green algal genus Klebsormidium (Klebsormidiales, Streptophyta) are typical components of terrestrial microbiotic communities such as biological soil crusts, which have many important ecological functions. In the present study, Klebsormidium dissectum (Gay) Ettl & Gärtner was isolated from a high alpine soil crust in the Tyrolean Alps, Austria. Physiological performance in terms of growth and photosynthesis was investigated under different controlled abiotic conditions and compared with ultrastructural changes under the treatments applied. K. dissectum showed very low light requirements as reflected in growth patterns and photosynthetic efficiency. Increasing temperatures from 5°C to 40°C led to different effects on respiratory oxygen consumption and photosynthetic oxygen evolution. While at low temperatures (5-10°C), respiration was not detectable or on a very low level, photosynthesis was relatively high, Reversely, at the highest temperature, respiration was unaffected, and photosynthesis strongly inhibited pointing to strong differences in temperature sensitivity between both physiological processes. Although photosynthetic performance of K. dissectum was strongly affected under short-term desiccation and recovered only partly after rehydration, this species was capable to survive even 3 weeks at 5% relative air humidity. K. dissectum cells have a cell width of 5.6 ± 0.3 μm and a cell length of 8.4 ± 2.0 μm. Desiccated cells showed a strongly reduced cell width (46% of control) and cell length (65% of control). In addition, in desiccated cells, fewer mitochondria were stained by DIOC(6), and damaged plasma membranes were detected by FM 1-43 staining. High-pressure freeze fixation as well as chemical fixation allowed visualizing ultrastructural changes caused by desiccation. In such cells, the nucleus and chloroplast were still visibly intact, but the extremely thin cell walls (75-180 nm) were substantially

  2. Testing of an Amine-Based Pressure-Swing System for Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Amy; Smith, Frederick; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey; Graf, John; Nalette, Tim; Papale, William; Campbell, Melissa; Lu, Sao-Dung

    2007-01-01

    In a crewed spacecraft environment, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and moisture control is crucial. Hamilton Sundstrand has developed a stable and efficient amine-based CO2 and water vapor sorbent, SA9T, that is well-suited for use in a spacecraft environment. The sorbent is efficiently packaged in pressure-swing regenerable beds that are thermally linked to improve removal efficiency and minimize vehicle thermal loads. Flows are all controlled with a single spool valve. This technology has been baselined for the new Orion spacecraft. However, more data was needed on the operational characteristics of the package in a simulated spacecraft environment. A unit was therefore tested with simulated metabolic loads in a closed chamber at Johnson Space Center during the last third of 2006. Tests were run at a variety of cabin temperatures and with a range of operating conditions varying cycle time, vacuum pressure, air flow rate, and crew activity levels. Results of this testing are presented and potential flight operational strategies discussed.

  3. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Soil Desiccation for Vadose Zone Remediation: Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andy L.; Oostrom, Mart; Bacon, Diana H.

    2008-02-04

    Apart from source excavation, the options available for the remediation of vadose zone metal and radionuclide contaminants beyond the practical excavation depth (0 to 15 m) are quite limited. Of the available technologies, very few are applicable to the deep vadose zone with the top-ranked candidate being soil desiccation. An expert panel review of the work on infiltration control and supplemental technologies identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be overcome before soil desiccation could be deployed. The report documents some of the research conducted in the last year to fill these knowledge gaps. This work included 1) performing intermediate-scale laboratory flow cell experiments to demonstrate the desiccation process, 2) implementing a scalable version of Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases–Water-Air-Energy (STOMP-WAE), and 3) performing numerical experiments to identify the factors controlling the performance of a desiccation system.

  4. Advancements in oxygen generation and humidity control by water vapor electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Sudar, M.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Regenerative processes for the revitalization of manned spacecraft atmospheres or other manned habitats are essential for realization of long-term space missions. These processes include oxygen generation through water electrolysis. One promising technique of water electrolysis is the direct conversion of the water vapor contained in the cabin air to oxygen. This technique is the subject of the present program on water vapor electrolysis development. The objectives were to incorporate technology improvements developed under other similar electrochemical programs and add new ones; design and fabricate a mutli-cell electrochemical module and a testing facility; and demonstrate through testing the improvements. Each aspect of the water vapor electrolysis cell was reviewed. The materials of construction and sizing of each element were investigated analytically and sometime experimentally. In addition, operational considerations such as temperature control in response to inlet conditions were investigated. Three specific quantitative goals were established.

  5. Role of sigB and osmolytes in desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes in simulated food soils on the surface of food grade stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yannan; Ells, Timothy C; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2015-04-01

    This research aimed to determine whether the SigB (σ(B)) regulon and osmolytes impact the survival of the foodborne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, during desiccation in simulated food soils with varying salt and nutrient contents on food grade stainless steel (SS) surfaces. L. monocytogenes 568 (Lm568, serotype 1/2a), its isogenic sigB mutant (ΔsigB) and the back-complemented ΔsigB were desiccated in BHI, TSB with 1% glucose (TSB-glu), peptone physiological saline (PPS) and minimal media (MM) for 21 days at 43% relative humidity (RH) and 15 °C on SS. The effect of food related osmolytes (proline, betaine and carnitine) on desiccation survival was studied by (a) pre-culturing strains in MM with an osmolyte followed by desiccation in MM and (b) by desiccating strains in MM with an osmolyte. Desiccation survival of L. monocytogenes was positively correlated to the nutrient and osmolyte concentrations in the desiccation substrates. Initial Lm568 levels of 8 Log(CFU/cm(2)) decreased by 0.9 Log(CFU/cm(2)) in BHI and 1.1-2.9 Log(CFU/cm(2)) in TSB-glu, PPS and MM after 21 days. Comparatively, the initial survival of ΔsigB was reduced in PS and MM, while no differences were observed among the three strains in BHI and TSB-glu. Pre-culture in osmolyte containing MM enhanced (p < 0.05) desiccation survival of all strains. Desiccation in osmolyte-containing MM improved desiccation survival of all strains, albeit the protection was less than that observed after pre-culture with the osmolytes. Complementation of the ΔsigB mutant restored the wildtype phenotype. In conclusion, this work shows the protective effect of osmolytes in desiccation survival of L. monocytogenes, while the σ(B) regulon only improved the initial survival in nutrient and osmolyte poor environments. PMID:25475314

  6. Testing of an Amine-Based Pressure-Swing System for Carbon Dioxide and Humidity Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Amy B.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.; Smith, Frederick D.

    2006-01-01

    Hamilton Sundstrand has developed a stable and efficient amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) sorbent, SA9T, that is well-suited for use in a spacecraft environment. The sorbent is efficiently packaged in pressure-swing regenerable beds that are thermally linked to improve removal efficiency and minimize vehicle thermal loads, and the flows are all controlled with a single spool valve. The SA9T sorbent technology has already been baselined for the new Orion spacecraft. However, more data was needed on the operational characteristics of the package in a simulated spacecraft environment. This amine-based technology, referred to as the CO2 And Moisture Removal Amine Swing-bed (CAMRAS) by the Exploration Life Support Air Team at Johnson Space Center (JSC), was tested at JSC during the last third of 2006. Two series of tests on the CAMRAS were performed at simulated metabolic loads of four and/or six crewmen in a closed chamber. Tests were run at a variety of cabin temperatures and with a range of operating conditions varying cycle time, available vacuum pressure, blower speed, and crew activity levels. Results of this testing are presented and potential flight operational strategies discussed.

  7. Radiative-dynamical and microphysical processes of thin cirrus clouds controlling humidity of air entering the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Tra; Fueglistaler, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Thin cirrus clouds in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) are of great interest due to their role in the control of water vapor and temperature in the TTL. Previous research on TTL cirrus clouds has focussed mainly on microphysical processes, specifically the ice nucleation mechanism and dehydration efficiency. Here, we use a cloud resolving model to analyse the sensitivity of TTL cirrus characteristics and impacts with respect to microphysical and radiative processes. A steady-state TTL cirrus cloud field is obtained in the model forced with dynamical conditions typical for the TTL (2-dimensional setup with a Kelvin-wave temperature perturbation). Our model results show that the dehydration efficiency (as given by the domain average relative humidity in the layer of cloud occurrence) is relatively insensitive to the ice nucleation mechanism, i.e. homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation. Rather, TTL cirrus affect the water vapor entering the stratosphere via an indirect effect associated with the cloud radiative heating and dynamics. Resolving the cloud radiative heating and the radiatively induced circulations approximately doubles the domain average ice mass. The cloud radiative heating is proportional to the domain average ice mass, and the observed increase in domain average ice mass induces a domain average temperature increase of a few Kelvin. The corresponding increase in water vapor entering the stratosphere is estimated to be about 30 to 40%.

  8. Development Status of Amine-based, Combined Humidity, CO2, and Trace Contaminant Control System for CEV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Fred; Perry, Jay; Nalette, Tim; Papale, William

    2006-01-01

    Under a NASA-sponsored technology development project, a multi-disciplinary team consisting of industry, academia, and government organizations lead by Hamilton Sundstrand is developing an amine-based humidity and CO2 removal process and prototype equipment for Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) applications. Originally this project sought to research enhanced amine formulations and incorporate a trace contaminant control capability into the sorbent. In October 2005, NASA re-directed the project team to accelerate the delivery of hardware by approximately one year and emphasize deployment on board the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) as the near-term developmental goal. Preliminary performance requirements were defined based on nominal and off-nominal conditions and the design effort was initiated using the baseline amine sorbent, SA9T. As part of the original project effort, basic sorbent development was continued with the University of Connecticut and dynamic equilibrium trace contaminant adsorption characteristics were evaluated by NASA. This paper summarizes the University sorbent research effort, the basic trace contaminant loading characteristics of the SA9T sorbent, design support testing, and the status of the full-scale system hardware design and manufacturing effort.

  9. Relation between Water Vapor Adsorption Isotherms and Dynamic Dehumidification Performances of Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koji; Matsuguma, Shingo; Jin, Wei-Li; Okano, Hiroshi; Teraoka, Yasutake; Hirose, Tsutomu

    Desiccant rotors with different water vapor adsorption properties were fabricated by the synthesis of silica gels inside the honeycomb matrices. Dynamic dehumidification performances of the rotors were measured under different conditions and they were discussed in relation to water vapor adsorption isotherms. At the reactivation air temperatures of 80 and 140 oC, the best dynamic performance was observed with the rotor on which the adsorbed amount of water vapor at lower relative humidity was highest. When the reactivation air temperature was 50 oC, on the other hand, the rotor of which the isotherm exhibited monotonic and nearly linear increase up to higher relative humidity was the most suitable. The normalized changes of absolute humidity and adsorbed amount were defined, and these phenomena were analyzed. When the dependences of both parameters against the relative humidity were similar, the rotor showed the best dehumidification performance.

  10. Thermal Inactivation of Desiccation-Adapted Salmonella spp. in Aged Chicken Litter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhao; Diao, Junshu; Dharmasena, Muthu; Ionita, Claudia; Rieck, James

    2013-01-01

    Thermal inactivation of desiccation-adapted Salmonella spp. in aged chicken litter was investigated in comparison with that in a nonadapted control to examine potential cross-tolerance of desiccation-adapted cells to heat treatment. A mixture of four Salmonella serovars was inoculated into the finished compost with 20, 30, 40, and 50% moisture contents for a 24-h desiccation adaptation. Afterwards, the compost with desiccation-adapted cells was inoculated into the aged chicken litter with the same moisture content for heat treatments at 70, 75, 80, 85, and 150°C. Recovery media were used to allow heat-injured cells to resuscitate. A 5-log reduction in the number of the desiccation-adapted cells in aged chicken litter with a 20% moisture content required >6, >6, ∼4 to 5, and ∼3 to 4 h of exposure at 70, 75, 80, and 85°C, respectively. As a comparison, a 5-log reduction in the number of nonadapted control cells in the same chicken litter was achieved within ∼1.5 to 2, ∼1 to 1.5, ∼0.5 to 1, and <0.5 h at 70, 75, 80, and 85°C, respectively. The exposure time required to obtain a 5-log reduction in the number of desiccation-adapted cells gradually became shorter as temperature and moisture content were increased. At 150°C, desiccation-adapted Salmonella cells survived for 50 min in chicken litter with a 20% moisture content, whereas control cells were detectable by enrichment for only 10 min. Our results demonstrated that the thermal resistance of Salmonella in aged chicken litter was increased significantly when the cells were adapted to desiccation. This study also validated the effectiveness of thermal processing being used for producing chicken litter free of Salmonella contamination. PMID:24014540

  11. Instrument uncertainty effect on calculation of absolute humidity using dewpoint, wet-bulb, and relative humidity sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Slayzak, S.J.; Ryan, J.P.

    1998-04-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s Advanced Desiccant Technology Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is characterizing the state-of-the-art in desiccant dehumidifiers, the key component of desiccant cooling systems. The experimental data will provide industry and end users with independent performance evaluation and help researchers assess the energy savings potential of the technology. Accurate determination of humidity ratio is critical to this work and an understanding of the capabilities of the available instrumentation is central to its proper application. This paper compares the minimum theoretical random error in humidity ratio calculation for three common measurement methods to give a sense of the relative maximum accuracy possible for each method assuming systematic errors can be made negligible. A series of experiments conducted also illustrate the capabilities of relative humidity sensors as compared to dewpoint sensors in measuring the grain depression of desiccant dehumidifiers. These tests support the results of the uncertainty analysis. At generally available instrument accuracies, uncertainty in calculated humidity ratio for dewpoint sensors is determined to be constant at approximately 2%. Wet-bulb sensors range between 2% and 6% above 10 g/kg (4%--15% below), and relative humidity sensors vary between 4% above 90% rh and 15% at 20% rh. Below 20% rh, uncertainty for rh sensors increases dramatically. Highest currently attainable accuracies bring dewpoint instruments down to 1% uncertainty, wet bulb to a range of 1%--3% above 10 g/kg (1.5%--8% below), and rh sensors between 1% and 5%.

  12. Water isotopes in desiccating lichens

    PubMed Central

    Cuntz, Matthias; Máguas, Cristina; Lakatos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of water is routinely used as a tracer to study water exchange processes in vascular plants and ecosystems. To date, no study has focussed on isotope processes in non-vascular, poikilohydric organisms such as lichens and bryophytes. To understand basic isotope exchange processes of non-vascular plants, thallus water isotopic composition was studied in various green-algal lichens exposed to desiccation. The study indicates that lichens equilibrate with the isotopic composition of surrounding water vapour. A model was developed as a proof of concept that accounts for the specific water relations of these poikilohydric organisms. The approach incorporates first their variable thallus water potential and second a compartmentation of the thallus water into two isotopically distinct but connected water pools. Moreover, the results represent first steps towards the development of poikilohydric organisms as a recorder of ambient vapour isotopic composition. PMID:19888598

  13. Water isotopes in desiccating lichens.

    PubMed

    Hartard, Britta; Cuntz, Matthias; Máguas, Cristina; Lakatos, Michael

    2009-12-01

    The stable isotopic composition of water is routinely used as a tracer to study water exchange processes in vascular plants and ecosystems. To date, no study has focussed on isotope processes in non-vascular, poikilohydric organisms such as lichens and bryophytes. To understand basic isotope exchange processes of non-vascular plants, thallus water isotopic composition was studied in various green-algal lichens exposed to desiccation. The study indicates that lichens equilibrate with the isotopic composition of surrounding water vapour. A model was developed as a proof of concept that accounts for the specific water relations of these poikilohydric organisms. The approach incorporates first their variable thallus water potential and second a compartmentation of the thallus water into two isotopically distinct but connected water pools. Moreover, the results represent first steps towards the development of poikilohydric organisms as a recorder of ambient vapour isotopic composition. PMID:19888598

  14. Assessment of the Microbial Control Measures for the Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Condensing Heat Exchanger of the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Steele, John W.; Marsh, Robert W.; Callahan, David M.; VonJouanne, Roger G.

    1999-01-01

    In August 1997 NASA/ Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) began a test with the objective of monitoring the growth of microorganisms on material simulating the surface of the International Space Station (ISS) Temperature and Humidity Control (THC) Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX). The test addressed the concerns of potential uncontrolled microbial growth on the surface of the THC CHX subsystem. For this study, humidity condensate from a closed manned environment was used as a direct challenge to the surfaces of six cascades in a test set-up. The condensate was collected using a Shuttle-type CHX within the MSFC End-Use Equipment Testing Facility. Panels in four of the six cascades tested were coated with the ISS CHX silver impregnated hydrophilic coating. The remainder two cascade panels were coated with the hydrophilic coating without the antimicrobial component, silver. Results of the fourteen-month study are discussed in this paper. The effects on the microbial population when drying vs. not-drying the simulated THC CHX surface are also discussed.

  15. Testing of novel desiccant materials and dehumidifier matrices for desiccant cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    This paper presents the results of testing of desiccant materials and dehumidifier matrices for desiccant cooling and dehumidification applications. In testing desiccant materials, we used a gravimetric technique to measure the moisture capacity of four desiccant materials. These materials were microporous silica gel powder, macroporous silica gel powder, polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt, and a silica-gel/epoxy composite. The microporous silica gel powder had the most desirable moisture capacity properties of the four materials tested for desiccant cooling applications. The polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt showed some promise. Our testing of dehumidifier matrices included measuring the pressure drop and heat- and mass-transfer rate characteristics of a silica-gel/corrugated dehumidifier matrix under conditions typical of desiccant cooling systems. The matrix is a section of a commercial dehumidifier. The transient dehumidification capacity of the matrix was calculated from the tests and compared with previously tested matrices. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Membrane humidity control investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, J.; Ruder, J.; Strumpf, H.

    1974-01-01

    The basic performance data on a hollow fiber membrane unit that removes water from a breathing gas loop by diffusion is presented. Using available permeability data for cellulose acetate, a preliminary design was made of a dehumidifier unit that would meet the problem statement.

  17. SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. Status report. Preliminary data on the performance of a rotary parallel-passage silica-gel dehumidifier

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, K.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. The facility can test bench-scale rotary dehumidifiers over a wide range of controlled conditions. We constructed and installed in the test loop a prototype parallel-passage rotary dehumidifier that has spirally wound polyester tape coated with silica gel. The initial tests gave satisfactory results indicating that approximately 90% of the silica gel was active and the overall Lewis number of the wheel was near unity. The facility has several minor difficulties including an inability to control humidity satisfactorily and nonuniform and highly turbulent inlet velocities. To completely validate the facility requires a range of dehumidifier designs. Several choices are available including constructing a second parallel-passage dehumidifier with the passage spacing more uniform.

  18. Maintenance or Collapse: Responses of Extraplastidic Membrane Lipid Composition to Desiccation in the Resurrection Plant Paraisometrum mileense

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Buzhu; Yu, Xiaomei; Li, Weiqi

    2014-01-01

    Resurrection plants usually grow in specific or extreme habitats and have the capacity to survive almost complete water loss. We characterized the physiological and biochemical responses of Paraisometrum mileense to extreme desiccation and found that it is a resurrection plant. We profiled the changes in lipid molecular species during dehydration and rehydration in P. mileense, and compared these with corresponding changes in the desiccation-sensitive plant Arabidopsis thaliana. One day of desiccation was lethal for A. thaliana but not for P. mileense. After desiccation and subsequent rewatering, A. thaliana showed dramatic lipid degradation accompanied by large increases in levels of phosphatidic acid (PA) and diacylglycerol (DAG). In contrast, desiccation and rewatering of P. mileense significantly decreased the level of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and increased the unsaturation of membrane lipids, without changing the level of extraplastidic lipids. Lethal desiccation in P. mileense caused massive lipid degradation, whereas the PA content remained at a low level similar to that of fresh leaves. Neither damage nor repair processes, nor increases in PA, occurred during non-lethal desiccation in P. mileense. The activity of phospholipase D, the main source of PA, was much lower in P. mileense than in A. thaliana under control conditions, or after either dehydration or rehydration. It was demonstrated that low rates of phospholipase D-mediated PA formation in P. mileense might limit its ability to degrade lipids to PA, thereby maintaining membrane integrity following desiccation. PMID:25068901

  19. Humidity and Buildings. Technical Paper No. 188.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutcheon, N. B.

    Modified and controlled relative humidity in buildings for certain occupancies is discussed. New criteria are used in determining the needs, desirability and problems associated with humidities in a building. Severe winter climate requires that special attention be given to the problems associated with increased indoor humidities during cold…

  20. Active Desiccant Dehumidification Module Integration with Rooftop Packaged HVAC

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J

    2002-04-17

    This report summarizes a research and development program that produced a stand-alone active desiccant module (ADM) that can be easily integrated with new or existing packaged cooling equipment. The program also produced a fully integrated hybrid system, combining the active desiccant section with a conventional direct expansion air-conditioning unit, that resulted in a compact, low-cost, energy-efficient end product. Based upon the results of this investigation, both systems were determined to be highly viable products for commercialization. Major challenges--including wheel development, compact packaging, regeneration burner development, control optimization, and low-cost design--were all successfully addressed by the final prototypes produced and tested as part of this program. Extensive laboratory testing was completed in the SEMCO laboratory for each of the two ADM system approaches. This testing confirmed the performance of the ADM systems to be attractive compared with that of alternate approaches currently used to precondition outdoor air, where a return air path is not readily available for passive desiccant recovery or where first cost is the primary design criterion. Photographs, schematics, and performance maps are provided for the ADM systems that were developed; and many of the control advantages are discussed. Based upon the positive results of this research and development program, field tests are under way for fully instrumented pilot installations of ADM systems in both a hotel/motel and a restaurant.

  1. DR1769, a Protein with N-Terminal Beta Propeller Repeats and a Low-Complexity Hydrophilic Tail, Plays a Role in Desiccation Tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S.

    2013-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m−2. These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions. PMID:23794625

  2. A new microscopic method to analyse desiccation-induced volume changes in aeroterrestrial green algae.

    PubMed

    Lajos, K; Mayr, S; Buchner, O; Blaas, K; Holzinger, A

    2016-08-01

    Aeroterrestrial green algae are exposed to desiccation in their natural habitat, but their actual volume changes have not been investigated. Here, we measure the relative volume reduction (RVRED ) in Klebsormidium crenulatum and Zygnema sp. under different preset relative air humidities (RH). A new chamber allows monitoring RH during light microscopic observation of the desiccation process. The RHs were set in the range of ∼4 % to ∼95% in 10 steps. RVRED caused by the desiccation process was determined after full acclimation to the respective RHs. In K. crenulatum, RVRED (mean ± SE) was 46.4 ± 1.9%, in Zygnema sp. RVRED was only 34.3 ± 2.4% at the highest RH (∼95%) tested. This indicates a more pronounced water loss at higher RHs in K. crenulatum versus Zygnema sp. By contrast, at the lowest RH (∼4%) tested, RVRED ranged from 75.9 ± 2.7% in K. crenulatum to 83.9 ± 2.2% in Zygnema sp. The final volume reduction is therefore more drastic in Zygnema sp. These data contribute to our understanding of the desiccation process in streptophytic green algae, which are considered the closest ancestors of land plants. PMID:27075881

  3. Adsorption/Desorption Behavior of Water Vapor in an Adsorbent Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Kodama, Akio

    To clarify the operating and design concept of desiccant rotor, which is a most important component of an adsorptive desiccant cooling process, adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor has been investigated by means of computer simulation. Mass transfer coefficient in the mathematical model could be related to cycle time by applying the penetration theory. Considering this relationship, influences of the rotation speed of the desiccant rotor, process / regeneration air velocity and their velocity ratio were investigated. It was found that the optimum rotation speed tended to disappear when the regeneration air temperature was low and its humidity was considerably small compared to the process inlet air, since the product air condition approached to regeneration air condition as the rotation speed increased. Decrease of the dehumidifying performance was observed at higher air velocity and the corresponding higher rotation speed since the adsorbent rotor was not fully regenerated due to shorter regeneration time and shorter residence time of process / regeneration air in the adsorbent rotor prevented the mass transfer between air and adsorbent. It was also found that the dehumidifying performance was not improved even though the adsorbent was fully regenerated by higher regeneration air velocity as the sensible heat transferred from the regeneration zone via adsorbent itself increased and disturbed adsorption.

  4. Potential Evaluation of Solar Heat Assisted Desiccant Hybrid Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thien Nha; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    The solar thermal driven desiccant dehumidification-absorption cooling hybrid system has superior advantage in hot-humid climate regions. The reasonable air processing of desiccant hybrid air conditioning system and the utility of clean and free energy make the system environment friendly and energy efficient. The study investigates the performance of the desiccant dehumidification air conditioning systems with solar thermal assistant. The investigation is performed for three cases which are combinations of solar thermal and absorption cooling systems with different heat supply temperature levels. Two solar thermal systems are used in the study: the flat plate collector (FPC) and the vacuum tube with compound parabolic concentrator (CPC). The single-effect and high energy efficient double-, triple-effect LiBr-water absorption cooling cycles are considered for cooling systems. COP of desiccant hybrid air conditioning systems are determined. The evaluation of these systems is subsequently performed. The single effect absorption cooling cycle combined with the flat plate collector solar system is found to be the most energy efficient air conditioning system.

  5. Rheological behaviors of edible casein-based packaging films under extreme environmental conditions, using humidity-controlled dynamic mechanical analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thin casein films for food packaging applications possess good strength and low oxygen permeability but low water-resistance and elasticity. Customizing the mechanical properties of the films to target specific behaviors depending on temperature and humidity changes would enable a variety of commerc...

  6. Effects of Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Vadose Zone Desiccation: Intermediate-scale Laboratory Experiments and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, Jacob H.; Truex, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry gas injection, is a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process to limit contaminant transport through the vadose zone. A series of four intermediate-scale flow cell experiments was conducted in homogeneous and simple layered heterogeneous porous medium systems to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on desiccation of unsaturated porous media. The permeability ratios of porous medium layers ranged from about five to almost two orders of magnitude. The insulated flow cell was equipped with twenty humidity and temperature sensors and a dual-energy gamma system was used to determine water saturations at various times. The multiphase code STOMP was used to simulate the desiccation process. Results show that injected dry gas flowed predominantly in the higher permeability layer and delayed water removal from the lower permeability material. For the configurations tested, water vapor diffusion from the lower to the higher permeability zone was considerable over the duration of the experiments, resulting in much larger relative humidity values of the outgoing air than based on permeability ratios alone. Acceptable numerical matches with the experimental data were obtained when an extension of the saturation-capillary pressure relation below the residual water saturation was used. The agreements between numerical and experimental results suggest that the correct physics are implemented in the simulator and that the thermal and hydraulic properties of the porous media, flow cell wall and insulation materials were properly represented.

  7. Adsorption/Desorption Behavior Of Water Vapor In An Adsorbent Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Kodama, Akio

    Desiccant cooling system can be driven with a low temperature heat such as around 80°C obtained from exhaust gas and so on. Among the configuration of the cooling cycle, honeycomb rotary adsorber is the most important part to achieve higher cooling performance. By means of computer simulation, angular and axial distributions of the amount of adsorbed water, air humidity, air temperature and adsorbent temperature inside the desiccant rotor at various operating conditions were investigated. In the mathematical model, lumped mass transfer coefficient was used and its value were derived from the fitting with experimental results to improve the reliability of discussion about the simultaneous heat/mass transfer in the desiccant rotor. It was found that the part of honeycomb rotary adsorber which is close to the regeneration air inlet cannot work well as an adsorbent at higher regeneration temperature regardless of outside air condition and regeneration air humidity. On the other hand, since the driving force was extremely low throughout all the axial positions, water vapor was adsorbed gradually at the whole axial position of rotor under a lower regeneration temperature. Consequently, this study could clarify the importance of the optimization of the rotor in terms of its length depending on the operating and air conditions.

  8. Evidence for the absence of enzymatic reactions in the glassy state. A case study of xanthophyll cycle pigments in the desiccation-tolerant moss Syntrichia ruralis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Kranner, Ilse; Sebastián, María San; Artetxe, Unai; Laza, José Manuel; Vilas, José Luis; Pritchard, Hugh W.; Nadajaran, Jayanthi; Míguez, Fátima; Becerril, José María; García-Plazaola, José Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Desiccation-tolerant plants are able to withstand dehydration and resume normal metabolic functions upon rehydration. These plants can be dehydrated until their cytoplasm enters a ‘glassy state’ in which molecular mobility is severely reduced. In desiccation-tolerant seeds, longevity can be enhanced by drying and lowering storage temperature. In these conditions, they still deteriorate slowly, but it is not known if deteriorative processes include enzyme activity. The storage stability of photosynthetic organisms is less studied, and no reports are available on the glassy state in photosynthetic tissues. Here, the desiccation-tolerant moss Syntrichia ruralis was dehydrated at either 75% or <5% relative humidity, resulting in slow (SD) or rapid desiccation (RD), respectively, and different residual water content of the desiccated tissues. The molecular mobility within dry mosses was assessed through dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, showing that at room temperature only rapidly desiccated samples entered the glassy state, whereas slowly desiccated samples were in a ‘rubbery’ state. Violaxanthin cycle activity, accumulation of plastoglobules, and reorganization of thylakoids were observed upon SD, but not upon RD. Violaxanthin cycle activity critically depends on the activity of violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE). Hence, it is proposed that enzymatic activity occurred in the rubbery state (after SD), and that in the glassy state (after RD) no VDE activity was possible. Furthermore, evidence is provided that zeaxanthin has some role in recovery apparently independent of its role in non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence. PMID:23761488

  9. Desiccation tolerance in Bryophytes: relevance to the evolution of desiccation tolerance in Land Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The majority of desiccation-tolerant plants are found in the less complex clades that constitute the algae, lichens and bryophytes. However, within the larger and more complex groups of vascular land plants there are some 120-130 species that exhibit some degree of vegetative desiccation tolerance. ...

  10. Polymer-based heat exchanger desiccant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Staton, J.C.; Howard, J.L.; Scott, E.P.; Kander, R.G.

    1999-07-01

    The increasing popularity of desiccant-enhanced air conditioning systems has sparked new interest in the search for a better, more efficient desiccant material. The ultimate goal of this research was to develop a material that, when applied to an existing air-to-air heat exchanger, would achieve the necessary heat and mass transfer in a single process, thus transforming a sensible heat exchanger into a total enthalpy exchanger. This study focused on the development and determination of appropriate polymeric desiccant materials for use in different heat and mass transfer systems. The specific objectives for the study were to select an appropriate polymer desiccant, determine the necessary materials properties for this material, and develop and implement mathematical models to analyze the desiccant performance. Two systems were investigated for this study: a rotary wheel total enthalpy exchanger and a fixed plate total enthalpy exchanger. Seven different polymer materials were analyzed to determine the most suitable candidate. Although for the specific conditions studied, the commercial paper-ceramic desiccant out-performed the PVOH materials in both rotary wheel and fixed plate systems, the results suggested that two PVOH materials, PVOH open-cell foam and PVOH/silica gel/molecular sieve composite, have potential for use in total energy exchange applications. By modifying the design conditions, total efficiencies exceeding 70% were achieved for both PVOH foam and PVOH/ceramic composite in rotary wheel systems. In addition, modified the design conditions resulted in total efficiencies greater than 90% for the PVOH foam in both counter-flow and cross-flow flat plate systems. These findings indicated that with appropriate optimization of the exchanger design, these two PVOH materials could have the potential to perform as well as desiccant materials in current rotary wheel and fixed plate exchanger systems.

  11. Light and desiccation responses of some Hymenophyllaceae (filmy ferns) from Trinidad, Venezuela and New Zealand: poikilohydry in a light-limited but low evaporation ecological niche

    PubMed Central

    Proctor, Michael C. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Hymenophyllaceae (filmy ferns) are typically plants of shady, constantly moist habitats. They attain greatest species diversity and biomass in humid tropical montane forests and temperate hyperoceanic climates. This paper presents ecophysiological data bearing on their worldwide ecological niche space and its limits. Methods Chlorophyll fluorescence was used to monitor recovery in desiccation experiments, and for measurements of 95 % saturating irradiance [photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD95 %)] of photosynthetic electron flow and other parameters, in the New Zealand Hymenophyllum sanguinolentum, and three species each of Hymenophyllum and Trichomanes from forests in Trinidad and Venezuela. Key Results Hymenophyllum sanguinolentum was comparable in desiccation tolerance and light responses with the European species. The more common species in the two tropical forests showed PPFD95 % >100 µmol m−2 s−1, and withstood moderate desiccation (–40 MPa) for several days. The four most shade-adapted species had PPFD95 % ≤51 µmol m−2 s−1, and were sensitive to even mild and brief desiccation (–22 MPa for 3 d). Conclusions Light and desiccation responses of filmy ferns can be seen as an integrated package. At low light and windspeed in humid forests, net radiation and saturation deficit are low, and diffusion resistance high. Water loss is slow and can be supported by modest conduction from the sub-stratum. With higher irradiance, selection pressure for desiccation tolerance increases progressively. With low light and high humidity, the filmy fern pattern of adaptation is probably optimal, and the vascular plant leaf with mesophyll and stomata offers no advantage in light capture, water economy or CO2 uptake. Trade-offs between light adaptation and desiccation tolerance, and between stem conduction and water absorption through the leaf surface, underlie adaptive radiation and niche differentiation of species within the family

  12. Investigation of humidity-dependent size control of local anodic oxidation on graphene by using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Seoknam; Lee, Seong jun; Son, Maengho; Ahn, Doyeol; Lee, Seung-Woong

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate nanoscale local anodic oxidation (LAO) patterning on few-layer graphene by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) at room temperature under a normal atmosphere. We focus on the humidity dependency of nanoscale oxidation of graphene. The relations between the oxidation size and the setting values of the AFM, such as the set point, tip speed, and the humidity, are observed. By changing these values, proper parameters were found to produce features with on-demand size. This technique provides an easy way for graphene oxide lithography without any chemical resists. We obtained oxidation sizes down to 50 nm with a 6-nm-high oxide barrier line by using a 0.1- μm/s tip scanning speed. We also obtained micrometer-sized symbols on a graphene flake. We attribute the bumps of oxidized graphene in the graphene layer to local anodic oxidation on graphenes surface and to an incorporation of oxygen ions into the graphene lattice.

  13. Twin-cuvette measurement technique for investigation of dry deposition of O3 and PAN to plant leaves under controlled humidity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shang; Moravek, Alexander; von der Heyden, Lisa; Held, Andreas; Sörgel, Matthias; Kesselmeier, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    We present a dynamic twin-cuvette system for quantifying the trace-gas exchange fluxes between plants and the atmosphere under controlled temperature, light, and humidity conditions. Compared with a single-cuvette system, the twin-cuvette system is insensitive to disturbing background effects such as wall deposition. In combination with a climate chamber, we can perform flux measurements under constant and controllable environmental conditions. With an Automatic Temperature Regulated Air Humidification System (ATRAHS), we are able to regulate the relative humidity inside both cuvettes between 40 and 90 % with a high precision of 0.3 %. Thus, we could demonstrate that for a cuvette system operated with a high flow rate (> 20 L min-1), a temperature-regulated humidification system such as ATRAHS is an accurate method for air humidification of the flushing air. Furthermore, the fully automatic progressive fill-up of ATRAHS based on a floating valve improved the performance of the entire measurement system and prevented data gaps. Two reactive gas species, ozone (O3) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), were used to demonstrate the quality and performance of the twin-cuvette system. O3 and PAN exchange with Quercus ilex was investigated over a 14 day measurement period under controlled climate chamber conditions. By using O3 mixing ratios between 32 and 105 ppb and PAN mixing ratios between 100 and 350 ppt, a linear dependency of the O3 flux as well as the PAN flux in relation to its ambient mixing ratio could be observed. At relative humidity (RH) of 40 %, the deposition velocity ratio of O3 and PAN was determined to be 0.45. At that humidity, the deposition of O3 to the plant leaves was found to be only controlled by the leaf stomata. For PAN, an additional resistance inhibited the uptake of PAN by the leaves. Furthermore, the formation of water films on the leaf surface of plants inside the chamber could be continuously tracked with our custom built leaf wetness sensors

  14. Low relative humidity triggers RNA-directed de novo DNA methylation and suppression of genes controlling stomatal development

    PubMed Central

    Tricker, Penny J.; Gibbings, J. George; Rodríguez López, Carlos M.; Hadley, Paul; Wilkinson, Mike J.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental cues influence the development of stomata on the leaf epidermis, and allow plants to exert plasticity in leaf stomatal abundance in response to the prevailing growing conditions. It is reported that Arabidopsis thaliana ‘Landsberg erecta’ plants grown under low relative humidity have a reduced stomatal index and that two genes in the stomatal development pathway, SPEECHLESS and FAMA, become de novo cytosine methylated and transcriptionally repressed. These environmentally-induced epigenetic responses were abolished in mutants lacking the capacity for de novo DNA methylation, for the maintenance of CG methylation, and in mutants for the production of short-interfering non-coding RNAs (siRNAs) in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. Induction of methylation was quantitatively related to the induction of local siRNAs under low relative humidity. Our results indicate the involvement of both transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene suppression at these loci in response to environmental stress. Thus, in a physiologically important pathway, a targeted epigenetic response to a specific environmental stress is reported and several of its molecular, mechanistic components are described, providing a tractable platform for future epigenetics experiments. Our findings suggest epigenetic regulation of stomatal development that allows for anatomical and phenotypic plasticity, and may help to explain at least some of the plant’s resilience to fluctuating relative humidity. PMID:22442411

  15. Effect of transparent film desiccant on the lifetime of top-emitting active matrix organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung Duk; Cho, Yoon-Hyung; Kim, Won-Jong; Oh, Min Ho; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Zang, Dong Sik

    2007-03-01

    The effects of a transparent film desiccant on the lifetime of top-emitting active matrix organic light emitting diodes (AMOLEDs) were investigated. The transparent film desiccants were prepared by mixing solutions dispersed with calcium oxide powders and ultraviolet-curable resins. As the solid content in the solutions increased from 15to30wt%, the average particle size increased from 107to240nm, whereas the transmittance of the films decreased from 98% to 80% in the visible range. The devices encapsulated with the transparent film desiccants which contained 20wt% CaO exhibited no dark spots and 97% of the initial luminance, even after being stored for over 500h at 70°C and 90% relative humidity. Also, the operational lifetime of these devices was 1850h, ten times longer than that of a device without desiccant. These results confirmed that the transparent film desiccants, which absorbed the moisture that penetrated into the devices, could be applied to the encapsulation of top-emitting AMOLEDs.

  16. Salinity effects on the dynamics and patterns of desiccation cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, N.; Zhou, P.

    2012-12-01

    Cracking arising from desiccation is a ubiquitous phenomenon encountered in various industrial and geo-environmental applications including drying of clayey soil, cement, ceramics, gels, and many more colloidal suspensions. Presence of cracks in muddy sediments modifies the characteristics of the medium such as pore structure, porosity, and permeability which in turn influence various flow and transport processes. Thus it remains a topic of great interest in many disciplines to describe the dynamics of desiccation cracking under various boundary conditions. To this end, we conducted a comprehensive study to investigate effects of NaCl concentrations on cracking dynamics and patterns during desiccation of Bentonite. Mixtures of Bentonite and NaCl solutions were prepared with NaCl concentration varying from 2 to 10 percent in 0.5 percent increment (totally 17 configurations). The slurry was placed in a Petri dish mounted on a digital balance to record the evaporation dynamics. The atmospheric conditions were kept constant using an environmental chamber. An automatic camera was used to record the dynamics of macro-cracks (mm scale) at the surface of desiccating clay each minute. The obtained results illustrate the significant effects of salt concentration on the initiation, propagation, morphology and general dynamics of macro-cracks. We found that higher salt concentrations results in larger macro cracks' lengths attributed to the effects of NaCl on compressing the electric double layer of particles at increasing electrolyte concentrations which reduce considerably the repulsive forces among the particles and causing instability of the slurry and flocculation of the colloidal particles. Rheological measurements by means of a stress controlled rheometer revealed that the yield stress of the slurry decreases as NaCl concentration increases which may indicate aggregation of larger units in the slurry as a result of flocculation causing larger cracks' lengths due to

  17. Determination of dimethyl fumarate and other potential allergens in desiccant and antimould sachets.

    PubMed

    Lamas, J Pablo; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Regueiro, Jorge; Llompart, Maria; Garcia-Jares, Carmen

    2009-08-01

    A method for the determination of dimethyl fumarate (DMF), benzothiazole (BT) and tert-butylphenol (TBP) in desiccant and antimould agents employed for protecting consumer products from humidity and mould has been developed. The method is based on ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) followed by GC-MS analysis. Parameters that could affect the extraction of the compounds have been optimised using a multivariate approach. In the final conditions, the extraction is performed using only 0.5 or 1 mL ethyl acetate and applying ultrasound energy for 5 min. Simultaneous extractions could also be carried out in 5 min without losing efficiency. The method was validated showing good linearity (R2 >0.995). Both intra- and inter-day precisions were studied at several concentration levels, being satisfactory in all cases (RSD <10%). Recovery was evaluated in four real desiccant samples at different compound concentrations, ranging between 87% and 109%. Limits of detection and quantification were in the low nanogramme per gramme level, thus allowing the determination of DMF at concentrations well below the limit established by the recent EU Directive (0.1 microg/g). The proposed procedure was applied to the determination of the target compounds in several desiccant and antimould samples. Although most of them were simply labelled as "silica gel", more than 70% of the tested samples contained high amounts of DMF, many of them at the high microgram per gramme level. Many samples also showed the presence of the other two potential allergens. These results demonstrate that the content of the "desiccant" sachets and tablets in consumer products does not usually belong with the label of the desiccant, and hence, the high risk of exposition to the powerful allergen DMF and other potentially harmful chemicals through consumer goods should be a matter of concern. PMID:19578833

  18. Heat or humidity, which triggers tree phenology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Julia; Sparks, Tim H.; Estrella, Nicole; Menzel, Annette

    2014-05-01

    An overwhelming number of studies confirm that temperature is the main driver for phenological events such as leafing, flowering or fruit ripening, which was first discovered by Réaumur in 1735. Since then, several additional factors which influence onset dates have been identified, such as length of the chilling period, photoperiod, temperature of the previous autumn, nutrient availability, precipitation, sunshine and genetics (local adaptations). Those are supposed to capture some of the remaining, unexplained variance. But our ability to predict onset dates remains imprecise, and our understanding of how plants sense temperature is vague. From a climate chamber experiment on cuttings of 9 tree species we present evidence that air humidity is an important, but previously overlooked, factor influencing the spring phenology of trees. The date of median leaf unfolding was 7 days earlier at 90% relative humidity compared to 40% relative humidity. A second experiment with cuttings shows that water uptake by above-ground tissue might be involved in the phenological development of trees. A third climate chamber experiment suggests that winter dormancy and chilling might be linked to dehydration processes. Analysis of climate data from several meteorological stations across Germany proves that the increase in air humidity after winter is a reliable signal of spring, i.e. less variable or susceptible to reversal compared to temperature. Finally, an analysis of long-term phenology data reveals that absolute air humidity can even be used as a reliable predictor of leafing dates. Current experimental work tries to elucidate the involved foliar uptake processes by using deuterium oxide marked water and Raman spectroscopy. We propose a new framework, wherein plants' chilling requirements and frost tolerance might be attributed to desiccation processes, while spring development is linked to re-humidification of plant tissue. The influence of air humidity on the spring

  19. Liquid Desiccant in Air Conditioners: Nano-Engineered Porous Hollow Fiber Membrane-Based Air Conditioning System

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-02

    BEETIT Project: UTRC is developing an air conditioning system that is optimized for use in warm and humid climates. UTRC’s air conditioning system integrates a liquid drying agent or desiccant and a traditional vapor compression system found in 90% of air conditioners. The drying agent reduces the humidity in the air before it is cooled, using less energy. The technology uses a membrane as a barrier between the air and the liquid salt stream allowing only water vapor to pass through and not the salt molecules. This solves an inherent problem with traditional liquid desiccant systems—carryover of the liquid drying agent into the conditioned air stream—which eliminates corrosion and health issues

  20. Desiccation tolerance in bryophytes: a reflection of the primitive strategy for plant survival in dehydrating habitats?

    PubMed

    Oliver, Melvin J; Velten, Jeff; Mishler, Brent D

    2005-11-01

    Bryophytes are a non-monophyletic group of three major lineages (liverworts, hornworts, and mosses) that descend from the earliest branching events in the phylogeny of land plants. We postulate that desiccation tolerance is a primitive trait, thus mechanisms by which the first land plants achieved tolerance may be reflected in how extant desiccation-tolerant bryophytes survive drying. Evidence is consistent with extant bryophytes employing a tolerance strategy of constitutive cellular protection coupled with induction of a recovery/repair mechanism upon rehydration. Cellular structures appear intact in the desiccated state but are disrupted by rapid uptake of water upon rehydration, but cellular integrity is rapidly regained. The photosynthetic machinery appears to be protected such that photosynthetic activity recovers quickly. Gene expression responds following rehydration and not during drying. Gene expression is translationally controlled and results in the synthesis of a number of proteins, collectively called rehydrins. Some prominent rehydrins are similar to Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, classically ascribed a protection function during desiccation. The role of LEA proteins in a rehydrating system is unknown but data indicates a function in stabilization and reconstitution of membranes. Phylogenetic studies using a Tortula ruralis LEA-like rehydrin led to a re-examination of the evolution of desiccation tolerance. A new phylogenetic analysis suggests that: (i) the basic mechanisms of tolerance seen in modern day bryophytes have changed little from the earliest manifestations of desiccation tolerance in land plants, and (ii) vegetative desiccation tolerance in the early land plants may have evolved from a mechanism present first in spores. PMID:21676830

  1. Vapor pressures of the aqueous desiccants

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.W.; Luo, C.M.

    1999-09-01

    The vapor pressures of the aqueous desiccants lithium chloride, lithium bromide, calcium chloride, ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, and their mixtures were measured at their typical operating concentrations and at temperatures from 298 K to 313 K. The experimental data were fitted to an Antoine type of equation, ln[P(kPa)] = A {minus} B/[T(K) + C], where A, B, and C are constants and are concentration dependent. Vapor pressure data were further used to predict the effectiveness of dehumidification in liquid desiccant dehumidifiers.

  2. A Field-Test of Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu

    A field-test of solar assisted desiccant evaporative cooling process has been carried out, which is a quite attractive cooling / dehumidification process considering various environmental problems caused by conventional electricity driven air conditioners. The process performance has been examined by means of temperature drop between outside air and supply air and COPs (COP value based on solar irradiation). This cooling performance was strongly influenced by solar irradiation and ambient air condition. Stable irradiation produced a higher regeneration temperature resulting higher dehumidifying performance. At one day with as table solar irradiation, the cooling process could produce cool supply air of 18.7°C against the ambient air of 30.1°C and averaged COP, was 0.41. On the other hand, unstable irradiation due to some clouds made the dehumidifying performance lower. However, decrease in the cooling performance was small compared to that obtained at the stable irradiation condition. This is due to buffering by thermal storage of the water circulating in solar collectors. Influence of ambient humidity on the cooling performance was rather serious. At higher humidity condition, the amount of dehumidified water became larger due to increase of effective adsorption capacity of the desiccant rotor. However, the temperature drop was decreased to 6.9°C. This behavior was mainly due to simultaneous increase of humidity and temperature in the dehumidified air. In this situation, an effective evaporation in the following water spray evaporative cooler did not occur.

  3. Relative humidity from psychrometric data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical equation for computing relative humidity as function of wet bulb temperature, dry bulb temperature, and atmospheric pressure is suitable for use with calculator or computer. Analytical expressions may be useful for chemical process control systems and building environmental control systems.

  4. Maneuvering the Internal Porosity and Surface Morphology of Electrospun Polystyrene Yarns by Controlling the Solvent and Relative Humidity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ping; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a simple and reliable method for generating polystyrene (PS) yarns composed of bundles of nanofibrils by using a proper combination of solvent and relative humidity. We elucidated the mechanism responsible for the formation of this new morphology by systematically investigating the molecular interactions among the polymer, solvent(s), and water vapor. We demonstrated that vapor-induced phase separation played a pivotal role in generating the yarns with a unique structure. Furthermore, we discovered that the low vapor pressure of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) was critical to the evolution of pores in the interiors. On the contrary, the relatively high vapor pressure of tetrahydrofuran (THF) hindered the formation of interior pores but excelled in creating a rough surface. In all cases, our results clearly indicate that the formation of either internal porosity or surface roughness required the presence of water vapor, a nonsolvent of the polymer, at a proper level of relative humidity. The exact morphology or pore structure was dependent on the speed of evaporation for the solvent(s) (DMF, THF, and their mixtures), as well as the inter-diffusion and penetration of the nonsolvent (water) and solvent(s). Our findings can serve as guidelines for the preparation of fibers with desired porosity both internally and externally through electrospinning. PMID:23530752

  5. Measuring Relative Humidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkham, Chester A.; Barrett, Kristin Burrows

    1992-01-01

    Describes four experiments that enable students to explore the phenomena of evaporation and condensation and determine the relative humidity by measuring air temperature and dew point on warm September days. Provides tables to calculate saturation points and relative humidity. (MDH)

  6. Comparative metabolic profiling between desiccation-sensitive and desiccation-tolerant species of Selaginella reveals insights into the resurrection trait

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spike-mosses (Selaginellaceae) represent an ancient lineage of vascular plants in which some species have evolved or revolved desiccation tolerance (DT). A sister group comparison was conducted between a desiccation-tolerant species, Selaginella lepidophylla, and a desiccation-sensitive species, S. ...

  7. Experiments on sorption characteristics of solid desiccant materials for solar desiccant cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1984-11-01

    A test facility for measuring the sorption properties of candidate solid desiccant materials under dynamic conditions as well as equilibrium conditions, those experienced during desiccant dehumidifier operation, was constructed and tested. The theory of perturbation chromatography was initially used to measure the equilibrium properties of a desiccant/water-vapor system for the first time. Silica gel, molecular sieve, and gamma-manganese dioxide were tested. The equilibrium capacity estimated by the perturbation chromatography was lower than those available in literature, which suggests that perturbation chromatography may not be applicable to desiccant/water-vapor systems. The perturbation chromatography was replaced with a gravimetric technique, and satisfactory results were obtained for a water-vapor/molecular-sieve system.

  8. Warm, Humid, and High Sun Exposure Climates are Associated with Poorly Controlled Eczema: PEER (Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry) Cohort, 2004–2012

    PubMed Central

    Sargen, Michael R.; Hoffstad, Ole; Margolis, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of children experiencing eczema flares during winter and summer months along with global variation in eczema prevalence has fueled speculation that climate may modulate disease activity. The aim of this study was to determine if long-term weather patterns affect the severity and persistence of eczema symptoms in children. We performed a prospective cohort study of U.S. children (N=5,595) enrolled in PEER (Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry) between 2004 and 2012 to evaluate the effect of climate (daily temperature, daily sun exposure, daily humidity) on the severity of eczema symptoms. Odds ratios were calculated for the patient evaluated outcome of disease control. Multivariate logistic regression modeling adjusting for gender, race, income, and topical medication use demonstrated that higher temperature (OR=0·90, 95% CI: 0·87–0·93, p<0·001) and increased sun exposure (OR=0·93, 95% CI: 0·89–0·98, p=0·009) were associated with poorly controlled eczema. Higher humidity (OR=0·90, 95% CI: 0·812–0.997, p=0·04) was also associated with poorly controlled disease, but the statistical significance of this association was lost in our multivariate analysis (p=0.44). PMID:23774527

  9. Influence of Temperature and Humidity on the Stability of Carotenoids in Biofortified Maize (Zea mays L.) Genotypes during Controlled Postharvest Storage.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Darwin; Rocheford, Torbert; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2016-04-01

    Maize is a staple crop that has been the subject of biofortification efforts to increase the natural content of provitamin A carotenoids. Although significant progress toward increasing provitamin A carotenoid content in maize varieties has been made, postharvest handling factors that influence carotenoid stability during storage have not been fully established. The objectives of this study were to determine carotenoid profiles of six selected provitamin A biofortified maize genotypes at various developmental stages and assess the stability of carotenoids in maize kernels during controlled storage conditions (12 month period), including elevated temperature and relative humidity. There were no significant changes in the content of individual carotenoids within genotypes during kernel development from 45 days after pollination through the time of harvest. Carotenoid losses through traditional grain drying were also minimal (<9%). However, the stability of carotenoids in maize kernels over storage time after harvest was found to be dependent on both temperature and humidity, with variation observed among genotypes. Different forms of provitamin A carotenoids follow similar degradation rates. The genotype C17xDE3 had a degradation rate 2 times faster than those of the other genotypes evaluated (P < 0.001). These differences in carotenoid stability under controlled storage were attributed, in part, to observed differences in the physical properties of the kernels (surface area and porosity). These results support the notion that effective control of moisture content and temperature of the kernels during storage conditions is essential to reduce the speed of degradative reactions. PMID:26939642

  10. TROPICAL SPIDERWORT STEM DESICCATION AND RECOVERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical spiderwort has the curious ability to survive periods of drought stress, even as segmented pieces of stem. The purpose of this study was to establish the moisture level to which stems of tropical spiderwort (TSW) must desiccate in order to effectively kill the plant regenerative process. ...