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Sample records for desired time localization

  1. Public Education in Neoliberal Times: Memory and Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This article reflects on the desire to defend and claim public education amidst the educational policy effects of contemporary neoliberal politics. The defence of public education, from schools to higher education, undoubtedly provides a powerful counter-veiling weight to the neoliberal policy logic of education-as-individual-value-accrual. At a…

  2. Time to Go Local!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Time to Go Local! Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... MedlinePlus.gov health topic pages, you will find "Go Local" links that take you to information about ...

  3. Marking of Fluid Timed Events Graphs with Multipliers for a desired cycle time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaci, S.; Labadi, K.

    2009-03-01

    We study fluid analogues of a subclass of petri nets, called Fluid Timed Event Graphs with Multipliers, which are a time extension of weighted T-Systems studied in the Petri Net literature. These event graphs can be studied in the algebraic structure called (min, +) algebra. In this paper we deal with the problem of allocating an initial marking in a Fluid Timed Event Graphs with Multipliers for a desired cycle time. for that, to calculate the marking of some places, we proceed by linearization of the mathematical model reflecting the behavior of a FGETM in order to obtain a model (min, +) linear. From the latter, we determine the marking which satisfiers the desired cycle time .

  4. Eye Movements Reveal the Time-Course of Anticipating Behaviour Based on Complex, Conflicting Desires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Heather J.; Breheny, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The time-course of representing others' perspectives is inconclusive across the currently available models of ToM processing. We report two visual-world studies investigating how knowledge about a character's basic preferences (e.g. "Tom's favourite colour is pink") and higher-order desires (his wish to keep this preference secret) compete to…

  5. Adaptive Decomposition of Highly Resolved Time Series into Local and Non‐local Components

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly time-resolved air monitoring data are widely being collected over long time horizons in order to characterizeambient and near-source air quality trends. In many applications, it is desirable to split the time-resolved data into two ormore components (e.g., local and region...

  6. Local-time representation of path integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x -dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x (t ) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x . Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  7. Energy Deposition in the Body from External Sources to Chemically Trigger Cellular Responses in Desired Localized Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibsen, Stuart Duncan

    One of the major challenges of modern chemotherapy is to deliver a therapeutic dose of active drug to the tumor tissue without causing systemic exposure. The realization of this goal could considerably reduce the negative side effects experienced by patients. The work conducted in this thesis looks at two different approaches to trigger drug activation with the use of external energy sources. This avoids the challenges of relying solely on biochemical and environmental differences as triggers. The two triggers used were low intensity focused ultrasound and 365 nm light delivered with a custom designed needle UV LED fiber optic system. Both can be localized within the body to spatially highlight just the tumor tissue creating a stark differentiation between it and the healthy tissue. The 365nm light based delivery scheme developed here was the first demonstration of a photoactivatable doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug called DOX-PCB. DOX-PCB was shown to be 200 times less toxic than DOX and could be activated to a fully therapeutic form upon exposure to 365nm light. The pharmacokinetics showed a circulation half life comparable to that of DOX and stability against in vivo metabolic degradation. The 365 nm light was shown to adequately irradiate a centimeter of tumor tissue and cause localized activation. In vivo tumors exposed to the light had significantly higher doses of DOX than unexposed control tumors in the same individual. The second delivery scheme made use of focused ultrasound to activate echogenic drug delivery vehicles. These vehicles were the first demonstration of encapsulating microbubbles within liposomes. Specially designed optical equipment documented that the microbubble was ultrasound responsive. The microbubble was shown to violently cavitate and rupture the outer liposome membrane releasing the payload contents. The three dimensional localization of activation was demonstrated in tissue phantoms. The strengths of these two delivery schemes could

  8. Local-time representation of path integrals.

    PubMed

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x-dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x(t) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x. Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed. PMID:26764662

  9. Sources of Local Time Asymmetries in Magnetodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Kane, M.; Sergis, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-04-01

    The rapidly rotating magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn contain a near-equatorial thin current sheet over most local times known as the magnetodisc, resembling a wrapped-up magnetotail. The Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons spacecraft at Jupiter and Saturn have provided extensive datasets from which to observationally identify local time asymmetries in these magnetodiscs. Imaging in the infrared and ultraviolet from ground- and space-based instruments have also revealed the presence of local time asymmetries in the aurora which therefore must map to local time asymmetries in the magnetosphere. Asymmetries are found in (i) the configuration of the magnetic field and magnetospheric currents, where a thicker disc is found in the noon and dusk sectors; (ii) plasma flows where the plasma flow has local time-dependent radial components; (iii) a thicker plasma sheet in the dusk sector. Many of these features are also reproduced in global MHD simulations. Several models have been developed to interpret these various observations and typically fall into two groups: ones which invoke coupling with the solar wind (via reconnection or viscous processes) and ones which invoke internal rotational processes operating inside an asymmetrical external boundary. In this paper we review these observational in situ findings, review the models which seek to explain them, and highlight open questions and directions for future work.

  10. Time Discretization Approach to Dynamic Localization Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, E.

    An alternative wavefunction to the description of the dynamic localization of a charged particle moving on a one-dimensional lattice under the influence of a periodic time dependent electric field is written down. For this purpose the method of characteristics such as applied by Dunlap and Kenkre [Phys. Rev. B 34, 3625 (1986)] has been modified by using a different integration variable. Handling this wavefunction one is faced with the selection of admissible time values. This results in a conditionally exactly solvable problem, now by accounting specifically for the implementation of a time discretization working in conjunction with a related dynamic localization condition. In addition, one resorts to the strong field limit, which amounts to replace, to leading order, the large order zeros of the Bessel function J0(z), used before in connection with the cosinusoidal modulation, by integral multiples of π. Here z stands for the ratio between the field amplitude and the frequency. The modulation function of the electric field vanishes on the nodal points of the time grid, which stands for an effective field-free behavior. This opens the way to propose quickly tractable dynamic localization conditions for arbitrary periodic modulations. We have also found that the present time discretization approach produces the minimization of the mean square displacement characterizing the usual exact wavefunction. Other realizations and comparisons have also been presented.

  11. Local finite-time Lyapunov exponent, local sampling and probabilistic source and destination regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, A. E.; Ross, S. D.; Schmale, D. G., III

    2015-11-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is a powerful Lagrangian concept widely used for describing large-scale flow patterns and transport phenomena. However, field experiments usually have modest scales. Therefore, it is necessary to bridge the gap between the concept of FTLE and field experiments. In this paper, two independent observations are discussed: (i) approximation of the local FTLE time series at a fixed location as a function of known distances between the destination (or source) points of released (or collected) particles and local velocity, and (ii) estimation of the distances between the destination (or source) points of the released (or collected) particles when consecutive release (or sampling) events are performed at a fixed location. These two observations lay the groundwork for an ansatz methodology that can practically assist in field experiments where consecutive samples are collected at a fixed location, and it is desirable to attribute source locations to the collected particles, and also in planning of optimal local sampling of passive particles for maximal diversity monitoring of atmospheric assemblages of microorganisms. In addition to deterministic flows, the more realistic case of unresolved turbulence and low-resolution flow data that yield probabilistic source (or destination) regions are studied. It is shown that, similar to deterministic flows, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) and local FTLE can describe the separation of probabilistic source (or destination) regions corresponding to consecutively collected (or released) particles.

  12. The Global-Local Nexus: Desired History Curriculum Components from the Perspective of Future Teachers in a Conflict-Ridden Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yemini, Miri; Yardeni-Kuperberg, Oria; Natur, Nazie

    2015-01-01

    This study reveals the views of future teachers from Israeli-Jewish and Palestinian-Arab communities regarding the desired school history curricula. We applied a quantitative and qualitative survey to a sample of 528 students studying in teachers' preparation programmes in three higher education institutions: one research university with a…

  13. Local Impacts of Religious Discourses on Rights to Express Same-Sex Sexual Desires in Peri-Urban Rio de Janeiro1

    PubMed Central

    García, Jonathan; Laboy, Miguel Muñoz; de Almeida, Vagner; Parker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a study that examined how religious discourses of inclusion and exclusion—in Roman Catholic, evangelical Protestant, and Afro-Brazilian religious traditions—affected people’s rights to express same-sex sexual desires, behaviors, and identities in the socioeconomically marginalized urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Using extended ethnographic observation of institutions and religious events over a period of 2 years, the authors identified how sexual rights were constructed within religious discourses and conducted ethnographic interviews with 45 religious leaders. In the low-income and violent urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, religious leaders and institutions play key roles in molding community inclusion and exclusion. A comparison of the 3 major religious denominations shows a diversity of discourses about same-sex sexual desires and their impacts on community formation. PMID:20161503

  14. Desire, Democracy and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thogersen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the concept of eros has found its way back into educational literature with the aim of integrating human desires into educational theories and counteracting a devaluation of emotional life. This paper holds the view that this integration is important because desire expresses a fundamental way of relating to the world. However, part…

  15. Study on desirable ionospheric corrections accuracy for network-RTK positioning and its impact on time-to-fix and probability of successful single-epoch ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paziewski, Jacek

    2016-02-01

    The mitigation of ionospheric delay is still of crucial interest in GNSS positioning, especially in precise solutions such as instantaneous RTK positioning. Thus, several effective algorithms and functional models were developed, and also numerous investigations of ionospheric correction properties in RTK positioning have been performed so far. One of the most highly effective approaches in precise relative positioning is the application of the ionosphere-weighted model with network-derived corrections. This contribution investigates the impact of the accuracy of the network ionospheric corrections on time-to-fix in RTK-OTF positioning. Also, an attempt has been made to estimate the desirable accuracy of the network ionospheric corrections, allowing for reliable instantaneous ambiguity resolution. The experiment is based on a multi-baseline GPS RTK positioning supported with network-derived ionospheric corrections for medium length baselines. The results show that in such scenario, the double-differenced ionospheric correction residuals should not exceed ∼1/3 of the L1 wavelength for successful single-epoch ambiguity resolution.

  16. A Desire for Parsimony

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of wildness is being developed as a quality of interactive processing that increases survival opportunities in nature. A link is made between the need to improve interactive quality for wildness, and cognitive desires and interests in art, music, religion and philosophy as these can also be seen as attempts to improve interactive quality internally and externally. Interactive quality can be improved through gains in parsimony, that is, simplifications in the organisation of skills. The importance of parsimony in evolution is discussed, along with indicators of an internal parsimony desire that experiences joy if achieved through processes such as insight and understanding. A mechanism for the production and measurement of the parsimony desire is proposed, based on the number of subcortical pleasure hotspots that can be stimulated at once within the ‘archipelago’ available in the limbic system. PMID:25379257

  17. A desire for parsimony.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Lawrence J

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of wildness is being developed as a quality of interactive processing that increases survival opportunities in nature. A link is made between the need to improve interactive quality for wildness, and cognitive desires and interests in art, music, religion and philosophy as these can also be seen as attempts to improve interactive quality internally and externally. Interactive quality can be improved through gains in parsimony, that is, simplifications in the organisation of skills. The importance of parsimony in evolution is discussed, along with indicators of an internal parsimony desire that experiences joy if achieved through processes such as insight and understanding. A mechanism for the production and measurement of the parsimony desire is proposed, based on the number of subcortical pleasure hotspots that can be stimulated at once within the 'archipelago' available in the limbic system. PMID:25379257

  18. Quantum time and spatial localization in relativistic quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Zuben, Francis Stephen Geisler

    1999-11-01

    Two related problems in relativistic quantum mechanics, the apparent superluminal propagation of initially localized particles, and the dependence of their localization on the motion of the observer, are analyzed in the context of the theory of constraints. Time and energy operators are introduced for the free relativistic particle, and a parametrization invariant formulation is obtained through Dirac constraint theory. The resulting description is of a system constrained in momentum and energy, but not in position or time, for which observables are constants of the motion. The Klein-Gordon equation is recovered on a physical Hilbert space, constructed via integration over the proper time from an augmented Hilbert space, wherein time and energy are dynamical variables. It is shown that the position observable acts on states in the augmented space; those states having strictly positive energy are non-local in time. Localization arises on a particular space-like hyperplane from quantum interference in time, position measurements receiving contributions from the past and future. Apparent causality problems are resolved by noting that, as the particle is potentially in the past, it can propagate to distant regions without exceeding the speed of light. Non-locality of the same system to a moving observer is due to Lorentz rotation of spatial axes out of the interference minimum.

  19. Schooling of Desire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlin, Karen E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses education in virtue, inviting college professors to see themselves not as "meddlers" in students' private lives but rather as interlocutors who prompt students to examine their desires--not simply what they hope to gain, but who they hope to become as a result of their university education. Focuses on the philosophies of Plato,…

  20. Hypoactive Sexual Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Helen S.

    1977-01-01

    Low-libido disorders are highly prevalent, may be extremely distressful to patients and their partners, and influence the course and prognosis of therapy. This paper focuses on this important aspect of human sexuality. Some clinical features of hypoactive sexual desire are described, and some hypotheses about etiology and prognosis are presented.…

  1. Real-Time MEG Source Localization Using Regional Clustering.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Christoph; Strohmeier, Daniel; Luessi, Martin; Güllmar, Daniel; Baumgarten, Daniel; Haueisen, Jens; Hämäläinen, Matti S

    2015-11-01

    With its millisecond temporal resolution, Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is well suited for real-time monitoring of brain activity. Real-time feedback allows the adaption of the experiment to the subject's reaction and increases time efficiency by shortening acquisition and off-line analysis. Two formidable challenges exist in real-time analysis: the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limited time available for computations. Since the low SNR reduces the number of distinguishable sources, we propose an approach which downsizes the source space based on a cortical atlas and allows to discern the sources in the presence of noise. Each cortical region is represented by a small set of dipoles, which is obtained by a clustering algorithm. Using this approach, we adapted dynamic statistical parametric mapping for real-time source localization. In terms of point spread and crosstalk between regions the proposed clustering technique performs better than selecting spatially evenly distributed dipoles. We conducted real-time source localization on MEG data from an auditory experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed real-time method localizes sources reliably in the superior temporal gyrus. We conclude that real-time source estimation based on MEG is a feasible, useful addition to the standard on-line processing methods, and enables feedback based on neural activity during the measurements. PMID:25782980

  2. Sexual Desire Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and sexual aversion disorder (SAD) are an under-diagnosed group of disorders that affect men and women. Despite their prevalence, these two disorders are often not addressed by healthcare providers and patients due their private and awkward nature. As physicians, we need to move beyond our own unease in order to adequately address our patients’ sexual problems and implement appropriate treatment. Using the Sexual Response Cycle as the model of the physiological changes of humans during sexual stimulation and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition this article will review the current literature on the desire disorders focusing on prevalence, etiology, and treatment. PMID:19727285

  3. Local troposphere augmentation for real-time precise point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junbo; Xu, Chaoqian; Guo, Jiming; Gao, Yang

    2014-12-01

    The IGS real-time service (RTS) enables real-time precise point positioning (PPP) at a global scale. A long convergence time however is still a challenging factor. In order to reduce the convergence time, external troposphere corrections could be introduced to remove the troposphere effects on the coordinate solution. This paper proposes the use of a local troposphere model to augment real-time PPP. First, undifferenced observations from a network of multiple stations are processed to estimate the station-based troposphere zenith wet delay (ZWD). A set of local troposphere fitting coefficients are then derived using a proposed optimal fitting model. Finally, the determined troposphere fitting coefficients are broadcast to users to reduce the convergence time in the user solution. A continuous operating reference station (CORS) network is utilized to assess the performance of the proposed approach under quiet and active troposphere conditions. The numerical results show that the overall fitting precisions of the local troposphere model can reach 1.42 and 1.05 cm under the two troposphere conditions. The convergence time of the positioning solutions, especially the height solution, can be greatly reduced using the local troposphere model. The horizontal accuracy of 9.2 cm and the vertical accuracy of 10.1 cm are obtainable under the quiet troposphere condition after 20 min of initialization time, compared to the 14.7 cm horizontal and 21.5 cm vertical accuracies in the conventional troposphere estimation approach. Moreover, the horizontal accuracies of 13.0 cm and the vertical accuracies of 12.4 cm have also been obtained after 20 min under the active troposphere condition.

  4. Target localization and real-time tracking using the Calypso 4D localization system in patients with localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Willoughby, Twyla R.; Kupelian, Patrick A. . E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Pouliot, Jean; Shinohara, Katsuto; Aubin, Michelle; Roach, Mack; Skrumeda, Lisa L.; Balter, James M.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Wei, John T.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: The Calypso 4D Localization System is being developed to provide accurate, precise, objective, and continuous target localization during radiotherapy. This study involves the first human use of the system, to evaluate the localization accuracy of this technique compared with radiographic localization and to assess its ability to obtain real-time prostate-motion information. Methods and Materials: Three transponders were implanted in each of 20 patients. Eleven eligible patients of the 20 patients participated in a study arm that compared radiographic triangulated transponder locations to electromagnetically recorded transponder locations. Transponders were tracked for 8-min periods. Results: The implantations were all successful, with no major complications. Intertransponder distances were largely stable. Comparison of the patient localization on the basis of transponder locations as per the Calypso system with the radiographic transponder localization showed an average ({+-}SD) 3D difference of 1.5 {+-} 0.9 mm. Upon tracking during 8 min, 2 of the 11 patients showed significant organ motion (>1 cm), with some motion lasting longer that 1 min. Conclusion: Calypso transponders can be used as magnetic intraprostatic fiducials. Clinical evaluation of this novel 4D nonionizing electromagnetic localization system with transponders indicates a comparable localization accuracy to isocenter (within 2 mm) compared with X-ray localiza0010ti.

  5. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  6. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  7. THE LOCAL EFFECT TIME (LET) AND HOW IT INCORPORATES ECOLOGY INTO RESIDENCE TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    A clear and direct connection between constituent/water residence times and ecological effects is necessary to quantitatively relate these time scales to ecology. The concept of "local effect time" (LET) is proposed here as a time scale with adequate spatial resolution to relate ...

  8. Effects of Local and Widespread Muscle Fatigue on Movement Timing

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Jeffrey C.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Gates, Deanna H.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive movements can cause muscle fatigue, leading to motor reorganization, performance deficits, and/or possible injury. The effects of fatigue may depend on the type of fatigue task employed, however. The purpose of this study was to determine how local fatigue of a specific muscle group versus widespread fatigue of various muscle groups affected the control of movement timing. Twenty healthy subjects performed an upper-extremity low-load work task similar to sawing for 5 continuous minutes both before and after completing a protocol that either fatigued all the muscles used in the task (widespread fatigue) or a protocol that selectively fatigued the primary muscles used to execute the pushing stroke of the sawing task (localized fatigue). Subjects were instructed to time their movements with a metronome. Timing error, movement distance, and speed were calculated for each movement. Data were then analyzed using a goal-equivalent manifold (GEM) approach to quantify changes in goal-relevant and non-goal-relevant variability. We applied detrended fluctuation analysis to each time series to quantify changes in fluctuation dynamics that reflected changes in the control strategies used. After localized fatigue, subjects made shorter, slower movements and exerted greater control over non-goal-relevant variability. After widespread fatigue, subjects exerted less control over non-goal-relevant variability and did not change movement patterns. Thus, localized and widespread muscle fatigue affected movement differently. Local fatigue may reduce the available motor solutions and therefore cause greater movement reorganization than widespread muscle fatigue. Subjects altered their control strategies but continued to achieve the timing goal after both fatigue tasks. PMID:25183157

  9. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, O.; Aksoy, B.; Akalin, O. B.; Bayraktar, H.; Alaca, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads.

  10. Average waiting time in FDDI networks with local priorities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gercek, Gokhan

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to compute the average queuing delay experienced by different priority group messages in an FDDI node. It is assumed that no FDDI MAC layer priorities are used. Instead, a priority structure is introduced to the messages at a higher protocol layer (e.g. network layer) locally. Such a method was planned to be used in Space Station Freedom FDDI network. Conservation of the average waiting time is used as the key concept in computing average queuing delays. It is shown that local priority assignments are feasable specially when the traffic distribution is asymmetric in the FDDI network.

  11. Music Education Desire(ing): Language, Literacy, and Lieder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Issues of desire in music education are integral and anathema to the profession. Constituted of and by desire, we bodily engage music emotionally and cognitively; yet references to the body are limited to how it may be better managed in order to produce more satisfactory (desired) sounds, thus disciplining desire as we focus on the content of…

  12. Impulse source localization in an urban environment: Time reversal versus time matching.

    PubMed

    Cheinet, Sylvain; Ehrhardt, Loïc; Broglin, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates two approaches for localizing an impulse sound source with distributed sensors in an urban environment under controlled processing time. In both approaches, the numerical model used for calculating the sound propagation is a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model. The simulations are drastically accelerated by restricting to the lower frequencies of the impulse signals and are evaluated against in situ measurements. The first tested localization technique relies on the time reversal of the measurements with the model. In the second technique, the source is localized by matching the observed differences in the first times of arrival of the signals to those obtained from a pre-defined database of simulations with known source positions. The localization performance is physically investigated on the basis of the measurements, considering two source positions and all possible combinations from 5 to 15 microphones. The time matching localization attains an accuracy of 10 m, which is targeted in this study, in the vast majority of the configurations. In comparison, the time reversal localization is affected by the weakness of contributions from sensors masked and distant from the source. Practical requirements are also discussed, such as real-time constraints, hardware and description of the urban environment. PMID:26827011

  13. Predicting the time derivative of local magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; Meng, Xing; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Rastätter, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Some of the potentially most destructive effects of severe space weather storms are caused by the geomagnetically induced currents. Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) can cause failures of electric transformers and result in widespread blackouts. GICs are induced by the time variability of the magnetic field and are closely related to the time derivative of the local magnetic field perturbation. Predicting dB/dt is rather challenging, since the local magnetic perturbations and their time derivatives are both highly fluctuating quantities, especially during geomagnetic storms. The currently available first principles-based and empirical models cannot predict the detailed minute-scale or even faster time variation of the local magnetic field. On the other hand, Pulkkinen et al. (2013) demonstrated recently that several models can predict with positive skill scores whether the horizontal component of dB/dt at a given magnetometer station will exceed some threshold value in a 20 min time interval. In this paper we investigate if one can improve the efficiency of the prediction further. We find that the Space Weather Modeling Framework, the best performing among the five models compared by Pulkkinen et al. (2013), shows significantly better skill scores in predicting the magnetic perturbation than predicting its time derivative, especially for large deviations. We also find that there is a strong correlation between the magnitude of dB/dt and the magnitude of the horizontal magnetic perturbation itself. Combining these two results one can devise an algorithm that gives better skill scores for predicting dB/dt exceeding various thresholds in 20 min time intervals than the direct approach.

  14. Local time displacement as a symmetry of nature in flat space-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    Local time displacement is shown to be a true symmetry of Minkowskian physics, thereby demonstrating the empirical equivalence of different choices of the clock synchronization parameter in generalized Lorentz transformations.

  15. Producing desired ice faces

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J.; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih––a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface––due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid. PMID:26512102

  16. Local time dependences of oxygen ENA periodicities at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Brandt, P. C.

    2014-08-01

    The periodicities of energetic neutral atoms (90-170 keV oxygens) at Saturn are determined by applying Lomb-Scargle periodogram analyses to energetic neutral atom (ENA) fluxes observed in eight local time sectors of the equatorial plane between 5 and 15 RS (1 RS = 60,268 km). The analyses come from four long intervals (>180 days each) of high-latitude viewing from 2007 to 2013 and represent an essentially global view of Saturn's periodicities. The periodograms display rich and complex structures in local time. Sectors near midnight generally exhibit the strongest periodicities (in terms of highest signal-to-noise ratios) and often show the dual or single periods of the Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR). Sectors near noon display single or multiple periodicities or none. Furthermore, dayside periods may be much shorter (~10.3 h) than SKR periods. Sectors near dawn or dusk display periodicities intermediate between midnight and noon or may show no periodicities whatsoever. These patterns of local time dependence do not remain constant from interval to interval.

  17. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Aydin, O; Aksoy, B; Akalin, O B; Bayraktar, H; Alaca, B E

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads. PMID:26931864

  18. Source localization in a time-varying ocean waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Cristiano; Siderius, Martin; Jesus, Sergio M.

    2002-11-01

    One of the most stringent impairments in matched-field processing is the impact of missing or erroneous environmental information on the final source location estimate. This problem is known in the literature as model mismatch and is strongly frequency dependent. Another unavoidable factor that contributes to model mismatch is the natural time and spatial variability of the ocean waveguide. As a consequence, most of the experimental results obtained to date focus on short source-receiver ranges (usually <5 km), stationary sources, reduced time windows and frequencies generally below 600 Hz. This paper shows that MFP source localization can be made robust to time-space environmental mismatch if the parameters responsible for the mismatch are clearly identified, properly modeled and (time-)adaptively estimated by a focalization procedure prior to MFP source localization. The data acquired during the ADVENT'99 sea trial at 2, 5, and 10 km source-receiver ranges and in two frequency bands, below and above 600 Hz, provided an excellent opportunity to test the proposed techniques. The results indicate that an adequate parametrization of the waveguide is effective up to 10 km range in both frequency bands achieving a precise localization during the whole recording of the 5 km track, and most of the 10 km track. It is shown that the increasing MFP dependence on erroneous environmental information in the higher frequency and at longer ranges can only be accounted for by including a time dependent modeling of the water column sound speed profile. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  19. Young Children's Understanding of Desire Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Louis J.; Coon, Jennifer A.; Wusinich, Nicole

    2000-01-01

    Two studies examined preschoolers' appreciation of how mental states arise. Findings suggest that 3- and 5-year-olds better understood perception-generated beliefs and attitude-generated desires than physiology-generated desires. Four- and 5-year-olds better understood the effects of quantity of experience than of time of experience on…

  20. Time-Localization of Forced Oscillations in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.; Pierre, John W.

    2015-07-26

    In power systems forced oscillations occur, and identification of these oscillations is important for the proper operation of the system. Two of the parameters of interest in analyzing and addressing forced oscillations are the starting and ending points. To obtain estimates of these parameters, this paper proposes a time-localization algorithm based on the geometric analysis of the sample cross-correlation between the measured data and a complex sinusoid at the frequency of the forced oscillation. Results from simulated and measured synchrophasor data demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately estimate the starting and ending points of forced oscillations.

  1. Magnetopause characteristics at 0840-1040 hours local time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of three-dimensional energetic particle distributions for 14 consecutive ISEE satellite orbits during magnetopause crossings and close approaches is presented. The data were collected from the Nov. 10 through Dec. 11, 1977, time period and cover local times of 0840 to 1040 hours. It was found that the magnetopause in this period defined by energetic particles can be represented as sharp particles and a well defined boundary for magnetospherically trapped particles for a wide range of magnetospheric activity and magnetosheath field conditions. The magnetopause position, orientation, and velocity were determined for all identified magnetopause crossings and close approaches using the technique of Williams (1979); it was found that the magnetopause is nearly always in motion with velocities ranging from near zero to at least plus or minus 25 km/s. Correlations with published plasma, magnetic field, and plasma wave magnetopause identifications show the energetic particle results to be accurate and an important factor in determining magnetopause characteristics and behavior.

  2. LOCAL MEASUREMENT OF {Lambda} USING PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Espriu, Domenec; Puigdomenech, Daniel

    2013-02-20

    We consider the propagation of gravitational waves (GWs) in de Sitter spacetime and how a non-zero value of the cosmological constant might affect their detection in pulsar timing arrays (PTAs). If {Lambda} {ne} 0, the waves are anharmonic in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker coordinates, and although this effect is very small it gives rise to noticeable consequences for GWs originating in extragalactic sources such as spiraling black hole binaries. The results indicate that the timing residuals induced by GWs from such sources in PTAs will show a peculiar angular dependence with a marked enhancement around a particular value of the angle subtended by the source and the pulsars, depending mainly on the actual value of the cosmological constant and the distance to the source. The position of the peak could represent a gauge of the value of {Lambda}. The enhancement that the new effect brings about could facilitate the first direct detection of GWs while representing a local measurement of {Lambda}.

  3. Detecting Abrupt Changes in a Piecewise Locally Stationary Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Last, Michael; Shumway, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Non-stationary time series arise in many settings, such as seismology, speech-processing, and finance. In many of these settings we are interested in points where a model of local stationarity is violated. We consider the problem of how to detect these change-points, which we identify by finding sharp changes in the time-varying power spectrum. Several different methods are considered, and we find that the symmetrized Kullback-Leibler information discrimination performs best in simulation studies. We derive asymptotic normality of our test statistic, and consistency of estimated change-point locations. We then demonstrate the technique on the problem of detecting arrival phases in earthquakes. PMID:19190715

  4. What controls the local time extent of flux transfer events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Imber, S. M.; Carter, J. A.; Walach, M.-T.; Hubert, B.

    2016-02-01

    Flux transfer events (FTEs) are the manifestation of bursty and/or patchy magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause. We compare two sequences of the ionospheric signatures of flux transfer events observed in global auroral imagery and coherent ionospheric radar measurements. Both sequences were observed during very similar seasonal and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, though with differing solar wind speed. A key observation is that the signatures differed considerably in their local time extent. The two periods are 26 August 1998, when the IMF had components BZ≈-10 nT and BY≈9 nT and the solar wind speed was VX≈650 km s-1, and 31 August 2005, IMF BZ≈-7 nT, BY≈17 nT, and VX≈380 km s-1. In the first case, the reconnection rate was estimated to be near 160 kV, and the FTE signatures extended across at least 7 h of magnetic local time (MLT) of the dayside polar cap boundary. In the second, a reconnection rate close to 80 kV was estimated, and the FTEs had a MLT extent of roughly 2 h. We discuss the ramifications of these differences for solar wind-magnetosphere coupling.

  5. Local time variations of the Venusian hydrogen corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaufray, J.-Y.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quémerais, E.; Sulis, S.; Leblanc, F.

    2014-04-01

    Atomic hydrogen in the upper atmosphere of Venus is produced by chemical reactions involving hydrogen bearing molecules such as H2O. Due to its low mass, atomic hydrogen can reach high altitudes and become the dominant species in the Venusian exosphere. The density of atomic hydrogen retrieved by Pioneer Venus Orbiter from H+ measurement of the ion mass spectrometer indicated large diurnal variation of the hydrogen content with a peak of density near 4:00 local time (1). The large dayside/nightside ratio ~ 1000 was attributed to the wind system induced from temperature contrast. First dayside observations of the atomic hydrogen Lymanalpha resonant line performed by the UV spectrometer SPICAV (2) aboard Venus Express suggested a lower ratio ~ 30 between morning side and evening side (3). In this presentation, we will present several recent observations of the Venusian hydrogen corona obtained by SPICAV at different local times at nightside to investigate more accurately the diurnal variations of the Venusian hydrogen corona.

  6. My Desire for Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetrick, Laura J.

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Laura Hetrick focuses on what is inherently missing from the art education literature about teaching future teachers of art--of addressing nascent teachers' personal, pedagogical, and professional desires. Specifically, she considers teachers' desires for power and recognition, their desires to love and be loved, and…

  7. Local-time asymmetries in the Venus thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Bougher, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    Our current understanding of the global structure and dynamics of the Venus thermosphere is embodied in models such as the Venus Thermospheric General Circulation Model (VTGCM) and empirical composition models such as VIRA and VTS3. We have completed an analysis of ultraviolet images of Venus at 130 nm acquired by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (PVOUVS). We have examined 97 images spanning the 10-year period between 1980 and 1990, and have developed a technique for global radiative transfer modeling with which we create synthetic models of each image analyzed. We have developed a hypothesis for understanding the persistent local-time asymmetry observed as a signature of vertically propagating internal gravity waves interacting with the thermospheric SS-AS circulation. This hypothesis is presented.

  8. Energy-time entanglement, elements of reality, and local realism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogenfors, Jonathan; Larsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-10-01

    The Franson interferometer, proposed in 1989 (Franson 1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 2205-08), beautifully shows the counter-intuitive nature of light. The quantum description predicts sinusoidal interference for specific outcomes of the experiment, and these predictions can be verified in experiment. In the spirit of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen it is possible to ask if the quantum-mechanical description (of this setup) can be considered complete. This question will be answered in detail in this paper, by delineating the quite complicated relation between energy-time entanglement experiments and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) elements of reality. The mentioned sinusoidal interference pattern is the same as that giving a violation in the usual Bell experiment. Even so, depending on the precise requirements made on the local realist model, this can imply (a) no violation, (b) smaller violation than usual, or (c) full violation of the appropriate statistical bound. Alternatives include (a) using only the measurement outcomes as EPR elements of reality, (b) using the emission time as EPR element of reality, (c) using path realism, or (d) using a modified setup. This paper discusses the nature of these alternatives and how to choose between them. The subtleties of this discussion needs to be taken into account when designing and setting up experiments intended to test local realism. Furthermore, these considerations are also important for quantum communication, for example in Bell-inequality-based quantum cryptography, especially when aiming for device independence. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘50 years of Bell’s theorem’.

  9. The IMF dependence of the local time of transpolar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fear, R.; Milan, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Transpolar arcs or polar cap arcs are auroral features which are observed within the polar cap. They occur predominantly during intervals of northward IMF (Berkey et al., 1976). There is mixed evidence for IMF BY control of the local time at which the arcs initially form; Gussenhoven (1982) found that polar cap arcs formed preferentially post-midnight when BY < 0 (evaluated over 1 or 2 hours preceding the start of the arc) and pre-midnight when BY > 0, whereas Valladares et al (1991) found no clear dependency. The only previous statistical study of globally-imaged transpolar arcs (Kullen et al., 2002) found differing results for moving and non-moving arcs, concluding that three different models were required to identify (i) moving arcs, (ii) stationary arcs near the dawn/dusk portion of the main oval, and (iii) stationary arcs in the midnight sector. In this presentation, we show the results of a statistical study of 131 transpolar arcs observed by the FUV cameras on the IMAGE satellite between June 2000 and September 2005. We find that arcs tend to form following the same dependency on BY as identified by Gussenhoven (1982), whether moving or not. We find that the correlation between the magnetic local time at which the arc forms and the IMF BY component is relatively weak if the IMF is only averaged over the hour preceding the arc formation, but becomes stronger if the IMF is evaluated between 1 and 4 hours before the arc first forms. This is consistent with the timescale that is expected for newly-opened magnetospheric flux to reach the magnetotail plasma sheet (Dungey, 1961; Milan et al., 2007), and is therefore consistent with the suggestion that transpolar arcs map to the plasma sheet. We suggest that the similar dependence of stationary and moving arcs on the IMF BY component might imply that it is possible to explain both types of arc in terms of a single mechanism.

  10. Long Term Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinley, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Significant error has been observed in the long term prediction of the Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node on the Aqua spacecraft. This error of approximately 90 seconds over a two year prediction is a complication in planning and timing of maneuvers for all members of the Earth Observing System Afternoon Constellation, which use Aqua's MLTAN as the reference for their inclination maneuvers. It was determined that the source of the prediction error was the lack of a solid Earth tide model in the operational force models. The Love Model of the solid Earth tide potential was used to derive analytic corrections to the inclination and right ascension of the ascending node of Aqua's Sun-synchronous orbit. Additionally, it was determined that the resonance between the Sun and orbit plane of the Sun-synchronous orbit is the primary driver of this error. The analytic corrections have been added to the operational force models for the Aqua spacecraft reducing the two-year 90-second error to less than 7 seconds.

  11. Local Time-Dependent Charging in a Perovskite Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Victor W; Guo, Yunlong; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hermes, Ilka M; Li, Dan; Klasen, Alexander; Bretschneider, Simon A; Nakamura, Eiichi; Berger, Rüdiger; Weber, Stefan A L

    2016-08-01

    Efficient charge extraction within solar cells explicitly depends on the optimization of the internal interfaces. Potential barriers, unbalanced charge extraction, and interfacial trap states can prevent cells from reaching high power conversion efficiencies. In the case of perovskite solar cells, slow processes happening on time scales of seconds cause hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. In this work, we localized and investigated these slow processes using frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) on cross sections of planar methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) perovskite solar cells. FM-KPFM can map the charge density distribution and its dynamics at internal interfaces. Upon illumination, space charge layers formed at the interfaces of the selective contacts with the MAPI layer within several seconds. We observed distinct differences in the charging dynamics at the interfaces of MAPI with adjacent layers. Our results indicate that more than one process is involved in hysteresis. This finding is in agreement with recent simulation studies claiming that a combination of ion migration and interfacial trap states causes the hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. Such differences in the charging rates at different interfaces cannot be separated by conventional device measurements. PMID:27377472

  12. Activating the Desire to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullo, Bob

    2007-01-01

    Wouldn't your job be easier if students were just more interested in learning? Now, here's a book that will open your eyes to where the desire to learn actually comes from and what teachers can really do to activate it. Using stories from classroom teachers, counselors, administrators, and students, Bob Sullo explains why the desire to learn is…

  13. Paedophilia, Sexual Desire, and Perversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiecker, Ben; Steutel, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Criticizes justifications given by pedophiles for having sex with children, including an analysis of "sexual desire" and "erotic." Raises the question of whether pedophile activities can ever be morally permissible. Uses principles of mutual consent and non-exploitation to answer negatively. Examines whether pedophile desires can be regarded as…

  14. The Neural Correlates of Desire

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Hideaki; Zeki, Semir

    2008-01-01

    In an event-related fMRI study, we scanned eighteen normal human subjects while they viewed three categories of pictures (events, objects and persons) which they classified according to desirability (desirable, indifferent or undesirable). Each category produced activity in a distinct part of the visual brain, thus reflecting its functional specialization. We used conjunction analysis to learn whether there is a brain area which is always active when a desirable picture is viewed, regardless of the category to which it belongs. The conjunction analysis of the contrast desirable > undesirable revealed activity in the superior orbito-frontal cortex. This activity bore a positive linear relationship to the declared level of desirability. The conjunction analysis of desirable > indifferent revealed activity in the mid-cingulate cortex and in the anterior cingulate cortex. In the former, activity was greater for desirable and undesirable stimuli than for stimuli classed as indifferent. Other conjunction analyses produced no significant effects. These results show that categorizing any stimulus according to its desirability activates three different brain areas: the superior orbito-frontal, the mid-cingulate, and the anterior cingulate cortices. PMID:18728753

  15. Mean Velocity of Local Populations: Axiality, Age and Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael; Alcobé, Santiago

    2007-05-01

    The mean velocity of local stellar populations is analyzed by building a set of hierarchically selected samples from Hipparcos catalog, with the full space motions. The technique for scanning populations, MEMPHIS (Maximum Entropy of the Mixture Probability from HIerarchical Segregation), is a combination of two separate procedures: A sample selecting filter (Alcobé & Cubarsi 2005, A&A 442, 292) and a segregation method (Cubarsi & Alcobé 2004, A&A 427, 131). By continuously increasing the sampling parameter, in our case the absolute value of the stellar velocity, we build a set of nested subsamples containing an increasing number of populations. A bimodal pattern is then applied in order to identify differentiated kinematic populations. The resulting populations can be identified as early-type stars, young disk stars, old disk stars, and thick disk stars. Discontinuities of the velocity dispersion are found for early-type and thick disk stars, while young and old disk stars show a continuous trend that is asymptotically represented by the thin disk galactic component. Similarly, the mean velocity of early-type stars shows a particular behavior, while the remaining populations share a similar average motion. The later populations are studied on the basis of a time-dependent and non-axial Chandrasekhar model, allowing to estimate the degree of deviation from axial symmetry and steady-state hypotheses, as well as the average age of each population. According to this model, the no net radial movement point can be evaluated, having heliocentric velocities U=-18 ± 1 km/s in the radial direction, which is very close to the radial mean velocity of early-type stars, and V=-76 ± 2 km/s in rotation. The remaining populations share a common differential galactic movement, suggesting a common dynamical origin for the rupture of the axial symmetry.

  16. Time-dependent local density approximation study of attosecond time delays in the photoionization of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Madjet, Mohamed; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2016-05-01

    We investigate Wigner-Smith (WS) time delays of the photoionization from various subshells of xenon using the time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) with the Leeuwen and Baerends exchange-correlation functional. At the 4d giant dipole resonance region as well as near all the Cooper minimum anti-resonances in 5p, 5s and 4d photoemissions, effects of electron correlations uniquely determine the shapes of the emission quantum phase. The Wigner-Smith time delay derived from this phase indicates significant variations as a function of energy. The results qualitatively support our TDLDA predictions at the fullerene plasmon region and at 3p Cooper minimum in argon, and should encourage attosecond measurements of Xe photoemission via two-photon interferometric techniques, such as RABITT. The work is supported by the NSF, USA.

  17. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing.

    PubMed

    Newman, W I; Phoenix, S L

    2001-02-01

    Fiber bundle models, where fibers have random lifetimes depending on their load histories, are useful tools in explaining time-dependent failure in heterogeneous materials. Such models shed light on diverse phenomena such as fatigue in structural materials and earthquakes in geophysical settings. Various asymptotic and approximate theories have been developed for bundles with various geometries and fiber load-sharing mechanisms, but numerical verification has been hampered by severe computational demands in larger bundles. To gain insight at large size scales, interest has returned to idealized fiber bundle models in 1D. Such simplified models typically assume either equal load sharing (ELS) among survivors, or local load sharing (LLS) where a failed fiber redistributes its load onto its two nearest flanking survivors. Such models can often be solved exactly or asymptotically in increasing bundle size, N, yet still capture the essence of failure in real materials. The present work focuses on 1D bundles under LLS. As in previous works, a fiber has failure rate following a power law in its load level with breakdown exponent rho. Surviving fibers under fixed loads have remaining lifetimes that are independent and exponentially distributed. We develop both new asymptotic theories and new computational algorithms that greatly increase the bundle sizes that can be treated in large replications (e.g., one million fibers in thousands of realizations). In particular we develop an algorithm that adapts several concepts and methods that are well-known among computer scientists, but relatively unknown among physicists, to dramatically increase the computational speed with no attendant loss of accuracy. We consider various regimes of rho that yield drastically different behavior as N increases. For 1/2< or =rho< or =1, ELS and LLS have remarkably similar behavior (they have identical lifetime distributions at rho=1) with approximate Gaussian bundle lifetime statistics and a

  18. Adaptive filters for monitoring localized brain activity from surface potential time series

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, M.E. |; Leahy, R.M.; Mosher, J.C. |; Lewis, P.S.

    1992-12-01

    We address the problem of processing electroencephalographic (EEG) data to monitor the time series of the components of a current dipole source vector at a given location in the head. This is the spatial filtering problem for vector sources in a lossy, three dimensional, zero delay medium. Dipolar and distributed sources at other than the desired location are canceled or attenuated with an adaptive linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. Actual EEG data acquired from a human subject serves as the interference in a case where the desired source is simulated and superimposed on the actual data. It is shown that the LCMV beamformer extracts the desired dipole time series while effectively canceling the subjects interference.

  19. Adaptive filters for monitoring localized brain activity from surface potential time series

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, M.E. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA ); Leahy, R.M. . Signal and Image Processing Inst.); Mosher, J.C. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. Lo

    1992-01-01

    We address the problem of processing electroencephalographic (EEG) data to monitor the time series of the components of a current dipole source vector at a given location in the head. This is the spatial filtering problem for vector sources in a lossy, three dimensional, zero delay medium. Dipolar and distributed sources at other than the desired location are canceled or attenuated with an adaptive linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. Actual EEG data acquired from a human subject serves as the interference in a case where the desired source is simulated and superimposed on the actual data. It is shown that the LCMV beamformer extracts the desired dipole time series while effectively canceling the subjects interference.

  20. Development and application of a local linearization algorithm for the integration of quaternion rate equations in real-time flight simulation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. E., Jr.; Bowles, R. L.; Williams, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    High angular rates encountered in real-time flight simulation problems may require a more stable and accurate integration method than the classical methods normally used. A study was made to develop a general local linearization procedure of integrating dynamic system equations when using a digital computer in real-time. The procedure is specifically applied to the integration of the quaternion rate equations. For this application, results are compared to a classical second-order method. The local linearization approach is shown to have desirable stability characteristics and gives significant improvement in accuracy over the classical second-order integration methods.

  1. A Compelling Desire for Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veale, David

    2006-01-01

    A case is described of a patient who has a compelling and persistent desire to become deaf. She often kept cotton wool moistened with oil in her ears and was learning sign language. Living without sound appeared to be a severe form of avoidance behavior from hyperacusis and misophonia. She had a borderline personality disorder that was associated…

  2. Lifelong Learning, Policy and Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Recent lifelong learning policies have been criticized for creating an illusion of freedom whilst simultaneously reducing choice. The concept of desire permits engagement with the conscious and unconscious drives that underpin individual decision-making, which direct the life course. Utilizing the ideas of Hume and Spinoza, the present article…

  3. Space-Time Localization and Registration on the Beating Heart

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Nathan A.; Waugh, Kevin; Liu, Tian Yu Tommy; Zenati, Marco A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for localizing a miniature epicardial crawling robot, HeartLander, on the beating heart using only 6-degree-of-freedom position measurements from an electromagnetic position tracker and a dynamic surface model of the heart. Using only this information, motion and observation models of the system are developed such that a particle filter can accurately estimate not only the location of the robot on the surface of the heart, but also the pose of the heart in the world coordinate frame as well as the current physiological phase of the heart. The presented framework is then demonstrated in simulation on a dynamic 3-D model of the human heart and a robot motion model which accurately mimics the behavior of the HeartLander robot. PMID:24511430

  4. Time-independent quantum circuits with local interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifnashri, Sahand; Kianvash, Farzad; Nobakht, Jahangir; Karimipour, Vahid

    2016-06-01

    Heisenberg spin chains can act as quantum wires transferring quantum states either perfectly or with high fidelity. Gaussian packets of excitations passing through dual rails can encode the two states of a logical qubit, depending on which rail is empty and which rail is carrying the packet. With extra interactions in one or between different chains, one can introduce interaction zones in arrays of such chains, where specific one- or two-qubit gates act on any qubit which passes through these interaction zones. Therefore, universal quantum computation is made possible in a static way where no external control is needed. This scheme will then pave the way for a scalable way of quantum computation where specific hardware can be connected to make large quantum circuits. Our scheme is an improvement of a recent scheme where we borrowed an idea from quantum electrodynamics to replace nonlocal interactions between spin chains with local interactions mediated by an ancillary chain.

  5. Memory trace and timing mechanism localized to cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Fredrik; Jirenhed, Dan-Anders; Rasmussen, Anders; Zucca, Riccardo; Hesslow, Germund

    2014-10-14

    The standard view of the mechanisms underlying learning is that they involve strengthening or weakening synaptic connections. Learned response timing is thought to combine such plasticity with temporally patterned inputs to the neuron. We show here that a cerebellar Purkinje cell in a ferret can learn to respond to a specific input with a temporal pattern of activity consisting of temporally specific increases and decreases in firing over hundreds of milliseconds without a temporally patterned input. Training Purkinje cells with direct stimulation of immediate afferents, the parallel fibers, and pharmacological blocking of interneurons shows that the timing mechanism is intrinsic to the cell itself. Purkinje cells can learn to respond not only with increased or decreased firing but also with an adaptively timed activity pattern. PMID:25267641

  6. Local feature saliency classifier for real-time intrusion monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Norbert; Velastin, Sergio A.

    2014-07-01

    We propose a texture saliency classifier to detect people in a video frame by identifying salient texture regions. The image is classified into foreground and background in real time. No temporal image information is used during the classification. The system is used for the task of detecting people entering a sterile zone, which is a common scenario for visual surveillance. Testing is performed on the Imagery Library for Intelligent Detection Systems sterile zone benchmark dataset of the United Kingdom's Home Office. The basic classifier is extended by fusing its output with simple motion information, which significantly outperforms standard motion tracking. A lower detection time can be achieved by combining texture classification with Kalman filtering. The fusion approach running at 10 fps gives the highest result of F1=0.92 for the 24-h test dataset. The paper concludes with a detailed analysis of the computation time required for the different parts of the algorithm.

  7. Time Variable Gravity from Local Mascon Analysis of GRACE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Klosko, Steven M.; Rowlands, David; Chinn, Douglas S.; McCarthy, John J.; Cox, Christopher M.; Williams, Terry A.; Pavlis, Despina E.

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed GRACE Level 1-B data in 2003 and assessed a new approach for extracting time variable gravity that isolates the gravity signal in both time and space. The Level-1B satellite-to-satellite range rate (KBRR) data and accelerometry are processed in daily arcs using the precise orbit products produced by the GRACE team from GPS to calibrate both the accelerometer and KBRR data. We then adjusted select components of the intersatellite baseline vector for each data segment isolated to the region of interest. Herein, we solved for mass anomalies in 45 deg x 45 deg blocks over the Amazon and the nearby Atlantic Ocean and estimate mass flux in units of cm of water over each block. We show with this approach that we can recover mass anomalies on a submonthly basis with 10 to 15 day temporal resolution. We discuss the important issues related to this solution, including the size of the mascon blocks, the weight given to the temporal and spatial constraint used to stabalize the solutions, as well as the optimal correlation in time and distance. We compare the the mascon results with solutions obtained from the more standard approach using spherical harmonics and with independent hydrology models and lake data. This technique demonstrates that sub-monthly medium wavelength mass flux phenomena are well sensed by the hyper-precise line of sight velocity data produced from GRACE.

  8. Spike-Timing-Based Computation in Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Dan F. M.; Brette, Romain

    2010-01-01

    Spike timing is precise in the auditory system and it has been argued that it conveys information about auditory stimuli, in particular about the location of a sound source. However, beyond simple time differences, the way in which neurons might extract this information is unclear and the potential computational advantages are unknown. The computational difficulty of this task for an animal is to locate the source of an unexpected sound from two monaural signals that are highly dependent on the unknown source signal. In neuron models consisting of spectro-temporal filtering and spiking nonlinearity, we found that the binaural structure induced by spatialized sounds is mapped to synchrony patterns that depend on source location rather than on source signal. Location-specific synchrony patterns would then result in the activation of location-specific assemblies of postsynaptic neurons. We designed a spiking neuron model which exploited this principle to locate a variety of sound sources in a virtual acoustic environment using measured human head-related transfer functions. The model was able to accurately estimate the location of previously unknown sounds in both azimuth and elevation (including front/back discrimination) in a known acoustic environment. We found that multiple representations of different acoustic environments could coexist as sets of overlapping neural assemblies which could be associated with spatial locations by Hebbian learning. The model demonstrates the computational relevance of relative spike timing to extract spatial information about sources independently of the source signal. PMID:21085681

  9. Flibanserin and Female Sexual Desire.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2016-01-01

    Female hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is one type of sexual problem that can affect women. It is characterized by low or absent sexual desire that cannot be attributed to another cause and results in difficulty in interpersonal relationships. HSDD is not well understood, and women may not report symptoms of difficulties to their health care providers. In August 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved flibanserin, a nonhormonal oral medication for the treatment of HSDD in premenopausal women. Flibanserin is the only currently available pharmacologic treatment for HSDD. This article will provide an overview of flibanserin, including potential adverse reactions, special considerations for use, and implications for nursing practice. PMID:27287358

  10. Dynamic regimes of local homogeneous population model with time lag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neverova, Galina; Frisman, Efim

    2016-06-01

    We investigated Moran - Ricker model with time lag 1. It is made analytical and numerical study of the model. It is shown there is co-existence of various dynamic regimes under the same values of parameters. The model simultaneously possesses several different limit regimes: stable state, periodic fluctuations, and chaotic attractor. The research results show if present population size substantially depends on population number of previous year then it is observed quasi-periodic oscillations. Fluctuations with period 2 occur when the growth of population size is regulated by density dependence in the current year.

  11. Energy-momentum localization in Marder space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygün, S.; Saygün, M.; Tarhan, I.

    2007-01-01

    Considering the Einstein, Møller, Bergmann--Thomson, Landau--Lifshitz (LL), Papapetrou, Qadir--Sharif and Weinberg's definitions in general relativity, we find the momentum four-vector of the closed Universe based on Marder space--time. The momentum four-vector (due to matter plus field) is found to be zero. These results support the viewpoints of Banerjee--Sen, Xulu and Aydogdu--Salti. Another point is that our study agrees with the previous works of Cooperstock--Israelit, Rosen, Johri et al.

  12. Desirable Difficulties in Vocabulary Learning.

    PubMed

    Bjork, Robert A; Kroll, Judith F

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss the role of desirable difficulties in vocabulary learning from two perspectives, one having to do with identifying conditions of learning that impose initial challenges to the learner but then benefit later retention and transfer, and the other having to do with the role of certain difficulties that are intrinsic to language processes, are engaged during word learning, and reflect how language is understood and produced. From each perspective we discuss evidence that supports the notion that difficulties in learning and imposed costs to language processing may produce benefits because they are likely to increase conceptual understanding. We then consider the consequences of these processes for actual second-language learning and suggest that some of the domain-general cognitive advantages that have been reported for proficient bilinguals may reflect difficulties imposed by the learning process, and by the requirement to negotiate cross-language competition, that are broadly desirable. As Alice Healy and her collaborators were perhaps the first to demonstrate, research on desirable difficulties in vocabulary and language learning holds the promise of bringing together research traditions on memory and language that have much to offer each other. PMID:26255443

  13. Desirable Difficulties in Vocabulary Learning

    PubMed Central

    BJORK, ROBERT A.; KROLL, JUDITH F.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we discuss the role of desirable difficulties in vocabulary learning from two perspectives, one having to do with identifying conditions of learning that impose initial challenges to the learner but then benefit later retention and transfer, and the other having to do with the role of certain difficulties that are intrinsic to language processes, are engaged during word learning, and reflect how language is understood and produced. From each perspective we discuss evidence that supports the notion that difficulties in learning and imposed costs to language processing may produce benefits because they are likely to increase conceptual understanding. We then consider the consequences of these processes for actual second-language learning and suggest that some of the domain-general cognitive advantages that have been reported for proficient bilinguals may reflect difficulties imposed by the learning process, and by the requirement to negotiate cross-language competition, that are broadly desirable. As Alice Healy and her collaborators were perhaps the first to demonstrate, research on desirable difficulties in vocabulary and language learning holds the promise of bringing together research traditions on memory and language that have much to offer each other. PMID:26255443

  14. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  15. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm-diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  16. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ninad B.; Wohlgemuth, Melville J.; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment. PMID:24860509

  17. Water age, exposure time, and local flushing time in semi-enclosed, tidal basins with negligible freshwater inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; Defina, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of tidally flushed, semi-enclosed basins with negligible freshwater inflow, and under steady periodic flow conditions, three frequently used local transport time scales to quantify the efficiency of water renewal, namely water age, exposure time, and local flushing time are studied and compared to each other. In these environments, water renewal is strongly controlled by diffusion, and it is significantly affected by the return flow (i.e., the fraction of effluent water that returns into the basin on each flood tide). The definition of water age is here modified to account for the return flow, in analogy with exposure time and local flushing time. We consider approximate time scales, whose accuracy is analyzed, in order to overcome problems related to the size of the computational domain and to reduce the computational effort. A new approximate procedure is introduced to estimate water age, which is based on the water aging rate. Also, the concept of local flushing time as a relevant time scale is introduced. Under steady periodic conditions, we demonstrate that the local flushing time quantitatively corresponds to water age, and well approximates exposure time when the flow is dominated by diffusion. Since the effort required to compute water age and exposure time is greater than that required to compute the local flushing time, the present results can also have a practical interest in the assessment of water renewal efficiency of semi-enclosed water basins. The results of a modeling study, in which the lagoon of Venice is used as a benchmark, confirm the substantial quantitative equivalence between these three transport time scales in highly diffusive environments.

  18. Visualizing desirable patient healthcare experiences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sandra S; Kim, Hyung T; Chen, Jie; An, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    High healthcare cost has drawn much attention and healthcare service providers (HSPs) are expected to deliver high-quality and consistent care. Therefore, an intimate understanding of the most desirable experience from a patient's and/or family's perspective as well as effective mapping and communication of such findings should facilitate HSPs' efforts in attaining sustainable competitive advantage in an increasingly discerning environment. This study describes (a) the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the experience desired by patients and (b) the application of two visualization tools that are relatively new to the healthcare sector, namely the "spider-web diagram" and "promotion and detraction matrix." The visualization tools are tested with primary data collected from telephone surveys of 1,800 patients who had received care during calendar year 2005 at 6 of 61 hospitals within St. Louis, Missouri-based, Ascension Health. Five CQAs were found by factor analysis. The spider-web diagram illustrates that communication and empowerment and compassionate and respectful care are the most important CQAs, and accordingly, the promotion and detraction matrix shows those attributes that have the greatest effect for creating promoters, preventing detractors, and improving consumer's likelihood to recommend the healthcare provider. PMID:20155554

  19. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore » readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  20. Localization of Parathyroid Adenoma With Real-Time Ultrasound: Freehand SPECT Fusion.

    PubMed

    Bluemel, Christina; Kirchner, Paul; Kajdi, Georg W; Werner, Rudolf A; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Preoperative localization of parathyroid adenoma in primary hyperparathyroidism gains in importance as there is a trend toward minimally invasive parathyroid surgery. Besides MRI, 4-dimensional CT, PET/CT, invasive-selective venous sampling, or angiography, both ultrasound and scintigraphy are standard of care for lesion localization. Here we report on a 53-year-old woman with suspicion of primary hyperparathyroidism using real-time fusion of scintigraphic (freehand SPECT) and ultrasound imaging for adenoma localization. Real-time fusion of ultrasound and freehand SPECT allowed noninvasive dedicated metabolic and anatomic adenoma localization and treatment planning. PMID:26284776

  1. A METHOD TO INCORPORATE ECOLOGY INTO RESIDENCE TIME OF CHEMICALS IN EMBAYMENTS: LOCAL EFFECT TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residence times are classically defined by the physical and chemical aspects of water bodies rather than by their ecological implications. Therefore, a more clear and direct connection between the residence times and ecological effects is necessary to quantitatively relate these ...

  2. Time-local Heisenberg-Langevin equations and the driven qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, S. J.; Carmichael, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    The time-local master equation for a driven boson system interacting with a boson environment is derived by way of a time-local Heisenberg-Langevin equation. Extension to the driven qubit fails—except for weak excitation—due to the lost linearity of the system-environment interaction. We show that a reported time-local master equation for the driven qubit is incorrect. As a corollary to our demonstration, we also uncover odd asymptotic behavior in the "repackaged" time-local dynamics of a system driven to a far-from-equilibrium steady state: the density operator becomes steady while time-dependent coefficients oscillate (with periodic singularities) forever.

  3. Local time occurrence frequency of energetic ions in the earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Hill, P.; Baumjohann, W.; Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The occurrence frequency of energetic ions in the energy range from 8 to 40 keV/e as a function of local time in the magnetosheath is presented. Energetic ions are observed in the magnetosheath with a minimum probability of 25 percent for all local times. The occurrence frequency for the energetic ions is higher on the dawnside than on the duskside but shows a relative maximum postnoon in the local time range from 12 to 15 hours. The postnoon relative maximum is attributed to a magnetospheric source for the energetic ions while the dawn-dusk asymmetry is attributed to a quasi-parallel bow shock source.

  4. A survey on farmers' fertility desires.

    PubMed

    1996-04-01

    This news brief presents findings from a survey of fertility desires among 10,000 farm households in 1400 villages, 140 townships, and 14 counties in Hunan Province, China. Findings reveal that farmers fully support the present national family planning program. Farmers believe that smaller families will contribute to higher incomes and improvement in people's lives. 1.51% of farmers were dissatisfied with the family planning program, and 2.48% desired more children. During 1982 to the present, the average number of births in Huanglongxincum Village, Huanghua Town, Changsha County, declined from 76 to 26 births. The average net per capita income increased from 100 yuan to 3000 yuan. Five couples with only daughters declined the offer of second birth quotas. A woman from Shou Hongsheng, Heliao Township, Zhigiang County, had an only daughter and left with her family for another village in 1991 with the hope of having a second child. Instead the couple prospered, and net annual family income from a specialized fruit production business increased to 40,000 yuan yearly. By 1994, the couple was given permission to have a second child, but the couple turned down the offer. Local provincial family planning officials believe these changes in attitude among farmers are a hopeful sign and the highest award given by the people to the public sector. PMID:12347489

  5. Efficient Multi-Stage Time Marching for Viscous Flows via Local Preconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Wood, William A.; vanLeer, Bram

    1999-01-01

    A new method has been developed to accelerate the convergence of explicit time-marching, laminar, Navier-Stokes codes through the combination of local preconditioning and multi-stage time marching optimization. Local preconditioning is a technique to modify the time-dependent equations so that all information moves or decays at nearly the same rate, thus relieving the stiffness for a system of equations. Multi-stage time marching can be optimized by modifying its coefficients to account for the presence of viscous terms, allowing larger time steps. We show it is possible to optimize the time marching scheme for a wide range of cell Reynolds numbers for the scalar advection-diffusion equation, and local preconditioning allows this optimization to be applied to the Navier-Stokes equations. Convergence acceleration of the new method is demonstrated through numerical experiments with circular advection and laminar boundary-layer flow over a flat plate.

  6. Local regularity for time-dependent tug-of-war games with varying probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Mikko; Ruosteenoja, Eero

    2016-07-01

    We study local regularity properties of value functions of time-dependent tug-of-war games. For games with constant probabilities we get local Lipschitz continuity. For more general games with probabilities depending on space and time we obtain Hölder and Harnack estimates. The games have a connection to the normalized p (x , t)-parabolic equation ut = Δu + (p (x , t) - 2) Δ∞Nu.

  7. From desires to behavior: Moderating factors in a fertility transition

    PubMed Central

    Hayford, Sarah R.; Agadjanian, Victor

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensive research in both developed and developing countries has shown that preferences and intentions for future childbearing predict behavior. However, very little of this research has examined high-fertility contexts in sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, the factors that increase or decrease correspondence between fertility desires and behavior in these settings are not well understood. OBJECTIVE This article documents the degree to which the desire to stop childbearing predicts fertility behavior over the short term among married women in rural southern Mozambique, a context where fertility transition is still in the early stages. Analyses test the moderating powers of individual, household, and community characteristics. METHODS Analyses use data from a longitudinal survey of married women of reproductive age (N=1678) carried out in 2006 and 2009 in rural areas of southern Mozambique. Logistic regression models are estimated to predict childbearing between 2006 and 2009 based on desires to stop childbearing and characteristics measured in 2006. RESULTS As expected, the desire to stop childbearing is strongly predictive of fertility behavior. Household wealth, local adult AIDS mortality, and being married to an unsuccessful labor migrant are associated with higher correspondence between reported desire to stop childbearing and fertility behavior. CONCLUSIONS Both factors related to the ability to carry out desires to stop childbearing and factors related to the strength and consistency of these desires moderate the association between desires and behaviors. Future research should expand measurement of fertility preferences to incorporate their strength and consistency as well as direction. PMID:23626485

  8. Quasi-local mass in the covariant Newtonian space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Huei; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2008-10-01

    In general relativity, quasi-local energy-momentum expressions have been constructed from various formulae. However, Newtonian theory of gravity gives a well known and an unique quasi-local mass expression (surface integration). Since geometrical formulation of Newtonian gravity has been established in the covariant Newtonian space-time, it provides a covariant approximation from relativistic to Newtonian theories. By using this approximation, we calculate Komar integral, Brown-York quasi-local energy and Dougan-Mason quasi-local mass in the covariant Newtonian space-time. It turns out that Komar integral naturally gives the Newtonian quasi-local mass expression, however, further conditions (spherical symmetry) need to be made for Brown-York and Dougan-Mason expressions.

  9. If time is a local observable, then Hawking radiation is unitary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Hrvoje

    2014-08-01

    In the usual formulation of quantum theory, time is a global classical evolution parameter, not a local quantum observable. On the other hand, both canonical quantum gravity (which lacks fundamental time-evolution parameter) and the principle of spacetime covariance (which insists that time should be treated on an equal footing with space) suggest that quantum theory should be slightly reformulated, in a manner that promotes time to a local observable. Such a reformulated quantum theory is unitary in a more general sense than the usual quantum theory. In particular, this promotes the non-unitary Hawking radiation to a unitary phenomenon, which avoids the black-hole information paradox.

  10. Local Stable and Unstable Manifolds and Their Control in Nonautonomous Finite-Time Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that stable and unstable manifolds strongly influence fluid motion in unsteady flows. These emanate from hyperbolic trajectories, with the structures moving nonautonomously in time. The local directions of emanation at each instance in time is the focus of this article. Within a nearly autonomous setting, it is shown that these time-varying directions can be characterised through the accumulated effect of velocity shear. Connections to Oseledets spaces and projection operators in exponential dichotomies are established. Availability of data for both infinite- and finite-time intervals is considered. With microfluidic flow control in mind, a methodology for manipulating these directions in any prescribed time-varying fashion by applying a local velocity shear is developed. The results are verified for both smoothly and discontinuously time-varying directions using finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  11. Local Stable and Unstable Manifolds and Their Control in Nonautonomous Finite-Time Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that stable and unstable manifolds strongly influence fluid motion in unsteady flows. These emanate from hyperbolic trajectories, with the structures moving nonautonomously in time. The local directions of emanation at each instance in time is the focus of this article. Within a nearly autonomous setting, it is shown that these time-varying directions can be characterised through the accumulated effect of velocity shear. Connections to Oseledets spaces and projection operators in exponential dichotomies are established. Availability of data for both infinite- and finite-time intervals is considered. With microfluidic flow control in mind, a methodology for manipulating these directions in any prescribed time-varying fashion by applying a local velocity shear is developed. The results are verified for both smoothly and discontinuously time-varying directions using finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  12. Improving electroencephalographic source localization of epileptogenic zones with time-frequency analysis.

    PubMed

    Cuspineda-Bravo, Elena R; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo; Farach-Fumero, Miguel; Machado-Curbelo, Calixto

    2015-04-01

    The combination of recently developed methods for electroencephalographic (EEG) space-time-frequency analysis can provide noninvasive functional neuroimages necessary for obtaining an accurate localization of the epileptogenic zone. The aim of this study was to determine if time-frequency (TF) analysis, followed by EEG source localization, would improve the detection and identification of epileptogenic and related activity. Seventeen patients with refractory frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) were studied using video EEG recording. TF analysis identified the first epileptogenic EEG changes. Using the Bayesian model averaging (BMA) approach, we compared brain electromagnetic tomographic (BET) images, constructed from the TF domain, with BET images constructed from the time domain only. We determined if the localization identified by BET images was concordant with the localization from medical history and video EEG recording. TF analysis provided a clear display of subtle EEG features, including EEG lateralization, and more concordant and delimited epileptogenic zones, compared with time-domain source analysis. In conclusion, EEG TF analysis improves source localization. After a thorough validation, this methodology could become a useful noninvasive tool for localizing the epileptogenic zone in clinical practice. PMID:24879437

  13. Bibliotherapy for low sexual desire: evidence for effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Mintz, Laurie B; Balzer, Alexandra M; Zhao, Xinting; Bush, Hannah E

    2012-07-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of bibliotherapy for low sexual desire among women, which is the most frequent sexual concern brought to counselors. Forty-five women responded to an advertisement for participation in a study on low sexual desire and were assigned to either the intervention or the wait-list control group. The intervention group completed the Hurlbert Index of Sexual Desire (HISD; Apt & Hurlbert, 1992) and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI; R. Rosen et al., 2000), read the self-help book under study in 6 weeks, and completed the measures a second time. The control group completed the same measures 6 weeks apart. Results demonstrated that the intervention group made statistically greater gains over time as compared with the control group on measures of sexual desire (HISD and FSFI Desire subscale), sexual arousal (FSFI Arousal subscale), sexual satisfaction (FSFI Satisfaction subscale), and overall sexual functioning (FSFI Total Score). A subset of participants in the intervention group participated in a 7-week follow-up study, and these participants maintained their gains in sexual desire and overall sexual functioning. Findings have important implications for future research on the efficacy of bibliotherapy generally and for low sexual desire specifically. Results also have vital implications for the treatment of low sexual desire. PMID:22774869

  14. Numerical approximations to nonlinear conservation laws with locally varying time and space grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, S.; Sanders, R.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical approximations to the initial value problem for nonlinear systems of conservation laws are considered. The considered system is said to be hyperbolic when all eigenvalues of every real linear combination of the Jacobian matrices are real. Solutions may develop discontinuities in finite time, even when the initial data are smooth. In the investigation, explicit finite difference methods which use locally varying time grids are considered. The global CFL restriction is replaced by a local restriction. The numerical flux function is studied from a finite volume viewpoint, and a differencing technique is developed at interface points between regions of distinct time increments.

  15. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouch, Gabriel D.

    In a very general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems, the infinite volume limit of the complex-time evolution of a local observable is an entire analytic function of the time variable and obeys a locality principle. This result has recently been used to prove a number of important results in statistical mechanics. In dimensions greater than one, although it has not been expected that the infinite volume limit of the complex-time evolution of a general local observable will be entire analytic, nothing rigorous has been established concerning the breakdown of analyticity or the nature of the singularities, if they exist. In this work we begin by presenting a possible approach to proving locality bounds for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of quantum spin systems in any dimension. Then we specifically apply this approach to the one-dimensional case, and establish entire analyticity of the dynamics as a corollary. In dimensions greater than one, ideas related to the much studied Eden growth process suggest that a similar locality result will also hold. In particular, we establish an upper bound on the expected perimeter of lattice animals grown according to an Eden growth process, and note that a similar upper bound on a closely related average perimeter would lead to a locality result in the plane. Finally, and perhaps unexpectedly, we demonstrate through a specific construction that such a locality result does not hold in general and that the infinite volume limit of the complex-time dynamics can blow up a finite distance along the imaginary-time axis.

  16. Pleasure/Desire, Sexularism and Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Mary Louise

    2012-01-01

    Pleasure and desire have been important components of researchers' vision for sexuality education for over 20 years, a trend inspired by Michelle Fine's seminal paper, "Sexuality, Schooling, and Adolescent Females: The Missing Discourse of Desire." This essay considers how discourses related to pleasure and desire have been taken up in the USA and…

  17. Producing graphite with desired properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. M.; Imprescia, R. J.; Reiswig, R. D.; Smith, M. C.

    1971-01-01

    Isotropic or anisotropic graphite is synthesized with precise control of particle size, distribution, and shape. The isotropic graphites are nearly perfectly isotropic, with thermal expansion coefficients two or three times those of ordinary graphites. The anisotropic graphites approach the anisotropy of pyrolytic graphite.

  18. Clinical service desires of medical cannabis patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medical cannabis dispensaries following the social or hybrid model offer supplementary holistic services in addition to dispensing medical cannabis. Historically, alternative physical health services have been the norm for these dispensaries, including services such as yoga, acupuncture, or chiropractor visits. A clinical service dearth remains for medical cannabis patients seeking substance use, misuse, dependence, and mental health services. This study examined patient desires for various clinical services and level of willingness to participate in specific clinical services. Methods Anonymous survey data (N = 303) were collected at Harborside Health Center (HHC), a medical cannabis dispensary in Oakland, CA. The sample was 70% male, 48% Caucasian and 21% African American. The mean male age was 38 years old and female mean age was 30. Sixty two percent of the male participants and 44% of the female participants are single. Sixteen percent of the population reported having a domestic partner. Forty six percent of the participants are employed full time, 41% have completed at least some college, and 49% make less than $40,000 a year. Results A significant portion of the sample, 62%, indicated a desire to participate in free clinical services at HHC, 34% would like more information about substances and use, and 41% want to learn more about reducing harms from substance use. About one quarter of the participants marked "would" or "likely would" participate in individual services such as consultation. Approximately 20% indicated "would" or "likely would" participate in psycho-educational forums, harm reduction information sharing sessions, online support groups, and coping, life, and social skills group. There was little interest in traditional NA/AA 12-step groups or adapted 12-step groups. Conclusions Desired clinical services can be qualified as a combination of harm reduction, educational, skills-based, peer support and therapeutic individual and group

  19. Dynamical localization in chaotic systems: spectral statistics and localization measure in the kicked rotator as a paradigm for time-dependent and time-independent systems.

    PubMed

    Manos, Thanos; Robnik, Marko

    2013-06-01

    We study the kicked rotator in the classically fully chaotic regime using Izrailev's N-dimensional model for various N≤4000, which in the limit N→∞ tends to the quantized kicked rotator. We do treat not only the case K=5, as studied previously, but also many different values of the classical kick parameter 5≤K≤35 and many different values of the quantum parameter kε[5,60]. We describe the features of dynamical localization of chaotic eigenstates as a paradigm for other both time-periodic and time-independent (autonomous) fully chaotic or/and mixed-type Hamilton systems. We generalize the scaling variable Λ=l(∞)/N to the case of anomalous diffusion in the classical phase space by deriving the localization length l(∞) for the case of generalized classical diffusion. We greatly improve the accuracy and statistical significance of the numerical calculations, giving rise to the following conclusions: (1) The level-spacing distribution of the eigenphases (or quasienergies) is very well described by the Brody distribution, systematically better than by other proposed models, for various Brody exponents β(BR). (2) We study the eigenfunctions of the Floquet operator and characterize their localization properties using the information entropy measure, which after normalization is given by β(loc) in the interval [0,1]. The level repulsion parameters β(BR) and β(loc) are almost linearly related, close to the identity line. (3) We show the existence of a scaling law between β(loc) and the relative localization length Λ, now including the regimes of anomalous diffusion. The above findings are important also for chaotic eigenstates in time-independent systems [Batistić and Robnik, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 43, 215101 (2010); arXiv:1302.7174 (2013)], where the Brody distribution is confirmed to a very high degree of precision for dynamically localized chaotic eigenstates, even in the mixed-type systems (after separation of regular and chaotic eigenstates). PMID

  20. Local time asymmetries and toroidal field line resonances: Global magnetospheric modeling in SWMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellington, S. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2016-03-01

    We present evidence of resonant wave-wave coupling via toroidal field line resonance (FLR) signatures in the Space Weather Modeling Framework's (SWMF) global, terrestrial magnetospheric model in one simulation driven by a synthetic upstream solar wind with embedded broadband dynamic pressure fluctuations. Using in situ, stationary point measurements of the radial electric field along the 1500 LT meridian, we show that SWMF reproduces a multiharmonic, continuous distribution of FLRs exemplified by 180° phase reversals and amplitude peaks across the resonant L shells. By linearly increasing the amplitude of the dynamic pressure fluctuations in time, we observe a commensurate increase in the amplitude of the radial electric and azimuthal magnetic field fluctuations, which is consistent with the solar wind driver being the dominant source of the fast mode energy. While we find no discernible local time changes in the FLR frequencies despite large-scale, monotonic variations in the dayside equatorial mass density, in selectively sampling resonant points and examining spectral resonance widths, we observe significant radial, harmonic, and time-dependent local time asymmetries in the radial electric field amplitudes. A weak but persistent local time asymmetry exists in measures of the estimated coupling efficiency between the fast mode and toroidal wave fields, which exhibits a radial dependence consistent with the coupling strength examined by Mann et al. (1999) and Zhu and Kivelson (1988). We discuss internal structural mechanisms and additional external energy sources that may account for these asymmetries as we find that local time variations in the strength of the compressional driver are not the predominant source of the FLR amplitude asymmetries. These include resonant mode coupling of observed Kelvin-Helmholtz surface wave generated Pc5 band ultralow frequency pulsations, local time differences in local ionospheric dampening rates, and variations in azimuthal

  1. Space-Time Hierarchical-Graph Based Cooperative Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Tiejun; Gao, Hui; Li, Xiaopeng; Yang, Shaoshi; Hanzo, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that cooperative localization is capable of improving both the positioning accuracy and coverage in scenarios where the global positioning system (GPS) has a poor performance. However, due to its potentially excessive computational complexity, at the time of writing the application of cooperative localization remains limited in practice. In this paper, we address the efficient cooperative positioning problem in wireless sensor networks. A space-time hierarchical-graph based scheme exhibiting fast convergence is proposed for localizing the agent nodes. In contrast to conventional methods, agent nodes are divided into different layers with the aid of the space-time hierarchical-model and their positions are estimated gradually. In particular, an information propagation rule is conceived upon considering the quality of positional information. According to the rule, the information always propagates from the upper layers to a certain lower layer and the message passing process is further optimized at each layer. Hence, the potential error propagation can be mitigated. Additionally, both position estimation and position broadcasting are carried out by the sensor nodes. Furthermore, a sensor activation mechanism is conceived, which is capable of significantly reducing both the energy consumption and the network traffic overhead incurred by the localization process. The analytical and numerical results provided demonstrate the superiority of our space-time hierarchical-graph based cooperative localization scheme over the benchmarking schemes considered.

  2. Fourth order exponential time differencing method with local discontinuous Galerkin approximation for coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Xiao; Khaliq, Abdul Q. M.; Xing, Yulong

    2015-01-23

    In this paper, we study a local discontinuous Galerkin method combined with fourth order exponential time differencing Runge-Kutta time discretization and a fourth order conservative method for solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Based on different choices of numerical fluxes, we propose both energy-conserving and energy-dissipative local discontinuous Galerkin methods, and have proven the error estimates for the semi-discrete methods applied to linear Schrödinger equation. The numerical methods are proven to be highly efficient and stable for long-range soliton computations. Finally, extensive numerical examples are provided to illustrate the accuracy, efficiency and reliability of the proposed methods.

  3. Local dominance of exotic plants declines with residence time: a role for plant–soil feedback?

    PubMed Central

    Speek, Tanja A.A.; Schaminée, Joop H.J.; Stam, Jeltje M.; Lotz, Lambertus A.P.; Ozinga, Wim A.; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that introduced exotic plant species may be released from their native soil-borne pathogens, but that they become exposed to increased soil pathogen activity in the new range when time since introduction increases. Other studies have shown that introduced exotic plant species become less dominant when time since introduction increases, and that plant abundance may be controlled by soil-borne pathogens; however, no study yet has tested whether these soil effects might explain the decline in dominance of exotic plant species following their initial invasiveness. Here we determine plant–soil feedback of 20 plant species that have been introduced into The Netherlands. We tested the hypotheses that (i) exotic plant species with a longer residence time have a more negative soil feedback and (ii) greater local dominance of the introduced exotic plant species correlates with less negative, or more positive, plant–soil feedback. Although the local dominance of exotic plant species decreased with time since introduction, there was no relationship of local dominance with plant–soil feedback. Plant–soil feedback also did not become more negative with increasing time since introduction. We discuss why our results may deviate from some earlier published studies and why plant–soil feedback may not in all cases, or not in all comparisons, explain patterns of local dominance of introduced exotic plant species. PMID:25770013

  4. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer

  5. Local Rainfall Forecast System based on Time Series Analysis and Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendia-Buendía, F. S.; López Carrión, F.; Tarquis, A. M.; Buendía Moya, G.; Andina, D.

    2010-05-01

    Rainfall is one of the most important events in daily life of human beings. During several decades, scientists have been trying to characterize the weather, current forecasts are based on high complex dynamic models. In this paper is presented a local rainfall forecast system based on Time Series analysis and Neural Networks. This model tries to complement the currently state of the art ensembles, from a locally historical perspective, where the model definition is not so dependent from the exact values of the initial conditions. After several years taking data, expert meteorologists proposed this approximation to characterize the local weather behaviour, that is automated by this system. The current system predicts rainfall events over Valladolid within a time period of a month with a twelve hours accuracy. The different blocks of the system is explained as well as the work introduces how to apply the forecast system to prevent economical impact hazards produced by rainfalls.

  6. Local Rainfall Forecast System based on Time Series Analysis and Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buendia, Fulgencio S.; Tarquis, A. M.; Buendia, G.; Andina, D.

    2010-05-01

    Rainfall is one of the most important events in daily life of human beings. During several decades, scientists have been trying to characterize the weather, current forecasts are based on high complex dynamic models. In this paper is presented a local rainfall forecast system based on Time Series analysis and Neural Networks. This model tries to complement the currently state of the art ensembles, from a locally historical perspective, where the model definition is not so dependent from the exact values of the initial conditions. After several year taking data, expert meteorologists proposed this approximation to characterize the local weather behavior, that is being automated by this system in different stages. However the whole system is introduced, it is focused on the different rainfall events situation classification as well as the time series analysis and forecast

  7. Causal-Path Local Time-Stepping in the discontinuous Galerkin method for Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo, L. D.; Alvarez, J.; Teixeira, F. L.; Pantoja, M. F.; Garcia, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel local time-stepping technique for marching-in-time algorithms. The technique is denoted as Causal-Path Local Time-Stepping (CPLTS) and it is applied for two time integration techniques: fourth-order low-storage explicit Runge-Kutta (LSERK4) and second-order Leap-Frog (LF2). The CPLTS method is applied to evolve Maxwell's curl equations using a Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme for the spatial discretization. Numerical results for LF2 and LSERK4 are compared with analytical solutions and the Montseny's LF2 technique. The results show that the CPLTS technique improves the dispersive and dissipative properties of LF2-LTS scheme.

  8. A conservative finite volume scheme with time-accurate local time stepping for scalar transport on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, José Rafael; Dumbser, Michael; Motta-Marques, David da; Fragoso Junior, Carlos Ruberto

    2015-12-01

    In this article we propose a new conservative high resolution TVD (total variation diminishing) finite volume scheme with time-accurate local time stepping (LTS) on unstructured grids for the solution of scalar transport problems, which are typical in the context of water quality simulations. To keep the presentation of the new method as simple as possible, the algorithm is only derived in two space dimensions and for purely convective transport problems, hence neglecting diffusion and reaction terms. The new numerical method for the solution of the scalar transport is directly coupled to the hydrodynamic model of Casulli and Walters (2000) that provides the dynamics of the free surface and the velocity vector field based on a semi-implicit discretization of the shallow water equations. Wetting and drying is handled rigorously by the nonlinear algorithm proposed by Casulli (2009). The new time-accurate LTS algorithm allows a different time step size for each element of the unstructured grid, based on an element-local Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) stability condition. The proposed method does not need any synchronization between different time steps of different elements and is by construction locally and globally conservative. The LTS scheme is based on a piecewise linear polynomial reconstruction in space-time using the MUSCL-Hancock method, to obtain second order of accuracy in both space and time. The new algorithm is first validated on some classical test cases for pure advection problems, for which exact solutions are known. In all cases we obtain a very good level of accuracy, showing also numerical convergence results; we furthermore confirm mass conservation up to machine precision and observe an improved computational efficiency compared to a standard second order TVD scheme for scalar transport with global time stepping (GTS). Then, the new LTS method is applied to some more complex problems, where the new scalar transport scheme has also been coupled to

  9. Local volume-time averaged equations of motion for dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.; Slattery, J.C.

    1980-11-01

    In most flows of liquids and their vapors, the phases are dispersed randomly in both space and time. These dispersed flows can be described only statistically or in terms of averages. Local volume-time averaging is used here to derive a self-consistent set of equations governing momentum and energy transfer in dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows. The empiricisms required for use with these equations are the subject of current research.

  10. Geometrical properties of an internal local octonionic space in curved space time

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, S.; Oliveira, C.G.

    1986-04-01

    A geometrical treatment on a flat tangent space local to a generalized complex, quaternionic, and octonionic space-time is constructed. It is shown that it is possible to find an Einstein-Maxwell-Yang-Mills correspondence in this generalized (Minkowskian) tangent space. 9 refs.

  11. Three-dimensional localization of low activity gamma-ray sources in real-time scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.; Lee, Hyoung K.

    2016-03-01

    Radioactive source localization plays an important role in tracking radiation threats in homeland security tasks. Its real-time application requires computationally efficient and reasonably accurate algorithms even with limited data to support detection with minimum uncertainty. This paper describes a statistic-based grid-refinement method for backtracing the position of a gamma-ray source in a three-dimensional domain in real-time. The developed algorithm used measurements from various known detector positions to localize the source. This algorithm is based on an inverse-square relationship between source intensity at a detector and the distance from the source to the detector. The domain discretization was developed and implemented in MATLAB. The algorithm was tested and verified from simulation results of an ideal case of a point source in non-attenuating medium. Subsequently, an experimental validation of the algorithm was performed to determine the suitability of deploying this scheme in real-time scenarios. Using the measurements from five known detector positions and for a measurement time of 3 min, the source position was estimated with an accuracy of approximately 53 cm. The accuracy improved and stabilized to approximately 25 cm for higher measurement times. It was concluded that the error in source localization was primarily due to detection uncertainties. In verification and experimental validation of the algorithm, the distance between 137Cs source and any detector position was between 0.84 m and 1.77 m. The results were also compared with the least squares method. Since the discretization algorithm was validated with a weak source, it is expected that it can localize the source of higher activity in real-time. It is believed that for the same physical placement of source and detectors, a source of approximate activity 0.61-0.92 mCi can be localized in real-time with 1 s of measurement time and same accuracy. The accuracy and computational efficiency

  12. Local Stability of AIDS Epidemic Model Through Treatment and Vertical Transmission with Time Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novi W, Cascarilla; Lestari, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to explain stability of the spread of AIDS through treatment and vertical transmission model. Human with HIV need a time to positively suffer AIDS. The existence of a time, human with HIV until positively suffer AIDS can be delayed for a time so that the model acquired is the model with time delay. The model form is a nonlinear differential equation with time delay, SIPTA (susceptible-infected-pre AIDS-treatment-AIDS). Based on SIPTA model analysis results the disease free equilibrium point and the endemic equilibrium point. The disease free equilibrium point with and without time delay are local asymptotically stable if the basic reproduction number is less than one. The endemic equilibrium point will be local asymptotically stable if the time delay is less than the critical value of delay, unstable if the time delay is more than the critical value of delay, and bifurcation occurs if the time delay is equal to the critical value of delay.

  13. Social desirability and sexual offenders: a review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lavinia; Grace, Randolph C

    2008-03-01

    Social desirability--the desire to make a favorable impression on others-poses a significant threat to the validity of self-reports. This review examines research on social desirability in both forensic and nonforensic populations with the goal of identifying how best to minimize threats to the validity of research with sexual offenders. Although social desirability has long been a major research topic in personality, consensus has not been reached on key questions such as its dimensional structure and whether social desirability constitutes a trait or a response bias. Research with offenders has shown that social desirability is negatively related to recidivism and that different offender subtypes vary in the degree to which social desirability appears to influence self-reports, with child molesters exhibiting the strongest tendency to "fake good." Several methods of controlling for social desirability have been proposed, but the effectiveness of these methods in increasing validity of offender self reports is questionable. Given the lack of consensus in the personality literature, a fresh start is needed in which basic questions regarding social desirability are revisited with respect to offender populations. PMID:18420557

  14. Real-time automatic small infrared target detection using local spectral filtering in the frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhang, Hong; Li, Jiafeng; Yuan, Ding; Sun, Mingui

    2014-11-01

    Accurate and fast detection of small infrared target has very important meaning for infrared precise guidance, early warning, video surveillance, etc. Based on human visual attention mechanism, an automatic detection algorithm for small infrared target is presented. In this paper, instead of searching for infrared targets, we model regular patches that do not attract much attention by our visual system. This is inspired by the property that the regular patches in spatial domain turn out to correspond to the spikes in the amplitude spectrum. Unlike recent approaches using global spectral filtering, we define the concept of local maxima suppression using local spectral filtering to smooth the spikes in the amplitude spectrum, thereby producing the pop-out of the infrared targets. In the proposed method, we firstly compute the amplitude spectrum of an input infrared image. Second, we find the local maxima of the amplitude spectrum using cubic facet model. Third, we suppress the local maxima using the convolution of the local spectrum with a low-pass Gaussian kernel of an appropriate scale. At last, the detection result in spatial domain is obtained by reconstructing the 2D signal using the original phase and the log amplitude spectrum by suppressing local maxima. The experiments are performed for some real-life IR images, and the results prove that the proposed method has satisfying detection effectiveness and robustness. Meanwhile, it has high detection efficiency and can be further used for real-time detection and tracking.

  15. Assessing Significance of Global Climate Change in Local Climate Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livezey, M. M.; Bair, A.; Livezey, R.; Hollingshead, A.; Horsfall, F. M. C.; Meyers, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    A common question by users to NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) local offices is how significant is global climate change in their local area. The scientific community provides copious information on global climate change, including assessments, for large regions. However, most decisions are made at the local level, where little or no information typically exists. To address this need, NOAA NWS released operationally the Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) in 2013 and specifically incorporated a capability into the tool to determine the local Rate of Change (ROC). Although ROC provides answers to some questions, we have seen an additional need for clarification on the significance of the ROC, such as whether or not it differentiates natural variability from a real signal of longer-term climate change. This question becomes very important for decision makers in consideration of their long term planning efforts to build local resilience to changes in climate. LCAT uses three trend adjustment methods in computing ROC: Hinge, Optimal Climate Normals (OCN), and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA). The Hinge tracks changes in climate time series, and OCN and EWMS track changes in climate normals. ROC is the slope of the straight line fit of the trend. Standard statistical methodology in use provides guidance for confidence intervals of the slope parameter (von Storch and Zwiers, 1999), which works well for a linear regression fit and can be used for ROCs of OCN and EWMA. However the Hinge, which is a linear fit anchored on one end, needs some additional adjustments and most likely will have smaller confidence intervals than those estimated by the statistical method. An additional way to look at the problem is to assess how the climate change signal compares to climate variability in the local time series. Livezey et al. (2007) suggested the use of the signal to noise ratio to estimate the significance of the rate of climate change. The signal to noise ratio of

  16. A Non-invasive Real-time Localization System for Enhanced Efficacy in Nasogastric Intubation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenglong; Foong, Shaohui; Maréchal, Luc; Tan, U-Xuan; Teo, Tee Hui; Shabbir, Asim

    2015-12-01

    Nasogastric (NG) intubation is one of the most commonly performed clinical procedures. Real-time localization and tracking of the NG tube passage at the larynx region into the esophagus is crucial for safety, but is lacking in current practice. In this paper, we present the design, analysis and evaluation of a non-invasive real-time localization system using passive magnetic tracking techniques to improve efficacy of the clinical NG intubation process. By embedding a small permanent magnet at the insertion tip of the NG tube, a wearable system containing embedded sensors around the neck can determine the absolute position of the NG tube inside the body in real-time to assist in insertion. In order to validate the feasibility of the proposed system in detecting erroneous tube placement, typical reference intubation trajectories are first analyzed using anatomically correct models and localization accuracy of the system are evaluated using a precise robotic platform. It is found that the root-mean-squared tracking accuracy is within 5.3 mm for both the esophagus and trachea intubation pathways. Experiments were also designed and performed to demonstrate that the system is capable of tracking the NG tube accurately in biological environments even in presence of stationary ferromagnetic objects (such as clinical instruments). With minimal physical modification to the NG tube and clinical process, this system allows accurate and efficient localization and confirmation of correct NG tube placement without supplemental radiographic methods which is considered the current clinical standard. PMID:26108204

  17. Toward fast feature adaptation and localization for real-time face recognition systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Fei; de With, Peter H.

    2003-06-01

    In a home environment, video surveillance employing face detection and recognition is attractive for new applications. Facial feature (e.g. eyes and mouth) localization in the face is an essential task for face recognition because it constitutes an indispensable step for face geometry normalization. This paper presents a new and efficient feature localization approach for real-time personal surveillance applications with low-quality images. The proposed approach consists of three major steps: (1) self-adaptive iris tracing, which is preceded by a trace-point selection process with multiple initializations to overcome the local convergence problem, (2) eye structure verification using an eye template with limited deformation freedom, and (3) eye-pair selection based on a combination of metrics. We have tested our facial feature localization method on about 100 randomly selected face images from the AR database and 30 face images downloaded from the Internet. The results show that our approach achieves a correct detection rate of 96%. Since our eye-selection technique does not involve time-consuming deformation processes, it yields relatively fast processing. The proposed algorithm has been successfully applied to a real-time home video surveillance system and proven to be an effective and computationally efficient face normalization method preceding the face recognition.

  18. Latitude and local time dependence of precipitated low energy electrons at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafsson, G.

    1972-01-01

    Data from particle detectors on board the satellite OGO-4 were used to study the precipitation of electrons in the energy range 0.7 to 24 keV. The latitude dependence of these particles in the local time region from midnight to dawn was investigated in detail. The analysis shows that the precipitation of particles of energies 2.3 to 24 keV is centered at an invariant latitude of about 68 deg at midnight with a clear shift in latitude with increasing local time and this shift is more pronounced for lower energies. The highest fluxes of particles in this energy interval are measured at midnight and they decrease rapidly with local time. The data in the energy range 2.3 to 24 keV support a theory where particles are injected in the midnight region from the tail gaining energy due to a betatron process and then drift eastwards in a combined electric and magnetic field. The main part of the electrons at 0.7 keV show a different behavior. They seem to undergo an acceleration process which is rather local, sometimes giving field aligned fluxes which may be super-imposed on the background precipitation.

  19. Subjective time dilation: spatially local, object-based, or a global visual experience?

    PubMed

    New, Joshua J; Scholl, Brian J

    2009-01-01

    Time can appear to slow down in certain brief real-life events-e.g. during car accidents or critical moments of athletes' performances. Such time dilation can also be produced to a smaller degree in the laboratory by 'oddballs' presented in series of otherwise identical stimuli. We explored the spatial distribution of subjective time dilation: Does time expand only for the oddball objects themselves, only for the local spatial region including the oddball, or for the entire visual field? Because real-life traumatic events provoke an apparently global visual experience of time expansion, we predicted-and observed-that a locally discrete oddball would also dilate the apparent duration of other concurrent events in other parts of the visual field. This 'dilation at a distance' was not diminished by increasing spatial separation between the oddball and target events, and was not influenced by manipulations of objecthood that drive object-based attention. In addition, behaviorally 'urgent' oddballs (looming objects) yielded time dilation, but visually similar receding objects did not. We interpret these results in terms of the influence of attention on time perception-where attention reflects general arousal and faster internal pacing rather than spatial or object-based selection, per se. As a result, attention influences subjective time dilation as a global visual experience. PMID:19271914

  20. Processing advances for localization of beaked whales using time difference of arrival.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the localization of clicking Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) using an array of widely spaced bottom-mounted hydrophones. A set of signal and data processing advances are presented that together make reliable tracking a possibility. These advances include a species-specific detector, elimination of spurious time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) estimates, improved tracking of TDOA estimates, positive association of TDOA estimates using different hydrophone pairs, and joint localization of multiple whales. A key innovation in three of these advances is the principle of click-matching. The methods are demonstrated using real data. PMID:23742359

  1. Approximate local magnetic-to-electric surface operators for time-harmonic Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    El Bouajaji, M.

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this paper is to propose new local and accurate approximate magnetic-to-electric surface boundary operators for the three-dimensional time-harmonic Maxwell's equations. After their construction where their accuracy is improved through a regularization process, a localization of these operators and a full finite element approximation is introduced. Next, their numerical efficiency and accuracy is investigated in detail for different scatterers when these operators are used in the extreme situation of On-Surface Radiation Conditions methods.

  2. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    We present and prove a well-known locality bound for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems. Then we discuss how one might hope to extend this same procedure to higher dimensions using ideas related to the Eden growth process and lattice trees. Finally, we demonstrate with a specific family of lattice trees in the plane why this approach breaks down in dimensions greater than one and prove that there exist interactions for which the complex-time dynamics blows-up in finite imaginary time.

  3. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-15

    We present and prove a well-known locality bound for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems. Then we discuss how one might hope to extend this same procedure to higher dimensions using ideas related to the Eden growth process and lattice trees. Finally, we demonstrate with a specific family of lattice trees in the plane why this approach breaks down in dimensions greater than one and prove that there exist interactions for which the complex-time dynamics blows-up in finite imaginary time. .

  4. The taming of desire: Unspecific postponement reduces desire for and consumption of postponed temptations.

    PubMed

    Mead, Nicole L; Patrick, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation began with the conjecture that people may do better by saying "some other time" instead of "no, not ever" in response to temptations. Drawing from learning theories, we hypothesized that people interpret unspecific postponement ("I can have it some other time") as a signal that they do not strongly value the postponed temptation. In this way, unspecific postponement may reduce desire for and consumption of postponed temptations, both in the present moment and over time. Four experiments tested those hypotheses. A multiphase study using the free-choice paradigm supported the learning account for the effects of postponement: unspecific postponement reduced immediate desire for a self-selected temptation which in turn statistically accounted for diminished consumption during the week after the manipulation--but only when postponement was induced, not when it was imposed (Experiment 1). Supporting the hypothesis that unspecific but not specific postponement connotes weak valuation, only unspecific postponement reduced attention to (Experiment 2) and consumption of (Experiment 3) the postponed temptation. Additionally, unspecific postponement delayed consumption primarily among those who were highly motivated to forgo consumption of the temptation (Experiment 3). A final multiphase experiment compared the effectiveness of unspecific postponement to the classic self-control mechanism of restraint, finding that unspecific postponement (vs. restraint) reduced consumption of the temptation in the heat of the moment and across 1 week postmanipulation (Experiment 4). The current research provides novel insight into self-control facilitation, the modification of desire, and the differential effects of unspecific and specific intentions for reducing unwanted behavior. PMID:26727664

  5. Real-time image dehazing using local adaptive neighborhoods and dark-channel-prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Jesus A.; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.; Kober, Vitaly; Hernandez, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    A real-time algorithm for single image dehazing is presented. The algorithm is based on calculation of local neighborhoods of a hazed image inside a moving window. The local neighborhoods are constructed by computing rank-order statistics. Next the dark-channel-prior approach is applied to the local neighborhoods to estimate the transmission function of the scene. By using the suggested approach there is no need for applying a refining algorithm to the estimated transmission such as the soft matting algorithm. To achieve high-rate signal processing the proposed algorithm is implemented exploiting massive parallelism on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Computer simulation results are carried out to test the performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of dehazing efficiency and speed of processing. These tests are performed using several synthetic and real images. The obtained results are analyzed and compared with those obtained with existing dehazing algorithms.

  6. Real-time neural network based camera localization and its extension to mobile robot control.

    PubMed

    Choi, D H; Oh, S Y

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of using neural networks for camera localization and mobile robot control is investigated here. This approach has the advantages of eliminating the laborious and error-prone process of imaging system modeling and calibration procedures. Basically, two different approaches of using neural networks are introduced of which one is a hybrid approach combining neural networks and the pinhole-based analytic solution while the other is purely neural network based. These techniques have been tested and compared through both simulation and real-time experiments and are shown to yield more precise localization than analytic approaches. Furthermore, this neural localization method is also shown to be directly applicable to the navigation control of an experimental mobile robot along the hallway purely guided by a dark wall strip. It also facilitates multi-sensor fusion through the use of multiple sensors of different types for control due to the network's capability of learning without models. PMID:9427102

  7. The Influence of Outcome Desirability on Optimism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krizan, Zlatan; Windschitl, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    People are often presumed to be vulnerable to a desirability bias, namely, a tendency to be overoptimistic about a future outcome as a result of their preferences or desires for that outcome. In this article, this form of wishful thinking is distinguished from the more general concepts of motivated reasoning and overoptimism, and the evidence for…

  8. The Desired Image of a Science Writer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yore, Larry D.; Hand, Brian M.; Prain, Vaughan

    This study attempted to establish a desired image of an expert science writer based on a synthesis of writing theory, models, and research literature on academic writing in science and other disciplines and to contrast this desired image with an actual prototypical image of scientists as writers of science. The synthesis was used to develop a…

  9. Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, J. Gayle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the current state of knowledge about hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Despite clinical attention to this disorder, ambiguity remains concerning the nature and treatment of low sexual desire. Reviews diagnostic issues, including prevalence estimates. Highlights current theories of etiology and maintenance, as well as assessment…

  10. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  11. Object of desire self-consciousness theory.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Anthony F; Brotto, Lori A

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the construct of object of desire self-consciousness, the perception that one is romantically and sexually desirable in another's eyes. The authors discuss the nature of the construct, variations in its expression, and how it may function as part of a self-schemata or script related to romance and sexuality. The authors suggest that object of desire self-consciousness may be an adaptive, evolved psychological mechanism allowing sexual and romantic tactics suitable to one's mate value. The authors also suggest that it can act as a signal that one has high mate value in the sexual marketplace. The authors then review literature (e.g., on fantasies, on sexual activity preferences, on sexual dysfunctions, on language) suggesting that object of desire self-consciousness plays a particularly important role in heterosexual women's sexual/romantic functioning and desires. PMID:23905711

  12. Crustal Structure Beneath Pleasant Valley, Nevada from Local and Regional Earthquake Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, L. B.; Nabelek, J.; Braunmiller, J.

    2011-12-01

    In 1915 the Pleasant Valley fault in the Basin and Range Province of northern Nevada ruptured in a Mw~7 earthquake, one of the largest normal faulting earthquakes in U.S. history. We are currently operating a densely spaced linear array of broadband three-component seismometers across the Pleasant Valley fault to investigate the structure and the geometry of the fault zone. Here, we present a local crustal velocity model derived from P and S wave travel times of local and regional earthquakes recorded by the Pleasant Valley array. Regional events in northern California, eastern Nevada and Utah that occurred in line with the array are well recorded and provide constraints on upper mantle velocities. Many local seismic events were also observed. Only a few of these events were detected by the ANSS network, reflecting the limited detection capability in sparsely instrumented northern Nevada. The local event set includes earthquakes, mining blasts and sonic booms from nearby jet airplane flights. A subset of these events was located using Hypoinverse. Their travel time curves are used to estimate crustal structure and velocity in the Pleasant Valley region. This is an EarthScope FlexArray project.

  13. Wireless acoustic modules for real-time data fusion using asynchronous sniper localization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengy, S.; De Mezzo, S.; Duffner, P.; Naz, P.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of snipers in modern conflicts leads to high insecurity for the soldiers. In order to improve the soldier's protection against this threat, the French German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) has been conducting studies in the domain of acoustic localization of shots. Mobile antennas mounted on the soldier's helmet were initially used for real-time detection, classification and localization of sniper shots. It showed good performances in land scenarios, but also in urban scenarios if the array was in the shot corridor, meaning that the microphones first detect the direct wave and then the reflections of the Mach and muzzle waves (15% distance estimation error compared to the actual shooter array distance). Fusing data sent by multiple sensor nodes distributed on the field showed some of the limitations of the technologies that have been implemented in ISL's demonstrators. Among others, the determination of the arrays' orientation was not accurate enough, thereby degrading the performance of data fusion. Some new solutions have been developed in the past year in order to obtain better performance for data fusion. Asynchronous localization algorithms have been developed and post-processed on data measured in both free-field and urban environments with acoustic modules on the line of sight of the shooter. These results are presented in the first part of the paper. The impact of GPS position estimation error is also discussed in the article in order to evaluate the possible use of those algorithms for real-time processing using mobile acoustic nodes. In the frame of ISL's transverse project IMOTEP (IMprovement Of optical and acoustical TEchnologies for the Protection), some demonstrators are developed that will allow real-time asynchronous localization of sniper shots. An embedded detection and classification algorithm is implemented on wireless acoustic modules that send the relevant information to a central PC. Data fusion is then processed and the

  14. Local-time survey of plasma at low altitudes over the auroral zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, L. A.; Ackerson, K. L.

    1971-01-01

    A local-time survey of the low energy proton and electron intensities precipitated into the earth's atmosphere during periods of magnetic quiescence was constructed. A typical, individual satellite crossing of this region in each of eight local-time sectors was selected from a library of similar observations with the polar-orbiting satellite Injun 5. The trapping boundary for more energetic electron intensities, E 45 keV, is a natural coordinate for delineating the boundary between the two major types of lower energy, 50 or = E or = 15,000 eV. The main contributors to electron energy influx are inverted V precipitation poleward of the trapping boundary and the plasma sheet intensities equatorward. These are interpreted in terms of a magnetospheric model.

  15. Local radial point interpolation (MLRPI) method for solving time fractional diffusion-wave equation with damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Vahid Reza; Shivanian, Elyas; Chen, Wen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the current investigation is to determine numerical solution of time-fractional diffusion-wave equation with damping for Caputo's fractional derivative of order α (1 < α ≤ 2). A meshless local radial point interpolation (MLRPI) scheme based on Galerkin weak form is analyzed. The reason of choosing MLRPI approach is that it does not require any background integrations cells, instead integrations are implemented over local quadrature domains which are further simplified for reducing the complication of computation using regular and simple shape. The unconditional stability and convergence with order O (τ 6 - 2 α) are proved, where τ is time stepping. Also, several numerical experiments are illustrated to verify theoretical analysis.

  16. Time difference of arrival blast localization using a network of disposable sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobler, Ronald A.; Plummer, Thomas J.

    2007-04-01

    Determining the location of an explosive event using a networked sensor system within an acceptable accuracy is a challenging problem. McQ has developed such a system, using a mesh network of inexpensive acoustic sensors. The system performs a three-dimensional, time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) localization of blasts of various yields in several different environments. Localization information of the blast is provided to the end user by exfiltration over satellite communications. The system is able to perform accurately in the presence of various sources of error including GPS position, propagation effects, temperature, and error in determining the time of arrival (TOA). The system design as well as its performance are presented.

  17. Local-in-time well-posedness of a regularized mathematical model for silicon MESFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, A. M.; Tkachev, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    We prove the local-in-time well-posedness of the initial boundary value problem for a system of quasilinear equations. This system is used for finding numerical stationary solutions of the hydrodynamical model of charge transport in the silicon MESFET (metal semiconductor field effect transistor). The initial boundary value problem has the following peculiarities: the quasilinear system is not a Cauchy-Kovalevskaya-type system; the boundary is a non-smooth curve and has angular points; nonlinearity of the problem is mainly connected with squares of gradients of the unknown functions. By using a special representation for the solution of a model problem we reduce the original problem to an integro-differential system. The local-in-time existence of a weakened generalized solution of this system is then proved by the fixed-point argument.

  18. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  19. Direct picosecond time resolution of unimolecular reactions initiated by local mode excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, N. F.; Doany, F. E.; Zewail, A. H.; Perry, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the first results of direct, picosec measurements of the Delta-nu(OH) 5 local mode transition of H2O2. These time-resolved studies yield a direct measure of the unimolecular dissociation rate, and furnish a lower limit for the rate of energy redistribution from the OH stretch to the O-O reaction coordinate. The data thus determined may be used to ascertain the domain of validity for statistical unimolecular reaction rate theories.

  20. Digital sequences and a time reversal-based impact region imaging and localization method.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  1. Writing Queer across the Borders of Geography and Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malagreca, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author merges biographical notes, autoethnography and experimental writing to situate his migrant self as a self that "performs through writing," i.e. planned, experimental writing that subverts the centrality of the monolingual heterosexual identity. He explores the intersections of time, desire, and power across time and…

  2. Loschmidt echo in many-spin systems: contrasting time scales of local and global measurements.

    PubMed

    Zangara, Pablo R; Bendersky, Denise; Levstein, Patricia R; Pastawski, Horacio M

    2016-06-13

    A local excitation in a quantum many-spin system evolves deterministically. A time-reversal procedure, involving the inversion of the signs of every energy and interaction, should produce the excitation revival. This idea, experimentally coined in nuclear magnetic resonance, embodies the concept of the Loschmidt echo (LE). While such an implementation involves a single spin autocorrelation M(1,1), i.e. a local LE, theoretical efforts have focused on the study of the recovery probability of a complete many-body state, referred to here as global or many-body LE MMB Here, we analyse the relation between these magnitudes, with regard to their characteristic time scales and their dependence on the number of spins N We show that the global LE can be understood, to some extent, as the simultaneous occurrence of N independent local LEs, i.e. MMB∼(M(1,1))(N/4) This extensive hypothesis is exact for very short times and confirmed numerically beyond such a regime. Furthermore, we discuss a general picture of the decay of M1,1 as a consequence of the interplay between the time scale that characterizes the reversible interactions (T(2)) and that of the perturbation (τ(Σ)). Our analysis suggests that the short-time decay, characterized by the time scale τ(Σ), is greatly enhanced by the complex processes that occur beyond T(2) This would ultimately lead to the experimentally observed T(3), which was found to be roughly independent of τ(Σ) but closely tied to T(2). PMID:27140970

  3. Real-Time Lexicon-Free Scene Text Localization and Recognition.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Lukas; Matas, Jiri

    2016-09-01

    An end-to-end real-time text localization and recognition method is presented. Its real-time performance is achieved by posing the character detection and segmentation problem as an efficient sequential selection from the set of Extremal Regions. The ER detector is robust against blur, low contrast and illumination, color and texture variation. In the first stage, the probability of each ER being a character is estimated using features calculated by a novel algorithm in constant time and only ERs with locally maximal probability are selected for the second stage, where the classification accuracy is improved using computationally more expensive features. A highly efficient clustering algorithm then groups ERs into text lines and an OCR classifier trained on synthetic fonts is exploited to label character regions. The most probable character sequence is selected in the last stage when the context of each character is known. The method was evaluated on three public datasets. On the ICDAR 2013 dataset the method achieves state-of-the-art results in text localization; on the more challenging SVT dataset, the proposed method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods and demonstrates that the proposed pipeline can incorporate additional prior knowledge about the detected text. The proposed method was exploited as the baseline in the ICDAR 2015 Robust Reading competition, where it compares favourably to the state-of-the art. PMID:26540676

  4. Time-lapse monitoring of localized changes within heterogeneous media with scattered waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinaemerem, Kanu

    Time-lapse monitoring of geological and mechanical media has been the focus of various studies over the past four decades because of the information that the inferred changes within the medium provides insight into the dynamic characteristics of the medium. Time-lapse changes within a medium can be used to characterize the temporal evolution of the medium, evaluate the forces driving the changes within the medium and make predictions on the future state of the monitored medium. The detectability of the changes within a material depends on the characteristics of the change to be imaged, the sensitivity of the monitoring data to the change, and the time-lapse monitoring parameters such as the monitoring source-receiver array and the spectral content of the monitoring waves. Various time-lapse monitoring tools have been used to monitor changes within media ranging from the earth's surface to tumors within the human body. These monitoring tools include the use of 4D active surveys were an imprint of the change within the medium is extracted from the time-lapse surveys and the use of interferometric techniques that use singly or multiply scattered waves. My major goal in this study is to image and localize changes present within a scattering medium using time-lapse multiply scattered waves generated within the monitored medium. The changes to be imaged are generally localized in space. This work is an extension of coda wave interferometry. Coda wave interferometry focuses on the identification and extraction of average velocity change occurring within a scattering medium. Due to the non-linear characteristics of multiply scattered waves and limited information of the origin of the multiply scattered waves, coda wave interferometry resolves the average velocity change within the scattering medium with no or limited indication of the location of the change. In this study, I demonstrate that time-lapse changes can be imaged and localized within scattering media using

  5. Media Impacts on Women's Fertility Desires: A Prolonged Exposure Experiment.

    PubMed

    Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia; Willis, Laura E; Kennard, Ashley R

    2016-06-01

    Media exposure may have implications for family planning, a public health issue of key importance. Drawing on social comparison theory and social identity theory, a prolonged exposure experiment examined whether media portrayals of women's social roles affect fertility desires among 166 American, nonstudent, never married, childless women ages 21-35 years old. After sign-up and baseline sessions, participants viewed magazine pages five days in a row. Stimuli presented women in either mother/homemaker roles, beauty ideal roles, or professional roles. Three days later, participants again indicated their number of desired children and time planned until first birth. Exposure to mother/homemaker and beauty ideal portrayals increased the number of desired children across time. Exposure to professional portrayals increased the time planned until 1st birth compared to beauty ideal portrayals-this impact was partially mediated by a shift toward more progressive gender norms (per social identity theory) and assimilation (per social comparison theory). PMID:27166510

  6. Fermion sign problem in imaginary-time projection continuum quantum Monte Carlo with local interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcavecchia, Francesco; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-04-01

    We use the shadow wave function formalism as a convenient model to study the fermion sign problem affecting all projector quantum Monte Carlo methods in continuum space. We demonstrate that the efficiency of imaginary-time projection algorithms decays exponentially with increasing number of particles and/or imaginary-time propagation. Moreover, we derive an analytical expression that connects the localization of the system with the magnitude of the sign problem, illustrating this behavior through numerical results. Finally, we discuss the computational complexity of the fermion sign problem and methods for alleviating its severity.

  7. Fermion sign problem in imaginary-time projection continuum quantum Monte Carlo with local interaction.

    PubMed

    Calcavecchia, Francesco; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-04-01

    We use the shadow wave function formalism as a convenient model to study the fermion sign problem affecting all projector quantum Monte Carlo methods in continuum space. We demonstrate that the efficiency of imaginary-time projection algorithms decays exponentially with increasing number of particles and/or imaginary-time propagation. Moreover, we derive an analytical expression that connects the localization of the system with the magnitude of the sign problem, illustrating this behavior through numerical results. Finally, we discuss the computational complexity of the fermion sign problem and methods for alleviating its severity. PMID:27176442

  8. DETECTION, LOCALIZATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS IN A PULSAR TIMING ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Lee Samuel; Lommen, Andrea N.

    2010-08-01

    Efforts to detect gravitational waves by timing an array of pulsars have traditionally focused on stationary gravitational waves, e.g., stochastic or periodic signals. Gravitational wave bursts-signals whose duration is much shorter than the observation period-will also arise in the pulsar timing array waveband. Sources that give rise to detectable bursts include the formation or coalescence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), the periapsis passage of compact objects in highly elliptic or unbound orbits about an SMBH, or cusps on cosmic strings. Here, we describe how pulsar timing array data may be analyzed to detect and characterize these bursts. Our analysis addresses, in a mutually consistent manner, a hierarchy of three questions. (1) What are the odds that a data set includes the signal from a gravitational wave burst? (2) Assuming the presence of a burst, what is the direction to its source? (3) Assuming the burst propagation direction, what is the burst waveform's time dependence in each of its polarization states? Applying our analysis to synthetic data sets, we find that we can detect gravitational waves even when the radiation is too weak to either localize the source or infer the waveform, and detect and localize sources even when the radiation amplitude is too weak to permit the waveform to be determined. While the context of our discussion is gravitational wave detection via pulsar timing arrays, the analysis itself is directly applicable to gravitational wave detection using either ground- or space-based detector data.

  9. LOCAL BUCKLEY-JAMES ESTIMATION FOR HETEROSCEDASTIC ACCELERATED FAILURE TIME MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Lei; Lu, Wenbin; Wang, Huixia Judy

    2016-01-01

    In survival analysis, the accelerated failure time model is a useful alternative to the popular Cox proportional hazards model due to its easy interpretation. Current estimation methods for the accelerated failure time model mostly assume independent and identically distributed random errors, but in many applications the conditional variance of log survival times depend on covariates exhibiting some form of heteroscedasticity. In this paper, we develop a local Buckley-James estimator for the accelerated failure time model with heteroscedastic errors. We establish the consistency and asymptotic normality of the proposed estimator and propose a resampling approach for inference. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed method is flexible and leads to more efficient estimation when heteroscedasticity is present. The value of the proposed method is further assessed by the analysis of a breast cancer data set.

  10. Development of a protocol to quantify local bone adaptation over space and time: Quantification of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongtao; Boudiffa, Maya; Dall'Ara, Enrico; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-07-01

    In vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) scanning of small rodents is a powerful method for longitudinal monitoring of bone adaptation. However, the life-time bone growth in small rodents makes it a challenge to quantify local bone adaptation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol, which can take into account large bone growth, to quantify local bone adaptations over space and time. The entire right tibiae of eight 14-week-old C57BL/6J female mice were consecutively scanned four times in an in vivo µCT scanner using a nominal isotropic image voxel size of 10.4µm. The repeated scan image datasets were aligned to the corresponding baseline (first) scan image dataset using rigid registration. 80% of tibia length (starting from the endpoint of the proximal growth plate) was selected as the volume of interest and partitioned into 40 regions along the tibial long axis (10 divisions) and in the cross-section (4 sectors). The bone mineral content (BMC) was used to quantify bone adaptation and was calculated in each region. All local BMCs have precision errors (PE%CV) of less than 3.5% (24 out of 40 regions have PE%CV of less than 2%), least significant changes (LSCs) of less than 3.8%, and 38 out of 40 regions have intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of over 0.8. The proposed protocol allows to quantify local bone adaptations over an entire tibia in longitudinal studies, with a high reproducibility, an essential requirement to reduce the number of animals to achieve the necessary statistical power. PMID:27262181

  11. Space-Time Localization of Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, John W.; Estabrook, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Space weather is described as the variability of solar wind plasma that can disturb satellites and systems and affect human space exploration. Accurate prediction requires information of the heliosphere inside the orbit of the Earth. However, for predictions using remote sensing, one needs not only plane-of-sky position but also range information the third spatial dimension to show the distance to the plasma disturbances and thus when they might propagate or co-rotate to create disturbances at the orbit of the Earth. Appropriately processed radio signals from spacecraft having communications lines-of-sight passing through the inner heliosphere can be used for this spacetime localization of plasma disturbances. The solar plasma has an electron density- and radio-wavelength-dependent index of refraction. An approximately monochromatic wave propagating through a thin layer of plasma turbulence causes a geometrical-optics phase shift proportional to the electron density at the point of passage, the radio wavelength, and the thickness of the layer. This phase shift is the same for a wave propagating either up or down through the layer at the point of passage. This attribute can be used for space-time localization of plasma irregularities. The transfer function of plasma irregularities to the observed time series depends on the Doppler tracking mode. When spacecraft observations are in the two-way mode (downlink radio signal phase-locked to an uplink radio transmission), plasma fluctuations have a two-pulse response in the Doppler. In the two-way mode, the Doppler time series y2(t) is the difference between the frequency of the downlink signal received and the frequency of a ground reference oscillator. A plasma blob localized at a distance x along the line of sight perturbs the phase on both the up and down link, giving rise to two events in the two-way tracking time series separated by a time lag depending the blob s distance from the Earth: T2-2x/c, where T2 is the

  12. Effect of Local Nonradiative Recombination on Time-Resolved Electroluminescence of p-n Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptashchenko, A. A.; Melkonyan, D. V.; Moroz, N. V.; Ptashchenko, F. A.

    1997-02-01

    The effect of locally introduced dislocations on time-resolved electroluminescence (EL) in GaAlAs, GaAsP and GaP p-n structures is studied. The data indicate that the local nonradiative recombination results in non-exponential EL decay. A one-dimensional model of this effect, involving back-diffusion of injected electrons, their extraction into the n-region and local recombination at dislocations and the surface, is proposed. An analysis of EL decay, based on this model, enables to estimate the bulk lifetime of minority carriers and some parameters of local nonradiative recombination. Der Einfluß örtlich eingeführter Dislokationen auf den Zeitverlauf der Elektrolumineszenz (EL) in GaAlAs, GaAsP und GaP p-n Strukturen wurde studiert. Die experimentellen Daten zeigen, daß die lokale strahlungslose Rekombination zu einem nichtexponentiellen EL-Abfall führt. Ein eindimensionales Modell dieser Erscheinung, das die Rückdiffusion der injizierten Elektronen, ihre Extraktion in das n-Gebiet und lokale Rekombination an Dislokationen und der Oberfläche berücksichtigt, wird vorgeschlagen. Eine Analyse des EL-Abfalles auf Grund dieses Modells erlaubt, die Volumen-Lebensdauer von Minoritätsträgern und einige Parameter der lokalen strahlungslosen Rekombination abzuschätzen.

  13. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.

  14. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T; Carlson, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia. PMID:27131647

  15. Sexually compulsive men and inhibited sexual desire.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, B W

    1994-01-01

    Sexually compulsive males report extremely high rates of desire involving paraphiliac activity. Desire and arousal in partner sex is usually low or unstable. Cognitive-behavioral strategies and techniques are presented based on four components in the assessment/intervention process: 1) eliminating or reducing paraphiliac arousal; 2) sex education, changing sexual attitudes, self-disclosure, sexual assertiveness, and reduction of guilt and shame; 3) confronting secrecy and cognitive distortions, increasing empathy for victims, awareness of harm to others, and commitment to abstain from compulsive, abusive behavior; and 4) developing a healthy sexual desire and arousal pattern that nurtures and maintains an intimate relationship. The motivated male (especially with a partner he is comfortable with, attracted to, and trusts) can develop a pleasurable, erotic sexual pattern that allows him to maintain desire during partner sex. PMID:7996591

  16. Time-distance domain transformation for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin metallic plates.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram; Packo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Emission used in Non-Destructive Testing is focused on analysis of elastic waves propagating in mechanical structures. Then any information carried by generated acoustic waves, further recorded by a set of transducers, allow to determine integrity of these structures. It is clear that material properties and geometry strongly impacts the result. In this paper a method for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin plates is presented. The approach is based on the Time-Distance Domain Transform, that is a wavenumber-frequency mapping technique for precise event localization. The major advantage of the technique is dispersion compensation through a phase-shifting of investigated waveforms in order to acquire the most accurate output, allowing for source-sensor distance estimation using a single transducer. The accuracy and robustness of the above process are also investigated. This includes the study of Young's modulus value and numerical parameters influence on damage detection. By merging the Time-Distance Domain Transform with an optimal distance selection technique, an identification-localization algorithm is achieved. The method is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. The latter involves both laboratory and large scale industrial tests. PMID:26950889

  17. Sound Source Localization for HRI Using FOC-Based Time Difference Feature and Spatial Grid Matching.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Hong

    2013-08-01

    In human-robot interaction (HRI), speech sound source localization (SSL) is a convenient and efficient way to obtain the relative position between a speaker and a robot. However, implementing a SSL system based on TDOA method encounters many problems, such as noise of real environments, the solution of nonlinear equations, switch between far field and near field. In this paper, fourth-order cumulant spectrum is derived, based on which a time delay estimation (TDE) algorithm that is available for speech signal and immune to spatially correlated Gaussian noise is proposed. Furthermore, time difference feature of sound source and its spatial distribution are analyzed, and a spatial grid matching (SGM) algorithm is proposed for localization step, which handles some problems that geometric positioning method faces effectively. Valid feature detection algorithm and a decision tree method are also suggested to improve localization performance and reduce computational complexity. Experiments are carried out in real environments on a mobile robot platform, in which thousands of sets of speech data with noise collected by four microphones are tested in 3D space. The effectiveness of our TDE method and SGM algorithm is verified. PMID:26502430

  18. Real-time realizations of the Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, V.; Arrowsmith, S.; Hofstetter, A.; Nippress, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization method (BISL), introduced by Mordak et al. (2010) and upgraded by Marcillo et al. (2014) is destined for the accurate estimation of the atmospheric event origin at local, regional and global scales by the seismic and infrasonic networks and arrays. The BISL is based on probabilistic models of the source-station infrasonic signal propagation time, picking time and azimuth estimate merged with a prior knowledge about celerity distribution. It requires at each hypothetical source location, integration of the product of the corresponding source-station likelihood functions multiplied by a prior probability density function of celerity over the multivariate parameter space. The present BISL realization is generally time-consuming procedure based on numerical integration. The computational scheme proposed simplifies the target function so that integrals are taken exactly and are represented via standard functions. This makes the procedure much faster and realizable in real-time without practical loss of accuracy. The procedure executed as PYTHON-FORTRAN code demonstrates high performance on a set of the model and real data.

  19. [Pregnancy desired--baby refused (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Olivier, C

    1983-05-01

    This essay seeks to answer the question of why so many abortions are requested in France when contraceptive methods are readily available by arguing that in such cases, the pregnancy is a response to a woman's unconscious desires while the abortion signifies a return to conscious control. The woman's early relationship to her mother is viewed as a factor in the later playing out of unconscious desires. Little girls, by virtue of their similarity to their mothers, can never be sexual objects in the same way that little boys are. Because infant girls are cared for by adult women who are loving, but not desiring, they are less likely to be satisfied in their early feeding, and this insatisfaction is transferred into adult insatiability in terms of all that comes to her from the man, including sperm. Women must wait until their sex lives begin to receive what men have from the moment of birth; a gift from outside themselves, colored by desire. This feeling of completion is however not accompanied by a desire to mother the child. In other cases the pregnancy may be desired as a proof of femininity or of a feeling of equality with other women that may have been poorly established if the identification with the mother functioned badly. The infant represents something more than himself: perhaps the identity of the woman. The multiplicity of factors involved create difficult consultations for the woman and for the doctor, because, in fact, the woman seeking an abortion views the infant as imaginary, not real. A woman who presents herself more often for abortion than for obstetric care is dominated by neurotic unconscious desires. The psychologist can aid the woman in overcoming postabortal depression by helping her achieve a more profound understanding of her unconscious desires. PMID:12338682

  20. Particle swarm optimization and its application in MEG source localization using single time sliced data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juan; Liu, Chenglian; Guo, Yongning

    2014-10-01

    The estimation of neural active sources from the magnetoencephalography (MEG) data is a very critical issue for both clinical neurology and brain functions research. A widely accepted source-modeling technique for MEG involves calculating a set of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs). Depth in the brain is one of difficulties in MEG source localization. Particle swarm optimization(PSO) is widely used to solve various optimization problems. In this paper we discuss its ability and robustness to find the global optimum in different depths of the brain when using single equivalent current dipole (sECD) model and single time sliced data. The results show that PSO is an effective global optimization to MEG source localization when given one dipole in different depths.

  1. The Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Time-Dependent Convection-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockburn, Bernardo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods for nonlinear, time-dependent convection-diffusion systems. These methods are an extension of the Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin methods for purely hyperbolic systems to convection-diffusion systems and share with those methods their high parallelizability, their high-order formal accuracy, and their easy handling of complicated geometries, for convection dominated problems. It is proven that for scalar equations, the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods are L(sup 2)-stable in the nonlinear case. Moreover, in the linear case, it is shown that if polynomials of degree k are used, the methods are k-th order accurate for general triangulations; although this order of convergence is suboptimal, it is sharp for the LDG methods. Preliminary numerical examples displaying the performance of the method are shown.

  2. Optical cable fault locating using Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer and cable localized heating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. G.; Zhang, X. P.; Dong, Y. M.; Wang, F.; Liu, Y. H.

    2007-07-01

    A novel optical cable fault location method, which is based on Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer (BOTDR) and cable localized heating, is proposed and demonstrated. In the method, a BOTDR apparatus is used to measure the optical loss and strain distribution along the fiber in an optical cable, and a heating device is used to heat the cable at its certain local site. Actual experimental results make it clear that the proposed method works effectively without complicated calculation. By means of the new method, we have successfully located the optical cable fault in the 60 km optical fiber composite power cable from Shanghai to Shengshi, Zhejiang. A fault location accuracy of 1 meter was achieved. The fault location uncertainty of the new optical cable fault location method is at least one order of magnitude smaller than that of the traditional OTDR method.

  3. Stress avoidance in a common annual: reproductive timing is important for local adaptation and geographic distribution.

    PubMed

    Griffith, T M; Watson, M A

    2005-11-01

    Adaptation to local environments may be an important determinant of species' geographic range. However, little is known about which traits contribute to adaptation or whether their further evolution would facilitate range expansion. In this study, we assessed the adaptive value of stress avoidance traits in the common annual Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium) by performing a reciprocal transplant across a broad latitudinal gradient extending to the species' northern border. Populations were locally adapted and stress avoidance traits accounted for most fitness differences between populations. At the northern border where growing seasons are cooler and shorter, native populations had evolved to reproduce earlier than native populations in the lower latitude gardens. This clinal pattern in reproductive timing corresponded to a shift in selection from favouring later to earlier reproduction. Thus, earlier reproduction is an important adaptation to northern latitudes and constraint on the further evolution of this trait in marginal populations could potentially limit distribution. PMID:16313471

  4. Endovascular Stents and Stent-Grafts: Is Heparin Coating Desirable?

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Stephen R.; Souza, Nandita M. de; Allison, David J.

    2000-07-15

    Heparins are glycosaminoglycans that, in addition to their anticoagulant activity, have interactions with growth factors and other glycoproteins. These interactions may stimulate neointimal hyperplasia when heparin is delivered locally on stents and stent-grafts. Modifying the structure of heparin to retain anticoagulant activity while minimizing these stimulatory effects on the vascular endothelium is desirable and may be achieved by understanding the relationships between the structure and function of the various parts of the heparin molecule.

  5. Sparse representation based on local time-frequency template matching for bearing transient fault feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Ding, Xiaoxi

    2016-05-01

    The transients caused by the localized fault are important measurement information for bearing fault diagnosis. Thus it is crucial to extract the transients from the bearing vibration or acoustic signals that are always corrupted by a large amount of background noise. In this paper, an iterative transient feature extraction approach is proposed based on time-frequency (TF) domain sparse representation. The approach is realized by presenting a new method, called local TF template matching. In this method, the TF atoms are constructed based on the TF distribution (TFD) of the Morlet wavelet bases and local TF templates are formulated from the TF atoms for the matching process. The instantaneous frequency (IF) ridge calculated from the TFD of an analyzed signal provides the frequency parameter values for the TF atoms as well as an effective template matching path on the TF plane. In each iteration, local TF templates are employed to do correlation with the TFD of the analyzed signal along the IF ridge tube for identifying the optimum parameters of transient wavelet model. With this iterative procedure, transients can be extracted in the TF domain from measured signals one by one. The final signal can be synthesized by combining the extracted TF atoms and the phase of the raw signal. The local TF template matching builds an effective TF matching-based sparse representation approach with the merit of satisfying the native pulse waveform structure of transients. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by practical defective bearing signals. Comparison results also show that the proposed method is superior to traditional methods in transient feature extraction.

  6. Localized-state distributions in molecularly doped polymers determined from time-of-flight transient photocurrent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Takashi; Naito, Hiroyoshi

    2000-07-01

    Localized-state distributions have been studied in a molecularly doped polymer (MDP) system of a polymer binder (polycarbonate) doped with charge-transporting [N, N'-diphenyl-N, N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (TPD)] and trap-forming molecules [1-phenyl-3-(p-diethylaminostyryl)-5-(p-diethylaminophenyl)pyrazoline (PRA)] simultaneously by means of the conventional time-of-flight (TOF) transient photocurrent measurements. The existence of a transport energy in the MDP system is experimentally shown by comparing Gaussian distributions of localized states deduced by the Gaussian disorder model, due to Bässler and co-workers [H. Bässler, Phys. Status Solidi B 175, 15 (1993)], with localized-state distributions determined from the analysis of the TOF transient photocurrent data, based on the trap-controlled band transport [H. Naito, J. Ding, and M. Okuda, Appl. Phys. Lett. 64, 1830 (1994)]. The transport energy is found to be located at the center of the Gaussian distribution due to the host TPD molecules. It is also found that at 0.1 mol % PRA addition, the Gaussian distribution of localized states due to TPD molecules is broadened through the random electrostatic potential generated by dipoles of PRA, and at 1 mol % PRA addition, the localized-state structure due to PRA molecules, as well as the further broadening of the Gaussian distribution, are observed. The energy level of the structure is determined to be 0.54 eV above the transport energy, which is almost equal to the difference in the ionization potential between PRA and TPD.

  7. Coherent time-reversal microwave imaging for the detection and localization of breast tissue malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Delwar; Mohan, Ananda Sanagavarapu

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with the coherent processing of time-reversal operator for microwave imaging in the frequency domain. In frequency domain time-reversal imaging approach, images obtained for different frequency bins over ultrawideband are incoherently processed. In highly dense and cluttered medium, the signal subspace over each narrow frequency bin varies from that obtained using the complete ultrawideband. As a result, the detection and localization from noncoherent imaging approach is often inconclusive. In order to improve the stability of time-reversal microwave imaging, we propose coherent processing using novel focusing matrix approach. The proposed focusing matrix makes possible the time-reversal imaging technique to coherently process each frequency bin to yield a consistent signal subspace. The performance of coherent focusing is investigated when combined with time-reversal robust Capon beamformer (TR-RCB). We have used numerical experiments on breast cancer detection using finite difference time domain employing anatomically realistic numerical breast phantoms that contain varying amounts of dense fibroglandular tissue content. The imaging results indicate that the proposed coherent-TR-RCB could overcome the limitations of time-reversal imaging in a highly heterogeneous and cluttered medium.

  8. Mercury localization in mouse kidney over time: autoradiography versus silver staining

    SciTech Connect

    Rodier, P.M.; Kates, B.; Simons, R.

    1988-02-01

    Several methods of silver staining have been employed to localize mercury in tissue, under the assumption that the techniques represent total Hg, but recent reports have suggested that these stains are specific for a limited fraction of the Hg present in some samples. Magos et al. hypothesized that the stains actually vary with inorganic mercury content. The purpose of the present study was to compare localization by radiolabeling to localization by one silver stain, the photoemulsion histochemical technique, in tissues prepared to contain a range of levels of total Hg and a range of levels of inorganic Hg. Mice dosed with 8 mg Hg/kg as MeHg were killed 24 hr, 1 week, or 2 weeks after exposure, to allow a decrease in total Hg and an increase in the proportion of demethylated Hg over time. Mice dosed with 4 mg Hg/kg as HgCl/sub 2/ provided samples in which all the Hg present was in the inorganic form. Atomic absorption of kidneys of mice dosed with MeHg showed that total Hg fell from 55 micrograms/g to 39 to 25 over 2 weeks, while the inorganic fraction climbed from about 2 to 27 to 35%. Grain counts from autoradiographs of /sup 203/Hg-labeled sections correlated with total Hg content at +0.88, but silver staining was correlated with inorganic Hg content, appearing only at late termination times in MeHg-exposed animals, but soon after dosing in mice exposed to inorganic Hg. The photoemulsion histochemical technique revealed a substance strictly localized in the proximal tubules, while autoradiographs and grain counts showed total Hg to be present throughout the kidney tissue. These results support the contention that silver stains are selective for inorganic Hg.

  9. The local maxima method for enhancement of time-frequency map and its application to local damage detection in rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchowski, Jakub; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Zimroz, Radosław

    2014-06-01

    In this paper a new method of fault detection in rotating machinery is presented. It is based on a vibration time series analysis in time-frequency domain. A raw vibration signal is decomposed via the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The time-frequency map is considered as matrix (M×N) with N sub-signals with length M. Each sub-signal is considered as a time series and might be interpreted as energy variation for narrow frequency bins. Each sub-signal is processed using a novel approach called the local maxima method. Basically, we search for local maxima because they should appear in the signal if local damage in bearings or gearbox exists. Finally, information for all sub-signals is combined in order to validate impulsive behavior of energy. Due to random character of the obtained time series, each maximum occurrence has to be checked for its significance. If there are time points for which the average number of local maxima for all sub-signals is significantly higher than for the other time instances, then location of these maxima is “weighted” as more important (at this time instance local maxima create for a set of Δf a pattern on the time-frequency map). This information, called vector of weights, is used for enhancement of spectrogram. When vector of weights is applied for spectrogram, non-informative energy is suppressed while informative features on spectrogram are enhanced. If the distribution of local maxima on spectrogram creates a pattern of wide-band cyclic energy growth, the machine is suspected of being damaged. For healthy condition, the vector of the average number of maxima for each time point should not have outliers, aggregation of information from all sub-signals is rather random and does not create any pattern. The method is illustrated by analysis of very noisy both real and simulated signals.

  10. Path collapse in Feynman formula. Stable path integral formula from local time reparametrization invariant amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, H.

    1989-06-01

    The Feynman formula, which expresses the time displacement amplitude > x b | exp (-t Ȟ) | x a< in terms of a path integral Π 1N (∫ dn) Π 1N+1 ( {∫ dp n}/{2π}) exp{Σ 1N [ ip n(x n-x n-1) - ɛH (p n, x n)]} with large N, does not exist for systems with Coulomb {-1}/{r} potential and gives incorrect threshold behaviours near centrifugal {1}/{r 2} or angular {1}/{sin2θ } barriers. We discuss the physical origin of this failure and propose an alternative well-defined path integral formula based on a family of amplitudes that is invariant under arbitrary local time reparametrizations. The time slicing with finite N breaks this invariance. For appropriate choices of the reparametrization function the fluctuations are stabilized and the new formula is applicable to all the above systems.

  11. Time-reversal asymmetry without local moments via directional scalar spin chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosur, Pavan

    Quantum phases of matter that violate time-reversal symmetry invariably develop local spin or orbital moments in the ground state. Here, a directional scalar spin chiral order (DSSCO) phase is introduced, that disrespects time-reversal symmetry but has no static moments. It can be obtained by melting the spin moments in a magnetically ordered phase but retaining residual broken time-reversal symmetry. Orbital moments are then precluded by the spatial symmetries of the spin rotation symmetric state. Interestingly, polar Kerr effect in the 3D DSSCO has the same symmetries as those observed experimentally in the pseudogap phase of several underdoped cuprates. Finally, it is shown that the DSSCO provides a phenomenological route for reconciling the results of Kerr effect and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments in the cuprates, with charge ordering tendencies - observed in X-ray diffraction studies - playing a crucial role. The so-called ''memory effect'' in the cuprates can be incorporated into this picture as well.

  12. Real-time traffic jam detection and localization running on a smart camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipetski, Yuriy; Loibner, Gernot; Ulm, Michael; Ponweiser, Wolfgang; Sidla, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    Reliable automatic detection of traffic jam occurrences is of big significance for traffic flow analysis related applications. We present our work aimed at the application of video based real-time traffic jam detection. Our method can handle both calibrated and un-calibrated scenarios, operating in world and in image coordinate systems respectively. The method is designed to be operated on a smart camera, but is also suitable for a standard personal computer. The combination of state-of-the-art algorithms for vehicle detections and velocity estimation allows robust long-term system operation in due to the high recall rate and very low false alarm rate. The proposed method not only detects traffic jam events in real-time, but also precisely localizes traffic jams by their start and end positions per road lane. We describe also our strategy in making computationally heavy algorithms real-time capable even on hardware with a limited computing power.

  13. Locally activated Monte Carlo method for long-time-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaukonen, M.; Peräjoki, J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Jungnickel, G.; Frauenheim, Th.

    2000-01-01

    We present a technique for the structural optimization of atom models to study long time relaxation processes involving different time scales. The method takes advantage of the benefits of both the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and the molecular dynamics simulation techniques. In contrast to ordinary KMC, our method allows for an estimation of a true lower limit for the time scale of a relaxation process. The scheme is fairly general in that neither the typical pathways nor the typical metastable states need to be known prior to the simulation. It is independent of the lattice type and the potential which describes the atomic interactions. It is adopted to study systems with structural and/or chemical inhomogeneity which makes it particularly useful for studying growth and diffusion processes in a variety of physical systems, including crystalline bulk, amorphous systems, surfaces with adsorbates, fluids, and interfaces. As a simple illustration we apply the locally activated Monte Carlo to study hydrogen diffusion in diamond.

  14. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Via, Riccardo Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Ciocca, Mario; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Methods: Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Results: Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. Conclusions: A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring

  15. Relationship of edge localized mode burst times with divertor flux loop signal phase in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Todd, T. N.; Webster, A. J.; Morris, J.; Watkins, N. W.; Calderon, F. A.

    2014-06-15

    A phase relationship is identified between sequential edge localized modes (ELMs) occurrence times in a set of H-mode tokamak plasmas to the voltage measured in full flux azimuthal loops in the divertor region. We focus on plasmas in the Joint European Torus where a steady H-mode is sustained over several seconds, during which ELMs are observed in the Be II emission at the divertor. The ELMs analysed arise from intrinsic ELMing, in that there is no deliberate intent to control the ELMing process by external means. We use ELM timings derived from the Be II signal to perform direct time domain analysis of the full flux loop VLD2 and VLD3 signals, which provide a high cadence global measurement proportional to the voltage induced by changes in poloidal magnetic flux. Specifically, we examine how the time interval between pairs of successive ELMs is linked to the time-evolving phase of the full flux loop signals. Each ELM produces a clear early pulse in the full flux loop signals, whose peak time is used to condition our analysis. The arrival time of the following ELM, relative to this pulse, is found to fall into one of two categories: (i) prompt ELMs, which are directly paced by the initial response seen in the flux loop signals; and (ii) all other ELMs, which occur after the initial response of the full flux loop signals has decayed in amplitude. The times at which ELMs in category (ii) occur, relative to the first ELM of the pair, are clustered at times when the instantaneous phase of the full flux loop signal is close to its value at the time of the first ELM.

  16. The Relative Contribution of Interaural Time and Magnitude Cues to Dynamic Sound Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data from a study examining the relative contribution of interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) to the localization of virtual sound sources both with and without head motion. The listeners' task was to estimate the apparent direction and distance of virtual sources (broadband noise) presented over headphones. Stimuli were synthesized from minimum phase representations of nonindividualized directional transfer functions; binaural magnitude spectra were derived from the minimum phase estimates and ITDs were represented as a pure delay. During dynamic conditions, listeners were encouraged to move their heads; the position of the listener's head was tracked and the stimuli were synthesized in real time using a Convolvotron to simulate a stationary external sound source. ILDs and ITDs were either correctly or incorrectly correlated with head motion: (1) both ILDs and ITDs correctly correlated, (2) ILDs correct, ITD fixed at 0 deg azimuth and 0 deg elevation, (3) ITDs correct, ILDs fixed at 0 deg, 0 deg. Similar conditions were run for static conditions except that none of the cues changed with head motion. The data indicated that, compared to static conditions, head movements helped listeners to resolve confusions primarily when ILDs were correctly correlated, although a smaller effect was also seen for correct ITDs. Together with the results for static conditions, the data suggest that localization tends to be dominated by the cue that is most reliable or consistent, when reliability is defined by consistency over time as well as across frequency bands.

  17. Effective real-time vehicle tracking using discriminative sparse coding on local patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, XiangJun; Ye, Feiyue; Ruan, Yaduan; Chen, Qimei

    2016-01-01

    A visual tracking framework that provides an object detector and tracker, which focuses on effective and efficient visual tracking in surveillance of real-world intelligent transport system applications, is proposed. The framework casts the tracking task as problems of object detection, feature representation, and classification, which is different from appearance model-matching approaches. Through a feature representation of discriminative sparse coding on local patches called DSCLP, which trains a dictionary on local clustered patches sampled from both positive and negative datasets, the discriminative power and robustness has been improved remarkably, which makes our method more robust to a complex realistic setting with all kinds of degraded image quality. Moreover, by catching objects through one-time background subtraction, along with offline dictionary training, computation time is dramatically reduced, which enables our framework to achieve real-time tracking performance even in a high-definition sequence with heavy traffic. Experiment results show that our work outperforms some state-of-the-art methods in terms of speed, accuracy, and robustness and exhibits increased robustness in a complex real-world scenario with degraded image quality caused by vehicle occlusion, image blur of rain or fog, and change in viewpoint or scale.

  18. Detection of the Third Heart Sound Based on Nonlinear Signal Decomposition and Time-Frequency Localization.

    PubMed

    Barma, Shovan; Chen, Bo-Wei; Ji, Wen; Rho, Seungmin; Chou, Chih-Hung; Wang, Jhing-Fa

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a precise way to detect the third ( S3 ) heart sound, which is recognized as an important indication of heart failure, based on nonlinear single decomposition and time-frequency localization. The detection of the S3 is obscured due to its significantly low energy and frequency. Even more, the detected S3 may be misunderstood as an abnormal second heart sound with a fixed split, which was not addressed in the literature. To detect such S3, the Hilbert vibration decomposition method is applied to decompose the heart sound into a certain number of subcomponents while intactly preserving the phase information. Thus, the time information of all of the decomposed components are unchanged, which further expedites the identification and localization of any module/section of a signal properly. Next, the proposed localization step is applied to the decomposed subcomponents by using smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution followed by the reassignment method. Finally, based on the positional information, the S3 is distinguished and confirmed by measuring time delays between the S2 and S3. In total, 82 sets of cardiac cycles collected from different databases including Texas Heart Institute database are examined for evaluation of the proposed method. The result analysis shows that the proposed method can detect the S3 correctly, even when the normalized temporal energy of S3 is larger than 0.16, and the frequency of those is larger than 34 Hz. In a performance analysis, the proposed method demonstrates that the accuracy rate of S3 detection is as high as 93.9%, which is significantly higher compared with the other methods. Such findings prove the robustness of the proposed idea for detecting substantially low-energized S3 . PMID:26584485

  19. Real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tatsuhiro; Tamura, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Since social media started getting more attention from users on the Internet, social media has been one of the most important information source in the world. Especially, with the increasing popularity of social media, data posted on social media sites are rapidly becoming collective intelligence, which is a term used to refer to new media that is displacing traditional media. In this paper, we focus on geotagged tweets on the Twitter site. These geotagged tweets are referred to as georeferenced documents because they include not only a short text message, but also the documents' posting time and location. Many researchers have been tackling the development of new data mining techniques for georeferenced documents to identify and analyze emergency topics, such as natural disasters, weather, diseases, and other incidents. In particular, the utilization of geotagged tweets to identify and analyze natural disasters has received much attention from administrative agencies recently because some case studies have achieved compelling results. In this paper, we propose a novel real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics. The aim of our new application is to provide new platforms that can identify and analyze the localities of emergency topics. The proposed application is composed of three core computational intelligence techniques: the Naive Bayes classifier technique, the spatiotemporal clustering technique, and the burst detection technique. Moreover, we have implemented two types of application interface: a Web application interface and an android application interface. To evaluate the proposed application, we have implemented a real-time weather observation system embedded the proposed application. we used actual crawling geotagged tweets posted on the Twitter site. The weather observation system successfully detected bursty local areas related to observed emergency weather topics. PMID:25918679

  20. RadTrac : A system for detecting, localizing, and tracking radioactive sources in real time.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R.; Klann, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-01

    Within the homeland security and emergency response communities, there is a need for a low-profile system to detect and locate radioactive sources. RadTrac has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory as an integrated system for the detection, localization, identification, and tracking of radioactive sources in real time. The system is based on a network of radiation detectors and advanced signal-processing algorithms. Features include video surveillance, automated tracking, easy setup, and logging of all data and images. This paper describes the advanced algorithms that were developed and implemented for source detection, localization, and tracking in real time. In the physio-spatial integration approach to source localization, counts from multiple detectors are processed according to the underlying physics linking these counts to obtain the probability that a source is present at any point in space. This information is depicted in a probability density function map. This type of depiction allows the results to be presented in a simple, easy-to-understand manner. It also allows for many different complicated factors to be accounted for in a single image as each factor is computed as a probability density in space. These factors include spatial limitations, variable shielding, directional detectors, moving detectors, and different detector sizes and orientations. The utility and versatility of this approach is described in further detail. Advanced signal-processing algorithms have also been incorporated to improve real-time tracking and to increase signal-to-noise ratios including temporal linking and energy binning. Measurements aimed at demonstrating the sensitivity improvements through the use of advanced signal-processing techniques were performed and are presented. Results of tracking weak sources (<100 {micro}Ci {sup 137}Cs) using four fixed-position detectors are presented.

  1. Female sexual dysfunction: focus on low desire.

    PubMed

    Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Woodard, Terri

    2015-02-01

    Low or absent sexual desire is the most common sexual dysfunction in women, and its prevalence peaks during midlife. Its etiology is complex and may include biologic, psychologic, and social elements. Major risk factors for its development include poor health status, depression, certain medications, dissatisfaction with partner relationship, and history of physical abuse, sexual abuse, or both. Diagnosis is based on criteria set by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th Edition) and requires that a woman experience personal distress. Clinical evaluation should include medical history, sexual history, and, sometimes, a physical examination. Laboratory data are of limited value, except when warranted by history or physical examination. Treatment options include nonpharmacologic interventions such as education, office-based counseling, and psychotherapy. Although there are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatments for low desire, pharmacologic agents have been used off-label for this purpose. Bupropion is an antidepressant that has been shown to improve desire in some women with and without depression. Systemic estrogen therapy is not recommended in the absence of vasomotor symptoms and is not directly associated with desire. However, vaginal estrogen is useful in patients presenting with concomitant vaginal atrophy and dyspareunia. Ospemifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that can be used as an alternative to vaginal estrogen. Exogenous testosterone has demonstrated efficacy in treating loss of desire in postmenopausal women. However, patients should be counseled that it is not FDA-approved for this purpose and there are limited published long-term safety data. Several agents for the treatment of low desire are currently in development. Gynecologists are in a unique position to address concerns about sexual desire in women. PMID:25569014

  2. Non-Markovian Quantum Evolution: Time-Local Generators and Memory Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Należyty, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we provide a basic introduction to the topic of quantum non-Markovian evolution presenting both time-local and memory kernel approach to the evolution of open quantum systems. We start with the standard notion of a classical Markovian stochastic process and generalize it to classical Markovian stochastic evolution which in turn becomes a starting point of the quantum setting. Our approach is based on the notion of P-divisible, CP-divisible maps and their refinements to k-divisible maps. Basic methods enabling one to detect non-Markovianity of the quantum evolution are also presented. Our analysis is illustrated by several simple examples.

  3. Complete positivity, finite-temperature effects, and additivity of noise for time-local qubit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankinen, Juho; Lyyra, Henri; Sokolov, Boris; Teittinen, Jose; Ziaei, Babak; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-05-01

    We present a general model of qubit dynamics which entails pure dephasing and dissipative time-local master equations. This allows us to describe the combined effect of thermalization and dephasing beyond the usual Markovian approximation. We investigate the complete positivity conditions and introduce a heuristic model that is always physical and provides the correct Markovian limit. We study the effects of temperature on the non-Markovian behavior of the system and show that the noise additivity property discussed by Yu and Eberly [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 140403 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.140403] holds beyond the Markovian limit.

  4. Application of empirical mode decomposition with local linear quantile regression in financial time series forecasting.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Abobaker M; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Altaher, Alsaidi M

    2014-01-01

    This paper mainly forecasts the daily closing price of stock markets. We propose a two-stage technique that combines the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) with nonparametric methods of local linear quantile (LLQ). We use the proposed technique, EMD-LLQ, to forecast two stock index time series. Detailed experiments are implemented for the proposed method, in which EMD-LPQ, EMD, and Holt-Winter methods are compared. The proposed EMD-LPQ model is determined to be superior to the EMD and Holt-Winter methods in predicting the stock closing prices. PMID:25140343

  5. Time-localized projectors in string field theory with an E-field

    SciTech Connect

    Maccaferri, C.; Scherer Santos, R.J.; Tolla, D.D.

    2005-03-15

    We extend the analysis of Bonora et al. [hep-th/0409063] to the case of a constant electric field turned on the world volume and on a transverse direction of a D-brane. We show that time localization is still obtained by inverting the discrete eigenvalues of the lump solution. The lifetime of the unstable soliton is shown to depend on two free parameters: the b parameter and the value of the electric field. As a by-product, we construct the normalized diagonal basis of the star algebra in the B{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}-field background.

  6. Accelerating spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation using local time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D. B.; Rietmann, M.; Galvez, P.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Grote, M.; Schenk, O.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic tomography using full-waveform inversion requires accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media. However, finite element meshing in complex media often leads to areas of local refinement, generating small elements that accurately capture e.g. strong topography and/or low-velocity sediment basins. For explicit time schemes, this dramatically reduces the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to numerical stability conditions, ultimately making seismic inversions prohibitively expensive. To alleviate this problem, local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. Numerical simulations are thus liberated of global time-step constraints potentially speeding up simulation runtimes significantly. We present here a new, efficient multi-level LTS-Newmark scheme for general use with spectral-element methods (SEM) with applications in seismic wave propagation. We fit the implementation of our scheme onto the package SPECFEM3D_Cartesian, which is a widely used community code, simulating seismic and acoustic wave propagation in earth-science applications. Our new LTS scheme extends the 2nd-order accurate Newmark time-stepping scheme, and leads to an efficient implementation, producing real-world speedup of multi-resolution seismic applications. Furthermore, we generalize the method to utilize many refinement levels with a design specifically for continuous finite elements. We demonstrate performance speedup using a state-of-the-art dynamic earthquake rupture model for the Tohoku-Oki event, which is currently limited by small elements along the rupture fault. Utilizing our new algorithmic LTS implementation together with advances in exploiting graphic processing units (GPUs), numerical seismic wave propagation simulations in complex media will dramatically reduce computation times, empowering high

  7. Sex Differences in Judgments of Social Desirability.

    PubMed

    Paunonen, Sampo V

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluates sex differences in the perceived desirability of personality behaviors and beliefs. Men and women (N = 149, Mage  = 18.7) judged the social desirability scale values (SDSVs) of 150 personality statements as applied either to a male target or a female target. For comparison, some estimated SDSVs with no target sex specified. A separate sample of 537 respondents endorsed the 150 items via self-report. Raters showed a high consensus in their SDSV judgments within conditions (α = .86 to .90) and no sex-of-rater effects across conditions. Substantial sex-of-target effects (p < .001), however, revealed many behaviors that were viewed as desirable for one sex but not for the other. The behaviors seen as more (less) desirable when applied to men rather than to women were endorsed more (less) by men than by women in the respondent sample. Similar results were found when no target sex was specified for the SDSV ratings, presumably because judges evaluated the behaviors as applied to a target of their own sex. The present results have important implications for the measurement and reporting of SDSVs, the evaluation of substance versus style in self-reports, and the construction of desirability-reduced personality inventories. PMID:25728192

  8. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping

    PubMed Central

    Cantwell, C.D.; Roney, C.H.; Ng, F.S.; Siggers, J.H.; Sherwin, S.J.; Peters, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. PMID:25978869

  9. Time-dependent behavior of a localized electron at a heterojunction boundary of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Min S.; Kim, Hyungjun; Atwater, Harry A.; Goddard, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a finite-difference time-domain(FDTD) method for simulating the dynamics of graphene electrons, denoted GraFDTD. We then use GraFDTD to study the temporal behavior of a single localized electron wave packet, showing that it exhibits optical-like dynamics including the Goos–Hänchen effect [F. Goos and H. Hänchen, Ann. Phys.436, 333 (1947)] at a heterojunction, but the behavior is quantitatively different than for electromagnetic waves. This suggests issues that must be addressed in designing graphene-based electronic devices analogous to optical devices. GraFDTD should be useful for studying such complex time-dependent behavior of a quasiparticle in graphene.

  10. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, the dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.

  11. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, C D; Roney, C H; Ng, F S; Siggers, J H; Sherwin, S J; Peters, N S

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. PMID:25978869

  12. Evoked Potentials in Motor Cortical Local Field Potentials Reflect Task Timing and Behavioral Performance

    PubMed Central

    Confais, Joachim; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Diesmann, Markus; Riehle, Alexa

    2010-01-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) are observed in motor cortical local field potentials (LFPs) during movement execution (movement-related potentials [MRPs]) and in response to relevant visual cues (visual evoked potentials [VEPs]). Motor cortical EPs may be directionally selective, but little is known concerning their relation to other aspects of motor behavior, such as task timing and performance. We recorded LFPs in motor cortex of two monkeys during performance of a precued arm-reaching task. A time cue at the start of each trial signaled delay duration and thereby the pace of the task and the available time for movement preparation. VEPs and MRPs were strongly modulated by the delay duration, VEPs being systematically larger in short-delay trials and MRPs larger in long-delay trials. Despite these systematic modulations related to the task timing, directional selectivity was similar in short and long trials. The behavioral reaction time was positively correlated with MRP size and negatively correlated with VEP size, within sessions. In addition, the behavioral performance improved across sessions, in parallel with a slow decrease in the size of VEPs and MRPs. Our results clearly show the strong influence of the behavioral context and performance on motor cortical population activity during movement preparation and execution. PMID:20884766

  13. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  14. Neighbourhood selection for local modelling and prediction of hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, A. W.; Li, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2002-02-01

    The prediction of a time series using the dynamical systems approach requires the knowledge of three parameters; the time delay, the embedding dimension and the number of nearest neighbours. In this paper, a new criterion, based on the generalized degrees of freedom, for the selection of the number of nearest neighbours needed for a better local model for time series prediction is presented. The validity of the proposed method is examined using time series, which are known to be chaotic under certain initial conditions (Lorenz map, Henon map and Logistic map), and real hydro meteorological time series (discharge data from Chao Phraya river in Thailand, Mekong river in Thailand and Laos, and sea surface temperature anomaly data). The predicted results are compared with observations, and with similar predictions obtained by using arbitrarily fixed numbers of neighbours. The results indicate superior predictive capability as measured by the mean square errors and coefficients of variation by the proposed approach when compared with the traditional approach of using a fixed number of neighbours.

  15. Local velocity measurements in heterogeneous and time-dependent flows of a micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Decruppe, J P; Greffier, O; Manneville, S; Lerouge, S

    2006-06-01

    We present and discuss the results of pointwise velocity measurements performed on a viscoelastic micellar solution made of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium salicylate in water, respectively, at the concentrations of 50 and 100 mmol. The sample is contained in a Couette device and subjected to flow in the strain controlled mode. This particular solution shows shear banding and, in a narrow range of shear rates at the right end of the stress plateau, apparent shear thickening occurs. Time-dependent recordings of the shear stress in this range reveal that the flow has become unstable and that large sustained oscillations of the shear stress and of the first normal stresses difference emerge and grow in the flow. Local pointwise velocity measurements clearly reveal a velocity profile typical of shear banding when the imposed shear rate belongs to the plateau, but also important wall slip in the entire range of velocity gradients investigated. In the oscillations regime, the velocity is recorded as a function of time at a fixed point close to the rotor of the Couette device. The time-dependent velocity profile reveals random fluctuations but, from time to time, sharp decreases much larger than the standard deviation are observed. An attempt is made to correlate these strong variations with the stress oscillations and a correlation coefficient r is computed. However, the small value found for the coefficient r does not allow us to draw a final conclusion as concerns the correlation between stress oscillations and velocity fast decreases. PMID:16906838

  16. Simulation of a Real-Time Local Data Integration System over East-Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) simulated a real-time configuration of a Local Data Integration System (LDIS) using data from 15-28 February 1999. The objectives were to assess the utility of a simulated real-time LDIS, evaluate and extrapolate system performance to identify the hardware necessary to run a real-time LDIS, and determine the sensitivities of LDIS. The ultimate goal for running LDIS is to generate analysis products that enhance short-range (less than 6 h) weather forecasts issued in support of the 45th Weather Squadron, Spaceflight Meteorology Group, and Melbourne National Weather Service operational requirements. The simulation used the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) software on an IBM RS/6000 workstation with a 67-MHz processor. This configuration ran in real-time, but not sufficiently fast for operational requirements. Thus, the AMU recommends a workstation with a 200-MHz processor and 512 megabytes of memory to run the AMU's configuration of LDIS in real-time. This report presents results from two case studies and several data sensitivity experiments. ADAS demonstrates utility through its ability to depict high-resolution cloud and wind features in a variety of weather situations. The sensitivity experiments illustrate the influence of disparate data on the resulting ADAS analyses.

  17. Power, desire, and pleasure in sexual fantasies.

    PubMed

    Zurbriggen, Eileen L; Yost, Megan R

    2004-08-01

    One hundred and sixty-two participants (ages 21-45) wrote open-ended sexual fantasies and completed self-report measures of rape myth acceptance, adversarial sexual beliefs, and attitudes toward women. We coded fantasies using a newly developed scoring system that includes themes of dominance, submission, sexual pleasure, and sexual desire. Men fantasized about dominance more than women did; they also tended to focus more on the desire and pleasure of their partner. Desire and pleasure were more closely linked in the fantasies of men than in the fantasies of women, for whom the two were distinct constructs. Although fantasies of submission were not associated with problematic attitudes for either gender, men's fantasies of dominance were associated with greater acceptance of rape myths. For women, greater rape myth acceptance was associated with emotional and romantic fantasy themes. PMID:15497057

  18. Source-space ICA for EEG source separation, localization, and time-course reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Poudel, Govinda; Innes, Carrie; Jones, Richard

    2014-11-01

    We propose source-space independent component analysis (ICA) for separation, tomography, and time-course reconstruction of EEG and MEG source signals. Source-space ICA is based on the application of singular value decomposition and ICA on the neuroelectrical signals from all brain voxels obtained post minimum-variance beamforming of sensor-space EEG or MEG. We describe the theoretical background and equations, then evaluate the performance of this technique in several different situations, including weak sources, bilateral correlated sources, multiple sources, and cluster sources. In this approach, tomographic maps of sources are obtained by back-projection of the ICA mixing coefficients into the source-space (3-D brain template). The advantages of source-space ICA over the popular alternative approaches of sensor-space ICA together with dipole fitting and power mapping via minimum-variance beamforming are demonstrated. Simulated EEG data were produced by forward head modeling to project the simulated sources onto scalp sensors, then superimposed on real EEG background. To illustrate the application of source-space ICA to real EEG source reconstruction, we show the localization and time-course reconstruction of visual evoked potentials. Source-space ICA is superior to the minimum-variance beamforming in the reconstruction of multiple weak and strong sources, as ICA allows weak sources to be identified and reconstructed in the presence of stronger sources. Source-space ICA is also superior to sensor-space ICA on accuracy of localization of sources, as source-space ICA applies ICA to the time-courses of voxels reconstructed from minimum-variance beamforming on a 3D scanning grid and these time-courses are optimally unmixed via the beamformer. Each component identified by source-space ICA has its own tomographic map which shows the extent to which each voxel has contributed to that component. PMID:25108125

  19. Past-time Radar Rainfall Estimates using Radar AWS Rainrate system with Local Gauge Correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.; Lee, M. H.; Suk, M. K.; Nam, K. Y.; Hwang, J.; Ko, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Weather Radar Center at Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) has radar network for warnings for heavy rainfall and severe storms. We have been operating an operational real-time adjusted the Radar-Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Rainrate (RAR) system developed by KMA in 2006 for providing radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) to meteorologists. This system has several uncertainty in estimating precipitation by radar reflectivity (Z) and rainfall intensity (R) relationship. To overcome uncertainty of the RAR system and improve the accuracy of QPE, we are applied the Local Gauge Correction (LGC) method which uses geo-statistical effective radius of errors of the QPE to RAR system in 2012. According to the results of previous study in 2014 (Lee et al., 2014), the accuracy of the RAR system with LGC method improved about 7.69% than before in the summer season of 2012 (from June to August). It has also improved the accuracy of hydrograph when we examined the accuracy of flood simulation using hydrologic model and data derived by the RAR system with LGC method. We confirmed to have its effectiveness through these results after the application of LGC method. It is required for high quality data of long term to utilize in hydrology field. To provide QPE data more precisely and collect past-time data, we produce that calculated by the RAR system with LGC method in the summer season from 2006 to 2009 and investigate whether the accuracy of past-time radar rainfall estimation enhance or not. Keywords : Radar-AWS Rainrate system, Local gauge correction, past-time Radar rainfall estimation Acknowledgements : This research is supported by "Development and application of Cross governmental dual-pol radar harmonization (WRC-2013-A-1)" project of the Weather Radar Center, Korea Meteorological Administration in 2015.

  20. Time-Dependent Effects of Localized Inflammation on Peripheral Clock Gene Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Susan; Aguilar-Valles, Argel; Mongrain, Valérie; Luheshi, Giamal N.; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of the immune system, including circulating cytokine levels as well as counts and function of various immune cell types, present circadian rhythms. Notably, the mortality rate of animals subjected to high doses of lipopolysaccharide is dependent on the time of treatment. In addition, the severity of symptoms of various inflammatory conditions follows a daily rhythmic pattern. The mechanisms behind the crosstalk between the circadian and immune systems remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that localized inflammation induced by turpentine oil (TURP) causes a time-dependent induction of interleukin (IL)-6 and has time-, gene- and tissue-specific effects on clock gene expression. More precisely, TURP blunts the peak of Per1 and Per2 expression in the liver while in other tissues, the expression nadir is elevated. In contrast, Rev-erbα expression remains relatively unaffected by TURP treatment. Co-treatment with the anti-inflammatory agent IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) did not alter the response of Per2 to TURP treatment in liver, despite the reduced induction of fever and IL-6 serum levels. This indicates that the TURP-mediated changes of Per2 in the liver might be due to factors other than systemic IL-6 and fever. Accordingly, IL-6 treatment had no effect on clock gene expression in HepG2 liver carcinoma cells. Altogether, we show that localized inflammation causes significant time-dependent changes in peripheral circadian clock gene expression, via a mechanism likely involving mediators independent from IL-6 and fever. PMID:23527270

  1. The effects of local prevalence and explicit expectations on search termination times

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Shinichi; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    In visual search tasks, the relative proportions of target-present and -absent trials have important effects on behavior. Miss error rates rise as target prevalence decreases (Wolfe, Horowitz, & Kenner, Nature 435, 439–440, 2005). At the same time, search termination times on target-absent trials become shorter (Wolfe & Van Wert, Current Biology 20, 121–124, 2010). These effects must depend on some implicit or explicit knowledge of the current prevalence. What is the nature of that knowledge? In Experiment 1, we conducted visual search tasks at three levels of prevalence (6%, 50%, and 94%) and analyzed performance as a function of “local prevalence,” the prevalence over the last n trials. The results replicated the usual effects of overall prevalence but revealed only weak or absent effects of local prevalence. In Experiment 2, the overall prevalence in a block of trials was 20%, 50%, or 80%. However, a 100%-valid cue informed observers of the prevalence on the next trial. These explicit cues had a modest effect on target-absent RTs, but explicit expectation could not explain the full prevalence effect. We conclude that observers predict prevalence on the basis of an assessment of a relatively long prior history. Each trial contributes a small amount to that assessment, and this can be modulated but not overruled by explicit instruction. PMID:22006528

  2. Global meta-analysis reveals no net change in local-scale plant biodiversity over time.

    PubMed

    Vellend, Mark; Baeten, Lander; Myers-Smith, Isla H; Elmendorf, Sarah C; Beauséjour, Robin; Brown, Carissa D; De Frenne, Pieter; Verheyen, Kris; Wipf, Sonja

    2013-11-26

    Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a global database of 168 published studies and >16,000 nonexperimental, local-scale vegetation plots, we show that mean temporal change in species diversity over periods of 5-261 y is not different from zero, with increases at least as likely as declines over time. Sites influenced primarily by plant species' invasions showed a tendency for declines in species richness, whereas sites undergoing postdisturbance succession showed increases in richness over time. Other distinctions among studies had little influence on temporal richness trends. Although maximizing diversity is likely important for maintaining ecosystem function in intensely managed systems such as restored grasslands or tree plantations, the clear lack of any general tendency for plant biodiversity to decline at small scales in nature directly contradicts the key assumption linking experimental results to ecosystem function as a motivation for biodiversity conservation in nature. How often real world changes in the diversity and composition of plant communities at the local scale cause ecosystem function to deteriorate, or actually to improve, remains unknown and is in critical need of further study. PMID:24167259

  3. Calculations of the time-averaged local heat transfer coefficients in circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, T.H.; Qian, R.Z.; Ai, Y.F.

    1999-04-01

    The great potential to burn a wide variety of fuels and the reduced emission of pollutant gases mainly SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} have inspired the investigators to conduct research at a brisk pace all around the world on circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology. An accurate understanding of heat transfer to bed walls is required for proper design of CFB boilers. To develop an optimum economic design of the boiler, it is also necessary to know how the heat transfer coefficient depends on different design and operating parameters. It is impossible to do the experiments under all operating conditions. Thus, the mathematical model prediction is a valuable method instead. Based on the cluster renewal theory of heat transfer in circulating fluidized beds, a mathematical model for predicting the time-averaged local bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficients is developed. The effects of the axial distribution of the bed density on the time-average local heat transfer coefficients are taken into account via dividing the bed into a series of sections along its height. The assumptions are made about the formation and falling process of clusters on the wall. The model predictions are in an acceptable agreement with the published data.

  4. Global meta-analysis reveals no net change in local-scale plant biodiversity over time

    PubMed Central

    Vellend, Mark; Baeten, Lander; Myers-Smith, Isla H.; Elmendorf, Sarah C.; Beauséjour, Robin; Brown, Carissa D.; De Frenne, Pieter; Verheyen, Kris; Wipf, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a global database of 168 published studies and >16,000 nonexperimental, local-scale vegetation plots, we show that mean temporal change in species diversity over periods of 5–261 y is not different from zero, with increases at least as likely as declines over time. Sites influenced primarily by plant species’ invasions showed a tendency for declines in species richness, whereas sites undergoing postdisturbance succession showed increases in richness over time. Other distinctions among studies had little influence on temporal richness trends. Although maximizing diversity is likely important for maintaining ecosystem function in intensely managed systems such as restored grasslands or tree plantations, the clear lack of any general tendency for plant biodiversity to decline at small scales in nature directly contradicts the key assumption linking experimental results to ecosystem function as a motivation for biodiversity conservation in nature. How often real world changes in the diversity and composition of plant communities at the local scale cause ecosystem function to deteriorate, or actually to improve, remains unknown and is in critical need of further study. PMID:24167259

  5. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.

  6. Patterns of workplace supervisor support desired by abused women.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Nancy A; Yragui, Nanette L; Hanson, Ginger C; Glass, Nancy

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand differences in patterns of supervisor support desired by female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) and to examine whether the pattern of support desired at work is reflective of a woman's stage of change in the abusive relationship, IPV-related work interference, and IPV-related job reprimands or job loss. We conducted interviews in Spanish or English with adult women working in low-income jobs who had been physically or sexually abused by an intimate partner/ ex-partner in the past year ( N = 133). Cluster analysis revealed three distinct clusters that form a hierarchy of type of support wanted: those who desired limited support; those who desired confidential, time-off, and emotional support; and those who desired support in wide variety of ways from their supervisor. The clusters appeared to reflect stages of behavior change in an abusive relationship. Specifically, the limited-support cluster may represent an early precontemplation stage, with women reporting the least interference with work. The support-in-every-way cluster may represent later stages of change, in which women are breaking away from the abusive partner and report the greatest interference with work. Women in the confidential-, time-off-, and emotional-support cluster are in a transition stage in which they are considering change and are exploring options in their abusive relationship. Understanding the hierarchy of the type of support desired, and its relationship to stages of change in the abusive relationship and work interference, may provide a strong foundation for developing appropriate and effective workplace interventions to guide supervisors in providing support to women experiencing IPV. PMID:20889534

  7. Time-Accurate Local Time Stepping and High-Order Time CESE Methods for Multi-Dimensional Flows Using Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary

    2013-01-01

    With the wide availability of affordable multiple-core parallel supercomputers, next generation numerical simulations of flow physics are being focused on unsteady computations for problems involving multiple time scales and multiple physics. These simulations require higher solution accuracy than most algorithms and computational fluid dynamics codes currently available. This paper focuses on the developmental effort for high-fidelity multi-dimensional, unstructured-mesh flow solvers using the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) framework. Two approaches have been investigated in this research in order to provide high-accuracy, cross-cutting numerical simulations for a variety of flow regimes: 1) time-accurate local time stepping and 2) highorder CESE method. The first approach utilizes consistent numerical formulations in the space-time flux integration to preserve temporal conservation across the cells with different marching time steps. Such approach relieves the stringent time step constraint associated with the smallest time step in the computational domain while preserving temporal accuracy for all the cells. For flows involving multiple scales, both numerical accuracy and efficiency can be significantly enhanced. The second approach extends the current CESE solver to higher-order accuracy. Unlike other existing explicit high-order methods for unstructured meshes, the CESE framework maintains a CFL condition of one for arbitrarily high-order formulations while retaining the same compact stencil as its second-order counterpart. For large-scale unsteady computations, this feature substantially enhances numerical efficiency. Numerical formulations and validations using benchmark problems are discussed in this paper along with realistic examples.

  8. Cyberinfrastructure to support Real-time, End-to-End, High Resolution, Localized Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, M. K.; Lindholm, D.; Baltzer, T.; Domenico, B.

    2004-12-01

    From natural disasters such as flooding and forest fires to man-made disasters such as toxic gas releases, the impact of weather-influenced severe events on society can be profound. Understanding, predicting, and mitigating such local, mesoscale events calls for a cyberinfrastructure to integrate multidisciplinary data, tools, and services as well as the capability to generate and use high resolution data (such as wind and precipitation) from localized models. The need for such end to end systems -- including data collection, distribution, integration, assimilation, regionalized mesoscale modeling, analysis, and visualization -- has been realized to some extent in many academic and quasi-operational environments, especially for atmospheric sciences data. However, many challenges still remain in the integration and synthesis of data from multiple sources and the development of interoperable data systems and services across those disciplines. Over the years, the Unidata Program Center has developed several tools that have either directly or indirectly facilitated these local modeling activities. For example, the community is using Unidata technologies such as the Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, Local Data Manger (LDM), decoders, netCDF libraries, Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS), and the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) in their real-time prediction efforts. In essence, these technologies for data reception and processing, local and remote access, cataloging, and analysis and visualization coupled with technologies from others in the community are becoming the foundation of a cyberinfrastructure to support an end-to-end regional forecasting system. To build on these capabilities, the Unidata Program Center is pleased to be a significant contributor to the Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) project, a NSF-funded multi-institutional large Information Technology Research effort. The goal of LEAD is to create an

  9. Floor Covering and Surface Identification for Assistive Mobile Robotic Real-Time Room Localization Application

    PubMed Central

    Gillham, Michael; Howells, Gareth; Spurgeon, Sarah; McElroy, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Assistive robotic applications require systems capable of interaction in the human world, a workspace which is highly dynamic and not always predictable. Mobile assistive devices face the additional and complex problem of when and if intervention should occur; therefore before any trajectory assistance is given, the robotic device must know where it is in real-time, without unnecessary disruption or delay to the user requirements. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel robust method for determining room identification from floor features in a real-time computational frame for autonomous and assistive robotics in the human environment. We utilize two inexpensive sensors: an optical mouse sensor for straightforward and rapid, texture or pattern sampling, and a four color photodiode light sensor for fast color determination. We show how data relating floor texture and color obtained from typical dynamic human environments, using these two sensors, compares favorably with data obtained from a standard webcam. We show that suitable data can be extracted from these two sensors at a rate 16 times faster than a standard webcam, and that these data are in a form which can be rapidly processed using readily available classification techniques, suitable for real-time system application. We achieved a 95% correct classification accuracy identifying 133 rooms' flooring from 35 classes, suitable for fast coarse global room localization application, boundary crossing detection, and additionally some degree of surface type identification. PMID:24351647

  10. Floor covering and surface identification for assistive mobile robotic real-time room localization application.

    PubMed

    Gillham, Michael; Howells, Gareth; Spurgeon, Sarah; McElroy, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Assistive robotic applications require systems capable of interaction in the human world, a workspace which is highly dynamic and not always predictable. Mobile assistive devices face the additional and complex problem of when and if intervention should occur; therefore before any trajectory assistance is given, the robotic device must know where it is in real-time, without unnecessary disruption or delay to the user requirements. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel robust method for determining room identification from floor features in a real-time computational frame for autonomous and assistive robotics in the human environment. We utilize two inexpensive sensors: an optical mouse sensor for straightforward and rapid, texture or pattern sampling, and a four color photodiode light sensor for fast color determination. We show how data relating floor texture and color obtained from typical dynamic human environments, using these two sensors, compares favorably with data obtained from a standard webcam. We show that suitable data can be extracted from these two sensors at a rate 16 times faster than a standard webcam, and that these data are in a form which can be rapidly processed using readily available classification techniques, suitable for real-time system application. We achieved a 95% correct classification accuracy identifying 133 rooms' flooring from 35 classes, suitable for fast coarse global room localization application, boundary crossing detection, and additionally some degree of surface type identification. PMID:24351647

  11. Impulsive sound source localization using peak and RMS estimation of the time-domain beamformer output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Dae-Hoon; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a beamforming technique for locating impulsive sound source. The conventional frequency-domain beamformer is advantageous for localizing noise sources for a certain frequency band of concern, but the existence of many frequency components in the wide-band spectrum of impulsive noise makes the beamforming image less clear. In contrast to a frequency-domain beamformer, it has been reported that a time-domain beamformer can be better suited for transient signals. Although both frequency- and time-domain beamformers produce the same result for the beamforming power, which is defined as the RMS value of its output, we can use alternative directional estimators such as the peak value to enhance the performance of a time-domain beamformer. In this study, the performance of two different directional estimators, the peak and RMS output values, are investigated and compared with the incoherent measurement noise embedded in multiple microphone signals. The impulsive noise source is modeled as a triangular pulse, and the beamwidth and side lobe level of the time-domain beamformer are formulated as functions of the pulse duration, the microphone spacing, and the number of microphones. The proposed formula is verified via experiments in an anechoic chamber using a uniformly spaced linear array, and the results show that the peak estimation of beamformer output determines the location with better spatial resolution and a lower side lobe level than RMS estimation.

  12. Storm-to-storm main phase repeatability of the local time variation of disturbed low-latitude vertical ion drifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Song

    2015-07-01

    Penetration electric field can be very strong during magnetic storms. However, the variation of penetration electric field with local time (LT) has not been well understood. The Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite measures the plasma drift/electric field over all local times within ~100 min. In this paper, we present the first nearly simultaneous observations of the dependence of penetration electric field on local time. The meridional ion drift measured by C/NOFS during the main phase of five magnetic storms in 2012 is analyzed. The storm time ion drift shows a large enhancement around 1900 LT, a relatively small enhancement during daytime, and a deep decrease in the postmidnight sector with a peak around 0500 LT. The observed storm time variation of the meridional ion drift with local time represents the variation of the penetration electric field. The averaged ion drifts are in remarkable agreement with recent simulations.

  13. Derivation of local-in-time fourth post-Newtonian ADM Hamiltonian for spinless compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaranowski, Piotr; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives full details of the computation within the canonical formalism of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner of the local-in-time part of the fourth post-Newtonian, i.e. of power eight in one over speed of light, conservative Hamiltonian of spinless compact binary systems. The Hamiltonian depends only on the bodies' positions and momenta. Dirac delta distributions are taken as source functions. Their full control is furnished by dimensional continuation, by means of which the occurring ultraviolet (UV) divergences are uniquely regularized. The applied near-zone expansion of the time-symmetric Green function leads to infrared (IR) divergences. Their analytic regularization results in one single ambiguity parameter. Unique fixation of it was successfully performed in T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schäfer, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064058 (2014) through far-zone matching. Technically as well as conceptually (backscatter binding energy), the level of the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics is reached. In a first run a computation of all terms is performed in three-dimensional space using analytic Riesz-Hadamard regularization techniques. Then divergences are treated locally (i.e., around particles' positions for UV and in the vicinity of spatial infinity for IR divergences) by means of combined dimensional and analytic regularization. Various evolved analytic expressions are presented for the first time. The breakdown of the Leibniz rule for distributional derivatives is addressed as well as the in general nondistributive law when regularizing value of products of functions evaluated at their singular point.

  14. Social Desirability Scales: More Substance than Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrae, Robert R.; Costa, Paul T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Compared self-reports from 215 adults to the external criterion of spouse ratings of personality traits to separate substance from style in social desirability (SD) scales. Results showed that correcting self-reports for SD failed to improve correspondence with an external, objective criterion and in several cases lowered agreement. (LLL)

  15. Modeling Socially Desirable Responding and Its Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Matthias; Buehner, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The impact of socially desirable responding or faking on noncognitive assessments remains an issue of strong debate. One of the main reasons for the controversy is the lack of a statistical method to model such response sets. This article introduces a new way to model faking based on the assumption that faking occurs due to an interaction between…

  16. Age and the Desire to Marry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahay, Jenna; Lewin, Alisa C.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding attitudes toward marriage at older ages is increasingly important as young adults delay marriage and large numbers of people return to the marriage market after divorce. This study examines age differences in the desire to marry among singles age 18 to 69 years, taking into account selection into marriage. Using data drawn from the…

  17. Goal desires moderate intention-behaviour relations.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, Andrew; Perugini, Marco; Hurling, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Models such as the Extended Model of Goal-Directed Behaviour and the Theory of Planned Behaviour imply that the impact of one's goals on behaviour is mediated by more proximal determinants. We hypothesize that goals can have a broader and more dynamic impact on behaviour and, specifically, that goal desires can moderate the effect of intentions on behaviour. Four studies addressed this issue by examining the direct and moderated effects of goal desires on behaviour. All of the studies required participants to complete baseline measures and then a follow-up indicator of behaviour. In Study 1 (N=119) that focused on fruit intake, Study 2 (N=123) and Study 3 (N=96) concerned with drinking alcohol and Study 4 (N=109) regarding snack consumption, behavioural intentions were more reliably related to behaviour when goal desires were strong. The results of Study 3 suggested that goal desire stability increases the likelihood of this moderator effect emerging and Study 4 revealed that this effect was not suppressed by intention stability. The findings suggest that goals and behavioural intentions can operate simultaneously and jointly influence action, a view that contradicts predictions that the effects of goals are fully mediated by more proximal behavioural determinants. PMID:17594757

  18. Fisher informations and local asymptotic normality for continuous-time quantum Markov processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catana, Catalin; Bouten, Luc; Guţă, Mădălin

    2015-09-01

    We consider the problem of estimating an arbitrary dynamical parameter of an open quantum system in the input-output formalism. For irreducible Markov processes, we show that in the limit of large times the system-output state can be approximated by a quantum Gaussian state whose mean is proportional to the unknown parameter. This approximation holds locally in a neighbourhood of size {t}-1/2 in the parameter space, and provides an explicit expression of the asymptotic quantum Fisher information in terms of the Markov generator. Furthermore we show that additive statistics of the counting and homodyne measurements also satisfy local asymptotic normality and we compute the corresponding classical Fisher informations. The general theory is illustrated with the examples of a two-level system and the atom maser. Our results contribute towards a better understanding of the statistical and probabilistic properties of the output process, with relevance for quantum control engineering, and the theory of non-equilibrium quantum open systems.

  19. Local Self-Similarity and Finite-Time Singularity in a High-Symmetry Euler Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    1997-11-01

    The dynamical consequence of a positive fourth-order pressure derivative (p_xxxx) at the origin [C. S. Ng and A. Bhattacharjee, Phys. Rev. E 54 1530, 1996] in a high-symmetry Euler flow (the Kida flow) is considered. It is shown that the third order spatial derivative u_xxx of the x component of the velocity u at the origin is always decreasing in this situation. By assuming that u_xxx always attains a minimum possible value consistent with a given spectral profile, it is found that the flow is locally self-similar near the origin and collapses as energy cascades to Fourier modes with higher wavenumbers k. Moreover, it is found that the self-similar p(x) and u(x) profiles (as well as their derivatives) near the origin are very similar in shape to what were found in numerical simulations [O. N. Boratav and R. B. Pelz, Phys. Fluids 6 2757, 1994]. It is shown that a finite-time singularity (FTS) must appear in this case if the spectral index ν of the energy spectrum E(k) ∝ k^-ν of the locally self-similar flow is less than 6. A self-similar solution satisfying the Kelvin's theorem of circulation trivially has ν = 2 with vortex filaments and a FTS.

  20. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 in experimental autoimmune neuritis. Cellular localization and time course.

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, R.; Funa, K.; Schweitzer, T.; Jung, S.; Bourde, O.; Toyka, K. V.; Hartung, H. P.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is a monophasic inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system that resolves spontaneously by molecular mechanisms as yet unknown. We have investigated whether the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) might be endogenously expressed in the peripheral nervous system of Lewis rats with actively induced and adoptive transfer EAN. TGF-beta 1 mRNA was upregulated to high levels in sensory and motor roots, spinal ganglia, and sciatic nerve as revealed by quantitative Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization histochemistry, with peak levels just preceding the first signs of clinical recovery. TGF-beta 1 mRNA was localized to scattered round cells and dense cellular infiltrates, but only rarely to Schwann cell profiles. Double labeling studies revealed macrophages and subpopulations of T cells as the major cellular source of TGF-beta 1 mRNA. TGF-beta 1 protein was visualized immunocytochemically and localized to infiltrating mononuclear cells with peak expression around the same time as mRNA, in addition to some constitutive expression in axons and Schwann cells. Our studies suggest that the spontaneous recovery observed in Lewis rat EAN might be mediated by the endogenous elaboration of TGF-beta 1 within the peripheral nerve, and that macrophages might control their own cytotoxicity by expressing TGF-beta 1. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8546208

  1. Time reversal for localization of sources of infrasound signals in a windy stratified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lonzaga, Joel B

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal is used for localizing sources of recorded infrasound signals propagating in a windy, stratified atmosphere. Due to the convective effect of the background flow, the back-azimuths of the recorded signals can be substantially different from the source back-azimuth, posing a significant difficulty in source localization. The back-propagated signals are characterized by negative group velocities from which the source back-azimuth and source-to-receiver (STR) distance can be estimated using the apparent back-azimuths and trace velocities of the signals. The method is applied to several distinct infrasound arrivals recorded by two arrays in the Netherlands. The infrasound signals were generated by the Buncefield oil depot explosion in the U.K. in December 2005. Analyses show that the method can be used to substantially enhance estimates of the source back-azimuth and the STR distance. In one of the arrays, for instance, the deviations between the measured back-azimuths of the signals and the known source back-azimuth are quite large (-1° to -7°), whereas the deviations between the predicted and known source back-azimuths are small with an absolute mean value of <1°. Furthermore, the predicted STR distance is off only by <5% of the known STR distance. PMID:27369127

  2. Real-time ultrasound transducer localization in fluoroscopy images by transfer learning from synthetic training data.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Tobias; Mountney, Peter; John, Matthias; Ionasec, Razvan

    2014-12-01

    The fusion of image data from trans-esophageal echography (TEE) and X-ray fluoroscopy is attracting increasing interest in minimally-invasive treatment of structural heart disease. In order to calculate the needed transformation between both imaging systems, we employ a discriminative learning (DL) based approach to localize the TEE transducer in X-ray images. The successful application of DL methods is strongly dependent on the available training data, which entails three challenges: (1) the transducer can move with six degrees of freedom meaning it requires a large number of images to represent its appearance, (2) manual labeling is time consuming, and (3) manual labeling has inherent errors. This paper proposes to generate the required training data automatically from a single volumetric image of the transducer. In order to adapt this system to real X-ray data, we use unlabeled fluoroscopy images to estimate differences in feature space density and correct covariate shift by instance weighting. Two approaches for instance weighting, probabilistic classification and Kullback-Leibler importance estimation (KLIEP), are evaluated for different stages of the proposed DL pipeline. An analysis on more than 1900 images reveals that our approach reduces detection failures from 7.3% in cross validation on the test set to zero and improves the localization error from 1.5 to 0.8mm. Due to the automatic generation of training data, the proposed system is highly flexible and can be adapted to any medical device with minimal efforts. PMID:24856101

  3. Magnetic STAR technology for real-time localization and classification of unexploded ordnance and buried mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, R. F.

    2009-05-01

    A man-portable Magnetic Scalar Triangulation and Ranging ("MagSTAR") technology for Detection, Localization and Classification (DLC) of unexploded ordnance (UXO) has been developed by Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) with support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Proof of principle of the MagSTAR concept and its unique advantages for real-time, high-mobility magnetic sensing applications have been demonstrated by field tests of a prototype man-portable MagSTAR sensor. The prototype comprises: a) An array of fluxgate magnetometers configured as a multi-tensor gradiometer, b) A GPS-synchronized signal processing system. c) Unique STAR algorithms for point-by-point, standoff DLC of magnetic targets. This paper outlines details of: i) MagSTAR theory, ii) Design and construction of the prototype sensor, iii) Signal processing algorithms recently developed to improve the technology's target-discrimination accuracy, iv) Results of field tests of the portable gradiometer system against magnetic dipole targets. The results demonstrate that the MagSTAR technology is capable of very accurate, high-speed localization of magnetic targets at standoff distances of several meters. These advantages could readily be transitioned to a wide range of defense, security and sensing applications to provide faster and more effective DLC of UXO and buried mines.

  4. Localized Single Frequency Lasing States in a Finite Parity-Time Symmetric Resonator Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phang, Sendy; Vukovic, Ana; Creagh, Stephen C.; Sewell, Phillip D.; Gradoni, Gabriele; Benson, Trevor M.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a practical case of a finite periodic Parity Time chain made of resonant dielectric cylinders is considered. The paper analyzes a more general case where PT symmetry is achieved by modulating both the real and imaginary part of the material refractive index along the resonator chain. The band-structure of the finite periodic PT resonator chains is compared to infinite chains in order to understand the complex interdependence of the Bloch phase and the amount of the gain/loss in the system that causes the PT symmetry to break. The results show that the type of the modulation along the unit cell can significantly affect the position of the threshold point of the PT system. In all cases the lowest threshold is achieved near the end of the Brillouin zone. In the case of finite PT-chains, and for a particular type of modulation, early PT symmetry breaking is observed and shown to be caused by the presence of termination states localized at the edges of the finite chain resulting in localized lasing and dissipative modes at each end of the chain.

  5. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-J.; Wen, L.; Xiong, J.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Mohanty, S. D.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar, respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five per cent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio ≳30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW measurements.

  6. Real-time detection of generic objects using objectness estimation and locally adaptive regression kernels matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhihui; Gao, Lei; Xiao, Liping; Zhou, Bin; Gao, Shibo

    2015-12-01

    Our purpose is to develop a detection algorithm capable of searching for generic interest objects in real time without large training sets and long-time training stages. Instead of the classical sliding window object detection paradigm, we employ an objectness measure to produce a small set of candidate windows efficiently using Binarized Normed Gradients and a Laplacian of Gaussian-like filter. We then extract Locally Adaptive Regression Kernels (LARKs) as descriptors both from a model image and the candidate windows which measure the likeness of a pixel to its surroundings. Using a matrix cosine similarity measure, the algorithm yields a scalar resemblance map, indicating the likelihood of similarity between the model and the candidate windows. By employing nonparametric significance tests and non-maxima suppression, we detect the presence of objects similar to the given model. Experiments show that the proposed detection paradigm can automatically detect the presence, the number, as well as location of similar objects to the given model. The high quality and efficiency of our method make it suitable for real time multi-category object detection applications.

  7. Localized Mode DFT-S-OFDMA Implementation Using Frequency and Time Domain Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viholainen, Ari; Ihalainen, Tero; Rinne, Mika; Renfors, Markku

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method to generate a localized mode single-carrier frequency division multiple access (SC-FDMA) waveform. Instead of using DFT-spread OFDMA (DFT-S-OFDMA) processing, the new structure called SCiFI-FDMA relies on frequency and time domain interpolation followed by a user-specific frequency shift. SCiFI-FDMA can provide signal waveforms that are compatible to DFT-S-OFDMA. In addition, it provides any resolution of user bandwidth allocation for the uplink multiple access with comparable computational complexity, because the DFT is avoided. Therefore, SCiFI-FDMA allows a flexible choice of parameters appreciated in broadband mobile communications in the future.

  8. Real-time feedback control for high-intensity focused ultrasound system using localized motion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Azuma, Takashi; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is one of the noninvasive treatment for tumors. Visualizing the treated area inside the human body is necessary to control the HIFU exposure. Localized motion imaging (LMI) using ultrasound to induce and detect tissue deformation is one technique to detect a change in tissue stiffness caused by thermal coagulation. In experiments with porcine liver, LMI has shown to detect deformation with less than 20% accuracy. We have developed a prototype feedback control system using real-time LMI. In this system, coagulation size was measured every 1 s and controlled to correspond to a targeted size. The typical size error was reduced to 14% from 35%. LMI displacements in normal and coagulated tissues were sufficiently different to discriminate between coagulated areas and noncoagulated ones after HIFU sonication and to visualize treated areas after HIFU treatment.

  9. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  10. Real-time estimation and biofeedback of single-neuron firing rates using local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Thomas M.; Nazarpour, Kianoush; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The long-term stability and low-frequency composition of local field potentials (LFPs) offer important advantages for robust and efficient neuroprostheses. However, cortical LFPs recorded by multi-electrode arrays are often assumed to contain only redundant information arising from the activity of large neuronal populations. Here we show that multichannel LFPs in monkey motor cortex each contain a slightly different mixture of distinctive slow potentials that accompany neuronal firing. As a result, the firing rates of individual neurons can be estimated with surprising accuracy. We implemented this method in a real-time biofeedback brain–machine interface, and found that monkeys could learn to modulate the activity of arbitrary neurons using feedback derived solely from LFPs. These findings provide a principled method for monitoring individual neurons without long-term recording of action potentials. PMID:25394574

  11. Enhanced sonar array target localization using time-frequency interference phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibley, Jordan Almon

    The ability of traditional active sonar processing methods to detect targets is often limited by clutter and reverberation from ocean environments. Similarly, multipath arrivals from radiating sources such as ships and submarines are received at sensors in passive sonar systems. Reverberation and multipath signals introduce constructive and destructive interference patterns in received spectrograms in both active and passive sonar applications that vary with target range and frequency. The characterization and use of interference phenomena can provide insights into environmental parameters and target movement in conjunction with standard processing methods including spectrograms and array beamforming. This thesis focuses on utilizing the time-frequency interference structure of moving targets captured on sonar arrays to enhance the resolution and abilities of conventional sonar methods to detect and localize targets. Physics-based methods for interference-based beamforming and target depth separation are presented with application of these methods shown using broadband simulated array data.

  12. The inner magnetosphere ion composition and local time distribution over a solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C. G.

    2016-03-01

    Using the Cluster/Composition and Distribution Function (CODIF) analyzer data set from 2001 to 2013, a full solar cycle, we determine the ion distributions for H+, He+, and O+ in the inner magnetosphere (L < 12) over the energy range 40 eV to 40 keV as a function magnetic local time, solar EUV (F10.7), and geomagnetic activity (Kp). Concentrating on L = 6-7 for comparison with previous studies at geosynchronous orbit, we determine both the average flux at 90° pitch angle and the pitch angle anisotropy as a function of energy and magnetic local time. We clearly see the minimum in the H+ spectrum that results from the competition between eastward and westward drifts. The feature is weaker in O+ and He+, leading to higher O+/H+ and He+/H+ ratios in the affected region, and also to a higher pitch angle anisotropy, both features expected from the long-term effects of charge exchange. We also determine how the nightside L = 6-7 densities and temperatures vary with geomagnetic activity (Kp) and solar EUV (F10.7). Consistent with other studies, we find that the O+ density and relative abundance increase significantly with both Kp and F10.7. He+ density increases with F10.7, but not significantly with Kp. The temperatures of all species decrease with increasing F10.7. The O+ and He+ densities increase from L = 12 to L ~ 3-4, both absolutely and relative to H+, and then drop off sharply. The results give a comprehensive view of the inner magnetosphere using a contiguous long-term data set that supports much of the earlier work from GEOS, ISEE, Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers, and Polar from previous solar cycles.

  13. Crustal Structure of Northeastern Sicily, South Italy, From Tomographic Inversion of Local Earthquake Arrival-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orecchio, B.; Aloisi, M.; Barberi, G.; Neri, G.

    After integrating the databases of the local and national seismic networks relative to lithospheric seismicity that occurred in and around Northeastern Sicily bet ween 1978 and 2001, we selected 932 events for 3D local tomography of P- and S-wave velocity. A dataset of 10241 P and 5597 S arrival times was inverted for Vp, Vs and hypocenter distributions using the SIMULPS12 algorithm. Analysis of the Derivative Weight Sum and Spread Function detected a rather good level of constraint of velocity at nodes of a grid with horizontal and vertical spacing of 10 and 6 km respectively, spanning the upper 30 Km beneath the area including Central and Northeastern Sicily, Southern Calabria and the Southeasternmost Tyrrhenian Sea. Standard deviation of arrival-time residuals after 3D inversion was about 20% lower than obtained by locating the same earthquakes using the minimum 1D model. Four main spatial domains can be distinguished in the obtained velocity structure: i) a high-velocity domain corresponding to Tyrrhenian structural units; ii) low-velocity domain corresponding to Sicilian units; iii) a domain corresponding to the Calabrian Arc characterized by positive velocity anomalies at shallow depth (nodes in the range 0-12 Km) and by negative velocity ones below (18-30 Km); iv) positive anomalies at deep nodes (18-30 Km) and negative anomalies above, in the area including the Etna volcano and the Ionian coast of Sicily near the volcanic edifice. Velocity distributions were analyzed jointly with the geophysical and geological information available in the literature in order to improve our knowledge of the crustal structure in the study area. Furthermore, comparisons were made with the most recent regional geodynamic models and led us to state that the crustal features evidenced in the present investigation match well with the model assuming gravity- induced southeastward roll-back of an Ionian lithospheric slab subducting beneath the Tyrrhenian sea.

  14. Teaching Bodies/Learning Desire: Rethinking the Role of Desire in the Pedagogic Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Desire is a crucial aspect of the pedagogic process. For too long, however, there has been a dichotomous relationship between understandings of teacher and student desire. The former is often configured as a pedagogic anachronism, problematised and needing to be contained. Conversely, the latter is essentialised as a force that should not be…

  15. Separation of hydrological effects from GNSS time series on regional and local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Giuliana; Zuliani, David; Fabris, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Continuous GNSS networks provide unique information about the crustal displacements, of use for studies concerning gravity field, plate motions, tectonic processes, and earthquake cycle understanding. For these purposes, overall in the case of regions with slow deformation strain, we have to individuate and separate all the possible contributions, at the various frequencies. Among the others, hydrological loading effects can be present over a wide frequency range and have to be accurately modelled. The present work is aimed to test, whether the GNSS signal is sensitive to hydrological effects at a regional or a more local scale. The dataset we chose for the tests is ideal: it relates to a relatively small region, where the active collisional processes generate a moderate seismic activity and is characterized by high rainfall rate and significant hydrological phenomena. The data belong to the Friuli Regional Deformation Network (FReDNet) of OGS (Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e Geofisica Sperimentale), consisting of 16 GNSS permanent sites distributed on the northern edge of the Adria microplate (NE-Italy). The data set includes the time series from the 10 GNSS permanent sites of the Marussi network of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Regional Council. The time-span covered by the network overcomes in many cases the twelve years, giving the possibility to study the various terms superimposed to the linear one, due to the plate motion. After a first processing of the GPS data of the longest time series, using GAMIT/GLOBK, eliminating the outliers, and filling eventual short gaps in the data through linear interpolation, we corrected them for the annual and seasonal terms and the displacements due to hydrological mass loading effects on multiyear timescales. For our test, we first addressed the regional level problem. Following the approach of Chamoli et al. (2014), we separated the annual, semiannual, and pluriannual terms of the displacements excited by the

  16. Metallicity gradients in local Universe galaxies: Time evolution and effects of radial migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Coccato, Lodovico; Stanghellini, Letizia; Casasola, Viviana; Galli, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Context. Our knowledge of the shape of radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies has recently improved. Conversely, the understanding of their time evolution is more complex, since it requires analysis of stellar populations with different ages or systematic studies of galaxies at different redshifts. In the local Universe, H ii regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important tools to investigate radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies. Aims: We present an in-depth study of all nearby spiral galaxies (M33, M31, NGC 300, and M81) with direct-method nebular abundances of both populations, aiming at studying the evolution of their radial metallicity gradients. For the first time, we also evaluate the radial migration of PN populations. Methods: For the selected galaxies, we analysed H ii region and PN properties to: determine whether oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past interstellar medium (ISM) composition; homogenise published datasets; estimate the migration of the oldest stellar populations; and determine the overall chemical enrichment and slope evolution. Results: We confirm that oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past ISM metallicity. We find that PN gradients are flatter than or equal to those of H ii regions. When radial motions are negligible, this result provides a direct measurement of the time evolution of the gradient. For galaxies with dominant radial motions, we provide upper limits on the gradient evolution. Finally, the total metal content increases with time in all target galaxies, and early morphological types have a larger increment Δ(O/H) than late-type galaxies. Conclusions: Our findings provide important constraints to discriminate among different galactic evolutionary scenarios, favouring cosmological models with enhanced feedback from supernovae. The advent of extremely large telescopes allows us to include galaxies in a wider range of morphologies and environments, thus putting firmer constraints on galaxy formation

  17. Real-time measurements of local myocardium motion and arterial wall thickening.

    PubMed

    Kanai, H; Koiwa, Y; Zhang, J

    1999-01-01

    We have already developed a new method, namely, the phased tracking method, to track the movement of the heart wall and arterial wall accurately based on both the phase and magnitude of the demodulated signals to determine the instantaneous position of an object. This method has been realized by an off-line measurement system, which cannot be applied to transient evaluation of rapid response of the cardiovascular system to physiological stress. In this paper, therefore, a real-time system to measure change in the thickness of the myocardium and the arterial wall is presented. In this system, an analytic signal from standard ultrasonic diagnostic equipment is analogue-to-digital (A/D) converted at a sampling frequency of 1 MHz. By pipelining and parallel processing using four high-speed digital signal processing (DSP) chips, the method described is realized in real time. The tracking results for both sides of the heart and/or arterial wall are superimposed on the M (motion)-mode image in the work station (WS), and the thickness changes of the heart and/or arterial wall are also displayed and digital-to-analogue (D/A) converted in real time. From the regional change in thickness of the heart wall, spatial distribution of myocardial motility and contractility can be evaluated. For the arterial wall, its local elasticity can be evaluated by referring to the blood pressure. In in vivo experiments, the rapid response of the change in wall thickness of the carotid artery to the dose of the nitroglycerine (NTG) is evaluated. This new real-time system offers potential for quantitative diagnosis of myocardial motility, early stage atherosclerosis, and the transient evaluation of the rapid response of the cardiovascular system to physiological stress. PMID:18244316

  18. Analysis of local ionospheric time varying characteristics with singular value decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Jakob; Knudsen, Per; Jensen, Anna B. O.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, a time series from 1999 to 2007 of absolute total electron content (TEC) values has been computed and analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD). The data set has been computed using a Kalman Filter and is based on dual frequency GPS data from three reference stations in Denmark located in the midlatitude region. The station separation between the three stations is 132-208 km (the time series of the TEC can be freely downloaded at http://www.heisesgade.dk ). For each year, a SVD has been performed on the TEC time series in order to identify the three time varying (daily, yearly, and 11 yearly) characteristics of the ionosphere. The applied SVD analysis provides a new method for separating the daily from the yearly components. The first singular value is very dominant (approximately six times larger than the second singular value), and this singular value corresponds clearly to the variation of the daily cycle over the year. The second singular value corresponds to variations of the width of the daily peak over the year, and the third singular value shows a clear yearly variation of the daily signal with peaks around the equinoxes. The singular values for each year show a very strong correlation with the sunspot number for all the singular values. The correlation coefficients for the first 5 sets of singular values are all above 0.96. Based on the SVD analysis yearly models of the TEC in the ionosphere can be recomposed and illustrate the three time varying characteristics of the ionosphere very clearly. By prediction of the yearly mean sunspot number, future yearly models can also be predicted. These can serve as a priori information for a real time space weather service providing information of the current status of the ionosphere. They will improve the Kalman filter processing making it more robust, but can also be used as

  19. Inhibited Sexual Desire and Sexual Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Morse, William I.

    1985-01-01

    Inhibited sexual desire (ISD) is one of the most common sexual dysfunctions, especially in women. Family physicians have an opportunity to recognize ISD before the associated problems become entrenched, and to guide couples toward satisfactory resolution. A summary is presented of current thinking on ISD and its causes. Case reports and observations about frequency of and treatment for ISD are included. Much less has been written about sexual avoidance in the presence of desire. A definition is offered of simple sexual avoidance in the absence of genital dysfunction. Frequency, treatment response, and specific cases are described. A newly identified entity—mutual unwillingness to importune for sex—is discussed briefly. Counselling which focuses on communication, self responsibility, and sex education is very helpful to patients with sexual problems. PMID:21274060

  20. Children's Social Desirability and Dietary Reports

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Smith, Albert F.; Litaker, Mark S.; Baglio, Michelle L.; Guinn, Caroline H.; Shaffer, Nicole M.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated telephone administration of the Children's Social Desirability (CSD) scale and our adaptation for children of the Social Desirability for Food scale (C-SDF). Each of 100 4th-graders completed 2 telephone interviews 28 days apart. CSD scores had adequate internal consistency and test—retest reliability, and a 14-item subset was identified that sufficiently measures the same construct. Our C-SDF scale performed less well in terms of internal consistency and test—retest reliability; factor analysis revealed 2 factors, 1 of which was moderately related to the CSD. The 14-item subset of the CSD scale may help researchers understand error in children's dietary reports. PMID:15068757

  1. Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization of Ultra-Cold Atoms by Manipulation of Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspect, Alain

    In the early 1980's, observation of a magneto-resistance anomaly in metallic thin films was attributed to the phenomenon of weak localization of electrons and to time-reversal symmetry breaking due to a magnetic field acting upon charged particles. We have observed weak localization of ultra-cold atoms in a 2D configuration, placed in a disordered potential created by a laser speckle. In order to manipulate time-reversal symmetry with our neutral atoms, we take advantage of the slow evolution of our system, and we observe the suppression and revival of weak localization when time reversal symmetry is cancelled and reestablished. References: K. Muller, J. Richard, V. V. Volchkov, V. Denechaud, P. Bouyer, A. Aspect, and V. Josse, ''Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization through Control of Time-Reversal Symmetry,'' Physical Review Letters 114 (20) (2015) and references in. Work supported by the ERC Avanced Grant Quantatop.

  2. The best timing for administering systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimodaira, Yusuke; Harada, Kazuto; Lin, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, outcomes for patients with rectal cancer have improved considerably. However, several questions have emerged as survival times have lengthened and quality of life has improved for these patients. Currently patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are often recommended multimodality therapy with fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CT) and radiation followed by total mesorectal excision (TME), with consideration given to FOLFOX before chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Recently, Garcia-Aguilar and colleagues reported in Lancet Oncology that the addition of mFOLFOX6 administered between CRT and surgery affected the number of patients achieving pathologic complete response (pathCR), which is of great interest from the standpoint of pursuit of optimal timing of systemic CT delivery. This was a multicenter phase II study consisting of 4 sequential treatment groups of patients with LARC, and they reported that patients given higher number CT cycles between CRT and surgery achieved higher rates of pathCR than those given standard treatment. There was no association between response improvement and tumor progression, increased technical difficulty, or surgical complications. Ongoing phase III clinical trial further assessing this strategy might result in a paradigm shift. PMID:26889491

  3. Local time resolved dynamics of field-aligned currents and their response to solar wind variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Maosheng; Vogt, Joachim; Lühr, Hermann; Sorbalo, Eugen

    2014-07-01

    Using 10 years of CHAMP measurements condensed into the empirical model of field-aligned currents through empirical orthogonal function analysis, the dynamics of field-aligned currents (FACs) is modeled and studied in separate magnetic local time (MLT) sectors. We investigate the distributions of FAC intensity and latitude and evaluate their predictability in terms of geospace parameters which are ranked according to their relative importance measured by a multivariate regression procedure. The response time to changes in solar wind variables is studied in detail and found to be much shorter for dayside FACs than on the nightside (15-25 min versus 35-95 min). Furthermore, dayside FACs can be parameterized more accurately: R2 values maximize greater than 0.7 for FAC latitude and greater than 0.3 for FAC intensity, whereas the corresponding values on the nightside are smaller than 0.3 and 0.15, respectively. The results support the separation between directly driven coupling processes acting on the dayside and unloading processes controlling the nightside. In addition, the MLT-resolved standardized regression coefficients suggest that (1) FAC latitude is affected most significantly by the transpolar potential, substorm evolution, solar activity as represented by the F10.7 index and its square, and the dipole tilt; (2) Region-1/2 current intensity is controlled most efficiently by substorm evolution, IMF Bz and IMF By; and (3) cusp current intensity is influenced by conductivity, IMF By and their cross item.

  4. Positional Stability of Electromagnetic Transponders Used for Prostate Localization and Continuous, Real-Time Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberg, Dale W. . E-mail: litzen@umich.edu; Willoughby, Twyla R. M.Sc.; Balter, James M.; Sandler, Howard M.; Wei, John; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Cunningham, Alexis A.; Bock, Andrea; Aubin, Michele; Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto; Pouliot, Jean

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the relative positional stability of implanted glass-encapsulated circuits (transponders) used in continuous electromagnetic localization and tracking of target volumes during radiation therapy. Ideally, the distances between transponders remains constant over the course of treament. In this work, we evaluate the accuracy of these conditions. Methods and Materials: Three transponders were implanted in each of 20 patients. Images (CT scan or X-ray pair) were acquired at 13 time points. These images occurred from the day of implant (2 weeks before simulation) to 4 weeks posttreatment. The distance between transponders was determined from each dataset. The average and standard deviation of each distance were determined, and changes were evaluated over several time periods, including pretreatment and during therapy. Results: Of 60 transponders implanted, 58 showed no significant migration from their intended positions. Of the two transponders that did migrate, one appears to have been implanted in the venous plexus, and the other in the urethra, with no clinical consequences to the patients. An analysis that included the planning CT scan and all subsequent distance measurements showed that the standard deviation of intertransponder distances was {<=}1.2 mm for up to 1 month after the completion of therapy. Conclusions: Implanted transponders demonstrate the same long-term stability characteristics as implanted gold markers, within statistical uncertainties. As with gold markers, and using the same implant procedure, basic guidelines for the placement of transponders within the prostate help ensure minimal migration.

  5. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, themore » dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.« less

  6. Dynamic binaural sound localization based on variations of interaural time delays and system rotations.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Claude; Rogers, Chris; Massen, Francis

    2015-08-01

    This work develops the mathematical model for a steerable binaural system that determines the instantaneous direction of a sound source in space. The model combines system angular speed and interaural time delays (ITDs) in a differential equation, which allows monitoring the change of source position in the binaural reference frame and therefore resolves the confusion about azimuth and elevation. The work includes the analysis of error propagation and presents results from a real-time application that was performed on a digital signal processing device. Theory and experiments demonstrate that the azimuthal angle to the sound source is accurately yielded in the case of horizontal rotations, whereas the elevation angle is estimated with large uncertainty. This paper also proves the equivalence of the ITD derivative and the Doppler shift appearing between the binaurally captured audio signals. The equation of this Doppler shift is applicable for any kind of motion. It shows that weak binaural pitch differences may represent an additional cue in localization of sound. Finally, the paper develops practical applications from this relationship, such as the synthesizing of binaural images of pure and complex tones emitted by a moving source, and the generation of multiple frequency images for binaural beat experiments. PMID:26328682

  7. Longitudinal and local time asymmetries of magnetospheric turbulence in Saturn's plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papen, Michael; Saur, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Based on earlier studies that have shown Saturn's middle magnetosphere to contain turbulent magnetic field fluctuations, we analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the magnetic fluctuations and turbulent heating rate as a function of local time and magnetic phase. The region of study is Saturn's plasma sheet at a distance of 6-20 Rs, where Rs is Saturn's equatorial radius. The data set consists of magnetic field data measured during 92 orbits (revolutions) from the equatorial phases of Cassini covering 9 years from 2004 to 2012. We find asymmetries in the magnetosphere with enhanced fluctuations around noon. With respect to longitude we find increased fluctuations at 65° southern and 250° northern magnetic phase. This leads to an increased turbulent heating rate in these regions and is consistent with regions of increased plasma density and maximum downward field-aligned currents according to the quasi-dipolar perturbation fields. Analysis of single orbits reveals that the heating rate of 79% of all analyzed inbound and outbound legs is significantly (statistical error less than 1%) sinusoidally modulated. The modulation of the turbulent heating rate is predominantly observed during times when Cassini is located between dusk and midnight and additionally at dawn.

  8. Bifunctional electro-optical nanoprobe to real-time detect local biochemical processes in single cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin Ting; Hu, Weihua; Wang, Houxiao; Yang, Hongbin; Zhou, Wei; Li, Chang Ming

    2011-07-15

    A bifunctional electro-optical nanoprobe with integrated nanoring electrode and optical nanotip was fabricated and investigated to simultaneously detect both electrical and optical signals in real-time with high spatial resolution. Concurrent measurements of the oxidant generation and the intracellular antioxidant levels in single cells correlate the stronger oxidant generation with an altered initial antioxidant response in the breast cancer cells in comparison to the normal ones suggesting that the cell malignancy is associated with the strength of oxidative stress, and the higher antioxidant level may be the cause of the drug resistance. While the optical detection indicates the fluctuation of the intracellular redox homeostasis, the chronoamperometric signals allow quantitative real-time detection of the H₂O₂ release and decay. Furthermore, the nanoscale probe enables localized simultaneous detections thus discovering that activated enzymes responsible for the oxidative stress target at specific membrane regions. This method promises applications in study of the dynamics of important physiological processes, and provides the opportunity to unravel the interplay of various signaling pathways. PMID:21632233

  9. Magnetic local time variation and scaling of poleward auroral boundary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longden, N.; Chisham, G.; Freeman, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The balance of dayside and nightside reconnection processes within the Earth's magnetosphere and its effect on the amount of open magnetic flux threading the ionosphere is well understood in terms of the expanding-contracting polar cap model. However, the nature and character of the consequential fluctuations in the polar cap boundary are poorly understood. By using the poleward auroral luminosity boundary (PALB), as measured by the FUV instrument of the IMAGE spacecraft, as a proxy for the polar cap boundary, we have studied the motion of this boundary for more than 2 years across the complete range of magnetic local time. Our results show that the dayside PALB dynamics are broadly self-similar on timescales of 12 min to 6 h and appear to be monofractal. Similarity with the characteristics of solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field variability suggests that this dayside monofractal behavior is predominantly inherited from the solar wind via the reconnection process. The nightside PALB dynamics exhibit scale-free behavior at intermediate time scales (12-90 min) and appear to be multifractal. We propose that this character is a result of the intermittent multifractal structure of magnetotail reconnection.

  10. Local time distributions of repetition periods for rising tone lower band chorus waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shue, Jih-Hong; Hsieh, Yi-Kai; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wang, Kaiti; Fu, Hui Shan; Bortnik, Jacob; Tao, Xin; Hsieh, Wen-Chieh; Pi, Gilbert

    2015-10-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves generally occur outside the plasmapause in the magnetosphere. The most striking feature of the waves is their occurrence in discrete elements. One of the parameters that describe the discrete elements is the repetition period (Trp), the time between consecutive elements. The Trp has not been studied statistically before. We use high-resolution waveform data to derive distributions of Trp for different local times. We find that the average Trp for the nightside (0.56 s) and dawnside (0.53 s) are smaller than those for the dayside (0.81 s) and duskside (0.97 s). Through a comparison with the background plasma and magnetic fields, we also find that the total magnetic field and temperature are the main controlling factors that affect the variability of Trp. These results are important for understanding the generation mechanism of chorus and choosing parameters in simulations that model the acceleration and loss of electrons by wave-particle interactions.

  11. Tomographic imaging of local earthquake delay times for three-dimensional velocity variation in western Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.M.; Crosson, R.S. )

    1990-04-10

    Tomographic inversion is applied to delay times from local earthquakes to image three dimensional velocity variations in the Puget Sound region of western Washington. The 37,500 square km region is represented by nearly cubic blocks of 5 km per side. P-wave arrival time observations from 4,387 crustal earthquakes, with depths of 0 to 40 km, were used as sources producing 36,865 rays covering the target region. A conjugate gradient method (LSQR) is used to invert the large, sparse system of equations. To diminish the effects of noisy data, the Laplacian is constrained to be zero within horizontal layers, providing smoothing of the model. The resolution is estimated by calculating impulse responses at blocks of interest and estimates of standard errors are calculated by the jackknife statistical procedure. Results of the inversion are correlated with some known geologic features and independent geophysical measurements. High P-wave velocities along the eastern flank of the Olympic Peninsula are interpreted to reflect the subsurface extension of Crescent terrane. Low velocities beneath the Puget Sound further to the east are inferred to reflect thick sediment accumulations. The Crescent terrane appears to extend beneath Puget Sound, consistent with its interpretation as a major accretionary unit. In the southern Puget Sound basin, high velocity anomalies at depths of 10-20 km are interpreted as Crescent terrane and are correlated with a region of low seismicity. Near Mt. Ranier, high velocity anomalies may reflect buried plutons.

  12. The Local Group as a time machine: studying the high-redshift Universe with nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Bullock, James S.; Conroy, Charlie; Fitts, Alex

    2015-10-01

    We infer the UV luminosities of Local Group galaxies at early cosmic times (z ˜ 2 and z ˜ 7) by combining stellar population synthesis modelling with star formation histories derived from deep colour-magnitude diagrams constructed from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Our analysis provides a basis for understanding high-z galaxies - including those that may be unobservable even with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - in the context of familiar, well-studied objects in the very low-z Universe. We find that, at the epoch of reionization, all Local Group dwarfs were less luminous than the faintest galaxies detectable in deep HST observations of blank fields. We predict that JWST will observe z ˜ 7 progenitors of galaxies similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud today; however, the HST Frontier Fields initiative may already be observing such galaxies, highlighting the power of gravitational lensing. Consensus reionization models require an extrapolation of the observed blank-field luminosity function (LF) at z ≈ 7 by at least 2 orders of magnitude in order to maintain reionization. This scenario requires the progenitors of the Fornax and Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxies to be contributors to the ionizing background at z ˜ 7. Combined with numerical simulations, our results argue for a break in the UV LF from a faint-end slope of α ˜ -2 at MUV ≲ -13 to α ˜ -1.2 at lower luminosities. Applied to photometric samples at lower redshifts, our analysis suggests that HST observations in lensing fields at z ˜ 2 are capable of probing galaxies with luminosities comparable to the expected progenitor of Fornax.

  13. PEGylation of antibody fragments greatly increases their local residence time following delivery to the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Koussoroplis, Salome Juliette; Paulissen, Geneviève; Tyteca, Donatienne; Goldansaz, Hadi; Todoroff, Julie; Barilly, Céline; Uyttenhove, Catherine; Van Snick, Jacques; Cataldo, Didier; Vanbever, Rita

    2014-08-10

    Inhalation aerosols offer a targeted therapy for respiratory diseases. However, the therapeutic efficacy of inhaled biopharmaceuticals is limited by the rapid clearance of macromolecules in the lungs. The aim of this research was to study the effects of the PEGylation of antibody fragments on their local residence time after administration to the respiratory tract. We demonstrate that the conjugation of a two-armed 40-kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain to anti-interleukin-17A (IL-17A) F(ab')2 and anti-IL-13 Fab' greatly prolonged the presence of these fragments within the lungs of mice. The content of PEGylated antibody fragments within the lungs plateaued up to 4h post-delivery, whereas the clearance of unconjugated proteins started immediately after administration. Forty-eight hours post-delivery, F(ab')2 and Fab' contents in the lungs had decreased to 10 and 14% of the dose initially deposited, respectively. However, this value was 40% for both PEG40-F(ab')2 and PEG40-Fab'. The prolonged pulmonary residency of the anti-IL-17A PEG40-F(ab')2 translated into an improved efficacy in reducing lung inflammation in a murine model of house dust mite-induced lung inflammation. We demonstrate that PEGylated proteins were principally retained within the lung lumen rather than the nasal cavities or lung parenchyma. In addition, we report that PEG increased pulmonary retention of antibody fragments through mucoadhesion and escape from alveolar macrophages rather than increased hydrodynamic size or improved enzymatic stability. The PEGylation of proteins might find broad application in the local delivery of therapeutic proteins to diseased airways. PMID:24845126

  14. Three-dimensional crustal structure of the Mendocino Triple Junction region from local earthquake travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdonck, David; Zandt, George

    1994-12-01

    The large-scale, three-dimensional geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction at Cape Mendocino, California, was investigated by inverting nearly 19,000 P wave arrival times from over 1400 local earthquakes to estimate the three-dimensional velocity structure and hypocentral parameters. A velocity grid 175 km (N-S) by 125 km (E-W) centered near Garberville, California, was constructed with 25 km horizontal and 5 km vertical mode spacing. The model was well resolved near Cape Mendocino, where the earthquakes and stations are concentrated. At about 40.6 N latitude a high-velocity gradient between 6.5 and 7.5 km/s dips gently to the south and east from about 15 km depth near the coast. Relocated hypocenters concentrate below this high gradient which we interpret as the oceanic crust of the subducted Gorda Plate. Therefore the depth to the top of the Gorda Plate near Cape Mendocino is interpreted to be approximately 15 km. The Gorda Plate appears intact and dipping approximately 8 deg eastward due to subduction and flexing downward 6 deg - 12 deg to the south. Both hypocenters and velocity structure suggest that the southern edge of the plate intersects the coastline at 40.3 N latitude and maintains a linear trend 15 deg south of east to at least 123 W longitude. The top of a large low-velocity region at 20-30 km depth extends about 50 km N-S and 75 km E-W (roughly between Garberville and Covelo) and is located above and south of the southern edge of the Gorda Plate. We interpret this low velocity area to be locally thickened crust (8-10 km) due to either local compressional forces associated with north-south compression caused by the northward impingement of the rigid Pacific Plate or by underthrusting of the base of the accretionary subduction complex at the southern terminous of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. South of Cape Mendocino and southwest of the Garberville fault, high velocities indicative of oceanic crust are detected at 15 km depth. We interpret this

  15. Three-dimensional crustal structure for the Mendocino Triple Junction region from local earthquake travel times

    SciTech Connect

    Verdonck, D.; Zandt, G.

    1994-12-10

    The large-scale, three-dimensional geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction at Cape Mendocino, California, was investigated by inverting nearly 19,000 P wave arrival times from over 1400 local earthquakes to estimate the three-dimensional velocity structure and hypocentral parameters. A velocity grid 175 km (N-S) by 125 km (E-W) centered near Garberville, California, was constructed with 25 km horizontal and 5 km vertical node spacing. The model was well resolved near Cape Mendocino, where the earthquakes and stations are concentrated. At about 40.6{degrees}N latitude a high-velocity gradient between 6.5 and 7.5 km/s dips gently to the south and east from about 15 km depth near the coast. Relocated hypocenters concentrate below this high gradient which the authors interpret as the oceanic crust of the subducted Gorda Plate. Therefore the depth to the top of the Gorda Plate near Cape Mendocino is interpreted to be {approximately} 15 km. The Gorda Plate appears intact and dipping {approximately}8{degrees} eastward due to subduction and flexing downward 6{degrees}-12{degrees} to the south. Both hypocenters and velocity structure suggest that the southern edge of the plate intersects the coastline at 40.3{degrees}N latitude and maintains a linear trend 15{degrees} south of east to at least 123{degrees}W longitude. The top of a large low-velocity region at 20-30 km depth extends about 50 km N-S and 75 km E-W (roughly between Garberville and Covelo) and is located above and south of the southern edge of the Gorda Plate. The authors interpret this low velocity area to be locally thickened crust (8-10 km) due to either local compressional forces associated with north-south compression caused by the northward impingement of the rigid Pacific Plate or by underthrusting of the base of the accretionary subduction complex at the southern terminous of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. 66 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Time and Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Local Field Potential Synchronization by Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Clinton B.; Kiss, Zelma H. T.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson’s disease (PD). We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP) recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective), low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective) and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR), ventroanterior thalamus (VA), primary motor cortex (M1), and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic effects

  17. Comparison of manual and automatic onset Time picking for local earthquake in North Eastern Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallarossa, D.; Tiberi, L.; Costa, G.

    2012-04-01

    Automatic estimates of earthquake parameters continues to be of considerable interest to the seismological community. The automatic processing of seismic data, whether for real-time seismic warning system or to reprocessing large amount of seismic recordings, is increasingly being demanded by seismologists. In this study is presented a new method used for automatic phase picking (P and S) which include envelope function calculation, STA/LTA detectors and AR picking algorithms based on the Akaike information criterion (AIC) The main characteristics of the proposed picking algorithm are: a) Pre-filtering and envelope calculation to prearrange the onset; b) Preliminary detection of P onset using both the AIC based picker and the STA/LTA picker; c) S/N analysis, P validation, filtering and re-picking; d) Preliminary earthquake location; e) Detection of S onset adopting the AIC based picker; f) S/N analysis, S validation; g) Earthquake location. The algorithm is applied to a reference data composed by 200 events set with very heterogeneous qualities of P and S onsets acquired by South Eastern Alps Transfontier network from 01/01/2008 to 03/31/2008 in North Eastern Italy and surrounding regions. These data are collected through the use of the software Antelope, an integrated collection of programs for data management and seismic data analysis. The reliability and robustness of the proposed algorithm is tested by comparing manually derived P and S readings (determined by an experienced seismic analyst), serving as reference picks, with the corresponding automatically estimated P and S arrival times. An additional analysis is comparing these automatic picks with the ones produced by Antelope, which used only STA/LTA detectors and finally studying the effect of these different set of arrival times in the resultant localizations for each database event. Preliminary results indicate that seismic detectors which integrate different techniques could improve the stability of the

  18. Phase-space growth rates, local Lyapunov spectra, and symmetry breaking for time-reversible dissipative oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Grond, Florian

    2008-08-01

    We investigate and discuss the time-reversible nature of phase-space instabilities for several flows, x˙=f(x). The flows describe thermostated oscillator systems in from two through eight phase-space dimensions. We determine the local extremal phase-space growth rates, which bound the instantaneous comoving Lyapunov exponents. The extremal rates are point functions which vary continuously in phase space. The extremal rates can best be determined with a "singular-value decomposition" algorithm. In contrast to these precisely time-reversible local "point function" values, a time-reversibility analysis of the comoving Lyapunov spectra is more complex. The latter analysis is nonlocal and requires the additional storing and playback of relatively long (billion-step) trajectories. All the oscillator models studied here show the same time reversibility symmetry linking their time-reversed and time-averaged "global" Lyapunov spectra. Averaged over a long-time-reversed trajectory, each of the long-time-averaged Lyapunov exponents simply changes signs. The negative/positive sign of the summed-up and long-time-averaged spectra in the forward/backward time directions is the microscopic analog of the Second Law of Thermodynamics. This sign changing of the individual global exponents contrasts with typical more-complex instantaneous "local" behavior, where there is no simple relation between the forward and backward exponents other than the local (instantaneous) dissipative constraint on their sum. As the extremal rates are point functions, they too always satisfy the sum rule.

  19. Desired professional development pathways for clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Shord, Stacy S; Schwinghammer, Terry L; Badowski, Melissa; Banderas, Julie; Burton, Michael E; Chapleau, Christopher A; Gallagher, Jason C; Matsuura, Gregory; Parli, Sara E; Yunker, Nancy

    2013-04-01

    The 2012 American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Certification Affairs Committee was charged with developing guidelines for the desired professional development pathways for clinical pharmacists. This document summarizes recommendations for postgraduate education and training for graduates of U.S. schools and colleges of pharmacy and describes the preferred pathways for achieving, demonstrating, and maintaining competence as clinical pharmacists. After initial licensure within the state or jurisdiction in which the pharmacist intends to practice, completion of an accredited PGY1 pharmacy residency is recommended to further develop the knowledge and skills needed to optimize medication therapy outcomes. An accredited PGY2 pharmacy residency should be completed if a pharmacist wishes to seek employment in a specific therapeutic area or practice setting, if such a residency exists. Clinical pharmacists intending to conduct advanced research that is competitive for federal funding are encouraged to complete a fellowship or graduate education. Initial certification by the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS) or other appropriate sponsoring organizations should be completed in the desired primary therapeutic area or practice setting within 2 years after accepting a position within the desired specific therapeutic area or practice setting. Clinical pharmacists subsequently will need to meet the requirements to maintain pharmacist licensure and board certification. Traineeships, practice-based activities, and certificate programs can be used to obtain additional knowledge and skills that support professional growth. Pharmacists are strongly encouraged to adopt a lifelong, systematic process for professional development and work with ACCP and other professional organizations to facilitate the development and implementation of innovative strategies to assess core practice competencies. PMID:23401084

  20. The time-dependence of compaction localization in a porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Brantut, N.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Compaction bands in sandstone are laterally-extensive planar deformation features that are characterized by lower porosity and permeability than the surrounding host rock. As a result, this form of localization has important implications for both strain partitioning and fluid flow in the Earth's upper crust. To better understand the time-dependency of compaction band growth, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (initial porosity = 0.24) under constant stress (creep) conditions in the compactant regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the compactant regime, manifest as compaction bands. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterized by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain rate to shear failure, compaction creep is characterized by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain rate. The global decrease in the rates of axial strain, acoustic emission energy, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated at intervals by higher rate excursions, interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased. However, the inelastic strain associated with the growth of a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude (from 10-8 to 10-5 s-1). We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate (from both creep and constant strain rate experiments), the characteristics (geometry, thickness) of the compaction bands remain essentially the same. Several lines of evidence, notably the similarity between the differential stress dependence of creep strain rate in the dilatant and compactant regimes, suggest that, as for dilatant creep, subcritical stress corrosion cracking is the mechanism responsible for

  1. Trait inferences in goal-directed behavior: ERP timing and localization under spontaneous and intentional processing

    PubMed Central

    Van den Eede, Sofie; Baetens, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2009-01-01

    This study measured event-related potentials (ERPs) during multiple goal and trait inferences, under spontaneous or intentional instructions. Participants read sentences describing several goal-implying behaviors of a target person from which also a strong trait could be inferred or not. The last word of each sentence determined the consistency with the inference induced during preceding sentences. In comparison with behaviors that implied only a goal, stronger waveforms beginning at ∼150 ms were obtained when the behaviors additionally implied a trait. These ERPs showed considerable parallels between spontaneous and intentional inferences. This suggests that traits embedded in a stream of goal-directed behaviors were detected more rapidly and automatically than mere goals, irrespective of the participants’ spontaneous or intentional instructions. In line with this, source localization (LORETA) of the ERPs show predominantly activation in the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) during 150–200 ms, suggesting that goals were detected at that time interval. During 200–300 ms, activation was stronger at the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for multiple goals and traits as opposed to goals only, suggesting that traits were inferred during this time window. A cued recall measure taken after the presentation of the stimulus material support the occurrence of goal and trait inferences and shows significant correlations with the neural components, indicating that these components are valid neural indices of spontaneous and intentional social inferences. The early detection of multiple goal and trait inferences is explained in terms of their greater social relevance, leading to privileged attention allocation and processing in the brain. PMID:19270041

  2. Local, real-time measurement of drying films of aqueous polymer solutions using active microrheology.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Yoshiyuki; Leal, L Gary; Squires, Todd M

    2014-05-13

    Oscillatory microdisk rheometry was applied to evaluate the evolution of the viscoelastic properties at the surface of a film of an aqueous solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) during drying. The drying rate was measured concurrently, based upon measurements of the variation of film thickness. A fully hydrolyzed PVA solution shows a constant drying rate, while a less hydrolyzed PVA solution exhibits a decreased drying rate in the latter part of the drying process, which occurred at the same time as an increase of the elastic modulus. We suggest that this difference in behavior is a consequence of the fact that both the configuration of the PVA molecule and the strength of interaction with water depend on the degree to which the PVA is hydrolyzed. The polymer concentration at the film surface can be estimated from the measured viscosity at the surface for the fully hydrolyzed PVA solution, and this result then can be compared with two theoretical calculations: one in which the polymer concentration is assumed to remain uniform throughout the film, and the other in which the polymer concentration distribution is determined via a one-dimensional diffusion model. This comparison suggests that the polymer is first concentrated locally near the surface but later in the drying process the distribution of polymer becomes increasingly uniform, possibly due to a spontaneously generated convective flow inside the film. PMID:24725080

  3. Ordering of young injection events within Saturnian SLS longitude and local time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennelly, T.; Leisner, J. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Saturnian SLS longitude systems are based on periodic radio emissions generated at high latitudes and relatively close to the planet. These periodicities have been observed throughout the magnetosphere in both the magnetic field and the plasma. While their presence in the outer magnetosphere has been understood, one outstanding question is how these periodicities are transmitted to the inner magnetosphere. The inner and outer magnetospheres are connected by inward-moving flux tubes, referred to as injection events, and it was postulated that they could carry the periodicities between the two regions. Early analysis of these phenomena, however, showed that there was no ordering in longitude. In this study, we reexamine this possibility by limiting our data set to the young injection events observed by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument. We find that the young injection events are restricted to two local time sectors: post-noon and near-midnight. We find no structure in the post-noon sector, but the near-midnight events are strongly ordered by SLS longitude. Further, the longitudinal ordering varies with Saturnian season. Pre-equinox, the longitude system derived from the northern hemisphere's SKR emissions controls the event occurrence. Post-equinox, the events are ordered by the southern hemisphere-derived longitude system. We suggest that this may be an effect in the variations in the ionospheric conductivity or due to change in the magnetosphere's orientation relative to the solar wind.

  4. Interplay between ballooning and peeling modes in simulations of the time evolution of edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Onjun, Thawatchai; Kritz, Arnold H.; Bateman, Glenn; Parail, Vassili; Wilson, Howard R.; Dnestrovskij, Alex

    2005-01-01

    The time evolution of edge localized modes (ELMs) in the Joint European Torus tokamak [P. H. Rebut et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)] is investigated using the JETTO predictive modeling code [M. Erba et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 39, 261 (1997)]. It is found that both pressure-driven ballooning and current-driven peeling modes can play a role in triggering the ELM crashes. In the simulations carried out, each large ELM consists of a sequence of quasicontinuous small ELM crashes. Each sequence of ELM crashes is separated from the next sequence by a relatively longer ELM-free period. The initial crash in each ELM sequence can be triggered either by a pressure-driven ballooning mode or by a current-driven peeling mode, while the subsequent crashes within that sequence are triggered by current-driven peeling modes, which are made more unstable by the reduction in the pressure gradient resulting from the initial crash. The HELENA and MISHKA ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability codes [A. B. Mikhailovskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 23, 713 (1997)] are used to validate the stability criteria used in the JETTO simulations. This stability analysis includes infinite-n ideal ballooning, finite-n ballooning, and low-n kink/peeling modes.

  5. Oscillatory dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation identified by time-localized phase coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, L. W.; Vuksanović, V.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Stefanovska, A.

    2011-06-01

    We apply wavelet-based time-localized phase coherence to investigate the relationship between blood flow and skin temperature, and between blood flow and instantaneous heart rate (IHR), during vasoconstriction and vasodilation provoked by local cooling or heating of the skin. A temperature-controlled metal plate (≈10 cm2) placed on the volar side of the left arm was used to provide the heating and cooling. Beneath the plate, the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and the adjacent skin temperature by a thermistor. Two 1 h datasets were collected from each of the ten subjects. In each case a 30 min basal recording was followed by a step change in plate temperature, to either 24 °C or 42 °C. The IHR was derived from simultaneously recorded ECG. We confirm the changes in the energy and frequency of blood flow oscillations during cooling and heating reported earlier. That is, during cooling, there was a significant decrease in the average frequency of myogenic blood flow oscillations (p < 0.05) and the myogenic spectral peak became more prominent. During heating, there was a significant (p < 0.05) general increase in spectral energy, associated with vasodilation, except in the myogenic interval. Weak phase coherence between temperature and blood flow was observed for unperturbed skin, but it increased in all frequency intervals as a result of heating. It was not significantly affected by cooling. We also show that significant (p < 0.05) phase coherence exists between blood flow and IHR in the respiratory and myogenic frequency intervals. Cooling did not affect this phase coherence in any of the frequency intervals, whereas heating enhanced the phase coherence in the respiratory and myogenic intervals. This can be explained by the reduction in vascular resistance produced by heating, a process where myogenic mechanisms play a key role. We conclude that the mechanisms of vasodilation and vasoconstriction, in response to temperature change, are

  6. Oscillatory dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation identified by time-localized phase coherence.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, L W; Vuksanović, V; McClintock, P V E; Stefanovska, A

    2011-06-21

    We apply wavelet-based time-localized phase coherence to investigate the relationship between blood flow and skin temperature, and between blood flow and instantaneous heart rate (IHR), during vasoconstriction and vasodilation provoked by local cooling or heating of the skin. A temperature-controlled metal plate (approximately 10 cm2) placed on the volar side of the left arm was used to provide the heating and cooling. Beneath the plate, the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and the adjacent skin temperature by a thermistor. Two 1 h datasets were collected from each of the ten subjects. In each case a 30 min basal recording was followed by a step change in plate temperature, to either 24 °C or 42 °C. The IHR was derived from simultaneously recorded ECG. We confirm the changes in the energy and frequency of blood flow oscillations during cooling and heating reported earlier. That is, during cooling, there was a significant decrease in the average frequency of myogenic blood flow oscillations (p < 0.05) and the myogenic spectral peak became more prominent. During heating, there was a significant (p < 0.05) general increase in spectral energy, associated with vasodilation, except in the myogenic interval. Weak phase coherence between temperature and blood flow was observed for unperturbed skin, but it increased in all frequency intervals as a result of heating. It was not significantly affected by cooling. We also show that significant (p < 0.05) phase coherence exists between blood flow and IHR in the respiratory and myogenic frequency intervals. Cooling did not affect this phase coherence in any of the frequency intervals, whereas heating enhanced the phase coherence in the respiratory and myogenic intervals. This can be explained by the reduction in vascular resistance produced by heating, a process where myogenic mechanisms play a key role. We conclude that the mechanisms of vasodilation and vasoconstriction, in response to temperature change

  7. Synthetic Studies of Local Travel Time Tomography In The Earthquake Swarm Region Vogtland/nw-bohemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessler, D.; Korn, M.

    The Vogtland/NW-Bohemia region is characterized by periodic occurence of earth- quake swarms at upper crustal depths along deep-reaching neotectonic faults and other geophysical phenomena. As one source of these phenomena the existence of a deep- seated magma reservoir at the mantle-crust transition has been postulated. Seismic traveltime tomography making use of local seismic sources can image the 3-dimensional structure of the vp- and vp/vs-distribution in the earth's crust including the mantle-crust transition and thus might give explanations for the observed phenom- ena as aimed by the seismic experiment BOHEMA starting in 2002. The synthetic study presented here deals with the feasability to resolve given synthetic velocity anomalies embedded in a realistic background model of the Vogtland/NW- Bohemia region using realistic velocity background model derived from a refraction seismic experiment. A low velocity zone was included below 7 km representing a worst case scenario concerning ray path coverage. Synthetic travel times were com- puted for a receiver distribution consisting of 54 presently existing permanent seismic stations and 64 additional temporary stations as planned for for BOHEMA experi- ment. As for the sources, 12 epicentres of frequently recorded tectonic earthquakes and 138 sites of known quarry blasts were used guaranteeing sufficiant ray distri- bution in the crust. Applying the SIMULPS software, the tomographic inversion for P-velocity was carried out for a volume of 220 km x 180 km in horizontal and 50 km in vertical direction having increased grid density in the Vogtland/NW-Bohemia re- gion. Results of the inversion as well as considerations of their reliability are presented. The usage of a high number of quarry blasts enables high spatial resolution in the upper crust whereas reproduction of velocity patterns at Moho depth is strongly dependent on well distributed earthquake sources. Due to the existence of a low velocity zone tomographic

  8. Time dependent weak localization of a 2DEG in the presence of Andreev reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, H.; Harris, J.; Yuh, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on superconducting-normal-superconducting, SNS, junctions, comprised of Nb-2D InAs - Nb, exhibit AC currents at v = 4eV/h, twice the Josephson frequency. These currents can be ascribed to time dependent weak localization in the 2D InAs electron gas modulated by the presence of superconducting electrodes. The change of the current-voltage characteristic of a SNS structure under far-infrared (FIR) illumination (180GHz, 300GHz) has been investigated as a function of temperature, FIR power and magnetic field. The sample is an InAs/AlSb quantum well with a 1{mu}m-period Nb grating contacting the InAs. In the experiments a series connection of N = 300 junctions is measured. The differential resistance of the sample shows a very clear subharmonic gap structure, indicating multiple Andreev reflections between the SN-interfaces. Below a temperature of about T = 5K the sample is superconductive. At sufficiently high temperatures (T > 6K) the photoresponse of the sample under FIR illumination exhibits only a single resonance. This resonance is at V = Nhv/4e, that is half the voltage at which the first step of the AC Josephson effect would occur. B.Z. Spivak and D.E. Khmel`nitskii predicted this effect which arises from the quantum correction of the conductivity of a normal state electron gas due to Andreev reflections. Electrons and holes that are Andreev reflected at the superconductor interface acquire a phase shift that is determined by the phase {Phi} of the superconductor. Interference terms of time reversed paths that include Andreev reflections on adjacent superconductor stripes oscillate with 2({Phi}{sub 2}-{Phi}{sub 1}) = 4eVt/h and therefore lead to a time-dependent conductivity. The manifestation of the oscillating conductivity in the experiments is similar to the Shapiro steps of the AC Josephson effect but with twice the frequency. The experiments show that this effect is very sensitive to an applied magnetic field.

  9. Two Years of California's Local Control Funding Formula: Time to Reaffirm the Grand Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppich, Julia E.; Humphrey, Daniel C.; Marsh, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    California ended 40 years of reliance on categorical funding for schools when Governor Jerry Brown signed the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) into law on July 1, 2013. LCFF intends to enhance services for high-needs students through new flexibility, targeted student funding, and local accountability. Two years into LCFF implementation,…

  10. Asymmetric continuous-time neural networks without local traps for solving constraint satisfaction problems.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Botond; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária

    2013-01-01

    There has been a long history of using neural networks for combinatorial optimization and constraint satisfaction problems. Symmetric Hopfield networks and similar approaches use steepest descent dynamics, and they always converge to the closest local minimum of the energy landscape. For finding global minima additional parameter-sensitive techniques are used, such as classical simulated annealing or the so-called chaotic simulated annealing, which induces chaotic dynamics by addition of extra terms to the energy landscape. Here we show that asymmetric continuous-time neural networks can solve constraint satisfaction problems without getting trapped in non-solution attractors. We concentrate on a model solving Boolean satisfiability (k-SAT), which is a quintessential NP-complete problem. There is a one-to-one correspondence between the stable fixed points of the neural network and the k-SAT solutions and we present numerical evidence that limit cycles may also be avoided by appropriately choosing the parameters of the model. This optimal parameter region is fairly independent of the size and hardness of instances, this way parameters can be chosen independently of the properties of problems and no tuning is required during the dynamical process. The model is similar to cellular neural networks already used in CNN computers. On an analog device solving a SAT problem would take a single operation: the connection weights are determined by the k-SAT instance and starting from any initial condition the system searches until finding a solution. In this new approach transient chaotic behavior appears as a natural consequence of optimization hardness and not as an externally induced effect. PMID:24066045

  11. Local time distribution of the SSC-associated HF-Doppler frequency shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Sugiuchi, H.; Ishimine, T.

    1985-01-01

    The HF-Doppler frequency shift observed at the storm's sudden commencement is composed of a frequency increase (+) and decrease (-), and classified into four types, SCF(+ -), SCF(- +), SCF(+) and SCF(-). Since the latter two types are special cases of the former two types, two different kinds of electrical field exist in the F region and cause the ExB drift motion of plasma. HUANG (1976) interpreted the frequency increase of SCF(+ -) as due to the westward induction electric field proportional to delta H/ delta t and the succeeding frequency decrease due to the eastward conduction electric field which produces ionospheric currents responsible for the magnetic increase on the ground. In spite of his success in interpreting the SCF(+ -), some other interpretations are needed for the explanation of the whole set of SCF's, particularly SCF(- +). Local time distributions of the SCF's are derived from 41 SCF's which are observed on the HF standard signal (JJY) as received in Okinawa (path length =1600 km) and Kokubunji (60 km). It is shown that the SCF(+ -) appears mainly during the day, whereas the SCF(- +) is observed during the night. The results indicate that the preliminary frequency shift (+) of SCF(+ -) and (-) of SCF(- +) is caused by a westward electric field in the dayside hemisphere, while by an eastward electric field in the nightside hemisphere. The main frequency shift (-) of SCF(+ -) and (+) of SCF(- +) is caused by the reversed electric field. Consequently, the preliminary frequency shift is caused by the dusk-to-dawn electric field, while the main frequency shift by the dawn-to-dusk electric field.

  12. A Local Index of Cloud Immersion in Tropical Forests Using Time-Lapse Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassiouni, M.; Scholl, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Data on the frequency, duration and elevation of cloud immersion is essential to improve estimates of cloud water deposition in water budgets in cloud forests. Here, we present a methodology to detect local cloud immersion in remote tropical forests using time-lapse photography. A simple approach is developed to detect cloudy conditions in photographs within the canopy where image depth during clear conditions may be less than 10 meters and moving leaves and branches and changes in lighting are unpredictable. A primary innovation of this study is that cloudiness is determined from images without using a reference clear image and without minimal threshold value determination or human judgment for calibration. Five sites ranging from 600 to 1000 meters elevation along a ridge in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico were each equipped with a trail camera programmed to take an image every 30 minutes since March 2014. Images were classified using four selected cloud-sensitive image characteristics (SCICs) computed for small image regions: contrast, the coefficient of variation and the entropy of the luminance of each image pixel, and image colorfulness. K-means clustering provided reasonable results to discriminate cloudy from clear conditions. Preliminary results indicate that 79-94% (daytime) and 85-93% (nighttime) of validation images were classified accurately at one open and two closed canopy sites. The euclidian distances between SCICs vectors of images during cloudy conditions and the SCICs vector of the centroid of the cluster of clear images show potential to quantify cloud density in addition to immersion. The classification method will be applied to determine spatial and temporal patterns of cloud immersion in the study area. The presented approach offers promising applications to increase observations of low-lying clouds at remote mountain sites where standard instruments to measure visibility and cloud base may not be practical.

  13. Asymmetric Continuous-Time Neural Networks without Local Traps for Solving Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Botond; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária

    2013-01-01

    There has been a long history of using neural networks for combinatorial optimization and constraint satisfaction problems. Symmetric Hopfield networks and similar approaches use steepest descent dynamics, and they always converge to the closest local minimum of the energy landscape. For finding global minima additional parameter-sensitive techniques are used, such as classical simulated annealing or the so-called chaotic simulated annealing, which induces chaotic dynamics by addition of extra terms to the energy landscape. Here we show that asymmetric continuous-time neural networks can solve constraint satisfaction problems without getting trapped in non-solution attractors. We concentrate on a model solving Boolean satisfiability (k-SAT), which is a quintessential NP-complete problem. There is a one-to-one correspondence between the stable fixed points of the neural network and the k-SAT solutions and we present numerical evidence that limit cycles may also be avoided by appropriately choosing the parameters of the model. This optimal parameter region is fairly independent of the size and hardness of instances, this way parameters can be chosen independently of the properties of problems and no tuning is required during the dynamical process. The model is similar to cellular neural networks already used in CNN computers. On an analog device solving a SAT problem would take a single operation: the connection weights are determined by the k-SAT instance and starting from any initial condition the system searches until finding a solution. In this new approach transient chaotic behavior appears as a natural consequence of optimization hardness and not as an externally induced effect. PMID:24066045

  14. Flibanserin for Treating Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    There have been several products developed for male sexual dysfunction. However, developing agents for female sexual dysfunction is lagging behind for various reasons. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) and Tadalafil (Cialis), which have been prescribed for male sexual function disorders, are known to act on vessels.[1] On the other hand, flibanserin is thought to act on brain. Flibanserin has been approved by U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) of premenopausal women in 2015, and is expected to be released in South Korea soon. Authors wrote this article to acknowledge flibanserin to sexologists for females or physicians for menopausal medicine, so that this agent can be safely used for females who have HSDD. PMID:27152308

  15. Substituting telecommunications for travel - Feasible or desirable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Vleck, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in telecommunications and examines the detailed structure of travel to estimate the feasibility of substituting telecommunications for various travel objectives. The impact of travel is analyzed from a social, economic, energy, and pollution standpoint to assess the desirability of substitution. Perhaps 35-50% of the nation's travel could, in theory, be replaced by very advanced telecommunications (such as a much improved large-screen teleconferencing network), but public resistance would be massive. Much economic dislocation would result since, for example, over 25% of retail sales are travel-related. The energy savings would be modest since only 25% of the nation's energy is consumed by transportation. However, all pollution would be reduced substantially since transportation accounts for 75% of the carbon monoxide, 60% of the hydrocarbon, and 55% of the nitrogen oxide pollution in the nation. Problems related to the implementation of large-scale substitution are discussed.

  16. Flibanserin for Treating Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Soo Ah

    2016-04-01

    There have been several products developed for male sexual dysfunction. However, developing agents for female sexual dysfunction is lagging behind for various reasons. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) and Tadalafil (Cialis), which have been prescribed for male sexual function disorders, are known to act on vessels.[1] On the other hand, flibanserin is thought to act on brain. Flibanserin has been approved by U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) of premenopausal women in 2015, and is expected to be released in South Korea soon. Authors wrote this article to acknowledge flibanserin to sexologists for females or physicians for menopausal medicine, so that this agent can be safely used for females who have HSDD. PMID:27152308

  17. In the right place at the right time: visualizing and understanding mRNA localization

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Adina R.; Haimovich, Gal

    2015-01-01

    The spatial regulation of protein translation is an efficient way to create functional and structural asymmetries in cells. Recent research has furthered our understanding of how individual cells spatially organize protein synthesis, by applying innovative technology to characterize the relationship between mRNAs and their regulatory proteins, single-mRNA trafficking dynamics, physiological effects of abrogating mRNA localization in vivo and for endogenous mRNA labelling. The implementation of new imaging technologies has yielded valuable information on mRNA localization, for example, by observing single molecules in tissues. The emerging movements and localization patterns of mRNAs in morphologically distinct unicellular organisms and in neurons have illuminated shared and specialized mechanisms of mRNA localization, and this information is complemented by transgenic and biochemical techniques that reveal the biological consequences of mRNA mislocalization. PMID:25549890

  18. Ethical Reasoning in a Time of Revolution: A Study of Local Officials in Poland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Debra W; Sprinthall, Norman; Siemienska, Renata

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with 485 local officials in Poland showed that both elected and appointed officials strongly preferred principled reasoning for ethical decision making. Gender and attitude toward the change from Communism made a difference in preferred modes of ethical reasoning. (SK)

  19. Taylor dispersion in the presence of time-periodic convection phenomena. Part I. Local-space periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, M.; Brenner, H.

    1990-10-01

    Generalized Taylor dispersion theory is herein extended to circumstances for which the transport of dissolved or suspended chemically reactive (as well as inert) solutes is affected by carrier-solvent flow fields and/or external forces that are time periodic in both their global and local microscale spaces (and possess commensurate frequencies). The local-space- and time-averaged solute transport process is characterized by three time-independent, but frequency-dependent microscale phenomenological coefficients—K¯*, Ū*, and cf6D*, representing the mean chemical reaction rate, velocity vector, and dispersivity dyadic of the solute, respectively. These macroscale transport coefficients are expressed in terms of time-periodic eigenfunctions and corresponding eigenvalues using a recently developed solution scheme. This scheme permits the analysis of phenomena involving time-periodic transport coefficients on a par with that for the classical case of time-independent microscale phenomenological coefficients. The analysis generalizes to time-periodic local-space phenomena a previous treatment, in which only the global-space coefficients were allowed to vary periodically with time. This greatly enlarges the scope of potential applications of the analysis. In addition to the time-averaged phenomenological coefficients K¯*, Ū*, and CF6D*, comparable instantaneous coefficients are defined governing the local-space-averaged instantaneous solute concentration. In contrast with their time-averaged counterparts, K¯*, Ū*, and CF6D*, the latter instantaneous transport coefficients are shown to depend upon the initial solute distribution within the local space. Because of coupling between the local- and global-space transport processes in oscillatory flows and/or oscillatory external force fields, all harmonics of the resulting global-space solute velocity field contribute to the mean convective solute transport. This phenomenon may result, for example, in zero solvent

  20. The determination for time delay of the CCTV signals relayed by local TV stations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yan; Liang, Shuangyou

    1997-06-01

    It is necessary for the users, who need time signals of high precision, to understand the time delay of the received CCTV time signals. The methods for measuring the time delay of CCTV time signals relayed by synchronous satellite position and the measured results are described.

  1. Fourth Order Exponential Time Differencing Method with Local Discontinuous Galerkin Approximation for Coupled Nonlinear Schrödinger Equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liang, Xiao; Khaliq, Abdul Q.M.; Xing, Yulong

    2015-01-23

    In this paper, we study a local discontinuous Galerkin method combined with fourth order exponential time differencing Runge-Kutta time discretization and a fourth order conservative method for solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Based on different choices of numerical fluxes, we propose both energy-conserving and energy-dissipative local discontinuous Galerkin methods, and have proven the error estimates for the semi-discrete methods applied to linear Schrödinger equation. The numerical methods are proven to be highly efficient and stable for long-range soliton computations. Finally, extensive numerical examples are provided to illustrate the accuracy, efficiency and reliability of the proposed methods.

  2. Software for real-time localization of baleen whale calls using directional sonobuoys: A case study on Antarctic blue whales.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian S; Calderan, Susannah; Gillespie, Douglas; Weatherup, Graham; Leaper, Russell; Collins, Kym; Double, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    Directional frequency analysis and recording (DIFAR) sonobuoys can allow real-time acoustic localization of baleen whales for underwater tracking and remote sensing, but limited availability of hardware and software has prevented wider usage. These software limitations were addressed by developing a module in the open-source software PAMGuard. A case study is presented demonstrating that this software provides greater efficiency and accessibility than previous methods for detecting, localizing, and tracking Antarctic blue whales in real time. Additionally, this software can easily be extended to track other low and mid frequency sounds including those from other cetaceans, pinnipeds, icebergs, shipping, and seismic airguns. PMID:27036292

  3. Investigation of local time dependence of Mercury's sodium exosphere based on a numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Hiroaki; Sonobe, Aya; Morioka, Akira; Okano, Shoichi

    2008-11-01

    Mercury has a surface-bounded exosphere (SBE) similar to that of the Moon. One of the atmospheric species, sodium, was found by ground-based observations to be the most prominent component. Mercury's sodium SBE is known to be non-uniform with respect to local time (LT) in low-latitude regions: the sodium column density in the dawn-side region is larger than that in the dusk-side region, and the sodium abundance is the largest in the morning-noon region. To reveal the production processes for the exosphere near Mercury's surface, the LT dependence of the exosphere was investigated through a numerical simulation. Three data sets of sodium column densities observed for the dawn-side hemisphere, observed by Sprague et al. [1997. Distribution and abundance of sodium in Mercury's atmosphere, 1985-1988. Icarus 12, 506-527], were compared with results simulated by a 3D Monte Carlo method, and the source rates and density of sodium of the planetary surface were estimated. In the simulation, the photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and thermal desorption (TD) processes were assumed as the release mechanisms. The sodium source rates for the three data sets, at respective heliocentric distances of about 0.33, 0.42, and 0.44 AU, were estimated as 1-4×10 8 Na/cm 2/s with weak LT dependence. In contrast, the expected sodium surface density showed clear dependence on LT and the heliocentric distance. The sodium surface density decreases from early morning to noon by a few orders, and, particularly for large heliocentric distances, the surface is in a condition of sodium excess and depletion with respect to the surface sodium density assumed by Killen et al. [2004. Source rates and ion recycling rates for Na and K in Mercury's atmosphere. Icarus 171, 1-19] in the early morning and morning-noon regions, respectively. This study implies that the decrease in sodium surface density from the early morning to noon regions might produce the characteristic LT dependence in the low

  4. Localization of magnetic pills

    PubMed Central

    Laulicht, Bryan; Gidmark, Nicholas J.; Tripathi, Anubhav; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Numerous therapeutics demonstrate optimal absorption or activity at specific sites in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Yet, safe, effective pill retention within a desired region of the GI remains an elusive goal. We report a safe, effective method for localizing magnetic pills. To ensure safety and efficacy, we monitor and regulate attractive forces between a magnetic pill and an external magnet, while visualizing internal dose motion in real time using biplanar videofluoroscopy. Real-time monitoring yields direct visual confirmation of localization completely noninvasively, providing a platform for investigating the therapeutic benefits imparted by localized oral delivery of new and existing drugs. Additionally, we report the in vitro measurements and calculations that enabled prediction of successful magnetic localization in the rat small intestines for 12 h. The designed system for predicting and achieving successful magnetic localization can readily be applied to any area of the GI tract within any species, including humans. The described system represents a significant step forward in the ability to localize magnetic pills safely and effectively anywhere within the GI tract. What our magnetic pill localization strategy adds to the state of the art, if used as an oral drug delivery system, is the ability to monitor the force exerted by the pill on the tissue and to locate the magnetic pill within the test subject all in real time. This advance ensures both safety and efficacy of magnetic localization during the potential oral administration of any magnetic pill-based delivery system. PMID:21257903

  5. Global processing takes time: A meta-analysis on local-global visual processing in ASD.

    PubMed

    Van der Hallen, Ruth; Evers, Kris; Brewaeys, Katrien; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-05-01

    What does an individual with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) perceive first: the forest or the trees? In spite of 30 years of research and influential theories like the weak central coherence (WCC) theory and the enhanced perceptual functioning (EPF) account, the interplay of local and global visual processing in ASD remains only partly understood. Research findings vary in indicating a local processing bias or a global processing deficit, and often contradict each other. We have applied a formal meta-analytic approach and combined 56 articles that tested about 1,000 ASD participants and used a wide range of stimuli and tasks to investigate local and global visual processing in ASD. Overall, results show no enhanced local visual processing nor a deficit in global visual processing. Detailed analysis reveals a difference in the temporal pattern of the local-global balance, that is, slow global processing in individuals with ASD. Whereas task-dependent interaction effects are obtained, gender, age, and IQ of either participant groups seem to have no direct influence on performance. Based on the overview of the literature, suggestions are made for future research. PMID:25420221

  6. Impact localization combined with haptic feedback for touch panel applications based on the time-reversal approach.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Tsai, Yao Kun

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, a combined impact localization and haptic feedback system based on time-reversal signal processing is presented for touch panel applications. Theoretical impulse responses are derived from a propagation model of bending waves in a thin elastic plate. On the basis of the impulse responses, the time-reversal technique is exploited to spot the impact location as well as to generate haptic feedback. The chief advantage of the time-reversal technique lies in its robustness of tackling broadband sources in a reverberant environment. Piezoelectric ceramic plates and voice-coil motors are used as sensors for localization, whereas only voice-coil motors are used as the actuator for haptic feedback. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed system was effective in precise impact localization for a thin panel, while haptic feedback also implemented using time-reversal principle can generate an impulse at the previously touched position. The combined impact localization and haptic feedback system is capable of enhancing the sensation of man-machine interaction in real time fashion. PMID:21428493

  7. Binaural speech unmasking and localization in noise with bilateral cochlear implants using envelope and fine-timing based strategies.

    PubMed

    van Hoesel, Richard; Böhm, Melanie; Pesch, Jörg; Vandali, Andrew; Battmer, Rolf D; Lenarz, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Four adult bilateral cochlear implant users, with good open-set sentence recognition, were tested with three different sound coding strategies for binaural speech unmasking and their ability to localize 100 and 500 Hz click trains in noise. Two of the strategies tested were envelope-based strategies that are clinically widely used. The third was a research strategy that additionally preserved fine-timing cues at low frequencies. Speech reception thresholds were determined in diotic noise for diotic and interaurally time-delayed speech using direct audio input to a bilateral research processor. Localization in noise was assessed in the free field. Overall results, for both speech and localization tests, were similar with all three strategies. None provided a binaural speech unmasking advantage due to the application of 700 micros interaural time delay to the speech signal, and localization results showed similar response patterns across strategies that were well accounted for by the use of broadband interaural level cues. The data from both experiments combined indicate that, in contrast to normal hearing, timing cues available from natural head-width delays do not offer binaural advantages with present methods of electrical stimulation, even when fine-timing cues are explicitly coded. PMID:18397030

  8. Local Demand for a Global Intervention: Policy Priorities in the Time of AIDS

    PubMed Central

    DIONNE, KIM YI

    2012-01-01

    Summary — The success of global health and development interventions ultimately depends on local reception. This paper documents local demand for HIV/AIDS interventions in Africa and seeks to explain patterns of demand using data from a country hard-hit by AIDS. As international agencies and national governments scale up HIV/AIDS interventions in Africa, I find HIV-positive respondents more highly prioritize HIV/AIDS programs, however, cross-national opinion data paired with interviews of villagers and their headmen in rural Malawi show weak prioritization of HIV/AIDS. The data illustrate a misalignment of policy preferences in the global-to-local hierarchy, highlighting the import of studying preferences of intended beneficiaries. PMID:23585707

  9. On the potential strength and consequences for nonrandom gene flow caused by local adaptation in flowering time.

    PubMed

    Weis, A E

    2015-03-01

    Gene flow is generally considered a random process, that is the loci under consideration have no effect on dispersal success. Edelaar and Bolnick (Trends Ecol Evol, 27, 2012 659) recently argued that nonrandom gene flow could exert a significant evolutionary force. It can, for instance, ameliorate the maladaptive effects of immigration into locally adapted populations. I examined the potential strength for nonrandom gene flow for flowering time genes, a trait frequently found to be locally adapted. The idea is that plants that successfully export pollen into a locally adapted resident population will be a genetically biased subset of their natal population - they will have resident-like flowering times. Reciprocally, recipients will be more migrant-like than the resident population average. I quantified the potential for biased pollen exchange among three populations along a flowering time cline in Brassica rapa from southern California. A two-generation line cross experiment demonstrated genetic variance in flowering time, both within and among populations. Calculations based on the variation in individual flowering schedules showed that resident plants with the most migrant-like flowering times could expect to have up to 10 times more of the their flowers pollinated by immigrant pollen than the least migrant-like. Further, the mean flowering time of the pollen exporters that have access to resident mates differs by up to 4 weeks from the mean in the exporters' natal population. The data from these three populations suggest that the bias in gene flow for flowering time cuts the impact on the resident population by as much as half. This implies that when selection is divergent between populations, migrants with the highest mating success tend to be resident-like in their flowering times, and so, fewer maladaptive alleles will be introduced into the locally adapting gene pool. PMID:25728931

  10. The Desire for Structure: A Deconstructive Analysis of "Desire under the Elms."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Joel K.; Bowman, Michael S.

    A brief reading of "Desire under the Elms" by Eugene O'Neill illustrates how a conventional Oedipal reading of the playscript opens up spaces within the text for deconstructive free-play. In this case, a tension is identified and foregrounded between this conventional application of the Oedipal complex and Freud's interpretation of the Oedipal…

  11. Effects of Sexual Experience on Dating Desirability and Marriage Desirability: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Istvan, Joseph; Griffitt, William

    1980-01-01

    Inexperienced men and both inexperienced and moderately experienced women rated highly experienced opposite-sex peers as less desirable dates and marriage partners. Moderately and highly experienced men and highly experienced women tended to rate all opposite-sex peers similarly along these same dimensions. (Author)

  12. Grating image with desired shaped dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Hideaki; Toda, Toshiki; Takahashi, Susumu; Sawamura, Chikara; Iwata, Fujio

    2000-03-01

    A new type of Grating Image we dominate as `Sparklegram' is presented. The Sparklegram is characterized because it provides high quality and better design flexibility. These features are achieved by constructing it with shaped dots as desired. Each dot can be designed as an individual shape, for example, a star or a triangle. As dot shapes, we can use not only geometric patterns, but also some kind of symbols. Not only flexibility of each consists dot shape, but also the quality of reconstructed image is remarkably increased too. Because of these features, the constructed image with the new type of Grating Image, Sparklegram has high quality and high flexibility. It can be applied to security use, for example on credit-cards, tickets, etc., and also can be applied to the package of software products, CDs, videos and other kind of items requiring security. And with these features of flexibility and high quality, Sparklegram has also advantages to be applied to other use, for example amusement use, comics and game characters' goods and packages.

  13. SNSMIL, a real-time single molecule identification and localization algorithm for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yunqing; Dai, Luru; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Junbai; Hendriks, Johnny; Fan, Xiaoming; Gruteser, Nadine; Meisenberg, Annika; Baumann, Arnd; Katranidis, Alexandros; Gensch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule localization based super-resolution fluorescence microscopy offers significantly higher spatial resolution than predicted by Abbe’s resolution limit for far field optical microscopy. Such super-resolution images are reconstructed from wide-field or total internal reflection single molecule fluorescence recordings. Discrimination between emission of single fluorescent molecules and background noise fluctuations remains a great challenge in current data analysis. Here we present a real-time, and robust single molecule identification and localization algorithm, SNSMIL (Shot Noise based Single Molecule Identification and Localization). This algorithm is based on the intrinsic nature of noise, i.e., its Poisson or shot noise characteristics and a new identification criterion, QSNSMIL, is defined. SNSMIL improves the identification accuracy of single fluorescent molecules in experimental or simulated datasets with high and inhomogeneous background. The implementation of SNSMIL relies on a graphics processing unit (GPU), making real-time analysis feasible as shown for real experimental and simulated datasets. PMID:26098742

  14. Timing of Therapies in the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: Available Evidence and Implications for Routine Practice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Francesco; Chau, Ian

    2016-07-01

    A multimodality disciplinary approach is paramount for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer. Over the last decade, (chemo)radiotherapy followed by surgery plus or minus adjuvant chemotherapy has represented the mainstay of treatment for this disease. Nevertheless, robust evidence suggesting the optimal timing and sequence of therapies in this setting has been overall limited. A number of questions are still unsolved including the length of the interval between neoadjuvant radiotherapy and surgery or the timing of systemic chemotherapy. Interestingly, emerging data support the contention that altering sequence or timing or both of the components of this multimodality approach may provide an opportunity to implement treatment strategies that far better address the risk and expectations of individual patients. In this article, we review the available evidence on timing of therapies in the multidisciplinary treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer and discuss the potential implications for routine practice that may derive from a change of the currently accepted treatment paradigm. PMID:27238468

  15. Adapting to Hard Times: Family Participation Patterns in Local Thrift Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Spencer; Brown, Ralph B.; Goodsell, Todd L.; Stovall, Josh; Flaherty, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Using survey data from a western U.S. county (N = 595), we examined how lower, middle, and higher income families negotiate a period of economic stress--the closing of a major employer in the community--through their shopping patterns. Specifically, we examined their participation in local thrift economies such as yard sales and secondhand stores.…

  16. Dynamics of Choice: Relative Rate and Amount Affect Local Preference at Three Different Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Carlos F.; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right…

  17. Local Mesh Refinement in the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Wu, Yuhui; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Yang, Vigor

    2000-01-01

    A local mesh refinement procedure for the CE/SE method which does not use an iterative procedure in the treatments of grid-to-grid communications is described. It is shown that a refinement ratio higher than ten can be applied successfully across a single coarse grid/fine grid interface.

  18. Equatorial longitude and local time variations of topside magnetic field-aligned ion drifts at solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, A. G.; Heelis, R. A.; Stoneback, R. A.

    2012-04-01

    In the topside ionosphere, the high mobility of the plasma along the magnetic field allows field-aligned ion drifts to occur readily as a result of field-aligned gravitational forces, collisional forces, or pressure gradients. Therefore, variations in the field-aligned ion drifts can be used to explore the influence of thermospheric, electrodynamic, and chemical processes on the ionosphere. Longitude and local time variations in the field-aligned ion drifts near the magnetic equator are presented using observations from the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation on board the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System satellite. These observations were obtained during the period of extremely low solar activity present in 2008 and 2009, allowing the seasonal, local time, and longitudinal variations to reveal the relative importance of the processes responsible for topside field-aligned plasma drifts during solar minimum. This investigation found that the low-altitude winds and tides, the net ionization or loss, and the meridional E×B drift were all influential in creating longitudinal and local time variations in the field-aligned drift, though the strength of the influence seen by each driver was found to vary with season, local time, and longitude.

  19. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing. II. General Weibull fibers.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, S Leigh; Newman, William I

    2009-12-01

    Fiber bundle models (FBMs) are useful tools in understanding failure processes in a variety of material systems. While the fibers and load sharing assumptions are easily described, FBM analysis is typically difficult. Monte Carlo methods are also hampered by the severe computational demands of large bundle sizes, which overwhelm just as behavior relevant to real materials starts to emerge. For large size scales, interest continues in idealized FBMs that assume either equal load sharing (ELS) or local load sharing (LLS) among fibers, rules that reflect features of real load redistribution in elastic lattices. The present work focuses on a one-dimensional bundle of N fibers under LLS where life consumption in a fiber follows a power law in its load, with exponent rho , and integrated over time. This life consumption function is further embodied in a functional form resulting in a Weibull distribution for lifetime under constant fiber stress and with Weibull exponent, beta. Thus the failure rate of a fiber depends on its past load history, except for beta=1 . We develop asymptotic results validated by Monte Carlo simulation using a computational algorithm developed in our previous work [Phys. Rev. E 63, 021507 (2001)] that greatly increases the size, N , of treatable bundles (e.g., 10(6) fibers in 10(3) realizations). In particular, our algorithm is O(N ln N) in contrast with former algorithms which were O(N2) making this investigation possible. Regimes are found for (beta,rho) pairs that yield contrasting behavior for large N. For rho>1 and large N, brittle weakest volume behavior emerges in terms of characteristic elements (groupings of fibers) derived from critical cluster formation, and the lifetime eventually goes to zero as N-->infinity , unlike ELS, which yields a finite limiting mean. For 1/2

  20. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing. II. General Weibull fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Newman, William I.

    2009-12-01

    Fiber bundle models (FBMs) are useful tools in understanding failure processes in a variety of material systems. While the fibers and load sharing assumptions are easily described, FBM analysis is typically difficult. Monte Carlo methods are also hampered by the severe computational demands of large bundle sizes, which overwhelm just as behavior relevant to real materials starts to emerge. For large size scales, interest continues in idealized FBMs that assume either equal load sharing (ELS) or local load sharing (LLS) among fibers, rules that reflect features of real load redistribution in elastic lattices. The present work focuses on a one-dimensional bundle of N fibers under LLS where life consumption in a fiber follows a power law in its load, with exponent ρ , and integrated over time. This life consumption function is further embodied in a functional form resulting in a Weibull distribution for lifetime under constant fiber stress and with Weibull exponent, β . Thus the failure rate of a fiber depends on its past load history, except for β=1 . We develop asymptotic results validated by Monte Carlo simulation using a computational algorithm developed in our previous work [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X 63, 021507 (2001)] that greatly increases the size, N , of treatable bundles (e.g., 106 fibers in 103 realizations). In particular, our algorithm is O(NlnN) in contrast with former algorithms which were O(N2) making this investigation possible. Regimes are found for (β,ρ) pairs that yield contrasting behavior for large N . For ρ>1 and large N , brittle weakest volume behavior emerges in terms of characteristic elements (groupings of fibers) derived from critical cluster formation, and the lifetime eventually goes to zero as N→∞ , unlike ELS, which yields a finite limiting mean. For 1/2≤ρ≤1 , however, LLS has remarkably similar behavior to ELS (appearing to be virtually identical for ρ=1 ) with an asymptotic Gaussian lifetime distribution and a

  1. Anticipating by Pigeons Depends on Local Statistical Information in a Serial Response Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Alyson L.; Herbranson, Walter T.; Loper, Julia D.; Wood, David M.; Shimp, Charles P.

    2004-01-01

    Pigeons responded in a serial response time task patterned after that of M. J. Nissen and P. Bullemer (1987) with humans. Experiment 1 produced global facilitation: Response times in repeating lists of locations were faster than when locations were random. Response time to a spatial location was also a function of both that location's 1st- and…

  2. Phytoliths infer locally dense and heterogeneous paleovegetation at FLK North and surrounding localities during upper Bed I time, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboni, Doris; Ashley, Gail M.; Dominguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Bunn, Henry T.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Baquedano, Enrique

    2010-11-01

    The phytolith content of 10 samples collected immediately under Tuff IF (~ 1.785 Ma) at FLK N and other surrounding localities (~ 2 km²) provides a direct botanical evidence for woody vegetation in the eastern margin of Olduvai Gorge during uppermost Bed I time. Observation and counting of 143 phytolith types (5 to >150 μ) reveal dense but heterogeneous woody cover (~ 40-90%) of unidentified trees and/or shrubs and palms associated to the freshwater springs surrounding FLK N, and more open formation (presumably ~ 25-70% woody cover) in the southeast at localities VEK, HWK W and HWK E. The paleovegetation is best described as groundwater palm forest/woodland or bushland, which current analogue may be found near Lake Manyara in similar hydrogeological context (freshwater springs near saline/alkaline lake). Re-evaluating the published pollen data based on this analogy shows that 70% of the pollen signal at FLK N may be attributed to thicket-woodland, Acacia groundwater woodland, gallery and groundwater forests; while < 30% is attributed to swamp herbage and grasslands. Micro-botanical, isotopic, and taphonomical studies of faunal remains converge on the same conclusion that the area surrounding FLK N, which attracted both carnivores and hominins in the early Pleistocene, was densely wooded during uppermost Bed I time.

  3. Analysis of memory use for improved design and compile-time allocation of local memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcniven, Geoffrey D.; Davidson, Edward S.

    1986-01-01

    Trace analysis techniques are used to study memory referencing behavior for the purpose of designing local memories and determining how to allocate them for data and instructions. In an attempt to assess the inherent behavior of the source code, the trace analysis system described here reduced the effects of the compiler and host architecture on the trace by using a technical called flattening. The variables in the trace, their associated single-assignment values, and references are histogrammed on the basis of various parameters describing memory referencing behavior. Bounds are developed specifying the amount of memory space required to store all live values in a particular histogram class. The reduction achieved in main memory traffic by allocating local memory is specified for each class.

  4. Robust and low complexity localization algorithm based on head-related impulse responses and interaural time difference.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinwang; Liang, Juan

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a biologically inspired localization algorithm using two microphones, for a mobile robot. The proposed algorithm has two steps. First, the coarse azimuth angle of the sound source is estimated by cross-correlation algorithm based on interaural time difference. Then, the accurate azimuth angle is obtained by cross-channel algorithm based on head-related impulse responses. The proposed algorithm has lower computational complexity compared to the cross-channel algorithm. Experimental results illustrate that the localization performance of the proposed algorithm is better than those of the cross-correlation and cross-channel algorithms. PMID:23298016

  5. Decision regret following treatment for localized breast cancer: is regret stable over time?

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Kathryn A.; Li, Yun; Resnicow, Ken; Graff, John J.; Hamilton, Ann S.; Hawley, Sarah T

    2015-01-01

    Background While studies suggest most women have little regret regarding their breast cancer treatment decisions immediately following treatment, to date no studies have evaluated how regret may change over time. Objective To measure the stability of post-treatment decision regret over time among women with breast cancer. Methods Women diagnosed with breast cancer between August 2005 and May 2007 reported to the Detroit, Michigan or Los Angeles County Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry completed surveys at 9 months following diagnosis (Time 1) and again approximately 4 years later (Time 2). A decision regret scale consisting of 5 items was summed to create two decision regret scores at both Time 1 and Time 2 (range: 0 to 20). Multivariable linear regression was used to examine change in regret from 9 months to 4 years. Independent variables included surgery type, receipt of reconstruction, and recurrence status at follow-up. The model controlled for demographic and clinical factors. Results The analytic sample included 1,536 women. Mean regret in the overall sample was 4.9 at Time 1 and 5.4 at Time 2 (p<0.001). In the multivariable linear model, we found no difference in change in decision regret over time by surgery type. Reporting a new diagnosis of breast cancer at Time 2 was associated with 2.6 point increase in regret over time, compared to women without an additional diagnosis (p=0.003). Receipt of reconstruction was not associated with change in decision regret over time. Conclusions Decision regret following treatment was low and relatively stable over time for most women. Those facing an additional diagnosis of breast cancer following treatment may be at risk for elevated regret-related distress. PMID:25532824

  6. [Local fractal analysis of noise-like time series by all permutations method for 1-115 min periods].

    PubMed

    Panchelyuga, V A; Panchelyuga, M S

    2015-01-01

    Results of local fractal analysis of 329-per-day time series of 239Pu alpha-decay rate fluctuations by means of all permutations method (APM) are presented. The APM-analysis reveals in the time series some steady frequency set. The coincidence of the frequency set with the Earth natural oscillations was demonstrated. A short review of works by different authors who analyzed the time series of fluctuations in processes of different nature is given. We have shown that the periods observed in those works correspond to the periods revealed in our study. It points to a common mechanism of the phenomenon observed. PMID:26016038

  7. Using CNLS-net (Connectionist Normalized Local Spline-network) to predict the Mackey-Glass chaotic time series

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, W.C.; Jones, R.D.; Barnes, C.W.; Lee, L.A.; O'Rourke, M.K. ); Lee, Y.C.; Flake, G.W. Maryland Univ., College Park, MD )

    1991-01-01

    We use the Connectionist Normalized Local Spline (CNLS) network to learn the dynamics of the Mackey-Glass time-delay differential equation, for the case {tau} = 30. We show the optimum network operating mode and determine the accuracy and robustness of predictions. We obtain pedictions of varying accuracy using some 2--120 minutes of execution time on a Sun SPARC-1 workstation. CNLS-net is capable of very good performance in predicting the Mackey-Glass time series. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Damage localization of marine risers using time series of vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Yang, Hezhen; Liu, Fushun

    2014-10-01

    Based on dynamic response signals a damage detection algorithm is developed for marine risers. Damage detection methods based on numerous modal properties have encountered issues in the researches in offshore oil community. For example, significant increase in structure mass due to marine plant/animal growth and changes in modal properties by equipment noise are not the result of damage for riser structures. In an attempt to eliminate the need to determine modal parameters, a data-based method is developed. The implementation of the method requires that vibration data are first standardized to remove the influence of different loading conditions and the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model is used to fit vibration response signals. In addition, a damage feature factor is introduced based on the autoregressive (AR) parameters. After that, the Euclidean distance between ARMA models is subtracted as a damage indicator for damage detection and localization and a top tensioned riser simulation model with different damage scenarios is analyzed using the proposed method with dynamic acceleration responses of a marine riser as sensor data. Finally, the influence of measured noise is analyzed. According to the damage localization results, the proposed method provides accurate damage locations of risers and is robust to overcome noise effect.

  9. Demonstration of delivery of orthoimagery in real time for local emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Donald; Faulring, Jason; Krzaczek, Robert; Cavilia, Stephen; van Aardt, Jan

    2011-06-01

    The Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response (IPLER) is a new initiative led by the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) to develop and put into use new information products and tools derived from remote sensing data. This effort involves technical development and outreach to the user community having the two-fold objective of providing new information tools to enhance public safety and fostering economic development. Specifically, this paper addresses the demonstration of the collection and delivery of geo-referenced overhead imagery to local (county level) emergency managers in near realtime. The demonstration proved valuable to county personnel in showing what is possible and valuable to the researchers in highlighting the very real constraints of operatives in local government. The demonstration consisted of four major elements; 1) a multiband imaging system incorporating 4 cameras operating simultaneously in the visible (color), shortwave infrared, midwave infrared and long wave infrared, 2) an on-board inertial navigation and data processing system that renders the imagery into geo-referenced coordinates, 3) a microwave digital downlink, and 4) a data dissemination service via FTP and WMS-based browser. In this particular exercise, we successfully collected and downloaded over 700 images and delivered them to county servers located in their Emergency Operations Center as well as to a remote GIS van.

  10. Adjustment of interaural time difference in head related transfer functions based on listeners' anthropometry and its effect on sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yôiti; Watanabe, Kanji; Iwaya, Yukio; Gyoba, Jiro; Takane, Shouichi

    2005-04-01

    Because the transfer functions governing subjective sound localization (HRTFs) show strong individuality, sound localization systems based on synthesis of HRTFs require suitable HRTFs for individual listeners. However, it is impractical to obtain HRTFs for all listeners based on measurements. Improving sound localization by adjusting non-individualized HRTFs to a specific listener based on that listener's anthropometry might be a practical method. This study first developed a new method to estimate interaural time differences (ITDs) using HRTFs. Then correlations between ITDs and anthropometric parameters were analyzed using the canonical correlation method. Results indicated that parameters relating to head size, and shoulder and ear positions are significant. Consequently, it was attempted to express ITDs based on listener's anthropometric data. In this process, the change of ITDs as a function of azimuth angle was parameterized as a sum of sine functions. Then the parameters were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, in which the anthropometric parameters were used as explanatory variables. The predicted or individualized ITDs were installed in the nonindividualized HRTFs to evaluate sound localization performance. Results showed that individualization of ITDs improved horizontal sound localization.

  11. Sound localization in common vampire bats: acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Rickye S; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°-within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms. PMID:25618037

  12. Sound localization in common vampire bats: Acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Rickye S.; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°—within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms. PMID:25618037

  13. The local properties of ocean surface waves by the phase-time method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Long, Steven R.; Tung, Chi-Chao; Donelan, Mark A.; Yuan, Yeli; Lai, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach using phase information to view and study the properties of frequency modulation, wave group structures, and wave breaking is presented. The method is applied to ocean wave time series data and a new type of wave group (containing the large 'rogue' waves) is identified. The method also has the capability of broad applications in the analysis of time series data in general.

  14. An Assessment of the Argumentativeness Scale for Social Desirability Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicotera, Anne Maydan

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between the argumentativeness scale and judgments of its social desirability. Finds that when the variance in argumentativeness that can be attributed to social desirability is removed, the difference between the sexes diminishes. Analyzes sex differences in social desirability, and concludes that sex differences on…

  15. Governing Educational Desire: Culture, Politics, and Schooling in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipnis, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    Parents in China greatly value higher education for their children, but the intensity and effects of their desire to achieve this goal have largely gone unexamined--until now. "Governing Educational Desire" explores the cultural, political, and economic origins of Chinese desire for a college education as well as its vast consequences, which…

  16. Girls' Portraits of Desire: Picturing a Missing Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits the missing discourse of female desire [Fine, M. 1988. Sexuality, schooling and adolescent females: The missing discourse of desire. "Harvard Educational Review" 58, no. 1: 29-53] in secondary schools. Instead of echoing previous studies that have documented how female desire is missing, this research starts from the premise…

  17. An Investigation of Desired Friendships during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Katelyn K.; Bowker, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    This study of 384 young adolescents (45% girls, "M" age = 12.94 years) and their desired friendships (friendships that adolescents indicate they would like to form in the future) examined whether (a) adolescents desire to be friends with peers who are well-liked, popular, aggressive, and prosocial; (b) having desired friendships is…

  18. A Contrapuntal Analysis of Discourses of Desire in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Implicated in contributing to the problems youth today face in trying to claim an education, an informed active participation in the social order, dominant discourses of desire in education foreclose formal, critical analysis of social structures that construct, police, entreat, and deny desire. Looking at the ways in which desire is encoded in…

  19. An implicit difference scheme for the long-time evolution of localized solutions of a generalized Boussinesq system

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, C.I.; Maugin, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear system of equations built up from a generalized Boussinesq equation coupled with a wave equation which is a model for the one-dimensional dynamics of phases in martensitic alloys. The strongly implicit scheme employing Newton`s quasilinearisation allows us to track the long time evolution of the localized solutions of the system. Two distinct classes of solutions are encountered for the pure Boussinesq equation. The first class consists of oscillatory pulses whose envelopes are localized waves. The second class consists of smoother solutions whose shapes are either heteroclinic (kinks) or homoclinic (bumps). The homoclinics decrease in amplitude with time while their support increases. An appropriate self-similar scaling is found analytically and confirmed by the direct numerical simulations to high accuracy. The rich phenomenology resulting from the coupling with the wave equation is also investigated. 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Adapting to Hard Times: Family Participation Patterns in Local Thrift Economies

    PubMed Central

    James, Spencer; Brown, Ralph B.; Goodsell, Todd L.; Stovall, Josh; Flaherty, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Using survey data from a western U.S. county (N = 595), we examined how lower, middle, and higher income families negotiate a period of economic stress—the closing of a major employer in the community—through their shopping patterns. Specifically, we examined their participation in local thrift economies such as yard sales and secondhand stores. We found that lower and middle income households shop more frequently at these venues. They also tend to shop more for furniture and clothing, whereas higher income households tend to shop for antiques and trinkets. These relationships varied across the type of thrift economy examined. Overall, findings support the argument that engagement in thrift economies may constitute one mechanism families use during periods of economic stress. PMID:21197154

  1. Is a Fuller Relinguification of TESOL Desirable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Joshua A.

    2009-01-01

    The author well remembers the First TESOL War (TW1), in the 1950s, a "war" personified by an obvious altercation between Professors Rudy Troike and Jim Alatis, as to whether TESOL was good or bad for bilingual education. It was imperfectly resolved, for the time being, at least, by the National Association for Bilingual Education's (NABE's)…

  2. Contested Desires: The Edible Landscape of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Food and drink are associated with survival and for children and young people the edible landscape represents an essential part of survival in the modern school. Within any institution that "contains" persons over time, such as schools, hospitals and prisons, the organization and control of eating and drinking takes on a particularly significant…

  3. Modeling and Observational Framework for Diagnosing Local Land-Atmosphere Coupling on Diurnal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Alonge, Charles; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Land-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture states. The degree of coupling between the land surface and PBL in numerical weather prediction and climate models remains largely unexplored and undiagnosed due to the complex interactions and feedbacks present across a range of scales. Further, uncoupled systems or experiments (e.g., the Project for Intercomparison of Land Parameterization Schemes, PILPS) may lead to inaccurate water and energy cycle process understanding by neglecting feedback processes such as PBL-top entrainment. In this study, a framework for diagnosing local land-atmosphere coupling is presented using a coupled mesoscale model with a suite of PBL and land surface model (LSM) options along with observations during field experiments in the U. S. Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to the Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. Within this framework, the coupling established by each pairing of the available PBL schemes in WRF with the LSMs in LIS is evaluated in terms of the diurnal temperature and humidity evolution in the mixed layer. The co-evolution of these variables and the convective PBL is sensitive to and, in fact, integrative of the dominant processes that govern the PBL budget, which are synthesized through the use of mixing diagrams. Results show how the sensitivity of land-atmosphere interactions to the specific choice of PBL scheme and LSM varies across surface moisture regimes and can be quantified and evaluated against observations. As such, this methodology provides a potential pathway to study factors controlling local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) using the LIS-WRF system, which will serve as a testbed for future experiments to evaluate

  4. A Modeling and Observational Framework for Diagnosing Local Land-Atmosphere Coupling on Diurnal Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santanello, J. A.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Kumar, S.

    2009-12-01

    Land-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture states. The degree of coupling between the land surface and PBL in numerical weather prediction and climate models remains largely unexplored and undiagnosed due to the complex interactions and feedbacks present across a range of scales. Further, uncoupled systems or experiments (e.g., the Project for Intercomparison of Land Parameterization Schemes, PILPS) may lead to inaccurate water and energy cycle process understanding by neglecting feedback processes such as PBL-top entrainment. In this study, a framework for diagnosing local land-atmosphere coupling is presented using a coupled mesoscale model with a suite of PBL and land surface model (LSM) options along with observations during the summer of 2006 and 2007 in the Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to the Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. Mixing diagram diagnostics based on the evolution of 2m temperature and humidity are examined for the dry/wet extremes of this region, along with the sensitivity of PBL-LSM coupling to perturbations in soil moisture. As such, this methodology provides a potential pathway to study factors controlling local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) using the LIS-WRF system, which will serve as a testbed for future experiments to evaluate coupling diagnostics within the community.

  5. A system for nonradiographic source localization and real-time planning of intraoperative high dose rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Anderson, L L

    1997-12-01

    We have developed a system for source localization and real-time planning of interstitial volume implants for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) using high dose rate remote afterloading techniques. Source localization is realized by using an electromagnetic tracking device, which consists of a transmitter coil, a receiver coil, and a signal processing unit, to generate the coordinates and orientation of the receiver. A drawback of the device is its sensitivity to adjacent metallic objects. Localization accuracy was evaluated in an operating room environment, where the metallic objects closest to the receiver are surgical retractors (that, incidentally, preclude radiographic localization). For achievable separation distances, we found an rms error of 0.7 mm in determining the distance between points 2 cm apart, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of the method. The receiver is mounted on a plastic block from which projects a long stylet and the transmitter is located at about 50 cm from the receiver. The stylet is inserted sequentially into source catheters to obtain the location and orientation data that serve as input to treatment planning software. The planning program optimizes source dwell time to make calculated dose conform to the dose prescribed on an ellipsoidal surface to an extent consistent with a certain level of dose uniformity inside the target volume. A least squares method is used that involves minimizing the objective function by a matrix method (nonnegative least squares). We have demonstrated that dwell time optimization can be performed in a short time and that the approach is adequate for the IORT application. PMID:9434985

  6. Space-time models based on random fields with local interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.; Tsantili, Ivi C.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of space-time data from complex, real-life phenomena requires the use of flexible and physically motivated covariance functions. In most cases, it is not possible to explicitly solve the equations of motion for the fields or the respective covariance functions. In the statistical literature, covariance functions are often based on mathematical constructions. In this paper, we propose deriving space-time covariance functions by solving “effective equations of motion”, which can be used as statistical representations of systems with diffusive behavior. In particular, we propose to formulate space-time covariance functions based on an equilibrium effective Hamiltonian using the linear response theory. The effective space-time dynamics is then generated by a stochastic perturbation around the equilibrium point of the classical field Hamiltonian leading to an associated Langevin equation. We employ a Hamiltonian which extends the classical Gaussian field theory by including a curvature term and leads to a diffusive Langevin equation. Finally, we derive new forms of space-time covariance functions.

  7. Local constraints on cosmic string loops from photometry and pulsar timing

    SciTech Connect

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Tuntsov, A. V.

    2010-04-15

    We constrain the cosmological density of cosmic string loops using two observational signatures--gravitational microlensing and the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. Photometry from RXTE and CoRoT space missions and pulsar timing from Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes allow us to probe cosmic strings in a wide range of tensions G{mu}/c{sup 2}=10{sup -16} divide 10{sup -10}. We find that pulsar timing data provide the most stringent constraints on the abundance of light strings at the level {Omega}{sub s{approx}}10{sup -3}. Future observational facilities such as the Square Kilometer Array will allow one to improve these constraints by orders of magnitude.

  8. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  9. Wavelets, period-doubling, and time-frequency localization with application to organization of convection over the tropical western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weng, Hengyi; Lau, K.-M.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, preliminary results in using orthogonal and continuous wavelet transform (WT) to identify period doubling and time-frequency localization in both synthetic and real data are presented. First, the Haar WT is applied to synthetic time series derived from a simple nonlinear dynamical system- a first-order quadratic difference equation. Second, the complex Morlet WT is used to study the time-frequency localization of tropical convection based on a high-resolution Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite infrared (IR) radiance dataset. The Haar WT of the synthetic time series indicates the presence and distinct separation of multiple frequencies in a period-doubling sequence. The period-doubling process generates a multiplicity of intermediate frequencies, which are manifested in the nonuniformity in time with respect to the phase of oscillations in the lower frequencies. Wavelet transform also enables the detection of extremely weak signals in high-order subharmonics resulting from the period-doubling bifurcations. These signals are either undetected or considered statistically insignificant by traditional Fourier analysis. The Morlet WT of the IR radiance dataset indicates the presence of multiple timescales, which are localized in both frequency and time. There are two regimes in the variation of IR radiance, corresponding to the wet and dry periods. Multiple timescales, ranging from semidiurnal, diurnal, synoptic, to intraseasonal with embedding structures, are active in the wet regime. In particular, synoptic variability is more prominent during the wet phase of an intensive intraseasonal cycle. These are not only consistent with, but also show more details than, previous findings by using other techniques. The phase-locking relationships among the oscillations with different time-scales suggest that both synoptic and intraseasonal variations may be mixed oscillations due to the interaction of self-excited oscillations in the tropical

  10. Localized Nonlinear Waves in Systems with Time- and Space-Modulated Nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Belmonte-Beitia, Juan; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Vekslerchik, Vadym; Konotop, Vladimir V.

    2008-04-25

    Using similarity transformations we construct explicit nontrivial solutions of nonlinear Schroedinger equations with potentials and nonlinearities depending both on time and on the spatial coordinates. We present the general theory and use it to calculate explicitly nontrivial solutions such as periodic (breathers), resonant, or quasiperiodically oscillating solitons. Some implications to the field of matter waves are also discussed.

  11. A Conditional Joint Modeling Approach for Locally Dependent Item Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Xiang-Bin; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The assumption of conditional independence between the responses and the response times (RTs) for a given person is common in RT modeling. However, when the speed of a test taker is not constant, this assumption will be violated. In this article we propose a conditional joint model for item responses and RTs, which incorporates a covariance…

  12. Comparison of Time-Distance Local Helioseismology on GONG and MDI Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Zhao, J.; Rajaguru, S. P.; Toner, C. G.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Thompson, M. J.; Hughes, S. J.

    2003-01-01

    We show first results derived from one rotation of GONG++ and MDI data analyzed independently by different groups with time-distance techniques. We focus on observations obtained during spring 2002 and especially on Carrington rotation 1988 (2002/3/30 - 2002/4/26) and measure flow components and wave speed inhomogeneities over a range of depths for different active regions.

  13. Localization by interaural time difference (ITD): Effects of interaural frequency mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Bonham, B.H.; Lewis, E.R.

    1999-07-01

    A commonly accepted physiological model for lateralization of low-frequency sounds by interaural time delay (ITD) stipulates that binaural comparison neurons receive input from frequency-matched channels from each ear. Here, the effects of hypothetical interaural frequency mismatches on this model are reported. For this study, the cat{close_quote}s auditory system peripheral to the binaural comparison neurons was represented by a neurophysiologically derived model, and binaural comparison neurons were represented by cross-correlators. The results of the study indicate that, for binaural comparison neurons receiving input from one cochlear channel from each ear, interaural CF mismatches may serve to either augment or diminish the effective difference in ipsilateral and contralateral axonal time delays from the periphery to the binaural comparison neuron. The magnitude of this increase or decrease in the effective time delay difference can be up to 400 {mu}s for CF mismatches of 0.2 octaves or less for binaural neurons with CFs between 250 Hz and 2.5 kHz. For binaural comparison neurons with nominal CFs near 500 Hz, the 25-{mu}s effective time delay difference caused by a 0.012-octave CF mismatch is equal to the ITD previously shown to be behaviorally sufficient for the cat to lateralize a low-frequency sound source. {copyright} {ital 1999 Acoustical Society of America.}

  14. Three-dimensional desirability spaces for quality-by-design-based HPLC development.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Hatem I; Abdel-Salam, Randa A; Hadad, Ghada M

    2015-04-01

    In this study, three-dimensional desirability spaces were introduced as a graphical representation method of design space. This was illustrated in the context of application of quality-by-design concepts on development of a stability indicating gradient reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of vinpocetine and α-tocopheryl acetate in a capsule dosage form. A mechanistic retention model to optimize gradient time, initial organic solvent concentration and ternary solvent ratio was constructed for each compound from six experimental runs. Then, desirability function of each optimized criterion and subsequently the global desirability function were calculated throughout the knowledge space. The three-dimensional desirability spaces were plotted as zones exceeding a threshold value of desirability index in space defined by the three optimized method parameters. Probabilistic mapping of desirability index aided selection of design space within the potential desirability subspaces. Three-dimensional desirability spaces offered better visualization and potential design spaces for the method as a function of three method parameters with ability to assign priorities to this critical quality as compared with the corresponding resolution spaces. PMID:25002683

  15. Validation of Scores on the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Walter L.; Beretvas, S. Natasha

    2005-01-01

    The Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS), the most commonly used social desirability bias (SDB) assessment, conceptualizes SDB as an individual's need for approval. The Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) measures SDB as two separate constructs: impression management and self-deception. Scores on SDB scales are commonly…

  16. Lead-time reduction utilizing lean tools applied to healthcare: the inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital.

    PubMed

    Al-Araidah, Omar; Momani, Amer; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Momani, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The healthcare arena, much like the manufacturing industry, benefits from many aspects of the Toyota lean principles. Lean thinking contributes to reducing or eliminating nonvalue-added time, money, and energy in healthcare. In this paper, we apply selected principles of lean management aiming at reducing the wasted time associated with drug dispensing at an inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital. Thorough investigation of the drug dispensing process revealed unnecessary complexities that contribute to delays in delivering medications to patients. We utilize DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) and 5S (Sort, Set-in-order, Shine, Standardize, Sustain) principles to identify and reduce wastes that contribute to increasing the lead-time in healthcare operations at the pharmacy understudy. The results obtained from the study revealed potential savings of > 45% in the drug dispensing cycle time. PMID:20151593

  17. Testosterone and sexual desire in healthy women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M

    2012-12-01

    Sexual desire is typically higher in men than in women, with testosterone (T) thought to account for this difference as well as within-sex variation in desire in both women and men. However, few studies have incorporated both hormonal and social or psychological factors in studies of sexual desire. The present study addressed how three psychological domains (sexual-relational, stress-mood, body-embodiment) were related to links between T and sexual desire in healthy adults and whether dyadic and solitary desire showed associations with T. Participants (n = 196) were recruited as part of the Partnering, Physiology, and Health study, which had 105 men and 91 women who completed questionnaires and provided saliva for cortisol and T assays. T was positively linked to solitary desire in women, with masturbation frequency influencing this link. In contrast, T was negatively correlated with dyadic desire in women, but only when cortisol and perceived social stress were controlled. Replicating past findings, no significant correlations between T and desire in men were apparent, but these analyses showed that the null association remained even when psychological and confound variables were controlled. Men showed higher desire than women, but masturbation frequency rather than T influenced this difference. Results were discussed in terms of challenges to assumptions of clear links between T and desire, gendered approaches to T, and the unitarity of desire. PMID:22552705

  18. Numerical assessment of time-domain methods for the estimation of local arterial pulse wave speed.

    PubMed

    Alastruey, Jordi

    2011-03-15

    A local estimation of pulse wave speed c, an important predictor of cardiovascular events, can be obtained at arterial locations where simultaneous measurements of blood pressure (P) and velocity (U), arterial diameter (D) and U, flow rate (Q) and cross-sectional area (A), or P and D are available, using the PU-loop, sum-of-squares (∑(2)), lnDU-loop, QA-loop or new D(2)P-loop methods. Here, these methods were applied to estimate c from numerically generated P, U, D, Q and A waveforms using a visco-elastic one-dimensional model of the 55 larger human systemic arteries in normal conditions. Theoretical c were calculated from the parameters of the model. Estimates of c given by the loop methods were closer to theoretical values and more uniform within each arterial segment than those obtained using the ∑(2). The smaller differences between estimates and theoretical values were obtained using the D(2)P-loop method, with root-mean-square errors (RMSE) smaller than 0.18 ms(-1), followed by averaging the two c given by the PU- and lnDU-loops (RMSE <2.99 ms(-1)). In general, the errors of the PU-, lnDU- and QA-loops decreased at locations where visco-elastic effects were small and nearby junctions were well-matched for forward-travelling waves. The ∑(2) performed better at proximal locations. PMID:21211799

  19. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ipsen, S.; Blanck, O.; Rades, D.; Oborn, B.; Bode, F.; Liney, G.; Hunold, P.; Schweikard, A.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  20. Real-time prediction of respiratory motion based on a local dynamic model in an augmented space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, S.-M.; Jung, B.-H.; Ruan, D.

    2011-03-01

    Motion-adaptive radiotherapy aims to deliver ablative radiation dose to the tumor target with minimal normal tissue exposure, by accounting for real-time target movement. In practice, prediction is usually necessary to compensate for system latency induced by measurement, communication and control. This work focuses on predicting respiratory motion, which is most dominant for thoracic and abdominal tumors. We develop and investigate the use of a local dynamic model in an augmented space, motivated by the observation that respiratory movement exhibits a locally circular pattern in a plane augmented with a delayed axis. By including the angular velocity as part of the system state, the proposed dynamic model effectively captures the natural evolution of respiratory motion. The first-order extended Kalman filter is used to propagate and update the state estimate. The target location is predicted by evaluating the local dynamic model equations at the required prediction length. This method is complementary to existing work in that (1) the local circular motion model characterizes 'turning', overcoming the limitation of linear motion models; (2) it uses a natural state representation including the local angular velocity and updates the state estimate systematically, offering explicit physical interpretations; (3) it relies on a parametric model and is much less data-satiate than the typical adaptive semiparametric or nonparametric method. We tested the performance of the proposed method with ten RPM traces, using the normalized root mean squared difference between the predicted value and the retrospective observation as the error metric. Its performance was compared with predictors based on the linear model, the interacting multiple linear models and the kernel density estimator for various combinations of prediction lengths and observation rates. The local dynamic model based approach provides the best performance for short to medium prediction lengths under relatively

  1. Horizons and non-local time evolution of quantum mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadio, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    According to general relativity, trapping surfaces and horizons are classical causal structures that arise in systems with sharply defined energy and corresponding gravitational radius. The latter concept can be extended to a quantum mechanical matter state simply by means of the spectral decomposition, which allows one to define an associated "horizon wave-function". Since this auxiliary wave-function contains crucial information about the causal structure of space-time, a new proposal is formulated for the time evolution of quantum systems in order to account for the fundamental classical property that outer observers cannot receive signals from inside a horizon. The simple case of a massive free particle at rest is used throughout the paper as a toy model to illustrate the main ideas.

  2. Real time tracker based upon local hit correlation circuit for silicon strip sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Niklaus; Pirrami, Lorenzo; Blue, Andrew; Diez, Sergio; Dressnandt, Nandor; Duner, Silvan; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Haber, Carl; Halgeri, Amogh; Keener, Paul; Keller, John; Newcomer, Mitchell; Pasner, Jacob; Peschke, Richard; Risbud, Amar; Ropraz, Eric; Stalder, Jonas; Wang, Haichen

    2016-01-01

    For the planned high luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a significant performance improvement of the detectors is required, including new tracker and trigger systems that makes use of charged track information early on. In this note we explore the principle of real time track reconstruction integrated in the readout electronics. A prototype was built using the silicon strip sensor for the ATLAS phase-II upgrade. The real time tracker is not the baseline for ATLAS but is nevertheless of interest, as the upgraded trigger design has not yet been finalized. For this, a new readout scheme in parallel with conventional readout, called the Fast Cluster Finder (FCF), was included in the latest prototype of the ATLAS strip detector readout chip (ABC130). The FCF is capable of finding hits within 6 ns and transmitting the found hit information synchronously every 25 ns. Using the FCF together with external correlation logic makes it possible to look for pairs of hits consistent with tracks from the interaction point above a transverse momentum threshold. A correlator logic finds correlations between two closely spaced parallel sensors, a "doublet", and can generate information used as input to a lowest level trigger decision. Such a correlator logic was developed as part of a demonstrator and was successfully tested in an electron beam. The results of this test beam experiment proved the concept of the real time track vector processor with FCF.

  3. Using time-reversal to generate generalized transversely localized transient waves (X-waves).

    PubMed

    Walker, S C

    2009-03-01

    In the traditional approach to X-waves, the X-wave field is synthesized from a superposition of solutions to the homogenous wave equation (in three-dimensions) without regard to boundary conditions. As a consequence the synthesized solution is acausal. Here, it is shown that the solution to the inhomogenous scalar wave equation for the acoustic field from a supersonic source distribution consistent with the radiation condition, i.e., a Mach front, defines a causal X-wave. Using the connection between X-waves and a physical source, it is shown that an X-wave can be generated from a planar aperture using time-reversal. By appealing to the demonstrated self-adaptivity of time-reversal processes, the method should allow for the generation of X-waves in arbitrary (inhomogenous) media. Typically, the generation of approximate acoustic X-waves from a planar aperture is achieved using a complicated annular transducer arrangement. Here, the time-reversal method for the generation of approximate acoustic X-waves is experimentally proven using a line transducer array in two-dimensional geometry in free space. PMID:19275313

  4. Linking El Niño, local rainfall, and migration timing in a tropical migratory species.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Allison K; Kelly, Kathryn A

    2013-11-01

    Current climate models project changes in both temperature and precipitation patterns across the globe in the coming years. Migratory species, which move to take advantage of seasonal climate patterns, are likely to be affected by these changes, and indeed, a number of studies have shown a relationship between changing climate and the migration timing of various species. However, these studies have almost exclusively focused on the effects of temperature change on species that inhabit temperate zones. Here, we explore the relationship between rainfall and migration timing in a tropical species, Gecarcoidea natalis (Christmas Island red crab). We find that the timing of the annual crab breeding migration is closely related to the amount of rain that falls during a 'migration window' period prior to potential egg release dates, which is in turn related to the Southern Oscillation Index, an atmospheric El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index. As reproduction in this species is conditional on successful migration, major changes in migration patterns could have detrimental consequences for the survival of the species. This study serves to broaden our understanding of the effects of climate change on migratory species and will hopefully inspire future work on rainfall and tropical migrations. PMID:23821605

  5. Brain signatures of perceiving a smile: Time course and source localization.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, David; Calvo, Manuel G

    2015-11-01

    Facial happiness is consistently recognized faster than other expressions of emotion. In this study, to determine when and where in the brain such a recognition advantage develops, EEG activity during an expression categorization task was subjected to temporospatial PCA analysis and LAURA source localizations. Happy, angry, and neutral faces were presented either in whole or bottom-half format (with the mouth region visible). The comparison of part- versus whole-face conditions served to examine the role of the smile. Two neural signatures underlying the happy face advantage emerged. One peaked around 140 ms (left N140) and was source-located at the left IT cortex (MTG), with greater activity for happy versus non-happy faces in both whole and bottom-half face format. This suggests an enhanced perceptual encoding mechanism for salient smiles. The other peaked around 370 ms (P3b and N3) and was located at the right IT (FG) and dorsal cingulate (CC) cortices, with greater activity specifically for bottom-half happy versus non-happy faces. This suggests an enhanced recruitment of face-specific information to categorize (or reconstruct) facial happiness from diagnostic smiling mouths. Additional differential brain responses revealed a specific "anger effect," with greater activity for angry versus non-angry expressions (right N170 and P230; right pSTS and IPL); and a coarse "emotion effect," with greater activity for happy and angry versus neutral expressions (anterior P2 and posterior N170; vmPFC and right IFG). PMID:26252428

  6. Transit-time devices as local oscillators for frequencies above 100 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, H.; Kidner, C.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    Very promising preliminary experimental results have been obtained from GaAs IMPATT diodes at F-band frequencies (75 mW, 3.5 percent at 111.1 GHz and 20 mW, 1.4 percent at 120.6 GHz) and from GaAs TUNNETT diodes at W-band frequencies (26 mW, 1.6 percent at 87.2 GHz and 32 mW, 2.6 percent at 93.5 GHz). These results indicate that IMPATT, MITATT and TUNNETT diodes have the highest potential of delivering significant amounts of power at Terahertz frequencies. As shown recently, the noise performance of GaAs W-band IMPATT diodes can compete with that of Gunn devices. Since TUNNETT diodes take advantage of the quieter tunnel injection, they are expected to be especially suited for low-noise local oscillators. This paper will focus on the two different design principles for IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes, the material parameters involved in the design and some aspects of the present device technology. Single-drift flat-profile GaAs D-band IMPATT diodes had oscillations up to 129 GHz with 9 mW, 0.9 percent at 128.4 GHz. Single-drift GaAs TUNNETT diodes had oscillations up to 112.5 GHz with 16 mW and output power levels up to 33 mW and efficiencies up to 3.4 percent around 102 GHz. These results are the best reported so far from GaAs IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes.

  7. Time course and localization of endothelin-1 gene expression in a model of renal disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzi, I.; Corna, D.; Zoja, C.; Orisio, S.; Schiffrin, E. L.; Cavallotti, D.; Remuzzi, G.; Benigni, A.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental and human proteinuric glomerulopathies are associated with tubulo-interstitial injury that correlates with the decline of renal function even better than glomerular lesions do. Mechanism(s) leading to tubulo-interstitial damage are unknown. It has been proposed that excessive reabsorption of filtered proteins activates renal cells to produce vasoactive and inflammatory molecules including endothelin-1. The aim of the present study was twofold: we first evaluated the cellular origin of excessive renal endothelin-1 production in the renal mass reduction model and then related endothelin-1 distribution to the development of kidney lesions. Four groups of renal mass reduction (n = 15) and four groups of control rats (n = 5) were studied at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after surgery. Urinary proteins in renal mass reduction rats were comparable with controls at day 7 but became significantly higher thereafter. Renal mass reduction rats first developed tubulo-interstitial changes, which were already evident at day 14 in the majority of them. At 28 days, renal mass reduction rats also developed glomerulosclerosis. A parallel increase of renal endothelin-1 gene expression and synthesis of the corresponding peptide in renal mass reduction rats versus controls was observed from day 14. Nonradioactive in situ hybridization confirmed a pattern of endothelin-1 mRNA consistent with the distribution of lesions. At day 14, endothelin-1 staining was stronger in renal mass reduction than in control kidneys and mainly localized to the cytoplasm of tubular cells, whereas glomeruli were negative. At day 28, endothelin-1 expression further increased in renal mass reduction rats as compared with controls, and the staining was apparent also in glomeruli. Thus, in renal mass reduction, a progressive up-regulation of endothelin-1 occurs during the development of renal injury, that first involves the tubules and, only in a subsequent phase, the glomeruli. Images Figure 2 PMID:9358749

  8. Solar sail attitude dynamics and coning control: On Developing Control Methods for Solar Sail Coning at Orbit Rate to Attain Desired Orbital Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    In this thesis, a control method is developed for the solar sail normal vector to trace a desired circular coning trajectory at orbit rate. The coning trajectory is defined in the local vertical local horizontal (LVLH) frame and the coning occurs about an LVLH equilibrium sail attitude. Past research has shown that sail attitude equilibria exist in the LVLH frame under the influence of aerodynamic, gravity gradient and solar torques. Precession of the sail normal from these equilibria causes sail normal coning about that equilibrium attitude. If the coning happens at orbit rate, wide variety of orbital effects can be induced with minimum excitation of the sailcraft structure. This results in an inexpensive spacecraft with a longer duration mission as compared to other conventional efforts. A special case of analyzing circular cones (at orbit rate coning) revealed that new Sun-synchronous orbits were created and launch injection errors were overcome by employing the sail coning method. The control method herein minimizes the angular momentum error between the sail and desired angular momentum vectors at orbit rate. Since angular momentum is a function of sail normal, angular momentum error reduction raises hope in reducing the sail normal error between the sail normal and desired sail normal vector as well. The results show that even though the control method enables the sail angular momentum to track the desired angular momentum on the coning trajectory, the sail normal tracing can only occur about certain LVLH equilibrium points, for small cones and small initial condition angular position/velocity errors. The control method is robust for tracking the desired angular momentum at orbit rate, but not always for tracking the desired sail normal. The case where the sail normal does track the desired at orbit rate corresponds to tracing a 1° circular cone about an orbit lowering LVLH equilibrium point. Even though the control torques are on the order of 10-6 Nm

  9. Optimization of Milling Parameters Employing Desirability Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L. S.; Rubio, J. C. Campos; Abrão, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of tool material (one cermet and two coated carbide grades), cutting speed and feed rate on the machinability of hardened AISI H13 hot work steel, in order to identify the cutting conditions which lead to optimal performance. A multiple response optimization procedure based on tool life, surface roughness, milling forces and the machining time (required to produce a sample cavity) was employed. The results indicated that the TiCN-TiN coated carbide and cermet presented similar results concerning the global optimum values for cutting speed and feed rate per tooth, outperforming the TiN-TiCN-Al2O3 coated carbide tool.

  10. Stable Collocated-grid Finite Difference Seismic Wave Modeling Using Discontinuous Grids with Locally Variable Time Steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    It is widely accepted that they are oversampled in spatial grid spacing and temporal time step in the high speed medium if uniform grids are used for the numerical simulation. This oversampled grid spacing and time step will lower the efficiency of the calculation, especially high velocity contrast exists. Based on the collocated-grid finite-difference method (FDM), we present an algorithm of spatial discontinuous grid, with localized grid blocks and locally varying time steps, which will increase the efficiency of simulation of seismic wave propagation and earthquake strong ground motion. According to the velocity structure, we discretize the model into discontinuous grid blocks, and the time step of each block is determined according to the local stability. The key problem of the discontinuous grid method is the connection between grid blocks with different grid spacing. We use a transitional area overlapped by both of the finer and the coarser grids to deal with the problem. In the transitional area, the values of finer ghost points are obtained by interpolation from the coarser grid in space and time domain, while the values of coarser ghost points are obtained by downsampling from the finer grid. How to deal with coarser ghost points can influent the stability of long time simulation. After testing different downsampling methods and finally we choose the Gaussian filtering. Basically, 4th order Rung-Kutta scheme will be used for the time integral for our numerical method. For our discontinuous grid FDM, discontinuous time steps for the coarser and the finer grids will be used to increase the simulation efficiency. Numerical tests indicate that our method can provide a stable solution even for the long time simulation without any additional filtration for grid spacing ratio n=2. And for larger grid spacing ratio, Gaussian filtration could be used to preserve the stability. With the collocated-grid FDM, which is flexible and accurate in implementation of free

  11. Emergence of Space-Time Localization and Cosmic Decoherence:. More on Irreversible Time, Dark Energy, Anti-Matter and Black-Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnon, Anne

    2005-04-01

    A non geometric cosmology is presented, based on logic of observability, where logical categories of our perception set frontiers to comprehensibility. The Big-Bang singularity finds here a substitute (comparable to a "quantum jump"): a logical process (tied to self-referent and divisible totality) by which information emerges, focalizes on events and recycles, providing a transition from incoherence to causal coherence. This jump manufactures causal order and space-time localization, as exact solutions to Einstein's equation, where the last step of the process disentangles complex Riemann spheres into real null-cones (a geometric overturning imposed by self-reference, reminding us of our ability to project the cosmos within our mental sphere). Concepts such as antimatter and dark energy (dual entities tied to bifurcations or broken symmetries, and their compensation), are presented as hidden in the virtual potentialities, while irreversible time appears with the recycling of information and related flow. Logical bifurcations (such as the "part-totality" category, a quantum of information which owes its recycling to non localizable logical separations, as anticipated by unstability or horizon dependence of the quantum vacuum) induce broken symmetries, at the (complex or real) geometric level [eg. the antiselfdual complex non linear graviton solutions, which break duality symmetry, provide a model for (hidden) anti-matter, itself compensated with dark-energy, and providing, with space-time localization, the radiative gravitational energy (Bondi flux and related bifurcations of the peeling off type), as well as mass of isolated bodies]. These bifurcations are compensated by inertial effects (non geometric precursors of the Coriolis forces) able to explain (on logical grounds) the cosmic expansion (a repulsion?) and critical equilibrium of the cosmic tissue. Space-time environment, itself, emerges through the jump, as a censor to totality, a screen to incoherence (as

  12. Time-programmed DCA and oxaliplatin release by multilayered nanofiber mats in prevention of local cancer recurrence following surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyun; Liu, Shi; Qi, Yanxin; Zhou, Dongfang; Xie, Zhigang; Jing, Xiabin; Chen, Xuesi; Huang, Yubin

    2016-08-10

    Local recurrence following surgery in cancer treatment remains a major clinical challenge. To increase antitumor activity but maintain toxicity in an acceptable level in prevention of local cancer recurrence, we demonstrated a dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats strategy, in which DCA and oxaliplatin were co-electrospun into the distinct layer of resultant fabrics and the oxaliplatin-loaded fibers layer was sealed between the basement film layer and other two fibers layers. The dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats exhibit time-programmed dual release behavior and synergistic effect upon cancer cells. Nontoxic DCA selectively promotes apoptosis of cancer cells through modulating cellular metabolism, and oxaliplatin subsequently kills the remained cancer cells in a low concentration. After implantation on the resection margin of cervical carcinoma on a murine model, the dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats displayed enhanced anti-recurrence efficacy and decreased side toxic effects over 30days compared with drug-loaded monolayered fiber mats. The time-programmed combination of DCA and oxaliplatin within multilayered nanofiber mats appears to be a promising strategy for local cancer treatment following resection. PMID:27221069

  13. Gamma-Ray Burst Arrival Time Localizations: Simultaneous Observations by Mars Observer, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laros, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Hurley, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; McCollough, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1992 October 4 and 1993 August 1, concurrent coverage by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), Mars Observer (MO), and Ulysses spacecraft was obtained for 78 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although most of these were below the MO and Ulysses thresholds, nine were positively detected by all three spacecraft, with data quality adequate for quantitative localization analysis. All were localized independently to approximately 2 deg accuracy by the CGRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). We computed arrival-time error boxes with larger dimensions ranging from a few arcminutes to the diameters of the BATSE-only boxes and with smaller dimensions in the arcminute range. Three events are of particular interest: GB 930704 (BATSE 2428) has been described as a possible repeater. The arrival-time information is consistent with that hypothesis, but only just so. The GB 930706 (2431) box, at approximately 1 min x 4 min, is the only one this small obtained since Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) entered the Venusian atmosphere in 1992 October. Sensitive radio and optical observations of this location were made within 8 and 9 days of the burst, but no counterpart candidates were identified. GB 930801 (2477) is the first GRB that had its localization improved by taking into account BATSE Earth occultation.

  14. Desiring T, desiring self: "T-style" pop singers and lesbian culture in China.

    PubMed

    Kam, Lucetta Y L

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an emerging group of "T-style" female singers in the popular music scene in China. The expression "T," which is developed from the term "tomboy," refers to lesbians with masculine gender style. It is a widely used form of identification in local lesbian communities in China. The emergence of "T-style" female singers coincided with the rapid development of local lesbian communities in major cities in China. By exploring the intersections-or mutual modeling-of "T-style" singers and local lesbian gender culture, this article also analyzes the different receptions of "T-style" singers by local lesbian women, and explores whether "T-style" singers are seen as a "cultural resource" that aids the construction of lesbian gender and sexual identities. PMID:24972284

  15. The impact of sexual trauma on sexual desire and function.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Barry; Farr, Emily

    2011-01-01

    The field of sexual trauma is one of the most controversial and value-laden in mental health. The three factors which most affect adult sexual desire and function are the type of sexual trauma, how the sexual incidents were dealt with at the time and, most important, whether the person views her/himself as a survivor or victim. The assessment and treatment program described focuses on couple sex therapy with a special focus on processing the sexual trauma, honoring the person's veto and being 'partners in healing'. The core therapeutic theme is valuing intimate, erotic sexuality, which reinforces being a proud survivor rather than a shameful, anxious or angry victim. It is crucial to create a relapse prevention program to ensure that the person with the sexual trauma history continues to experience the positive roles of adult couple sexuality. PMID:22005207

  16. Five-dimensional neuroimaging: Localization of the time-frequency dynamics of cortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Sarang S.; Guggisberg, Adrian G.; Edwards, Erik; Sekihara, Kensuke; Findlay, Anne M.; Canolty, Ryan T.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Knight, Robert T.; Barbaro, Nicholas M.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2008-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of cortical oscillations across human brain regions remain poorly understood because of a lack of adequately validated methods for reconstructing such activity from noninvasive electrophysiological data. In this paper, we present a novel adaptive spatial filtering algorithm optimized for robust source time-frequency reconstruction from magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) data. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated with simulated sources and is also applied to real MEG data from a self-paced finger movement task. The algorithm reliably reveals modulations both in the beta band (12–30 Hz) and high gamma band (65–90 Hz) in sensorimotor cortex. The performance is validated by both across-subjects statistical comparisons and by intracranial electrocorticography (ECoG) data from two epilepsy patients. Interestingly, we also reliably observed high frequency activity (30–300 Hz) in the cerebellum, though with variable locations and frequencies across subjects. The proposed algorithm is highly parallelizable and runs efficiently on modern high performance computing clusters. This method enables the ultimate promise of MEG and EEG for five-dimensional imaging of space, time, and frequency activity in the brain and renders it applicable for widespread studies of human cortical dynamics during cognition. PMID:18356081

  17. Local time variations of high-energy plasmaspheric ion pitch angle distributions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Larsen, Brian Arthur; Moldwin, Mark B.; Katus, Roxanne M.; Wygant, John R.

    2016-07-05

    Recent observations from the Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument revealed a persistent depletion in the 1–10 eV ion population in the postmidnight sector during quiet times in the 2 < L < 3 region. This study explores the source of this ion depletion by developing an algorithm to classify 26 months of pitch angle distributions measured by the HOPE instrument. We correct the HOPE low energy fluxes for spacecraft potential using measurements from the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instrument. A high percentage of low count pitch angle distributions is found in the postmidnight sector coupledmore » with a low percentage of ion distributions peaked perpendicular to the field line. A peak in loss cone distributions in the dusk sector is also observed. Here, these results characterize the nature of the dearth of the near 90° pitch angle 1–10 eV ion population in the near-Earth postmidnight sector. This study also shows, for the first time, low-energy HOPE differential number fluxes corrected for spacecraft potential and 1–10 eV H+ fluxes at different levels of geomagnetic activity.« less

  18. The Local Interstellar Medium Magnetic Field: Back to the Old Times!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Jaffel, L.; Ratkiewicz, R.

    2011-12-01

    The crossing of the solar wind termination shock (TS) by Voyager 1 (V1) & Voyager 2 (V2) spacecrafts respectively at ~94 AU and ~84 AU revealed a rather strong asymmetry in the heliosphere that was immediately associated with the imprint of the unknown local interstellar medium magnetic field (LIMF). The observed asymmetry in the TS shape and further in situ measurements made by the Voyager plasma and magnetic field instruments deep in the heliosheath were interpreted as being a result of the unusually strong LIMF level that stands in stark contrast with commonly accepted values 1.8-2.5 μG derived from ground-based observations. In addition, the derived orientation was different from average orientation observed on the ~100 parsecs scale, requiring a distortion of the far field lines in order to adjust to the solar vicinity region. The Lyman-α emission originating from the neutral hydrogen component was reported to show a distortion in the heliosphere, however, and this distortion should also be used to constrain the LIMF strength and its two orientation angles. In addition, Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) reported a ribbon-like structure in the spatial distribution of energetic neutrals of heliospheric origin, a structure that may be explained by the presence of an oblique LIMF. Here we show that the asymmetries observed in respectively the Lyman-α emission deep in the heliosphere-in the TS position as measured by V1 and V2-and the Ibex ribbon could be explained with a rather weak 1.8-2.5 μG strength of LIMF and orientation well below the galactic plane. We also show that the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modelling of V1 and V2 plasma observations does not lead to unique values of the LIMF strength and orientation as previously claimed. The LIMF derived here is oriented almost orthogonal to the spiral arm that hosts our solar system, which is consistent with previous findings from pulsar rotation, diffuse radio emission, and polarization of starlight

  19. Real-Time Localization of Moving Dipole Sources for Tracking Multiple Free-Swimming Weakly Electric Fish

    PubMed Central

    Jun, James Jaeyoon; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    In order to survive, animals must quickly and accurately locate prey, predators, and conspecifics using the signals they generate. The signal source location can be estimated using multiple detectors and the inverse relationship between the received signal intensity (RSI) and the distance, but difficulty of the source localization increases if there is an additional dependence on the orientation of a signal source. In such cases, the signal source could be approximated as an ideal dipole for simplification. Based on a theoretical model, the RSI can be directly predicted from a known dipole location; but estimating a dipole location from RSIs has no direct analytical solution. Here, we propose an efficient solution to the dipole localization problem by using a lookup table (LUT) to store RSIs predicted by our theoretically derived dipole model at many possible dipole positions and orientations. For a given set of RSIs measured at multiple detectors, our algorithm found a dipole location having the closest matching normalized RSIs from the LUT, and further refined the location at higher resolution. Studying the natural behavior of weakly electric fish (WEF) requires efficiently computing their location and the temporal pattern of their electric signals over extended periods. Our dipole localization method was successfully applied to track single or multiple freely swimming WEF in shallow water in real-time, as each fish could be closely approximated by an ideal current dipole in two dimensions. Our optimized search algorithm found the animal’s positions, orientations, and tail-bending angles quickly and accurately under various conditions, without the need for calibrating individual-specific parameters. Our dipole localization method is directly applicable to studying the role of active sensing during spatial navigation, or social interactions between multiple WEF. Furthermore, our method could be extended to other application areas involving dipole source

  20. Localization and interaural time difference (ITD) thresholds for cochlear implant recipients with preserved acoustic hearing in the implanted ear.

    PubMed

    Gifford, René H; Grantham, D Wesley; Sheffield, Sterling W; Davis, Timothy J; Dwyer, Robert; Dorman, Michael F

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate horizontal plane localization and interaural time difference (ITD) thresholds for 14 adult cochlear implant recipients with hearing preservation in the implanted ear. Localization to broadband noise was assessed in an anechoic chamber with a 33-loudspeaker array extending from -90 to +90°. Three listening conditions were tested including bilateral hearing aids, bimodal (implant + contralateral hearing aid) and best aided (implant + bilateral hearing aids). ITD thresholds were assessed, under headphones, for low-frequency stimuli including a 250-Hz tone and bandpass noise (100-900 Hz). Localization, in overall rms error, was significantly poorer in the bimodal condition (mean: 60.2°) as compared to both bilateral hearing aids (mean: 46.1°) and the best-aided condition (mean: 43.4°). ITD thresholds were assessed for the same 14 adult implant recipients as well as 5 normal-hearing adults. ITD thresholds were highly variable across the implant recipients ranging from the range of normal to ITDs not present in real-world listening environments (range: 43 to over 1600 μs). ITD thresholds were significantly correlated with localization, the degree of interaural asymmetry in low-frequency hearing, and the degree of hearing preservation related benefit in the speech reception threshold (SRT). These data suggest that implant recipients with hearing preservation in the implanted ear have access to binaural cues and that the sensitivity to ITDs is significantly correlated with localization and degree of preserved hearing in the implanted ear. PMID:24607490

  1. Real-Time Local Range On-Demand and Dynamic Regional Range Images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.V.

    2000-02-22

    This paper presents a new approach to a gesture tracking system using real-time range on-demand. The system represents a gesture-controlled interface for interactive visual exploration of large data sets. The paper describes a method performing range processing only when necessary and where necessary. Range data is processed only for non-static regions of interest. This is accomplished by a set of filters on the color, motion, and range data. The speedup achieved is between 41% and 54%. The algorithm also includes a robust skin color segmentation insensitive to illumination changes. Selective range processing results in dynamic regional range images (DRRIs). This development is also placed in a broader context of a biological visual system emulation, specifically redundancies and attention mechanisms.

  2. Real-Time Local Range On-Demand for Tracking Gestures and Dynamic Regional Range Images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.V.

    2000-05-30

    This paper presents a new approach to a gesture-tracking system using real-time range on-demand. The system represents a gesture-controlled interface for interactive visual exploration of large data sets. The paper describes a method performing range processing only when necessary and where necessary. Range data is processed only for non-static regions of interest. This is accomplished by a set of filters on the color, motion, and range data. The speedup achieved is between 41% and 54%. The algorithm also includes a robust skin-color segmentation insensitive to illumination changes. Selective range processing results in dynamic regional range images (DRRIs). This development is also placed in a broader context of a biological visual system emulation, specifically redundancies and attention mechanisms.

  3. Automated seismic event location by arrival time stacking: Applications to local and micro-seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, F.; Cesca, S.; Braun, T.; Philipp, J.; Dahm, T.

    2012-04-01

    Locating seismic events is one of the oldest problem in seismology. In microseismicity application, when the number of event is very large, it is not possible to locate earthquake manually and automated location procedures must be established. Automated seismic event location at different scales is very important in different application areas, including mining monitoring, reservoir geophysics and early warning systems. Location is needed to start rescue operations rapidly. Locating and mapping microearthquakes or acoustic emission sources in mining environments is important for monitoring of mines stability. Mapping fractures through microseimicity distribution inside hydrocarbon reservoirs is needed to find areas with an higher permeability and enhance oil production. In the last 20 years a large number of picking algorithm was developed in order to locate seismic events automatically. While P onsets can now be accurately picked using automatic routines, the automatic picking of later seismic phases (including S onset) is still problematic , thus limiting the location performance. In this work we present a picking free location method based on the use of the Short-Term-Average/Long-Term-Average (STA/LTA) traces at different stations as observed data. For different locations and origin times, observed STA/LTA are stacked along the travel time surface corresponding to the selected hypocentre. Iterating this procedure on a three-dimensional grid we retrieve a multidimensional matrix whose absolute maximum corresponds to the spatio-temporal coordinates of the seismic event. We tested our methodology on synthetic data, simulating different environments and network geometries. Finally, we apply our method to real datasets related to microseismic activity in mines and earthquake swarms in Italy. This work has been funded by the German BMBF "Geotechnologien" project MINE (BMBF03G0737A).

  4. Optimal time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon . E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr; Choi, Won Sik; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chang, Heung Moon; Ryu, Min Hee; Jang, Se Jin; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided into Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy.

  5. FUNDAMENTAL STUDY ON REAL-TIME FLOOD FORECASTING METHOD FOR LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL IN URBAN DRAINAGE AREAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Makoto; Kido, Yoshinobu; Nakakita, Eiichi

    Recently, locally heavy rainfall occurs frequently at highly urbanized area, and causes serious personal accidents, so importance of flood forecasting system is growing in order to reduce damage of inundation. However, flood forecasting that secured lead-time for evacuation is extremely difficult, because the rainfall flows out rapidly. In this study, the numerical simulation model that can finely express inundation mechanism of urban drainage areas was applied with the most recent available data and analysis tool. The influence of the factor (i.e. sewer system, overland and rainfall information) which affected inundation mechanism was evaluated through the sensibility analysis with this model, and evaluation results show some requirements of model condition and information on time and space resolution of real-time flood forecasting.

  6. Crustal seismic structure beneath the Deccan Traps area (Gujarat, India), from local travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Srichand; Kukarina, Ekaterina; Mishra, Santosh

    2016-03-01

    The Gujarat region in western India is known for its intra-plate seismic activity, including the Mw 7.7 Bhuj earthquake, a reverse-faulting event that reactivated normal faults of the Mesozoic Kachchh rift zone. The Late Cretaceous Deccan Traps, one of the largest igneous provinces on the Earth, cover the southern part of Gujarat. This study is aimed at bringing light to the crustal rift zone structure and likely origin of the Traps based on the velocity structure of the crust beneath Gujarat. Tomographic inversion of the Gujarat region was done using the non-linear, passive-source tomographic algorithm, LOTOS. We use high-quality arrival times of 22,280 P and 22,040 S waves from 3555 events recorded from August 2006 to May 2011 at 83 permanent and temporary stations installed in Gujarat state by the Institute of Seismological Research (ISR). We conclude that the resulting high-velocity anomalies, which reach down to the Moho, are most likely related to intrusives associated with the Deccan Traps. Low velocity anomalies are found in sediment-filled Mesozoic rift basins and are related to weakened zones of faults and fracturing. A low-velocity anomaly in the north of the region coincides with the seismogenic zone of the reactivated Kachchh rift system, which is apparently associated with the channel of the outpouring of Deccan basalt.

  7. Diffuse globally, compute locally: a cyclist approach to modeling long time robot locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingnan; Goldman, Daniel; Cvitanović, Predrag

    2015-03-01

    To advance autonomous robots we are interested to develop a statistical/dynamical description of diffusive self-propulsion on heterogeneous terrain. We consider a minimal model for such diffusion, the 2-dimensional Lorentz gas, which abstracts the motion of a light, point-like particle bouncing within a large number of heavy scatters (e.g. small robots in a boulder field). We present a precise computation (based on exact periodic orbit theory formula for the diffusion constant) for a periodic triangular Lorentz gas with finite horizon. We formulate a new approach to tiling the plane in terms of three elementary tiling generators which, for the first time, enables use of periodic orbits computed in the fundamental domain (that is, 1 / 12 of the hexagonal elementary cell whose translations tile the entire plane). Compared with previous literature, our fundamental domain value of the diffusion constant converges quickly for inter-disk separation/disk radius > 0 . 2 , with the cycle expansion truncated to only a few hundred periodic orbits of up to 5 billiard wall bounces. For small inter-disk separations, with periodic orbits up to 6 bounces, our diffusion constants are close (< 10 %) to direct numerical simulation estimates and the recent literature probabilistic estimates.

  8. Platelets aggregation in pathological conditions: role of local shear rates and platelet activation delay time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Zarif Khalili Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in the initiation and formation of a thrombus, however their detailed motion in blood vessels with complex geometries, such as in the aneurysmal vessel or stenotic vessel in atherosclerosis, has not been studied systematically. Here, we perform spectral element simulations (NEKTAR code) to obtain the 3D flow field in blood vessel with cavities, and we apply the force coupling method (FCM) to simulate the motion of platelets in blood flow. Specifically, simulations of platelets are performed in a 0.25 mm diameter circular blood vessel with 1 mm length. Corresponding coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide input to the NEKTAR-FCM code. Simulations are conducted at several different Reynolds numbers (Re). An ellipsoid-shaped cavity is selected to intersect with the middle part of the circular vessel to represent the aneurysmal part of the blood vessel. Based on the simulation results, we quantify how the platelets motion and aggregation in the blood vessel cavities depend on Re, platelet activation delay time, and the geometry of the cavities.

  9. Analysis of the effects of mean local node-crossing time on the evolution of Sun-synchronous orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, P.; Blaes, V.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of mean local node-crossing time on the evolution of Sun-synchronous orbits was undertaken during Phase-A orbit analysis for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) O,P,Q environmental spacecraft. That analysis added to the growing body of evidence that individual Sun-synchronous missions, at differing node-crossing times, experience nodal drift rates that can differ in both magnitude and direction. A Sun-synchronous orbit is obtained by means of a nodal drift rate approximating the 0.9856-degree-per-day apparent precession of the position of the mean Sun. This drift rate is achieved through the interaction of the orbital semimajor axis and inclination in Earth's geopotential field. Influencing perturbations include atmospheric drag and, most important, the effects of solar gravitation on inclination. The present analysis examines a series of Sun-synchronous orbits with mean local node-crossing times at 1-hour intervals from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. It considers the fixed geometry of each orbital plane with respect to both the Sun and the diurnal atmospheric bulge, then analyzes the influence of these features upon the evolution of the semimajor axix and inclination and thus upon the rate of the nodal drift in the course of 1 year.

  10. A Spiking Neural Network Model of the Medial Superior Olive Using Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity for Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Glackin, Brendan; Wall, Julie A.; McGinnity, Thomas M.; Maguire, Liam P.; McDaid, Liam J.

    2010-01-01

    Sound localization can be defined as the ability to identify the position of an input sound source and is considered a powerful aspect of mammalian perception. For low frequency sounds, i.e., in the range 270 Hz–1.5 KHz, the mammalian auditory pathway achieves this by extracting the Interaural Time Difference between sound signals being received by the left and right ear. This processing is performed in a region of the brain known as the Medial Superior Olive (MSO). This paper presents a Spiking Neural Network (SNN) based model of the MSO. The network model is trained using the Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity learning rule using experimentally observed Head Related Transfer Function data in an adult domestic cat. The results presented demonstrate how the proposed SNN model is able to perform sound localization with an accuracy of 91.82% when an error tolerance of ±10° is used. For angular resolutions down to 2.5°, it will be demonstrated how software based simulations of the model incur significant computation times. The paper thus also addresses preliminary implementation on a Field Programmable Gate Array based hardware platform to accelerate system performance. PMID:20802855

  11. Children's understanding of the distinction between intentions and desires.

    PubMed

    Schult, Carolyn A

    2002-01-01

    Much of the previous research on children's understanding of intentions confounded intentions with desires. Intentions and desires are different, in that a desire can be satisfied in a number of ways, but an intention must be satisfied by carrying out the intended action. Children 3 through 7 years of age and adults were presented with situations in which intentions were satisfied but desires were not, or vice versa, in a story-comprehension task (N = 71) and a target-hitting game (N = 45). Although 3- and 4-year-olds were unable to differentiate desires and intentions consistently, 5- and 7-year-olds often matched the adult pattern. Younger children's difficulties in understanding intentions are discussed in terms of their use of a desire-outcome matching strategy and the representational complexities of intentions. PMID:12487490

  12. Research applications of night-time aerial photography, from local to global scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, J.; Sadler, J.

    2012-12-01

    Artificial lighting of the earth's surface is changing at a global scale, with numerous social, economic and environmental implications. In many regions, the extent, brightness and spectral range of lighting is increasing, reflecting economic and technological development, population growth and urbanization. Its benefits include improving the perception of neighbourhood safety and increasing people's options for when activities can take place. Impacts range from the disruption of sleep patterns by a single street lamp to obscured views of the night sky for tens of kilometers surrounding an urban area. There is therefore a need to secure baseline maps of artificial lighting, and to detect changes in their extent and quality over time. Considerable success has been achieved in generating global lighting datasets from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) data, which have been used to support a broad range of research and policy applications. However, their coarse spatial and spectral resolution and difficulties in radiance calibration have been recognised as barriers to some potential applications. We present the first multi-spectral radiance calibrated lighting data for cities at a fine spatial resolution (10cm). We then illustrate how these data can be effective for exploring relationships between lighting and urban form, and that they can support the radiance calibration of lighting datasets with much greater spatial extents. Color night photography was collected for two major English cities - Birmingham and London. Ground photometry and radiometry surveys were undertaken, permitting the reclassification of the images to represent incident lux and the identification and classification of individual lamps. Total illuminated area and lamp density both correlated positively with percentage built surface cover, although the strength of these relationships differed between cities. This suggests that artificial lighting may

  13. Cues Resulting in Desire for Sexual Activity in Women

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Katie; Meston, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Introduction A number of questionnaires have been created to assess levels of sexual desire in women, but to our knowledge, there are currently no validated measures for assessing cues that result in sexual desire. A questionnaire of this nature could be useful for both clinicians and researchers, because it considers the contextual nature of sexual desire and it draws attention to individual differences in factors that can contribute to sexual desire. Aim The aim of the present study was to create a multidimensional assessment tool of cues for sexual desire in women that is validated in women with and without hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). Methods Factor analyses conducted on both an initial sample (N = 874) and a community sample (N = 138) resulted in the Cues for Sexual Desire Scale (CSDS) which included four factors: (i) Emotional Bonding Cues; (ii) Erotic/ Explicit Cues; (iii) Visual/Proximity Cues; and (iv) Implicit/Romantic Cues. Main Outcome Measures Scale construction of cues associated with sexual desire and differences between women with and without sexual dysfunction. Results The CSDS demonstrated good reliability and validity and was able to detect significant differences between women with and without HSDD. Results from regression analyses indicated that both marital status and level of sexual functioning predicted scores on the CSDS. The CSDS provided predictive validity for the Female Sexual Function Index desire and arousal domain scores, and increased cues were related to a higher reported frequency of sexual activity in women. Conclusions The findings from the present study provide valuable information regarding both internal and external triggers that can result in sexual desire for women. We believe that the CSDS could be beneficial in therapeutic settings to help identify cues that do and do not facilitate sexual desire in women with clinically diagnosed desire difficulties. PMID:16942529

  14. Local flow management/profile descent algorithm. Fuel-efficient, time-controlled profiles for the NASA TSRV airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, J. L.; Izumi, K. H.; Markham, C. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Thompson, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Local Flow Management/Profile Descent (LFM/PD) algorithm designed for the NASA Transport System Research Vehicle program is described. The algorithm provides fuel-efficient altitude and airspeed profiles consistent with ATC restrictions in a time-based metering environment over a fixed ground track. The model design constraints include accommodation of both published profile descent procedures and unpublished profile descents, incorporation of fuel efficiency as a flight profile criterion, operation within the performance capabilities of the Boeing 737-100 airplane with JT8D-7 engines, and conformity to standard air traffic navigation and control procedures. Holding and path stretching capabilities are included for long delay situations.

  15. An Advanced Electrospinning Method of Fabricating Nanofibrous Patterned Architectures with Controlled Deposition and Desired Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasel, Sheikh Md

    We introduce a versatile advanced method of electrospinning for fabricating various kinds of nanofibrous patterns along with desired alignment, controlled amount of deposition and locally variable density into the architectures. In this method, we employed multiple electrodes whose potentials have been altered in milliseconds with the help of microprocessor based control system. Therefore, key success of this method was that the electrical field as well as charge carrying fibers could be switched shortly from one electrode's location to another, as a result, electrospun fibers could be deposited on the designated areas with desired alignment. A wide range of nanofibrous patterned architectures were constructed using proper arrangement of multiple electrodes. By controlling the concurrent activation time of two adjacent electrodes, we demonstrated that amount of fibers going into the pattern can be adjusted and desired alignment in electrospun fibers can be obtained. We also revealed that the deposition density of electrospun fibers in different areas of patterned architectures can be varied. We showed that by controlling the deposition time between two adjacent electrodes, a number of functionally graded patterns can be generated with uniaxial alignment. We also demonstrated that this handy method was capable of producing random, aligned, and multidirectional nanofibrous mats by engaging a number of electrodes and switching them in desired patterns. A comprehensive study using finite element method was carried out to understand the effects of electrical field. Simulation results revealed that electrical field strength alters shortly based on electrode control switch patterns. Nanofibrous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds and its composite reinforced with wollastonite and wood flour were fabricated using rotating drum electrospinning technique. Morphological, mechanical, and thermal, properties were characterized on PVA/wollastonite and PVA/wood flour nanocomposites

  16. Timely detection of localized excess influenza activity in Northern California across patient care, prescription, and laboratory data.

    PubMed

    Greene, Sharon K; Kulldorff, Martin; Huang, Jie; Brand, Richard J; Kleinman, Kenneth P; Hsu, John; Platt, Richard

    2011-02-28

    Timely detection of clusters of localized influenza activity in excess of background seasonal levels could improve situational awareness for public health officials and health systems. However, no single data type may capture influenza activity with optimal sensitivity, specificity, and timeliness, and it is unknown which data types could be most useful for surveillance. We compared the performance of 10 types of electronic clinical data for timely detection of influenza clusters throughout the 2007/08 influenza season in northern California. Kaiser Permanente Northern California generated zip code-specific daily episode counts for: influenza-like illness (ILI) diagnoses in ambulatory care (AC) and emergency departments (ED), both with and without regard to fever; hospital admissions and discharges for pneumonia and influenza; antiviral drugs dispensed (Rx); influenza laboratory tests ordered (Tests); and tests positive for influenza type A (FluA) and type B (FluB). Four credible events of localized excess illness were identified. Prospective surveillance was mimicked within each data stream using a space-time permutation scan statistic, analyzing only data available as of each day, to evaluate the ability and timeliness to detect the credible events. AC without fever and Tests signaled during all four events and, along with Rx, had the most timely signals. FluA had less timely signals. ED, hospitalizations, and FluB did not signal reliably. When fever was included in the ILI definition, signals were either delayed or missed. Although limited to one health plan, location, and year, these results can inform the choice of data streams for public health surveillance of influenza. PMID:21312219

  17. [Testosterone therapy in female hypoactive sexual desire disorder].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patrick

    2016-03-16

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is a deficiency of sexual desire that causes marked personal or interpersonal distress. It occurs in approximately 1 in 10 adult women. A number of potential contributory factors (hormonal, neurobiological and psychosocial) have been identified. Testosterone plays an excitatory role in sexual desire but the mechanism is not yet well understood. Treatment with testosterone has been shown to improve sexual desire in menopausal women with HSDD. However, there are limited data concerning premenopausal women and long-term safety. At present, physiological testosterone preparations for use in women are not available in Switzerland. PMID:27149714

  18. Temporal Non-Local Means Filtering Reveals Real-Time Whole-Brain Cortical Interactions in Resting fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Chitresh; Chong, Minqi; Choi, Soyoung; Joshi, Anand A.; Haldar, Justin P.; Damasio, Hanna; Leahy, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Intensity variations over time in resting BOLD fMRI exhibit spatial correlation patterns consistent with a set of large scale cortical networks. However, visualizations of this data on the brain surface, even after extensive preprocessing, are dominated by local intensity fluctuations that obscure larger scale behavior. Our novel adaptation of non-local means (NLM) filtering, which we refer to as temporal NLM or tNLM, reduces these local fluctuations without the spatial blurring that occurs when using standard linear filtering methods. We show examples of tNLM filtering that allow direct visualization of spatio-temporal behavior on the cortical surface. These results reveal patterns of activity consistent with known networks as well as more complex dynamic changes within and between these networks. This ability to directly visualize brain activity may facilitate new insights into spontaneous brain dynamics. Further, temporal NLM can also be used as a preprocessor for resting fMRI for exploration of dynamic brain networks. We demonstrate its utility through application to graph-based functional cortical parcellation. Simulations with known ground truth functional regions demonstrate that tNLM filtering prior to parcellation avoids the formation of false parcels that can arise when using linear filtering. Application to resting fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project shows significant improvement, in comparison to linear filtering, in quantitative agreement with functional regions identified independently using task-based experiments as well as in test-retest reliability. PMID:27391481

  19. Temporal Non-Local Means Filtering Reveals Real-Time Whole-Brain Cortical Interactions in Resting fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Chitresh; Chong, Minqi; Choi, Soyoung; Joshi, Anand A; Haldar, Justin P; Damasio, Hanna; Leahy, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Intensity variations over time in resting BOLD fMRI exhibit spatial correlation patterns consistent with a set of large scale cortical networks. However, visualizations of this data on the brain surface, even after extensive preprocessing, are dominated by local intensity fluctuations that obscure larger scale behavior. Our novel adaptation of non-local means (NLM) filtering, which we refer to as temporal NLM or tNLM, reduces these local fluctuations without the spatial blurring that occurs when using standard linear filtering methods. We show examples of tNLM filtering that allow direct visualization of spatio-temporal behavior on the cortical surface. These results reveal patterns of activity consistent with known networks as well as more complex dynamic changes within and between these networks. This ability to directly visualize brain activity may facilitate new insights into spontaneous brain dynamics. Further, temporal NLM can also be used as a preprocessor for resting fMRI for exploration of dynamic brain networks. We demonstrate its utility through application to graph-based functional cortical parcellation. Simulations with known ground truth functional regions demonstrate that tNLM filtering prior to parcellation avoids the formation of false parcels that can arise when using linear filtering. Application to resting fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project shows significant improvement, in comparison to linear filtering, in quantitative agreement with functional regions identified independently using task-based experiments as well as in test-retest reliability. PMID:27391481

  20. Projection of Romantic and Sexual Desire in Opposite-Sex Friendships: How Wishful Thinking Creates a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Edward P; Wolf, Noah R

    2016-07-01

    In two studies, the authors examined the projection of romantic and sexual desire in opposite-sex friendships. In both studies, perceivers who strongly desired their friends projected this desire onto their friends, believing that their desire was more reciprocated than was actually the case. In turn, projection of desire appeared to motivate perceivers into enacting relationship initiation behaviors, which predicted changes in targets' romantic and sexual desires over time (Study 2). Projection was elevated for perceivers who saw themselves as high in mate value, and targets appeared to be influenced by perceivers' overtures primarily when they believed perceivers were high in mate value. This research suggests that, for perceivers high in mate value, romantic and sexual desire creates biased perceptions that initiate self-fulfilling prophecies. PMID:27189004

  1. ESTELA: a method for evaluating the source and travel time of the wave energy reaching a local area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Jorge; Méndez, Fernando J.; Menéndez, Melisa; Losada, Inigo J.

    2014-08-01

    The description of wave climate at a local scale is of paramount importance for offshore and coastal engineering applications. Conditions influencing wave characteristics at a specific location cannot, however, be fully understood by studying only local information. It is necessary to take into account the dynamics of the ocean surface over a large `upstream' wave generation area. The goal of this work is to provide a methodology to easily characterize the area of influence of any particular ocean location worldwide. Moreover, the developed method is able to characterize the wave energy and travel time in that area. The method is based on a global scale analysis using both geographically and physically based criteria. The geographic criteria rely on the assumption that deep water waves travel along great circle paths. This limits the area of influence by neglecting energy that cannot reach a target point, as its path is blocked by land. The individual spectral partitions from a global wave reanalysis are used to reconstruct the spectral information and apply the physically based criteria. The criteria are based on the selection of the fraction of energy that travels towards the target point for each analysed grid point. The method has been tested on several locations worldwide. Results provide maps that inform about the relative importance of different oceanic areas to the local wave climate at any target point. This information cannot be inferred from local parameters and agrees with information from other approaches. The methodology may be useful in a number of applications, such as statistical downscaling, storm tracking and grid definition in numerical modelling.

  2. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Mapping of Relative Local Surface Temperatures with a Thin-Film Sensor Array.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Zhenhai; Mao, Xinyu; Zhang, Yinghuang; Huo, Xiaoye; Liu, Haixiao; Xu, Shengyong

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic mapping of an object's local temperature distribution may offer valuable information for failure analysis, system control and improvement. In this letter we present a computerized measurement system which is equipped with a hybrid, low-noise mechanical-electrical multiplexer for real-time two-dimensional (2D) mapping of surface temperatures. We demonstrate the performance of the system on a device embedded with 32 pieces of built-in Cr-Pt thin-film thermocouples arranged in a 4 × 8 matrix. The system can display a continuous 2D mapping movie of relative temperatures with a time interval around 1 s. This technique may find applications in a variety of practical devices and systems. PMID:27347969

  3. Array magnetics modal analysis for the DIII-D tokamak based on localized time-series modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, K. E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; Shiraki, D.; Volpe, F. A.; Humphreys, D. A.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Strait, E. J.; Welander, A. S.; Kolemen, E.; Okabayashi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Time-series analysis of magnetics data in tokamaks is typically done using block-based fast Fourier transform methods. This work presents the development and deployment of a new set of algorithms for magnetic probe array analysis. The method is based on an estimation technique known as stochastic subspace identification (SSI). Compared with the standard coherence approach or the direct singular value decomposition approach, the new technique exhibits several beneficial properties. For example, the SSI method does not require that frequencies are orthogonal with respect to the timeframe used in the analysis. Frequencies are obtained directly as parameters of localized time-series models. The parameters are extracted by solving small-scale eigenvalue problems. Applications include maximum-likelihood regularized eigenmode pattern estimation, detection of neoclassical tearing modes, including locked mode precursors, and automatic clustering of modes, and magnetics-pattern characterization of sawtooth pre- and postcursors, edge harmonic oscillations and fishbones.

  4. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Mapping of Relative Local Surface Temperatures with a Thin-Film Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Wang, Zhenhai; Mao, Xinyu; Zhang, Yinghuang; Huo, Xiaoye; Liu, Haixiao; Xu, Shengyong

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic mapping of an object’s local temperature distribution may offer valuable information for failure analysis, system control and improvement. In this letter we present a computerized measurement system which is equipped with a hybrid, low-noise mechanical-electrical multiplexer for real-time two-dimensional (2D) mapping of surface temperatures. We demonstrate the performance of the system on a device embedded with 32 pieces of built-in Cr-Pt thin-film thermocouples arranged in a 4 × 8 matrix. The system can display a continuous 2D mapping movie of relative temperatures with a time interval around 1 s. This technique may find applications in a variety of practical devices and systems. PMID:27347969

  5. Local time-space mesh refinement for simulation of elastic wave propagation in multi-scale media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, Victor; Lisitsa, Vadim; Reshetova, Galina; Tcheverda, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an original approach to local time-space grid refinement for the numerical simulation of wave propagation in models with localized clusters of micro-heterogeneities. The main features of the algorithm are the application of temporal and spatial refinement on two different surfaces; the use of the embedded-stencil technique for the refinement of grid step with respect to time; the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)-based interpolation to couple variables for spatial mesh refinement. The latter makes it possible to perform filtration of high spatial frequencies, which provides stability in the proposed finite-difference schemes. In the present work, the technique is implemented for the finite-difference simulation of seismic wave propagation and the interaction of such waves with fluid-filled fractures and cavities of carbonate reservoirs. However, this approach is easy to adapt and/or combine with other numerical techniques, such as finite elements, discontinuous Galerkin method, or finite volumes used for approximation of various types of linear and nonlinear hyperbolic equations.

  6. Improvements in localized proton NMR spectroscopy of human brain. Water suppression, short echo times, and 1 ml resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, J.; Michaelis, T.; Merboldt, K. D.; Bruhn, H.; Gyngell, M. L.; Hänicke, W.

    Considerable technical improvements are reported for localized proton NMR spectroscopy using stimulated echoes. When compared to previous results, proton NMR spectra of the human brain are now obtainable (i) with in vivo water suppression factors of ⩾1000, (ii) with only minor T2 losses and negligible distortions due to J modulation at short echo times of 10-20 ms, and (iii) from volumes of interest as small as 1-8 ml within measuring times of 1-10 min. As a consequence, the detection of cerebral metabolites is greatly facilitated. This particularly applies to the assignment of those resonances (e.g., glutamate, taurine, inositols) that suffer from strong spin-spin coupling at the field strengths commonly in use for NMR in man. Studies of regional metabolite differences, tissue heterogeneity, and focal lesions in patients benefit from the increased spatial resolution and a concomitant reduction of partial volume effects. Localized proton NMR spectroscopy was performed on young healthy volunteers. Experiments were carried out on a 2.0 T whole-body MRI/MRS system using the standard headcoil for both imaging and spectroscopy.

  7. Locally non-uniform finite-difference time domain with application to stealth, crosstalk, and narrow apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, D. J.

    1993-04-01

    A technique to integrate a dense, locally non-uniform mesh into finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) codes is presented. The method is designed for the full-wave analysis of multi-material layers that are physically thin, but perhaps electrically thick. Such layers are often used for the purpose of suppressing electromagnetic reflections from conducting surfaces. Throughout the non-uniform local mesh, average values for the conductivity and permittivity are used, where as variations in permeability are accommodated by splitting H-field line integrals and enforcing continuity of the normal B field. A unique interpolation scheme provides accuracy and late-time stability for mesh discontinuities as large as 1000 to 1. Application is made to resistive sheets, the absorbing Salisbury screen, crosstalk on printed circuit boards, and apertures that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to a uniform cell. Where appropriate, comparisons are made with the MoM code CARLOS and transmission-line theory. The hybrid mesh formulation has been highly optimized for both vector and parallel-processing on Cray Y-MP architectures.

  8. Locally non-uniform finite-difference time domain with application to stealth, crosstalk, and narrow apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.J.

    1993-04-01

    A technique to integrate a dense, locally non-uniform mesh into finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) codes is presented. The method is designed for the full-wave analysis of multi-material layers that are physically thin, but perhaps electrically thick. Such layers are often used for the purpose of suppressing electromagnetic reflections from conducting surfaces. Throughout the non-uniform local mesh, average values for the conductivity and permittivity are used, where as variations in permeability are accommodated by splitting H-field line integrals and enforcing continuity of the normal B field. A unique interpolation scheme provides accuracy and late-time stability for mesh discontinuities as large as 1000 to 1. Application is made to resistive sheets, the absorbing Salisbury screen, crosstalk on printed circuit boards, and apertures that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to a uniform cell. Where appropriate, comparisons are made with the MoM code CARLOS and transmission-line theory. The hybrid mesh formulation has been highly optimized for both vector and parallel-processing on Cray YMP architectures.

  9. Analysis and design of modified window shapes for S-transform to improve time-frequency localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianping; Jiang, Jin

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with window design issues for modified S-transform (MST) to improve the performance of time-frequency analysis (TFA). After analyzing the drawbacks of existing window functions, a window design technique is proposed. The technique uses a sigmoid function to control the window width in frequency domain. By proper selection of certain tuning parameters of a sigmoid function, windows with different width profiles can be obtained for multi-component signals. It is also interesting to note that the MST algorithm can be considered as a special case of a generalized method that adds a tunable shaping function to the standard window in frequency domain to meet specific frequency localization needs. The proposed design technique has been validated on a physical vibration test system using signals with different characteristics. The results have demonstrated that the proposed MST algorithm has superior time-frequency localization capabilities over standard ST, as well as other classical TFA methods. Subsequently, the proposed MST algorithm is applied to vibration monitoring of pipes in a water supply process controlled by a diaphragm pump for fault detection purposes.

  10. Library Users' Service Desires: A LibQUAL+ Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce; Kyrillidou, Martha; Cook, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to explore library users' desired service quality levels on the twenty-two core LibQUAL+ items. Specifically, we explored similarities and differences in users' desired library service quality levels across user groups (i.e., undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty), across geographic locations (i.e.,…

  11. "Non-Coercive Rearrangements": Theorizing Desire in TESOL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motha, Suhanthie; Lin, Angel

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that at the center of every English language learning moment lies desire: desire for the language; for the identities that English represents; for capital, power, and images that are associated with English; for what is believed to lie beyond the doors that English unlocks. However, despite its centrality within…

  12. Social Desirability, Environmental Attitudes, and General Ecological Behaviour in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oerke, Britta; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Socially desirable responses have been widely discussed as potentially biasing self-reported measures of environmental attitude and behaviour assessment. The direct and moderating effect of social desirability on children has not been analysed before. By applying a Lie scale together with a two-factor environmental attitude set measure and a scale…

  13. Breaking up with Deleuze: Desire and Valuing the Irreconcilable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuck, Eve

    2010-01-01

    In this article, Eve Tuck grapples with Gilles Deleuze's conceptualization of desire, finding it simultaneously generative and unsatisfying. Recognizing that Deleuze will not "say" what Tuck wants him to say about desire--that it is smart, and constitutes expertise--Tuck reasons that there is only one thing she can do: break up with Deleuze. The…

  14. Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Desire to Marry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South, Scott J.

    1993-01-01

    Used data from over 2,000 respondents to explore racial, ethnic, and gender differences in desire to marry. African Americans were significantly less desiring of marriage than whites; racial difference among men was significantly larger than difference among women. Compared to nonhispanic whites of same gender, Hispanic men were more likely,…

  15. Neural Correlates of Belief- and Desire-Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, David; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Wellman, Henry M.

    2009-01-01

    Theory of mind requires an understanding of both desires and beliefs. Moreover, children understand desires before beliefs. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying this developmental lag. Additionally, previous neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have neglected the direct comparison of these developmentally critical mental-state…

  16. Understanding the Desirability of English Language Education in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Chao-Ling

    2008-01-01

    The popularity and desirability of English language education has become somewhat unbeatable in Taiwan. This article seeks to understand the multiple threads of reasoning systems that come together to constitute and sustain the desirability of English learning. It conceptualizes that language education is more than teaching and learning a…

  17. Patterns of Workplace Supervisor Support Desired by Abused Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Nancy A.; Yragui, Nanette L.; Hanson, Ginger C.; Glass, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand differences in patterns of supervisor support desired by female victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) and to examine whether the pattern of support desired at work is reflective of a woman's stage of change in the abusive relationship, IPV-related work interference, and IPV-related job reprimands or…

  18. Intergalactic Encounters: Desire and the Political Immediacy of Children's Drawing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The author of this article creates a semblance between Deleuze and Guattari's conception of a politics of desire and the four realities, as outlined by Brent and Marjorie Wilson. By making this theoretical move, the author advances the idea that children's drawing unfolds from one moment to the next through the assemblages of desire that are most…

  19. Human Sexual Desire Disorder: Do We Have a Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNab, Warren L.; Henry, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD), loss of sexual desire for sexual activity, is one of the most common sexual dysfunctions of men and women in the United States. This article presents an overview of this specific sexual dysfunction including incidence, possible causes, treatment options, and the role of the health educator in addressing…

  20. Bibliotherapy for Low Sexual Desire: Evidence for Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Laurie B.; Balzer, Alexandra M.; Zhao, Xinting; Bush, Hannah E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of bibliotherapy for low sexual desire among women, which is the most frequent sexual concern brought to counselors. Forty-five women responded to an advertisement for participation in a study on low sexual desire and were assigned to either the intervention or the wait-list control group. The intervention…

  1. The neural basis of desire reasoning for self and others: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qin; Li, Peng; Li, Fuhong; Wang, Qi; Cao, Bihua; Li, Hong

    2016-01-20

    Theory of mind refers to the ability to attribute mental states to self and others, and predict actions in terms of mental states. It is still unclear how certain kinds of processing occur in theory of mind operation. The present study compared neural activities elicited by desire reasoning for self and for others under consistent or inconsistent conditions using the event-related potential method. The results showed that the late positive component (LPC) associated with desire reasoning was larger during the 450-550 ms time period in the condition of reasoning for self than that for others when desires were inconsistent. A left hemisphere effect on the scalp distribution was observed for the LPC component. The present study showed that a left frontal LPC component might reflect the subjective categorization process in desire reasoning. PMID:26619233

  2. Wishful seeing: more desired objects are seen as closer.

    PubMed

    Balcetis, Emily; Dunning, David

    2010-01-01

    Although people assume that they see the surrounding environment as it truly is, we suggest that perception of the natural environment is dependent upon the internal goal states of perceivers. Five experiments demonstrated that perceivers tend to see desirable objects (i.e., those that can fulfill immediate goals-a water bottle to assuage their thirst, money they can win, a personality test providing favorable feedback) as physically closer to them than less desirable objects. Biased distance perception was revealed through verbal reports and through actions toward the object (e.g., underthrowing a beanbag at a desirable object). We suggest that seeing desirable objects as closer than less desirable objects serves the self-regulatory function of energizing the perceiver to approach objects that fulfill needs and goals. PMID:20424036

  3. Heritability of Health and Aging Limitations on Personally Desired Activities

    PubMed Central

    Gurland, Barry J.; Page, William; Small, Brent; McArdle, John J.; Plassman, Brenda L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate heritability of incident limitations on personally desired activities within the eighth decade of life. We measured self-rated ability to perform ten personally desired activities in 1606 male veteran twin pairs at baseline and four years later. At follow-up, 33% of the cohort reported more limitations in desired activities. Among twins who completed both assessments, there were no statistically significant differences in incidence rates of limitations as a function of zygosity. Sensitivity tests showed the same for change scores; and that, if cognitive impairment or death are deemed to belong among limitations of desired activities, zygosity contributed 10% to new limitations at follow-up. Maintaining personally desired activities over four years in the eighth decade is not subject to substantial genetic influence. However, if death and cognitive impairment are added to incident limitations, then genetics plays a modest role. In all cases, unique environment is the predominant influence. PMID:26973959

  4. Social desirability in personality inventories: Symptoms, diagnosis and prescribed cure

    PubMed Central

    Bäckström, Martin; Björklund, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of social desirability in personality assessment is presented. Starting with the symptoms, Study 1 showed that mean ratings of graded personality items are moderately to strongly linearly related to social desirability (Self Deception, Impression formation, and the first Principal Component), suggesting that item popularity may be a useful heuristic tool for identifying items which elicit socially desirable responding. We diagnose the cause of socially desirable responding as an interaction between the evaluative content of the item and enhancement motivation in the rater. Study 2 introduced a possible cure; evaluative neutralization of items. To test the feasibility of the method lay psychometricians (undergraduates) reformulated existing personality test items according to written instructions. The new items were indeed lower in social desirability while essentially retaining the five factor structure and reliability of the inventory. We conclude that although neutralization is no miracle cure, it is simple and has beneficial effects. PMID:23252410

  5. TreeMAC: Localized TDMA MAC protocol for real-time high-data-rate sensor networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Huang, R.; Shirazi, B.; LaHusen, R.

    2009-01-01

    Earlier sensor network MAC protocols focus on energy conservation in low-duty cycle applications, while some recent applications involve real-time high-data-rate signals. This motivates us to design an innovative localized TDMA MAC protocol to achieve high throughput and low congestion in data collection sensor networks, besides energy conservation. TreeMAC divides a time cycle into frames and each frame into slots. A parent node determines the children's frame assignment based on their relative bandwidth demand, and each node calculates its own slot assignment based on its hop-count to the sink. This innovative 2-dimensional frame-slot assignment algorithm has the following nice theory properties. First, given any node, at any time slot, there is at most one active sender in its neighborhood (including itself). Second, the packet scheduling with TreeMAC is bufferless, which therefore minimizes the probability of network congestion. Third, the data throughput to the gateway is at least 1/3 of the optimum assuming reliable links. Our experiments on a 24-node testbed show that TreeMAC protocol significantly improves network throughput, fairness, and energy efficiency compared to TinyOS's default CSMA MAC protocol and a recent TDMA MAC protocol Funneling-MAC. Partial results of this paper were published in Song, Huang, Shirazi and Lahusen [W.-Z. Song, R. Huang, B. Shirazi, and R. Lahusen, TreeMAC: Localized TDMA MAC protocol for high-throughput and fairness in sensor networks, in: The 7th Annual IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications, PerCom, March 2009]. Our new contributions include analyses of the performance of TreeMAC from various aspects. We also present more implementation detail and evaluate TreeMAC from other aspects. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Prognostic Value of Triple-Negative Phenotype at the Time of Locally Recurrent, Conservatively Treated Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, Rahul R.; Housman, Douglas; Yang Qifeng; Toppmeyer, Deborah; Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic value of triple-negative (TN) ER, PR, Her2/neu basal-like carcinoma of the breast, at the time of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) after conservative surgery and radiation treatment (RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray was constructed of 47 IBTR specimens of patients who experienced an IBTR after conservative surgery and RT that were processed and stained for ER, PR, and HER2/neu. Results: At a median post-recurrence follow-up of 7.5 years, the 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease metastasis-free survival (DMFS) after IBTR were 91.4% and 83.0%, respectively. Median time to tumor recurrence (TTR) and IBTR was shorter in the TN phenotype (3.88 vs. 5.00 years; p = 0.09). The TN tumors were not associated with size of local recurrence or recurrence elsewhere in the breast. Despite administration of standard chemotherapy at the time of IBTR, the 5-year DMFS and 5-year OS for the TN cohort were 48.6% and 72.7%, respectively. The 5-year DMFS was 48.6% for TN tumors and 90.8% for non-TN tumors (p < 0.01). By univariate analysis, significant factors associated with poor 5-year DMFS and OS after IBTR included: TN phenotype (p < 0.01), TTR 3 years or less (p < 0.01), local recurrence at or near the original tumor site (p = 0.08). In multivariate analysis, TN was a significant independent predictor of poorer 5-year DMFS (relative risk, 5.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.83-19.01; p < 0.01) after IBTR. Conclusions: Although patients experiencing an IBTR have a relatively favorable prognosis, those with IBTR events of the TN phenotype had a rather poor prognosis despite receiving standard chemotherapy. Strategies with novel systemic therapies to improve outcomes in patients experiencing IBTR of the TN phenotype are warranted.

  7. Perceptions of desirable graduate competencies for science and technology new graduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Richard K.; Zegwaard, Karsten E.

    2006-05-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) programmes that combine on-campus classroom-based study with off-campus authentic work experience are a growing area of interest internationally. Despite widespread practice of WIL, there are few reports that shed light on appropriate pedagogies for the work experience in particular. As with any form of education, providers hold certain views as to desirable outcomes in terms of graduate profiles and of desirable graduate competencies. A complication for multi-party WIL programmes is that educational stakeholders (e.g., staff working in tertiary education provider institutions and employers) may hold different views as to desirable graduate competencies. Here we argue that an understanding of stakeholder views of desirable graduate competencies is an essential prerequisite of pedagogical design. The research reported here is an intrinsic case study and comprised an investigation of perceptions of 24 desirable graduate competencies for new science and technology graduates entering the workforce both today, and in ten years’ time. Stakeholders for four sector stakeholder groups (n = 458): undergraduate students (n = 71), recent graduates (n = 143), employers of graduates (n = 172), and faculty (n = 72), were surveyed using a previously reported and validated instrument. The research findings suggest that science and technology stakeholders see all 24 competencies as desirable, and see the importance of all skills and some skills in particular as likely to increase in ten years’ time. Despite emphasis on cognitive and technical skills (often termed ‘hard’ skills), the single most desirable skill is ability and willingness to learn, a behavioural skill (often termed ‘soft’ skills). It is proposed that classroom-based instruction is unlikely to produce graduates with the desired skills, and that work-integrated learning may have a role to play in the development of graduate competencies.

  8. TreeMAC: Localized TDMA MAC protocol for real-time high-data-rate sensor networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Huang, R.; Shirazi, B.; Husent, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Earlier sensor network MAC protocols focus on energy conservation in low-duty cycle applications, while some recent applications involve real-time high-data-rate signals. This motivates us to design an innovative localized TDMA MAC protocol to achieve high throughput and low congestion in data collection sensor networks, besides energy conservation. TreeMAC divides a time cycle into frames and frame into slots. Parent determines children's frame assigmnent based on their relative bandwidth demand, and each node calculates its own slot assignment based on its hop-count to the sink. This innovative 2-dimensional frame-slot assignment algorithm has the following nice theory properties. Firstly, given any node, at any time slot, there is at most one active sender in its neighborhood (includ ing itself). Secondly, the packet scheduling with TreelMAC is bufferless, which therefore minimizes the probability of network congestion. Thirdly, the data throughput to gateway is at least 1/3 of the optimum assuming reliable links. Our experiments on a 24 node test bed demonstrate that TreeMAC protocol significantly improves network throughput and energy efficiency, by comparing to the TinyOS's default CSMA MAC protocol and a recent TDMA MAC protocol Funneling-MAC[8]. ?? 2009 IEEE.

  9. On the depletion and accretion time-scales of cold gas in local early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Timothy A.; Bureau, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We consider what can be learnt about the processes of gas accretion and depletion from the kinematic misalignment between the cold/warm gas and stars in local early-type galaxies. Using simple analytic arguments and a toy model of the processes involved, we show that the lack of objects with counter-rotating gas reservoirs strongly constrains the relaxation, depletion and accretion time-scales of gas in early-type galaxies. Standard values of the accretion rate, star-formation efficiency and relaxation rate are not simultaneously consistent with the observed distribution of kinematic misalignments. To reproduce that distribution, both fast gas depletion (tdep ≲ 108 yr; e.g. more efficient star formation) and fast gas destruction (e.g. by active galactic nucleus feedback) can be invoked, but both also require a high rate of gas-rich mergers (>1 Gyr-1). Alternatively, the relaxation of misaligned material could happen over very long time-scales (≃100 dynamical times or ≈1-5 Gyr). We explore the various physical processes that could lead to fast gas depletion and/or slow gas relaxation, and discuss the prospects of using kinematic misalignments to probe gas-rich accretion processes in the era of large integral-field spectroscopic surveys.

  10. Optical frequency comb-based local oscillator phase noise cancellation in time-delay-interferometer for gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Nan

    Time-delay-interferometer (TDI) is well established as an effective technique to mitigate laser phase noises in laser interferometer gravitational wave detection (GWD). Just as important in the TDI scheme is the ability to suppress the rf local oscillator noise (LO) in the optical heterodyne measurements. We show that LO noises can be effectively and elegantly cancelled by employing optical frequency combs in which the rf signal phases are coherent with the optical phases. In addition, the deployment of optical combs eliminates the need for separate ultra-stable oscillators. This is a simpler and more reliable approach than the modulation scheme, and it can be applied to the most generalized TDI combinations. In this proposed effort, we will investigate the application of optical combs in TDI and demonstrate in a test bed simultaneous noise cancellations in both ranging lasers and rf LOs in a generalized TDI configuration.

  11. Time Measurement of Local Photorefractive Response of a Medium Using the π Shift of an Interference Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    A method for the measurement of the recording/erasing time of dynamic phase gratings that are recorded by phase-modulated beams in photorefractive medium with local response is presented. The method is based on the detection of the intensity modulation of output beams in the course of rerecording of the grating after a shift of the interference pattern by one-half of spatial period. It is demonstrated that a relatively high sensitivity of the method is due to the selective detection of signals at a high frequency and a high efficiency of energy exchange of the recording beams in comparison with the diffraction of the probe beam. The application of the method in dynamic holographic seismographs is discussed.

  12. A Dyadic Operator for the Gradation of Desirability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piolle, Guillaume

    We propose a normal modal deontic logic based on a dyadic operator, similar in structure to the temporal "until". By bringing significant expressiveness to the logic, it allows both the definition of a monadic desirability operator similar to the SDL obligation, and the expression of the relative level of desirability of target formulae. The interpretation of this logic on a linear structure of worlds ordered by desirability makes its semantics more intuitive and concrete than the SDL deontic accessibility relation. We also show that the core modality of the logic permits to represent the Chisholm and Forrester paradoxes of deontic logic in a more precise way, which does not lead to inconsistencies.

  13. Local and Catchment-Scale Water Storage Changes in Northern Benin Deduced from Gravity Monitoring at Various Time-Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderer, J.; Hector, B.; Séguis, L.; Descloitres, M.; Cohard, J.; Boy, J.; Calvo, M.; Rosat, S.; Riccardi, U.; Galle, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water storage changes (WSC) are investigated by the mean of gravity monitoring in Djougou, northern Benin, in the frame of the GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) project. In this area, WSC are 1) part of the control system for evapotranspiration (ET) processes, a key variable of the West-African monsoon cycle and 2) the state variable for resource management, a critical issue in storage-poor hard rock basement contexts such as in northern Benin. We show the advantages of gravity monitoring for analyzing different processes in the water cycle involved at various time and space scales, using the main gravity sensors available today (FG5 absolute gravimeter, superconducting gravimeter -SG- and CG5 micro-gravimeter). The study area is also part of the long-term observing system AMMA-Catch, and thus under intense hydro-meteorological monitoring (rain, soil moisture, water table level, ET ...). Gravity-derived WSC are compared at all frequencies to hydrological data and to hydrological models calibrated on these data. Discrepancies are analyzed to discuss the pros and cons of each approach. Fast gravity changes (a few hours) are significant when rain events occur, and involve different contributions: rainfall itself, runoff, fast subsurface water redistribution, screening effect of the gravimeter building and local topography. We investigate these effects and present the statistical results of a set of rain events recorded with the SG installed in Djougou since July 2010. The intermediate time scale of gravity changes (a few days) is caused by ET and both vertical and horizontal water redistribution. The integrative nature of gravity measurements does not allow to separate these different contributions, and the screening from the shelter reduces our ability to retrieve ET values. Also, atmospheric corrections are critical at such frequencies, and deserve some specific attention. However, a quick analysis of gravity changes following rain events shows that the

  14. Continuous, high-resolution spatial mapping of water isotopes: improving tools for quantifying local evaporation and residence times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffrey A.; Winkler, Renato; Downing, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Bergamaschi, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotopes of water (d2H, d18O) are unique tracers of many hydrological processes including evaporation, precipitation, reservoir mixing and residence time. Historically, discrete water samples have been collected and analyzed via either Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, or more recently laser-based spectroscopic methods, such as Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). However, the analysis of discrete samples precludes the ability to construct high resolution water isotope data sets through time and space. By coupling a recently developed front-end peripheral device (Continuous Water Sampler or CWS) to a CRDS analyzer (Picarro L2130-i), we continuously measured and spatially mapped water isotopes on a transect of the Sacramento River Delta following an extended period of drought. More than two-thousand five-second average d18O and d2H measurements were made aboard the R/V King (USGS) over a six-hour period. In addition to water isotopes, nitrate, chlorophyll, dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence, and other water quality parameters were also measured continuously. As you travel northeast up the delta, surface waters become progressively more enriched in 18O and 2H, while nitrate decreased in concentration and chlorophyll and DOM increased. We utilize the spatially-mapped isotope data within a single transect to understand local evaporation and residence time by (i) utilizing the secondary parameter, d-excess, and (ii) using a simple mass balance model of water moving through the system (inflow, outflow and evaporation). Additional transects, to be conducted during the rainy season, should highlight how the Delta system evolves seasonally. In concert with other data previously collected from the Sacramento River Delta, we suggest the lower region represents a mixture of river waters derived from the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the more marine waters from the mouth of the San Francisco Bay. Moving NE up the Delta into shallow sloughs through flooded wetlands

  15. What’s in a Kiss? The Effect of Romantic Kissing on Mate Desirability

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarski, Rafael; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2015-01-01

    Past research suggests that various courtship rituals, such as romantic kissing, may convey useful mate quality information. Two studies were carried out to examine how purported romantic kissing abilities, as a potential cue to some form of mate information, affect appraisals of potential mating partners. In Experiment 1, 724 participants were presented with vignette descriptions of potential mating partners and were asked to rate partner desirability for various mating-related situations. The primary result of this experiment was that purported kissing ability increased mate desirability in “casual sex” mating situations for women to a greater extent than for men. Experiment 2 repeated the same procedure with another 178 participants, this time including visual information alongside vignette descriptions containing kissing-related information to examine the relative effects of these two modalities. It was found that the presence of a picture alongside a descriptive vignette negated the effect of kissing-related information only when rating potential partners on attractiveness or desirability for further courtship, though not when evaluating partners for casual sex or long-term relationship scenarios. Visual information containing “attractive” photos of potential partners was also found to have a greater effect on men’s ratings of partner desirability than on women’s ratings of partner desirability. The results are discussed in light of romantic kissing’s potential function of conveying important mate quality and desirability information, and its relative role in the presence of additional visual mate cues. PMID:25299759

  16. Fertility desires and intentions of HIV-positive patients at a suburban specialist center.

    PubMed Central

    Oladapo, Olufemi T.; Daniel, Olusoji J.; Odusoga, Okanlawon L.; Ayoola-Sotubo, Oluwafayokemi

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the extent of fertility desires and intentions of HIV-positive patients receiving care at a suburban specialist clinic and assess how these may vary by their sociodemographic and health-related factors. METHODS: Questionnaire-based interview of a consecutive sample of HIV-positive men (18-55 years) and HIV-positive women (18-45 years) who presented at the HIV clinic of the Center for Special Studies, Sagamu, Nigeria, between November and December 2004. RESULTS: 63.3% of the 147 studied participants expressed the desire for childbearing, even though 50.4% of them already had > or = 2 children. Respectively, 71.5% and 93.8% of men and women who desired children intended to have > or = 2 in the near future. Only 4.3% of those who desired children did not intend to have any. All 30 individuals who had no children intended to bear children in the future, and they constituted 32.3% of those who expressed the desire for childbearing. Multivariate logistic regression analyses of associated factors indicated that decreasing age, shorter time since diagnosis of HIV infection and nondisclosure of serostatus to current partner significantly increase the odds of desire for childbearing, while having no children and a poor most-recent CD4 count significantly increase the odds of intention to have > or = 3 children instead of 1-2. CONCLUSION: The extent of the fertility desires and intentions of these patients poses a threat to the preventive strategies against vertical and heterosexual transmission of HIV in this region. In view of their compelling desire for parenthood, it may be wise for caregivers to desist from the conventional systematic advice against pregnancy but, in addition to laying emphasis on the risks, provide adequate information on practicable reproductive options for HIV-positive individuals. PMID:16396059

  17. Treating Inhibited Sexual Desire: A Marital Therapy Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Linda Stone; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Defines inhibited sexual desire (ISD) as a relational phenomenon best treated in the marital context. Discusses ISD as it relates to the central marital issues of power, intimacy, and boundaries. (JAC)

  18. Time's Arrows Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitt, Steven F.

    1997-06-01

    Introduction; Part I. Cosmology and Time's Arrow: 1. Time, gravity, and quantum mechanics W. Unruh; 2. Cosmology, time's arrow, and that old double standard H. Price; Part II. Quantum Theory and Time's Arrow: 3. Time's arrow and the quantum measurement problem A. Leggett; 4. Time, decoherence, and 'reversible' measurements P. Stamp; 5. Time flows, non-locality, and measurement in quantum mechanics S. McCall; 6. Stochastically branching spacetime topology R. Douglas; Part III. Thermodynamics and Time's Arrow: 7. The elusive object of desire: in pursuit of the kinetic equations and the second law L. Sklar; 8. Time in experience and in theoretical description of the world L. Sklar; 9. When and why does entropy increase? M. Barrett and E. Sober; Part IV. Time Travel and Time's Arrow: 10. Closed causal chains P Horwich; 11. Recent work on time travel J. Earman.

  19. Developing appreciation for ambivalence: the understanding of concurrent conflicting desires in 4- to 7-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Rostad, Kristin; Pexman, Penny M

    2014-06-01

    The current experiment examined the development of children's ability to comprehend concurrent conflicting desires (i.e., both wanting and not wanting something at the same time). Participants were 4- to 7-year-old children and a group of undergraduate students (N = 20 in each age group). Results showed that the 6- and 7-year-old children understood concurrent conflicting desires at levels that were well above chance. There was evidence that even some of the 5-year-olds exhibited an emerging comprehension of conflicting desires. However, the 4-year-old children showed little ability to appreciate conflicting desire states. As such, children showed appreciation for conflicting desires at younger ages than suggested by previous research. In addition, significant relationships were observed between children's concurrent conflicting desire understanding and their theory of mind (ToM) and executive functioning (EF) skills, even after controlling for chronological and verbal age. PMID:24708406

  20. You can’t always want what you get: Children’s intuitions about ownership and desire

    PubMed Central

    Noles, Nicholaus S.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Ownership is a central element of human experience. The present experiments were designed to examine the influence of psychological state on ownership judgments. In three experiments, 4-year-olds were asked to make ownership attributions about owners and non-owners who either desired or did not desire a gift. Despite exhibiting a clear sensitivity to the desires of others, children made accurate ownership attributions independent of individuals’ desires. At the same time, there are subtle influences of desires on children’s ownership judgments, as well as subtle influences of ownership on children’s desire judgments. Thus, the two factors are largely but not wholly distinct in young children’s thinking. PMID:25018586

  1. Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties

    DOEpatents

    Ally, Moonis R.; Braunstein, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

  2. An efficient locally one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method based on the conformal scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao-Kun; Shao, Wei; Shi, Sheng-Bing; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Bing-Zhong

    2015-07-01

    An efficient conformal locally one-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (LOD-CFDTD) method is presented for solving two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic (EM) scattering problems. The formulation for the 2D transverse-electric (TE) case is presented and its stability property and numerical dispersion relationship are theoretically investigated. It is shown that the introduction of irregular grids will not damage the numerical stability. Instead of the staircasing approximation, the conformal scheme is only employed to model the curve boundaries, whereas the standard Yee grids are used for the remaining regions. As the irregular grids account for a very small percentage of the total space grids, the conformal scheme has little effect on the numerical dispersion. Moreover, the proposed method, which requires fewer arithmetic operations than the alternating-direction-implicit (ADI) CFDTD method, leads to a further reduction of the CPU time. With the total-field/scattered-field (TF/SF) boundary and the perfectly matched layer (PML), the radar cross section (RCS) of two 2D structures is calculated. The numerical examples verify the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61331007 and 61471105).

  3. Spectral narrowing and spin echo for localized carriers with heavy-tailed Lévy distribution of hopping times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Z.; Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    We study analytically the free induction decay and the spin echo decay originating from the localized carriers moving between the sites which host random magnetic fields. Due to disorder in the site positions and energies, the on-site residence times, τ , are widely spread according to the Lévy distribution. The power-law tail ∝τ-1 -α in the distribution of τ does not affect the conventional spectral narrowing for α >2 but leads to a dramatic acceleration of the free induction decay in the domain 2 >α >1 . The next abrupt acceleration of the decay takes place as α becomes smaller than 1. In the latter domain the decay does not follow a simple-exponent law. To capture the behavior of the average spin in this domain, we solve the evolution equation for the average spin using the approach different from the conventional approach based on the Laplace transform. Unlike the free induction decay, the tail in the distribution of the residence times leads to the slow decay of the spin echo. The echo is dominated by realizations of the carrier motion for which the number of sites, visited by the carrier, is minimal.

  4. The impact of Local Authorities' interventions on household waste collection: a case study approach using time series modelling.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christine; Quddus, Mohammed; Wheatley, Andrew; Osmani, Mohamed; Kay, Kath

    2014-02-01

    At a local Government level there have been many interventions and changes made to household waste collection services to meet new regulatory requirements. These changes include separate collection of recyclable and organic materials. This paper has used a time series model to quantify the success of interventions introduced by a LA. The case study was a medium sized UK LA, Charnwood Borough Council (CBC), the research analyses monthly data of quantities of recyclates, garden waste for composting and residual waste for landfill disposal. The time series model was validated with a five year data set and used to measure the impacts of the various changes to identify which intervention was the most successful, while controlling for season and number of working days. The results show the interventions analysed both had abrupt and permanent positive impacts on the yield of recyclable materials, and a corresponding negative impact on the residual waste. The model could be added to the National data base to help LAs to compare interventions and to understand which schemes encourage householder participation and improve recycling performance. PMID:24256716

  5. Self-contained diffuse optical imaging system for real-time detection and localization of vascular occlusions.

    PubMed

    Pollonini, Luca; Forseth, Kiefer J; Dacso, Clifford C; Parazynski, Scott E; Friedman, Jeffrey D

    2015-08-01

    Free flap surgery is a procedure where healthy tissue is transferred from a donor site to a recipient site of the body to fill a defect without maintaining the original blood supply to the flap. The anastomosis of the vascular network of the flap to the blood vessels adjacent to the recipient site has associated risks of arterial and/or venous occlusions that must be promptly detected to avoid temporary or permanent tissue damage. In this work, we present a skin-contact diffusion optical imaging (DOI) system able to continuously provide a three-dimensional representation of the flap oxygenation to promptly detect vascular occlusions potentially occurring in the flap. Multiple near-infrared LEDs and photodetectors were embedded into a self-contained optical sensor for prolonged monitoring of concentration changes of oxygenated (HbO) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (HbR) at multiple locations and depths. A time-efficient algorithm mapped measured oxygenation changes in a three-dimensional volume to allow surgeons and clinical personnel to detect and localize abnormal blood perfusion changes during or after surgery, in time for corrective intervention. The image reconstruction algorithm was validated using computerized flap models in which oxygenation was synthetically altered, whereas the optical system was preliminarily tested on a healthy forearm simulating a flap undergoing arterial and venous occlusions, proving the feasibility of implementing DOI in the form of a wearable patch for prolonged perfusion monitoring. PMID:26737630

  6. Local Polarization Dynamics and Bias-Induced Phase Transitions in Ferroelectric Relaxors: Time-resolved Spectroscopy and Ergodic Gap Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, S. V.; Rodriguez, B.; Nikiforov, M. P.; Balke, N.; Jesse, S.; Ovchinnikov, O. S.; Bokov, A. A.; Ye, Z.-G.

    2009-03-01

    Mesoscopic domain structure and dynamics in PMN-PT solis solutions is studied using spatially resolved time- and voltage spectroscopic imaging modes. For compositions close to the MPB, we observe the formation of classical ferroelectric domains with rough self-affine boundaries. In the ergodic phase (PMN and PMN-10PT), the formation of non-classical labyrinthine domain patterns characterized by a single characteristic length scale is observed. The (a) persistence of these patterns well above Tc and (b) the fact that cannot be switched by tip bias suggest that they can be attributed to the frozen polarization component. Spatial variability of polarization relaxation dynamics in PMN-10PT is studied. Local relaxation attributed to the reorientation of polar nanoregions was found to follow stretched exponential dependence, with β 0.4, much larger than the macroscopic value determined from dielectric spectra (β 0.09). The spatial inhomogeneity of relaxation time distribution with the presence of 100-200 nm ``fast'' and ``slow'' regions is observed. The results are analyzed to map the Vogel-Fulcher temperatures on the nanoscale. The applicability of this technique to map ``ergodic gap'' distribution on the surface is discussed. Research supported by the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC.

  7. Tracking Local Conformational Changes of Ribonuclease A Using Picosecond Time-Resolved Fluorescence of the Six Tyrosine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Melinda; Lima, João C.; Paci, Emanuele; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L.

    2007-01-01

    The six tyrosine residues of ribonuclease A (RNase A) are used as individual intrinsic probes for tracking local conformational changes during unfolding. The fluorescence decays of RNase A are well described by sums of three exponentials with decay times (τ1 = 1.7 ns, τ2 = 180 ps, and τ3 = 30 ps) and preexponential coefficients (A1 = 1, A2 = 1, and A3 = 4) at pH 7, 25°C. The decay times are controlled by photo-induced electron transfer from individual tyrosine residues to the nearest disulphide (–SS–), bridge, which is distance (R) dependent. We assign τ1 to Tyr-76 (R = 12.8 Å), τ2 to Tyr-115 (R = 6.9 Å), and τ3 to Tyr-25, Tyr-73, Tyr-92, and Tyr-97 (all four at R = 5.5 ± 0.3 Å) at 23°C. On the basis of this assignment, the results show that, upon thermal or chemical unfolding only Tyr-25, Tyr-92, and Tyr-76 undergo significant displacement from their nearest –SS– bridge. Despite reporting on different regions of the protein, the concordance between the transition temperatures, Tm, obtained from Tyr-76 (Tm = 59.2°C) and Tyr-25 and Tyr-92 (Tm = 58.2°C) suggests a single unfolding event in this temperature range that affects all these regions similarly. PMID:17384067

  8. Exploring the effects of sexual desire discrepancy among married couples.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Brian J; Farero, Adam M; Busby, Dean M

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have found associations between the individual discrepancy of desired sexual frequency and actual sexual frequency and relational outcomes among premarital couples. The present study extended this research by using a sample of 1,054 married couples to explore how actor and partner individual sexual desire discrepancy (SDD) scores were associated with relationship satisfaction, stability, communication, and conflict during marriage. All participants took an online survey which assessed both couple sexual dynamics and relationship outcomes. Findings suggested that higher actor individual SDD was generally associated with negative relational outcomes, including lower reported relationship satisfaction, stability, and more reported couple conflict. These effects were found after controlling for background factors, baseline sexual frequency and desire, and couple desire discrepancies. Some partner effects were also found and were generally in the same direction. Marital length did not moderate the effects found although gender moderated associations between individual SDD and reported couple communication. Negative associations between individual SDD and communication were particularly strong when the husband reported high discrepancies between desired and actual sexual frequency. Results suggested that higher individual sexual desire discrepancies among married individuals may undermine relationship well-being. Applications of these findings to a clinical setting are also discussed. PMID:24045904

  9. "This Way!", "No! That Way!"--3-Year Olds Know that Two People Can Have Mutually Incompatible Desires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In theory of mind research, there is a long standing dispute about whether children come to understand the subjectivity of both desires and beliefs at the same time (around age 4), or whether there is an asymmetry such that desires are understood earlier. To address this issue, 3-year olds' understanding of situations in which two persons have…

  10. A multiscale maximum entropy moment closure for locally regulated space-time point process models of population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Raghib, Michael; Hill, Nicholas A; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of structure in biological populations challenges fundamental assumptions at the heart of continuum models of population dynamics based only on mean densities (local or global). Individual-based models (IBMs) were introduced during the last decade in an attempt to overcome this limitation by following explicitly each individual in the population. Although the IBM approach has been quite useful, the capability to follow each individual usually comes at the expense of analytical tract ability, which limits the generality of the statements that can be made. For the specific case of spatial structure in populations of sessile (and identical) organisms, space-time point processes with local regulation seem to cover the middle ground between analytical tract ability and a higher degree of biological realism. This approach has shown that simplified representations of fecundity, local dispersal and density-dependent mortality weighted by the local competitive environment are sufficient to generate spatial patterns that mimic field observations. Continuum approximations of these stochastic processes try to distill their fundamental properties, and they keep track of not only mean densities, but also higher order spatial correlations. However, due to the non-linearities involved they result in infinite hierarchies of moment equations. This leads to the problem of finding a 'moment closure'; that is, an appropriate order of (lower order) truncation, together with a method of expressing the highest order density not explicitly modelled in the truncated hierarchy in terms of the lower order densities. We use the principle of constrained maximum entropy to derive a closure relationship for truncation at second order using normalisation and the product densities of first and second orders as constraints, and apply it to one such hierarchy. The resulting 'maxent' closure is similar to the Kirkwood superposition approximation, or 'power-3' closure, but it is

  11. Space Monitoring of air pollution using satellite time series: from a global view down to local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanorte, Antonio; Aromando, Angelo; Desantis, Fortunato; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of air pollution has been performed by different means over the years and, recently, the use of satellite data for detecting and monitoring atmospheric pollution has received considerable attention especially for application in industrial and urban areas. Methods based on satellite data (such as Landsat TM, SPOT MODIS images) are focused on the estimation of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) that is a measure of aerosol loading in the atmosphere, and therefore, it is considered as the main significant parameter of the presence/absence of atmospheric pollutants. A higher AOT value expresses the degree to which aerosols prevent the transmission of light, therefore, higher columnar of aerosol loading means lower visibility and higher aerosol concentration Several state-of-art aerosol retrieval techniques provide aerosol properties in global scale, as for example products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites. The current aerosol optical thickness (AOT) products from MODIS (available free of charge by the NASA web site) is 10 km. This product is suitable for global research, but it faces difficulty in local area research, especially in urban areas However, new aerosol retrieval algorithm for the (MODIS) 500m resolution data have been developed to retrieve aerosol properties over land, which helps on addressing the aerosol climatic issues in local/urban scale. Over the years, several algorithms for determining the aerosol optical thickness have been developed using several approaches and satellite sensors including medium (Landsat; ASTER) and high resolution imagery (IKONOS and Quickbird). A comparison of results from these methods and independent data sets has been performed in the Basilicata region in the framework of the MITRA project (ref). This research activity was conducted in order to analyze their temporal dynamics and reliability for systematically using them

  12. Time-dependent localization of high- and low-sulfated keratan sulfates in the song nuclei of developing zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Hisataka; Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Abe, Kentaro; Uchimura, Kenji; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Jinno, Shozo

    2015-11-01

    Keratan sulfate proteoglycans (KSPGs) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) consist of a protein core with covalently attached glycosaminoglycan side chain. Although CSPGs are known to regulate the end of the critical period, the role of KSPGs in brain development remains unclear. Young male zebra finches memorise song templates during development. The brain regions that are responsible for song learning, known as song nuclei, are recognized as a suitable model for the study of brain development. To understand the potential role of KSPGs, here we examined the localization of KSs with different degrees of sulfation in the brain of developing male zebra finches. Exclusively in the song nuclei, an increase in expression of 5-D-4-positive (5-D-4(+)) high-sulfated KS started after hatching, and reached a plateau at the end of the sensory period, during which the young bird listens to and memorises the song of an adult tutor. By contrast, weak and ubiquitous expression of BCD-4(+) low-sulfated KS remained unchanged until the end of the sensory period, and first increased in the song nuclei at the end of the sensorimotor period, during which the young bird produces plastic songs. Immunoblot analysis showed that phosphacan was a common core protein of 5-D-4(+) KS and BCD-4(+) KS. Finally, we confirmed that the sulfotransferase responsible for the synthesis of high-sulfated KS was exclusively localised in the song nuclei. Our observations suggest that time-dependent localization of KSPGs with different sulfation patterns in the song nuclei may underlie song learning in developing male zebra finches. PMID:26369722

  13. Anisotropic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle in the Taiwan region from local travel time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; Wu, Yih-Min

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan Island located in a contact zone between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates, the tectonic processes in this area are mostly controlled by the relative kinematics of these two plates. In the east, the Philippine Sea plate subducts northward under the Eurasian plate along the Ryukyu trench. Off the southern tip of Taiwan, the South China Sea subplate, part of the Eurasian plate, subducts eastward under the Philippine Sea plate underneath the Luzon Island. The Taiwan Island is located at the junction between these two subduction zones. Here we present anisotropic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle in the Taiwan region derived from local travel time tomography. We use more than 300 000 P and more than 150 000 S rays coming from 12910 earthquakes occurred in the Taiwan region and registered by 816 stations of different local Taiwanese seismic networks. The ANITA algorithm, for iterative nonlinear inversion of local earthquake data in orthorhombic anisotropic media with one predefined vertical orientation, was used for the tomographic inversion. This algorithm presumes anisotropy for only P velocity described as horizontally oriented ellipsoid. For S velocity we presume an isotropic model. Results show a good agreement with tectonic structure of the region. Obtained isotropic P and S velocity models show fit to each other. The most prominent features of the models are Philippine Sea plate characterized by increased velocities and decreased velocities observed along the Luzon and Ryukyu arcs. We observe that orientation of the fast velocity axis within the Philippine Sea plate coincides with direction of its displacement. Along the Luzon and Ryukyu arcs orientation of the fast velocities axis coincide with the arcs extension. The results show that upper mantle beneath the eastern Taiwan characterized by decreased velocities and N-S orientation of the fast velocity axis. The western Taiwan characterized by alteration of the relatively small negative

  14. Resolution for a local earthquake arrival time and ambient seismic noise tomography around the Eyjafjallajökull volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benediktsdóttir, Á.; Gudmundsson, Ö.; Tryggvason, A.; Bödvarsson, R.; Brandsdóttir, B.; Vogfjörd; K.; Sigmundsson, F.

    2012-04-01

    The explosive summit eruption of Eyjafjallajökull volcano from 14 April to end of May 2010 was preceded by an effusive flank eruption of the volcano (at Fimmvörðuháls) March 20th - April 12th. These eruptions culminated 18 years of recurrent volcanic unrest in the area, with extensive seismicity and high deformation rates since beginning of January 2010. A national network of seismic stations in Iceland (the SIL network), operated by he Icelandic Meteorological Office, monitored the precursors and development of the eruptions, in real time. We analyse a seismic dataset available from SIL stations in the vicinity of the eruption area, as well as data from additional portable stations that were deployed during a period of unrest in 1999 and just before and during the eruptions in 2010. The SIL system detected and located 2328 events between early March and late May 2010 in the area around Eyjafjallajökull. Here we present a preliminary evaluation of resolution for a local earthquake arrival time tomography. Adding the portable stations to the pre-existing SIL data set is crucial in order to identify more seismic events and improve the data coverage for tomography. We also present a resolution analysis for Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography (ASNT) in the area. In this method ambient seismic noise, recorded at two seismic stations, is cross-correlated. This band-limited approximation of the Green's function between two stations is used to estimate surface wave velocities. The fundamental assumptions underlying this method is that the noise is constructed from a randomly distributed wavefield, but this may be violated by volcanic tremor during the eruptions. We evaluate the robustness of inter-station correlograms as a function of time during the unrest period as well as their frequency content for evaluation of depth resolution. The results can be compared to constraints on magma movements inside the volcano based on interpretation of crustal deformation and

  15. Hungry for money: the desire for caloric resources increases the desire for financial resources and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Briers, Barbara; Pandelaere, Mario; Dewitte, Siegfried; Warlop, Luk

    2006-11-01

    This report attempts to provide an evolutionary explanation for humans' motivation to strive for money in present-day societies. We propose that people's desire for money is a modern derivate of their desire for food. In three studies, we show the reciprocal association between the incentive value of food and of money. In Study 1, hungry participants were less likely than satiated participants to donate to charity. In Study 2, participants in a room with an olfactory food cue, known to increase the desire to eat, offered less money in a give-some game compared with participants in a room free of scent. In Study 3, participants' desire for money affected the amount of M&M's they ate in a subsequent taste test, but only among participants who were not restricting their food intake in order to manage their weight. PMID:17176423

  16. Local Outer Radiating Boundary Conditions for the Finite-Difference Time-Domain Method Applied to Maxwell's Equations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steich, David James

    1995-01-01

    The Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method is a simple yet powerful method for numerically solving electromagnetic wave phenomenon on computers. The FDTD technique discretizes Maxwell's equations with finite difference equations. These finite difference equations, which approximate local field behavior, are applied to large spatial lattices allowing calculation of a vast array of electromagnetical phenomenon. The greatest strengths of the FDTD method are in its simplicity, efficiency, and diversity. FDTD is capable of modeling the scattering and coupling to lossy dielectrics, lossy magnetics, anisotropic media, dispersive media, and nonlinear materials for general geometric shapes. Wideband frequency information can be obtained using FDTD for both near and far field observation points in a single computational run. However, along with all of its benefits, the FDTD algorithm has some deficiencies. For most problems of interest, poor accuracy at geometry interfaces of differing media and at outer problem space boundarys where the spatial lattice must be truncated are the two largest error sources of the FDTD algorithm. Although most accuracy issues can be circumvented by expending large amounts of computer memory and cpu time, using excessive computer resources is not always possible and is never appealing. The purpose of this thesis is to generalize, analyze, and test various mainstream local Outer Radiating Boundary Conditions (ORBCs) for the FDTD method applied to Maxwell's equations in order to help gain a better understanding of present ORBC limitations. A common mathematical model is presented for the boundary conditions. Boundary conditions shown to fit the model include Mur, Superabsorption, Liao, Higdon, and Lindman ORBCs of varying orders. Simple operators are defined and then used to generate the final discretized equations for each of the boundary conditions, automatically, without requiring complicated high order equations. The procedure also allows

  17. Seven Years (2004-2011) of Cassini Measurements Reveal Strong Local Time Asymmetry of the Saturnian Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergis, N.; Krimigis, S.; Thomsen, M.; Roelof, E.; Mitchell, D.; Hamilton, D.; Krupp, N.; Dougherty, M.; Crary, F.

    2012-04-01

    The Saturnian ring current, initially inferred from magnetic field and particle measurements after the Voyager 1 and 2 flybys, has been studied in substantial detail via in-situ and remote measurements since the July 2004 Cassini orbit insertion. The ring current of Saturn, located between 7 and 15 RS and primarily composed of O+ ions, is characterized by increased suprathermal (> 3 keV) particle pressure with high (> 1) plasma β values and intense dynamic behavior, as revealed by the analysis of combined particle data from the Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer instrument (CAPS), and magnetic field measurements from the Cassini magnetometer (MAG). Among the most important findings so far is that the azimuthal ring current flows primarily to balance inertial centrifugal forces inside ~8 RS, but increasingly it is driven by the non-thermal pressure gradient beyond its maximum region (8-12 RS, 100-150 pA/m2) and certainly it dominates farther out. Beyond ~ 10RS, the non-thermal pressure decreases with radial distance faster than the previously assumed 1/r rate and results in a magnetic perturbation of 10-15 nT. In this work we present the most complete (2004-2011) and up-to-date results, focusing on the local time asymmetry of the ring current properties (e.g. particle pressure, current density), and the relative contribution of different components to the radial force balance. The comprehensive spatial and local time coverage provided by the Cassini orbits has revealed that the suprathermal pressure and its corresponding pressure gradient is higher by a factor of 3 to 8 on the night side, in agreement with the observed distribution of energetic particle injections and energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. In addition to in-situ measurements, ENA images from the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) of Cassini, offer a unique overview of large parts of the Saturnian magnetosphere, depicting the rotation and dynamics of the

  18. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Joycelin; Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  19. Automated determination of P-phase arrival times at regional and local distances using higher order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küperkoch, L.; Meier, T.; Lee, J.; Friederich, W.; Working Group, EGELADOS

    2010-05-01

    We present an algorithm for automatic P-phase arrival time determination for local and regional seismic events based on higher order statistics (HOS). Using skewness or kurtosis a characteristic function is determined to which a new iterative picking algorithm is applied. For P-phase identification we apply the Akaike Information Criterion to the characteristic function, while for a precise determination of the P-phase arrival time a pragmatic picking algorithm is applied to a recalculated characteristic function. In addition, an automatic quality estimate is obtained, based on the slope and the signal-to-noise ratio, both calculated from the characteristic function. To get rid of erroneous picks, a Jackknife procedure and an envelope function analysis is used. The algorithm is applied to a large data set with very heterogeneous qualities of P-onsets acquired by a temporary, regional seismic network of the EGELADOS-project in the southern Aegean. The reliability and robustness of the proposed algorithm is tested by comparing more than 3000 manually derived P readings, serving as reference picks, with the corresponding automatically estimated P-wave arrival times. We find an average deviation from the reference picks of 0.26 +/- 0.64s when using kurtosis and 0.38 +/- 0.75s when using skewness. If automatically as excellent classified picks are considered only, the average difference from the reference picks is 0.07 +/- 0.31s and 0.07 +/- 0.41s, respectively. However, substantially more P-arrival times are determined when using kurtosis, indicating that the characteristic function derived from kurtosis estimation is to be preferred. Since the characteristic function is calculated recursively, the algorithm is very fast and hence suited for earthquake early warning purposes. Furthermore, a comparative study with automatically derived P-readings using Allen's and Baer & Kradolfer's picking algorithms applied to the same data set demonstrates better quantitative and

  20. Desired emotions across cultures: A value-based account.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Maya; Schwartz, Shalom H; Cieciuch, Jan; Riediger, Michaela; Torres, Claudio; Scollon, Christie; Dzokoto, Vivian; Zhou, Xiaolu; Vishkin, Allon

    2016-07-01

    Values reflect how people want to experience the world; emotions reflect how people actually experience the world. Therefore, we propose that across cultures people desire emotions that are consistent with their values. Whereas prior research focused on the desirability of specific affective states or 1 or 2 target emotions, we offer a broader account of desired emotions. After reporting initial evidence for the potential causal effects of values on desired emotions in a preliminary study (N = 200), we tested the predictions of our proposed model in 8 samples (N = 2,328) from distinct world cultural regions. Across cultural samples, we found that people who endorsed values of self-transcendence (e.g., benevolence) wanted to feel more empathy and compassion, people who endorsed values of self-enhancement (e.g., power) wanted to feel more anger and pride, people who endorsed values of openness to change (e.g., self-direction) wanted to feel more interest and excitement, and people who endorsed values of conservation (e.g., tradition) wanted to feel more calmness and less fear. These patterns were independent of differences in emotional experience. We discuss the implications of our value-based account of desired emotions for understanding emotion regulation, culture, and other individual differences. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26524003

  1. Socially desirable responding on the web: investigating the candor hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Risko, Evan F; Quilty, Lena C; Oakman, Jonathan M

    2006-12-01

    The investigation presented here explores the hypothesis that participants are less likely to respond in a socially desirable fashion on self-report questionnaires completed on the Web relative to those completed in the laboratory--the candor hypothesis. A battery of social desirability questionnaires (i.e., Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding [Paulhaus, 1984], Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale [Crowne & Marlowe, 1964], Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Lie Scale [Eysenck & Eysenck, 1994]) was administered to 3 groups: 2 groups consisted of undergraduate participants who were randomly assigned to complete the measures either in the laboratory (n = 60) or on the Web (n = 60), and 1 group consisted of self-selected participants who visited our experimental Web page and completed the measures online (n = 284). This design allowed us to assess the role of Web administration while controlling for differences in sample type, an oft-neglected issue in the Web literature. Results do not support the claim that administering self-report measures over the Web results in a decrease in socially desirable responding. Furthermore, these findings highlight the problems associated with confounding sample and medium. Implications for the use of Web as a research tool are discussed. PMID:17134335

  2. A real time Monte Carlo simulation of thin film nucleation in localized-laser chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotecki, David E.; Herman, Irving P.

    1988-11-01

    A real time Monte Carlo simulation is used to model the nucleation and initial stages of thin film growth during localized-laser chemical vapor deposition (LLCVD). This model includes the effects of laser-substrate heating, heterogeneous pyrolytic decomposition of parent molecules on the laser-heated region of the surface, and adatom migration and desorption dynamics. The amount of material deposited as a function of time is obtained over a surface area of 150×150 Å for various values of the substrate temperature, parent gas pressure, and adsorbate-substrate binding energy. Additional information is obtained about the cluster density, and the role of surface defects and two-atom cluster dynamics on the initial growth rate. The deposition of silicon by heterogeneous pyrolytic decomposition of silane (SiH4) is used as a base case for the simulation. Predictions of the initial thin film morphology and its temporal evolution during static laser heating of micron-dimensional regions of the surface are presented. Simulation results indicate that for a given silane pressure and adsorbate-substrate binding energy, there is a critical temperature Tc such that for laser-induced peak temperatures TpTc, nucleation occurs initially in an annulus region centered with respect to the incident laser irradiation. The inclusion of two-atom cluster dynamics in the simulation is shown to increase the value of Tc and alter the initial morphology for low adsorbate-substrate binding energies. The simulation results are extended to scanning LLCVD to predict the maximum scan speed at which nucleation will occur.

  3. Velocity structure of the Long Valley caldera from the inversion of local earthquake P and S travel times

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, A.E. Jr.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.

    1993-11-10

    A high-resolution tomographic study of the Long Valley region began in 1989 with the installation of a special fan array of eight three-component borehole (80-160 m depths) receivers on the northwestern rim of the caldera to provide the data necessary for a joint inversion for hypocenters and the three-dimensional P and S wave velocity structure in and below the caldera. The experiment specifically targeted the subsurface location of the previously inferred magma chamber beneath the Resurgent Dome. Additional coverage was provided by existing US Geological Survey and University of Nevada, Reno seismographic networks. The authors employed the progressive inversion scheme of Thurber, with cubic spline interpolation after Michelini and McEvilly. The final model is based on data from 280 well-distributed local earthquakes. Some 6900 arrival times were used, including about 700 S wave times from the three-component stations. The resulting velocity structure reflects the known geology, defining the low-velocity Sierran block and highland terrane. No isolated distinct low-velocity anomalies are revealed beneath the caldera floor, although a diffuse zone of reduced velocity persists to a depth of about 8 km. These lower velocities may be related to hydrothermal alteration and/or extensive fractures. The Vp/Vs structure contains significant lateral variation within and beneath the caldera to about 8 km depth, and these variations can be related to accepted models of the active geothermal system. The lack of a significant S wave velocity anomaly, along with the normal or low values of the Vp/Vs ratio, argues against the presence of a sizable and distinct magma body at shallow to midcrustal depth beneath Long Valley caldera, although a very low percentage of partial melt cannot be precluded. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  4. An activation-repolarization time metric to predict localized regions of high susceptibility to re-entry

    PubMed Central

    Child, Nicholas; Bishop, Martin J.; Hanson, Ben; Coronel, Ruben; Opthof, Tobias; Bourkens, Bastiaan; Walton, Richard; Efimov, Igor; Bostock, Julian; Hill, Yolanda; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Initiation of re-entrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) involves complex interactions between activation and repolarization wavefronts. Recent experimental work has identified the time interval between S2 repolarization proximal to a line of functional block and the activation at the adjacent distal side, as a critical determinant of re-entry. Objective We hypothesized: (1) an algorithm could be developed which would generate a spatial map of this interval (designated the “re-entry vulnerability index”-RVI); (2) that this would accurately identify a pathway of re-entry as well as rotor formation in animal experiments and in a computational model; and, (3) that it would be possible to generate an RVI map in humans during routine clinical procedures and co-register with anatomical and electrophysiological features. Methods and Results An algorithm was developed which sampled all points on a multielectrode grid and calculated RVI between all pairs of electrodes within a given radius. The algorithm successfully identified the spatial region with increased susceptibility to re-entry in an established Langendorff pig heart model and the site of re-entry and rotor formation in an optically mapped sheep heart model and corresponding computational simulations. The feasibility of RVI mapping was evaluated during a clinical procedure by co-registering with the anatomy and physiology in a patient undergoing a VT ablation. Conclusions We developed an algorithm to calculate a re-entry vulnerability index from intervals between local repolarization and activation times at all adjacent points over a multielectrode grid. The algorithm accurately identified the region of re-entry in two animal models of functional re-entry. The possibility of clinical application was demonstrated in a patient with VT. PMID:25863160

  5. Wavelet-based denoising of the Fourier metric in real-time wavefront correction for single molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Kayvan Forouhesh; Mortensen, Luke J.; Kner, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront sensorless schemes for correction of aberrations induced by biological specimens require a time invariant property of an image as a measure of fitness. Image intensity cannot be used as a metric for Single Molecule Localization (SML) microscopy because the intensity of blinking fluorophores follows exponential statistics. Therefore a robust intensity-independent metric is required. We previously reported a Fourier Metric (FM) that is relatively intensity independent. The Fourier metric has been successfully tested on two machine learning algorithms, a Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization, for wavefront correction about 50 μm deep inside the Central Nervous System (CNS) of Drosophila. However, since the spatial frequencies that need to be optimized fall into regions of the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) that are more susceptible to noise, adding a level of denoising can improve performance. Here we present wavelet-based approaches to lower the noise level and produce a more consistent metric. We compare performance of different wavelets such as Daubechies, Bi-Orthogonal, and reverse Bi-orthogonal of different degrees and orders for pre-processing of images.

  6. Accretionary nature of the crust of Central and East Java (Indonesia) revealed by local earthquake travel-time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberland, Christian; Bohm, Mirjam; Asch, Günter

    2014-12-01

    Reassessment of travel time data from an exceptionally dense, amphibious, temporary seismic network on- and offshore Central and Eastern Java (MERAMEX) confirms the accretionary nature of the crust in this segment of the Sunda subduction zone (109.5-111.5E). Traveltime data of P- and S-waves of 244 local earthquakes were tomographically inverted, following a staggered inversion approach. The resolution of the inversion was inspected by utilizing synthetic recovery tests and analyzing the model resolution matrix. The resulting images show a highly asymmetrical crustal structure. The images can be interpreted to show a continental fragment of presumably Gondwana origin in the coastal area (east of 110E), which has been accreted to the Sundaland margin. An interlaced anomaly of high seismic velocities indicating mafic material can be interpreted to be the mantle part of the continental fragment, or part of obducted oceanic lithosphere. Lower than average crustal velocities of the Java crust are likely to reflect ophiolitic and metamorphic rocks of a subduction melange.

  7. Mother and Infant Talk about Mental States Relates to Desire Language and Emotion Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taumoepeau, Mele; Ruffman, Ted

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the relation between mother mental state language and child desire language and emotion understanding in 15--24-month-olds. At both times point, mothers described pictures to their infants and mother talk was coded for mental and nonmental state language. Children were administered 2 emotion understanding tasks and their mental…

  8. How MDMA's pharmacology and pharmacokinetics drive desired effects and harms.

    PubMed

    Michael White, C

    2014-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is an agent of abuse that has been used by over 16 million Americans. Increased energy, elevated mood, bonding with others, and psychedelic effects are desired effects while liver damage, extended depressed mood, sexual assault, rhabdomyolysis, serotonin syndrome, multiorgan failure, cardiovascular events, arrhythmias, and death are possible adverse effects. These desirable and adverse effects of MDMA are extensions of its fascinating pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic profile. In addition to methamphatemine like effects, MDMA also has mescaline like effects and increases the release of cortisol, oxytocin, and antidiuretic hormone. The desirable effects of MDMA are accentuated by the rave or electronic dance music scene where warm temperatures, vigorous dancing, loud music, and light shows accentuate some of the responses. However, the same environment increases the risk of certain harms. Knowledge of the constellation of these factors is needed for education, prevention of harm, and treatment. PMID:24431106

  9. Desire thinking: A risk factor for binge eating?

    PubMed

    Spada, Marcantonio M; Caselli, Gabriele; Fernie, Bruce A; Manfredi, Chiara; Boccaletti, Fabio; Dallari, Giulia; Gandini, Federica; Pinna, Eleonora; Ruggiero, Giovanni M; Sassaroli, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    In the current study we explored the role of desire thinking in predicting binge eating independently of Body Mass Index, negative affect and irrational food beliefs. A sample of binge eaters (n=77) and a sample of non-binge eaters (n=185) completed the following self-report instruments: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Irrational Food Beliefs Scale, Desire Thinking Questionnaire, and Binge Eating Scale. Mann-Whitney U tests revealed that all variable scores were significantly higher for binge eaters than non-binge eaters. A logistic regression analysis indicated that verbal perseveration was a predictor of classification as a binge eater over and above Body Mass Index, negative affect and irrational food beliefs. A hierarchical regression analysis, on the combined sample, indicated that verbal perseveration predicted levels of binge eating independently of Body Mass Index, negative affect and irrational food beliefs. These results highlight the possible role of desire thinking as a risk factor for binge eating. PMID:25880044

  10. Representing female desire within a labial framework of sexuality.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Britt-Marie

    2012-12-01

    Sexual experiences, rather than being neutral, are specifically male or female. Yet at present no conceptual framework exists for representing female sexual desire. This has resulted in frequent misrepresentations of female sexual experience. To correct this, a labial framework is proposed, not to replace or oppose a phallic framework, but to exist alongside it. The lips of the mouth and those of the genitals provide a felicitous doubling of sexuality and speech to represent female desire and sexual pleasure as labial. Phallic and labial rhythms are organized differently in sexual arousal and desire, since, as Simone de Beauvoir put it, "Man 'gets stiff,' but woman 'gets wet.'" The labial framework therefore represents female psychosexuality more in terms of "wetware" than of "hardware." PMID:23118235

  11. Contributions of Social Desirability to Self-Reported Ageism.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Katie E; Allen, Priscilla D; Denver, Jenny Y; Holland, Kayla R

    2015-09-01

    The authors examined the role of social desirability in 445 participants' responses to self-reported measures of ageism across two studies. In Study 1, college students and community adults completed the Relating to Older People Evaluation (ROPE) and a short form of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (M-C SDS). Study 2 was a conceptual replication that included the Fraboni Scale of Ageism (FSA). Correlation analyses confirmed a small but significant relationship between scores on the positive ageist items and the social desirability scale in both studies. Ageist attitudes were correlated with negative ageist behaviors in Study 2. Implications for current views on ageism and strategies for reducing ageist attitudes and behaviors in everyday life are discussed. PMID:24652882

  12. Trajectories of intimate partnerships, sexual attitudes, desire and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ammar, N; Gauthier, J-A; Widmer, E D

    2014-12-01

    This research addresses the interrelations existing between trajectories of intimate partnerships and attitudes toward sexuality, sexual desire, and sexual satisfaction. It is based on a dataset of 600 adults aged 25-46 living in Geneva (Switzerland) and uses innovative multivariate techniques for clustering life trajectories. The results emphasize the diversity of men's and women's trajectories of intimate partnerships. Trajectories with frequent and short-term partnerships are associated with recreational attitudes and higher solitary and dyadic sexual desire. In contrast, trajectories featuring few or no intimate partnerships are associated with traditional sexual attitudes and less sexual desire. Women's attitudes toward sexuality are more strongly associated with their intimate trajectories than men's. This suggests that men and women do not develop their sexuality in the same relation with intimacy. The results are referred to the gendered master status hypothesis. PMID:26047692

  13. Computed tomography-guided time-domain diffuse fluorescence tomography in small animals for localization of cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tichauer, Kenneth M; Holt, Robert W; Samkoe, Kimberley S; El-Ghussein, Fadi; Gunn, Jason R; Jermyn, Michael; Dehghani, Hamid; Leblond, Frederic; Pogue, Brian W

    2012-01-01

    Small animal fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) can be a powerful tool for preclinical drug discovery and development studies. However, light absorption by tissue chromophores (e.g., hemoglobin, water, lipids, melanin) typically limits optical signal propagation through thicknesses larger than a few millimeters. Compared to other visible wavelengths, tissue absorption for red and near-infrared (near-IR) light absorption dramatically decreases and non-elastic scattering becomes the dominant light-tissue interaction mechanism. The relatively recent development of fluorescent agents that absorb and emit light in the near-IR range (600-1000 nm), has driven the development of imaging systems and light propagation models that can achieve whole body three-dimensional imaging in small animals. Despite great strides in this area, the ill-posed nature of diffuse fluorescence tomography remains a significant problem for the stability, contrast recovery and spatial resolution of image reconstruction techniques and the optimal approach to FMI in small animals has yet to be agreed on. The majority of research groups have invested in charge-coupled device (CCD)-based systems that provide abundant tissue-sampling but suboptimal sensitivity, while our group and a few others have pursued systems based on very high sensitivity detectors, that at this time allow dense tissue sampling to be achieved only at the cost of low imaging throughput. Here we demonstrate the methodology for applying single-photon detection technology in a fluorescence tomography system to localize a cancerous brain lesion in a mouse model. The fluorescence tomography (FT) system employed single photon counting using photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and information-rich time-domain light detection in a non-contact conformation. This provides a simultaneous collection of transmitted excitation and emission light, and includes automatic fluorescence excitation exposure control, laser referencing, and co

  14. Social desirability bias in diary panels is evident in panelists' behavioral frequency.

    PubMed

    Toh, Rex S; Lee, Eunkyu; Hu, Michael Y

    2006-10-01

    The purpose was to analyze a large-scale database, a national sample of 1108 heads of households collected by AT&T, to show that behavioral frequencies of the activities of consumer diary panelists may regress toward the population mean during the diary-keeping period given social desirability bias produced by the conditioning effect of keeping diaries. This effect is distinguished from regression toward the mean, a statistical phenomenon reflecting happenstance of extreme initial values. Social desirability bias is demonstrated in two ways-by observing decreasing coefficients of variation over time and by detecting a greater proportion of panelists' behavioral frequencies moving toward the population mean than moving away from it. Both cannot be explained by regression toward the mean. Social desirability bias was manifest only during the early stages of the diary-keeping period and only for activities high in involvement. The presence of social desirability bias in diary panels implies that, when people are subjected to observation, diary observations may be contaminated, leading to the mistaken impression that the population is more homogeneous than it actually is. Thus it is important for researchers to monitor the diary panel carefully to detect social desirability bias when engaged in longitudinal studies. PMID:17153800

  15. Fluoxetine attenuates alcohol intake and desire to drink.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, C A; Poulos, C X; Bremner, K E; Lanctot, K L

    1994-09-01

    Several serotonin uptake inhibitors, including the long-acting fluoxetine, have been found to decrease alcohol intake in moderately dependent alcoholics. While the mechanism of their effect is not fully elucidated, a previous study with citalopram indicated that decreased desire to drink may be an important factor. Therefore, we tested fluoxetine effects on alcohol intake and desire to drink in a placebo-controlled study. Subjects, recruited by advertisement, were mildly/moderately dependent alcoholics (12 male, four female, aged 19-59 years, healthy, non-depressed) who did not believe they had a drinking problem and were not requesting treatment. After a 1 week baseline they received, single-blind, 2 weeks placebo followed by 2 weeks fluoxetine 60 mg/day. As out-patients, subjects recorded daily standard drinks (13.6 g ethanol) and rated interest, desire, craving and liking for alcohol biweekly. Each out-patient period was immediately followed by a double-blind experimental drinking session. Out-patient daily drinks slightly decreased during fluoxetine to 6.6 +/- 0.9 (mean +/- S.E.M.) compared with during placebo (7.16 +/- 0.95, p = 0.07, N.S.) and baseline (7.18 +/- 1.0, p > 0.1, N.S.). Desire, interest and craving for alcohol decreased during fluoxetine vs placebo baseline (p < 0.05), but not vs placebo. Appetite loss and decrease in food intake (p < 0.01, fluoxetine vs placebo) correlated with each other (r = 0.91, p < 0.01) but neither correlated with decrease in alcohol intake (appetite: r = 0.26, N.S.; food intake: r = 0.22, N.S.). Weight loss occurred during fluoxetine (p < 0.05 vs placebo) but did not correlate with decrease in alcohol intake (r = 0.1, N.S.). In the experimental drinking sessions after placebo and fluoxetine treatments subjects rated their desire for each of 18 mini-drinks (each one-third of a standard drink) offered at 5 min intervals. Fluoxetine decreased desire to drink throughout the sessions; both mean and maximum desire ratings were

  16. A nuclear-weapon-free world: Desirable? Feasible?

    SciTech Connect

    Rotblat, J.; Steinberger, J.; Udgaonkar, B.

    1993-12-31

    The authors seeks answers to two key questions: Is an nuclear-weapons-free-world (NWFW) desirable, and is it feasible? Organized into six parts, the book begins with a historical review of attempts to abolish nuclear weapons. Five subsequent parts address the desirability of an NWFW, its feasibility, alternative routes to this goal, and intermediate steps to this end. The authors deals with many obstacles and difficulties facing those who wish to progress from today`s world of 50,000 or more nuclear weapons to one where none exist and strong international verification assures that no rogue state will resurrect these dread devices.

  17. Probabilistic reconstructions of local temperature and soil moisture from tree-ring data with potentially time-varying climatic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolwinski-Ward, S. E.; Tingley, M. P.; Evans, M. N.; Hughes, M. K.; Nychka, D. W.

    2015-02-01

    We explore a probabilistic, hierarchical Bayesian approach to the simultaneous reconstruction of local temperature and soil moisture from tree-ring width observations. The model explicitly allows for differing calibration and reconstruction interval responses of the ring-width series to climate due to slow changes in climatology coupled with the biological climate thresholds underlying tree-ring growth. A numerical experiment performed using synthetically generated data demonstrates that bimodality can occur in posterior estimates of past climate when the data do not contain enough information to determine whether temperature or moisture limitation controlled reconstruction-interval tree-ring variability. This manifestation of nonidentifiability is a result of the many-to-one mapping from bivariate climate to time series of tree-ring widths. The methodology is applied to reconstruct temperature and soil moisture conditions over the 1080-1129 C.E. interval at Methusalah Walk in the White Mountains of California, where co-located isotopic dendrochronologies suggest that observed moisture limitations on tree growth may have been alleviated. Our model allows for assimilation of both data sources, and computation of the probability of a change in the climatic controls on ring-width relative to those observed in the calibration period. While the probability of a change in control is sensitive to the choice of prior distribution, the inference that conditions were moist and cool at Methuselah Walk during the 1080-1129 C.E. interval is robust. Results also illustrate the power of combining multiple proxy data sets to reduce uncertainty in reconstructions of paleoclimate.

  18. Desiring Diversity and Backlash: White Property Rights in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    In this theoretical essay, I argue that the current incidences of backlash to diversity are best understood as a dynamic of complicated, historic and intertwined desires for racial diversity and white entitlement to property. I frame this argument in the theories of critical race theory and settler colonialism, each of which provide necessary but…

  19. Residual magnetism holds solenoid armature in desired position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. P.

    1967-01-01

    Holding solenoid uses residual magnetism to hold its armature in a desired position after excitation current is removed from the coil. Although no electrical power or mechanical devices are used, the solenoid has a low tolerance to armature displacement from the equilibrium position.

  20. Topology of Sustainable Management of Dynamical Systems with Desirable States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzig, Jobst; Kittel, Tim

    2015-04-01

    To keep the Earth System in a desirable region of its state space, such as the recently suggested 'tolerable environment and development window', 'planetary boundaries', or 'safe (and just) operating space', in addition to the identification of the quantitative internal dynamics and the available options for influencing it (management), there is an urgent need to understand the systems' state space structure with regard to questions such as (i) which of its parts can be reached from which others with or without leaving the desirable region, (ii) which parts are in a variety of senses 'safe' to stay in when management options break away, and which qualitative decision problems may occur as a consequence of this structure. To complement existing approaches from optimal control focusing on quantitative optimization and being much applied in both engineering and integrated assessment, we develop a mathematical theory of the qualitative topology that partitions the state space of a dynamical system with management options and desirable states including terminology suggestions for the various resulting parts. Our detailed formal classification of the possible states and management options with respect to the possibility of avoiding or leaving the undesired region indicates that before performing some form of quantitative optimization, the sustainable management of the Earth System may require decisions of a more discrete type, e.g. choosing between ultimate safety and permanent desirability, or between permanent safety and increasing future options.

  1. Constructing Gender Pedagogies: Desire and Resistance in the "Alternative" Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooks, Leda; Sun, Chyng

    2002-01-01

    Examines the constructions of gender and sexuality, desire and resistance in students' reflections on a course (entitled, "Gender, Culture and Communication") and a curriculum which asked them not only to interrogate the reasons for their performance of gendered identity, but to question (and resist) the performance itself. Explores the boundaries…

  2. Desirable Attributes and Practices for Mentees: Mentor Teachers' Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates attributes and practices for mentor teachers that can be used for effective mentoring. Universities provide guidelines for preservice teacher (mentee) engagement in schools generally from anecdotal evidence, however, what are desirable attributes and practices for mentees? This qualitative study gathers data from 25 mentor…

  3. Desirable Leadership Behaviours of Multi-Cultural Managers in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littrell, Romie F.

    2002-01-01

    Hotel managers (both expatriate and indigenous) and supervisors (n=122) in China identified desirable and actual leadership traits in English and Chinese versions of the Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire. Indigenous managers had more tolerance of freedom than expatriate managers. Supervisors were more tolerant than managers.…

  4. Social desirability, anonymity, and Internet-based questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Joinson, A

    1999-08-01

    It has been argued that behavior on the Internet differs from similar behavior in the "real world" (Joinson, 1998a). In the present study, participants completed measures of self-consciousness, social anxiety, self-esteem, and social desirability, using either the World-Wide Web (WWW) or pen and paper, and were assigned to either an anonymous or a nonanonymous condition. It was found that people reported lower social anxiety and social desirability and higher self-esteem when they were anonymous than when they were nonanonymous. Furthermore, participants also reported lower social anxiety and social desirability when they were using the Internet than when they were using paper-based methods. Contrast analyses supported the prediction that participants using the WWW anonymously would show the lowest levels of social desirability, whereas participants answering with pen and paper nonanonymously would score highest on the same measure. Implications for the use of the Internet for the collection of psychological data are discussed. PMID:10502866

  5. Women selectively guard their (desirable) mates from ovulating women.

    PubMed

    Krems, Jaimie Arona; Neel, Rebecca; Neuberg, Steven L; Puts, David A; Kenrick, Douglas T

    2016-04-01

    For women, forming close, cooperative relationships with other women at once poses important opportunities and possible threats-including to mate retention. To maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of same-sex social relationships, we propose that women's mate guarding is functionally flexible and that women are sensitive to both interpersonal and contextual cues indicating whether other women might be likely and effective mate poachers. Here, we assess one such cue: other women's fertility. Because ovulating (i.e., high-fertility) women are both more attractive to men and also more attracted to (desirable) men, ovulating women may be perceived to pose heightened threats to other women's romantic relationships. Across 4 experiments, partnered women were exposed to photographs of other women taken during either their ovulatory or nonovulatory menstrual-cycle phases, and consistently reported intentions to socially avoid ovulating (but not nonovulating) women-but only when their own partners were highly desirable. Exposure to ovulating women also increased women's sexual desires for their (highly desirable) partners. These findings suggest that women can be sensitive to subtle cues of other women's fertility and respond (e.g., via social exclusion, enhanced sexual attention to own mate) in ways that may facilitate their mate retention goals while not thwarting their affiliative goals. PMID:26766112

  6. Eliciting Change in Maltreating Fathers: Goals, Processes, and Desired Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crooks, Claire V.; Scott, Katreena L.; Francis, Karen J.; Kelly, Tim; Reid, Maureen

    2006-01-01

    There has been a growing recognition of the need to provide appropriate intervention services to fathers who have been abusive in their families. This paper highlights four specific treatment goals for fathers who maltreat their children, along with therapeutic strategies necessary to accomplish desired outcomes. These goals were developed as part…

  7. Adolescent Expectations and Desires about Marriage and Parenthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Using data collected in 2000 on a racially and ethnically diverse sample of high school seniors, this study analyzes adolescents' expectations and desires about marriage and parenthood, including unwed parenthood. The conceptual framework combines family context, opportunity cost, and social-psychological perspectives. Each perspective receives…

  8. Ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes with desirability functions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In functional genomics experiments, researchers often select genes to follow-up or validate from a long list of differentially expressed genes. Typically, sharp thresholds are used to bin genes into groups such as significant/non-significant or fold change above/below a cut-off value, and ad hoc criteria are also used such as favouring well-known genes. Binning, however, is inefficient and does not take the uncertainty of the measurements into account. Furthermore, p-values, fold-changes, and other outcomes are treated as equally important, and relevant genes may be overlooked with such an approach. Desirability functions are proposed as a way to integrate multiple selection criteria for ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes. These functions map any variable to a continuous 0–1 scale, where one is maximally desirable and zero is unacceptable. Multiple selection criteria are then combined to provide an overall desirability that is used to rank genes. In addition to p-values and fold-changes, further experimental results and information contained in databases can be easily included as criteria. The approach is demonstrated with a breast cancer microarray data set. The functions and an example data set can be found in the desiR package on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/desiR/) and the development version is available on GitHub (https://github.com/stanlazic/desiR). PMID:26644980

  9. Characteristics of Athletic Training Students That Preceptors Find Desirable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Thomas, Spencer; Paulsen, Jenica; Chiu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students acquire clinical hours under the direct supervision of athletic training preceptors. Objective: The purpose of this project was to explore what characteristics preceptors desire in their athletic training students. Design and Setting: Online survey instrument. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 286…

  10. Sexuality Education and Desire: Still Missing after All These Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Michelle; McClelland, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Nearly twenty years after the publication of Michelle Fine's essay "Sexuality, Schooling, and Adolescent Females: The Missing Discourse of Desire," the question of how sexuality education influences the development and health of adolescents remains just as relevant as it was in 1988. In this article, Michelle Fine and Sara McClelland examine the…

  11. Desired change in couples: gender differences and effects on communication.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Richard E; Hunt-Martorano, Ashley N; Malik, Jill; Slep, Amy M Smith

    2009-08-01

    Using a sample (N = 453) drawn from a representative sampling frame of couples who are married or living together and have a 3 to 7 year-old child, this study investigates (a) the amount and specific areas of change desired by men and women, (b) the relation between relationship adjustment and desired change; and (c) the ways in which partners negotiate change. On the Areas of Change Questionnaire, women compared with men, wanted greater increases in their partners' emotional and companionate behaviors, instrumental support, and parenting involvement; men wanted greater increases in sex. Using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model (Kenny, 1996), both men's and women's relationship adjustment predicted desired change (i.e., actor effects), over and above the effects of their partners' adjustment (i.e., partner effects); partner effects were not significant. Each couple was also observed discussing the man's and the woman's top desired change area. Both men and women behaved more positively during the partner-initiated conversations than during their own-initiated conversations. Women, compared with men, were more negative in their own and in their partners' conversations. PMID:19685983

  12. [Hyperprolactin as cause of hypoactive sexual desire in men].

    PubMed

    Baltzar, Mette Thing; Anholm, Christian; Petersen, Christina Damsted

    2012-06-18

    Algorithms previously focused primarily on the testosterone level and its role when diagnosing and managing hypoactive sexual desire (HSD) in men. The importance of prolactin in male sexuality is recognized and should be taken into account when investigating more complex cases of HSD in men. PMID:22713225

  13. 50 CFR 80.9 - Notice of desire to participate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.9 Notice of desire to... Federal Assistance which contains plans for the use of Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program...

  14. Factors Influencing the Desire To Take Environmental Action in Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruneau, Diane; Chouinard, Omer; Musafiri, Jean-Pierre; IsaBelle, Claire

    In a coastal community, four social groups were chosen to participate in various educational programs designed to promote their desire to take environmental action. At the end of these educational programs, conducted by a scientist and an environmental educator, the participants were invited to get involved in the resolution of an environmental…

  15. Drawing Desire: Male Youth and Homoerotic Fan Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Jeffery P.

    2010-01-01

    Although Western mass media aimed at juvenile audiences aggressively eliminates any references to same-sex desire and behavior, it inspires a tremendous amount of homoerotic fan art. To determine how same-sex potential is portrayed in juvenile fan art, a content analysis was conducted of 872 male homoerotic images by 442 juvenile male and female…

  16. Feminine Desire in the Age of Satellite Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Contributes to scholarship on global media conglomerates, cultural expression, and feminism. Delineates the corporate logic of culture industries in the neo-network era. Shows, using the television show "Absolutely Fabulous," how media firms benefit from transnational circulation of multiple and alternative representations of feminine desire.…

  17. Functional Family Therapy and the Treatment of Inhibited Sexual Desire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regas, Susan J.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the therapy, assessment, and education principles of Functional Family Therapy and applies them to the treatment of inhibited sexual desire, using a case illustration. Functional Family Therapy works at motivating the couple to want change, rather than providing an understanding of underlying causes of the problem. (JAC)

  18. Sexual desire, sexual arousal and hormonal differences in premenopausal US and Dutch women with and without low sexual desire.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Julia R; Rupp, Heather; Janssen, Erick; Newhouse, Sarah K; Brauer, Marieke; Laan, Ellen

    2011-05-01

    The interaction between women's hormonal condition and subjective, physiological, and behavioral indices of desire or arousal remains only partially explored, in spite of frequent reports from women about problems with a lack of sexual desire. The present study recruited premenopausal women at two sites, one in the United States and the other in the Netherlands, and incorporated various measures of acute changes in sexual desire and arousal. A sample of 46 women who met criteria for Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD) was compared to 47 women who experienced no sexual problems (SF). Half of each group used oral contraceptives (OCs). The specific goal was to investigate whether there is a relationship between women's hormone levels and their genital and subjective sexual responsiveness. Background demographics and health variables, including oral contraceptive (OC) use, were recorded and hormones (total testosterone (T), free testosterone (FT), SHBG, and estradiol) were analyzed along with vaginal pulse amplitude and self-report measures of desire and arousal in response to sexual fantasy, visual sexual stimuli, and photos of men's faces. Self-reported arousal and desire were lower in the HSDD than the SF group, but only for women who were not using oral contraceptives. Relationships between hormones and sexual function differed depending on whether a woman was HSDD or not. In line with prior literature, FT was positively associated with physiological and subjective sexual arousal in the SF group. The HSDD women demonstrated the opposite pattern, in that FT was negatively associated with subjective sexual responsiveness. The findings suggest a possible alternative relationship between hormones and sexual responsiveness in women with HSDD who have characteristics similar to those in the present study. PMID:21514299

  19. Latitudinal variation of the specific local time of postmidnight enhancement peaks in F layer electron density at low latitudes: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunhua; Deng, Chi; Yang, Guobin; Liu, Jing; Zhu, Peng; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Song, Huan; Lan, Ting; Zhou, Chen; Wu, Xiongbin; Zhang, Yuannong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Komolmis, Tharadol; Supnithi, Pornchai; Yatini, Clara Y.

    2016-04-01

    Ionospheric nighttime enhancements are manifested in an increase of the electron density at nighttime. This paper studies the latitudinal variation of the specific local time of postmidnight enhancement peaks using ionosondes distributed at low latitudes. To obtain the parameters of the ionosphere, we manually extracted ionograms recorded by ionosondes. Cases show that there are significant latitudinal variations in the observed local time of the postmidnight enhancement peaks. Results show that the lower the geomagnetic latitude, the earlier the enhancement peak occurred in the geomagnetic northern hemisphere. Additionally, the enhancement peaks occurred earlier in the geomagnetic southern hemisphere than that in the geomagnetic northern hemisphere for these present cases. We suggest that the combined effect of the geomagnetic inclination and transequatorial meridional wind might be the main driving force for latitudinal variation of the local time of the occurrence.

  20. Supersonic projectile models for asynchronous shooter localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozick, Richard J.; Whipps, Gene T.; Ash, Joshua N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work we consider the localization of a gunshot using a distributed sensor network measuring time differences of arrival between a firearm's muzzle blast and the shockwave induced by a supersonic bullet. This so-called MB-SW approach is desirable because time synchronization is not required between the sensors, however it suffers from increased computational complexity and requires knowledge of the bullet's velocity at all points along its trajectory. While the actual velocity profile of a particular gunshot is unknown, one may use a parameterized model for the velocity profile and simultaneously fit the model and localize the shooter. In this paper we study efficient solutions for the localization problem and identify deceleration models that trade off localization accuracy and computational complexity. We also develop a statistical analysis that includes bias due to mismatch between the true and actual deceleration models and covariance due to additive noise.

  1. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R; Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E; Pan, L; Gilson, W; Seethamraju, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without ionizing

  2. Importance of Time Scale and Local Environment in Electron-Driven Proton Transfer. The Anion of Acetoacetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Keolopile, Zibo G; Gutowski, Maciej; Buonaugurio, Angela; Collins, Evan; Zhang, Xinxing; Erb, Jeremy; Lectka, Thomas; Bowen, Kit H; Allan, Michael

    2015-11-18

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) probe different regions of the anionic potential energy surface. These complementary techniques provided information about anionic states of acetoacetic acid (AA). Electronic structure calculations facilitated the identification of the most stable tautomers and conformers for both neutral and anionic AA and determined their relative stabilities and excess electron binding energies. The most stable conformers of the neutral keto and enol tautomers differ by less than 1 kcal/mol in terms of electronic energies corrected for zero-point vibrations. Thermal effects favor these conformers of the keto tautomer, which do not support an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the keto and the carboxylic groups. The valence anion displays a distinct minimum which results from proton transfer from the carboxylic to the keto group; thus, we name it an ol structure. The minimum is characterized by a short intramolecular hydrogen bond, a significant electron vertical detachment energy of 2.38 eV, but a modest adiabatic electron affinity of 0.33 eV. The valence anion was identified in the anion PES experiments, and the measured electron vertical detachment energy of 2.30 eV is in good agreement with our computational prediction. We conclude that binding an excess electron in a π* valence orbital changes the localization of a proton in the fully relaxed structure of the AA(-) anion. The results of EELS experiments do not provide evidence for an ultrarapid proton transfer in the lowest π* resonance of AA(-), which would be capable of competing with electron autodetachment. This observation is consistent with our computational results, indicating that major gas-phase conformers and tautomers of neutral AA do not support the intramolecular hydrogen bond that would facilitate ultrarapid proton transfer and formation of the ol valence anion. This is confirmed by our vibrational EELS spectrum. Anions

  3. Effect of desired speed variability on highway traffic flow.

    PubMed

    Lipshtat, Azi

    2009-06-01

    Traffic flow is a function of many natural, environmental, and human factors. Not only that weather and road condition can vary, but drivers' decisions and policies also can affect the flow. Here we analyze the effect of distribution of desired speeds. We show that a broader distribution can reduce the flow efficiency and increase congestions. Since different drivers react differently to changes in weather or road conditions, such a change leads to a change in desired speed distribution as well. As a result, nonintuitive changes in traffic flow may occur. Besides providing insight and analyzing the underlying mechanism of a collective phenomenon, this example sheds light on a fundamental aspect of computational modeling. Although "mean-field" models that deal with average values only and ignore variability are simpler and easier to analyze, they can very easily turn into oversimplifications and miss relevant qualitative phenomena. PMID:19658567

  4. Use of anisotropy to guide acoustic waves along desired trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehranian, Aref; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2010-03-01

    Acoustic stress waves can be guided to follow pre-determined paths in solids, using elastic anisotropy. Recently, there has been intense interest to design materials and structures that can shield specific regions within the material by redirecting the incident stress-waves along desired paths. Some of the proposed techniques involve variable mass density and stiffness. We have designed a material with isotropic mass density but highly anisotropic elasticity that can guide incident waves along desired trajectories. Harmonic excitations are imposed, and it is shown that the stress-wave energy would travel around a protected central region. The model is also evaluated using numerical simulations, which confirm that majority of the stress-wave energy is guided around the central cavity and is delivered exactly to the opposing face in a location corresponding to the incident excitation location.

  5. Desirable role in a price-setting international mixed duopoly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Fernanda A.; Ferreira, Flávio

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we study the order of moves in a mixed international duopoly for differentiated goods, where firms choose whether to set prices sequentially or simultaneously. We discuss the desirable role of the public firm by comparing welfare among three games. We find that, in the three possible roles, the domestic public firm put a lower price, and then produces more than the foreign private firm.

  6. Desirable features of a "humanoid" robot-therapist.

    PubMed

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; Giannoni, Psiche; Masia, Lorenzo; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Squeri, Valentina; Vergaro, Elena

    2009-01-01

    In relation with a recent Cochrane review, the paper discusses desirable features of a "humanoid" robot-therapist: 1) high mechanical compliance, 2) large range of force, 3) minimum assistance level, 4) soft haptic interaction for proprioceptive awareness, 5) adaptative assistance properties. It also proposes a framework for addressing optimal assistance and learning paradigms in view of a consensus in the community of rehabilitation engineers about shared principles and common standards. PMID:19965200

  7. TIMING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

    1956-04-17

    The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

  8. Determining Desirable Cursor Control Device Characteristics for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Holden, Kritina

    2007-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) that will travel to the moon and Mars, and all future Exploration vehicles and habitats will be highly computerized, necessitating an accurate method of interaction with the computers. The design of a cursor control device will have to take into consideration g-forces, vibration, gloved operations, and the specific types of tasks to be performed. The study described here is being undertaken to begin identifying characteristics of cursor control devices that will work well for the unique Exploration mission environments. The objective of the study is not to identify a particular device, but to begin identifying design characteristics that are usable and desirable for space missions. Most cursor control devices have strengths and weaknesses; they are more appropriate for some tasks and less suitable for others. The purpose of this study is to collect some initial usability data on a large number of commercially available and proprietary cursor control devices. A software test battery was developed for this purpose. Once data has been collected using these low-level, basic point/click/drag tasks, higher fidelity, scenario-driven evaluations will be conducted with a reduced set of devices. The standard tasks used for testing cursor control devices are based on a model of human movement known as Fitts law. Fitts law predicts that the time to acquire a target is logarithmically related to the distance over the target size. To gather data for analysis with this law, fundamental, low-level tasks are used such as dragging or pointing at various targets of different sizes from various distances. The first four core tasks for the study were based on the ISO 9241-9:(2000) document from the International Organization for Standardization that contains the requirements for non-keyboard input devices. These include two pointing tasks, one dragging and one tracking task. The fifth task from ISO 9241-9, the circular tracking task was not used

  9. Desired machines: cinema and the world in its own image.

    PubMed

    Canales, Jimena

    2011-09-01

    In 1895 when the Lumière brothers unveiled their cinematographic camera, many scientists were elated. Scientists hoped that the machine would fulfill a desire that had driven research for nearly half a century: that of capturing the world in its own image. But their elation was surprisingly short-lived, and many researchers quickly distanced themselves from the new medium. The cinematographic camera was soon split into two machines, one for recording and one for projecting, enabling it to further escape from the laboratory. The philosopher Henri Bergson joined scientists, such as Etienne-Jules Marey, who found problems with the new cinematographic order. Those who had worked to make the dream come true found that their efforts had been subverted. This essay focuses on the desire to build a cinematographic camera, with the purpose of elucidating how dreams and reality mix in the development of science and technology. It is about desired machines and their often unexpected results. The interplay between what "is" (the technical), what "ought" (the ethical), and what "could" be (the fantastical) drives scientific research. PMID:21995220

  10. Augmented approach to desirability function based on MM estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midi, Habshah; Mustafa, Mohd Shafie; Fitrianto, Anuar

    2013-04-01

    The desirability function approach is commonly used in industry to tackle multiple response optimization problems. The shortcoming of this approach is that the variability in each predicted response is ignored. It is now evident that the actual response may fall outside the acceptable region even though the predicted response at the optimal solution has a high overall desirability score. An augmented approach to the desirability function (AADF) is put forward to rectify this problem. Nevertheless the AADF is easily affected by outliers since the AADF is constructed based on the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) estimate which is not resistant to outliers. As an alternative, we propose a robust MM-estimator to estimate the parameters of the Response Surface Model (RSM) and incorporated the estimated parameters in the augmented approach framework. A numerical example is presented to assess the performance of the AADF-MM based method. The numerical results signify that the AADF-MM based is more efficient than the AADF-OLS based method.

  11. Correlates of the desired family size among Indian communities.

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, N V; Gadgil, M; Patil, S

    1996-01-01

    The People of India database of the Anthropological Survey of India documents 631 cultural, ecological, and economic traits of the 4635 communities to which the entire Indian population is assigned. Focusing on 1342 communities of South India, we looked for correlates of low (1 or 2 children) and high (4 or more children) desired family size (DFS) reported as the norm for any given community by key informants. We found 10 cultural and 18 economic traits to be significantly correlated to high DFS and 21 cultural and 9 economic traits to low DFS. The economic traits so identified are compatible with high family size being desired by parents who have little capability of investing in quality of offspring, but whose children contribute economically from an early age. In contrast, communities desiring low family size are part of the modern intensive agriculture/organized industry/services sector and invest heavily in educating their children. A composite index based on 27 economic traits (CEI) has a high predictive value with respect to the DFS for the entire set of 4635 Indian communities. The 31 cultural traits highly correlated to high or low DFS constitute 5 clusters that can be identified as characterizing scheduled tribes, scheduled castes, rural and landless lower castes, urban upper castes, and Moslems. Whereas economic traits have similar influence on DFS within each of these ethnic categories, Moslems demonstrate a significantly higher DFS for lower values of CEI. PMID:11607687

  12. The influence of the number of fractions and of overall treatment time on local control and late complication rate in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejewski, B.; Preuss-Bayer, G.; Trott, K.

    1983-03-01

    Three hundred and ten patients with T/sub 3//T/sub 4/, N/sub 0/, M/sub 0/ squamous cell carcinoma were irradiated with 200 kV X rays with total doses ranging from 4,900 to 6,200 rad, given in 21 to 35 fractions in 32-63 days. After a minimum follow-up period of 3 years, the local control rate was 50%; 21 severe late complications were observed among the patients. The dependence of local control rate and of late complication rate on the dose per fraction and on overall treatment time was analyzed by various statistical methods. Whereas the late complication rate depended significantly on dose per fraction, local tumor control depended strongly on overall treatment time.

  13. A Recent Swedish Attempt to Weaken State Control and Strengthen School Autonomy: The Experiment with Local Time Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronnberg, Linda

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, after a series of far-reaching reforms aiming at decentralisation, deregulation and increased local autonomy in Swedish education, the Government decided to introduce a five-year experiment, which would develop these reform efforts even further. Even though Swedish compulsory schools already were the most autonomous in Europe with regard…

  14. The Global/Local Nexus in Comparative Policy Studies: Analysing the Triple Bonus System in Mongolia over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2012-01-01

    The article analyses a phenomenon that has accompanied teacher salary reform in Mongolia: the import of two global education policies that were nearly identical to the already existing local bonus system ("olympiads"). To make sense of an import that appears superfluous, the author analyses the reception and translation of the triple bonus system…

  15. Fertility Desires and Intentions among People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Hyma; Chowta, Nithyananda; Ramapuram, John; Bhaskaran, Unnikrishnan; Achappa, Basavaprabhu; Chandran, Vishnu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The desire of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) to have children can have significant public health implications. Combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART) has increased the life expectancy of PLWHA as a result of which they may consider child bearing. There are hardly any studies from India addressing the fertility desires among PLWHA. Aim This study was done to assess the fertility desires of PLWHA in Southern India. Materials and Methods It was a cross-sectional study conducted among 230 HIV-positive men and women who presented to Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Mangalore, India. Study was conducted between October 2012 and October 2014. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software version 11.5. Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test and student t-test was used to find out the association of various factors affecting fertility desire. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The mean age of our study population was 36.3±5.5 years. The mean age of males was 37.3±6 years and for female 34.9±5 years. In our study 132 (57.4%) were males. Majority were literate 229 (99%). Majority of patients were employed 166 (72%). In our study 195 (84.7%) were on cART. Out of 230 PLWHA 39 (16.95%) were unmarried and 151(65.5%) married PLHIV were living with partners at the time of study. In our study 77 (33.5%) patients had fertility desire. Age, gender, marital status, number of children, partner’s fertility desire and HIV status of partner had an association with fertility desire. Conclusion Providing universal access to cART is the main aim of national programs. It is high time that these programs focus on fertility issues of PLWHA. Reproductive rights of PLWHA need to be respected. Physicians and HIV counselors should proactively discuss and address reproductive issues of PLWHA.

  16. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  17. Characterizing Methane Emissions at Local Scales with a 20 Year Total Hydrocarbon Time Series, Imaging Spectrometry, and Web Facilitated Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Eliza Swan

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas for which uncertainty in local emission strengths necessitates improved source characterizations. Although CH4 plume mapping did not motivate the NASA Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) design and municipal air quality monitoring stations were not intended for studying marine geological seepage, these assets have capabilities that can make them viable for studying concentrated (high flux, highly heterogeneous) CH4 sources, such as the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field (˜0.015 Tg CH4 yr-1) offshore Santa Barbara, California. Hourly total hydrocarbon (THC) data, spanning 1990 to 2008 from an air pollution station located near COP, were analyzed and showed geologic CH4 emissions as the dominant local source. A band ratio approach was developed and applied to high glint AVIRIS data over COP, resulting in local-scale mapping of natural atmospheric CH4 plumes. A Cluster-Tuned Matched Filter (CTMF) technique was applied to Gulf of Mexico AVIRIS data to detect CH4 venting from offshore platforms. Review of 744 platform-centered CTMF subsets was facilitated through a flexible PHP-based web portal. This dissertation demonstrates the value of investigating municipal air quality data and imaging spectrometry for gathering insight into concentrated methane source emissions and highlights how flexible web-based solutions can help facilitate remote sensing research.

  18. Simultaneous recording of brain extracellular glucose, spike and local field potential in real time using an implantable microelectrode array with nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenjing; Song, Yilin; Fan, Xinyi; Zhang, Song; Wang, Li; Xu, Shengwei; Wang, Mixia; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is the main substrate for neurons in the central nervous system. In order to efficiently characterize the brain glucose mechanism, it is desirable to determine the extracellular glucose dynamics as well as the corresponding neuroelectrical activity in vivo. In the present study, we fabricated an implantable microelectrode array (MEA) probe composed of platinum electrochemical and electrophysiology microelectrodes by standard micro electromechanical system (MEMS) processes. The MEA probe was modified with nano-materials and implanted in a urethane-anesthetized rat for simultaneous recording of striatal extracellular glucose, local field potential (LFP) and spike on the same spatiotemporal scale when the rat was in normoglycemia, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. During these dual-mode recordings, we observed that increase of extracellular glucose enhanced the LFP power and spike firing rate, while decrease of glucose had an opposite effect. This dual mode MEA probe is capable of examining specific spatiotemporal relationships between electrical and chemical signaling in the brain, which will contribute significantly to improve our understanding of the neuron physiology.

  19. Simultaneous recording of brain extracellular glucose, spike and local field potential in real time using an implantable microelectrode array with nano-materials.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wenjing; Song, Yilin; Fan, Xinyi; Zhang, Song; Wang, Li; Xu, Shengwei; Wang, Mixia; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-03-18

    Glucose is the main substrate for neurons in the central nervous system. In order to efficiently characterize the brain glucose mechanism, it is desirable to determine the extracellular glucose dynamics as well as the corresponding neuroelectrical activity in vivo. In the present study, we fabricated an implantable microelectrode array (MEA) probe composed of platinum electrochemical and electrophysiology microelectrodes by standard micro electromechanical system (MEMS) processes. The MEA probe was modified with nano-materials and implanted in a urethane-anesthetized rat for simultaneous recording of striatal extracellular glucose, local field potential (LFP) and spike on the same spatiotemporal scale when the rat was in normoglycemia, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. During these dual-mode recordings, we observed that increase of extracellular glucose enhanced the LFP power and spike firing rate, while decrease of glucose had an opposite effect. This dual mode MEA probe is capable of examining specific spatiotemporal relationships between electrical and chemical signaling in the brain, which will contribute significantly to improve our understanding of the neuron physiology. PMID:26871752

  20. Analysis and prediction of aperiodic hydrodynamic oscillatory time series by feed-forward neural networks, fuzzy logic, and a local nonlinear predictor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentili, Pier Luigi; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Dolnik, Milos; Epstein, Irving R.

    2015-01-01

    Forecasting of aperiodic time series is a compelling challenge for science. In this work, we analyze aperiodic spectrophotometric data, proportional to the concentrations of two forms of a thermoreversible photochromic spiro-oxazine, that are generated when a cuvette containing a solution of the spiro-oxazine undergoes photoreaction and convection due to localized ultraviolet illumination. We construct the phase space for the system using Takens' theorem and we calculate the Lyapunov exponents and the correlation dimensions to ascertain the chaotic character of the time series. Finally, we predict the time series using three distinct methods: a feed-forward neural network, fuzzy logic, and a local nonlinear predictor. We compare the performances of these three methods.