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Sample records for desorbed neutral molecules

  1. Molecular surface analysis by laser ionization of desorbed molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Lykke, K.R.; Wurz, P.; Parker, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    While elemental analysis of surfaces has progressed dramatically over the past ten years, quantitative molecular surface analysis remains difficult. This is particularly true in the analysis of complex materials such as polymers and rubbers which contain a wide compliment of additives and pigments to enhance their material characteristics. For mass spectrometric analysis the difficulty is two fold. First, desorption of surface molecules must be accompanied with minimal fragmentation and collateral surface damage. Second, the desorbed molecules must be ionized for subsequent mass analysis with high efficiency and without significant cracking. This paper focuses on the second of these problems.

  2. Molecular surface analysis by laser ionization of desorbed molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Lykke, K.R.; Wurz, P.; Parker, D.H.

    1992-07-01

    While elemental analysis of surfaces has progressed dramatically over the past ten years, quantitative molecular surface analysis remains difficult. This is particularly true in the analysis of complex materials such as polymers and rubbers which contain a wide compliment of additives and pigments to enhance their material characteristics. For mass spectrometric analysis the difficulty is two fold. First, desorption of surface molecules must be accompanied with minimal fragmentation and collateral surface damage. Second, the desorbed molecules must be ionized for subsequent mass analysis with high efficiency and without significant cracking. This paper focuses on the second of these problems.

  3. Ultrafast laser time-of-flight mass analysis of laser-desorbed atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, S. M.; Robson, L.; Tasker, A. D.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; McCanny, T.; Singhal, R. P.; Kosmidis, C.; Tzallas, P.; Langley, A. J.; Taday, P. F.; Divall, E. J.

    2001-08-01

    Femtosecond time-of-fight mass spectra of laser-desorbed gallium arsenide (GaAs) and trinitrobenzene (TNT) reveal the characteristic features and differences of femtosecond atomic and molecular ionization. Significant yields of multiply-charged atomic fragments, parent molecular ions and structure-specific fragment ions of labile molecules have been obtained. An optimum desorption laser intensity for the transfer of neutral intact parent molecules in to the gas phase has been observed to be molecule-dependent. This work demonstrates the potential of ultrafast laser ionization and has significant implications for analytical and environmental studies of solid materials.

  4. Efficient small sample analysis via laser post-ionized neutrals desorbed from surfaces: LPI-SNMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, I.; Calaway, W.; Pellin, M.; Moore, J.; Burnett, D.

    2003-04-01

    A number of popular analytical techniques rely on ion sputtering or laser desorption to probe solid samples. The popularity of this class of techniques is derived from the fact that they produce information on elemental and molecular compositions at trace levels. These techniques are particularly amenable to small sample analysis, since both ion and photon beams can be focused to sub-micron dimensions. Because ion sputtering and laser desorption consume material, there exists a trade off between sample size and achievable detection limit. This trade off is quantified by an instruments useful yield, which is defined as the number of atoms detected per atoms consumed. Laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry (LPI-SNMS) has useful yields significantly higher than competing techniques and is thus well suited for trace analysis of small samples. With LPI-SNMS, either a pulse of energetic ions or photons remove material from a solid surface into the gas phase. The desorbed material, predominantly ground state neutral atoms, is photo-ionized by one or more lasers and then extracted into a mass spectrometer for detection. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have developed a new reflectron time-of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer especially designed to optimize useful yield in LPI-SNMS measurements. Using ion optics simulations, an improved extraction design has been developed that allows photo ions from a large (4 × 4 × 3 mm^3) volume above a sample surface to be transmitted through a TOF mass spectrometer with > 98% efficiency. Efficient extraction from such a large ionization volume means that more than 40% of all desorbed species are available for detection, producing an overall useful yield of > 30%. Such a high sensitivity allows analysis of small samples at trace levels never before achievable, opening many new applications. For example, the new LPI-SNMS instrument will allow (1) part-per-trillion detections of solar wind elements implanted in the top

  5. Comparing Vacuum and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation for Postionization of Laser Desorbed Neutrals from Bacterial Biofilms and Organic Fullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspera, Gerald L.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moored, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-12-08

    Vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation from 8 - 24 eV generated at a synchrotron was used to postionize laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotic-treated biofilms and a modified fullerene using laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). Results show detection of the parent ion, various fragments, and extracellular material from biofilms using LDPI-MS with both vacuum and extreme ultraviolet photons. Parent ions were observed for both cases, but extreme ultraviolet photons (16-24 eV) induced more fragmentation than vacuum ultraviolet (8-14 eV) photons.

  6. Discrete Visible Luminescence of Helium Atoms and Molecules Desorbing from Helium Clusters: The Role of Electronic, Vibrational, and Rotational Energy Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    von Haeften, K.; von Pietrowski, R.; Moeller, T.; Joppien, M.; Moussavizadeh, L.; de Castro, A.R.

    1997-06-01

    Discrete visible and near-infrared luminescence of a beam of photoexcited helium clusters is reported. The emission lines are attributed to free helium atoms and molecules desorbing from clusters in electronically excited states. Depending on the excitation energy, various atomic and molecular singlet and triplet states are involved in the relaxation process. With increasing cluster size the intensity of molecular transitions becomes dominant. The temperature of ejected molecules could be estimated to T{sub vib}{approximately}2500 K and T{sub rot}{approximately}450 K and is much higher than that of the cluster itself. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Electron stimulated desorption of the metallic substrate at monolayer coverage: Sensitive detection via 193 nm laser photoionization of neutral aluminum desorbed from CH3O/Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. E.; Whitten, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Jones, P. L.

    A fortuitous overlap between the gain profile of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser and the Al autoionizing transition (sup 2)S(sub 1/2) (512753/cm) yields to the left (sup 2)P(sup 0)J has been exploited in the direct observation of substrate metal atoms in an electron simulated desorption (ESD) process from the monolayer adsorbate system CH3O/Al(111). The identity of the mass 27 photoion was established as Al(+) by (1) isotopic substitution of C-13 in the methanol employed for methoxy formation, and (2) tunable laser scans utilizing the DJ-2 (J = 3/2, 5/2) intermediate levels at approximately 32436/cm and a 248 nm ionization step. An ESD yield of approximately x 10(exp -6) Al atoms/(electron at 1 keV) was established by comparison with a sputtering experiment in the same apparatus. Velocity distributions measured for the desorbed Al species showed some differences in comparison with methoxy velocity data: a slightly lower peak velocity and a significantly less prominent high-velocity component.

  8. Deceleration of neutral molecules in macroscopic traveling traps

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwalder, Andreas; Meek, Samuel A.; Hammer, Georg; Haak, Henrik; Meijer, Gerard

    2010-05-15

    A decelerator is presented where polar neutral molecules are guided and decelerated using the principle of traveling electric potential wells, such that molecules are confined in stable three-dimensional traps throughout. We compare this decelerator with that of Scharfenberg et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 023410 (2009)] and we show that the current decelerator provides a substantially larger phase-space acceptance, even at higher acceleration. The mode of operation is described and experimentally demonstrated by guiding and decelerating CO molecules.

  9. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  10. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  11. BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-15

    A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

  12. Translational and rotational energy measurements of desorbed water molecules in their vibrational ground state following 157 nm irradiation of amorphous solid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Masaaki; Yabushita, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Watanabe, Naoki

    2011-05-01

    Water ice is the major solid component in a variety of astrophysical environments, e.g., cold and dense molecular clouds. Photodesorption plays a dominant role in consuming ice in such cold regions. In this study, photodesorption of vibrationally ground-state H 2O( v = 0) from amorphous solid water has been investigated at 157 nm. Using a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization technique, the translational and rotational energy distributions of photodesorbed H 2O( v = 0) were measured, i.e., Boltzmann distributions at 1800 and 300 K, respectively. These energies are in good accordance with those predicted by classical molecular calculations for water photodesorption due to a kick-out mechanism following absorption of a single photon; hot H atom released by photodissociation of H 2O in ice transfers enough momentum to another H 2O molecule to kick it off the surface. Desorption of D 2O( v = 0) following 193 nm photoirradiation of a D 2O/H 2S mixed ice was investigated to provide further direct evidence for the operation of a kick-out mechanism. The other desorption mechanisms were also discussed in the context of possible photodesorption of vibrationally excited H 2O.

  13. Polyethyleneimine as a novel desorbent for anionic organic dyes on layered double hydroxide surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siming; Li, Zenghe; Lu, Chao

    2015-11-15

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) is a positively charged polymer with hydrogen-bonding sites and hydrophobic chains. Therefore, it has been clearly established as an efficient adsorbent by means of these native properties in the literatures. However, there is apparently no good reason to disregard the use of PEI as a desired desorbent. Herein, using methyl orange as a model anionic dye, we investigated the desorption performances of PEI toward anionic dyes adsorbed on the surface of CO3-layered double hydroxides (LDHs) in a wide range of pH values. The experiment results showed that the positively charged PEI had very strong desorption capacity for anionic dyes at low pH values (<9.5) through electrostatic attraction between PEI and methyl orange because of the high degree of protonation of PEI. At high pH values (>9.5), PEI existed as neutral molecule, it could desorb methyl orange via hydrogen bonding between the amino groups of it and sulfonate group of methyl orange; simultaneously, the anion-exchange process occurred between abundant hydroxyl anions and anionic methyl orange. The adsorption capacity of the used LDH adsorbent was about 80% after five cycles of adsorption-desorption-regeneration, which was much higher than that conducted by 0.1M NaOH solution. These findings suggested that PEI could be regarded as a promising desorbent for enriching anionic dyes in wastewater and regenerating LDHs through surface adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:26255712

  14. Transport of neutral atoms and molecules in TFCX

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C.D.

    1984-09-01

    The distribution of neutrals in the proposed reactor TFCX has been modeled by the 3-D Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS, which has been run in conjunction with the 1-1/2-D time-dependent plasma transport code WHIST. The former code contains the best available treatment of neutral-particle physics, including a selection of wall reflection models. The latter code has a comprehensive set of plasma transport coefficients, an MHD equilibrium package, and provision for source terms such as those involving neutrals. It has a simple scrape-off model involving sound-speed flow to the neutralizer plates. The codes are run in iteration, so that the flux-surface averaged particle and energy sources due to interactions with neutrals are consistent with the plasma profiles. The design considered here has a bottom limiter with a pumping plenum. Results are given for the power balance, the mutually consistent plasma and neutral distributions set up in the edge region, the neutral density in the plenum, and the charge-exchange power deposition and erosion along the limiter.

  15. Beam dynamics in a storage ring for neutral (polar) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, Glen R.

    2003-05-01

    The force from a non-uniform electric field on the electric dipole moment of a molecule may be used to circulate and focus molecules in a storage ring. The nature of the forces from multipole electrodes for bending and focusing are described for strong-field-seeking and for weak-field-seeking molecules. Fringe-field forces are analyzed. Examples of storage ring designs are presented; these include long straight sections and provide bunching and acceleration.

  16. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  17. Optical Frequency Standards Based on Neutral Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz; Helmcke, Juergen

    The current status and prospects of optical frequency standards based on neutral atomic and molecular absorbers are reviewed. Special attention is given to an optical frequency standard based on cold Ca atoms which are interrogated with a pulsed excitation scheme leading to resolved line structures with a quality factor Q > 10^12. The optical frequency was measured by comparison with PTB's primary clock to be νCa = 455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a total relative uncertainty of 2.5 x10^-13. After a recent recommendation of the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM), this frequency standard now represents one of the most accurate realizations of the length unit.

  18. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Xu, H; Atia-Tul-Noor, A; Hu, B T; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2016-08-19

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H_{2}/D_{2} gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H_{2} and D_{2}. The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation. PMID:27588855

  19. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Xu, H.; Atia-Tul-Noor, A.; Hu, B. T.; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2 . The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  20. Absorption machine with desorber-resorber

    DOEpatents

    Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    An absorption refrigeration system utilizing a low temperature desorber and intermediate temperature resorber. The system operates at three temperatures and three pressures to increase the efficiency of the system and is capable of utilizing a lower generator temperature than previously used.

  1. Bond-forming reactions of small triply charged cations with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, James D; Parkes, Michael A; Price, Stephen D

    2013-08-12

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals that atomic and small molecular triply charged cations exhibit extensive bond-forming chemistry, following gas-phase collisions with neutral molecules. These experiments show that at collision energies of a few eV, I(3+) reacts with a variety of small molecules to generate molecular monocations and molecular dications containing iodine. Xe(3+) and CS2(3+) react in a similar manner to I(3+), undergoing bond-forming reactions with neutrals. A simple model, involving relative product energetics and electrostatic interaction potentials, is used to account for the observed reactivity. PMID:23843367

  2. Internal Energies of Ion-Sputtered Neutral Tryptophan and Thymine Molecules Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-11

    Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi3 + indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have ~;;2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi3 + ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis.

  3. Internal energies of ion-sputtered neutral tryptophan and thymine molecules determined by vacuum ultraviolet photoionization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle K; Wilson, Kevin R; Leone, Stephen R; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-05-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi(3)(+) indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have approximately 2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi(3)(+) ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis. PMID:20353160

  4. Dissociation dynamics of fast neutral molecules scattered under glancing incidence conditions from crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snowdon, K. J.; Harder, R.; Nesbitt, A.

    1996-08-01

    When fast ( vthermal ≪ v < vFermi) neutral or ionised atoms or molecules are scattered under glancing incidence conditions from atomically smooth metal single crystal surfaces, translational energy losses of 0.1-1 eV per femtosecond or per Å of the trajectory in the near surface region are not atypical. A large fraction of this energy appears in the electron-hole pair excitation channel. In addition, the orientation distribution of the internuclear co-ordinate of dissociatively scattered molecules is often sharply peaked about the surface normal. Such a distribution could arise if, coincident with vibrational excitation of the intra-molecular co-ordinate, the molecules were preferentially aligned about the surface normal. Alternatively, such a distribution may arise if, following dissolution of the intra-molecular bond, the difference in the surface normal momentum transfer to the two unbound atoms considerably exceeds the difference in the surface parallel momentum transfer. We investigate these two possibilities within a classical simulation of energy transfer from the translational to internal degrees of freedom of the molecule via repeated transitions between different electronic states of the molecule-surface system. These simulations suggest that in general, the observed surface-normal aligned final orientation of dissociatively scattered molecules is caused by strong vibrational excitation in the entrance channel region of the adiabatic ground state potential energy surface describing the interaction of the neutral molecule with the surface.

  5. Global molecular identification from graphs. Neutral and ionized main-group diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    James, Bryan; Caviness, Ken; Geach, Jonathan; Walters, Chris; Hefferlin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Diophantine equations and inequalities are presented for main-group closed-shell diatomic molecules. Specifying various bond types (covalent, dative, ionic, van der Waals) and multiplicities, it becomes possible to identify all possible molecules. While many of the identified species are probably unstable under normal conditions, they are interesting and present a challenge for computational or experimental analysis. Ionized molecules with net charges of -1, 1, and 2 are also identified. The analysis applies to molecules with atoms from periods 2 and 3 but can be generalized by substituting isovalent atoms. When closed-shell neutral diatomics are positioned in the chemical space (with axes enumerating the numbers of valence electrons of the free atoms), it is seen that they lie on a few parallel isoelectronic series. PMID:11855960

  6. A Method of Slowing and Cooling Molecules and Neutral Atoms Using Time Varying Electric Field Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Harvey; Maddi, Jason; Dinneen, Timothy

    2000-06-01

    Time-invariant electric field gradients have long been used to deflect beams of molecules and neutral atoms. However, time-varying electric field gradients can also be used to accelerate, slow [1,2], cool [2], or bunch these same beams. The possible applications include slowing and cooling thermal beams of molecules and atoms, launching cold atoms from a trap into a fountain, beam transport, and measuring atomic dipole polarizabilities. [1] H.L. Bethlem, G. Berden, and G Meijer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1588 (1999). [2] J. A. Maddi, T.P. Dinneen, and H. Gould, Phys. Rev. A60, 3882 (1999).

  7. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  8. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  9. Ab initio determination of the proton affinities of small neutral and anionic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeFrees, D. J.; McLean, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    The proton affinity of a molecule in the gas phase is a fundamental measure of its basicity and is the factor controlling the course of many ion-molecule reactions. In this article, ab initio molecular orbital theory at the MP4/6-311 ++ G(3df, 3pd) level of theory is demonstrated to predict proton affinities (PA's) for small neutral and anionic bases to within 2 kcal mol-1. Furthermore, the errors are random, indicating that there are likely no systematic errors in either the experimental or theoretical PA's. Also, this level of theory is used to calibrate less sophisticated theoretical models which are suitable for larger molecules; the MP4/6-311 ++ G(2d, 2p) and MP2/6-311 ++ G(d, p) theoretical models should be particularly useful. A procedure for predicting the vibrational frequencies for anion is proposed and applied to CH3-, NH2-, OH-, and CN-.

  10. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging

    PubMed Central

    Lackowski, Marcin; Tobiszewski, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers. PMID:27127674

  11. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging.

    PubMed

    Lackowski, Marcin; Tobiszewski, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers. PMID:27127674

  12. Identification of neutralization and diagnostic epitopes on PIM, the polymorphic immunodominant molecule of Theileria parva.

    PubMed Central

    Toye, P; Nyanjui, J; Goddeeris, B; Musoke, A J

    1996-01-01

    The polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) of Theileria parva is expressed by the schizont and sporozoite stages of the parasite. We have recently cloned the cDNA encoding the PIM antigen from two stocks of the parasite: the cattle-derived T. parva (Muguga) stock and a buffalo-derived stock. The cDNAs were used in transient-transfection assays to assess the reactivity of the antigen with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) previously raised against schizont-infected cells and used for parasite strain identification. We demonstrate that 19 of the 25 MAb are specific for PIM. Antibody reactivities with deletion mutants of a fusion protein containing PIM and Pepscan analysis of the Muguga version of the molecule with 13 of the MAb indicate that there are at least 10 different epitopes throughout the molecule. None of the MAb react with a tetrapeptide repeat present in the central region of the molecule, probably because of an inability of BALB/c mice to produce antibodies to this repeat. In contrast, sera from infected cattle react strongly with the repeat region, suggesting that this region alone may be useful as a diagnostic reagent. Previous studies showed that MAb to PIM inhibit sporozoite infectivity of bovine lymphocytes in vitro, which suggests that the antigen may be useful in immunizing cattle against T. parva infection. Pepscan analysis revealed that sera from infected cattle reacted with peptides recognized by the neutralizing MAb, as did sera from cattle inoculated with a PIM-containing recombinant protein. The latter sera did not, however, neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro. These results will be useful in exploiting the strain identification, diagnostic, and immunizing potentials of this family of antigens. PMID:8613398

  13. New Method for Production of High-Energy Neutral Molecules of Reactive Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metel, Alexander; Bolbukov, Vasily; Volosova, Marina; Grigoriev, Sergei; Melnik, Yury

    2015-09-01

    For the surface modification of dielectric substrates by reactive gas molecules with energy of 100 keV they are usually produced due to charge exchange collisions of ions extracted from a plasma emitter and accelerated by high-voltage pulses. As generation of the ion plasma emitter at a 100-kV potential is quite difficult, it was proposed to extract the ions from a ground potential emitter, accelerate them by high voltage between the emitter and a negatively biased high-transparency grid and transform them into fast neutral molecules in the positive space charge sheaths of the grid. As the energy of fast molecules is defined by potentials of charge exchange collision points inside the sheath their spectrum ranges from zero to a value corresponding to the pulse amplitude. A reverse beam is always generated due to acceleration of ions from the plasma on the other side of the grid. The lower the latter density, the higher the ratio of the primary to the reverse beam currents. When the grid is composed of parallel flat plates, the charge exchange due to reflections from the plates substantially contributes at low gas pressure to production of molecules with the energy corresponding to the pulse amplitude. The work was supported by the Grant No. 14-29-00297 of the Russian Science Foundation.

  14. Kondo effect in a neutral and stable all organic radical single molecule break junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzuri, Enrique; Gaudenzi, Rocco; Frisenda, Riccardo; Franco, Carlos; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Rovira, Concepcio; Veciana, Jaume; Alcon, Isaac; Bromley, Stefan T.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    Organic radicals are neutral, purely organic molecules exhibiting an intrinsic magnetic moment due to the presence of an unpaired electron in the molecule in its ground state. This property, added to the low spin-orbit coupling makes organic radicals good candidates for molecular spintronics insofar as the radical character is stable in solid state electronic devices. We show that the paramagnetism of the PTM radical molecule, in the shape of a Kondo anomaly is preserved in two- and three-terminal solid-state devices, regardless of mechanical and electrostatic changes. Indeed, our results demonstrate that the Kondo anomaly is robust under electrodes displacement and changes of the electrostatic environment, pointing to a localized orbital in the radical as the source of magnetism. Strong support to this picture is provided by density functional calculations and measurements of the corresponding nonradical specie. We further study polyradical systems, where several unpaired spins interact in the same molecule. This work was supported by the EU FP7 program through project 618082 ACMOL and ERC grant advanced Mols@Mols. It was also supported by the Dutch funding organization NWO (VENI).

  15. Small neutralizing molecules to inhibit actions of the chemokine CXCL12.

    PubMed

    Hachet-Haas, Muriel; Balabanian, Karl; Rohmer, François; Pons, Françoise; Franchet, Christel; Lecat, Sandra; Chow, Ken Y C; Dagher, Rania; Gizzi, Patrick; Didier, Bruno; Lagane, Bernard; Kellenberger, Esther; Bonnet, Dominique; Baleux, Françoise; Haiech, Jacques; Parmentier, Marc; Frossard, Nelly; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Hibert, Marcel; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2008-08-22

    The chemokine CXCL12 and the receptor CXCR4 play pivotal roles in normal vascular and neuronal development, in inflammatory responses, and in infectious diseases and cancer. For instance, CXCL12 has been shown to mediate human immunodeficiency virus-induced neurotoxicity, proliferative retinopathy and chronic inflammation, whereas its receptor CXCR4 is involved in human immunodeficiency virus infection, cancer metastasis and in the rare disease known as the warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, immunodeficiency, and myelokathexis (WHIM) syndrome. As we screened chemical libraries to find inhibitors of the interaction between CXCL12 and the receptor CXCR4, we identified synthetic compounds from the family of chalcones that reduce binding of CXCL12 to CXCR4, inhibit calcium responses mediated by the receptor, and prevent CXCR4 internalization in response to CXCL12. We found that the chemical compounds display an original mechanism of action as they bind to the chemokine but not to CXCR4. The highest affinity molecule blocked chemotaxis of human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo. It was also active in vivo in a mouse model of allergic eosinophilic airway inflammation in which we detected inhibition of the inflammatory infiltrate. The compound showed selectivity for CXCL12 and not for CCL5 and CXCL8 chemokines and blocked CXCL12 binding to its second receptor, CXCR7. By analogy to the effect of neutralizing antibodies, this molecule behaves as a small organic neutralizing compound that may prove to have valuable pharmacological and therapeutic potential. PMID:18556651

  16. Chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and neutral molecules in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, B.; Offenberg, D.; Zhang, C. B.; Schiller, S.

    2008-10-01

    Using a laser-cooled ion trapping apparatus, we have investigated laser-induced chemical reactions between cold trapped Ba+ ions and several neutral molecular gases at room temperature, O2 , CO2 , and N2O , leading to the production of cold trapped (≈20mK) BaO+ ions. The BaO+ ions were converted back to Ba+ ions via reaction with room-temperature CO. Reaction rates were determined by employing molecular dynamics simulations. The cold mixed-species ion ensembles produced were used for studying the efficiency of sympathetic cooling, by variation of the ratio of laser-cooled to sympathetically cooled ion numbers. In one extreme case, 20 laser-cooled Ba+138 ions were capable of maintaining the translational temperature of 120 sympathetically cooled barium isotopes (Ba+135-137) and 430 Ba16138O+ molecules at approximately 25mK .

  17. Production of excited neutral and ionic photofragments following core-level excitation in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R. A.; Wen, C.-R.; Tan, K.; Chen, J.-M.

    1990-05-01

    We have performed the first experiments to examine the neutral fragmentation paths following direct core-level excitation in a molecule. Using monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the range 100-140 eV, we have monitored the dispersed UV/optical fluorescence resulting from excitation of a Si 2p electron in SiF4. The main features in the fluorescence spectrum have been identified as emission from the SiF+4 D state and from excited SiF, Si, F, and Si+. Features in the fluorescence excitation spectra are assigned to excitation of a Si 2p electron to unoccupied valence orbitals, Rydberg orbitals, and shape resonances. There is a large enhancement in the yield of excited-state fragments following core-to-Rydberg excitation, which is due to the greater probability of the core-excited Rydberg state decaying, via a resonant Auger process, to highly excited, unbound states of SiF+4.

  18. Properties of clusters in the gas phase. V - Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, R. G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-molecules association reactions of the form A(-)(B)n-1 + B = A(-)(B)n were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), and NO2(-) with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO2(-) and SO3(-) with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), NO2(-), CO3(-), and SO3(-) with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions.

  19. Electroosmotic enhancement of the binding of a neutral molecule to a transmembrane pore

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Li-Qun; Cheley, Stephen; Bayley, Hagan

    2003-01-01

    The flux of solvent water coupled to the transit of ions through protein pores is considerable. The effect of this electroosmotic solvent flow on the binding of a neutral molecule [β-cyclodextrin (βCD)] to sites within the staphylococcal α-hemolysin pore was investigated. Mutant α-hemolysin pores were used to which βCD can bind from either entrance and through which the direction of water flow can be controlled by choosing the charge selectivity of the pore and the polarity of the applied potential. The Kd values for βCD for individual mutant pores varied by >100-fold with the applied potential over a range of –120 to +120 mV. In all cases, the signs of the changes in binding free energy and the influence of potential on the association and dissociation rate constants for βCD were consistent with an electroosmotic effect. PMID:14676320

  20. Experimental evidence of chemical components in the bonding of helium and neon with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, David; Bartocci, Alessio; Grandinetti, Felice; Falcinelli, Stefano; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-04-13

    The complexes of helium and neon with gaseous neutral molecules are generally perceived to be van der Waals adducts held together by physical (non-covalent) forces, owing to the combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. Molecular beam experiments confirm that this is the case for He-CF4 , Ne-CF4 adducts, but revealed that the interaction of He and Ne with CCl4 features an appreciable contribution of chemical components that arise from the anisotropy of the electron density of CCl4 that enhances a charge transfer from Ng (Ng=He, Ne). These findings furnish a novel assay of the bonding capabilities of helium and neon, and invite to revisit the neutral complexes of these elements as systems of chemical relevance. The CCl4 -Ng are also peculiar examples of halogen bonds, a group of interactions of major current concern. Finally, this investigation is a prelude to the development of semi-empirical models for force fields aimed to the unified description of static and dynamical properties of systems of comparable or higher complexity. PMID:25755007

  1. Cross-Linking Poly(lactic acid) Film Surface by Neutral Hyperthermal Hydrogen Molecule Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Du, Wangli; Shao, Hong; He, Zhoukun; Tang, Changyu; Liu, Yu; Shen, Tao; Zhu, Yan; Lau, Woon-ming; Hui, David

    2015-12-16

    Constructing a dense cross-linking layer on a polymer film surface is a good way to improve the water resistance of poly(lactic acid) (PLA). However, conventional plasma treatments have failed to achieve the aim as a result of the unavoidable surface damage arising from the charged species caused by the uncontrolled high energy coming from colliding ions and electrons. In this work, we report a modified plasma method called hyperthermal hydrogen-induced cross-linking (HHIC) technology to construct a dense cross-linking layer on PLA film surfaces. This method produces energy-controlled neutral hyperthermal hydrogen, which selectively cleaves C-H bonds by molecule collision from the PLA film without breaking other bonds (e.g., C-C bonds in the polymer backbone), and results in subsequent cross-linking of the carbon radicals generated from the organic molecules. The formation of a dense cross-linking layer can serve as a barrier layer to significantly improve both the hydrophobicity and water vapor barrier property of the PLA film. Because of the advantage of selective cleavage of C-H bonds by HHIC treatment, the original physical properties (e.g., mechanical strength and light transmittance) of the PLA films are well-preserved. PMID:26594874

  2. A Desorbed Gas Molecular Ionization Mechanism for Arcing Onset in Solar Arrays Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.; Degroot, W.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have hypothesized that the onset of Solar Array Arc (SAA) initiation in low-density space plasmas is caused by a desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism. Indeed past investigations performed at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility tend to not only support the desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism, but have gone as far as identifying the crucial molecular species that must be present for molecular ion dominated process to occur. When electrical breakdown occurs at a triple junction site on a solar array panel, a quasi-neutral plasma cloud is ejected. Assuming the main component of the expelled plasma cloud by weight is due to water vapor, the fastest process available is due to HO molecules and OH(+) ions, or more succinctly, dissociative molecular-ion dominated recombination processes: H2O(+) + e(-) yields H* + OH*. Recently published spectroscopic observations of solar array arc spectra in ground tests have revealed the well-known molecular OH band (302 to 309nm), as well as the molecular SiH band (387nm peak), and the molecular CH band (432nm peak). Note that the OH band is observed in emission arcs where water vapor is present. Strong atomic lines were also observed for H(sub beta) at 486nm and H(sub alpha) at 656.3nm in prior ground testing. Independent supporting evidence of desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanisms also come from measurements of arc current pulse widths at different capacitances. We will revisit an earlier first order approximation demonstrating the dependence of arc current pulse widths on the square root of the capacitance. The simple arc current pulse width model will be then be used to estimate the temperature of the arc plasma (currently believed to be somewhere in the range of 3 to 5 eV). The current paper then seeks to extend the outlined work by including numerous vacuum chamber measurements obtained with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A small solar array was mounted inside the vacuum

  3. Characterization of the gene encoding the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, a neutralizing antigen of Theileria parva

    SciTech Connect

    Toye, P.G.; Metzelaar, M.J.; Wijngaard, P.L.J.

    1995-08-01

    Theileria parva, a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite related to Plasmodium spp., causes the disease East Coast fever, an acute and usually fatal lymphoproliferative disorder of cattle in Africa. Previous studies using sera from cattle that have survived infection identified a polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that is expressed by both the infective sporozoite stage of the parasite and the intracellular schizont. Here we show that mAb specific for the PIM Ag can inhibit sporozoite invasion of lymphocytes in vitro. A cDNA clone encoding the PIM Ag of the T. parva (Muguga) stock was obtained by using these mAb in a novel eukaryotic expression cloning system that allows isolation of cDNA encoding cytoplasmic or surface Ags. To establish the molecular basis of the polymorphism of PIM, the cDNA of the PIM Ag from a buffalo-derived T. parva stock was isolated and its sequence was compared with that of the cattle-derived Muguga PIM. The two cDNAs showed considerable identity in both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions, but there was substantial sequence divergence in the central regions. Several types of repeated sequences were identified in the variant regions. In the Muguga form of the molecule, there were five tandem repeats of the tetrapeptide, QPEP, that were shown, by transfection of a deleted version of the PIM gene, not to react with several anti-PIM mAbs. By isolating and sequencing the genomic version of the gene, we identified two small introns in the 3{prime} region of the gene. Finally, we showed that polyclonal rat Abs against recombinant PIM neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro, suggesting that the PIM Ag should be evaluated for its capacity to immunize cattle against East Coast Fever.

  4. Probing Dynamics from Within in Negative Ions, Neutral Molecules and van der Waals Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrah, Nora

    2006-05-01

    We have investigated with unprecedented levels of detail, processes and phenomena involving photodetachment of negative ions and photoionization of molecules and van der Waals clusters using the brightness, spectral resolution, tunability and polarization of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Photodetachment of negative ions exhibit structure and processes differing substantially from corresponding processes in neutral and positive ions, owing to the dominance of correlation in both the initial and final states. We will report on investigations carried out in inner-valence CN^- molecules giving rise to absolute double photodetachment cross sections as well as on fragmentation of negative ions clusters. We will also present absolute inner-shell photodetachment of atoms leading to multi-Auger decay [1] and discuss threshold laws [2] and PCI effects [3]. The measurements were conducted using collinear photon-ion spectroscopy. The evolution of inner-shell photoionization of clusters, as a function of photon energy, will be presented and compared to analogous measurements in atoms. The measurements were conducted using angle resolved two-dimensional photoelectron spectroscopy. Molecular fragmentation results using an ion imaging detector will briefly be presented. [1] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, G. D. Ackerman, N. D. Gibson, C. W.Walter, A. Aguilar, G. Turri, I. Dumitriu and N. Berrah, PRA 72, 050701(R), 2005. [2] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, N. D. Gibson, C. W. Walter, G. D. Ackerman, I. Dumitriu, and N. Berrah, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 083001 (2005). [3] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, A. Agular, G. D. Ackerman, and N. Berrah, (in press PRA brief report).

  5. Plume Image Profiling of UV Laser Desorbed Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, T. L.; Hunniford, C.A.; McCullough, R. W.; Timson, D. J.; Catney, M.

    2008-12-08

    An experimental system, based upon the techniques of UV and IR laser desorption with time of flight mass spectrometry, has been constructed to enable the production and characterization of neutral biomolecular targets. The feasibility of the laser desorption technique for the purpose of radiation interaction experiments is investigated here. Fluorescent dye tagging and laser induced fluorescence imaging has been used to help characterize the laser produced plumes of biomolecules revealing their spatial density profiles and temporal evolution. Peak target thicknesses of 2x10{sup 12} molecules cm{sup -2} were obtained 30 {mu}s after laser desorption.

  6. Routes to formation of highly excited neutral atoms in the break-up of strongly driven hydrogen molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanouilidou, Agapi

    2012-06-01

    We present a theoretical quasiclassical treatment of the formation, during Coulomb explosion, of highly excited neutral H atoms for strongly-driven hydrogen molecule. This process, where after the laser field is turned off, one electron escapes to the continuum while the other occupies a Rydberg state, was recently reported in an experimental study in Phys. Rev. Lett 102, 113002 (2009). We find that two-electron effects are important in order to correctly account for all pathways leading to highly excited neutral hydrogen formation [1]. We identify two pathways where the electron that escapes to the continuum does so either very quickly or after remaining bound for a few periods of the laser field. These two pathways of highly excited neutral H formation have distinct traces in the probability distribution of the escaping electron momentum components. [4pt] [1] A. Emmanouilidou, C. Lazarou, A. Staudte and U. Eichmann, Phys. Rev. A (Rapid) 85 011402 (2012).

  7. Manipulating Neutral Atoms and Molecules by Strong Non-Resonant Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilensky, Mark

    Manipulating neutral particles by laser light has been of great interest during the last decade. The main effort is placed on atom cooling together with atomic beam deceleration, deflection, focusing, mirroring, and related aspects of atom optics. In the present thesis we provide indepth analytical and numerical analysis of the optical shaker approach to non-resonant laser cooling, and propose new methods for deceleration and cooling atoms/molecules in a feedback-controlled bistable cavity. Moreover, application of the latter technique to cooling of a micromechanical object is also proposed and analyzed. In the Introduction we review the current state-of-the-art cooling techniques and provide a brief history of their development. Chapter I presents in-depth analysis of the optical shaker operation; we study the issue of the detection of the dipole force in the far zone, which is the main building block of the optical shaker technique. The effects of the finite response time of the detectors and of the phase modulator are modeled numerically. The thresholds for cooling are estimated analytically and verified numerically. Minimal requirements for the stability of the laser sources are formulated. Perturbation theory analysis of the heating rate of an ensemble of particles embedded in a non-stationary sinusoidal (non-harmonic) potential is provided. In addition, a preliminary study of the adaptive cooling strategy is outlined. Chapter II presents a new method for deceleration of a single particle and cooling of an ensemble of particles in a bistable optical cavity. Optical bistability is achieved by non-linear feedback control of the field incident on the cavity. The technique realizes cavity-induced Sisyphustype cooling mechanism. This approach is rather generic because of its off-resonance nature. The bistable cavity introduces a "dry friction" stopping force, and requires a relatively "bad cavity" for its implementation. We provide an analytical estimate for the

  8. Enzymatic membranes for the selective transport of neutral molecules by electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Bernard; Couturier, Roger; Fiaty, Koffi; Charcosset, Catherine; Maïsterrena, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    The active and selective transport of glucose and glycerol was carried out using electrophoresis and artificial enzymatic membranes. These positively charged composite membranes carry, on the face adjacent to the donor compartment of an electrophoresis module, a specific kinase (hexokinase or glycerokinase) and, on the opposite face, an alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Phosphorylation of the neutral substrate (glucose or glycerol) on the donor side by the kinase generates a negatively charged phosphorylated substrate, whose transmembrane migration is promoted by an electric field and by the membrane's positive charge. Dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated substrate by ALP on the opposite face regenerates the neutral substrate, which accumulates in the receiver compartment of the electrophoresis module. Using an electrophoresis module specifically designed for this study, our experiments were carried out enabling glucose and glycerol to be concentrated approximately eight- and twelve-fold, respectively, in 8 h. PMID:18435500

  9. Nitrosamine formation in amine scrubbing at desorber temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fine, Nathan A; Goldman, Mark J; Rochelle, Gary T

    2014-01-01

    Amine scrubbing is a thermodynamically efficient and industrially proven method for carbon capture, but amine solvents can nitrosate in the desorber, forming potentially carcinogenic nitrosamines. The kinetics of reactions involving nitrite and monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), methylethanolamine (MMEA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) were determined under desorber conditions. The nitrosations of MEA, DEA, and MMEA are first order in nitrite, carbamate species, and hydronium ion. Nitrosation of MDEA, a tertiary amine, is not catalyzed by the addition of CO2 since it cannot form a stable carbamate. Concentrated and CO2 loaded MEA was blended with low concentrations of N-(2-hydroxyethyl) glycine (HeGly), hydroxyethyl-ethylenediamine (HEEDA), and DEA, secondary amines common in MEA degradation. Nitrosamine yield was proportional to the concentration of secondary amine and was a function of CO2 loading and temperature. Blends of tertiary amines with piperazine (PZ) showed n-nitrosopiperazine (MNPZ) yields close to unity, validating the slow nitrosation rates hypothesized for tertiary amines. These results provide a useful tool for estimating nitrosamine accumulation over a range of amine solvents. PMID:24956458

  10. Carbon disulfide-formic acid: an efficient desorbant for industrial solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Raulinaitis, I.

    1987-11-01

    When vapors of one solvent are collected on a charcoal tube, the desorbants suggested by NIOSH are adequate. When several solvents are collected at the same time, however, then a desorbant suggested for one solvent may mask some of the analytes or some of the analytes may be desorbed very poorly. An actual sample containing 13 solvents was brought to the laboratory for analysis. All solvents could be resolved on a 6-m 10% FFAP column, but some could not be desorbed efficiently with carbon disulfide; masking problems were encountered with other desorbants. Several solvents were tried; the most promising one was carbon disulfide saturated with formic acid.

  11. Arylethynyl receptors for neutral molecules and anions: emerging applications in cellular imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Calden N.; Naleway, John J.; Haley, Michael M.; Johnson, Darren W.

    2011-01-01

    This critical review will focus on the application of shape-persistent receptors for anions that derive their rigidity and optoelectronic properties from the inclusion of arylethynyl linkages. It will highlight a few of the design strategies involved in engineering selective and sensitive fluorescent probes and how arylacetylenes can offer a design pathway to some of the more desirable properties of a selective sensor. Additionally, knowledge gained in the study of these receptors in organic media often leads to improved receptor design and the production of chromogenic and fluorogenic probes capable of detecting specific substrates among the multitude of ions present in biological systems. In this ocean of potential targets exists a large number of geometrically distinct anions, which present their own problems to the design of receptors with complementary binding for each preferred coordination geometry. Our interest in targeting charged substrates, specifically how previous work on receptors for cations or neutral guests can be adapted to anions, will be addressed. Additionally, we will focus on the design and development of supramolecular arylethynyl systems, their shape-persistence and fluorogenic or chromogenic optoelectronic responses to complexation. We will also examine briefly how the “chemistry in the cuvet” translates into biological media. PMID:20820467

  12. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  13. Laser-driven acoustic desorption of organic molecules from back-irradiated solid foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, A. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Moore, J. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Materials Science Division; Mass Think

    2007-11-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the single-photon ionization method combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have examined the neutral component of the desorbed flux in LIAD and compared it to that from direct laser desorption. These basic studies of LIAD, conducted for molecules of various organic dyes (rhodamine B, fluorescein, anthracene, coumarin, BBQ), have demonstrated detection of intact parent molecules of the analyte even at its surface concentrations corresponding to a submonolayer coating. In some cases (rhodamine B, fluorescein, BBQ), the parent molecular ion peak was accompanied by a few fragmentation peaks of comparable intensity, whereas for others, only peaks corresponding to intact parent molecules were detected. At all measured desorbing laser intensities (from 100 to 500 MW/cm{sup 2}), the total amount of desorbed parent molecules depended exponentially on the laser intensity. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules, determined for the first time in this work, were of the order of hundreds of meters per second, less than what has been observed in our experiments for direct laser desorption, but substantially greater than the possible perpendicular velocity of the substrate foil surface due to laser-generated acoustic waves. Moreover, these velocities did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of a more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. Also, the total flux of desorbed intact molecules as a function of the total number of desorbing laser pulses, striking the same point on the target, decayed following a power law rather than an exponential function, as would have been predicted by the shake-off model. To summarize, the

  14. MOCCA: A 4k-Pixel Molecule Camera for the Position- and Energy-Resolving Detection of Neutral Molecule Fragments at CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamer, L.; Schulz, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Kempf, S.; Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of MOCCA, a large-area particle detector that is developed for the position- and energy-resolving detection of neutral molecule fragments produced in electron-ion interactions at the Cryogenic Storage Ring at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The detector is based on metallic magnetic calorimeters and consists of 4096 particle absorbers covering a total detection area of 44.8 mathrm {mm} × 44.8 mathrm {mm}. Groups of four absorbers are thermally coupled to a common paramagnetic temperature sensor where the strength of the thermal link is different for each absorber. This allows attributing a detector event within this group to the corresponding absorber by discriminating the signal rise times. A novel readout scheme further allows reading out all 1024 temperature sensors that are arranged in a 32 × 32 square array using only 16+16 current-sensing superconducting quantum interference devices. Numerical calculations taking into account a simplified detector model predict an energy resolution of Δ E_mathrm {FWHM} le 80 mathrm {eV} for all pixels of this detector.

  15. MOCCA: A 4k-Pixel Molecule Camera for the Position- and Energy-Resolving Detection of Neutral Molecule Fragments at CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamer, L.; Schulz, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Kempf, S.; Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present the design of MOCCA, a large-area particle detector that is developed for the position- and energy-resolving detection of neutral molecule fragments produced in electron-ion interactions at the Cryogenic Storage Ring at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The detector is based on metallic magnetic calorimeters and consists of 4096 particle absorbers covering a total detection area of 44.8 {mm} × 44.8 {mm} . Groups of four absorbers are thermally coupled to a common paramagnetic temperature sensor where the strength of the thermal link is different for each absorber. This allows attributing a detector event within this group to the corresponding absorber by discriminating the signal rise times. A novel readout scheme further allows reading out all 1024 temperature sensors that are arranged in a 32 × 32 square array using only 16+16 current-sensing superconducting quantum interference devices. Numerical calculations taking into account a simplified detector model predict an energy resolution of Δ E_{FWHM} ≤ 80 {eV} for all pixels of this detector.

  16. Investigations of desorbed species from matrix materials used in MALDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, C. T. J.; Kosmidis, C.; Jia, W. J.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Singhal, R. P.

    1995-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI), the processes involved in ion formation have yet to be satisfactorily explained. Protonation processes have been suggested as a possible method for the creation of the analyte ions. In this work, the existence of neutral hydrogen atoms in the ablation plume is investigated by using the postionization (PI) technique. Neutral atomic hydrogen is ionized through a (2+1) resonant excitation ionization scheme. The mass spectra at different delay times between the ablation and PI lasers have demonstrated the existence of hydrogen atoms with high velocities in the ablated plume.

  17. Neutral gas temperature measurements of high-power-density fluorocarbon plasmas by fitting swan bands of C{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Bo; Sawin, Herbert H.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    The neutral gas temperature of fluorocarbon plasmas in a remote toroidal transformer-coupled source was measured to be greater than 5000 K, under the conditions of a power density greater than 15 W/cm{sup 3} and pressures above 2 torr. The rovibrational bands of C{sub 2} molecules (swan bands, d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) were fitted to obtain the rotational temperature that was assumed to equal the translational temperature. This rotational-translational temperature equilibrium assumption was supported by the comparison with the rotational temperature of second positive system of added N{sub 2}. For the same gas mixture, the neutral gas temperature is nearly a linear function of plasma power, since the conduction to chamber wall and convection are the major energy-loss processes, and they are both proportional to neutral gas temperature. The dependence of the neutral gas temperature on O{sub 2} flow rate and pressure can be well represented through the power dependence, under the condition of constant current operation. An Arrhenius type of dependence between the etching rate of oxide film and the neutral gas temperature is observed, maybe indicating the importance of the pyrolytic dissociation in the plasma formation process when the temperature is above 5000 K.

  18. Dynamics of alkali ions-neutral molecules reactions: Radio frequency-guided beam experimental cross-sections and direct quasiclassical trajectory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, J.; Andres, J. de; Lucas, J. M.; Alberti, M.; Huarte-Larranaga, F.; Bassi, D.; Aguilar, A.

    2012-11-27

    Different reactive processes taking place in collisions between alkali ions and neutral i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Cl molecules in the low (center of mass frame) energy range have been studied using an octopole radiofrequency guided-ion-beam apparatus developed in our laboratory. Cross-section energy dependences for all these reactions have been obtained in absolute units. Ab initio electronic structure calculations for those colliding systems evolving on the ground single potential surface have given relevant information on the main topological features of the surfaces. For some of the reactions a dynamic study by 'on the fly' trajectories has complemented the available experimental and electronic structure information.

  19. STUDIES OF X-RAY PRODUCTION FOLLOWING CHARGE EXCHANGE RECOMBINATION BETWEEN HIGHLY CHARGED IONS AND NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Wargelin, B J

    2008-08-28

    We have used microcalorimeters built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap to measure X-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between highly charged ions colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. Our measurements show the spectral dependence on neutral species and also show the distinct differences between spectra produced by charge exchange reactions and those produced by direct impact excitation. These results are part of an ongoing experimental investigation at the LLNL EBIT facility of charge exchange spectral signatures and can be used to interpret X-ray spectra produced by a variety of laboratory and celestial sources including cometary and planetary atmospheres, the Earth's magnetosheath, the heliosphere, and tokamaks.

  20. Functionalized Collagen Scaffold Neutralizing the Myelin-Inhibitory Molecules Promoted Neurites Outgrowth in Vitro and Facilitated Spinal Cord Regeneration in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Han, Jin; Zhao, Yannan; Ding, Wenyong; Wei, Jianshu; Han, Sufang; Shang, Xianping; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-07-01

    Research has demonstrated that many myelin-associated inhibitory molecules jointly contribute to the failure of adult spinal cord regeneration. Therapies comprehensively targeting the multiple inhibitory nature of the injured spinal cord are being concerned. Here, two collagen-binding proteins, CBD-EphA4LBD and CBD-PlexinB1LBD, were constructed, respectively, to neutralize the axon guidance molecules ephrinB3 and sema4D that inhibit the regeneration of nerve fibers. The two neutralizing proteins have proven their ability to specifically bind collagen and to continuously release from collagen scaffolds. They could also promote neurites outgrowth of cerebellar granular neurons and dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro. Subsequently, the functionalized collagen scaffolds by physically absorbing NEP1-40 and immobilizing CBD-EphA4LBD and CBD-PlexinB1LBD were transplanted into a rat T10 complete spinal cord transection model. Our results showed that rats that received the treatment of transplanting the functionalized collagen scaffold exhibited great advantage on axonal regeneration and locomotion recovery after spinal cord injury. PMID:26034998

  1. Measurement of desorbed products during organic polymer thin film etching by plasma beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, Kazuaki; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Egami, Akihiro; Nakamura, Moritaka

    2006-11-15

    The authors investigated the etching characteristics of three kinds of methacrylate polymer films, which have the same main chain but with different side chains, using a plasma beam irradiation apparatus. The polymers are polytbutylmethacrylate, polybenzylmethacrylate, and polycyclohexylmethacrylate. The major desorbed products during nitrogen plasma beam etching were found to be HCN and C{sub 2}N{sub 2} for all methacrylate polymer films. The desorbed products originating from the polymer structure, namely, the main chain and the side chain, were hardly observed. The energy distributions of desorbed products were mainly composed of Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with a small component of collision cascade distribution for all three polymers and were slightly dependent on the ion energy. It is concluded that chemical sputtering, which can be defined as the production of weakly bound species by ion bombardment, followed by thermal desorption, is the significant ion induced mechanism of organic polymer etching.

  2. ION AND NEUTRAL MOLECULES IN THE W43-MM1(G30.79 FIR 10) INFALLING CLUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, Paulo C.

    2011-12-20

    The high-mass star-forming clump W43-MM1 has been mapped in N{sub 2}H{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), C{sup 18}O(3 {yields} 2), SiO(8 {yields} 7), and in a single pointing in DCO{sup +}(5 {yields} 4) toward the center of the clump. Column densities from these observations as well as previous HCO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), HCN(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CN(4 {yields} 3), and CS(7 {yields} 6) data have been derived using the RADEX code; results later have been used to derive chemical abundances at selected points in the MM1 main axis. We compare with chemical models to estimate an evolutionary age of 10{sup 4} years for a remarkable warm hot core inside MM1. We also proposed that the dust temperature derived from the spectral energy distribution fitting in MM1 is not representative of the gas temperature deep inside the clump because dust emission may have become optically thick. By deriving a deuterium fractionation of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, we estimate an electron fraction of X(e) = 6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}. Thus, the coupling between the neutral gas and the magnetic field is estimated by computing the ambipolar diffusion Reynolds number R{sub m} = 18 and the wave coupling number W = 110. Considering that the infalling speed is slightly supersonic (M = 1.1) but sub-Alfvenic, we conclude that the MM1 clump has recently been or is in the process of decoupling the field from the neutral fluid. Thus, the MM1 clump appears to be in an intermediate stage of evolution in which a hot core has developed while the envelope is still infalling and not fully decoupled from the ambient magnetic field.

  3. Selection of desorbing solvents for organic compounds from active carbon tubes.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Y

    1996-01-01

    To ensure the effective performance of active carbon tubes for working environment measurements, suitable desorbing solvents were selected for 46 kinds of organic compounds by the phase equilibrium method. The criteria for suitable desorbing solvents in this study was desorption of the objective compounds from active carbon at efficiencies greater than 90% and to give good separation between its own peak and that of the objective compound on a gas chromatogram. For most non-polar or hydrophobic compounds, carbon disulfide was a versatile and effective solvent. But for polar and hydrophilic compounds like alcohol, N,N-dimethylformamide and dimethylsulfoxide were good desorbing solvents if their peaks did not overlap with those of the objective compounds. Mixtures of lower molecular weight alcohols with carbon disulfide or dichloromethane could be alternative solvents for hydrophilic compounds as well. A thermodynamic parameter of the solute-solvent system, i.e., the mixing energy derived from the solubility parameter, gave a rough indication of the effectiveness of solvents but it could not be used as a critical indicator for the efficient desorbing solvents for organic vapors collected on active carbon. PMID:8768662

  4. Determination of Desorbed Species During Heating of AgI-Mordenite Provided by ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Croes, Kenneth James; Garino, Terry J.; Mowry, Curtis D.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-12-15

    This study is focused on describing the desorbed off gases due to heating of the AgIMordenite (MOR) produced at ORNL for iodine (I2) gas capture from nuclear fuel aqueous reprocessing. In particular, the interest is for the incorporation of the AgI-MOR into a waste form, which might be the Sandia developed, low temperature sintering, Bi-Si oxide based, Glass Composite Material (GCM). The GCM has been developed as a waste form for the incorporation any oxide based getter material. In the case where iodine may be released during the sintering process of the GCM, additional Ag flake is added as further insurance in total iodine capture and retention. This has been the case for the incorporated ORNL developed AgIMOR. Thermal analysis studies were carried out to determine off gasing processes of ORNL AgIMOR. Independent of sample size, ~7wt% of total water is desorbed by 225°C. This includes both bulk surface and occluded water, and are monitored as H2O and OH. Of that total, ~5.5wt% is surface water which is removed by 125°C, and 1.5wt% is occluded (in zeolite pore) water. Less than ~1 wt% total water continues to desorb, but is completely removed by 500°C. Above 300°C, the detectable remaining desorbing species observed are iodine containing compounds, including I and I2.

  5. Renner-Teller Coupling in Open Shell Dihydrides: a Comparison of Theory with Optical Spectra of Neutral and Ionic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, G.; Jungen, Ch.; Alijah, A.

    2013-06-01

    The studies of the Renner-Teller coupling in isoelectronic series of the neutral dihydrides, started with the experiments of Dressler and Ramsay on the absorption spectra of NH_{2} and of ND_{2} published in 1959, with a companion paper on the theory by Pople and Longuet Higgins. Subsequently experiments on their ionic counterparts, e.g. H_{2}O+, were carried out, initially using photoelectron spectroscopy. However it was not until the period starting in 1965 to 1980 that methods for calculating the vibronic interaction between the half-states were derived and tested. Complications arise owing the the role of the linear degeneracy of the two half states in the formation of the rovibronic structure, and the effects of the increasing spin-orbit interaction in the series from NH_{2} to SbH_{2}, and H_{2}O+ to H_{2}Se+ in facilitating fragmentation processes. Many of these molecular spectra were considered in great detail, but some, such as that of AsH_{2}, have had a less complete treatment of vibronic interaction, in part since the original study of its electronic spectrum took place in the period from 1966-67 before most of the vibronic coupling methods had been developed developed. We wish to show the interplay between the angular momentum effects caused by the large amplitude motion in a degenerate system, and those caused by a rapidly increasing spin-orbit coupling constant. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 251,553(1959) Molec. Phys. 1,372(1958)

  6. Statistical ortho-to-para ratio of water desorbed from ice at 10 kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The anomalously low ortho-to-para ratios (OPRs) exhibited by gaseous water in space have been used to determine the formation temperature (<50 kelvin) of ice on cold interstellar dust. This approach assumes that the OPR of water desorbed from ice is related to the ice formation temperature on the dust. However, we report that water desorbed from ice at 10 kelvin shows a statistical high-temperature OPR of 3, even when the ice is produced in situ by hydrogenation of O2, a known formation process of interstellar water. This invalidates the assumed relation between OPR and temperature. The necessary reinterpretation of the low OPRs will help elucidate the chemical history of interstellar water from molecular clouds and processes in the early solar system, including comet formation.

  7. Ion trap mass spectrometric detection of laser desorbed ions from derivatized fused silica fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.W.; Earl, W.L.; Cisper, M.E.; Nogar, N.S.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1994-12-31

    Solid-phase microextraction of analytes from complex matrices using fused silica fibers has many advantages over traditional chemical sample preparation technique. Microextraction requires small sample sizes little sample preparation (providing rapid sample turnaround time), and greatly reduces the amount of chemical waste generated in sample preparation. These advantages make fused silica fibers attractive for direct sampling and detection experiments using laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry (LITMS). The drawback is the very small area ({approximately}1 mm{sup 2}) exposed to laser irradiation, which limits the amount of material desorbed into the ion trap.

  8. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power. PMID:26844402

  9. Spectroscopic and computational investigations on the origin of charge transfer between included neutral guest molecules and a functionalized anionic layered host.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipak; Tummanapelli, Anil Kumar

    2016-08-10

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) or anionic clays are an important class of ion-exchange materials, well known for drug and gene delivery and several other applications including catalysis, bioactive nanocomposite, electroactive and photoactive materials. Their structure is based on positively charged brucite-like inorganic sheets with the interlamellar space being occupied by charge-compensating exchangeable anions. In spite of having a vast scope many of the applications of LDHs are restricted as their host-guest chemistry is limited to ion-exchange reactions. Recently we have shown for the first time that charge-transfer interactions can be used as a driving force for the insertion of neutral guest molecules (ortho- and para-chloranil) within the galleries of an Mg-Al LDH by forming a charge-transfer complex with aniline pre-intercalated as p-aminobenzoate anion. Here, we have performed quantum chemical calculations in combination with molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the nature of interactions, arrangement and the evaluation of electronic and Raman spectral signatures of the chloranil charge-transfer complex included within the galleries of the Mg-Al LDH. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been used to understand the nature and origin of the unidirectional charge-transfer that lead to the unusual insertion of chloranil in the galleries of the Mg-Al LDH. The NBO analysis reveals that a considerable amount of electronic charge redistribution occurs from the p-aminobenzoate to the chloranil during latter's insertion within the LDH galleries with a very negligible amount of back donation. This work is expected to pave the way for understanding the host-guest chemistry and targeted and controlled delivery of poorly soluble drugs. PMID:27461409

  10. Methodologies for Removing/Desorbing and Transporting Particles from Surfaces to Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carla J.; Cespedes, Ernesto R.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive trace detection (ETD) continues to be a key technology supporting the fight against terrorist bombing threats. Very selective and sensitive ETD instruments have been developed to detect explosive threats concealed on personnel, in vehicles, in luggage, and in cargo containers, as well as for forensic analysis (e.g. post blast inspection, bomb-maker identification, etc.) in a broad range of homeland security, law enforcement, and military applications. A number of recent studies have highlighted the fact that significant improvements in ETD systems' capabilities will be achieved, not by increasing the selectivity/sensitivity of the sensors, but by improved techniques for particle/vapor sampling, pre-concentration, and transport to the sensors. This review article represents a compilation of studies focused on characterizing the adhesive properties of explosive particles, the methodologies for removing/desorbing these particles from a range of surfaces, and approaches for transporting them to the instrument. The objectives of this review are to summarize fundamental work in explosive particle characterization, to describe experimental work performed in harvesting and transport of these particles, and to highlight those approaches that indicate high potential for improving ETD capabilities.

  11. Neutralizer optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Mohajeri, Kayhan

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a test program to optimize a neutralizer design for 30 cm xenon ion thrusters are discussed. The impact of neutralizer geometry, neutralizer axial location, and local magnetic fields on neutralizer performance is discussed. The effect of neutralizer performance on overall thruster performance is quantified, for thruster operation in the 0.5-3.2 kW power range. Additionally, these data are compared to data published for other north-south stationkeeping (NSSK) and primary propulsion xenon ion thruster neutralizers.

  12. Graphene and graphite, low-temperature catalysts producing weakly-excited hydrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenig, Wilhelm; Roman, Tanglaw

    2014-08-01

    A model for the low-temperature catalysis of hydrogen molecules on graphene and graphite, relevant for interstellar chemistry, is proposed: hydrogen atoms are either chemisorbed at the edges, or physisorbed on graphene and transported to a chemisorbed state at the edges. A second atom can then produce a molecule via a hot atom or an Eley-Rideal process. Since much of the energy is needed to desorb the molecule from the tightly-bound chemisorbed state, the desorbing molecules have only low internal excitation energy, in agreement with astronomical observations.

  13. Time-resolved measurements of desorbed gas during 1-MeV K+ pulsedbeam deposition in a stainless steel target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Molvik, A.W.; KireeffCovo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements were made of the density, species and velocity of the desorbed gas cloud on intense K{sup +} beam bombardment of a stainless steel target. RGA measurements indicate that the gas cloud consists of predominantly H{sub 2}. Energy analyzer measurements of doubly-ionized beam ions show that the ratio of hydrogen gas production to beam density was approximately 3000 at normal incidence. Optical measurements of the evolution of the gas cloud during the beam pulse show a distribution with an average expansion velocity of about 0.5 mm/{micro}s. Comparison is made with a simple model of the gas cloud behavior.

  14. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  15. The First Detections of the Key Prebiotic Molecule PO in Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Cesaroni, R.

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element in biochemistry, in particular the P‑O bond, which is key in the formation of the backbone of deoxyribonucleic acid. So far, PO has only been detected toward the envelope of evolved stars, but never toward star-forming regions. We report the first detection of PO toward two massive star-forming regions, W51 e1/e2 and W3(OH), using data from the IRAM 30 m telescope. PN has also been detected toward the two regions. The abundance ratio PO/PN is 1.8 and 3 for W51 and W3(OH), respectively. Our chemical model indicates that the two molecules are chemically related and are formed via gas-phase ion–molecule and neutral–neutral reactions during cold collapse. The molecules freeze out onto grains at the end of the collapse and desorb during the warm-up phase once the temperature reaches ∼35 K. Similar abundances of the two species are expected during a period of ∼5 × 104 yr at the early stages of the warm-up phase, when the temperature is in the range 35–90 K. The observed molecular abundances of 10‑10 are predicted by the model if a relatively high initial abundance of 5 × 10‑9 of depleted phosphorus is assumed.

  16. The First Detections of the Key Prebiotic Molecule PO in Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Cesaroni, R.

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element in biochemistry, in particular the P‑O bond, which is key in the formation of the backbone of deoxyribonucleic acid. So far, PO has only been detected toward the envelope of evolved stars, but never toward star-forming regions. We report the first detection of PO toward two massive star-forming regions, W51 e1/e2 and W3(OH), using data from the IRAM 30 m telescope. PN has also been detected toward the two regions. The abundance ratio PO/PN is 1.8 and 3 for W51 and W3(OH), respectively. Our chemical model indicates that the two molecules are chemically related and are formed via gas-phase ion–molecule and neutral–neutral reactions during cold collapse. The molecules freeze out onto grains at the end of the collapse and desorb during the warm-up phase once the temperature reaches ˜35 K. Similar abundances of the two species are expected during a period of ˜5 × 104 yr at the early stages of the warm-up phase, when the temperature is in the range 35–90 K. The observed molecular abundances of 10‑10 are predicted by the model if a relatively high initial abundance of 5 × 10‑9 of depleted phosphorus is assumed.

  17. The development and evaluation of a thermally-desorbable miniature passive dosimeter for the monitoring of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J; Levine, S P

    1986-06-01

    A thermally desorbable passive dosimeter for organic vapors has been developed in conformity with theoretical and practical aspects of passive dosimeter design. The device was optimized for low sample loadings which result from short-term and/or low concentration level exposure. Laboratory evaluation of this device for factors critical to the performance of passive dosimeters included the following: desorption efficiency, capacity, sensitivity, accuracy and precision, concentration level, environmental conditions (e.g., air face velocity, relative humidity) and sample stability during short and long periods of time. This device has been shown to operate in accordance with theoretically predicted performance and should be adequate for short-term exposure limits and/or low concentration monitoring of organic vapors in the workplace. PMID:3739902

  18. Novel cathode interlayers based on neutral alcohol-soluble small molecules with a triphenylamine core featuring polar phosphonate side chains for high-performance polymer light-emitting and photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongcheng; Zhou, Hu; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Wei-Ming; Su, Shi-Jian; Cao, Yong

    2013-04-12

    A new family of neutral alcohol-soluble small molecular materials comprised of electron-rich triphenylamine (TPA) and fluorene featuring phosphonate side chains (FEP) is reported, namely 3TPA-FEP, 2TPA-2FEP and TPA-3FEP, which have different TPA and FEP contents. Due to their good solubility in polar solvents like alcohol, multilayer devices can be fabricated by a wet process from orthogonal solvents. Polymer light-emitting devices with these materials as a cathode interlayer and Al as the cathode show greatly enhanced efficiencies in contrast to control devices without such a cathode interlayer, and their efficiencies are comparable with or even higher than devices with the low work-function metal Ba/Al as the cathode. In addition, high-performance polymer solar cells based on the poly[N-9''-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT):[6,6]-phenyl C71 -butyric acid methyl ester (PC71 BM) system are also achieved with power conversion efficiencies of 7.21%, 6.90% and 6.89%, by utilizing 3TPA-FEP, 2TPA-2FEP and TPA-3FEP as the cathode interlayer, respectively. These efficiencies are also much higher than those for control devices without the cathode interlayer. Although TPA is well-known as a hole-transport unit, the current findings indicate that alcohol-soluble TPA-based small molecules are also a promising cathode interlayer for both electron injection and extraction. PMID:23386362

  19. Extremely slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot and soot-like materials: evidence by supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Michiel T.O. Jonker; Steven B. Hawthorne; Albert A. Koelmans

    2005-10-15

    Combustion-derived PAHs are strongly sorbed to their particulate carrier (i.e., soot, charcoal), and therefore, very slow desorption kinetics of the chemicals might be anticipated. Measurements are however lacking, because conventional methods (Tenax, XAD, gas-purging) fail to accurately determine desorption kinetics due to practical problems. In this study, we used a mild supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method, which mimics desorption into water and circumvents these problems, to quantify desorption kinetics of 13 native PAHs from pure charcoal, coal, and four types of soot. The results show that generally only very small PAH fractions are released. Desorption behavior was, however, not related to common sorbent/sorbate characteristics. Two-site model-derived 'fast desorbing fractions' were {lt}0.01 in the majority of cases, and for the dominant 'slow sites', the calculated rate constants for desorption into water measured from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -5} h{sup -1}. These data suggest that desorption of coal and combustion-derived PAHs can be even slower than the 'very slow' desorption observed in sediments. Estimated time scales required for removal of pyrogenic PAHs from these extremely slow sites into water amount to several millennia. Our results imply reduced chemical risks for soot and soot-like materials, casting doubts on current risk assessment procedures and environmental quality standards of pyrogenic PAHs. 41 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Dynamics of the photoinduced desorption of nitric oxide molecules from the surface of pure and modified platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khubezhov, S. A.; Silaev, I. V.; Demeev, Z. S.; Ramonova, A. V.; Kaloeva, A. G.; Tvauri, I. V.; Grigorkina, G. S.; Kibizov, D. D.; Ashkhotov, O. G.; Ogura, S.; Sekiba, D.; Fukutani, K.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of NO molecules desorbed from a Pt(111) surface due to valence electron excitation over rotational energy levels N( J) is analyzed using a simple impulse-induced model. A linear dependence is found between ln N( J) and ( E r )1/2, where E r is the rotational energy of the desorbed molecules. The lifetime of the excited state and the critical time of residence in the excited state estimated using this dependence are found to be close to one another (~10-15 s). The frequency and amplitude of the tilting vibrations of the adsorbed molecules in the excited state are estimated.

  1. Experimental investigations of the internal energy of molecules evaporated via laser-induced acoustic desorption into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Shea, Ryan C; Petzold, Christopher J; Liu, Ji-Ang; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2007-03-01

    The internal energy of neutral gas-phase organic and biomolecules, evaporated by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, was investigated through several experimental approaches. The desorbed molecules were demonstrated not to undergo degradation during the desorption process by collecting LIAD-evaporated molecules and subjecting them to analysis by electrospray ionization/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Previously established gas-phase basicity values were remeasured for LIAD-evaporated organic molecules and biomolecules with the use of the bracketing method. No endothermic reactions were observed. The remeasured basicity values are in close agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of internal energy deposited during LIAD is concluded to be less than a few kilocalories per mole. Chemical ionization with a series of proton-transfer reagents was employed to obtain a breakdown curve for a protonated dipeptide, Val-Pro, evaporated by LIAD. Comparison of this breakdown curve with a previously published analogous curve obtained by using substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) to evaporate the peptide suggests that the molecules evaporated via LIAD have a similar internal energy as those evaporated via SALD. PMID:17263513

  2. Poisson's spot with molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, Thomas; Holst, Bodil; Patel, Amil A.; Smith, Henry I.; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo

    2009-05-15

    In the Poisson-spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson's spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson's spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large molecule diffraction to patterning with molecules.

  3. Poisson's spot with molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Thomas; Patel, Amil A.; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo; Smith, Henry I.; Holst, Bodil

    2009-05-01

    In the Poisson-spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson’s spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson’s spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large molecule diffraction to patterning with molecules.

  4. Poisson's Spot with Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisinger, Thomas; Patel, Amil; Reingruber, Herbert; Fladischer, Katrin; Ernst, Wolfgang E.; Bracco, Gianangelo; Smith, Henry I.; Holst, Bodil

    2009-03-01

    In the Poisson-Spot experiment, waves emanating from a source are blocked by a circular obstacle. Due to their positive on-axis interference an image of the source (the Poisson spot) is observed within the geometrical shadow of the obstacle. The Poisson spot is the last of the classical optics experiments to be realized with neutral matter waves. In this paper we report the observation of Poisson's Spot using a beam of neutral deuterium molecules. The wavelength-independence and the weak constraints on angular alignment and position of the circular obstacle make Poisson's spot a promising candidate for applications ranging from the study of large-molecule diffraction and coherence in atom-lasers to patterning with large molecules.

  5. Neutralization kinetics for polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, K.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1988-06-01

    In a well-defined experimental system the neutralization of polonium-218 ions was investigated as a function of the physical and chemical properties of the controlled composition atmosphere. The diffusion coefficient of polonium-218 under various concentrations of trace gas NO/sub 2/ in nitrogen was measured. The mobilities of Po/sup +/ and PoO/sub 2//sup +/ are determined by combining experimental results with a computer model of the system. Three neutralization mechanisms were individually studied. The small-ion recombination rate has been found to be proportional to the square root of radon concentration. The electron-scavenging mechanism is responsible for the neutralization of Po/sup +/ in NO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O in nitrogen. When PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is formed, the electron-transfer mechanism dominates the neutralization process. The electron is transferred to PoO/sub 2//sup +/ from molecules with lower ionization potentials. The ionization molecules with lower ionization potentials. The ionization potential of PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is also determined to be 10.44 +/- 0.05 eV.

  6. Experimental Investigations of the Internal Energy of Molecules Evaporated via Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption into a Fourier-transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (LIAD/FT-ICR)

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Ryan C.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Ji-ang; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2008-01-01

    The internal energy of neutral gas-phase organic and biomolecules, evaporated by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR), was investigated through several experimental approaches. The desorbed molecules were demonstrated not to undergo degradation during the desorption process by collecting LIAD-evaporated molecules and subjecting them to analysis by electrospray ionization/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Previously established gas-phase basicity (GB) values were remeasured for LIAD-evaporated organic molecules and biomolecules with the use of the bracketing method. No endothermic reactions were observed. The remeasured basicity values are in close agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of internal energy deposited during LIAD is concluded to be less than a few kcal/mol. Chemical ionization with a series of proton transfer reagents was employed to obtain a breakdown curve for a protonated dipeptide, val-pro, evaporated by LIAD. Comparison of this breakdown curve with a previously published analogous curve obtained by using substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) to evaporate the peptide suggests that the molecules evaporated via LIAD have less internal energy than those evaporated via SALD. PMID:17263513

  7. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  8. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.

    1981-08-18

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  9. An autoneutralizing neutral molecular beam gun

    SciTech Connect

    Delmore, J.E.; Appelhans, A.D.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A high-energy (up to 28 keV) neutral molecular beam gun has been developed and put into routine use that takes advantage of the autoneutralization properties of the sulfur hexafluoride anion for the production of high-energy sulfur hexafluoride neutral molecules. The anions are produced in an electron-capture source, accelerated, and focused in a lens assembly designed to minimize residence time, allowed to drift at their terminal velocity for a suitable distance during which up to 30% auto-eject an electron, and all remaining charged particles are electrostatically skimmed, resulting in a focused neutral beam. Rasterable neutral beams focused to a 5-mm spot size up to 3 m from the source have been produced with beam currents up to 40 pA equivalent. Spot sizes of 1 mm can be produced with intensity levels of a few picoamperes equivalent.

  10. Kinetics of neutralization of Po-218

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    In a well-defined experimental system the neutralization of polonium-218 ions was investigated as a function of the physical and chemical properties of the controlled composition atmosphere. The mobilities of Po/sup +/ and PoO/sub 2//sup +/ are determined by combining experimental results with a computer model of the system. Three neutralization mechanisms were individually studied. The small ion recombination rate has been found to be proportional to the square root of radon concentration. The electron scavenging mechanism is responsible for the neutralization of Po/sup +/ in NO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O in nitrogen. When PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is formed, the electron transfer mechanism dominates the neutralization process. The electron is transferred to PoO/sub 2//sup +/ from molecules with lower ionization potentials. The ionization potential of PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is also determined to be 10.44 +/- 0.05 eV.

  11. The neutral diffuse ISM after Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Observations with the Herschel Space Observatory have greatly enhanced our understanding of neutral diffuse material in the interstellar medium. In particular, high-resolution absorption line spectroscopy at THz frequencies has led to the discovery of several new interstellar molecules - including SH+, OH+, H2O, H2Cl+, HCl+, and ArH+ (the first known astrophysical molecule containing a noble gas atom) - and has enabled astrochemical studies in which the abundances of multiple species are measured and modeled. Because of the different chemical pathways responsible for their formation and destruction, different molecules probe specific aspects of the interstellar environment. Carefully interpreted, they provide unique information about the cosmic ray density, the molecular fraction, the ultraviolet radiation field, and the dissipation of energy within the turbulent interstellar medium. Future spectroscopic observations with ALMA and SOFIA promise to extend further our understanding of fundamental physical and chemical processes the neutral diffuse ISM.

  12. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, Alexander V.; Veryovkin, Igor V.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2009-03-17

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  13. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, A. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Materials Science Division

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  14. Effect of Surface Charge on Laser-induced Neutral Atom Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, Kenneth M.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2010-10-01

    When an ionic metal oxide crystal is cleaved, inhomogeneous electrical charging of the surface can be a result. Such an effect has been well-documented in magnesium oxide (100). For example, recent rigorous AFM studies indicate that nanoscale charged clusters of MgO are created during cleavage, with high concentrations often located at terrace step edges.[1] In addition, ablation processes of freshly cleaved magnesium oxide crystals may be effected by remnant surface charging and microstructures.[2] We report here that such surface charging strongly impacts even neutral atom desorption, even under conditions of extremely mild excitation of surface terrace features. In our experiments, single crystal MgO (100) is cleaved in air and placed in an ultra-high vacuum chamber (UHV). We irradiate the crystal at 6.4 eV, photon energy resonant with five-coordinated (5-C) terrace sites and probe desorbing neutral oxygen atoms. It is found that a significant fraction of desorbed neutral oxygen atoms from the charged surface possess kinetic energies in excess of 0.7 eV. This is in contrast to uncharged samples (discharged in vacuo over 24 hours) that display a near-thermal oxygen atom distribution.

  15. On neutral plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Morrison, P.J.

    1993-06-01

    We examine the conditions for the existence of spectrally stable neutral modes in a Vlasov-Poisson plasma and show that for stable equilibria of systems that have unbounded spatial domain, the only possible neutral modes are those with phase velocities that correspond to stationary inflection points of the equilibrium distribution function. It is seen that these neutral modes can possess positive or negative free energy.

  16. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  17. Neutralization of thoron progeny in gases.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y S; Yu, C C; Tung, C J; Hopke, P K

    1994-08-01

    This paper reports charge neutralization phenomena of 212Pb particles in nitrogen or oxygen atmospheres with trace amounts of other gases. Newly produced thoron or radon progeny are positively charged, stable molecular clusters that are subsequently neutralized by several mechanisms. The charged clusters have a smaller diffusion coefficient than neutral clusters of the same size due to the interaction of the charge with the surrounding gas molecules. In this study, we have found that the diffusion coefficients of 212Pb in O2, N2, NH3/O2, NH3/N2, and C6H12/N2 (IPs between 15.58 and 9.8 eV) ranged between 0.015 and 0.030 cm2 s-1. In the case of C6H12/O2, NO2/O2, NO/O2, and dimethylamine/O2 (ionization potential between 9.8 and 8.23 eV), the diffusion coefficients have increased to between 0.046 and 0.69 cm2 s-1. These results are consistent with previous results of 218Po, indicating that charged progeny are neutralized by electron transfer from a gas molecule with a lower ionization potential than lead oxide. We estimate the ionization potential of lead oxide to range between 9.8 and 10.2 eV. 212Pb was also neutralized by an electron scavenging mechanism in NO2/nitrogen. PMID:8026969

  18. A DFT study of hydration in neutral and zwitterionic norfloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto Vitorino, Graciela; Barrera, Gustavo D.; Rosa Mazzieri, María; Binning, R. C., Jr.; Bacelo, Daniel E.

    2006-12-01

    Hydration of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic norfloxacin has been examined in B3LYP/6-31+G ∗ calculations. The neutral and zwitterionic forms and their one- and two-water complexes have been optimized both as isolated molecules and within a solvation field simulated by the polarizable continuum model. The explicitly included water molecules are found to affect solvation energies of both neutrals and zwitterions, but overall their inclusion does not improve the average solvated neutral-zwitterion energy separation. The calculated separations of 3-5 kcal/mol are consistent with experimental observations that the two forms coexist in solution under physiological conditions.

  19. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  20. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  1. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  2. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  3. Neutrality in Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Lionel

    2010-01-01

    The unavoidability of language makes it critical that language policies appeal to some notion of language neutrality as part of their rationale, in order to assuage concerns that the policies might otherwise be unduly discriminatory. However, the idea of language neutrality is deeply ideological in nature, since it is not only an attempt to treat…

  4. An Approach for Measuring the Sorptive Behavior of Odorants Using a Multifunction Thermal Desorber Unit: Preliminary Tests on Reduced Sulfur Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Choi, Ye-Jin; Yang, Hye-Soon; Joo, Sang-Woo

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the sorptive behavior of reduced sulfur compounds (RSC) was investigated using a combination of thermal desorber (TD) unit and gas chromatography (GC). To examine the sorptive properties of RSC on textile materials, two types of experiments were conducted under experimental conditions favorable for sorptive processes. In all the experiments, gaseous standards of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were supplied to initiate the adsorption processes on textile pieces. The textile pieces were then forced to release those adsorbed RSC under a fixed condition. It was found that the extent of adsorption, if evaluated quantitatively, occurred at approximately 1/1000 to 1/100 of the level of RSC standards supplied originally to induce adsorption. It also indicated that RSC adsorption was affected very sensitively by the initial exposure durations to induce RSC adsorption with an exponential decrease in relative recovery (RR) values with increasing exposure time. The relative sorptive patterns, when compared between different RSCs, were affected most sensitively by such factors as molecular weight and/or physical contact conditions.

  5. Evaluation of a Fin and Tube Type Adsorber/Desorber Heat Exchanger using =ACF/C2H5OH Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, Keishi; Makimoto, Naoya; Kuwahara, Ken; Koyama, Shigeru

    This study deals with the experiment to clarify the characteristics of adsorption refrigeration system employing activated carbon fiber (ACF) and ethanol pair and to evaluate the performance of adsorber/desorber heat exchanger defined by two kind of index to the system performance. The experiments are carried out by varying system running parameters such as regeneration temperature for adsorber, ethanol temperature in the evaporator, pre-heating/cooling cycle time, adsorption/desorption cycle time. Regeneration temperature for adsorber is from 60 to 90 °C and ethanol temperature is from 0 to 20 °C and pre-heating/cooling cycle time is 60 and 120 second and adsorption/desorption cycle time is from 120 to 300 second. Results show that the system can be operated with regeneration temperature of 60 °C and the system performance improves with increase of ethanol temperature. It is also found that the system performance is affected by regeneration temperature for adsorber and the pre-heating/cooling cycle time and adsorption/desorption cycle time.

  6. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined “MALDI-2,” which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  7. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined "MALDI-2," which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed. PMID:25669372

  8. Fundamental studies of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, using time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Eades, D.; Wruck, D.; Gregg, H.

    1996-11-11

    MALDI MS was developed as a way of getting molecular weight information on small quantities (picomole to femtomole levels) of high-mass, thermally labile macromolecules. While most other analytical MS ionization techniques cause fragmentation, decomposition, or multiple charging, MALDI efficiently places intact macromolecules into the gas phase with little fragmentation or rearrangement. This project had 3 objectives: establish the MALDI capability at LLNL, perform fundamental studies of analyte-matrix interactions, and apply the technique for biochemical research. A retired time-of-flight instrument was adapted for MALDI analyses, relevant parameters influencing the MALDI process were identified for further study (matrix molar absorptivity, sample crystal preparation), and collaborations were established with research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program at LLNL. In MALDI, the macromolecule of interest is mixed with a high-molar excess (1:100 to 1:10,000) of an organic matrix which readily absorbs energy at the wavelength corresponding to a UV laser. Upon laser irradiation, the matrix absorbs the majority of the energy, causing it to desorb from the surface and gently release the macromolecule into the gas phase with little or no fragmentation. Once in the gas phase, ion-molecule reactions between excited matrix and neutral macromolecules generated ionized analyte species which then can be focused into a MS for detection.

  9. Equivalent Neutral Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Wenqing

    1996-01-01

    The definition of equivalent neutral wind and the rationale for using it as the geophysical product of a spaceborne scatterometer are reviewed. The differences between equivalent neutral wind and actual wind, which are caused by atmospheric density stratification, are demonstrated with measurements at selected locations. A method of computing this parameter from ship and buoy measurements is described and some common fallacies in accounting for the effects of atmospheric stratification on wind shear are discussed. The computer code for the model to derive equivalent neutral wind is provided.

  10. Observing single molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Emory, S. R.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, P. M.; Keller, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    We report the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of broad SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm{sup -1} and 1340 cm{sup -1} observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurements of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

  11. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  12. A niche for neutrality.

    PubMed

    Adler, Peter B; Hillerislambers, Janneke; Levine, Jonathan M

    2007-02-01

    Ecologists now recognize that controversy over the relative importance of niches and neutrality cannot be resolved by analyzing species abundance patterns. Here, we use classical coexistence theory to reframe the debate in terms of stabilizing mechanisms (niches) and fitness equivalence (neutrality). The neutral model is a special case where stabilizing mechanisms are absent and species have equivalent fitness. Instead of asking whether niches or neutral processes structure communities, we advocate determining the degree to which observed diversity reflects strong stabilizing mechanisms overcoming large fitness differences or weak stabilization operating on species of similar fitness. To answer this question, we propose combining data on per capita growth rates with models to: (i) quantify the strength of stabilizing processes; (ii) quantify fitness inequality and compare it with stabilization; and (iii) manipulate frequency dependence in growth to test the consequences of stabilization and fitness equivalence for coexistence. PMID:17257097

  13. Is dispersal neutral?

    PubMed

    Lowe, Winsor H; McPeek, Mark A

    2014-08-01

    Dispersal is difficult to quantify and often treated as purely stochastic and extrinsically controlled. Consequently, there remains uncertainty about how individual traits mediate dispersal and its ecological effects. Addressing this uncertainty is crucial for distinguishing neutral versus non-neutral drivers of community assembly. Neutral theory assumes that dispersal is stochastic and equivalent among species. This assumption can be rejected on principle, but common research approaches tacitly support the 'neutral dispersal' assumption. Theory and empirical evidence that dispersal traits are under selection should be broadly integrated in community-level research, stimulating greater scrutiny of this assumption. A tighter empirical connection between the ecological and evolutionary forces that shape dispersal will enable richer understanding of this fundamental process and its role in community assembly. PMID:24962790

  14. High-energy collision-induced dissociation of [M+Na]+ ions desorbed by fast atom bombardment of ceramides isolated from the starfish Distolasterias nipon.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Sun; Park, Taeseong; Bang, Geul; Lee, Chulhyun; Rho, Jung-Rae; Kim, Young Hwan

    2013-02-01

    Ten ceramides and four cerebrosides were extracted from the starfish Distolasterias nipon by solvent extraction, silica gel column chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Structural identification was conducted using tandem mass spectrometry of monosodiated ions desorbed by fast atom bombardment. The complete structures of four cerebrosides were determined by a previously reported method. The high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectral characteristics of ceramides with various structures depend on the number and positions of double bonds on both the N-acyl and sphingoid chains, the presence of a hydroxyl group or a double bond at the C-4 position of the sphingoid chain and the presence of an α-hydroxy group on the N-acyl chain. The high-energy CID of the monosodiated ion, [M+Na](+), of each ceramide molecular species generated abundant ions, providing information on the composition of the fatty acyl chains and sphingoid long-chain bases. Each homologous ion series along the fatty acyl group and aliphatic chain of the sphingoid base was used for locating the double-bond positions of both chains and hydroxyl groups on the sphingoid base chain. The double-bond positions were also confirmed by the m/z values of abundant allylic even- and odd-electron ions, and the intensity ratio of the T ion peak relative to the O ion peak. This technique could determine the complete structures of ceramides and cerebrosides in an extract mixture and has great potential for determining other sphingolipids isolated from various biological sources. PMID:23378088

  15. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment. PMID:25867282

  16. Stark and Zeeman Deceleration of Neutral Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, S. D.; Vliegen, E.; Sprecher, D.; Vanhaecke, N.; Andrist, M.; Schmutz, H.; Meier, U.; Meier, B. H.; Merkt, F.

    2008-04-01

    Argon and hydrogen atoms excited to Rydberg Stark states in supersonic expansions have been decelerated using inhomogeneous electric fields. In the case of hydrogen, the atoms have been decelerated from an initial velocity of 700 m/s to zero velocity in the lab frame using time-dependent inhomogeneous electric fields and subsequently stored in two- and three-dimensional traps. The dynamics of the Rydberg atoms in the traps and the phase-space characteristics of the decelerated atoms have been characterized by pulsed field ionization and imaging techniques. Multi-stage Zeeman deceleration of ground state H and D atoms has been demonstrated. Using this technique H atoms, traveling at 420 m/s, have been decelerated to half of their initial kinetic energy.

  17. Neutral versus polycationic coordination cages: a comparison regarding neutral guest inclusion.

    PubMed

    Szalóki, György; Croué, Vincent; Allain, Magali; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2016-08-21

    A neutral self-assembled container synthesized from a concave π-extended tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) ligand and the cis-Pd(dctfb)2(cod) complex (dctfb = 3,5-dichloro-2,4,6-trifluorobenzene; cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) is described. This molecular host exhibits a good binding ability for fused polyaromatic substrates. The corresponding inclusion properties are compared with those of a previously described analogous octacationic cage, offering therefore the opportunity to address the effect of the cavity charge state over the binding of neutral molecules. PMID:27440274

  18. Neutral particle lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Barry Paul

    Neutral particle lithography (NPL) is a high resolution, proximity exposure technique where a broad beam of energetic neutral particles floods a stencil mask and transmitted beamlets transfer the mask pattern to resist on a substrate, such that each feature is printed in parallel, rather than in the serial manner of electron beam lithography. It preserves the advantages of ion beam lithography (IBL), including extremely large depth-of-field, sub-5 nm resist scattering, and the near absence of diffraction, yet is intrinsically immune to charge-related artifacts including line-edge roughness and pattern placement errors due to charge accumulation on the mask and substrate. In our experiments, a neutral particle beam is formed by passing an ion beam (e.g., 30 keV He+) through a high pressure helium gas cell (e.g., 100 mTorr) to convert the ions to energetic neutrals through charge transfer scattering. The resolution of NPL is generally superior to that of IBL for applications involving insulating substrates, large proximity gaps, and ultra-small features. High accuracy stepped exposures with energetic neutral particles, where magnetic or electrostatic deflection is impossible, have been obtained by clamping the mask to the wafer, setting the proximity gap with a suitable spacer, and mechanically inclining the mask/wafer stack relative to the beam. This approach is remarkably insensitive to vibration and thermal drift; nanometer scale image offsets have been obtained with +/-2 nm placement accuracy for experiments lasting over one hour. Using this nanostepping technique, linewidth versus dose curves were obtained, from which the NPL lithographic blur was determined as 4.4+/-1.4 nm (1sigma), which is 2-3 times smaller than the blur of electron beam lithography. Neutral particle lithography has the potential to form high density, periodic patterns with sub-10 nm resolution.

  19. A superconducting NbN detector for neutral nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marksteiner, Markus; Divochiy, Alexander; Sclafani, Michele; Haslinger, Philipp; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Korneev, Alexander; Semenov, Alexander; Gol'tsman, Gregory; Arndt, Markus

    2009-11-01

    We present a proof-of-principle study of superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) for the detection of individual neutral molecules/nanoparticles at low energies. The new detector is applied to characterize a laser desorption source for biomolecules and allows retrieval of the arrival time distribution of a pulsed molecular beam containing the amino acid tryptophan, the polypeptide gramicidin as well as insulin, myoglobin and hemoglobin. We discuss the experimental evidence that the detector is actually sensitive to isolated neutral particles.

  20. Ultracold neutral plasmas.

    PubMed

    Killian, Thomas C

    2007-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas occupy an exotic regime of plasma physics in which electrons form a swarming, neutralizing background for ions that sluggishly move in a correlated manner. Strong interactions between the charged particles give rise to surprising dynamics such as oscillations of the average kinetic energy during equilibration and extremely fast recombination. Such phenomena offer stimulating and challenging problems for computational scientists, and the physics can be applied to other environments, such as the interior of gas giant planets and plasmas created by short-pulse laser irradiation of solid, liquid, and cluster targets. PMID:17478712

  1. Neutral beam development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, H S

    1980-08-01

    The national plan is presented for developing advanced injection systems for use on upgrades of existing experiments, and use on future facilities such as ETF, to be built in the late 1980's or early 90's where power production from magnetic fusion will move closer to a reality. Not only must higher power and longer pulse length systems be developed , but they must operate reliably; they must be a tool for the experimenter, not the experiment itself. Neutral beam systems handle large amounts of energy and as such, they often are as complicated as the plasma physics experiment itself. This presents a significant challenge to the neutral beam developer.

  2. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  3. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  4. Electron stimulated desorption studies of the adsorption and dynamics of molecules on a copper(110) single crystal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocuta, Dan Mihai

    This thesis describes studies of angular distributions produced by the electron stimulated desorption of ions and neutrals from adsorbates on a Cu(110) surface. A new technique, time-of-flight electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution (TOF-ESDIAD), has been developed and several studies using this method are reported. The low frequency frustrated translation mode of a model system, low coverage CO/Cu(110), is analyzed using TOF-ESDIAD. A simplified model is used to extract the energies of this mode along the two crystal azimuthal directions. A first time measurement of an anisotropy of this mode in the two directions is reported. The same frustrated translational energies giving the same anisotropy have been measured in a helium atom scattering experiment in confirmation of the ESDIAD measurements. An analysis of the TOF distributions of species desorbing from CO/Cu(110) shows that these are Maxwellian. It is shown that CO* and CO+ have similar TOF distributions, indicating a common desorption channel for both species. The ability of ESDIAD to measure chemical bond directions has been put to use in the observation of interadsorbate interactions. It is shown that at high CO coverage on the Cu(110) surface, the CO molecules agglomerate in chains and tilt away from the surface normal. The same phenomenon is observed in the case of NH3, where H+ ions produced by rupturing the N-H bonds of this molecule are imaged. The NH3 molecules can be trapped in a tilted position by cooling the copper surface using liquid helium. It is shown that such a configuration is a precursor to the upright chemisorbed configuration, in which the molecules rotate around the C3v axis. Not only can we image using the electrons, but we can produce new species by electron bombardment. The dissociation of NH3 to NH2 and H has been induced by electrons and the formation of these products is witnessed using ESDIAD. The oxygen induced reconstruction of the Cu(110) surface is studied

  5. Entropy bottlenecks in ion-molecule reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, J. A.; Brauman, J. I.; Golden, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The significance of entropy bottlenecks in dissociation and recombination pathways in the prototype ionic system CH3 + CH3(+) has been investigated. Ion-molecule systems are shown to react through an entirely different dynamics than neutral systems, due to intrinsic differences in the shapes of the relevant potential surfaces. Consequences with regard to the interpretation of experimental rate parameters in the ion-molecule area are discussed.

  6. Modeling thermospheric neutral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Liying

    Satellite drag prediction requires determination of thermospheric neutral density. The NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and the global-mean Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM) were used to quantify thermospheric neutral density and its variations, focusing on annual/semiannual variation, the effect of using measured solar irradiance on model calculations of solar-cycle variation, and global change in the thermosphere. Satellite drag data and the MSIS00 empirical model were utilized to compare to the TIEGCM simulations. The TIEGCM simulations indicated that eddy diffusion and its annual/semiannual variation is a mechanism for annual/semiannual density variation in the thermosphere. It was found that eddy diffusion near the turbopause can effectively influence thermospheric neutral density. Eddy diffusion, together with annual insolation variation and large-scale circulation, generated global annual/semiannual density variation observed by satellite drag. Using measured solar irradiance as solar input for the TIEGCM improved the solar-cycle dependency of the density calculation shown in F10.7 -based thermospheric empirical models. It has been found that the empirical models overestimate density at low solar activity. The TIEGCM simulations did not show such solar-cycle dependency. Using historic measurements of CO2 and F 10.7, simulations of the global-mean TIMEGCM showed that thermospheric neutral density at 400 km had an average long-term decrease of 1.7% per decade from 1970 to 2000. A forecast of density decrease for solar cycle 24 suggested that thermospheric density will decrease at 400 km from present to the end of solar cycle 24 at a rate of 2.7% per decade. Reduction in thermospheric density causes less atmospheric drag on earth-orbiting space objects. The implication of this long-term decrease of thermospheric neutral density is that it will increase the

  7. The Origin of Complex Organic Molecules in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-11-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been detected in a variety of environments including cold prestellar cores. Given the low temperatures of these objects, these detections challenge existing models. We report here new observations toward the prestellar core L1544. They are based on an unbiased spectral survey of the 3 mm band at the IRAM 30 m telescope as part of the Large Program ASAI. The observations allow us to provide a full census of the oxygen-bearing COMs in this source. We detected tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, ketene, and propyne with abundances varying from 5 × 10-11 to 6 × 10-9. The non-LTE analysis of the methanol lines shows that they are likely emitted at the border of the core at a radius of ~8000 AU, where T ~ 10 K and n H_2 ~2 × 104 cm-3. Previous works have shown that water vapor is enhanced in the same region because of the photodesorption of water ices. We propose that a non-thermal desorption mechanism is also responsible for the observed emission of methanol and COMs from the same layer. The desorbed oxygen and a small amount of desorbed methanol and ethene are enough to reproduce the abundances of tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ketene measured in L1544. These new findings open the possibility that COMs in prestellar cores originate in a similar outer layer rather than in the dense inner cores, as previously assumed, and that their formation is driven by the non-thermally desorbed species.

  8. THE ORIGIN OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN PRESTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-11-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been detected in a variety of environments including cold prestellar cores. Given the low temperatures of these objects, these detections challenge existing models. We report here new observations toward the prestellar core L1544. They are based on an unbiased spectral survey of the 3 mm band at the IRAM 30 m telescope as part of the Large Program ASAI. The observations allow us to provide a full census of the oxygen-bearing COMs in this source. We detected tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, ketene, and propyne with abundances varying from 5 × 10{sup –11} to 6 × 10{sup –9}. The non-LTE analysis of the methanol lines shows that they are likely emitted at the border of the core at a radius of ∼8000 AU, where T ∼ 10 K and n {sub H{sub 2}} ∼2 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}. Previous works have shown that water vapor is enhanced in the same region because of the photodesorption of water ices. We propose that a non-thermal desorption mechanism is also responsible for the observed emission of methanol and COMs from the same layer. The desorbed oxygen and a small amount of desorbed methanol and ethene are enough to reproduce the abundances of tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ketene measured in L1544. These new findings open the possibility that COMs in prestellar cores originate in a similar outer layer rather than in the dense inner cores, as previously assumed, and that their formation is driven by the non-thermally desorbed species.

  9. Comet Halley neutral gas density profile along the Vega 1 trajectory measured by NGE. [Neutral Gas Experiment (NGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, C. C.; Fan, C. Y.; Hsieh, K. C.; Hunten, D. M.; Ip, WING-H.; Keppler, E.; Richter, A. K.; Umlauft, G.; Afonin, V. V.; Dyachkov, A. V.

    1986-01-01

    Data from the Vega 1 permitted the determination of the total neutral gas density profile along the spacecraft trajectory. Discounting small fluctuations, the field ionization source instrument measured a density profile which varied approximately as the inverse radial distance squared. Data from the electron impact ionization instrument yielded a series of calibration points; e.g., the neutral density at 100,000 km is 10,000/cc. The combined data provide a calibrated total density profile, and imply a neutral production rate of 10 to the 30th power molecules/sec.

  10. Self-Entanglement and the Dissociation of Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gonis, Antonios; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    The concept of self-entanglement is introduced to describe a mixed state or ensemble density as a pure state in an augmented Hilbert space formed by the products of the individual states forming a mixed state (or ensemble). We use this representation of mixed states to show that upon dissociation a neutral homonuclear diatomic molecule will separate into two neutral atoms.

  11. Neutral cloud and heavy ion inner torus at Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Pospieszalska, M.K.; Sittler, E.C. Jr.; Cheng, A.F.; Lanzerotti, L.J.

    1989-02-01

    Voyager plasma data are used in conjunction with laboratory data on water molecule sputter-yields and energy distributions to calculate the morphology of the Saturn neutral water molecule and dissociated water molecule-product torus coexisting with the E-ring and icy satellites of this planet. Plasma production rates determined for this cloud exhibit a structure with distance from Saturn as well as from the orbit plane; this suggests a lack of equilibrium for the heavy ion plasma at less than 7 planet radii. Attention is given to the possibility that the Saturn E-ring may be a precipitate of the neutral cloud that is initiated by low-energy ion-molecule reactions. 61 references.

  12. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  13. Between detection and neutralization.

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Green, Mary Wilson; Adams, Douglas Glenn; Pritchard, Daniel Allison

    2005-08-01

    Security system analytical performance analysis is generally based on the probability of system effectiveness. The probability of effectiveness is a function of the probabilities of interruption and neutralization. Interruption occurs if the response forces are notified in sufficient time to engage the adversary. Neutralization occurs if the adversary attack is defeated after the security forces have actively engaged the adversary. Both depend upon communications of data. This paper explores details of embedded communications functions that are often assumed to be inconsequential. It is the intent of the authors to bring focus to an issue in security system modeling that, if not well understood, has the potential to be a deciding factor in the overall system failure or effectiveness.

  14. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  15. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  16. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L.; Blank, Merle L.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated ether-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood pressure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  17. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  18. Phase Transitions in a Model of Y-Molecules Abstract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Danielle; Ruth, Donovan; Toral, Raul; Gunton, James

    Immunoglobulin is a Y-shaped molecule that functions as an antibody to neutralize pathogens. In special cases where there is a high concentration of immunoglobulin molecules, self-aggregation can occur and the molecules undergo phase transitions. This prevents the molecules from completing their function. We used a simplified model of 2-Dimensional Y-molecules with three identical arms on a triangular lattice with 2-dimensional Grand Canonical Ensemble. The molecules were permitted to be placed, removed, rotated or moved on the lattice. Once phase coexistence was found, we used histogram reweighting and multicanonical sampling to calculate our phase diagram.

  19. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  20. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  1. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  2. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free Exercise and…

  3. Alkali metal ion storage properties of sulphur and phosphorous molecules encapsulated in nanometer size carbon cylindrical pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Sakamoto, Yuki; Song, Hayong; Tashiro, Kosuke; Nishiwaki, Yoshiki; Al-zubaidi, Ayar; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the physical and chemical stabilities of sulfur and phosphorus molecules encapsulated in a mesoporous carbon (MPC) and two kinds of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having different cylindrical pore diameters. The sublimation temperatures of sulfur molecules encapsulated in MPC and the two kinds of SWCNTs were measured by thermo-gravimetric measurements. It was found that the sublimation temperature of sulfur molecules encapsulated in SWCNTs having mean tube diameter of 1.5 nm is much higher than any other molecules encapsulated in larger pores. It was also found that the capacity fading of lithium-sulfur battery can be diminished by encapsulation of sulfur molecules in SWCNTs. We also investigated the electrochemical properties of phosphorus molecules encapsulated in SWCNTs (P@SWCNTs). It was shown that P@SWCNT can adsorb and desorb both Li and Na ions reversibly.

  4. An ultrasensitive universal detector based on neutralizer displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jagotamoy; Cederquist, Kristin B.; Zaragoza, Alexandre A.; Lee, Paul E.; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2012-08-01

    Diagnostic technologies that can provide the simultaneous detection of nucleic acids for gene expression, proteins for host response and small molecules for profiling the human metabolome will have a significant advantage in providing comprehensive patient monitoring. Molecular sensors that report changes in the electrostatics of a sensor's surface on analyte binding have shown unprecedented sensitivity in the detection of charged biomolecules, but do not lend themselves to the detection of small molecules, which do not carry significant charge. Here, we introduce the neutralizer displacement assay that allows charge-based sensing to be applied to any class of molecule irrespective of the analyte charge. The neutralizer displacement assay starts with an aptamer probe bound to a neutralizer. When analyte binding occurs the neutralizer is displaced, which results in a dramatic change in the surface charge for all types of analytes. We have tested the sensitivity, speed and specificity of this system in the detection of a panel of molecules: (deoxy)ribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, cocaine, adenosine triphosphate and thrombin.

  5. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  6. Atmospheric Measurements of Neutral Nucleating Clusters (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Eisele, F. L.; Smith, J. N.; Chen, M.; Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; McMurry, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Nanoparticles produced by nucleation can subsequently grow to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) within one or two days and hence affect cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric radiation budgets. As an intermediate stage between molecules and nanoparticles, neutral molecular clusters are believed to play an important role in processes that lead to boundary layer nucleation. Therefore, knowledge of chemical composition, concentrations, thermodynamic properties, and evolution of neutral molecular clusters is essential to better elucidate the nucleation mechanism and to reduce the uncertainty in nucleation rates used in global climate models. Here we present laboratory and field measurements from a recently developed chemical ionization mass spectrometer (the Cluster-CIMS) designed to measure atmospheric neutral clusters (Zhao et al., 2010). The sensitivity of the Cluster-CIMS was significantly improved by using a unique conical octopole device in the first vacuum stage for transmitting and focusing ions, which was further confirmed by ion trajectory simulations using SIMION. The ion cluster formation in the atmospheric-pressure inlet was controlled by two processes: neutral ionization and ion-induced clustering (IIC), which can be differentiated from the time independency of the intensity ratio between the cluster and monomer ions. Two methods were employed to separate neutral clusters from the ion-induced clustering. The concentrations and distribution of the neutral nucleating clusters containing up to 4 H2SO4 are estimated from the above methods at three measurement sites in the US (NCAR foothill laboratory, Manitou Forest Observatory, and Atlanta). Typically, the molecular cluster concentrations are well correlated with the concentrations of nanoparticles measured simultaneously during the nucleation event periods. The Cluster-CIMS was employed to measure clusters containing both sulfuric acid and amines in summer 2010 at NCAR foothill laboratory

  7. Imaging space plasmas in energetic neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Demajistre, R.; Mitchell, D. G.; C:Son Brandt, P.

    2004-11-01

    Many space plasmas contain energetic singly-charged ions immersed in a cold gas of neutral atoms and molecules. When the energetic ions undergo charge-exchange collisions with the background cold neutrals, they become energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). Thus the space plasma Â"glowsÂ" in the ENAs which escape the plasma on straight-line trajectories. Properly designed 2-dimentsional particle telescopes that deflect ions using electro-static fields become ENA Â"camerasÂ". Such cameras are now operating on the NASA IMAGE spacecraft in orbit around Earth and the NASA/ESA Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn. They are providing all-sky global images of the singly-charged trapped ion populations of these planets with time resolution of a few minutes. Each pixel contains an energy spectra from 10 to 200 keV/nucleon of the major singly-charged ions (protons and O^+), thus providing a quantitative diagnostic of energetic ion injection, acceleration, and transport. ENA imaging has now taken its place as a fundamental tool in magnetospheric research, and new missions are moving forward to apply ENA imaging to the heliosphere itself (the domain of the solar wind) and its termination ˜100 AU from the Sun where it interacts with the local interstellar gas.

  8. Water dynamics at neutral and ionic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Emily E.; Wong, Daryl B.; Fayer, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    The orientational dynamics of water at a neutral surfactant reverse micelle interface are measured with ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch, and the results are compared to orientational relaxation of water interacting with an ionic interface. The comparison provides insights into the influence of a neutral vs. ionic interface on hydrogen bond dynamics. Measurements are made and analyzed for large nonionic surfactant Igepal CO-520reverse micelles (water nanopool with a 9-nm diameter). The results are compared with those from a previous study of reverse micelles of the same size formed with the ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT). The results demonstrate that the orientational relaxation times for interfacial water molecules in the two types of reverse micelles are very similar (13 ps for Igepal and 18 ps for AOT) and are significantly slower than that of bulk water (2.6 ps). The comparison of water orientational relaxation at neutral and ionic interfaces shows that the presence of an interface plays the dominant role in determining the hydrogen bond dynamics, whereas the chemical nature of the interface plays a secondary role. PMID:19706895

  9. Experimental Measurement of Micrometeoroid-Produced Neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Munsat, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    We describe the first laboratory measurement of vapor produced by simulated micrometeoroid bombardment. Exospheric gas measurements remain one of the outstanding accomplishments of the Apollo era, and are a clear scientific goal for future exploration of airless objects. New in-situ observations of the surface-bounded exosphere (SBE) at Mercury by MESSENGER, and the Moon by LRO/LAMP, have highlighted the uncertainty surrounding the role of micrometeoroid impacts in sustaining planetary SBEs. In a recent series of experiments, the quantity of neutral molecules generated by impacts of simulated micrometeoroids (0.1-1 micron radius, 1-10 km/s speed) was measured in the lab using a fast ionization gauge inside an ultrahigh-vacuum system. The quantity of neutrals released was found to be consistent with a power law N = mv^a in projectile speed v, mass m and exponent a ~ 2.4 We present these experimental results and discuss their implications for the upcoming LADEE mission, which carries both neutral mass and optical spectrometers for exospheric measurements, capable of identifying micrometeoroid-sourced gases.

  10. The global morphology of the Europa neutral torus from Cassini Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) observations and implications for JUICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, P. C.; Mauk, B.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Barabash, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    From about December 2000 to January 2001 the Ion Neutral Camera (INCA) on board the Cassini spacecraft imaged Jupiter in Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) that are created when singly charged ions charge exchange with neutral gas atoms or molecules. The INCA observations were obtained from a distance of about 137-250 Jovian planetary radii (RJ) over an energy range from about 10 to 300 keV. We present underlying neutral torus gas morphologies by simulating INCA images using an empirical ion distribution model and a range of theoretical gas model distributions. Just like Mauk et al. (2003), who used a different analysis technique, we find that the INCA images are consistent with a neutral torus at the orbital distance of Europa (9.5 RJ). However, within the limitations of instrument resolution, we present also possible solutions of a longitudinally asymmetric torus distribution and its implication for neutral gas release and loss rates from Europa. The Jovian Energetic Neutral and Ions (JENI) camera is the second generation ENA camera based on INCA and was selected for the science payload of the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE) mission, planned for launch around 2022 and orbit insertion around Jupiter in 2030. Using the same forward simulation technique as above, we use the INCA observations to demonstrate what we expect the JENI camera to observe in orbit around Jupiter and Ganymede.

  11. Cryoprotectant toxicity neutralization.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Gregory M

    2010-07-01

    Cryoprotectant toxicity is a fundamental limiting factor for the successful cryopreservation of living systems by both freezing and vitrification, and the ability to negate it would be attractive. Past attempts to demonstrate "cryoprotectant toxicity neutralization" (CTN) have had many ups and downs. First convincingly introduced by Baxter and Lathe in 1971, the concept that certain amides can block toxic effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) was contradicted by direct experiments in 1990. But in 1995, the opposite mode of CTN, in which Me(2)SO blocked the damaging effects of formamide, was robustly demonstrated. Recent experiments have verified the original 1995 results and extended them to urea and acetamide, but no CTN was detected for N-methylamides (N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, and N-methylacetamide). On the theory that the latter amides and acetamide might serve as low-toxicity structural analogs of formamide, urea, or Me(2)SO, competition experiments were carried out between them and formamide or urea, but CTN was not observed for these amide-amide systems. The idea that the N-methylamides might have non-specific rather than specific toxicity was supported by the fact that the concentrations of these amides that cause toxicity are similar to the concentrations that denature model proteins. Clear examples of neutralization of the toxicity of glycerol, propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, or Me(2)SO are presently lacking, but effects of the latter that depend on sulfhydryl oxidation have been reversed with reducing agents. In summary, CTN is a useful phenomenon with significant theoretical and practical implications. PMID:19501081

  12. Electron-stimulated desorption of neutrals from methanol-dosed Al(111) - velocity distributions and adsorbate decomposition determined by nonresonant laser ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, J. E.; Young, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Jones, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    Electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of neutrals from methanol-dosed Al(111) is studied using laser ionization at 193 nm coupled with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. At room temperature and at very low laser intensity, mass spectrometry of the neutral ESD species indicates the presence of desorbing CH 3O, the methoxy radical. At higher laser intensity, this species is efficiently photolyzed to C + and HCO + fragments. The velocity distributions of these photofragments, indicative of the velocity distribution of the methoxy parent, are measured for methanol dosed onto both clean and pre-oxidized single crystal surfaces. Both of the surfaces yield similar non-Boltzmann distributions with peak velocities of ˜ 900 m/s, corresponding to a peak kinetic energy of ˜ 0.1 eV for the methoxy parent. The similar results may find explanation in terms of oxidation of the Al(111) surface by the initial methanol exposure. The major ionic desorbate observed from this methanol-dosed Al(111) is H +, and its kinetic energy distribution peaks at ˜ 4 eV, a value which is typical of that observed in other ESD studies of ionic desorbates. The order of magnitude difference in kinetic energies between the desorbed ions and neutrals is discussed in terms of possible desorption mechanisms. Neutral ESD, combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is also used as a probe of changes in surface adsorbate composition as a function of temperature and of electron beam dose for methanol/Al(111). The surface concentration of the methoxy species, as monitored via the HCO + photofragment, is found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature. An increase in C + signal at ˜ 470 K is attributed to the formation of a thermal decomposition product with either a higher desorption cross section or a higher laser ionization/fragmentation cross section than the methoxy species. Electron beam damage studies of the methoxy/aluminum system at an electron beam energy of 3 keV give a cross

  13. Transient ion neutralization by electrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems describing the lateral neutralization of ion beams for the cases that (1) an auxiliary electric field accelerates the electrons into the ion space, and (2) the electrons are injected into the ion space at a prescribed current density are treated. Analytical solutions are derived which give the position and speed of the neutralization front as a function of time, and the temporal development of the electron density, velocity, and electric fields during the neutralization process.

  14. A proposed neutral line signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxas, I.; Speiser, T. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Horton, W.

    1992-01-01

    An identifying signature is proposed for the existence and location of the neutral line in the magnetotail. The signature, abrupt density, and temperature changes in the Earthtail direction, was first discovered in test particle simulations. Such temperature variations have been observed in ISEE data (Huang et. al. 1992), but their connection to the possible existence of a neutral line in the tail has not yet been established. The proposed signature develops earlier than the ion velocity space ridge of Martin and Speiser (1988), but can only be seen by spacecraft in the vicinity of the neutral line, while the latter can locate a neutral line remotely.

  15. Chemistry of carotenoid neutral radicals.

    PubMed

    Ligia Focsan, A; Magyar, Adam; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-04-15

    Proton loss from the carotenoid radical cations (Car(+)) to form neutral radicals (#Car) was investigated by numerous electrochemical, EPR, ENDOR and DFT studies described herein. The radical cation and neutral radicals were formed in solution electrochemically and stabilized on solid silica-alumina and MCM-41 matrices. Carotenoid neutral radicals were recently identified in Arabidopsis thaliana plant and photosystem II samples. Deprotonation at the terminal ends of a zeaxanthin radical cation could provide a secondary photoprotection pathway which involves quenching excited state chlorophyll by the long-lived zeaxanthin neutral radicals formed. PMID:25687648

  16. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading.

    PubMed

    Coppolaro, V; Papi, N; Khanbekyan, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Marmugi, L; Moi, L; Corradi, L; Dainelli, A; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Sakemi, Y; Calabrese, R; Mazzocca, G; Tomassetti, L; Ricci, L

    2014-10-01

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 10(5). The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with (85)Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a (210)Fr MOT is shown. PMID:25296799

  17. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppolaro, V.; Papi, N.; Khanbekyan, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E.; Marmugi, L.; Moi, L.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Calabrese, R.; Mazzocca, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Ricci, L.

    2014-10-01

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 105. The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with 85Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a 210Fr MOT is shown.

  18. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading

    SciTech Connect

    Coppolaro, V.; Papi, N.; Khanbekyan, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E. Marmugi, L.; Moi, L.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Calabrese, R.; Mazzocca, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Ricci, L.

    2014-10-07

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 10{sup 5}. The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with {sup 85}Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a {sup 210}Fr MOT is shown.

  19. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  20. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in

  1. Behavior of molecules on interstellar grains - Application of the Langevin equation and iterative extended Hueckel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Chang, S.

    1980-01-01

    The Langevin equation was used to explore an adsorbate desorption mechanism. Calculations were performed using iterative extended Hueckel on a silica model site with various small adsorbates, e.g., H, CH, OH, NO, CO. It was found that barriers to free traversal from one site to another are substantial (about 3-10 eV). A bootstrap desorption mechanism for some molecules in the process of forming at a site also became apparent from the calculations. The desorption mechanisms appear to be somewhat balanced by a counterforce - the attraction of sites for the newly desorbed molecule. The order of attraction to a silica grain site for the diatomic molecules considered was OH greater than CH greater than CO greater than NO, when these entities were sufficiently distant. The nature of the silica grain and that of the 'cold' desorption mechanism, when considered together, suggest that the abundance of very small grains might be less common than anticipated.

  2. Behavior of Molecules on Interstellar Grains: Application of the Langevin Equation and Iterative Extended Huckel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz. Sheldon

    1980-01-01

    The Langevin equation was used to explore an adsorbate desorption mechanism. Calculations were performed using iterative extended Huckel on a silica model site with various small adsorbates, e.g., H, CH, OH, NO, CO. It was found that barriers to free traversal from one site to another are substantial (approximately 3 - 10 eV). A bootstrap desorption mechanism for some molecules in the process of forming at a site also became apparent from the calculations. The desorption mechanisms appear to be somewhat balanced by a counterforce--the attraction of sites for the newly desorbed molecule. The order of attraction to a silica grain site for the diatomic molecules considered was OH > CH > CO > NO, when these entities were sufficiently distant. The nature of the silica grain and that of the "cold" desorption mechanism, when considered together, suggest that the abundance of very small grains might be less common than anticipated.

  3. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is a cutaway illustration of the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC ). The MSFC NBS provided an excellent environment for testing hardware to examine how it would operate in space and for evaluating techniques for space construction and spacecraft servicing. Here, engineers, designers, and astronauts performed various tests to develop basic concepts, preliminary designs, final designs, and crew procedures. The NBS was constructed of welded steel with polyester-resin coating. The water tank was 75-feet (22.9- meters) in diameter, 40-feet (12.2-meters) deep, and held 1.32 million gallons of water. Since it opened for operation in 1968, the NBS had supported a number of successful space missions, such as the Skylab, Solar Maximum Mission Satellite, Marned Maneuvering Unit, Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity/Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (EASE/ACCESS), the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Space Station. The function of the MSFC NBS was moved to the larger simulator at the Johnson Space Center and is no longer operational.

  4. Is science metaphysically neutral?

    PubMed

    Fry, Iris

    2012-09-01

    This paper challenges the claim that science is metaphysically neutral upheld by contenders of the separation of peacefully co-existent science and religion and by evolutionary theists. True, naturalistic metaphysical claims can neither be refuted nor proved and are thus distinct from empirical hypotheses. However, metaphysical assumptions not only regulate the theoretical and empirical study of nature, but are increasingly supported by the growing empirical body of science. This historically evolving interaction has contributed to the development of a naturalistic worldview that renounces the necessity of a transcendent god and of purposeful design. The thesis presented here differs not only from the claims of the "separatists" and of evolutionary theists. In pointing to the metaphysical aspects of science, I also criticize the failure of some evolutionary naturalists to distinguish between empirical and metaphysical contentions. Most important, based on the examination of science suggested here, creationists' false accusation that science is only a naturalistic dogma is refuted. Finally, the difficulties involved in the position endorsed here for the public support of evolution are acknowledged, taking into account the high religious profile of the American society and the social and political context in the US and in other countries. PMID:22771725

  5. Neutralization tests on the SERT 2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Domitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Neutralization test data obtained on the SERT 2 spacecraft are presented. Tests included ion beam neutralization of a thruster by a close (normal design) neutralizer as well as by a distant (1 meter) neutralizer. Parameters affecting neutralization, such as neutralizer bias voltage, neutralizer anode voltage, local spacecraft plasma density, and solar array voltage configuration were varied and changes in plasma potentials were measured. A plasma model is presented as an approximation of observed results.

  6. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  7. Neutral Sphingomyelinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Filosto, Simone; Castillo, Sianna; Danielson, Aaron; Franzi, Lisa; Khan, Elaine; Kenyon, Nick; Last, Jerold; Pinkerton, Kent; Tuder, Rubin; Goldkorn, Tzipora

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is caused by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS). One mechanism of CS-induced lung injury is aberrant generation of ceramide, which leads to elevated apoptosis of epithelial and endothelial cells in the alveolar spaces. Recently, we discovered that CS-induced ceramide generation and apoptosis in pulmonary cells is governed by neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) 2. In the current experiments, we expanded our studies to investigate whether nSMase2 governs ceramide generation and apoptosis in vivo using rodent and human models of CS-induced lung injury. We found that exposure of mice or rats to CS leads to colocalizing elevations of ceramide levels and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated X-dUTP nick end labeling–positive cells in lung tissues. These increases are nSMase2 dependent, and are abrogated by treatment with N-acetyl cysteine or anti-nSMase2 small interfering RNA (siRNA). We further showed that mice that are heterozygous for nSMase2 demonstrate significant decrease in ceramide generation after CS exposure, whereas acidic sphingomyelinase (aSMase) knockout mice maintain wild-type ceramide levels, confirming our previous findings (in human airway epithelial cells) that only nSMase2, and not aSMase, is activated by CS exposure. Lastly, we found that lung tissues from patients with emphysema (smokers) display significantly higher levels of nSMase2 expression compared with lung tissues from healthy control subjects. Taken together, these data establish the central in vivo role of nSMase2 in ceramide generation, aberrant apoptosis, and lung injury under CS exposure, underscoring its promise as a novel target for the prevention of CS-induced airspace destruction. PMID:20448054

  8. Electron attachment to the phthalide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Asfandiarov, N. L.; Pshenichnyuk, S. A.; Vorob’ev, A. S.; Nafikova, E. P.; Lachinov, A. N.; Kraikin, V. A.; Modelli, A.

    2015-05-07

    Phthalide, the simplest chain of conductive polymer thin film, was investigated by means of Electron Transmission Spectroscopy, Negative Ion Mass Spectrometry, and density functional theory quantum chemistry. It has been found that formation of gas-phase long-lived molecular anions of phthalide around 0.7 eV takes place through cleavage of a C–O bond of the pentacyclic ring of the parent molecular anion to give a vibrationally excited (electronically more stable) open-ring molecular anion. The energy of the transition state for ring opening of the parent negative ion is calculated to be 0.65 eV above the neutral ground state of the molecule. The energy (2.64 eV) evaluated for the corresponding transition state in the neutral molecule is much higher, so that the process of electron detachment from the anion must lead to a neutral molecule with its initial pentacyclic structure. The average lifetime of the molecular negative ions formed at an electron energy of 0.75 eV and 80 °C is measured to be about 100 μs. The known switching effect of thin phthalide films could stem from the presence of a similar open/closed transition state also in the polymer.

  9. Environmental neutralization of polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that two mechanisms of neutralization of the singly charged polonium ion exist. Charged Polonium-218 can be neutralized by reacting with oxygen to form a polonium oxide ion with a higher ionization potential than that of the polonium metal and then accepting an electron transferred from a lower ionization potential gas. In this present work, this mechanism has been verified by determining that the polonium oxide has an ionization potential in the range 10.35-10.53 eV. It was also previously reported that /sup 218/Po can be neutralized, in the absence of oxygen, by the scavenging of electrons by a trace gas such as water or nitrogen dioxide and their diffusion to the polonium ion. To verify this second neutralization mechanism, concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen in the range of 50 ppb-1 ppm were examined for their ability to neutralize the polonium ion. Complete neutralization of /sup 218/Po was observed at nitrogen dioxide concentrations greater than 700 ppb. For concentrations below 700 ppb, the degree of neutralization was found to increase smoothly with the nitrogen dioxide concentration.

  10. [Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Mitsuru

    2013-03-01

    The Ibaraki Medical Association established the Committee for Alternative Dispute Resolution called the Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee in 2006. Among 64 claims presented to the committee, 29 were settled through mediation or consultation. Patients were generally satisfied that their claims were considered fairly by the committee and that they were able to talk directly with healthcare professionals. However, some did not consider the committee to be completely neutral. The healthcare professionals involved rated the committee highly because they felt that the processes were neutral and no emotional aspects were involved. PMID:23617190

  11. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  12. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J.; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J.; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A.; Seaman, Michael S.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design. PMID:26267277

  13. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A; Seaman, Michael S; Sanders, Rogier W; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design. PMID:26267277

  14. Manipulation of molecules with electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, Gerard

    2004-05-01

    During the last few years we have been experimentally exploring the possibilities of manipulating neutral polar molecules with electric fields [1]. Arrays of time-varying, inhomogeneous electric fields have been used to reduce in a stepwise fashion the forward velocity of molecules in a beam. With this so-called 'Stark-decelerator', the equivalent of a LINear ACcelerator (LINAC) for charged particles, one can transfer the high phase-space density that is present in the moving frame of a pulsed molecular beam to a reference frame at any desired velocity; molecular beams with a computer-controlled (calibrated) velocity and with a narrow velocity distribution, corresponding to sub-mK longitudinal temperatures, can be produced. These decelerated beams offer new possibilities for collision studies, for instance, and enable spectroscopic studies with an improved spectral resolution; first proof-of-principle high-resolution spectroscopic studies have been performed. These decelerated beams have also been used to load neutral ammonia molecules in an electrostatic trap at a density of (better than) 10^7 mol/cm^3 and at temperatures of around 25 mK. In another experiment, a decelerated beam of ammonia molecules is injected in an electrostatic storage ring. The package of molecules in the ring can be observed for more than 50 distinct round trips, corresponding to 40 meter in circular orbit and almost 0.5 sec. storage time, sufficiently long for a first investigation of its transversal motion in the ring. A scaled up version of the Stark-decelerator and molecular beam machine has just become operational, and has been used to produce decelerated beams of ground-state OH and electronically excited (metastable) NH radicals. The NH radical is particularly interesting, as an optical pumping scheme enables the accumulation of decelerated bunches of slow NH molecules, either in a magnetic or in an optical trap. By miniaturizing the electrode geometries, high electric fields can be

  15. Nonlocal desorption of chlorobenzene molecules from the Si(111)-(7×7) surface by charge injection from the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope: remote control of atomic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Sloan, P A; Sakulsermsuk, S; Palmer, R E

    2010-07-23

    We report the nonlocal desorption of chlorobenzene molecules from the Si(111)-(7×7) surface by charge injection from the laterally distant tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and demonstrate remote control of the manipulation process by precise selection of the atomic site for injection. Nonlocal desorption decays exponentially as a function of radial distance (decay length ∼100  A) from the injection site. Electron injection at corner-hole and faulted middle adatoms sites couples preferentially to the desorption of distant adsorbate molecules. Molecules on the faulted half of the unit cell desorb with higher probability than those on the unfaulted half. PMID:20867889

  16. Neutralizing antibodies decrease the envelope fluidity of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Shinji Monde, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Kimura, Tetsuya; Maeda, Yosuke; Yusa, Keisuke

    2008-01-05

    For successful penetration of HIV-1, the formation of a fusion pore may be required in order to accumulate critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41 with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. An increase in temperature to 40 {sup o}C after viral adsorption at 25 {sup o}C enhanced the infectivity by 1.4-fold. The enhanced infectivity was inhibited by an anti-CXCR4 peptide, T140, and anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies (0.5{beta} and 694/98-D) by post-attachment neutralization, but not by non-neutralizing antibodies (670-30D and 246-D) specific for the C5 of gp120 and cluster I of gp41, respectively. Anti-HLA-II and an anti-HTLV-I gp46 antibody, LAT27, neutralized the molecule-carrying HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}. The anti-V3 antibodies suppressed the fluidity of the HIV-1{sub C-2} envelope, whereas the non-neutralizing antibodies did not. The anti-HLA-II antibody decreased the envelope fluidity of HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}, but not that of HIV-1{sub C-2}. Therefore, fluidity suppression by these antibodies represents an important neutralization mechanism, in addition to inhibition of viral attachment.

  17. Neutral transport in the ALT-I limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C.D.; Heifetz, D.B.; Post, D.E.; Malinowski, M.E.

    1983-10-01

    The behavior of neutral atoms and molecules in the TEXTOR pump limiter ALT-I has been investigated with the aid of the 2-D Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS. The code incorporates the full set of relevant collision processes (atomic and molecular), and it has a standard wall model which includes fast-neutral reflection and molecular desorption. The limiter was modeled with a 2-D geometry, which included corrections for 3-D effects. Among the quantities predicted by the code which are directly relevant to experiment include the neutral pressure within the plenum and along the duct leading into the plenum, the gettering rates, and the heat flux to the walls of the duct. These have been calculated for a variety of plasma parameters in the inlet, and the behavior with respect to variations of the duct widths has been studied. Because of the presence of the long duct separating the entrance chamber from the plenum, a high probability of ionization generally results, suggesting that a calculation allowing the plasma to adjust to the neutral sources might show a large amount of recycling.

  18. Experimental evidence of energetic neutrals production in an ion diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Y. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents several experimental proofs of the formation of energetic charge-exchange neutrals in a self-magnetically insulated ion diode with a graphite cathode. The energetic neutrals are thought to be produced as a result of charge exchange process between accelerated ions and stationary neutral molecules. The experiments have been carried out using both a diode with externally applied magnetic insulation (single-pulse mode: 100 ns, 250-300 kV) and a diode with self-magnetic insulation (double-pulse mode: 300-500 ns, 100-150 kV (negative pulse); 120 ns, 250-300 kV (positive pulse)). The motivation for looking at the neutral component of the ion beam came when we compared two independent methods to measure the energy density of the beam. A quantitative comparison of infrared measurements with signals from Faraday cups and diode voltage was made to assess the presence of neutral atoms in the ion beam. As another proof of charge-exchange effects in ion diode we present the results of statistical analysis of diode performance. It was found that the shot-to shot variation of the energy density in a set of 50-100 shots does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20-30%; suggesting the presence of neutrals in the beam. Moreover, the pressure in the zone of ion beam energy dissipation exceeds the results stated in cited references. The difference between our experimental data and results stated by other authors we attribute to the presence of a low-energy charge-exchange neutral component in the ion beam.

  19. Neutral and Non-Neutral Evolution of Drosophila Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rand, D. M.; Dorfsman, M.; Kann, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    To test hypotheses of neutral evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), nucleotide sequences were determined for 1515 base pairs of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) gene in the mitochondrial DNA of 29 lines of Drosophila melanogaster and 9 lines of its sibling species Drosophila simulans. In contrast to the patterns for nuclear genes, where D. melanogaster generally exhibits much less nucleotide polymorphism, the number of segregating sites was slightly higher in a global sample of nine ND5 sequences in D. melanogaster (s = 8) than in the nine lines of D. simulans (s = 6). When compared to variation at nuclear loci, the mtDNA variation in D. melanogaster does not depart from neutral expectations. The ND5 sequences in D. simulans, however, show fewer than half the number of variable sites expected under neutrality when compared to sequences from the period locus. While this reduction in variation is not significant at the 5% level, HKA tests with published restriction data for mtDNA in D. simulans do show a significant reduction of variation suggesting a selective sweep of variation in the mtDNA in this species. Tests of neutral evolution based on the ratios of synonymous and replacement polymorphism and divergence are generally consistent with neutral expectations, although a significant excess of amino acid polymorphism within both species is localized in one region of the protein. The rate of mtDNA evolution has been faster in D. melanogaster than in D. simulans and the population structure of mtDNA is distinct in these species. The data reveal how different rates of mtDNA evolution between species and different histories of neutral and adaptive evolution within species can compromise historical inferences in population and evolutionary biology. PMID:7851771

  20. Gas cell neutralizers (Fundamental principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, B.

    1985-06-01

    Neutralizing an ion-beam of the size and energy levels involved in the neutral-particle-beam program represents a considerable extension of the state-of-the-art of neutralizer technology. Many different mediums (e.g., solid, liquid, gas, plasma, photons) can be used to strip the hydrogen ion of its extra electron. A large, multidisciplinary R and D effort will no doubt be required to sort out all of the ''pros and cons'' of these various techniques. The purpose of this particular presentation is to discuss some basic configurations and fundamental principles of the gas type of neutralizer cell. Particular emphasis is placed on the ''Gasdynamic Free-Jet'' neutralizer since this configuration has the potential of being much shorter than other type of gas cells (in the beam direction) and it could operate in nearly a continuous mode (CW) if necessary. These were important considerations in the ATSU design which is discussed in some detail in the second presentation entitled ''ATSU Point Design''.

  1. Hindered and modulated rotational states and spectra of adsorbed diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.T.; Chuu, D.S.; Mei, W.N.

    1996-10-01

    Both vertical and horizontal adsorption configurations of a diatomic molecule were modeled as the rigid rotor with which the spatial motion was confined by a finite conical well. In addition to the polar hindering potential, a sinusoidal azimuthal modulation, which bears the local symmetry of the adsorption site, was incorporated. Eigenfunctions for different models were expressed analytically in terms of the hypergeometric functions, and eigenvalues were solved numerically. We found that the rotational energy levels exhibit oscillatory behavior when plotted as functions of the hindrance angle. This particular phenomenon was interpreted as the occurrence of resonance transmission of the rotor wave function at certain hindrance condition. We also found that the rotational levels were grouped into bands when the azimuthal modulation strength was increased. The solutions were used to calculate the rotational-state distribution of desorbed molecules, and agreement with the previous experiment was obtained. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these…

  3. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  4. Small Molecules Take A Big Step Against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of Clostridium difficile infections demands a shift away from antibiotics towards toxin-neutralizing agents. Work by Bender et al., using a drug that attenuates toxin action in vivo without affecting bacterial survival, demonstrates the exciting potential of small molecules as a new modality in the fight against C. difficile. PMID:26547239

  5. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  6. The influence of blobs on neutral particles in the scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrysøe, Alexander S.; Tophøj, Laust E. H.; Naulin, Volker; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders H.

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between plasma and neutrals are investigated with particular attention to the influence of large amplitude blob structures that mediate a significant particle and energy transport through the scrape-off layer (SOL). We perform a statistical analysis of the mean-field approximation for plasma parameters in the SOL, and this approximation is shown to be poor in a SOL with a high level of fluctuations, as the plasma fields are strongly correlated. A 1D neutral fluid model which account for both cold and hot neutrals is formulated and the effects of blobs on the ionization in the SOL and edge are investigated. Simulations suggest that neutrals originating from dissociation of hydrogen molecules only fuel in the outermost edge region of the plasma, whereas hot neutrals from charge exchange collisions penetrate deep into the bulk plasma. The results are recovered in a simplified 2D model.

  7. RE: Pedagogy--After Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    I'Anson, John

    2010-01-01

    Within the UK and in many parts of the world, official accounts of what it is to make sense of religion are framed within a rhetorics of neutrality in which such study is premised upon the possibility of dispassionate engagement and analysis. This paper, which is largely theoretical in scope, explores both the affordances and the costs of such an…

  8. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H. [Livermore, CA; Frank, Alan M. [Livermore, CA

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process.

  9. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  10. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  11. Communication: Long-lived neutral H2 in hydrogen migration within methanol dication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, K.; Kato, T.; Kono, H.; Yamanouchi, K.

    2013-11-01

    The ejection of triatomic hydrogen molecular ions HD2+ and D3+ from CD3OH2+ is investigated by first-principle molecular dynamics simulation. Two C-D chemical bonds are found to be broken to form a neutral D2 moiety that vibrates, rotates, and moves for a relatively long period of time (20-330 fs) towards a transition state leading to the ejection of HD2+ or D3+. The formation of such a long-lived neutral D2 moiety within a hydrocarbon molecule interprets well the recent experimental findings of the long lifetime of doubly charged energized hydrocarbon molecules prior to the ejection of H3+.

  12. Positron-molecule bound states and positive ion production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventhal, M.; Passner, A.; Surko, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction was studied of low energy positrons with large molecules such as alkanes. These data provide evidencce for the existence of long lived resonances and bound states of positrons with neutral molecules. The formation process and the nature of these resonances are discussed. The positive ions produced when a positron annihilates with an electron in one of these resonances were observed and this positive ion formation process is discussed. A review is presented of the current state of the understanding of these positron-molecule resonances and the resulting positive ion formation. A number of outstanding issues in this area is also discussed.

  13. Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D. ); Manson, S.T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1992-11-01

    Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H[sup +] and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15[degrees] electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V[sub p] But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V[sub p], the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

  14. Electron-electron interactions in fast neutral-neutral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.; Manson, S.T.

    1992-11-01

    Differential electron emission is studied for 50--500 keV H{sup +} and H atom impact on helium. Using the first Born formulation, it is shown that projectile electron-target electron interactions are expected to dominate the differential cross sections for low energy target electron emission induced by fast neutral projectile impact on any target. Measurements of the 15{degrees} electron emission were made in order to investigate this prediction. For low impact energies, a constant ratio between the hydrogen atom and proton impact cross sections was found for emitted electron velocities less than half the projectile velocity, V{sub p} But as the collision energy increased, for electron velocities less than 0.25 V{sub p}, the cross section ratio increased as the emitted electron velocity decreased. This is interpreted as a signature of projectile electron-target electron interactions becoming dominant for distant collisions between neutral particles.

  15. Automation of AMOEBA polarizable force field parameterization for small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Johnny C.; Chattree, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    A protocol to generate parameters for the AMOEBA polarizable force field for small organic molecules has been established, and polarizable atomic typing utility, Poltype, which fully automates this process, has been implemented. For validation, we have compared with quantum mechanical calculations of molecular dipole moments, optimized geometry, electrostatic potential, and conformational energy for a variety of neutral and charged organic molecules, as well as dimer interaction energies of a set of amino acid side chain model compounds. Furthermore, parameters obtained in gas phase are substantiated in liquid-phase simulations. The hydration free energy (HFE) of neutral and charged molecules have been calculated and compared with experimental values. The RMS error for the HFE of neutral molecules is less than 1 kcal/mol. Meanwhile, the relative error in the predicted HFE of salts (cations and anions) is less than 3% with a correlation coefficient of 0.95. Overall, the performance of Poltype is satisfactory and provides a convenient utility for applications such as drug discovery. Further improvement can be achieved by the systematic study of various organic compounds, particularly ionic molecules, and refinement and expansion of the parameter database. PMID:22505837

  16. Indirect observation of unobservable interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, E.; Green, S.; Thaddeus, P.; Klemperer, W.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the abundances of neutral non-polar interstellar molecules unobservable by radio astronomy can be systematically determined by radio observation of the protonated ions. As an example, observed N2H(+) column densities are analyzed to infer molecular nitrogen abundances in dense interstellar clouds. The chemistries and expected densities of the protonated ions of O2, C2, CO2, C2H2 and CH4 are then discussed. Microwave transition frequencies fo HCO2(+) and C2H3(+) are estimated, and a preliminary astronomical search for HCO2(+) is described.

  17. Analysis of Solar Wind Samples Returned by Genesis Using Laser Post Ionization Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, I. V.; Calaway, W. F.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    A new secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) instrument implementing laser post ionization (LPI) of ion sputtered and laser desorbed neutral species has been developed and constructed for the specific purpose of quantitative analysis of metallic elements at ultra trace levels in solar wind collector samples returned to Earth by the Genesis Discovery mission. The first LPI SNMS measurements are focusing on determining Al, Ca, Cr, and Mg in these samples. These measurements provide the first concentration and isotopic abundances determinations for several key metallic elements and also elucidate possible fractionation effects between the photosphere and the solar wind compositions. It is now documented that Genesis samples suffered surface contamination both during flight and during the breach of the Sample Return Capsule when it crashed. Since accurate quantitative analysis is compromised by sample contamination, several features have been built into the new LPI SNMS instrument to mitigate this difficulty. A normally-incident, low-energy (<500 eV) ion beam combined with a keV energy ion beam and a desorbing laser beam (both microfocused) enables dual beam analyses. The low-energy ion beam can be used to remove surface contaminant by sputtering with minimum ion beam mixing. This low-energy beam also will be used to perform ion beam milling, while either the microfocused ion or laser beam probes the solar wind elemental compositions as a function of sample depth. Because of the high depth resolution of dual beam analyses, such depth profiles clearly distinguish between surface contaminants and solar wind implanted atoms. In addition, in-situ optical and electron beam imaging for observing and avoiding particulates and scratches on solar wind sample surfaces is incorporated in the new LPI SNMS instrument to further reduce quantification problems. The current status of instrument tests and analyses will be presented. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of

  18. Polyatomic molecules under intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Jackson, James E; Levine, Benjamin G; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-12-11

    Interaction of intense laser pulses with atoms and molecules is at the forefront of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. It is the gateway to powerful new tools that include above threshold ionization, high harmonic generation, electron diffraction, molecular tomography, and attosecond pulse generation. Intense laser pulses are ideal for probing and manipulating chemical bonding. Though the behavior of atoms in strong fields has been well studied, molecules under intense fields are not as well understood and current models have failed in certain important aspects. Molecules, as opposed to atoms, present confounding possibilities of nuclear and electronic motion upon excitation. The dynamics and fragmentation patterns in response to the laser field are structure sensitive; therefore, a molecule cannot simply be treated as a "bag of atoms" during field induced ionization. In this article we present a set of experiments and theoretical calculations exploring the behavior of a large collection of aryl alkyl ketones when irradiated with intense femtosecond pulses. Specifically, we consider to what extent molecules retain their molecular identity and properties under strong laser fields. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with pump-probe techniques we study the dynamical behavior of these molecules, monitoring ion yield modulation caused by intramolecular motions post ionization. The set of molecules studied is further divided into smaller sets, sorted by type and position of functional groups. The pump-probe time-delay scans show that among positional isomers the variations in relative energies, which amount to only a few hundred millielectronvolts, influence the dynamical behavior of the molecules despite their having experienced such high fields (V/Å). High level ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed to predict molecular dynamics along with single and multiphoton resonances in the neutral and ionic states. We propose the

  19. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  20. Adhesion molecules and receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adhesion molecules are necessary for leukocyte trafficking and differentiation. They serve to initiate cell-cell interactions under conditions of shear, and they sustain the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions needed for cellular locomotion. They also can serve directly as signaling molecules act...

  1. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  2. Probing neutral atmospheric collision complexes with anion photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrold, Caroline

    Photodetachment of anionic precursors of neutral collision complexes offers a way to probe the effects of symmetry-breaking collision events on the electronic structure of normally transparent molecules. We have measured the anion photoelectron imaging (PEI) spectra of a series of O2- X complexes, where X is a volatile organic molecule with atmospheric relevance, to determine how the electronic properties of various X molecules affect the low-lying electronic structure of neutral O2 undergoing O2 - X collisons. The study was motivated by the catalog of vibrational and electronic absorption lines induced by O2 - O2, O2 - N2, and other collisions. The energies of electronic features observed in the anion PEI spectra of O2- X (X = hexane, hexene, isoprene and benzene) relative to O2- PEI spectroscopic features indicate that photodetachment of the anion does indeed access a repulsive part of the O2 - X potential. In addition, the spectra of the various complexes show an interesting variation in the intensities of transitions to the excited O2(1Δg) . X and O2(1Σg+) . X states relative to the ground O2(3Σg-) . X state. With X = non-polar species such as hexane, the relative intensities of transitions to the triplet and singlet states of O2 . X are very similar to those of isolated O2, while the relative intensity of the singlet band decreases and becomes lower in energy relative to the triplet band for X = polar molecules. A significant enhancement in the intensities of the singlet bands is observed for complexes with X = isoprene and benzene, both of which have low-lying triplet states. The role of the triplet states in isoprene and benzene, and the implications for induced electronic absorption in O2 undergoing collisions with these molecules, are explored. National Science Foundation NSF CHE 1265991.

  3. Coulomb blockade with neutral modes.

    PubMed

    Kamenev, Alex; Gefen, Yuval

    2015-04-17

    We study transport through a quantum dot in the fractional quantum Hall regime with filling factors ν=2/3 and ν=5/2, weakly coupled to the leads. We account for both injection of electrons to or from the leads, and quasiparticle rearrangement processes between the edge and the bulk of the quantum dot. The presence of neutral modes introduces topological constraints that modify qualitatively the features of the Coulomb blockade (CB). The periodicity of CB peak spacings doubles and the ratio of spacing between adjacent peaks approaches (in the low temperature and large dot limit) a universal value: 2∶1 for ν=2/3 and 3∶1 for ν=5/2. The corresponding CB diamonds alternate their width in the direction of the bias voltage and allow for the determination of the neutral mode velocity, and of the topological numbers associated with it. PMID:25933323

  4. Optimization of neutral atom imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.

    2008-12-01

    : The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80°. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume. Work was supported by grant ACT-05-40 from the ESTO office of NASA

  5. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  6. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  7. Neutral-current x-distributions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Friedman, J. I.; Kendall, H. W.; Bogert, D.; Burnstein, R.; Fisk, R.; Fuess, S.; Bofill, J.; Busza, W.; Eldridge, T.; Abolins, M.; Brock, R.; et al.

    1984-06-01

    The role of the semi leptonic neutral current interaction as a probe of nucleon structure is examined. Previous measurements of neutral current x-distributions are reviewed, and new results from the Fermilab - MIT - MSU collaboration are presented.

  8. Electron attenuation in free, neutral ethane clusters.

    PubMed

    Winkler, M; Myrseth, V; Harnes, J; Børve, K J

    2014-10-28

    The electron effective attenuation length (EAL) in free, neutral ethane clusters has been determined at 40 eV kinetic energy by combining carbon 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical lineshape modeling. More specifically, theory is employed to form model spectra on a grid in cluster size (N) and EAL (λ), allowing N and λ to be determined by optimizing the goodness-of-fit χ(2)(N, λ) between model and observed spectra. Experimentally, the clusters were produced in an adiabatic-expansion setup using helium as the driving gas, spanning a range of 100-600 molecules in mean cluster size. The effective attenuation length was determined to be 8.4 ± 1.9 Å, in good agreement with an independent estimate of 10 Å formed on the basis of molecular electron-scattering data and Monte Carlo simulations. The aggregation state of the clusters as well as the cluster temperature and its importance to the derived EAL value are discussed in some depth. PMID:25362297

  9. Electron attenuation in free, neutral ethane clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, M.; Harnes, J.; Børve, K. J.; Myrseth, V.

    2014-10-28

    The electron effective attenuation length (EAL) in free, neutral ethane clusters has been determined at 40 eV kinetic energy by combining carbon 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical lineshape modeling. More specifically, theory is employed to form model spectra on a grid in cluster size (N) and EAL (λ), allowing N and λ to be determined by optimizing the goodness-of-fit χ{sup 2}(N, λ) between model and observed spectra. Experimentally, the clusters were produced in an adiabatic-expansion setup using helium as the driving gas, spanning a range of 100–600 molecules in mean cluster size. The effective attenuation length was determined to be 8.4 ± 1.9 Å, in good agreement with an independent estimate of 10 Å formed on the basis of molecular electron-scattering data and Monte Carlo simulations. The aggregation state of the clusters as well as the cluster temperature and its importance to the derived EAL value are discussed in some depth.

  10. The Net Neutrality Debate: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Rich

    2006-01-01

    Rich Greenfield examines the basics of today's net neutrality debate that is likely to be an ongoing issue for society. Greenfield states the problems inherent in the definition of "net neutrality" used by Common Cause: "Network neutrality is the principle that Internet users should be able to access any web content they choose and use any…

  11. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  12. Magnetostatic traps for charged and neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomer, V.; Harms, O.; Haubrich, D.; Schadwinkel, H.; Strauch, F.; Ueberholz, B.; Aus der Wiesche, S.; Meschede, D.

    1997-08-01

    We have constructed magnetostatic traps from permanent magnets for trapping charged and neutral atoms. Two storage experiments are presented: a compact Penning trap for light ions and magnetic trapping of single neutral atoms. The dynamics of cold neutral atoms and their loss mechanisms in a quadrupole magnetostatic trap are discussed.

  13. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  14. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee of the Federal Government or any other individual who is acceptable to the parties to a dispute... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  15. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee of the Federal Government or any other individual who is acceptable to the parties to a dispute... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  16. Priming Effects for Affective vs. Neutral Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Leslie A.; Rabin, Laura; Wyatt, Gwinne; Frohlich, Jonathan; Vardy, Susan B.; Dimitri, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Affective and Neutral Tasks (faces with negative or neutral content, with different lighting and orientation) requiring reaction time judgments of poser identity were administered to 32 participants. Speed and accuracy were better for the Affective than Neutral Task, consistent with literature suggesting facilitation of performance by affective…

  17. Ultracold polar KRb molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyenhuis, Brian; Chotia, Amodsen; Moses, Steven; Ye, Jun; Jin, Deborah

    2011-05-01

    Ultracold polar molecules in the quantum degenerate regime open the possibility of realizing quantum gases with long-range, and spatially anisotropic, interparticle interactions. Currently, we can create a gas of ultracold fermionic ground-state KRb molecules in with a peak density of 1012 cm-3 and a temperature just 1.4 times the Fermi temperature. We will report on efforts to further cool this gas of molecules. One possibility is to evaporatively cool a spin-polarized molecular Fermi gas confined in quasi-2D, where we would rely on dipole-dipole interactions for rethermalization. We acknowledge funding from NIST, NSF, and AFOSR-MURI.

  18. Single-Molecule Enzymology

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoliang; Lu, H PETER.

    1999-06-04

    Viewing a movie of an enzyme molecule made from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we see incredible details of molecular motions, be it a change of the conformation or the action of a chemical reaction.

  19. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  20. Gas Flow Measurements of a Novel Geometry for Neutral Beam Neutralizers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirkle, David Ross

    The gas flow characteristics of a novel geometry (pumped neutralizer) for decreasing the flow of gas from neutral beam neutralizers were measured and compared with a conventional (passive) neutralizer. A passive neutralizer is typically a duct attached to the ion source. For the pumped neutralizer the top and bottom surfaces of the duct are replaced by a Venetian blind geometry which opens into ballast vacuum pumping volumes. With guidance from a Monte Carlo program which models gas flow at low pressure, a one-half scale model with pumped neutralizer geometry was built and compared to a passive neutralizer with comparable dimensions. With the vanes on the pumped neutralizer opened to 55 degrees, the line density of the pumped neutralizer was 1.6 times less than the passive neutralizer. The amount of gas flowing from the exit of the pumped neutralizer was from 2 to 5 times less than the amount flowing from the pumped neutralizer. Hence, the pumped neutralizer geometry appears to be a promising method of limiting the flow of gas from neutral beam gas cell neutralizers.

  1. Poliovirus neutralization epitopes: analysis and localization with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Emini, E A; Jameson, B A; Lewis, A J; Larsen, G R; Wimmer, E

    1982-01-01

    Two hybridomas (H3 and D3) secreting monoclonal neutralizing antibody to intact poliovirus type 1 (Mahoney strain) were established. Each antibody bound to a site qualitatively different from that to which the other antibody bound. The H3 site was located on intact virions and, to a lesser extent, on 80S naturally occurring empty capsids and 14S precursor subunits. The D3 site was found only on virions and empty capsids. Neither site was expressed on 80S heat-treated virions. The antibodies did not react with free denatured or undenatured viral structural proteins. Viral variants which were no longer capable of being neutralized by either one or the other antibody were obtained. Such variants arose during normal cell culture passage of wild-type virus and were present in the progeny viral population on the order of 10(-4) variant per wild-type virus PFU. Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate, a heterobifunctional covalent cross-linking reagent, was used to irreversibly bind the F(ab) fragments of the two antibodies to their respective binding sites. In this way, VP1 was identified as the structural protein containing both sites. PMID:6183443

  2. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joseph

    2010-05-21

    Ion beam emission/neutralization is one of the most fundamental problems in spacecraft plasma interactions and electric propulsion. Although ion beam neutralization is readily achieved in experiments, the understanding of the underlying physical process remains at a rather primitive level. No theoretical or simulation models have convincingly explained the detailed neutralization mechanism, and no conclusions have been reached. This paper presents a fully kinetic simulation of ion beam neutralization and plasma beam propagation and discusses the physics of electron-ion coupling and the resulting propagation of a neutralized mesothermal plasma.

  3. Polyatomic molecule vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Polyatomic molecule vibrations are analyzed as harmonic vibrations along normal coordinates. The energy eigenvalues are found for linear and nonlinear symmetric triatomic molecules for valence bond models of the potential function with arbitrary coupling coefficients; such models can usually be fitted to observed energy levels with reasonably good accuracy. Approximate normal coordinates for the H2O molecule are discussed. Degenerate vibrational modes such as occur in CO2 are analyzed and expressions for Fermi resonance between close-lying states of the same symmetry are developed. The bending modes of linear triatomic molecules are expressed in terms of Laguerre polynomials in cylindrical coordinates as well as in terms of Hermite polynomials in Cartesian coordinates. The effects of large-amplitude bending such as occur in the C3 molecule are analyzed, along with anharmonic effects, which split the usually degenerate bending mode energy levels. Finally, the vibrational frequencies, degeneracies, and symmetry properties of XY3, X2Y2, and XY4 type molecules are discussed.

  4. Cassini INMS Observations of Ions and Neutrals in Saturn's Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M. E.; Cravens, T. E.; Mandt, K.; Teolis, B. D.; Tokar, R. L.; Smith, H. T.; McNutt, R. L.; Waite, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) has measured the low-density particles in Saturn's inner magnetosphere (IM). Planning and implementing INMS observations of neutral molecules and water-group ions near the equatorial plane have steadily improved such that INMS now provides measurements that complement other observations of these low-energy ions and neutrals the IM, providing unambiguous resolution of the water-group ions and in situ, three-dimensional spatial dependence of the neutral densities. INMS measurements of neutrals are viable only in the densest regions, inside of 7 Saturn radii (RS) and within 20,000 km of the equatorial plane. Due to a variable background, the INMS detection limit for neutral water is near 103 molecules/cm3, which is the approximate density near 7 RS. High-energy radiation interferes with neutral observations inside of 3.5 RS. The tendency of H2O molecules to adhere to the walls of the INMS inlet aperture requires long integration times to determine the total volume of H2O molecules. Concurrent INMS measurements of associated volatile molecules such as CO2 determine spatial dependence of the neutral density. In the densest part of the neutral cloud that is outside of the Enceladus plumes and north of Enceladus, INMS measures 105 molecules/cm3. Near the equatorial plane, INMS data show that neutral water density drops a factor of ten from 4.2 RS, just outside the orbit of Enceladus, to 7 RS. This decline, caused by photo-ionization, disassociation by ion impact, and distribution by neutral-neutral collisions, is within the range of results derived from remote observations. INMS observations of azimuthal densities, which are not available from remote observations that average multiple observations, show the expected decline for neutrals that near the orbit of Enceladus but separated azimuthally. INMS can measure only one velocity at a time, restricting INMS measurements to only a small area of velocity phase space at a time

  5. Space station neutral external environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H.; Leger, L.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular contamination levels arising from the external induced neutral environment of the Space Station (Phase 1 configuration) were calculated using the MOLFLUX model. Predicted molecular column densities and deposition rates generally meet the Space Station contamination requirements. In the doubtful cases of deposition due to materials outgassing, proper material selection, generally excluding organic products exposed to the external environment, must be considered to meet contamination requirements. It is important that the Space Station configuration, once defined, is not significantly modified to avoid introducing new unacceptable contamination sources.

  6. Neutral gas dynamics in fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-06-01

    Fireballs are local discharge phenomena on positively biased electrodes in partially ionized plasmas. Electrons, energized at a double layer, heat neutral gas which expands. The gas pressure exceeds the plasma pressure, hence becomes important to the stability and transport in fireballs. The flow of gas moves the electrode and sensors similar to a mica pendulum. Flow speed and directions are measured. A fireball gun has been developed to partially collimate the flow of hot gas and heat objects in its path. New applications of fireballs are suggested.

  7. Charged versus Neutral Hydrogen-Bonded Complexes: Is There a Difference in the Nature of the Hydrogen Bonds?

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Mata, Ignasi; Molins, Elies; Espinosa, Enrique

    2016-06-27

    A theoretical study on some carboxylic acid dimers formed by positively or negatively charged molecules has been carried out by using DFT methods. The resulting dimers possess either a charge of +2 or -2. In addition, the corresponding neutral complexes have also been considered. The electron density distribution described by the atoms in molecules and the natural bond orbital methods, as well as the electric field maps of the systems, have been analyzed and compared without finding significant differences between the neutral and ionic complexes. The interaction energy along the dissociation path of the charged dimers shows both a local minimum and a local maximum, defining a stability region between them. When this energetic profile is recalculated by removing the repulsion between the charged groups, it resembles to those of the neutral molecules. Hence, the characteristics of the charged dimers are similar to those of the neutral ones: the addition of a repulsion term for the charged groups permits to retrieve the energetic profiles dependence with the distance in the charged system. The interacting quantum atom (IQA) method has been used to calculate the interaction energy terms, including the classic Coulombic term between the whole molecules and the corresponding of the carboxylic acid groups. The IQA results show repulsive electrostatic interactions when the whole molecules are considered in the ionic complexes, but attractive ones between the carboxylic groups in both neutral and ionic complexes. PMID:27225820

  8. Atomic force microscopy electrostatic nanolithography on self-assembled monolayer of organo-mercaptan molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Michael A.; Juhl, Shane; Umemura, Kazuo

    2005-03-01

    We report a novel technique for manipulating SAM molecules at the nanoscale. An initial stage, the AFM probe induces local modification of the self-assembled monolayer involving cleavage of the sulfur-metal bond. This leads to depressions appearing on the surface's topography images followed by the removal (diffusion) of the desorbed specie. It is known from the macroscopic scale electrochemical experiments that oxidative desorption of the organo-mercaptans from the gold surface takes place at potentials greater than +0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in aqueous KOH solutions. This corresponds to about -3.9 V in the absolute potential scale. A weak positive bias of the metal substrate is expected to result in the dissociative electron transfer from the mercaptan to the gold, taking place in the surface region localized near the scanning probe tip, where the water can be condensed from the ambient environment forming a nanoscale electrochemical cell.

  9. Infrared spectroscopy of water clusters co-adsorbed with hydrogen molecules on a sodium chloride film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen gas containing a trace of water vapor was dosed on a vacuum-evaporated sodium chloride film at 13 K, and water clusters formed on the substrate were investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Absorption bands due to (H2O)n clusters with n = 3-6 and an induced absorption band due to hydrogen were clearly observed. With increasing gas dosage, the intensities of the cluster bands increased linearly while the intensity of the hydrogen band was constant. This suggests that the water clusters were formed in two-dimensional matrices of hydrogen. We found that the water clusters did exist on the surface upon heating even after the hydrogen molecules had desorbed. A further rise of the substrate temperature up to 27 K yielded the formation of larger clusters, (H2O)n with n > 6 . We also discuss the origins of the two bands of the trimer in terms of pseudorotation and a metastable isomer.

  10. Water and complex organic molecules in the warm inner regions of solar-type protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Persson, M. V.; Lykke, J. M.; Taquet, V.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Vastel, C.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    Water and complex organic molecules play an important role in the emergence of Life. They have been detected in different types of astrophysical environments (protostars, prestellar cores, outflows, protoplanetary disks, comets, etc). In particular, they show high abundances towards the warm inner regions of protostars, where the icy grain mantles thermally desorb. Can a part of the molecular content observed in these regions be preserved during the star formation process and incorporated into asteroids and comets, that can deliver it to planetary embryos through impacts? By comparison with cometary studies, interferometric observations of solar-type protostars can help to address this important question. We present recent results obtained with the Plateau de Bure interferometer about water deuteration, glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol towards the low-mass protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A.

  11. Positron binding to molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2011-05-01

    While there is theoretical evidence that positrons can bind to atoms, calculations for molecules are much less precise. Unfortunately, there have been no measurements of positron-atom binding, due primarily to the difficulty in forming positron-atom bound states in two-body collisions. In contrast, positrons attach to molecules via Feshbach resonances (VFR) in which a vibrational mode absorbs the excess energy. Using a high-resolution positron beam, this VFR process has been studied to measure binding energies for more than 40 molecules. New measurements will be described in two areas: positron binding to relatively simple molecules, for which theoretical calculations appear to be possible; and positron binding to molecules with large permanent dipole moments, which can be compared to analogous, weakly bound electron-molecule (negative-ion) states. Binding energies range from 75 meV for CS2 (no dipole moment) to 180 meV for acetonitrile (CH3CN). Other species studied include aldehydes and ketones, which have permanent dipole moments in the range 2.5 - 3.0 debye. The measured binding energies are surprisingly large (by a factor of 10 to 100) compared to those for the analogous negative ions, and these differences will be discussed. New theoretical calculations for positron-molecule binding are in progress, and a recent result for acetonitrile will be discussed. This ability to compare theory and experiment represents a significant step in attempts to understand positron binding to matter. In collaboration with A. C. L. Jones, J. J. Gosselin, and C. M. Surko, and supported by NSF grant PHY 07-55809.

  12. Investigation of Sterilization Mechanism for Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores with Plasma-Excited Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the mechanism of the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas uses humidified mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores and tyrosine which is amino acid are treated by the plasma-excited neutral gas. Shape change of the treated spore is observed by SEM, and chemical modification of the treated tyrosine is analyzed by HPLC. As a result, the surface of the treated spore shows depression. Hydroxylation and nitration of tyrosine are shown after the treatment. For these reasons, we believe that the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas results from the deformation of spore structure due to the chemical modification of amino acid.

  13. Neutral endopeptidase modulates neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nadel, J A

    1991-06-01

    A noncholinergic, nonadrenergic nervous system has been described, involving the sensory nerves in the airways. Chemicals, dusts and other irritants stimulate these sensory nerves to release substance P and related neuropeptides. These neuropeptides have the remarkable ability to affect multiple cells in the airways and to provoke many responses including cough, mucus secretion, smooth muscle contraction, plasma extravasation and neutrophil adhesion. This series of effects is termed "neurogenic inflammation." An enzyme exists on the surfaces of all lung cells that contain receptors for these neuropeptides. This enzyme, neutral endopeptidase (NEP), by cleaving and thus inactivating the neuropeptides, limits the concentration of the neuropeptide that reaches the receptor on the cell surface. Thus, neurogenic inflammatory responses are normally mild and presumably protective in nature. However, when NEP is inhibited pharmacologically (with NEP inhibitors) or by cigarette smoke, respiratory viral infection, or by inhalation of the industrial pollutant toluene diisocyanate, neurogenic inflammatory responses are exaggerated. Delivery of exogenous human recombinant NEP inhibits neurogenic inflammation. Finally, evidence is provided that corticosteroids suppress neurogenic plasma extravasation and that this drug can upregulate NEP in human airway tissue. Neutral endopeptidase cleaves multiple peptides. Thus, its selectivity resides, at least in part, on its fixed location on the surfaces of specific cells where it can modulate effects of peptides exposed to the cells' surfaces. PMID:1889501

  14. Detailed Atomic Structure of Neutral and Near-Neutral Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Paul; Hibbert, Alan

    2011-05-11

    This paper highlights the issues which need to be addressed in undertaking accurate calculations of multi-electron atoms and ions, particularly at or near the neutral end of an isoelectronic sequence. We illustrate the processes through two calculations--of transitions in Cl I and Sn II--and discuss the convergence of our results as well as updating previous work. In particular, in the case of Cl I, we propose new identifications of the levels involved in certain transitions which are important in determining the abundance of chlorine in the inter-stellar medium (ISM), while in singly ionised tin, our calculations suggest a re-evaluation of the the abundance of tin in the ISM. We also confirm recent identification of Sn II lines seen in tokamak plasmas.

  15. Understanding ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul

    2009-05-01

    The successful production of a dense sample of ultracold ground state KRb polar molecules [1] opens the door to a new era of research with dipolar gases and lattices of such species. This feat was achieved by first associating a K and a Rb atom to make a weakly bound Feshbach molecule and then coherently transferring the population to the ground vibrational level of the molecule. This talk focuses on theoretical issues associated with making and using ultracold polar molecules, using KRb as an example [2]. Full understanding of this species and the processes by which it is made requires taking advantage of accurate molecular potentials [3], ab initio calculations [4], and the properties of the long-range potential. A highly accurate model is available for KRb for all bound states below the ground state separated atom limit and could be constructed for other species. The next step is to develop an understanding of the interactions between polar molecules, and their control in the ultracold domain. Understanding long-range interactions and threshold resonances will be crucial for future work. [1] K.-K. Ni, et al, Science 322, 231(2008). [2] P. S. Julienne, arXiv:0812:1233. [3] Pashov et al., Phys. Rev. A76, 022511 (2007). [4] S. Kotochigova, et al., arXiv:0901.1486.

  16. Molecules on ice

    SciTech Connect

    Clary, D.C.

    1996-03-15

    The ozone hole that forms in the spring months over the Antarctic is thought to be produced through a network of chemical reactions catalyzed by the surfaces of ice crystals in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A reaction between chlorine reservoir molecules, such as HCl + ClONO{sub 2} > HNO{sub 3} + Cl{sub 2}, is kinetically forbidden in the gas phase but proceeds quickly on the surface of ice and produces Cl{sub 2} molecules that are photodissociated by sunlight to yield the Cl atoms that destroy ozone. This destructive chain of events begins when HCl molecules stick to the ice crystals, and the mechanism for this crucial sticking process has been the subject of much debate. Recent work describes a mechanism that explains how HCl sticks to ice. This article goes on to detail research focusing surface reactions in stratospheric chemistry. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Positronium ions and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.

    1990-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies on positronium ions and molecules are discussed. A positronium ion is a three particle system consisting of two electrons in singlet spin state, and a positron. Recent studies include calculations of its binding energy, positron annihilation rate, and investigations of its doubly excited resonant states. A positronium molecule is a four body system consisting of two positrons and two electrons in an overall singlet spin state. The recent calculations of its binding energy against the dissociation into two positronium atoms, and studies of auto-detaching states in positronium molecules are discussed. These auto-dissociating states, which are believed to be part of the Rydberg series as a result of a positron attaching to a negatively charged positronium ion, Ps-, would appear as resonances in Ps-Ps scattering.

  18. Atomic branching in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A.; Randić, Milan

    A graph theoretic measure of extended atomic branching is defined that accounts for the effects of all atoms in the molecule, giving higher weight to the nearest neighbors. It is based on the counting of all substructures in which an atom takes part in a molecule. We prove a theorem that permits the exact calculation of this measure based on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the graph representing a molecule. The definition of this measure within the context of the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) and its calculation for benzenoid hydrocarbons are also studied. We show that the extended atomic branching can be defined using any real symmetric matrix, as well as any Hermitian (self-adjoint) matrix, which permits its calculation in topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical contexts.

  19. Single-Molecule Bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Lemay, Serge G.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental techniques which interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. Here we review several technologies which can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  20. Single-molecule bioelectronics.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Jacob K; Lemay, Serge G; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    Experimental techniques that interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. In this study, we review several technologies that can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  1. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  2. Molecules in η Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Güsten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodríguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-01

    We report the detection toward η Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO+, HCN, HNC, and N2H+, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, 13CO and H13CN. The line profiles are moderately broad (~100 km s-1), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO+ do not appear to be underabundant in η Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the 13C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of η Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  3. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  4. Towards single molecule switches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  5. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  6. The Charmonium-molecule hybrid structure of the X(3872)

    SciTech Connect

    Takizawa, Makoto; Takeuchi, Sachiko; Shimizu, Kiyotaka

    2011-10-21

    We propose that the X(3872) has the charmonium and the DD*-bar hadronic molecule hybrid structure. We study the structure of the X(3872) using the schematic model with the separable interaction. The strengths of the couplings between the charmonium state and the hadronic molecule states are determined so as to reproduce the observed mass of the the X(3872). The isospin symmetry breaking is introduced by the mass differences of the neutral and charged D mesons. The obtained structure of the X(3872) is about 9% of cc-bar charmonium, 75% of the isoscalar DD*-bar molecule and 16percent; of the isovector DD*-bar molecule which explains observed properties of the X(3872) well.

  7. Site Neutral Payments: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Dresevic, Adrienne; Rojas, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    A site neutral payment policy would entail CMS paying the same rate for the same healthcare service regardless of the location in which the service is provided. From the government's perspective, the reason behind this policy is potentially billions of dollars in savings. The rationale for using various payment systems is that there are different costs associated with providing healthcare services in different locations. Each payment system has a separate methodology for determining rates for services based on these costs. Hospitals may choose to prepare early for the inevitable through accurate cost reporting, shifting certain ancillary services to more appropriate outpatient, off site locations, and participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program. PMID:26571969

  8. High Resolution Neutral Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucay, Igal; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Stratis, Georgios; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a high resolution neutral atom microscope based on metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES). When a metastable atom of a noble gas is near a solid, a surface electron will tunnel to an empty energy level of the metastable atom, thereby ejecting the excited electron from the atom. The emitted electrons carry information regarding the local topography and electronic, magnetic, and chemical structures of most hard materials. Furthermore, using a chromatic aberration corrected magnetic hexapole lens we expect to attain a spatial resolution below 10 nm. We will use this microscope to investigate how local phenomena can give rise to macroscopic effects in materials that cannot be probed using a scanning tunneling microscope, namely insulating transition metal oxides.

  9. Neutral composition in the thermosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeusch, D. R.; Carignan, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Data obtained from the Ogo 6 neutral atmospheric composition (NAC) experiment for a period of more than 1 year are used to compare the average constituent composition at an altitude of 400 km with that predicted by the Jacchia 1971 and 1965 models. The comparison shows that the Jacchia 1971 model underestimates the molecular nitrogen densities at 400 km by a factor of 2. An atmosphere is constructed down to 120 km by means of the Stein and Walker technique. A fit is made with (1) the 400-km total densities from drag measurements and the composition from Ogo 6 NAC, (2) the 250-km measured molecular nitrogen densities, and (3) the 150-km total densities from drag. This fit shows that the Jacchia 1971 model overestimates the atomic oxygen content at 150 km.

  10. Ergonomically neutral arm support system

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J; Chung, Jeffrey Y; Dellinges, Steven; Lafever, Robin E

    2005-08-02

    An ergonomic arm support system maintains a neutral position for the forearm. A mechanical support structure attached to a chair or other mounting structure supports the arms of a sitting or standing person. The system includes moving elements and tensioning elements to provide a dynamic balancing force against the forearms. The support structure is not fixed or locked in a rigid position, but is an active dynamic system that is maintained in equipoise by the continuous operation of the opposing forces. The support structure includes an armrest connected to a flexible linkage or articulated or pivoting assembly, which includes a tensioning element such as a spring. The pivoting assembly moves up and down, with the tensioning element providing the upward force that balances the downward force of the arm.

  11. An accessible heavy neutral lepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao-Hsi

    1982-09-01

    In the SUL(2) ⊗ SUR(2) ⊗ UB-L(1) model, an accessible heavy neutral lepton may exist owing to the mixing of generations. Based on a rough estimate, it is pointed out that the most hopeful experiments to observe this lepton are ν-production in an emulsion (because the track of a particle with lifetime 10-11-10-13 s could be seen) and e-production. The author thanks Professor J.D. Bjorken, Professor He Zuo-Xiu, Professor R.E. Mashark, Professor S.J. Chang, Professor Zhu Cong-Yuan and Professor M. Dine for helpful discussions and comments. He would like to thank the referee for valuable comments.

  12. After treatment ends: neutral time.

    PubMed

    Hurt, G J; McQuellon, R P; Barrett, R J

    1994-01-01

    For persons diagnosed with cancer, the remission period may be marked by increased anxiety and distress. While the medical team may view remission as an eagerly anticipated milestone, the decreased medical surveillance during this time can cause a heightened fear of recurrence for the patient. One author has called this period of remission "neutral time," a time characterized by uncertainty. The safety signal hypothesis, developed by Martin Seligman, may help to explain the anxiety experienced by some patients during the remission period. Because cancer is frequently a silent disease with no overt symptoms, patients in remission often have no safety signal to indicate that the disease will not return. A case study is presented and discussed in light of these two concepts. PMID:7697080

  13. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  14. Neutral atom lithography with metastable helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Claire Shean

    In this dissertation we describe our performance of resist assisted neutral atom lithography using a bright beam of metastable 23S1 Helium (He*). Metastable Helium atoms have 20 eV of internal energy making them easy to detect and able to destroy a resist. The He* is produced by a reverse flow DC discharge source and then collimated with the bichromatic force, followed by three optical molasses velocity compression stages. The atoms in the resulting beam have a mean longitudinal velocity of 1125 m/s and a divergence of 1.1 mrad. The typical beam flux is 2 x 109 atoms/mm2s through a 0.1mm diameter aperture 70 cm away from the source. The internal energy of the atoms damages the molecules of a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of nonanethiol. The undisturbed SAM protects a 200 A layer of gold that has been evaporated onto a prepared Silicon wafer from a wet chemical etch. Two methods are used to pattern the He* atoms before they destroy the SAM. First, a Nickel micro mesh was used to protect the SAM. These experiments established an appropriate dosage and etch time for patterning. The samples were analyzed with an atomic force microscope and found to have an edge resolution of 63 nm. Then, patterning was accomplished using the dipole force the atoms experience while traversing a standing wave of lambda = 1083nm light tuned 500MHz below the 23S 1 → 23P2 transition. Depending on the intensity of the light, the He* atoms are focused or channeled into lines separated by lambda/2. The lines cover the entire exposed length of the substrate, about 3 mm. They are about 3 mm long, corresponding to about twice the beam waist of the laser standing wave. Thus there are 6 x 10 3 lines of length 5500lambda. These results agree with our numerical simulations of the experiment.

  15. Probing micro-solvation in "numbers": the case of neutral dipeptides in water.

    PubMed

    Takis, Panteleimon G; Papavasileiou, Konstantinos D; Peristeras, Loukas D; Melissas, Vasilios S; Troganis, Anastassios N

    2013-05-21

    How many solvent molecules and in what way do they interact directly with biomolecules? This is one of the most challenging questions regarding a deep understanding of biomolecular functionalism and solvation. We herein present a novel NMR spectroscopic study, achieving for the first time the quantification of the directly interacting water molecules with several neutral dipeptides. Our proposed method is supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, advanced analysis of which allowed the identification of the direct interactions between solute-solvent molecules in the zwitterionic L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide-water system. Beyond the quantification of dipeptide-water molecule direct interactions, this NMR technique could be useful for the determination and elucidation of small to moderate bio-organic molecular groups' direct interactions with various polar solvent molecules, shedding light on the biomolecular micro-solvation processes and behaviour in various solvents. PMID:23579285

  16. Anti-Stokes-enhanced tunneling ionization of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Aleksei S.; Zon, Boris A.

    2012-10-01

    We consider the influence of vibrational motion of nuclei on the tunneling ionization of a molecule in a strong light field. Unlike the molecular Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (MO-ADK) model [X. M. Tong , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.66.033402 66, 033402 (2002)], the Franck-Condon factors that take into consideration the quantization of nuclear vibrations are introduced in the theory. Modification of the vibrational motion of nuclei by the external field leads to the time-dependent constant in the asymptotic form of the electronic wave function. This in turn leads to a more significant modification of the Keldysh theory for the tunnel effect in molecules as compared to the MO-ADK model. We take into account the possibility of vibrational quantum numbers changing in a neutral molecule and in a molecular ion in the process of the tunneling ionization, which in principle enables one to get molecular ions of a certain isotopic composition if the vibrational states of the neutral molecules with this isotopic composition are pumped before ionization. We present numerical results illustrating this possibility for the isotopes of a hydrogen molecule.

  17. Ultralong-range triatomic Rydberg molecules in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera Fernández, Javier; Schmelcher, Peter; González-Férez, Rosario

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the electronic structure of a triatomic Rydberg molecule formed by a Rydberg atom and two neutral ground-state atoms. Taking into account the s-wave and p-wave interactions, we perform electronic structure calculations and analyze the adiabatic electronic potentials evolving from the Rb (n=35,l≥slant 3) Rydberg degenerate manifold. We hereby focus on three different classes of geometries of the Rydberg molecules, including symmetric, asymmetric and planar configurations. The metamorphosis of these potential energy surfaces in the presence of an external electric field is explored.

  18. Prebiologically Important Interstellar Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuan, Y.-J.; Huang, H.-C.; Charnley, S. B.; Tseng, W.-L.; Snyder, L. E.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kisiel, Z.; Thorwirth, S.; Bohn, R. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2004-06-01

    Understanding the organic chemistry of molecular clouds, particularly the formation of biologically important molecules, is fundamental to the study of the processes which lead to the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the Galaxy. Determining the level of molecular complexity attainable in the clouds, and the nature of the complex organic material available to protostellar disks and the planetary systems that form from them, requires an understanding of the possible chemical pathways and is therefore a central question in astrochemistry. We have thus searched for prebiologically important molecules in the hot molecular cloud cores: Sgr B2(N-LMH), W51 e1/e2 and Orion-KL. Among the molecules searched: Pyrimidine is the unsubstituted ring analogue for three of the DNA and RNA bases. 2H-Azirine and Aziridine are azaheterocyclic compounds. And Glycine is the simplest amino acid. Detections of these interstellar organic molecular species will thus have important implications for Astrobiology. Our preliminary results indicate a tentative detection of interstellar glycine. If confirmed, this will be the first detection of an amino acid in interstellar space and will greatly strengthen the thesis that interstellar organic molecules could have played a pivotal role in the prebiotic chemistry of the early Earth.

  19. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  20. Mighty Molecule Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Rushton, Greg; Bencomo, Marie

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SMATHematics Project: The Wonder of Science, The Power of Mathematics--a collaborative partnership between Kennesaw State University and two local school districts, fifth graders had the opportunity to puzzle out chemical formulas of propane, methanol, and other important molecules. In addition, they explored properties that…

  1. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  2. The Science of Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flory, Paul J.

    1974-01-01

    The author maintains that chemistry has a key role as the science of molecules and rejects the concept of chemistry as a branch of physics. The scope of chemistry, the philosophies underlying its practice, and the teaching of the subject also are discussed. (DT)

  3. Rydberg States of Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbings, R. F.; Dunning, F. B.

    2011-03-01

    List of contributors; Preface; 1. Rydberg atoms in astrophysics A. Dalgarno; 2. Theoretical studies of hydrogen Rydberg atoms in electric fields R. J. Damburg and V. V. Kolosov; 3. Rydberg atoms in strong fields D. Kleppner, Michael G. Littman and Myron L. Zimmerman; 4. Spectroscopy of one- and two-electron Rydberg atoms C. Fabre and S. Haroche; 5. Interaction of Rydberg atoms with blackbody radiation T. F. Gallagher; 6. Theoretical approaches to low-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with atoms and ions A. P. Hickman, R. E. Olson and J. Pascale; 7. Experimental studies of the interaction of Rydberg atoms with atomic species at thermal energies F. Gounand and J. Berlande; 8. Theoretical studies of collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules Michio Matsuzawa; 9. Experimental studies of thermal-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules F. B. Dunning and R. F. Stebbings; 10. High-Rydberg molecules Robert S. Freund; 11. Theory of Rydberg collisions with electrons, ions and neutrals M. R. Flannery; 12. Experimental studies of the interactions of Rydberg atoms with charged particles J. -F. Delpech; 13. Rydberg studies using fast beams Peter M. Koch; Index.

  4. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  5. Influenza virus antigenicity and broadly neutralizing epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Air, Gillian M.

    2015-01-01

    A vaccine formulation that would be effective against all strains of influenza virus has long been a goal of vaccine developers, but antibodies after infection or vaccination were seen to be strain specific and there was little evidence of cross-reactive antibodies that neutralized across subtypes. Recently a number of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies have been characterized. This review describes the different classes of broadly neutralizing antibodies and discusses the potential of their therapeutic use or for design of immunogens that induce a high proportion of broadly neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25846699

  6. Neutral Vlasov kinetic theory of magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tronci, Cesare; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-02-15

    The low-frequency limit of Maxwell equations is considered in the Maxwell-Vlasov system. This limit produces a neutral Vlasov system that captures essential features of plasma dynamics, while neglecting radiation effects. Euler-Poincaré reduction theory is used to show that the neutral Vlasov kinetic theory possesses a variational formulation in both Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates. By construction, the new model recovers all collisionless neutral models employed in plasma simulations. Then, comparisons between the neutral Vlasov system and hybrid kinetic-fluid models are presented in the linear regime.

  7. Structure and dynamics of supercooled water in neutral confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klameth, F.; Vogel, M.

    2013-04-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure and dynamics of liquid water in neutral nanopores, which are generated by pinning a suitable subset of water molecules in an equilibrium configuration of a bulk system. It is found that such neutral confinement does not disturb the structure of water, in particular, the local tetrahedral order, while it imposes a pronounced spatial inhomogeneity on the dynamics of water. Specifically, when the pore wall is approached, hopping motion sets in and water dynamics slows down. We show that the logarithm of the correlation time is an exponential function of the distance to the wall, indicating a tremendous gradient of water mobility across the confinement. Upon cooling, the length scale associated with this exponential distance dependence and, thus, the range of the wall effect increases, at least down to the critical temperature of mode coupling theory, Tc. Also, the temperature dependence of water dynamics varies across the pore, i.e., fragility is high in the pore center, while it is low near the pore wall. Due to all these effects, time-temperature superposition is violated. Our observations for a neutral confinement reveal that specific interactions at hydrophilic or hydrophobic walls are not the main cause of spatially inhomogeneous dynamics of confined water. In view of similarities with the behavior of Lennard-Jones liquids in neutral confinements, one may rather speculate that the effects observed for confined water are general and result from the existence of a static contribution to the energy landscape, which is imprinted by an immobile environment.

  8. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  9. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  10. Modelling and observations of molecules in discs around young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilee, John David

    2013-04-01

    This thesis contains a study of molecules within circumstellar discs around young stars. Firstly, the chemistry of a disc around a young, Class 0 protostar is modelled. Such discs are thought to be massive, and thus experience gravitational instabilities, which produce spiral density waves. These affect the chemistry in three ways; by desorbing molecules from dust grains, by providing extra energy for new reactions to take place, and by mixing the internal structure of the disc to provide a rich chemistry near the midplane. Secondly, high resolution near-infrared spectra of 20 massive young stellar objects are presented. The objects display CO first overtone bandhead emission, which is excited in the conditions expected within circumstellar discs. The emission is modelled using a simple analytic model of a Keplerian disc, and good fits are found to all spectra. On average, the discs correspond to being geometrically thin, spread across a wide range of inclinations. The discs are located within the dust sublimation radius, providing strong evidence that the CO emission originates in small gaseous discs, supporting the scenario in which massive stars form via disc accretion. Finally, medium resolution near-infrared spectra of 5 Herbig Ae/Be stars are presented. The spectra cover both CO bandhead and Br gamma emission. Accretion rates are derived from the measuring the Br gamma emission and through modelling the CO emission, however these accretion rates are found to be inconsistent. High resolution archival data of one of the targets is presented, and it is shown that this CO disc model is unable to fit the high resolution data. Therefore, it is concluded that to properly fit CO spectra, high resolution data are needed, and that previously published information determined from low resolution spectra should be treated with caution.

  11. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  12. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H.; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  13. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the point of

  14. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that "survived" the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  15. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  16. Modelling the Neutral Sodium Tails of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral sodium is typically easy to detect in active comets around perihelion, due to the very high efficiency of the sodium D transition, and at some comets a distinct neutral sodium tail is observed. The first distinct neutral sodium tail images were apparent in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) data taken using CoCam [Cremonese et al, 1997], but since this initial detection similar features have been observed at a number of near-Sun comets using the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph. An understanding of the distribution and evolution of neutral cometary sodium may best be developed using a combination of spectra and images in different filters at multiple times throughout a comet's orbit. At present the source of neutral sodium in comets is unknown, primarily because the evolution of neutral cometary sodium is difficult to intuitively predict due to the Swings and Greenstein effects. Several authors [review presented in Cremonese et al, 1999] have suggested various combinations of sources of neutral sodium in the nuclear region, near-nuclear region, dust tail and ion tail. In order to understand the wide variety of cometary observations of neutral sodium available we have developed the first fully three dimensional, heliocentric distance dependent, versatile Monte Carlo neutral sodium tail model (initially based on a model developed by [Brown et al, 1998]). Our model is known as COMPASS (Cometary Orbital Motion at Perihelion: an Adaptable Sodium Simulation), and incorporates the unintuitive variation in radiation pressure influences on sodium atoms with different heliocentric velocities. We present the initial results of a comparison between COMPASS and observational data. We have found good agreement between the overall morphology of the neutral sodium tail imaged at comet Hale-Bopp and COMPASS, and have begun to extend the study to other comets of interest. We also present a comparison between simulated COMPASS spectra and observations. The versatility of COMPASS allows it to

  17. Trimeric Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored HCDR3 of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody PG16 Is a Potent HIV-1 Entry Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lihong; Wang, Weiming; Yang, Lifei; Ren, Huanhuan; Kimata, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    PG9 and PG16 are two quaternary-structure-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies with unique HCDR3 subdomains. Previously, we showed that glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored HCDR3 subdomains (GPI-HCDR3) can be targeted to lipid rafts of the plasma membrane, bind to the epitope recognized by HCDR3 of PG16, and neutralize diverse HIV-1 isolates. In this study, we further developed trimeric GPI-HCDR3s and demonstrated that trimeric GPI-HCDR3 (PG16) dramatically improves anti-HIV-1 neutralization, suggesting that a stoichiometry of recognition of 3 or 2 HCDR3 molecules (PG16) to 1 viral spike is possible. PMID:23152526

  18. Neutral dissociation of hydrogen following photoexcitation of HCl at the chlorine K edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.L.; Arrasate, M.E.; Martin, R.; Vanderford, B.; Lindle, D.W.; Cotter, J.; Neill, P.; Fisher, G.R.; Perera, R.C.; Leung, K.T.; Levin, J.C.; Sellin, I.A.; Simon, M.; Simon, M.; Uehara, Y.; Whitfield, S.B.

    1998-04-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy was used to study the relaxation dynamics of HCl following photoexcitation in the vicinity of the Cl K edge ({approximately}2.8keV) using monochromatic synchrotron radiation. At the lowest resonant excitation to the 6{sigma}{sup {asterisk}} antibonding orbital, almost half of the excited molecules decay by emission of a neutral H atom, mostly in coincidence with a highly charged Cl{sup n+} ion. The present work demonstrates that neutral-atom emission can be a significant decay channel for excited states with very short lifetimes (1 fs). {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Beta-galactosidase and selective neutrality. [amino acid composition of proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.

    1979-01-01

    Three hypotheses to explain the amino acid composition of proteins are inconsistent (about 10 to the minus 9th) with the experimental data for beta-galactosidase from Escherichia coli. The exceptional length of this protein, 1021 residues, permits rigorous tests of these hypotheses without complication from statistical artifacts. Either this protein is not at compositional equilibrium, which is unlikely from knowledge about other proteins, or the evolution of this protein and its coding gene have not been selectively neutral. However, the composition of approximately 60% of the molecule is consistent with either a selectively neutral or nonneutral evolutionary process.

  20. Single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1995-09-15

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required for individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed before-hand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Strange skyrmion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-01

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  2. Strange skyrmion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-20

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  3. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  4. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  5. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  6. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  7. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  8. Efficient laser production of energetic neutral beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, F.; Antonelli, L.; Flacco, A.; Braenzel, J.; Vauzour, B.; Folpini, G.; Birindelli, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Batani, D.; Malka, V.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration by intense, ultra-short, laser pulse has received increasing attention in recent years, and the availability of much compact and versatile ions sources motivates the study of laser-driven sources of energetic neutral atoms. We demonstrate the production of a neutral and directional beam of hydrogen and carbon atoms up to 200 keV per nucleon, with a peak flow of 2.7× {{10}13} atom s-1. Laser accelerated ions are neutralized in a pulsed, supersonic argon jet with tunable density between 1.5× {{10}17} cm-3and 6× {{10}18} cm-3. The neutralization efficiency has been measured by a time-of-flight detector for different argon densities. An optimum is found, for which complete neutralization occurs. The neutralization rate can be explained only at high areal densities (>1× {{10}17} cm-2) by single electron charge transfer processes. These results suggest a new perspective for the study of neutral production by laser and open discussion of neutralization at a lower density.

  9. Controversial Issues: A Case for Neutrality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Arguments against teachers asserting their own views about controversial issues say that neutrality enables students to develop autonomous reflection. Others claim that a nonneutral stance is morally preferable. There are some teaching situations in which a neutral stance may not be an option. (SK)

  10. Gender Neutrality: Women's Friend or Foe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steuernagel, Trudy

    Gender neutral public policies are those that are either silent on the question of the existence of significant gender differences or incorporate a perspective which mandates that such differences be ignored. Prominent voices today contend that gender neutrality favors males and have held the male standard as the one for which women should aspire.…

  11. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  12. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  13. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  14. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  15. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  16. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  17. The Dubious Value of Value Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Hard science is properly value neutral. But when that ideological neutrality extends to the whole university, the traditional foundation crumbles. Steve Balch laments the moral vacuum that now substitutes for fundamental principles, because it is impossible to frame a program of education--especially in the humanities and social sciences--without…

  18. Types of Neutralization and Types of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jim; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Neutralization theory was tested with questionnaires administered to a random sample of public high school students (N-298) and institutionalized male delinquents (N-53). Neutralization acceptance technique patterns were similar across subsamples; however, correlations between each technique and each type of delinquency were statistically…

  19. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  20. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Skylab's success proved that scientific experimentation in a low gravity environment was essential to scientific progress. A more permanent structure was needed to provide this space laboratory. President Ronald Reagan, on January 25, 1984, during his State of the Union address, claimed that the United States should exploit the new frontier of space, and directed NASA to build a permanent marned space station within a decade. The idea was that the space station would not only be used as a laboratory for the advancement of science and medicine, but would also provide a staging area for building a lunar base and manned expeditions to Mars and elsewhere in the solar system. President Reagan invited the international community to join with the United States in this endeavour. NASA and several countries moved forward with this concept. By December 1985, the first phase of the space station was well underway with the design concept for the crew compartments and laboratories. Pictured are two NASA astronauts, at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS), practicing construction techniques they later used to construct the space station after it was deployed.

  1. Neutral Models of Microbiome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinglong; Sukumaran, Jeet; Wu, Steven; Rodrigo, Allen

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research on host-associated microbial communities (i.e.,microbiomes). Much of this research has focused on surveys of microbial diversities across a variety of host species, including humans, with a view to understanding how these microbiomes are distributed across space and time, and how they correlate with host health, disease, phenotype, physiology and ecology. Fewer studies have focused on how these microbiomes may have evolved. In this paper, we develop an agent-based framework to study the dynamics of microbiome evolution. Our framework incorporates neutral models of how hosts acquire their microbiomes, and how the environmental microbial community that is available to the hosts is assembled. Most importantly, our framework also incorporates a Wright-Fisher genealogical model of hosts, so that the dynamics of microbiome evolution is studied on an evolutionary timescale. Our results indicate that the extent of parental contribution to microbial availability from one generation to the next significantly impacts the diversity of microbiomes: the greater the parental contribution, the less diverse the microbiomes. In contrast, even when there is only a very small contribution from a constant environmental pool, microbial communities can remain highly diverse. Finally, we show that our models may be used to construct hypotheses about the types of processes that operate to assemble microbiomes over evolutionary time. PMID:26200800

  2. The status of neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirner, F.

    1987-11-01

    The situation of particle physics today is quite puzzling. On the one hand, the Standard Model (SM) of strong and electroweak interactions is consistent with all confirmed experimental data but theoretically rather unsatisfactory. On the other hand, none of the many theoretical speculations which try to go beyond the SM has (yet) received the slightest experimental support. The solution to this dilemma can only come from new data: either from the detection of a new particle threshold at high energy colliders, or from the appearance of some small discrepancy in high-precision experiments. A crucial sector for testing the SM and its extensions is that of neutral currents (NC), where an impressive amount of data has been collected in recent years. While waiting for the next generation of experiments, it is certainly useful to take stock of our knowledge, determining the NC parameters as precisely as we can and putting limits on possible deviations from the SM. The present talk contains the results of a recent analysis along these lines: the first part illustrates how a set of 'model-independent' parameters can be extracted from the available NC data, the second part particularizes the analysis to the SM and to some superstring-inspired models with an additional Z' in their low-energy spectrum. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Single Molecule Mechanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Yanxing; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu, Yanxing Zhang Team; Wilson Ho, Shaowei Li Team

    Mechanical forces can be used to trigger chemical reactions through bending and stretching of chemical bonds. Using the reciprocating movement of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), mechanical energy can be provided to a single molecule sandwiched between the tip and substrate. When the mechanical pulse center was moved to the outer ring feature of a CO molecule, the reaction rate was significantly increased compared with bare Cu surface and over Au atoms. First, DFT calculations show that the presence of CO makes the Cu cavity more attractive toward H2 Second, H2 prefers the horizontal adsorption geometry in the Cu-Cu and Au-Cu cavities and no hybridization occurs between the antibonding states of H2 and states of Cu atoms. While H2 loses electrons from its bonding state in all three cavities, the filling of its anti-bonding state only occurs in the CO-Cu cavity. Both make the CO-Cu cavity much more effectively to chop the H2 molecule. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation on Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) under Grant No. CHE-1414466.

  4. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed. PMID:25638443

  5. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  6. Molecules in interstellar clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Hjalmarson, A.; Rydbeck, O. E. H.

    The physical conditions and chemical compositions of the gas in interstellar clouds are reviewed in light of the importance of interstellar clouds for star formation and the origin of life. The Orion A region is discussed as an example of a giant molecular cloud where massive stars are being formed, and it is pointed out that conditions in the core of the cloud, with a kinetic temperature of about 75 K and a density of 100,000-1,000,000 molecules/cu cm, may support gas phase ion-molecule chemistry. The Taurus Molecular Clouds are then considered as examples of cold, dark, relatively dense interstellar clouds which may be the birthplaces of solar-type stars and which have been found to contain the heaviest interstellar molecules yet discovered. The molecular species identified in each of these regions are tabulated, including such building blocks of biological monomers as H2O, NH3, H2CO, CO, H2S, CH3CN and H2, and more complex species such as HCOOCH3 and CH3CH2CN.

  7. Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Trzpis, Monika; McLaughlin, Pamela M.J.; de Leij, Lou M.F.H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2007-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD326) is a glycoprotein of ∼40 kd that was originally identified as a marker for carcinoma, attributable to its high expression on rapidly proliferating tumors of epithelial origin. Normal epithelia express EpCAM at a variable but generally lower level than carcinoma cells. In early studies, EpCAM was proposed to be a cell-cell adhesion molecule. However, recent insights revealed a more versatile role for EpCAM that is not limited only to cell adhesion but includes diverse processes such as signaling, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Cell surface expression of EpCAM may actually prevent cell-cell adhesion. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the current knowledge on EpCAM biology in relation to other cell adhesion molecules. We discuss the implications of the newly identified functions of EpCAM in view of its prognostic relevance in carcinoma, inflammatory pathophysiology, and tissue development and regeneration as well as its role in normal epithelial homeostasis. PMID:17600130

  8. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  9. Plasmonic molecules via glass annealing in hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Growth of self-assembled metal nanoislands on the surface of silver ion-exchanged glasses via their thermal processing in hydrogen followed by out-diffusion of neutral silver is studied. The combination of thermal poling of the ion-exchanged glass with structured electrode and silver out-diffusion was used for simple formation of separated groups of several metal nanoislands presenting plasmonic molecules. The kinetics of nanoisland formation and temporal evolution of their size distribution on the surface of poled and unpoled glass are modeled. PACS 78.67.Sc (nanoaggregates; nanocomposites); 81.16.Dn (self-assembly); 68.35.bj (surface structure of glasses); 64.60.Qb (Nucleation); 81.16.Nd (micro- and nanolithography) PMID:25404875

  10. Mechanisms of lactone hydrolysis in neutral and alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2013-07-19

    The neutral and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of nine carboxylic acid esters was studied using a hybrid supermolecule-PCM approach including six explicit water molecules. The molecules studied included two linear esters, four β-lactones, two γ-lactones, and one δ-lactone: ethyl acetate and methyl formate, β-propiolactone, β-butyrolactone, β-isovalerolactone, diketene (4-methyleneoxetan-2-one), γ-butyrolactone, 2(5H)-furanone, and δ-valerolactone. DFT and ab initio methods were used to analyze the features of the various possible hydrolysis mechanisms. For all compounds, reasonable to very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental work was found, and evidence is provided to support long-standing hypotheses regarding the role of solvent molecule as a base catalyst. In addition, novel evidence is presented for the existence of an elimination-addition mechanism in the basic hydrolysis of diketene. A parallel work addresses the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of lactones. PMID:23758295

  11. Ionization and Desorption of Molecule Ice Stimulated by X-Rays in Circumstellar Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E. F.; Almeida, G.; Wolff, W.; Andrade, D. P. P.; Rocco, M. L. M.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    The HCN and C2H2 molecules present in protoplanetary disks can form the Nitrogen-containing cyclic organic molecules (N-heterocycles) that play important roles in terrestrial biology, for example as the nucleobases in genetic material. In this work the ionization, dissociation and desorption processes of pyrimidine ice, a nucleotide precursor molecule, were experimentally studied applying the time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique, in order to evaluate their destruction pathways in protoplanetary disks. These processes were stimulated by soft X-rays from 397 to 430 eV delivered by synchrotron light source. The photodesorption ion yield (ion photon-1) of several ions such as HCN+, C4H2+, HC3NH+, and C3H3N+ among other ionic fragments were determined. Considering that TW Hydrae has an integrated X-ray luminosity (LX) from 0.2 to 2 keV of ˜ 1 × 1030 erg s-1, the ion flux (ion cm-2 s-1) desorbed from the grain surface and the ion production rate (ion cm-3 s-1) were determined as a function of the distance from the central star. The results show that ionic species are formed from ice due to photons interaction, highlighting the role of the ice chemistry in the molecular enrichment in protoplanetary disks.

  12. Effective medium potentials for molecule-surface interactions: H2 on Cu and Ni surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørskov, J. K.

    1989-06-01

    A new approximate method is developed for the calculation of the adiabatic potential energy surface for a molecule outside a metal surface. It is computationally fast enough to be useful in simulations of the dynamics of adsorbing and desorbing molecules. The method is characterized by the fact that the functional form of the total energy expression is derived from density functional theory, that each of the terms entering can be given a precise physical interpretation, and that most of the parameters entering can be calculated, within the local density approximation. The method is explicitly derived for H2 outside metal surfaces and the applicability is illustrated for H2 adsorbing on various Cu and Ni surfaces. Although very approximate, the calculated potentials seem to include a number of features observed experimentally: Ni is more active in dissociating H2 than Cu, and open surfaces are more active than close-packed ones. Moreover, the method is simple enough that one can contemplate studying variations in dissociation pathways over the surface unit cell. For the Cu surfaces these variations are substantial accounting for at least part of the variation of the sticking coefficient with the kinetic energy of the incoming molecule. Because of the transparent nature of the energy expression, all these trends can be given a simple physical interpretation.

  13. Generic properties of combinatory maps: Neutral networks of RNA secondary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Reidys, C. |; Stadler, P.F. |; Schuster, P. ||

    1997-03-01

    Random graph theory is used to model and analyze the relationships between sequences and secondary structures of RNA molecules, which are understood as mappings from sequence space into shape space. These maps are non-invertible since there are always many orders of magnitude more sequences than structures. Sequences folding into identical structures form neutral networks. A neutral network is embedded in the set of sequences that are compatible with the given structure. Networks are modeled as graphs and constructed by random choice of vertices from the space of compatible sequences. The theory characterizes neutral networks by the mean fraction of neutral neighbors ({lambda}). The networks are connected and percolate sequence space if the fraction of neutral nearest neighbors exceeds a threshold value ({lambda} > {lambda}*). Below threshold ({lambda} < {lambda}*), the networks are partitioned into a largest giant component and several smaller components. Structures are classified as common or rare according to the sizes of their pre-images, i.e. according to the fractions of sequences folding into them. The neutral networks of any pair of two different common structures almost touch each other, and, as expressed by the conjecture of shape space covering sequences folding into almost all common structures, can be found in a small ball of an arbitrary location in sequence space. The results from random graph theory are compared to data obtained by folding large samples of RNA sequences. Differences are explained in terms of specific features of RNA molecular structures.

  14. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies. PMID:7428744

  15. Watching single molecules dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  16. Leucocyte cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Yong, K; Khwaja, A

    1990-12-01

    Leucocytes express adhesion promoting receptors which mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These adhesive interactions are crucial to the regulation of haemopoiesis and thymocyte maturation, the direction and control of leucocyte traffic and migration through tissues, and in the development of immune and non-immune inflammatory responses. Several families of adhesion receptors have been identified (Table). The leucocyte integrin family comprises 3 alpha beta heterodimeric membrane glycoproteins which share a common beta subunit, designated CD18. The alpha subunits of each of the 3 members, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1) and p150,95 are designated CD11a, b and c respectively. These adhesion molecules play a critical part in the immune and inflammatory responses of leucocytes. The leucocyte integrin family is, in turn, part of the integrin superfamily, members of which are evolutionally, structurally and functionally related. Another Integrin subfamily found on leucocytes is the VLA group, so-called because the 'very late activation antigens' VLA-1 and VLA-2 were originally found to appear late in T-cell activation. Members of this family function mainly as extracellular matrix adhesion receptors and are found both on haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic cells. They play a part in diverse cellular functions including tissue organisation, lymphocyte recirculation and T-cell immune responses. A third integrin subfamily, the cytoadhesins, are receptors on platelets and endothelial cells which bind extracellular matrix proteins. A second family of adhesion receptors is the immunoglobulin superfamily, members of which include CD2, LFA-3 and ICAM-1, which participate in T-cell adhesive interactions, and the antigen-specific receptors of T and B cells, CD4, CD8 and the MHC Class I and II molecules. A recently recognised family of adhesion receptors is the selectins, characterised by a common lectin domain. Leucocyte

  17. Single Molecule Transcription Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Galburt, Eric A.; Grill, Stephan W.; Bustamante, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Single molecule optical trapping assays have now been applied to a great number of macromolecular systems including DNA, RNA, cargo motors, restriction enzymes, DNA helicases, chromosome remodelers, DNA polymerases and both viral and bacterial RNA polymerases. The advantages of the technique are the ability to observe dynamic, unsynchronized molecular processes, to determine the distributions of experimental quantities and to apply force to the system while monitoring the response over time. Here, we describe the application of these powerful techniques to study the dynamics of transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19426807

  18. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  19. Neutral particle beams for space defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botwin, Robert; Favale, Anthony

    Neutral particle beam (NPB) weapons direct highly focused high energy streams of electrically neutral atomic particles traveling at nearly the speed of light, escaping deflection from the earth's magnetic field and acting on the subatomic structure of a target, destroying it from within. The beam's brief contact with a reentry vehicle produces a nuclear reaction in the latter that yields particle emissions; by detecting and identifying those particles, it becomes possible to effectively distinguish warheads from decoys. Attention is given to the NPB program roles to be played by the Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket and Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment projects.

  20. Imaging and manipulating molecules on a zeolite surface with an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenhorn, A.L.; MacDougall, J.E.; Gould, S.A.C.; Cox, S.D.; Wise, W.S.; Stucky, G.D.; Hansma, P.K. ); Massie, J.; Maivald, P.; Elings, V.B. )

    1990-03-16

    The adsorption of neutral molecules and ions on the surfaces of zeolites was observed in real time with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Direct imaging of the surface of the zeolite clinoptilolite was possible by using a diluted tert-butyl ammonium chloride solution as a medium. Images of the crystal in different liquids revealed that molecules could be bound to the surface in different ways; neutral molecules of tert-butanol formed an ordered array, whereas tert-butyl ammonium ions formed clusters. These absorbed molecules were not rearranged by the AFM tip when used in an imaging mode. However, when a sufficiently large force was applied, the tip of the AFM could rearrange the tert-butyl ammoniium ions on the zeolite surface. This demonstration of molecular manipulation suggests new applications, including biosensors and lithography. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Imaging and Manipulating Molecules on a Zeolite Surface with an Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenhorn, A. L.; Mac Dougall, J. E.; Gould, S. A. C.; Cox, S. D.; Wise, W. S.; Massie, J.; Maivald, P.; Elings, V. B.; Stucky, G. D.; Hansma, P. K.

    1990-03-01

    The adsorption of neutral molecules and ions on the surfaces of zeolites was observed in real time with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Direct imaging of the surface of the zeolite clinoptilolite was possible by using a diluted tert-butyl ammonium chloride solution as a medium. Images of the crystal in different liquids revealed that molecules could be bound to the surface in different ways; neutral molecules of tert-butanol formed an ordered array, whereas tert-butyl ammonium ions formed clusters. These absorbed molecules were not rearranged by the AFM tip when used in an imaging mode. However, when a sufficiently large force was applied, the tip of the AFM could rearrange the tert-butyl ammonium ions on the zeolite surface. This demonstration of molecular manipulation suggests new applications, including biosensors and lithography.

  2. Superhard Coatings Synthesis Assisted by Pulsed Beams of High-Energy Gas Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metel, Alexander; Bolbukov, Vasily; Volosova, Marina; Grigoriev, Sergei; Melnik, Yury; Department of high-efficiency machining technologies Team

    2015-09-01

    For production of nanocomposite superhard (HV 5000) and fracture-tough coatings on dielectric substrates a source of metal atoms accompanied by pulsed beams of 30-keV neutral molecules was used. The source is equipped with two parallel equipotential grids placed between a magnetron target and a substrate. Negative high-voltage pulses applied to the high-transparency grids accelerate from the magnetron plasma ions, which are transformed into high-energy neutral molecules due to charge-exchange collisions with gas molecules between the grids. Mixing of the substrate and coating materials through bombardment by high-energy gas molecules results in an adequate compressive stress of the coating and interface width exceeding 1 μm, which allows deposition of 100- μm-thick coatings with a perfect adhesion. The work was supported by the Grant No. 14-29-00297 of the Russian Science Foundation.

  3. Covalent Chemistry beyond Molecules.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juncong; Zhao, Yingbo; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-03-16

    Linking molecular building units by covalent bonds to make crystalline extended structures has given rise to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), thus bringing the precision and versatility of covalent chemistry beyond discrete molecules to extended structures. The key advance in this regard has been the development of strategies to overcome the "crystallization problem", which is usually encountered when attempting to link molecular building units into covalent solids. Currently, numerous MOFs and COFs are made as crystalline materials in which the large size of the constituent units provides for open frameworks. The molecular units thus reticulated become part of a new environment where they have (a) lower degrees of freedom because they are fixed into position within the framework; (b) well-defined spatial arrangements where their properties are influenced by the intricacies of the pores; and (c) ordered patterns onto which functional groups can be covalently attached to produce chemical complexity. The notion of covalent chemistry beyond molecules is further strengthened by the fact that covalent reactions can be carried out on such frameworks, with full retention of their crystallinity and porosity. MOFs are exemplars of how this chemistry has led to porosity with designed metrics and functionality, chemically-rich sequences of information within their frameworks, and well-defined mesoscopic constructs in which nanoMOFs enclose inorganic nanocrystals and give them new levels of spatial definition, stability, and functionality. PMID:26863450

  4. Rapid formation and slow collapse of a carbocation-anion pair to a neutral molecule.

    PubMed

    Hao, Weifang; Parker, Vernon D

    2008-01-01

    The 4,4',4' '-trimethoxytrityl cation (TMT(+)) was observed to react with acetate ion in acetic acid reversibly to give the corresponding ester (TMT-OAc). The rate of the reaction was found to be independent of [NaOAc] over a 25000-fold range. Similar results were observed in the presence of Bu(4)N(+) in acetic acid as well as in HOAc/AN (1/1). It was concluded that {TMT(+) (HOAc/AcO(-))} is an ion pair that forms essentially completely from free TMT(+) and HOAc/AcO(-) during the time of mixing under stopped-flow conditions. The process which was studied kinetically is the intramolecular collapse of the ion pair to TMT-OAc which takes place in two steps involving a kinetically significant intermediate. The remarkably close resemblance of this reaction to the Winstein scheme for solvolysis reactions is noted. In analogy to the Winstein scheme, it was proposed that the intermediate could be an intimate ion pair formed upon extrusion of solvent from the solvent separated ion pair. The product-forming step could then correspond to the intimate ion pair reacting further to form a covalent bond between the two moieties within the complex. The values of the thermodynamic and the activation parameters as well as the apparent rate constants for the reaction in the presence of either sodium or tetrabutylammonium ions suggest that these counterions play insignificant roles in the reactions. However, the equilibrium constant for the intramolecular step (K(4)) was observed to be two times greater in the presence of Bu(4)N(+) than in the presence of Na(+). The rate of the reaction in HOAc was observed to be about four times as great as that in HOAc/AN (1/1). PMID:18067318

  5. A coarse-grained kinetic equation for neutral particles in turbulent fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mekkaoui, A.; Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Stamm, R.; Capes, H.; Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Catoire, F.

    2012-06-15

    A coarse-grained kinetic equation for neutral particles (atoms, molecules) in magnetized fusion plasmas, valid on time scales large compared to the turbulence correlation time, is presented. This equation includes the effects of plasma density fluctuations, described by gamma statistics, on the transport of neutral particles. These effects have so far been neglected in plasma edge modeling, in spite of the fact that the amplitude of fluctuations can be of order unity. Density fluctuations are shown to have a marked effect on the screening of neutrals and on the spatial localization of the ionization source, in particular at high density. The coarse-grained equations obtained in this work are readily implemented in edge code suites currently used for fusion plasma analysis and future divertor design (ITER, DEMO).

  6. Electrophoretic mobilities of neutral analytes and electroosmotic flow markers in aqueous solutions of Hofmeister salts.

    PubMed

    Křížek, Tomáš; Kubíčková, Anna; Hladílková, Jana; Coufal, Pavel; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Small neutral organic compounds have traditionally the role of EOF markers in electrophoresis, as they are expected to have zero electrophoretic mobility in external electric fields. The BGE contains, however, ions that have unequal affinities to the neutral molecules, which in turn results in their mobilization. In this study we focused on two EOF markers-thiourea and DMSO, as well as on N-methyl acetamide (NMA) as a model of the peptide bond. By means of CE and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we explored mobilization of these neutral compounds in large set of Hofmeister salts. Employing a statistical mechanics approach, we were able to reproduce by simulations the experimental electrophoretic mobility coefficients. We also established the role of the chemical composition of marker and the BGE on the measured electrophoretic mobility coefficient. For NMA, we interpreted the results in terms of the relative affinities of cations versus anions to the peptide bond. PMID:24338984

  7. A SEARCH FOR CO-EVOLVING ION AND NEUTRAL GAS SPECIES IN PRESTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Hezareh, Talayeh; Willacy, Karen

    2012-11-20

    A comparison between the widths of ion and neutral molecule spectral lines has been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO{sup +}) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density, and thus, may not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO{sup +} and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral line width differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations, because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO{sup +}/NO, HCO{sup +}/CO, and NO{sup +}/NO.

  8. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Stephen Luke

    2008-07-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL and

  9. Compilation of Electron-Neutral Collision Data in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2009-10-01

    Data on electron-neutral interaction are required and indispensable in several areas of research including Power systems, Plasma applications, material scientists, Chemistry, and even biological processes. The data are generally classified under cross sections for various elastic and inelastic processes, swarm properties including transport parameters and growth coefficients. A large number of reviews and compilations for a limited number of gases have been previously published in the literature by other researchers. In this presentation the author has compiled, over a period of twenty years or so, data for most of the molecules, if not for all, studied for the electron energy range (0-1000 eV) For each target particle about sixteen quantities have been classified to the extent that data are available, provided in tabular and graphical formats. The data are updated on a continuous basis till publication time.

  10. A Neutral Silicon/Phosphorus Frustrated Lewis Pair.

    PubMed

    Waerder, Benedikt; Pieper, Martin; Körte, Leif A; Kinder, Timo A; Mix, Andreas; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2015-11-01

    Frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) have a great potential for activation of small molecules. Most known FLP systems are based on boron or aluminum atoms as acid functions, few on zinc, and only two on boron-isoelectronic silicenium cation systems. The first FLP system based on a neutral silane, (C2F5)3SiCH2P(tBu)2 (1), was prepared from (C2F5)3SiCl with C2F5 groups of very high electronegativity and LiCH2P(tBu)2. 1 is capable of cleaving hydrogen, and adds CO2 and SO2. Hydrogen splitting was confirmed by H/D scrambling reactions. The structures of 1, its CO2 and SO2 adducts, and a decomposition product with CO2 were elucidated by X-ray diffraction. PMID:26423202

  11. Chemistry of sprite discharges through ion-neutral reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Y.; Kasai, Y.; Fukunishi, H.

    2008-07-01

    We estimate the concentration changes, caused by streamer discharge in sprites, of ozone and related minor species as odd nitrogen (NOx) and hydrogen (HOx) families in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The streamer has an intense electric field and high electron density at its head, where a large number of chemically-radical ions and atoms are produced through electron impact on neutral molecules. After its propagation, densities of minor species can be perturbed through ion-neutral chemical reactions initiated by the relaxation of these radical products. We evaluate the production rates of ions and atoms using an electron kinetics model and by assuming that the electric field and electron density are in the head region. We calculate the density variations mainly for NOx, Ox, and HOx species using a one-dimensional model of the neutral and ion composition of the middle atmosphere, including the effect of the sprite streamer. Results at the nighttime condition show that the densities of NO, O3, H, and OH increase suddenly through reactions triggered by the first atomic nitrogen and oxygen product, and electrons just after streamer initiation. It is shown that NO and NO2 still remain for 1 h by a certain order of increase with their source-sink balance, predominantly around 60 km; for other species, increases in O3, OH, HO2, and H2O2 still remain in the range of 40 70 km. From this affirmative result of long-time behavior previously not presented, we emphasize that sprites would have the power to impact local chemistry at night. We also discuss the consistency with previous theoretical and observational studies, along with future suggestions.

  12. Chemistry of sprite discharges through ion-neutral reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Y.; Kasai, Y.; Fukunishi, H.

    2008-02-01

    We estimate the concentration changes, caused by a single streamer in sprites, of ozone and related minor species as odd nitrogen (NOx) and hydrogen (HOx) families in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The streamer has an intense electric field and high electron density at its head where a large number of chemically-radical ions and atoms are produced through electron impact on neutral molecules. After propagation of the streamer, the densities of minor species can be perturbed through ion-neutral chemical reactions initiated by the relaxation of these radical products. We evaluate the production rates of ions and atoms using electron kinetics model and assuming the electric field and electron density in the streamer head. We calculate the density variations mainly for NOx, Ox, and HOx species using a one-dimensional model of the neutral and ion composition of the middle atmosphere, including the effect of the sprite streamer. Results at the nighttime condition show that the densities of NO, O3, H, and OH increase suddenly through reactions triggered by firstly produced atomic nitrogen and oxygen, and electrons just after streamer initiation. It is shown that NO and NO2 still remain for 1 h by a certain order of increase with their source-sink balance predominantly around 60 km; for other species, increases in O3, OH, HO2, and H2O2 still remain in the range of 40-70 km. From this affirmative result of long time behavior previously not presented, we emphasize that sprites would have a power to impact on local chemistry at night. We also discuss comparison with previous studies and suggestion for satellite observations.

  13. Formation, stability, and reactivity studies of neutral iron sulfide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot

    2014-03-01

    Different methods are used to generate neutral iron sulfide clusters to study their formation, stability, and reactivity, employing a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) with VUV (118 nm) radiation single photon ionization (SPI). Neutral FemSn (m = 1-4, n = 1-6), and hydrogen containing FemSnHx (x >0, n > m) clusters are generated by the reaction of seeded H2S in a helium carrier gas with laser ablated iron metal within a supersonic nozzle. The observed strong signal of association products Fe2S2(SH)0,1 M (M = CO, C2H4, C3H6) suggest that the Fe2S2(SH)0,1 clusters have the high activity for interactions with these small molecules. In order to avoid the effect for reactivity from hydrogen containing clusters, pure FemSnclusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixed iron/sulfur target in the presence of a pure helium carrier gas. (FeS)m (m = 1-4) is observed to be the most stable series. Reaction of CO and H2 on neutral (FeS)1,2clusters is farther investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A size dependent reactivity of iron sulfide clusters toward CO is characterized. The reaction FeS + CO --> Fe + OCS is found for the FeS cluster. Products Fe2S 213COH2 and Fe2S 213COH4 are identified for reactions of 13CO and H2 on Fe2S2 clusters: this suggests that the Fe2S2 cluster has a high catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions of CO to form formaldehyde and methanol. DFT calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the two reactions: Fe2S2 + CO + 2H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH3OH; and Fe2S2 + CO + H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH2O.

  14. Cryosorption Pumps for a Neutral Beam Injector Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dremel, M.; Mack, A.; Day, C.; Jensen, H.

    2006-04-27

    We present the experiences of the manufacturing and the operating of a system of two identical cryosorption pumps used in a neutral beam injector test facility for fusion reactors. Calculated and measured heat loads of the cryogenic liquid helium and liquid nitrogen circuits of the cryosorption pumps are discussed. The design calculations concerning the thermo-hydraulics of the helium circuit are compared with experiences from the operation of the cryosorption pumps. Both cryopumps are integrated in a test facility of a neutral beam injector that will be used to heat the plasma of a nuclear fusion reactor with a beam of deuterium or hydrogen molecules. The huge gas throughput into the vessel of the test facility results in challenging needs on the cryopumping system.The developed cryosorption pumps are foreseen to pump a hydrogen throughput of 20 - 30 mbar{center_dot}l/s. To establish a mean pressure of several 10-5 mbar in the test vessel a pumping speed of about 350 m3/s per pump is needed. The pressure conditions must be maintained over several hours pumping without regeneration of the cryopanels, which necessitates a very high pumping capacity. A possibility to fulfill these requirements is the use of charcoal coated cryopanels to pump the gasloads by adsorption. For the cooling of the cryopanels, liquid helium at saturation pressure is used and therefore a two-phase forced flow in the cryopump system must be controlled.

  15. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The lizard Scincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  16. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers.

    PubMed

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-03-01

    The lizardScincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  17. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N.; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  18. The Ethics of Evaluation Neutrality and Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datta, Lois-ellin

    1999-01-01

    Examines arguments for and against evaluation advocacy in terms of the American Evaluation Association's "Guiding Principles for Evaluators" and other statements on advocacy and neutrality. Suggests revision of the "Guiding Principles." (Author/SLD)

  19. Neutral gas heating in helium microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugroot, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study details a self-consistent model of charged and neutral particle dynamics which is applied to atmospheric small-space (200 μm) discharges in helium. Hydrodynamic transport equations of the self-consistent and time-dependant model are described with an emphasis on the different terms involved in the close coupling among charged species, neutral species, and the electric field. Those equations are solved by two-dimensional numerical schemes for both species transport and electric field. The microplasmas are studied from an initial cloud until the stages of charged particle overamplification in small spaces, where transients are particularly important. Gas heating, neutral depletion initiation, and electric field reversal are observed, highlighting the close interaction between neutral gas and charged species in governing the evolution of the microplasma.

  20. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, H.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J.; Kucera, T.; Antiochos, S.; Kawashima, R.

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between ions and neutrals in magnetized plasmas is fundamentally important to many aspects of heliophysics, including our ionosphere, the solar chromosphere, the solar wind interaction with planetary atmospheres, and the interface between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Ion-neutral coupling also plays a major role in the physics of solar prominences. By combining theory, modeling, and observations we are working toward a better understanding of the structure and dynamics of partially ionized prominence plasma. Two key questions are addressed in the present work: 1) what physical mechanism(s) sets the cross-field scale of prominence threads? 2) Are ion-neutral interactions responsible for the vertical flows and structure in prominences? We present initial results from a study investigating what role ion-neutral interactions play in prominence dynamics and structure. This research was supported by NASA.

  1. Neutralized transport of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Anders, A.; Sharp, W.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. A converging ion beam at the exit of the final focus magnetic system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source and an RF plasma source. Effects of a ''plasma plug'', where electrons are extracted from a localized plasma in the upstream end of the drift section, and are then dragged along by the ion potential, as well as the ''volumetric plasma'', where neutralization is provided by the plasma laid down along the ion path, are both studied and their relative effects on the beam spot size are compared. Comparisons with 3-D PIC code predictions will also be presented.

  2. The Chemistry of Multiply Deuterated Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks: I. The Outer Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willacy, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present new models of the deuterium chemistry in protoplanetary disks, including, for the first time, multiply deuterated species. We use these models to explore whether observations in combination with models can give us clues as to which desorption processes occur in disks.We find, in common with other authors, that photodesorption can allow strongly bound molecules such as HDO to exist in the gas phase in a layer above the midplane. Models including this process give the best agreement with the observations. In the midplane, cosmic-ray heating can desorb weakly bound molecules such as CO and N2. We find the observations suggest that N2 is gaseous in this region, but that CO must be retained on the grains to account for the observed DCO+/HCO+. This could be achieved by CO having a higher binding energy than N2 (as may be the case when these molecules are accreted onto water ice) or by a smaller cosmic-ray desorption rate for CO than assumed here, as suggested by recent theoretical work. For gaseous molecules the calculated deuteration can be greatly changed by chemical processing in the disk from the input molecular cloud values. On the grains singly deuterated species tend to retain the D/H ratio set in the molecular cloud, whereas multiply deuterated species are more affected by the disk chemistry. Consequently, the D/H ratios observed in comets may be partly set in the parent cloud and partly in the disk, depending on the molecule.

  3. Sample-matrix effects in infrared laser neutral desorption, multiphoton-ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavis, R. C.; Lindner, J.; Grotemeyer, J.; Schlag, E. W.

    1988-05-01

    Sample-matrix effects in laser evaporation of intact neutral molecules (LEIM) prior to multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (MUPI MS) are studied. The results show that a strong influence exists in adding matrix materials to the sample upon the desorption step. Using sugars as matrix leads to a suppression of pyrolysis products in small peptides by the laser desorption. As a result mass spectrometric signals due to the pyrolysis products are avoided.

  4. Dissociative excitation as the source of neutral atoms in hydrogen discharges

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    Electron impact dissociative excitation of H/sub 2/ molecules is identified as the origin of the narrow width and structure of Balmer lines observed in various low density hydrogen discharges. On the basis of this data and estimates of the rates of competing processes in plasmas, dissociative excitation, together with other molecular reactions, is proposed as the source of neutral atoms and protons in these discharges.

  5. Efficient pathway to neutralization of multiply charged ions produced in Auger processes.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, V; Kolorenč, P; Gokhberg, K; Cederbaum, L S

    2013-06-21

    After core ionization of an atom or molecule by an x-ray photon, multiply charged ions are produced in the Auger decay process. These ions tend to neutralize their charge when embedded in an environment. We demonstrate that, depending on the atom or molecule and its neighbors, electron transfer mediated decay (ETMD) provides a particularly efficient neutralization pathway for the majority of the ions produced by Auger decay. The mechanism is rather general. As a showcase example, we conducted an ab initio study of the NeKr2 cluster after core ionization of the Ne atom. This example has been chosen because it is amenable to both ab initio calculations and coincidence experiments. We find that even for frozen nuclei, the neutralization rate can be as fast as 0.130  ps(-1). We also show that nuclear dynamics may increase the rate by about an order of magnitude. The generality of the mechanism makes this neutralization pathway important in weakly bonded environments. PMID:23829763

  6. Neutral hydrogen survey of andromeda galaxy.

    PubMed

    Brundage, W D; Kraus, J D

    1966-07-22

    A neutral hydrogen survey of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) has been conducted with the 260-foot (80m) Ohio State University radio telescope. The neutral hydrogen is concentrated in the spiral arm regions, with but relatively small amounts near the center of the galaxy. Similar deficiencies have been found near the center of M33 and our galaxy, suggesting similar evolutionary processes in the three galaxies. PMID:17839713

  7. Nitrogen-neutrality: a step towards sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison; Musinguzi, Patrick; Tumwesigye, Trust; Olupot, Giregon; Tenywa, John Stephen; Mudiope, Joseph; Hutton, Olivia; Cordovil, Claudia M. d. S.; Bekunda, Mateete; Galloway, James

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel indicator measuring one dimension of the sustainability of an entity in modern societies: Nitrogen-neutrality. N-neutrality strives to offset Nr releases an entity exerts on the environment from the release of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment by reducing it and by offsetting the Nr releases elsewhere. N-neutrality also aims to increase awareness about the consequences of unintentional releases of nitrogen to the environment. N-neutrality is composed of two quantified elements: Nr released by an entity (e.g. on the basis of the N footprint) and Nr reduction from management and offset projects (N offset). It includes management strategies to reduce nitrogen losses before they occur (e.g., through energy conservation). Each of those elements faces specific challenges with regard to data availability and conceptual development. Impacts of Nr releases to the environment are manifold, and the impact profile of one unit of Nr release depends strongly on the compound released and the local susceptibility to Nr. As such, N-neutrality is more difficult to conceptualize and calculate than C-neutrality. We developed a workable conceptual framework for N-neutrality which was adapted for the 6th International Nitrogen Conference (N2013, Kampala, November 2013). Total N footprint of the surveyed meals at N2013 was 66 kg N. A total of US 3050 was collected from the participants and used to offset the conference’s N footprint by supporting the UN Millennium Village cluster Ruhiira in South-Western Uganda. The concept needs further development in particular to better incorporate the spatio-temporal variability of impacts and to standardize the methods to quantify the required N offset to neutralize the Nr releases impact. Criteria for compensation projects need to be sharply defined to allow the development of a market for N offset certificates.

  8. Anion formation by neutral resonant ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, John S.

    2015-10-01

    A collision-radiation model of the cesium plasma that forms within a pitted or recessed sample in a Middleton-type sputter ion source showed that excited states of Cs formed. These excited states of neutral Cs undergo resonant electron transfer with neutral sputtered atoms of AMS samples to produce the accelerated anions. Numerous reported effects from over 30 years are readily explained by this mechanism, including several that puzzled Middleton.

  9. Molecules in the Spotlight

    SciTech Connect

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  10. Emerging small molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Staels, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Dyslipidaemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Pharmacological lowering of LDL-C levels using statins reduces cardiovascular risk. However, a substantial residual risk persists especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Because of the inverse association observed in epidemiological studies of HDL-C with the risk for cardiovascular diseases, novel therapeutic strategies to raise HDL-C levels or improve HDL functionality are developed as complementary therapy for cardiovascular diseases. However, until now most therapies targeting HDL-C levels failed in clinical trials because of side effects or absence of clinical benefits. This chapter will highlight the emerging small molecules currently developed and tested in clinical trials to pharmacologically modulate HDL-C and functionality including new CETP inhibitors (anacetrapib, evacetrapib), novel PPAR agonists (K-877, CER-002, DSP-8658, INT131 and GFT505), LXR agonists (ATI-111, LXR-623, XL-652) and RVX-208. PMID:25523004

  11. Biochips - Can molecules compute?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, J. B.

    1984-02-01

    In recent years the possibility has been considered to build 'biochip' computers, in which the silicon transistors of present machines would be replaced by large organic molecules or genetically engineered proteins. Two major advantages of such biochips over current devices would be related to vastly increased densities of computing elements, and entirely new styles of data processing, suited to such high-level tasks as pattern recognition and context-dependent analysis. The limitations of the semiconductor chip with respect to the density of elementary units due to size considerations and heat development could be overcome by making use of molecular switches. Attention is given to soliton switching, soliton logic, bulk molecular devices, analog biochips, 'intelligent' switches based on the employment of enzymes, robot vision, questions of biochip fabrication, protein engineering, and a strategy for the development of biochips.

  12. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  13. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by antibody heteroligation

    PubMed Central

    Mouquet, Hugo; Warncke, Malte; Scheid, Johannes F.; Seaman, Michael S.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2012-01-01

    Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing human antibodies against HIV-1 protects macaques against infection. However, HIV-1 uses several strategies to escape antibody neutralization, including mutation of the gp160 viral surface spike, a glycan shield to block antibody access to the spike, and expression of a limited number of viral surface spikes, which interferes with bivalent antibody binding. The latter is thought to decrease antibody apparent affinity or avidity, thereby interfering with neutralizing activity. To test the idea that increasing apparent affinity might enhance neutralizing activity, we engineered bispecific anti–HIV-1 antibodies (BiAbs) that can bind bivalently by virtue of one scFv arm that binds to gp120 and a second arm to the gp41 subunit of gp160. The individual arms of the BiAbs preserved the binding specificities of the original anti-HIV IgG antibodies and together bound simultaneously to gp120 and gp41. Heterotypic bivalent binding enhanced neutralization compared with the parental antibodies. We conclude that antibody recognition and viral neutralization of HIV can be improved by heteroligation. PMID:22219363

  14. The Phobos neutral and ionized torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Curry, S. M.; Fatemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Charged particle sputtering, micrometeoroid impact vaporization, and photon-stimulated desorption are fundamental processes operating at airless surfaces throughout the solar system. At larger bodies, such as Earth's Moon and several of the outer planet moons, these processes generate tenuous surface-bound exospheres that have been observed by a variety of methods. Phobos and Deimos, in contrast, are too gravitationally weak to keep ejected neutrals bound and, thus, are suspected to generate neutral tori in orbit around Mars. While these tori have not yet been detected, the distribution and density of both the neutral and ionized components are of fundamental interest. We combine a neutral Monte Carlo model and a hybrid plasma model to investigate both the neutral and ionized components of the Phobos torus. We show that the spatial distribution of the neutral torus is highly dependent on each individual species (due to ionization rates that span nearly 4 orders of magnitude) and on the location of Phobos with respect to Mars. Additionally, we present the flux distribution of torus pickup ions throughout the Martian system and estimate typical pickup ion fluxes. We find that the predicted pickup ion fluxes are too low to perturb the ambient plasma, consistent with previous null detections by spacecraft around Mars.

  15. Behavior of molecules and molecular ions near a field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Baptiste; Saxey, David W.; Ashton, Michael W.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Moody, Michael P.; Schreiber, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    The cold emission of particles from surfaces under intense electric fields is a process which underpins a variety of applications including atom probe tomography (APT), an analytical microscopy technique with near-atomic spatial resolution. Increasingly relying on fast laser pulsing to trigger the emission, APT experiments often incorporate the detection of molecular ions emitted from the specimen, in particular from covalently or ionically bonded materials. Notably, it has been proposed that neutral molecules can also be emitted during this process. However, this remains a contentious issue. To investigate the validity of this hypothesis, a careful review of the literature is combined with the development of new methods to treat experimental APT data, the modeling of ion trajectories, and the application of density-functional theory simulations to derive molecular ion energetics. It is shown that the direct thermal emission of neutral molecules is extremely unlikely. However, neutrals can still be formed in the course of an APT experiment by dissociation of metastable molecular ions. This work is a partial contribution of the US Government and therefore is not subject to copyright in the United States.

  16. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets

    PubMed Central

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge – automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings. PMID:26441761

  17. Observation of ultralong range Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, James

    2009-05-01

    In 1934, Enrico Fermi described the scattering of a low energy electron from a neutral atom by using the ideas of scattering length and pseudopotential. Although the long range potential for an electron-atom interaction is always attractive, Fermi realized that the s-wave scattering length that characterizes the low energy collision can be either positive or negative. For a positive scattering length, the wavefunction of the electron is shifted away from the atom, the electron is repelled; whereas for a negative scattering length, the wavefunction of the electron is shifted to the atom, the electron is attracted. Based on Fermi's approach, Greene and co-workers predicted a novel molecular binding mechanism where a low energy Rydberg electron is scattered from a ground state atom in the case of negative scattering length. In this situation, the interaction between the electron and ground state atom is attractive and results in the formation of bound states of the ground state atom and the Rydberg atom. Molecules bound by electron scattering can have an internuclear separation of several thousand Bohr radii and are very different from molecules formed by 2 Rydberg atoms where the binding is the result of multipolar forces between the atoms alone. In this talk, we present experimental data on the observation of these exotic molecular states for Rb Rydberg atoms in S states for principal quantum numbers n between 34 and 40. The spectroscopic results for the vibrational ground and first excited state of the dimer Rb(5S)-Rb(nS) are presented and the s-wave scattering length for electron-Rb(5S) scattering in the low energy regime where the kinetic energy is less than 100 meV. Finally, we discuss and present data on the lifetimes and decay mechanisms of these molecules in a magnetic trap.

  18. Linear Ion Trap for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, William; Arevalo, Ricardo; Danell, Ryan; van Amerom, Friso; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    The 2018 ExoMars rover mission includes the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation. MOMA will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. When combined with the complement of instruments in the rover's Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds. MOMA includes a linear, or 2D, ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) that is designed to analyze molecular composition of (i) gas evolved from pyrolyzed powder samples and separated on a gas chromatograph and (ii) ions directly desorbed from solid samples at Mars ambient pressure using a pulsed laser and a fast-valve capillary ion inlet system. This "dual source" approach gives MOMA unprecedented breadth of detection over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. Analysis of nonvolatile, higher-molecular weight organics such as carboxylic acids and peptides even in the presence of significant perchlorate concentrations is enabled by the extremely short (~1 ns) pulses of the desorption laser. Use of the ion trap's tandem mass spectrometry mode permits selective focus on key species for isolation and controlled fragmentation, providing structural analysis capabilities. The flight-like engineering test unit (ETU) of the ITMS, now under construction, will be used to verify breadboard performance with high fidelity, while simultaneously supporting the development of analytical scripts and spectral libraries using synthetic and natural Mars analog samples guided by current results from MSL. ETU campaign data will strongly advise the specifics of the calibration applied to the MOMA flight model as well as the science operational procedures during the mission.

  19. Modeling Neutral Densities Downstream of a Gridded Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    The details of a model for determining the neutral density downstream of a gridded ion thruster are presented. An investigation of the possible sources of neutrals emanating from and surrounding a NEXT ion thruster determined that the most significant contributors to the downstream neutral density include discharge chamber neutrals escaping through the perforated grids, neutrals escaping from the neutralizer, and vacuum facility background neutrals. For the neutral flux through the grids, near- and far-field equations are presented for rigorously determining the neutral density downstream of a cylindrical aperture. These equations are integrated into a spherically-domed convex grid geometry with a hexagonal array of apertures for determining neutral densities downstream of the ion thruster grids. The neutrals escaping from an off-center neutralizer are also modeled assuming diffuse neutral emission from the neutralizer keeper orifice. Finally, the effect of the surrounding vacuum facility neutrals is included and assumed to be constant. The model is used to predict the neutral density downstream of a NEXT ion thruster with and without neutralizer flow and a vacuum facility background pressure. The impacts of past simplifying assumptions for predicting downstream neutral densities are also examined for a NEXT ion thruster.

  20. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  1. Explicit Solvent Simulations of Friction between Brush Layers of Charged and Neutral Bottle-Brush Macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Brown, W Michael; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    We study friction between charged and neutral brush layers of bottle-brush macromolecules using molecular dynamics simulations. In our simulations the solvent molecules were treated explicitly. The deformation of the bottle-brush macromolecules under the shear were studied as a function of the substrate separation and shear stress. For charged bottle-brush layers we study effect of the added salt on the brush lubricating properties to elucidate factors responsible for energy dissipation in charged and neutral brush systems. Our simulations have shown that for both charged and neutral brush systems the main deformation mode of the bottle-brush macromolecule is associated with the backbone deformation. This deformation mode manifests itself in the backbone deformation ratio, , and shear viscosity, , to be universal functions of the Weissenberg number W. The value of the friction coefficient, , and viscosity, , are larger for the charged bottle-brush coatings in comparison with those for neutral brushes at the same separation distance, D, between substrates. The additional energy dissipation generated by brush sliding in charged bottle-brush systems is due to electrostatic coupling between bottle-brush and counterion motion. This coupling weakens as salt concentration, cs, increases resulting in values of the viscosity, , and friction coefficient, , approaching corresponding values obtained for neutral brush systems.

  2. COMSOL Modeling of Transport of Neutral Radicals to Substrate Surfaces Located Downstream from an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rokibul; Lekobou, William; Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    An Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma (APWIP) Reactor generates a significant number of charged particles and neutral radicals. In our work the carrier gas is argon and the precursor molecule is acetylene. The APWIP is generated by corona discharges associated with an array of high voltage metal needles facing a grounded metal screen. Neutral radical transport downstream from the grounded screen to the substrate via diffusion and convection will be modeled with COMSOL, a finite element software package. Substrates will include objects with various shapes and characteristic dimensions that range from nanometers to centimeters. After the model is validated against canonical problems with known solutions, thin film deposition rates will be compared with experimentally measured results. Substrate geometries will include discs, spheres, fibers and highly porous surfaces such as those found on asphalt road surfaces. A single generic neutral radical will be used to represent the entire family of neutral radicals resulting from acetylene bond scission by free electron impact.

  3. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  4. Bacterial production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, L.; Lechtenfeld, O.; Benner, R.; Middelboe, M.; Stedmon, C. A.

    2014-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining after long-term bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations (32 days) with natural and artificial seawater, indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol%) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3-14 mol%). DOM remaining after bacterial degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol%), followed by glucose (22 mol%) and the remaining neutral sugars (7-11 mol%). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days the D/L ratios of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural and artificial seawater samples, suggests that the microbial carbon pump also applies for neutral sugars and amino acids and that bacterially-produced biomolecules persist for long periods in the ocean.

  5. Production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids by bacteria in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, L.; Lechtenfeld, O. J.; Benner, R.; Middelboe, M.; Stedmon, C. A.

    2014-10-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of combined neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining after 32 days of bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations with natural seawater (sampled from water masses originating from the surface waters of the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean) and artificial seawater indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol %) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3-14 mol %). DOM remaining after bacterial degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol %), followed by glucose (22 mol %) and the remaining neutral sugars (7-11 mol %). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days, the D/L ratios of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural (representing marine semi-labile and refractory DOM) and artificial (representing bacterially produced DOM) seawater samples, suggests that microbes transform bioavailable neutral sugars and amino acids into a common, more persistent form.

  6. Structural aspects of host molecules acting as ionophores in ion-selective electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocheńska, Maria

    1998-09-01

    Structural aspects of ligand molecules acting as neutral ionophores in ion-selective membrane electrodes are discussed and examples of Li-selective ionophores are presented. The relationship between the structure of ionophore and its complex determined by X-ray and NMR study and the selectivity of ISE was determined.

  7. Electrochromic graphene molecules.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K; Sykora, Milan

    2015-04-28

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystalline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes and their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current, but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using a modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here, these were found to be E1,ox(0) = 0.77 ± 0.01 V and E2,ox(0) = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red(0) = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be nonideal. The nonideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes are attributed to strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling, GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component. PMID:25768313

  8. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were foundmore » to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.« less

  9. Reactions of oriented molecules.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P R

    1976-07-01

    Beams of oriented molecules have been used to directly study geometrical requirements in chemical reactions. These studies have shown that reactivity is much greater in some orientations than others and demonstrated the existence of steric effects. For some reactions portions of the orientation results are in good accord with traditional views of steric hindrance, but for others it is clear that our chemical intuition needs recalibrating. Indeed, the information gained from simultaneously orienting the reactants and observing the scattering angle of the products may lead to new insights about the detailed mechanism of certain reactions. Further work must be done to extend the scope and detail of the studies described here. More detailed information is needed on the CH(3)I reaction and the CF(3)I reaction. The effects of alkyl groups of various sizes and alkali metals of various sizes are of interest. In addition, reactions where a long-lived complex is formed should be studied to see if orientation is important. Finally, it would be of interest to apply the technique to the sort of reactions that led to our interest in the first place: the S(N)2 displacements in alkyl halides where the fascinating Walden inversion occurs. PMID:17793988

  10. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  11. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1987-10-07

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photons are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions. 3 figs.

  12. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole–dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  13. Adsorption kinetics of diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Burde, Jared T; Calbi, M Mercedes

    2014-05-01

    The adsorption dynamics of diatomic molecules on solid surfaces is examined by using a Kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm. Equilibration times at increasing loadings are obtained, and explained based on the elementary processes that lead to the formation of the adsorbed film. The ability of the molecules to change their orientation accelerates the overall uptake and leads to competitive kinetic behaviour between the different orientations. The dependence of the equilibration time on coverage follows the same decreasing trend obtained experimentally for ethane adsorption on closed-end carbon nanotube bundles. The exploration of molecule-molecule interaction effects on this trend provides relevant insights to understand the kinetic behaviour of other species, from simpler molecules to larger polyatomic molecules, adsorbing on surfaces with different binding strength. PMID:24654004

  14. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Haselton, Halsey H.; Stirling, William L.; Whealton, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  15. Species ages in neutral biodiversity models.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Ryan A; O'Dwyer, James P

    2014-05-01

    Biogeography seeks to understand the mechanisms that drive biodiversity across long temporal and large spatial scales. Theoretical models of biogeography can be tested by comparing their predictions of quantities such as species ages against empirical estimates. It has previously been claimed that the neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography predicts species ages that are unrealistically long. Any improved theory of biodiversity must rectify this problem, but first it is necessary to quantify the problem precisely. Here we provide analytical expressions for species ages in neutral biodiversity communities. We analyse a spatially implicit metacommunity model and solve for both the zero-sum and non-zero-sum cases. We explain why our new expressions are, in the context of biodiversity, usually more appropriate than those previously imported from neutral molecular evolution. Because of the time symmetry of the spatially implicit neutral model, our expressions also lead directly to formulas for species persistence times and species lifetimes. We use our new expressions to estimate species ages of forest trees under a neutral model and find that they are about an order of magnitude shorter than those predicted previously but still unrealistically long. In light of our results, we discuss different models of biogeography that may solve the problem of species ages. PMID:24530891

  16. Focusing and neutralization of intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Simon S.; Anders, Andre; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, Shmuel; Henestroza, Enrique; Roy, Prabir; Shuman, Derek; Waldron, William; Sharp, William; Rose, Dave; Welch, Dale; Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Eric

    2003-05-01

    In heavy ion inertial confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams through the target chamber is essential for the viability of an economically competitive heavy ion fusion power plant. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with PIC simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the NTX (Neutralized Transport Experiment) as shown in Figure 1. The experiment consists of 3 phases, each with physics issues of its own. Phase 1 is designed to generate a very high brightness potassium beam with variable perveance, using a beam aperturing technique. Phase 2 consists of magnetic transport through four pulsed quadrupoles. Here, beam tuning as well as the effects of phase space dilution through higher order nonlinear fields must be understood. In Phase 3, a converging ion beam at the exit of the magnetic section is transported through a drift section with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we present first results from all 3 phases of the experiment.

  17. Structural basis of influenza virus neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Thomas; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    Although seasonal influenza vaccines play a valuable role in reducing the spread of the virus at the population level, ongoing viral evolution to evade immune responses remains problematic. No current vaccines are likely to elicit enduring protection in the face of emerging and re-emerging influenza viruses that rapidly undergoing antigenic drift. Eliciting broadly cross-neutralizing antibody responses against influenza virus is a crucial goal for seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine preparation. Recent three-dimensional structure information obtained from crystallization of influenza antigens in complex with neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) have provided a framework for interpreting antibody-based viral neutralization that should aid in the design of vaccine immunogens. Here, we will review current knowledge of the structure-based mechanisms contributing to the neutralization and neutralization escape of influenza viruses. We will also explore the potential for this structure-based approach to overcome the challenge of obtaining the highly desired “universal” influenza vaccine. PMID:21251008

  18. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  19. Trapping Single Molecules by Dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzel, Ralph; Calander, Nils; Chiragwandi, Zackary; Willander, Magnus; Bier, Frank F.

    2005-09-01

    We have trapped single protein molecules of R-phycoerythrin in an aqueous solution by an alternating electric field. A radio frequency voltage is applied to sharp nanoelectrodes and hence produces a strong electric field gradient. The resulting dielectrophoretic forces attract freely diffusing protein molecules. Trapping takes place at the electrode tips. Switching off the field immediately releases the molecules. The electric field distribution is computed, and from this the dielectrophoretic response of the molecules is calculated using a standard polarization model. The resulting forces are compared to the impact of Brownian motion. Finally, we discuss the experimental observations on the basis of the model calculations.

  20. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  1. Electrical Transport through Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, C. N.; Chang, Shun-Chi; Williams, Stan

    2003-03-01

    We investigate electrical transport properties of single organic molecules using electromigration break junctions[1]. A self-assembled monolayer of various organic molecules such as 1,4-di(phenylethynyl-4'-methanethiol)benzene was grown on narrow metal wires, and single or a few molecules were incorporated into the junctions which were created by applying a large voltage and breaking the wires. The transport properties of these molecules were then measured at low temperatures. Latest experimental results will be discussed. [1] Park, J. et al, Nature, 417, 722 (2002); Liang W. et al, Nature, 417, 725 (2002).

  2. Coherent Dynamics Following Strong Field Ionization of Polyatomic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Lozovoy, Vadim; Jackson, James; Levine, Benjamin; Dantus, Marcos

    2015-03-01

    Molecules, as opposed to atoms, present confounding possibilities of nuclear and electronic motion upon strong field ionization. The dynamics and fragmentation patterns in response to the laser field are structure sensitive; therefore, a molecule cannot simply be treated as a ``bag of atoms'' during field induced ionization. We consider here to what extent molecules retain their molecular identity and properties under strong laser fields. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with pump-probe techniques we study the dynamical behavior of these molecules, monitoring ion yield modulation caused by intramolecular motions post ionization. The delay scans show that among positional isomers the variations in relative energies, amounting to only a few hundred meVs, influence the dynamical behavior of the molecules despite their having experienced such high fields (V/Å). Ab initio calculations were performed to predict dynamics along with single and multiphoton resonances in the neutral and ionic states. We propose that single electron ionization occurs within an optical cycle with the electron carrying away essentially all of the energy, leaving behind little internal energy in the cation. Evidence for this observation comes from coherent vibrational motion governed by the potential energy surface of the ground state of the cation. Subsequent fragmentation of the cation takes place as a result of further photon absorption modulated by one- and two-photon resonances, which provide sufficient energy to overcome the dissociation energy.

  3. Plasma precipitation and neutral particle emission at Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massetti, S.; Milillo, A.; Mura, A.; Orsini, S.; Plainaki, C.; Mangano, V.

    2012-04-01

    Ganymede, the largest moon of Jupiter is characterized by a tiny magnetosphere produced by an intrinsic magnetic moment; it is linked to the Jovian magnetosphere and embedded in its energetic plasma environment. In addition, since the plasma co-rotating with Jupiter impinges on Ganymede trailing side at subsonic speed, there is no bow-shock formation. Here we present preliminary results of Monte Carlo simulations aimed to evaluate the expected ion precipitation onto the polar caps of Ganymede, by means of the magnetic and electric fields derived by a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that realistically describe Ganymede's magnetospheric environment. We discuss precipitation pattern differences between the simulated ion species (H+, O+ and S+) at different energies in the range 10-100 keV. Plasma precipitating onto the surface of Ganymede modifies it both physically (via ion sputtering) and chemically (via radiolysis). Directly sputtered H2O molecules as well as products of H2O decomposition, that may recombine and produce diverse molecules, such as O2 and H2 are released. The yields of these processes have been estimated by means of accurate function that includes the dependence of the release on impacting ion species and energy as well as on the moon's surface temperature. In this study we attempted to isolate the temperature dependent part of this yield function and to assign it exclusively to the chemical processes taking place on ice and to the subsequent release of new molecules. In this way we make a rough preliminary distinction between the sputtering and radiolysis exospheric contributions. In our estimations we take into account also the energy spectra of precipitating plasma. A MonteCarlo model has been used to simulate the neutral density of escaping particles. Here we present results in terms of density and fluxes.

  4. Two-Dimensional Trapping of Dipolar Molecules in Time-Varying Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junglen, T.; Rieger, T.; Rangwala, S. A.; Pinkse, P. W.; Rempe, G.

    2004-06-01

    Simultaneous two-dimensional trapping of neutral dipolar molecules in low- and high-field seeking states is analyzed. A trapping potential of the order of 20mK can be produced for molecules such as ND3 with time-dependent electric fields. The analysis is in agreement with an experiment where slow molecules with longitudinal velocities of the order of 20 m/s are guided between four 50cm long rods driven by an alternating electric potential at a frequency of a few kHz.

  5. Single-molecule resolution of protein structure and interfacial dynamics on biomaterial surfaces

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Sean Yu; Kastantin, Mark; Schwartz, Daniel K.; Kaar, Joel L.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed to monitor dynamic changes in protein structure and interfacial behavior on surfaces by single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer. This method entails the incorporation of unnatural amino acids to site-specifically label proteins with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer probes for high-throughput dynamic fluorescence tracking microscopy on surfaces. Structural changes in the enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) were monitored upon adsorption to fused silica (FS) surfaces in the presence of BSA on a molecule-by-molecule basis. Analysis of >30,000 individual trajectories enabled the observation of heterogeneities in the kinetics of surface-induced OPH unfolding with unprecedented resolution. In particular, two distinct pathways were observed: a majority population (∼ 85%) unfolded with a characteristic time scale of 0.10 s, and the remainder unfolded more slowly with a time scale of 0.7 s. Importantly, even after unfolding, OPH readily desorbed from FS surfaces, challenging the common notion that surface-induced unfolding leads to irreversible protein binding. This suggests that protein fouling of surfaces is a highly dynamic process because of subtle differences in the adsorption/desorption rates of folded and unfolded species. Moreover, such observations imply that surfaces may act as a source of unfolded (i.e., aggregation-prone) protein back into solution. Continuing study of other proteins and surfaces will examine whether these conclusions are general or specific to OPH in contact with FS. Ultimately, this method, which is widely applicable to virtually any protein, provides the framework to develop surfaces and surface modifications with improved biocompatibility. PMID:24235137

  6. A Label as a Hidden Persuader: Chemists' Neutralization Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1991-01-01

    Identifies and describes the problems students have with the concept of neutralization. Analysis of over 7,500 students' answers to test questions over neutralization showed that many students understand the concept in its original meaning. Students assumed that in any neutralization reaction a neutral solution is formed, even if a weak acid or…

  7. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  8. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite available antivirals and vaccines, influenza infections continue to be a major cause of mortality worldwide. Vaccination generally induces an effective, but strain-specific antibody response. As the virus continually evolves, new vaccines have to be administered almost annually when a novel strain becomes dominant. Furthermore, the sporadic emerging resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors among circulating strains suggests an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Recently, several cross-reactive antibodies have been described, which neutralize an unprecedented spectrum of influenza viruses. These broadly neutralizing antibodies generally target conserved functional regions on the major influenza surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). The characterization of their neutralization breadth and epitopes on HA could stimulate the development of new antibody-based antivirals and broader influenza vaccines. PMID:23583287

  9. Phage display and Shiga toxin neutralizers.

    PubMed

    Bernedo-Navarro, Robert Alvin; Yano, Tomomasa

    2016-04-01

    The current work presents an overview of the use of phage display technology for the identification and characterization of potential neutralizing agents for Shiga toxins. The last major Shiga toxin-associated disease outbreak, which took place in Germany in 2011, showed the international community that Shiga toxins remain a serious threat to public health. This is also demonstrated by the lack of specific therapies against Shiga toxin-induced Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). Since its inception, phage display technology has played a key role in the development of antigen-specific (poly)-peptides or antibody fragments with specific biological properties. Herein, we review the current literature regarding the application of phage display to identify novel neutralizing agents against Shiga toxins. We also briefly highlight reported discoveries of peptides and heavy chain antibodies (VHH fragments or nanobodies) that can neutralize the cellular damage caused by these potent toxins. PMID:26898657

  10. Landau-like states in neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Ågren, Hans; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We show the emergence of a new type of dispersion relation for neutral atoms with an interesting similarity to the spectrum of two-dimensional electrons in an applied perpendicular constant magnetic field. These neutral atoms can be confined in toroidal optical traps and give quasi-Landau spectra. In strong contrast to the equidistant infinitely degenerate Landau levels for charged particles, the spectral gap for such two-dimensional neutral particles increases in particular electric-field configurations. The idea in the paper is motivated by the development in cold atom experiments and builds on the seminal paper of Aharonov and Casher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 319 (1984), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.53.319].

  11. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    Full particle PIC simulations are performed to study the neutralization of an ion beam in the cohesionless, mesothermal regime. Simulations further confirmed that neutralization is achieved through interactions between the trapped electrons and the potential well established by the propagation of the beam front along the beam direction and is not through plasma instabilities as previous studies suggested. In the transverse direction, the process is similar to that of the expansion of mesothermal plasma into vacuum. Parametric simulations are also performed to investigate the effects of beam radius and domain boundary condition on the neutralization process. The results suggests that, while the qualitative behavior may be similar in ground tests, quantitative parameters such as the beam potential will be affected significantly by the vacuum chamber because of the limits imposed on the expansion process by the finite chamber space.

  12. Methods for neutralizing anthrax or anthrax spores

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, Mark A; Vivekandanda, Jeevalatha; Holwitt, Eric A; Kiel, Johnathan L

    2013-02-26

    The present invention concerns methods, compositions and apparatus for neutralizing bioagents, wherein bioagents comprise biowarfare agents, biohazardous agents, biological agents and/or infectious agents. The methods comprise exposing the bioagent to an organic semiconductor and exposing the bioagent and organic semiconductor to a source of energy. Although any source of energy is contemplated, in some embodiments the energy comprises visible light, ultraviolet, infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, laser radiation, pulsed corona discharge or electron beam radiation. Exemplary organic semiconductors include DAT and DALM. In certain embodiments, the organic semiconductor may be attached to one or more binding moieties, such as an antibody, antibody fragment, or nucleic acid ligand. Preferably, the binding moiety has a binding affinity for one or more bioagents to be neutralized. Other embodiments concern an apparatus comprising an organic semiconductor and an energy source. In preferred embodiments, the methods, compositions and apparatus are used for neutralizing anthrax spores.

  13. Adhesion molecules in cutaneous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Barker, J N

    1995-01-01

    As in other organs, leukocyte adhesion molecules and their ligands play a major role in cutaneous inflammatory events both by directing leukocyte trafficking and by their effects on antigen presentation. Skin biopsies of inflamed skin from patients with diseases such as as psoriasis or atopic dermatitis reveal up-regulation of endothelial cell expression of P- and E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. Studies of evolving lesions following UVB irradiation, Mantoux reaction or application of contact allergen, demonstrate that expression of these adhesion molecules parallels leukocyte infiltration into skin. When cutaneous inflammation is widespread (e.g. in erythroderma), soluble forms of these molecules are detectable in serum. In vitro studies predict that peptide mediators are important regulatory factors for endothelial adhesion molecules. Intradermal injection of the cytokines interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma into normal human skin leads to induction of endothelial adhesion molecules with concomitant infiltration of leukocytes. In addition, neuropeptides rapidly induce P-selectin translocation to the cell membrane and expression of E-selectin. Adhesion molecules also play a crucial role as accessory molecules in the presentation of antigen to T lymphocytes by Langerhans' cells. Expression of selectin ligands by Langerhans' cells is up-regulated by various inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that adhesion molecules may be important in Langerhans' cell migration. The skin, because of its accessibility, is an ideal organ in which to study expression of adhesion molecules and their relationship to inflammatory events. Inflammatory skin diseases are common and inhibition of lymphocyte accumulation in skin is likely to prove of great therapeutic benefit. PMID:7587640

  14. MESSENGER: Insights Regarding the Relationship between Mercury's Surface and Its Neutral and Ionized Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, Ann L.; Vervack, R. J.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Starr, R. D.; Schriver, D.; Trávnícek, P.; Orlando, T. M.; McClain, J. L.; Grieves, G. A.; Boynton, W. V.; Lawrence, D. J.; MESSENGER Team

    2010-10-01

    Measurements by instruments on MESSENGER during the spacecraft's three Mercury flybys have led to discoveries of previously undetected neutral (Mg) and ionized (Ca+) species in Mercury's neutral and ionized exosphere and mapped these and previously known constituents (Na, Ca) on the anti-sunward side of the planet and over the poles. Also, Neutron Spectrometer measurements have indicated neutron absorption consistent with the presence of some combination of Fe, Ti, Sm, and Gd. Another element with a high neutron cross section is Mn. Manganese-bearing pyroxene has been inferred from modeling of Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) spectra of Mercury's surface. The total neutron cross section of Mn-bearing clinopyroxene, for example, (294.2 barns), is comparable to that of ilmenite (284.0 barns), and we suggest it as a possible neutron absorber at Mercury. Some ions and neutrals can be released directly from mineral surfaces by electron-stimulated desorption (ESD). Because cross sections of neutrals can be higher than photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) cross sections and because active electron precipitation on both the day and night side of Mercury can produce ESD of ions, at least part of the ionized exosphere is produced directly from surface materials by ESD. The process does not require photoionization of atoms or molecules. One inference is that model assumptions for ion production and magnetospheric- interactions may need to add ESD as another source. ESD experiments and simulations of electron precipitation on Mercury provide support for this suggestion. More laboratory work is required to quantify known, and to discover other, pathways to ion desorption from Mercury's surface. Searches for resonant fluorescent emissions from atoms, molecules and ions (e.g., Mn and S emission line triplets near 280 and 162 nm, respectively) in Mercury's neutral and ionized exosphere during the orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission are planned.

  15. Apparatus for neutralization of accelerated ions

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.; Frank, Alan M.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for neutralization of a beam of accelerated ions, such as hydrogen negative ions (H.sup.-), using relatively efficient strip diode lasers which emit monochromatically at an appropriate wavelength (.lambda. = 8000 A for H.sup.- ions) to strip the excess electrons by photodetachment. A cavity, formed by two or more reflectors spaced apart, causes the laser beams to undergo multiple reflections within the cavity, thus increasing the efficiency and reducing the illumination required to obtain an acceptable percentage (.about. 85%) of neutralization.

  16. High-current plasma contactor neutralizer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Vourgourakis, E. J.; Burch, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma-contactor neutralizer system is described, for the stabilizing the Orbiter's potential during flights of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science missions. The plasma contactor neutralizer will include a Xe plasma source that can provide steady-state ion-emission currents of up to 1.5 A. The Orbiter's potential will be maintained near that of the surrounding space plasma during electron-beam accelerator firings through a combination of ion emission from the Xe plasma source and electron collection from the ambient space plasma. Configuration diagrams and block diagrams are presented along with the performance characteristics of the system.

  17. Neutral Beam Ion Confinement in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; S.S. Medley; and A.L. Roquemore

    2001-07-24

    Neutral-beam (NB) heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) began in September 2000 using up to 5 MW of 80 keV deuterium (D) beams. An initial assessment of beam ion confinement has been made using neutron detectors, a neutral particle analyzer (NPA), and a Faraday cup beam ion loss probe. Preliminary neutron results indicate that confinement may be roughly classical in quiescent discharges, but the probe measurements do not match a classical loss model. MHD activity, especially reconnection events (REs) causes substantial disturbance of the beam ion population.

  18. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  19. Featured Molecules: Sucrose and Vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-04-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for April relate to the sense of taste. Apple Fool, the JCE Classroom Activity, mentions sucrose and vanillin and their use as flavorings. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  20. Proregenerative Properties of ECM Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Plantman, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    After traumatic injuries to the nervous system, regrowing axons encounter a complex microenvironment where mechanisms that promote regeneration compete with inhibitory processes. Sprouting and axonal regrowth are key components of functional recovery but are often counteracted by inhibitory molecules. This review covers extracellular matrix molecules that support neuron axonal outgrowth. PMID:24195084

  1. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  2. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities. PMID:25221867

  3. Magnetoassociation of KRb Feshbach molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, Tyler; Perreault, John; Shewmon, Ruth; Jin, Deborah

    2010-03-01

    I will discuss experiments in which we study the creation of ^40K^87Rb Feshbach molecules via magnetoassociation. We measure the molecule number as a function of the magnetic-field sweep rate through the interspecies Feshbach resonance and explore the dependence of association on the initial atom gas conditions. This study of the Feshbach molecule creation process may be relevant to the production of ultracold polar molecules, where magnetoassociated Feshbach molecules can be a crucial first step [1].[4pt] [1] K.-K. Ni, S. Ospelkaus, M. H. G. de Miranda, A. Peer, B. Neyenhuis, J. J. Zirbel, S. Kotochigova, P. S. Julienne, D. S. Jin, and J. Ye, Science, 2008, 322, 231- 235.

  4. Magnetoassociation of KRb Feshbach molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumby, Tyler; Perreault, John; Shewmon, Ruth; Jin, Deborah

    2010-03-01

    I will discuss experiments in which we study the creation of ^40K^87Rb Feshbach molecules via magnetoassociation. We measure the molecule number as a function of the magnetic-field sweep rate through the interspecies Feshbach resonance and explore the dependence of association on the initial atom gas conditions. This study of the Feshbach molecule creation process may be relevant to the production of ultracold polar molecules, where magnetoassociated Feshbach molecules can be a crucial first step [1].[4pt] [1] K.-K. Ni, S. Ospelkaus, M. H. G. de Miranda, A. Peer, B. Neyenhuis, J. J. Zirbel, S. Kotochigova, P. S. Julienne, D. S. Jin, and J. Ye, Science, 2008, 322, 231-235.

  5. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A; Branton, Daniel

    2013-07-23

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule's outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤ 0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  6. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  7. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission.

    PubMed

    Chrystal, C; Burrell, K H; Grierson, B A; Pace, D C

    2015-10-01

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access. PMID:26520957

  8. Neutralization escape mutants define a dominant immunogenic neutralization site on hepatitis A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, J.T.; Lemon, S.M.

    1987-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus is an hepatotrophic human picornavirus which demonstrates little antigenic variability. To topologically map immunogenic sites on hepatitis A virus which elicit neutralizing antibodies, eight neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were evaluated in competition immunoassays employing radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and HM-175 virus. Whereas two antibodies (K3-4C8 and K3-2F2) bound to intimately overlapping epitopes, the epitope bound by a third antibody (B5-B3) was distinctly different as evidenced by a lack of competition between antibodies for binding to the virus. The other five antibodies variably blocked the binding of both K3-4C8-K3-2F2 and B5-B3, suggesting that these epitopes are closely spaced and perhaps part of a single neutralization immunogenic site. Several combinations of monoclonal antibodies blocked the binding of polyclonal human convalescent antibody by greater than 96%, indicating that the neutralization epitopes bound by these antibodies are immunodominant in humans. Spontaneously arising HM-175 mutants were selected for resistance to monoclonal antibody-mediated neutralization. Neutralization resistance was associated with reduced antibody binding. These results suggest that hepatitis A virus may differ from poliovirus in possessing a single, dominant neutralization immunogenic site and therefore may be a better candidate for synthetic peptide or antiidiotype vaccine development.

  9. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.

    2015-10-15

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  10. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Grierson, B. A.; Pace, D. C.

    2015-10-01

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  11. Evaluation of Energy Gradients and Infrared Vibrational Spectra through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Jose, K V Jovan; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2015-03-10

    Molecules-in-Molecules (MIM) is a general hybrid fragment-based extrapolation approach for calculating accurate total energies of large molecules, similar in spirit to the popular ONIOM methodology. In this work, the MIM model is extended for the precise evaluation of the energy gradients and infrared (IR) vibrational spectra of large molecules. The overlapping subsystems in this work are constructed from nonoverlapping fragments using a number-based scheme, and the dangling bonds are saturated with link-hydrogen atoms. Independent fragment calculations are performed to evaluate the energies and its gradients. Subsequently, the link-atom energy gradient components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms, through the Jacobian projection method, as in the ONIOM approach. After geometry optimization, the Jacobian link-atom projection method is also employed for the precise evaluation of the force constants and dipole derivatives of the full molecule. The performance of the MIM model is benchmarked on 25 small-to-large peptides, with inevitable weak long-range intramolecular interactions. Upon accounting these long-range interactions through a second layer, at an inexpensive low-level of theory (MIM2), the energy accuracy improve by 80%, compared to MIM with one layer (MIM1). The MIM2 IR frequencies and intensities have an ∼75% improvement, compared to the corresponding values at the MIM1 level of theory. A similar improvement is also observed for anion, cation, and radical systems constructed from the neutral benchmark molecules. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM model for exploring the vibrational infrared spectra of large molecules. PMID:26579749

  12. Color appearance: neutral surrounds and spatial contrast.

    PubMed

    Smith, V C; Jin, Q; Pokorny, J

    1998-11-01

    The experimental data in this paper show that chromatic bars presented in alternation with equiluminant neutral-appearing bars are seen as more saturated than the same chromaticity presented as a uniform rectangle. This effect was diminished but not eliminated when test and match stimuli were presented within a slightly dimmer neutral surround. The test stimulus was a 2 x 5 degrees rectangle with a 0.7 cpd square wave grating composed of alternating equiluminant chromatic test bars and neutral bars. Asymmetric matching was used to match the test bar appearance to a uniform 2 x 5 degrees comparison rectangle. Test and comparison stimuli were presented to separate eyes in a haploscope and appeared flanking a central fixation target. Data were collected with test and inducing stimuli on the cardinal axes of color space. Test bars separated by neutral bars appeared more saturated than the comparison rectangle for both the l- and s-axis directions. Manipulation of excitation on one cardinal axis did not affect the appearance matches made for the other cardinal axis. PMID:9893836

  13. Laser neutralization of surface and buried munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habersat, James D.; Schilling, Bradley W.; Alexander, Joe; Lehecka, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    In recent years NVESD has been investigating laser-based neutralization of buried mines and minelike targets. This paper covers the most recent efforts in this area. A field-test was conducted to demonstrate the state-of-the-art capability for standoff laser neutralization of surface and buried mines. The neutralization laser is a Ytterbium fiber laser with a nominal power output of 10 kW and a beam quality of M2 ~ 1.8 at maximum power. Test trials were conducted at a standoff range of 50 meters with a 20° angle of attack. The laser was focused to a submillimeter spot using a Cassegrain telescope with a 12.5 inch diameter primary mirror. The targets were 105 mm artillery rounds with a composition B explosive fill. Three types of overburden were studied: sand, soil, and gravel. Laser neutralization capability was demonstrated under these conditions for live rounds buried under 7 cm of dry sand, 4 cm of soil, and 2 cm of gravel.

  14. Tissue dissociation enzyme neutral protease assessment.

    PubMed

    Breite, A G; Dwulet, F E; McCarthy, R C

    2010-01-01

    Neutral proteases, essential components of purified tissue dissociation enzymes required for successful human islet isolation, show variable activities and effects of substrate on their activities. Initially we used a spectrophotometric endpoint assay with azocasein substrate to measure neutral protease activity. After critical review of the results, we observed these data to be inconsistent and not correlating expected differences in specific activities between thermolysin and Bacillus polymyxa proteases. This observation led to the development of a fluorescent microplate assay using fluorescein isothyocyanate-conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) as the substrate. This simpler, more flexible method offered a homogeneous, kinetic enzyme assay allowing determination of steady state reaction rates of sample replicates at various dilutions. The assay had a linear range of 4- to 8-fold and interassay coefficients of variation for B polymyxa protease and thermolysin of <9% and <15%, respectively, which were lower than those using the spectrophotometric endpoint assay, namely, 54% and 36%, respectively. This format allowed for incorporation of enzyme inhibitors, as illustrated by addition of sulfhydryl protease inhibitors, which, consistent with earlier reports, strongly indicated that the main contaminant in purified collagenase preparations was clostripain. Determination of the specific activities for several purified neutral proteases showed that the B polymyxa and Clostridium histolyticum proteases had approximately 40% and 15% specific activities, respectively, of those obtained with purified thermolysin, indicating the different characteristics of neutral protease enzymes for cell isolation procedures. PMID:20692405

  15. The LIPSS search for light neutral bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2009-07-01

    An overview is presented of the LIPSS experimental search for very light neutral bosons using laser light from Jefferson Lab's Free Electron Laser. This facility provides very high power beams of photons over a large optical range, particularly at infrared wavelengths. Data has been collected in several experimental runs during the course of the past three years, most recently in the Fall of 2009.

  16. TPX Neutral Beam Injection System design

    SciTech Connect

    von Halle, A.; Bowen, O.N.; Edwards, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    The existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Neutral Beam system is proposed to be modified for long pulse operation on the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Day one of TPX will call for one TFTR beamline modified for 1000 second pulse lengths oriented co-directional to the plasma current. The system design will be capable of accommodating an additional co-directional and a single counter directional beamline. For the TPX conceptual design, every attempt was made to use existing Neutral Beam hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary systems, service infrastructure, and control systems. This paper describes the moderate modifications required to the power systems, the ion sources, and the beam impinged surfaces of the ion dumps, the calorimeters, the various beam scrapers, and the neutralizers. Also described are the minimal modifications required to the vacuum, cryogenic, and gas systems and the major modification of replacing the beamline-torus duct in its entirety. Operational considerations for Neutral Beam subsystems over 1000 second pulse lengths will be explored including proposed operating scenarios for full steady state operation.

  17. Semiconductor etching by hyperthermal neutral beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K. (Inventor); Giapis, Konstantinos P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An at-least dual chamber apparatus and method in which high flux beams of fast moving neutral reactive species are created, collimated and used to etch semiconductor or metal materials from the surface of a workpiece. Beams including halogen atoms are preferably used to achieve anisotropic etching with good selectivity at satisfactory etch rates. Surface damage and undercutting are minimized.

  18. Dynamics of evolutionary radiation under ecological neutrality.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takanori Mizuno; Chiba, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The most spectacular phenomenon of evolutionary biota is the explosive radiation that occurs in depauperate environments in which there are fewer competitors and predators, such as oceanic islands and crater lakes. Adaptation to divergent niches has been proposed as a major cause for this accelerated speciation. Here, we show that neutral mutation, genetic drift, and neutral community dynamics are sufficient to lead to radiation. In addition, these processes yield overshooting dynamics with a decline in species richness in the later stages of radiation. We constructed an ecologically neutral model for a community on an island with a uniform environment. For the speciation process, we introduced a null model with minimal assumptions in which the incompatibilities between alleles in different lineages evolve by a random accumulation of mutations via genetic drift. Our simulations showed that the speciation rate, extinction rate and genetic variation of the species colonizing the island rapidly increased to a sharp peak followed by a decrease that approached zero. Because the extinction rate reached a peak later than the speciation rate, the species richness initially increased, but declined in the later stage, exhibiting "overshooting". The highest species richness was found for the largest island at the largest initial population size. Accordingly, speciation is accelerated by the large population size of depauperate biota, whereas it is decelerated with increasing species richness from the decreasing population size. Explosive radiation without ecological divergence can occur in depauperate environments via neutral stochastic processes. PMID:27297287

  19. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  20. Intraprostatic injection of neutralized zinc in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fahim, M.S.; Wang, M.; Sutcu, M.F.; Fahim, Z.; Safron, J.A.; Ganjam, V.K. Xian Medical University )

    1991-03-11

    Zinc has been implicated in steroid endocrinology of the prostate gland. The conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by 5{alpha}-reductase enzyme is believed to express androgenic responses in the prostate. To note the effect of neutralized zinc on the prostate, 50 sexually mature rats, weighing 325 {plus minus} 20 grams, were divided into 5 groups as follows: (1) control, (2) sham, (3) castrated, (4) injected intraprostatically with 10 mg. neutralized zinc, and (5) injected intraprostatically with 20 mg. neutralized zinc. Results in the treated groups indicated significant reduction of prostate weights, 12% and 53% and histologically normal prostate; no significant change in weight and histological structure of testes, epididymides, and seminal vesicles; significant reduction in 5{alpha}-reductase activity and total protein and DNA concentrations in prostate tissue; and no significant effect on progeny of treated animals. These results suggest that direct application of neutralized zinc to the prostate offers a new modality for treatment of prostatitis without affecting spermatogenesis and testosterone production.

  1. Ion Acoustic Waves in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; Killian, T. C.

    2010-08-06

    We photoionize laser-cooled atoms with a laser beam possessing spatially periodic intensity modulations to create ultracold neutral plasmas with controlled density perturbations. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging reveals that the density perturbations oscillate in space and time, and the dispersion relation of the oscillations matches that of ion acoustic waves, which are long-wavelength, electrostatic, density waves.

  2. Method of purifying neutral organophosphorus extractants

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1988-01-01

    A method for removing acidic contaminants from neutral mono and bifunctional organophosphorous extractants by contacting the extractant with a macroporous cation exchange resin in the H.sup.+ state followed by contact with a macroporous anion exchange resin in the OH.sup.- state, whereupon the resins take up the acidic contaminants from the extractant, purifying the extractant and improving its extraction capability.

  3. DESIGN MANUAL: NEUTRALIZATION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual was prepared to assist designers and operators of mine drainage treatment plants in the selection of processes, equipment, and procedures. Included is a review of the most popular neutralizing agents and the methods used to handle, prepare, and feed these alkalies. Al...

  4. Gluons in a color-neutral nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Mahlon, Gregory

    1999-10-04

    We improve the McLerran-Venugopalan model [1,2] by introducing a charge-density correlation function which is consistent with the observation that nucleons carry no net color charge. The infrared divergence in the transverse coordinates that was present in the McLerran-Venugoplan model is eliminated by the enforcement of color neutrality.

  5. Gluons in a color-neutral nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlon, Gregory

    1999-10-01

    We improve the McLerran-Venugopalan model [1,2] by introducing a charge-density correlation function which is consistent with the observation that nucleons carry no net color charge. The infrared divergence in the transverse coordinates that was present in the McLerran-Venugoplan model is eliminated by the enforcement of color neutrality.

  6. Neutralization of rainwater acidity at Kanpur, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Sheo Prasad; Sharma, Mukesh

    2010-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) levels show significant seasonal variability and this can influence the neutralization of rainwater acidity. Months were grouped in two periods: monsoon (July to October) and non-monsoon (November to June) for studying the seasonal variability in PM and rainwater composition. To clearly establish the cause effect relationship of acid rain neutralization, a two tier model was proposed involving source apportionment of particulates at two levels: (i) ambient air and (ii) rainwater particulate interaction. For modelling purpose, PM10 (n = 100), soil (n = 4) and rainwater (n = 83) samples were collected at Kanpur, India during 2000-2002. The collected samples were analysed for metals and water soluble ion composition to employ factor analysis for source identification. Knowledge of statistical correlation and chemistry fundamentals were combined to estimate the sources for acid rain neutralization. NH4+ was a dominating ion responsible for neutralizing the acidity of rainwater in monsoon period and Ca2+ was dominating in non-monsoon period. Components of secondary particles (SO42- and NO3-) showed affinity with NH4+, signifying the major role that ammonia can play if present in excess of stoichiometric requirements.

  7. Absence of neutral alkali atoms in rhodizite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnay, G.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Sioda, R.

    1966-01-01

    The formula CsB12Be4Al4O28 has been proposed by others for the mineral rhodizite. Electron-spin-resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements prove the absence of neutral cesium atoms. An ionic formula CsB11Be4Al4O 26(OH)2is proposed.

  8. Economic and Legal Justifications of Fiscal Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, John S.; Clune, William H., III

    1973-01-01

    The principle of fiscal neutrality is that school spending may not depend on the wealth of localities: if local units are to select spending levels, the state must eliminate the influence of the varying wealth of these units by matching grants. (Author/JM)

  9. SODA ASH TREATMENT OF NEUTRALIZED MINE DRAINAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilization of acid mine drainage (AMD) streams as a source of potable and industrial water has become a major goal of several proposed AMD treatment schemes. From among the various schemes available, the lime neutralization/soda ash softening process was selected for use at Alto...

  10. If It's Neutral, It's Not Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strate, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Taking a media ecology perspective, this article argues that technology cannot be neutral, because it is a form of change, and it has an inherent bias based on the properties of its materials and methods. Additionally, the application of a technology is an intrinsic part of the technology itself, as is technique, instructions, software, or…

  11. OGO-6 neutral atmospheric composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeusch, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The continued analysis of data obtained from the neutral atmospheric composition experiment flown on OGO-V6 is discussed. The effort was directed toward the study of five specific areas of interest for which the OGO-V6 data were especially useful.

  12. The Molecule Microscope: A New Instrument for Biological and Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, James C.; King, John G.

    1973-01-01

    We describe a new instrument, the molecule microscope, which reveals directly spatial variations in the rate of evaporation of molecules from surfaces by using neutral molecules instead of light or charged particles used in existing kinds of microscopes. The surface composition of the sample determines the binding energy of the evaporating molecules and, hence, the rate of evaporation, which also depends on permeability of the sample when the molecules come either from within or from the other side. We show first results obtained with our apparatus, discuss the design of an instrument now under construction with ≈1-μm resolution, and describe briefly some more advanced versions under consideration with ≈100-Å resolution. Images PMID:4542778

  13. An ICR study of ion-molecule reactions of PH(n)+ ions. [of importance to interstellar chemistry, using ion cyclotron resonance techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, L. R.; Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    The reactions of PH(n)+ ions (n = 0-3) were examined with a number of neutrals using ion-cyclotron-resonance techniques. The reactions examined have significance for the distribution of phosphorus in interstellar molecules. The results indicate that interstellar molecules containing the P-O bond are likely to be more abundant than those containing the P-H bond.

  14. Involvement of human leukocyte antigen class I molecules in human immunodeficiency virus infection of CD4-positive cells.

    PubMed Central

    Benkirane, M; Blanc-Zouaoui, D; Hirn, M; Devaux, C

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the putative roles of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated and cell surface-expressed major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules in the course of the HIV life cycle by the combined use of MHC-I molecule-positive and MHC-I molecule-negative virus particles and MHC-I molecule-positive and MHC-I molecule-negative CD4+ human cells. We found (i) that several anti-MHC-I monoclonal antibodies neutralize cell infection by direct interaction with HIV-associated MHC-I antigens, (ii) that these HIV-associated MHC-I antigens are however dispensable for cell infection, and (iii) that the cell surface-expressed MHC-I molecules are unnecessary for productive infection of CD4+ human cells. These results clarify further the functions of MHC-I molecules during the HIV life cycle. PMID:7916059

  15. Selectionism and Neutralism in Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nei, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    Charles Darwin proposed that evolution occurs primarily by natural selection, but this view has been controversial from the beginning. Two of the major opposing views have been mutationism and neutralism. Early molecular studies suggested that most amino acid substitutions in proteins are neutral or nearly neutral and the functional change of proteins occurs by a few key amino acid substitutions. This suggestion generated an intense controversy over selectionism and neutralism. This controversy is partially caused by Kimura's definition of neutrality, which was too strict (|2Ns| ≤ 1). If we define neutral mutations as the mutations that do not change the function of gene products appreciably, many controversies disappear because slightly deleterious and slightly advantageous mutations are engulfed by neutral mutations. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution to that of synonymous substitution is a useful quantity to study positive Darwinian selection operating at highly variable genetic loci, but it does not necessarily detect adaptively important codons. Previously, multigene families were thought to evolve following the model of concerted evolution, but new evidence indicates that most of them evolve by a birth-and-death process of duplicate genes. It is now clear that most phenotypic characters or genetic systems such as the adaptive immune system in vertebrates are controlled by the interaction of a number of multigene families, which are often evolutionarily related and are subject to birth-and-death evolution. Therefore, it is important to study the mechanisms of gene family interaction for understanding phenotypic evolution. Because gene duplication occurs more or less at random, phenotypic evolution contains some fortuitous elements, though the environmental factors also play an important role. The randomness of phenotypic evolution is qualitatively different from allele frequency changes by random genetic drift. However, there is

  16. Compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer with Ion Drifts, Temperatures and Neutral Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric neutral and ion composition and density, temperatures, ion drifts and neutral winds, are in high demand to study the dynamics of the ionosphere-theremosphere-mesosphere system. This paper presents a compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) with impended ion drifts and temperature, and neutral winds capability for in situ measurements of ions and neutrals H, He, N, O, N2, O2. The mass resolution M/dM is approximately 10 at an incoming energy range of 0-20eV. The goal is to resolve ion drifts in the range 0 to 3000m/sec with a resolution better than 50m/sec, and neutral winds in the range of 0 to 1000m/sec with similar resolution. For temperatures the goal is to cover a dynamic range of 0 to 5000K. The INMS is based on front end optics for ions and neutrals, pre acceleration, gated time of flight, top hat ESA, MCP detectors and compact electronics. The instrument is redundant for ions and neutrals with the ion and neutral sensor heads on opposite sides and with full electronics in the middle. The ion front end includes RPA for temperature scanning and neutral front end includes angular modulation and thermionic ionization and ion blocking grids. The electronics include fast electric gating, TOF electronics, TOF binning and C&DH digital electronics. The data package includes 400 mass bins each for ions and neutrals and key housekeeping data for instrument health and calibration. The data sampling can be commanded from 0.1 to 10 sec with 1sec nominal setting. The instrument has significant onboard storage capability and a data compression scheme. The mass spectrometer version of the instrument has been flown on the Exocube mission. The instrument occupied 1.5U volume, weighed only 560 g and required nominal power of 1.6W The ExoCube mission was designed to acquire global knowledge of in-situ densities of [H], [He], [O] and H+, He+, O+ in the upper ionosphere and lower exosphere in combination with incoherent scatter radar and

  17. A field-ionization neutral detector - FIND. [neutral particle mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, C. C.; Hsieh, K. C.; Fan, C. Y.; Swanson, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The field ionization neutral detector FIND operates according to the following principle: Neutral atoms are attracted toward the field ionization tips since they are polarized by the electric field of the tips. The atoms are singly ionized and repelled by the positive potential of the tips toward the detector situated behind a grid at ground potential. The ions deposit in the detector their kinetic energies, typically 26 keV, corresponding to the potential difference between the ionization region and the detector. Laboratory results show that FIND can have the resolution, sensitivities and durability required to perform in situ measurements of neutral H and He fluxes in interplanetary space, cometary halos and exospheres.

  18. A coarse-grained transport model for neutral particles in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mekkaoui, A.; Reiter, D.; Boerner, P.; Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Stamm, R.

    2012-12-15

    The transport of neutral particles in turbulent plasmas is addressed from the prospect of developing coarse-grained transport models which can be implemented in code suites like B2-EIRENE, currently used for designing the ITER divertor. The statistical properties of turbulent fluctuations are described by a multivariate Gamma distribution able to retain space and time correlations through a proper choice of covariance function. We show that in the scattering free case, relevant for molecules and impurity atoms, the average neutral particle density obeys a Boltzmann equation with an ionization rate renormalized by fluctuations. This result lends itself to a straightforward implementation in the EIRENE Monte Carlo solver for neutral particles. Special emphasis is put on the inclusion of time correlations, and in particular on the ballistic motion of coherent turbulent structures. The role of these time dependent effects is discussed for D{sub 2} molecules and beryllium atoms. The sensitivity of our results to the assumptions on the statistical properties of fluctuations is investigated.

  19. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  20. An Ion-Neutral Collision Database for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip

    Collisions between ions and neutral atoms and molecules play an important role in a variety of astrophysical, atmospheric, and stellar-spheric gaseous and plasma environments. For example, charge transfer data, at the total and internal-state-specific level, are crucial for determining elemental ionization balances, the temperature balance, and ion emission spectra. Likewise, scattering- angle-dependent elastic and related transport cross sections describe the interaction of ion and neutral fluids largely controlling the rates of energy and momentum transfer, such as in ambipolar diffusion. As a consequence, most plasma/spectral modeling codes (e.g., Xstar, Cloudy, Chianti) require the input of large datasets of collisional information. Unfortunately, the available data are of a diverse nature in quality, energy or temperature coverage, state-specificity, format, and source documentation, or are completely unavailable in the literature. Further, such a lack of ion-neutral collision data, or data of poor quality, can lead to errors in astrophysical models and synthetic spectra and their related deductions. We propose here to address many of these issues with a significant update and extension of the existing Charge Transfer Database for Astrophysics which was funded from 1999- 2002 by the NASA AISRP program. The update of the charge transfer database will include i) the addition of new theoretical data computed in the past decade by our group, ii) the addition of new experimental and theoretical data from the literature with an emphasis on the post-2002 period, iii) data evaluations to produce recommended cross sections and rate coefficients, iv) facilities to generate approximate collisional data from semi-empirical models when data are completely lacking, v) conversion of all data into a format suitable for a relational database, vi) converters to facilitate exchange/export of data to other databases/users (e.g, XSAMS, uaDB, VAMDC), and vii) the development of a

  1. Relative Sizes of Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This computer graphic depicts the relative complexity of crystallizing large proteins in order to study their structures through x-ray crystallography. Insulin is a vital protein whose structure has several subtle points that scientists are still trying to determine. Large molecules such as insuline are complex with structures that are comparatively difficult to understand. For comparison, a sugar molecule (which many people have grown as hard crystals in science glass) and a water molecule are shown. These images were produced with the Macmolecule program. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  2. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  3. Organic heterocyclic molecules become superalkalis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Naaresh; Giri, Santanab

    2016-09-21

    An organic molecule which behaves like a superalkali has been designed from an aromatic heterocyclic molecule, pyrrole. Using first-principles calculation and a systematic two-step approach, we can have superalkali molecules with a low ionization energy, even lower than that of Cs. Couple cluster (CCSD) calculation reveals that a new heterocycle, C3N2(CH3)5 derived from a well-known aromatic heterocycle, pyrrole (C4H5N) has an ionization energy close to 3.0 eV. A molecular dynamics calculation on C3N2(CH3)5 reveals that the structure is dynamically stable. PMID:27530344

  4. Nonsequential double ionization of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    Double ionization of diatomic molecules by short linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We consider the final stage of the ionization process, that is the decay of a highly excited two electron molecule, which is formed after rescattering. The saddles of the effective adiabatic potential energy close to which simultaneous escape of electrons takes place are identified. Numerical simulations of the ionization of molecules show that the process can be dominated by either sequential or nonsequential events. In order to increase the ratio of nonsequential to sequential ionizations very short laser pulses should be applied.

  5. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT. PMID:27221947

  6. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-05-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT.

  7. Neutral O2 and Ion O2+ Sources from Rings into the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, M. K.; Johnson, R. E.; Cassidy, T. A.; Wilson, R. J.; Tseng, W.; Ip, W.

    2009-12-01

    The primary source of neutral O2 for Saturn’s magnetosphere is due to solar UV photons protons that produce O2 from H2O ice decomposition over the main rings as well as the tenuous F and G rings resulting in a tenuous O2 atmosphere (Johnson et. al. 2006). The O2 atmosphere is very thin to the point of being nearly collisionless. Our model of the atmosphere predict that as it interacts with the ring particles, the O2 is adsorbed and desorbed from the rings causing changes in the trajectories, which in turn, allows for a distribution of O2 from the rings throughout the magnetosphere (Tokar et. al. 2005; Tseng et. al. 2009). Predominately through photo-ionization and ion-exchange these O2 neutrals from the ice grains become a source for O2+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. Once the O2 becomes ionized to become O2+ the ions then follow the field lines. The ions interact with the ice particles in the rings to stick to the ring particles effectively reducing the ion density. As a result the ion density is greater over the Cassini Division and the area between the F and G ring where the optical depth due to the ice grain is less. Accordingly, the neutral O2 densities would tend to be high over the higher optical depth of the B and A main rings where the source rates are higher. Models of the neutral densities have shown high densities over the main rings, with a tail through the magnetosphere. Analysis of the CAPS (Cassini Plasma Spectrometer) data from the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) in 2004 shows a peak in density over the Cassini Division and a higher peak in O2+ ion density between the F and G rings. References: Johnson, R.E., J.G. Luhmann, R.L. Tokar, M. Bouhram, J.J. Berthelier, E.C. Siler, J.F. Cooper, T.W. Hill, H.T. Smith, M. Michael, M. Liu, F.J. Crary, D.T. Young, "Production, Ionization and Redistribution of O2 Saturn's Ring Atmosphere" Icarus 180, 393-402 (2006).(pdf) Tokar, R.L., and 12 colleagues, 2005. Cassini Observations of the Thermal Plasma in the

  8. Proton transfer in ionic and neutral reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Christian; Fayer, Michael D

    2015-05-14

    Proton-transfer kinetics in both ionic and neutral reverse micelles were studied by time-correlated single-photon counting investigations of the fluorescent photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (HPTS). Orientational dynamics of dissolved probe molecules in the water pools of the reverse micelles were also investigated by time-dependent fluorescence anisotropy measurements of MPTS, the methoxy derivative of HPTS. These experiments were compared to the same experiments in bulk water. It was found that in ionic reverse micelles (surfactant Aerosol OT, AOT), orientational motion (fluorescence anisotropy decay) of MPTS was relatively unhindered, consistent with MPTS being located in the water core of the reverse micelle away from the water-surfactant interface. In nonionic reverse micelles (surfactant Igepal CO-520, Igepal), however, orientational anisotropy displayed a slow multiexponential decay consistent with wobbling-in-a-cone behavior, indicating MPTS is located at the water-surfactant interface. HPTS proton transfer in ionic reverse micelles followed kinetics qualitatively like those in bulk water, albeit slower, with the long-time power law time dependence associated with recombination of the proton with the dissociated photoacid, suggesting a modified diffusion-controlled process. However, the power law exponents in the ionic reverse micelles are smaller (∼ -0.55) than that in bulk water (-1.1). In neutral reverse micelles, proton-transfer kinetics did not show discernible power law behavior and were best represented by a two-component model with one relatively waterlike population and a population with a faster fluorescence lifetime and negligible proton transfer. We explain the Igepal results on the basis of close association between the probe and the neutral water-surfactant interface, with the probe experiencing a distribution of more and less waterlike environments. In addition, the observation in bulk water of a power law t(-1.1) for diffusion

  9. Applications and Implications of Neutral versus Non-neutral Markers in Molecular Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Heather; Freeland, Joanna R.

    2011-01-01

    The field of molecular ecology has expanded enormously in the past two decades, largely because of the growing ease with which neutral molecular genetic data can be obtained from virtually any taxonomic group. However, there is also a growing awareness that neutral molecular data can provide only partial insight into parameters such as genetic diversity, local adaptation, evolutionary potential, effective population size, and taxonomic designations. Here we review some of the applications of neutral versus adaptive markers in molecular ecology, discuss some of the advantages that can be obtained by supplementing studies of molecular ecology with data from non-neutral molecular markers, and summarize new methods that are enabling researchers to generate data from genes that are under selection. PMID:21747718

  10. The Space Station neutral gas environment and the concomitant requirements for monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, George

    1988-01-01

    At 340 km, for typical conditions, the neutral atmospheric density is several times 10E8/cc and is thus more abundant than the ionized component by several factors of 10. At that altitude, the principal series is atomic oxygen with 10 percent N2, and 1 percent He, and trace amounts of O2, H, N, NO, and Ar. The constituent densities are highly variable with local time, latitude, and geophysical indices. The physical interaction with surfaces at orbital velocity leads to large buildup of density on forward faces and great depletions in the wakes of objects. Chemical reactions lead to major modifications in constituent densities as in the case of the conversion of most colliding oxygen atoms to oxygen bearing molecules. The neutral environment about an orbiting body is thus a complex product of many variables even without a source of neutral contaminants. The addition of fluxes of gases emanating from the orbiting vehicle, as will be the case for the Space Station, with the associated physical and chemical interactions adds another level of complexity to the character of the environment and mandates a sophisticated measurement capability if the neutral environment is to be quantitatively characterized.

  11. Characterization of epitopes involved in the neutralization of Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 leukotoxin.

    PubMed

    Lainson, F A; Murray, J; Davies, R C; Donachie, W

    1996-09-01

    Defined segments of the leukotoxin A gene (lktA) from an A1 serotype of Pasteurella haemolytica were cloned into a plasmid vector and expressed as LacZ alpha fusion proteins. These fusion proteins were electrophoresed in SDS-PAGE gels and their immunoblotting reactivities with several monoclonal antibodies characterized. The epitope recognized by a strongly neutralizing monoclonal antibody was localized to a 32 amino acid region near the C terminus of the leukotoxin A (LktA) molecule. The epitope recognized by a non-neutralizing antibody was localized to a 33 amino acid region immediately adjacent. Smaller recombinant peptides containing these epitopes were not antigenic, but a polypeptide encompassing 229 amino acids at the C terminus evoked neutralizing antibodies when used to immunize specific-pathogen-free lambs. The distributions of linear epitopes recognized by this antiserum and by antisera raised to full-length recombinant LktA and to native LktA produced by P. haemolytica serotype A1 were determined by their reactivities with a set of overlapping 10 amino acid synthetic peptides. This revealed a complex distribution of linear epitopes at the C-terminal end of LktA. Toxin-neutralizing antibodies in convalescent sheep serum were shown to be directed against conformational epitopes by selective absorption of antibodies directed against linear epitopes. PMID:8828217

  12. Study of near surface Nitrogen vacancy center (NV-) neutralization in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Abu Naim Rakib; Newell, Arthur; Dowdell, Dontray; Santamore, Deborah

    The performance of nitrogen vacancy based sensors strongly depends on the population of NV- near the diamond surface. The magnetic sensing capabilities of NV-diamonds are diminished as the NV-becomes neutralized and turns into NV,0whereNV0 represents the neutralized charge state of NV-. A theoretical calculation is performed to obtain the electron transfer rate between the NV- and surface molecules using the Marcus theory of electron transfer where reorganization energy and electronic wave function coupling are considered. The electronic wave function coupling is determined using the density functional theory method. Band structure simulation is also performed to confirm the NV-neutralization at the surface due to surface termination. The electron transfer rate is investigated for various surface terminations (hydrogen, oxygen). Moreover, an investigation of the stability of the NV- at different depths relative to the surface is conducted. This work provides the ratio of NV- to (NV0 + NV-) at equilibrium, which demonstrates the effect of surface termination and contamination on NV-neutralization and also depicts surface properties of NV-diamonds. National Science Foundation(NSF Grant: DMR-1505641).

  13. Study of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity into neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, G. Rout, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The major portion of the bulk plasma in magnetospheric space, interplanetary plasma belts and the solar winds contain neutral particles. Evidently these neutral particles undergo binary collisions with the charged particles and among themselves so as to contribute significantly to the transport and diffusion process in a singly charged electron – ion magnetoplasma. The effects of the neutral particles collisions on various diffusion transport coefficients are studied for magnetised electron-ion plasma and appropriately modified coefficients are derived analytically. The results reveal that these coefficients increase significantly owing to the effect of the charge -neutral and neutral-neutral collisions.

  14. Disordered Binding of Small Molecules to Aβ(12–28)*

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Marino; Vitalis, Andreas; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of small molecules and short peptides have been identified that interfere with aggregation and/or oligomerization of the Alzheimer β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Many of them possess aromatic moieties, suggesting a dominant role for those in interacting with Aβ along various stages of the aggregation process. In this study, we attempt to elucidate whether interactions of such aromatic inhibitors with monomeric Aβ(12–28) point to a common mechanism of action by performing atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at equilibrium. Our results suggest that, independently of the presence of inhibitors, monomeric Aβ(12–28) populates a partially collapsed ensemble that is largely devoid of canonical secondary structure at 300 K and neutral pH. The small molecules have different affinities for Aβ(12–28) that can be partially rationalized by the balance of aromatic and charged moieties constituting the molecules. There are no predominant binding modes, although aggregation inhibitors preferentially interact with the N-terminal portion of the fragment (residues 13–20). Analysis of the free energy landscape of Aβ(12–28) reveals differences highlighted by altered populations of a looplike conformer in the presence of inhibitors. We conclude that intrinsic disorder of Aβ persists at the level of binding small molecules and that inhibitors can significantly alter properties of monomeric Aβ via multiple routes of differing specificity. PMID:21969380

  15. Photodesorption of diatomic molecules from surfaces: A theoretical approach based on first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klüner, Thorsten

    2010-05-01

    Photodesorption of small molecules from surfaces is one of the most fundamental processes in surface photochemistry. Despite its apparent simplicity, a microscopic understanding beyond a qualitative picture still poses a true challenge for theory. While the dynamics of nuclear motion can be treated on various levels of sophistication, all approaches suffer from the lack of sufficiently accurate potential energy surfaces, in particular for electronically excited states involved in the desorption scenario. In the last decade, a systematic and accurate methodology has been developed which allows a reliable calculation of accurate ground and excited state potential energy surfaces (PES) for different adsorbate-substrate systems. These potential energy surfaces serve as a prerequisite for subsequent quantum dynamical wave packet calculations, which allow for a direct simulation of experimentally observable quantities such as quantum state resolved velocity distributions. In the first part of this review, we will focus on scalar properties of desorbing diatomic molecules from insulating surfaces, where we also present a recently developed strategy of obtaining accurate potential energy surfaces using quantum chemical approaches. In general, diatomic molecules on large band gap materials such as oxide surfaces are studied which allows the use of sufficiently large cluster models and accurate ab initio methods beyond density functional theory (DFT). In the second part, we will focus on the vectorial aspects of the dynamics of nuclear motion and present simulations of experimentally accessible observables such as velocity distributions, Doppler profiles and alignment parameters. For each system, the microscopic mechanism of photodesorption is elucidated. We will demonstrate that the driving force of surface photochemistry is strongly dependent on details of the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate systems. This implies that great caution is advisable if

  16. Moving Molecules and Mothball Madness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, John

    1993-01-01

    Describes concrete demonstrations on the states of matter. In the first demonstration, students represent molecules; and, in the second demonstration, moth balls are heated to produce a change of state. (PR)

  17. Surface chemistry of deuterated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1983-03-01

    The chemical composition of grain mantles is calculated in order to determine the concentration of deuterated molecules relative to their hydrogenated counterparts in grain mantles. The computation takes into account reactions involving deuterium in the gas phase and on grain surfaces. The results show that the abundance of deuterium molecules in grain mantles is much higher than expected on the basis of the cosmic abundance ratio of D to H. HDCO has a relatively high abundance in grain mantles as compared to other deuterated molecules, due to the fact that H abstraction from HDCO has a lower activation barrier than D abstraction. The infrared characteristics of the calculated grain mantles are discussed and observational tests of the model calcultions are suggested. The contribution of grain surface chemistry to the concentration of molecules in the gas phase is briefly considered.

  18. Cobalt single-molecule magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, En-Che; Hendrickson, David N.; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Nakano, Motohiro; Zakharov, Lev N.; Sommer, Roger D.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Ledezma-Gairaud, Marisol; Christou, George

    2002-05-01

    A cobalt molecule that functions as a single-molecule magnet, [Co4(hmp)4(MeOH)4Cl4], where hmp- is the anion of hydroxymethylpyridine, is reported. The core of the molecule consists of four Co(II) cations and four hmp- oxygen atom ions at the corners of a cube. Variable-field and variable-temperature magnetization data have been analyzed to establish that the molecule has a S=6 ground state with considerable negative magnetoanisotropy. Single-ion zero-field interactions (DSz2) at each cobalt ion are the origin of the negative magnetoanisotropy. A single crystal of the compound was studied by means of a micro-superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer in the range of 0.040-1.0 K. Hysteresis was found in the magnetization versus magnetic field response of this single crystal.

  19. Spin tunneling in magnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kececioglu, Ersin

    In this thesis, we will focus on spin tunneling in a family of systems called magnetic molecules such as Fe8 and Mn12. This is comparatively new, in relation to other tunneling problems. Many issues are not completely solved and/or understood yet. The magnetic molecule Fe 8 has been observed to have a rich pattern of degeneracies in its magnetic spectrum. We focus on these degeneracies from several points of view. We start with the simplest anisotropy Hamiltonian to describe the Fe 8 molecule and extend our discussion to include higher order anisotropy terms. We give analytical expressions as much as we can, for the degeneracies in the semi-classical limit in both cases. We reintroduce jump instantons to the instanton formalism. Finally, we discuss the effect of the environment on the molecule. Our results, for all different models and techniques, agree well with both experimental and numerical results.

  20. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A.; Branton, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule’s outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  1. Single-Molecule DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efcavitch, J. William; Thompson, John F.

    2010-07-01

    The ability to detect single molecules of DNA or RNA has led to an extremely rich area of exploration of the single most important biomolecule in nature. In cases in which the nucleic acid molecules are tethered to a solid support, confined to a channel, or simply allowed to diffuse into a detection volume, novel techniques have been developed to manipulate the DNA and to examine properties such as structural dynamics and protein-DNA interactions. Beyond the analysis of the properties of nucleic acids themselves, single-molecule detection has enabled dramatic improvements in the throughput of DNA sequencing and holds promise for continuing progress. Both optical and nonoptical detection methods that use surfaces, nanopores, and zero-mode waveguides have been attempted, and one optically based instrument is already commercially available. The breadth of literature related to single-molecule DNA analysis is vast; this review focuses on a survey of efforts in molecular dynamics and nucleic acid sequencing.

  2. Fluorescence Microscopy of Single Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmermann, Jan; van Dorp, Arthur; Renn, Alois

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of photochemistry and photophysics of individual quantum systems is described with the help of a wide-field fluorescence microscopy approach. The fluorescence single molecules are observed in real time.

  3. The production of low-energy neutral oxygen beams by grazing-incidence neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, R. G.; Haglund, R. F.; Tolk, N. H.; Daech, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University neutral oxygen facility produces beams of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms by means of grazing-incidence collisions between ion beams and metal surfaces. Residual ions are reflected by applied electric fields. This method can utilize initial ion beams of either O(+) or O2(+) since a very large percentage of molecular oxygen ions are dissociated when they undergo grazing-incidence neutralization. The method of neutralization is applicable to low-energy beams and to all ions. Particular emphasis is on O and N2 beams for simulation of the low Earth orbit space environment. Since the beam is a pure O-neutral beam and since measurements of the interaction of the beam with solid surfaces are made spectroscopically, absolute reaction rates can be determined. The technique permits the beams to be used in conjunction with electron and photon irradiation for studies of synergistic effects. Comparisons of optical spectra of Kapton excited by 2.5-keV O, O(+), and O2(+) show significant differences. Optical spectra of Kapton excited by neutral oxygen beams of less than 1 keV have been recorded.

  4. Collisional decoherence of polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Kai; Stickler, Benjamin A.; Hornberger, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    The quantum state of motion of a large and rotating polar molecule can lose coherence through the collisions with gas atoms. We show how the associated quantum master equation for the center of mass can be expressed in terms of the orientationally averaged differential and total scattering cross sections, for which we provide approximate analytic expressions. The master equation is then utilized to quantify collisional decoherence in a interference experiment with polar molecules.

  5. Nanochannel Based Single Molecule Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Lesoine, John F.; Venkataraman, Prahnesh A.; Maloney, Peter C.; Dumont, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the fluorescence from a single molecule hundreds of times without surface immobilization. The approach is based on the use of electroosmosis to repeatedly drive a single target molecule in a fused silica nanochannel through a stationary laser focus. Single molecule fluorescence detected during the transit time through the laser focus is used to repeatedly reverse the electrical potential controlling the flow direction. Our method does not rely on continuous observation and therefore is less susceptible to fluorescence blinking than existing fluorescence-based trapping schemes. The variation in the turnaround times can be used to measure the diffusion coefficient on a single molecule level. We demonstrate the ability to recycle both proteins and DNA in nanochannels and show that the procedure can be combined with single-pair Förster energy transfer. Nanochannel-based single molecule recycling holds promise for studying conformational dynamics on the same single molecule in solution and without surface tethering. PMID:22662745

  6. Retrocyclins neutralize bacterial toxins by potentiating their unfolding.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Seveau, Stephanie; Lu, Wuyuan; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2015-04-15

    Defensins are a class of immune peptides with a broad range of activities against bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Besides exerting direct anti-microbial activity via dis-organization of bacterial membranes, defensins are also able to neutralize various unrelated bacterial toxins. Recently, we have demonstrated that in the case of human α- and β-defensins, this later ability is achieved through exploiting toxins' marginal thermodynamic stability, i.e. defensins act as molecular anti-chaperones unfolding toxin molecules and exposing their hydrophobic regions and thus promoting toxin precipitation and inactivation [Kudryashova et al. (2014) Immunity 41, 709-721]. Retrocyclins (RCs) are humanized synthetic θ-defensin peptides that possess unique cyclic structure, differentiating them from α- and β-defensins. Importantly, RCs are more potent against some bacterial and viral pathogens and more stable than their linear counterparts. However, the mechanism of bacterial toxin inactivation by RCs is not known. In the present study, we demonstrate that RCs facilitate unfolding of bacterial toxins. Using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), limited proteolysis and collisional quenching of internal tryptophan fluorescence, we show that hydrophobic regions of toxins normally buried in the molecule interior become more exposed to solvents and accessible to proteolytic cleavage in the presence of RCs. The RC-induced unfolding of toxins led to their precipitation and abrogated activity. Toxin inactivation by RCs was strongly diminished under reducing conditions, but preserved at physiological salt and serum concentrations. Therefore, despite significant structural diversity, α-, β- and θ-defensins employ similar mechanisms of toxin inactivation, which may be shared by anti-microbial peptides from other families. PMID:25670244

  7. Effects of humidity on sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores with plasma-excited neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the effects of relative humidity on the sterilization process using a plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals were separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas is nitrogen mixed with 0.1% oxygen, and the relative humidity in the source gas is controlled by changing the mixing ratio of water vapor. The relative humidity near the sample in the reactor chamber is controlled by changing the sample temperature. As a result, the relative humidity near the sample should be kept in the range from 60 to 90% for the sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. When the relative humidity in the source gas increases from 30 to 90%, the sterilization effect is enhanced by the same degree.

  8. Neutral and charged clusters in the atmosphere - Their importance and potential role in heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment is presented of current knowledge concerning the role and importance of neutral and charged clusters in atmospheric heterogeneous catalysis, with a view to the recommendation of future studies needed for progress in the quantification of aerosol formation and catalytic reactivity. It is established that nucleation from the gaseous to the aerosol state commences via the formation of clusters among molecules participating in the phase-transformation process. Nucleation may proceed in some cases by way of the formation of prenucleation embryos, which then evolve through the energy barrier and undergo phase transformation. In other cases, cluster-cluster interaction among neutral particles or stagewise building of alternate-sign ion clusters may be important in the gas-to-particle conversion process.

  9. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Redox-Neutral and Redox-Green C-H Bond Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Huang, Hanmin

    2016-08-01

    Transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization has become one of the most promising strategies to prepare complex molecules from simple precursors. However, the utilization of environmentally unfriendly oxidants in the oxidative C-H bond functionalization reactions reduces their potential applications in organic synthesis. This account describes our recent efforts in the development of a redox-neutral C-H bond functionalization strategy for direct addition of inert C-H bonds to unsaturated double bonds and a redox-green C-H bond functionalization strategy for realization of oxidative C-H functionalization with O2 as the sole oxidant, aiming to circumvent the problems posed by utilizing environmentally unfriendly oxidants. In principle, these redox-neutral and redox-green strategies pave the way for establishing new environmentally benign transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization strategies. PMID:27258190

  10. Monochromaticity in neutral evolutionary network models.

    PubMed

    Halu, Arda; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies on epistatic networks of model organisms have unveiled a certain type of modular property called monochromaticity in which the networks are clustered into functional modules that interact with each other through the same type of epistasis. Here, we propose and study three epistatic network models that are inspired by the duplication-divergence mechanism to gain insight into the evolutionary basis of monochromaticity and to test if it can be explained as the outcome of a neutral evolutionary hypothesis. We show that the epistatic networks formed by these stochastic evolutionary models have monochromaticity conflict distributions that are centered close to zero and are statistically significantly different from their randomized counterparts. In particular, the last model we propose yields a strictly monochromatic solution. Our results agree with the monochromaticity findings in real organisms and point toward the possible role of a neutral mechanism in the evolution of this phenomenon. PMID:23367998

  11. EDITORIAL: Negative ion based neutral beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.

    2006-06-01

    It is widely recognized that neutral beam injection (NBI), i.e. the injection of high energy, high power, beams of H or D atoms, is a flexible and reliable system that has been the main heating system on a large variety of fusion devices, and NBI has been chosen as one of the three heating schemes of the International Tokomak Reactor (ITER). To date, all the NBI systems but two have been based on the neutralization (in a simple gas target) of positive hydrogen or deuterium ions accelerated to <100 keV/nucleon. Above that energy the neutralization of positive ions falls to unacceptably low values, and higher energy neutral beams have to be created by the neutralization of accelerated negative ions (in a simple gas target), as this remains high (approx60%) up to >1 MeV/nucleon. Unfortunately H- and D- are difficult to create, and the very characteristic that makes them attractive, the ease with which the electron is detached from the ion, means that it is difficult to create high concentrations or fluxes of them, and it is difficult to avoid substantial, collisional, losses in the extraction and acceleration processes. However, there has been impressive progress in negative ion sources and accelerators over the past decade, as demonstrated by the two pioneering, operational, multi-megawatt, negative ion based, NBI systems at LHD (180 keV, H0) and JT-60U (500 keV, D0), both in Japan. Nevertheless, the system proposed for ITER represents a substantial technological challenge as an increase is required in beam energy, to 1 MeV, D0, accelerated ion (D-) current, to 40 A, accelerated current density, 200 A m-2 of D-, and pulse length, to 1 h. At the Fourth IAEA Technical Meeting on Negative Ion Based Neutral Beam Injectors, hosted by the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy, 9-11 May 2005, the status of the R&D aimed at the realization of the injectors for ITER was presented. Because of the importance of this development to the success of the ITER project, participants at that

  12. Non-neutral theory of biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, G.; Ferretti, L.; Franz, S.

    2009-07-01

    We present a non-neutral stochastic model for the dynamics taking place in a meta-community ecosystems in the presence of migration. The model provides a framework for describing the emergence of multiple ecological scenarios and behaves in two extreme limits either as the unified neutral theory of biodiversity or as the Bak-Sneppen model. Interestingly, the model shows a condensation phase transition where one species becomes the dominant one, the diversity in the ecosystems is strongly reduced and the ecosystem is non-stationary. This phase transition extends the principle of competitive exclusion to open ecosystems and might be relevant for the study of the impact of invasive species in native ecologies.

  13. Time reversal violation for entangled neutral mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, J.

    2013-07-01

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of "in" and "out" states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  14. Thermospheric ion and neutral composition and chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    A summary is presented of research contributions by U.S. scientists during the years 1983-1986, toward an increased understanding of the properties and behavior of the earth's thermosphere and F-region ionosphere. As part of the more extensive aeronomy report to IUGG, this review addresses specifically the composition and relevant chemical and thermal processes that influence this region of the atmosphere. The discussion focuses on the separate neutral and ion species, and on the temperatures of the electrons, ions, and neutral gas. Related aspects of the solar radiation and photoelectrons are also included. Direct observational results and analyses are emphasized, along with references to pertinent findings from basic laboratory and theoretical studies.

  15. Quasi-Neutral Theory of Epidemic Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Oscar A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Some epidemics have been empirically observed to exhibit outbreaks of all possible sizes, i.e., to be scale-free or scale-invariant. Different explanations for this finding have been put forward; among them there is a model for “accidental pathogens” which leads to power-law distributed outbreaks without apparent need of parameter fine tuning. This model has been claimed to be related to self-organized criticality, and its critical properties have been conjectured to be related to directed percolation. Instead, we show that this is a (quasi) neutral model, analogous to those used in Population Genetics and Ecology, with the same critical behavior as the voter-model, i.e. the theory of accidental pathogens is a (quasi)-neutral theory. This analogy allows us to explain all the system phenomenology, including generic scale invariance and the associated scaling exponents, in a parsimonious and simple way. PMID:21760930

  16. Low-energy neutral-atom spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, D.E.; Cohen, S.A.

    1982-04-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of a low energy neutral atom spectrometer are described. Time-of-flight analysis is used to measure the energy spectrum of charge-exchange deuterium atoms emitted from the PLT tokamak plasma in the energy range from 20 to 1000 eV. The neutral outflux is gated on a 1 ..mu..sec time scale by a slotted rotating chopper disc, supported against gravity in vacuum by magnetic levitation, and is detected by secondary electron emission from a Cu-Be plate. The energy dependent detection efficiency has been measured in particle beam experiments and on the tokamak so that the diagnostic is absolutely calibrated, allowing quantitative particle fluxes to be determined with 200 ..mu..sec time resolution. In addition to its present application as a plasma diagnostic, the instrument is capable of making a wide variety of measurements relevant to atomic and surface physics.

  17. Particle reflection and TFTR neutral beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O`Connor, T.E.; Newman, R.A.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    Determination of two critical neutral beam parameters, power and divergence, are affected by the reflection of a fraction of the incident energy from the surface of the measuring calorimeter. On the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand, greater than 30% of the incident power directed at the target chamber calorimeter was unaccounted for. Most of this loss is believed due to reflection from the surface of the flat calorimeter, which was struck at a near grazing incidence (12{degrees}). Beamline calorimeters, of a ``V``-shape design, while retaining the beam power, also suffer from reflection effects. Reflection, in this latter case, artificially peaks the power toward the apex of the ``V``, complicating the fitting technique, and increasing the power density on axis by 10 to 20%; an effect of import to future beamline designers. Agreement is found between measured and expected divergence values, even with 24% of the incident energy reflected.

  18. Particle reflection and TFTR neutral beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O'Connor, T.E.; Newman, R.A.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-04-01

    Determination of two critical neutral beam parameters, power and divergence, are affected by the reflection of a fraction of the incident energy from the surface of the measuring calorimeter. On the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand, greater than 30% of the incident power directed at the target chamber calorimeter was unaccounted for. Most of this loss is believed due to reflection from the surface of the flat calorimeter, which was struck at a near grazing incidence (12{degrees}). Beamline calorimeters, of a V''-shape design, while retaining the beam power, also suffer from reflection effects. Reflection, in this latter case, artificially peaks the power toward the apex of the V'', complicating the fitting technique, and increasing the power density on axis by 10 to 20%; an effect of import to future beamline designers. Agreement is found between measured and expected divergence values, even with 24% of the incident energy reflected.

  19. Monochromaticity in neutral evolutionary network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halu, Arda; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies on epistatic networks of model organisms have unveiled a certain type of modular property called monochromaticity in which the networks are clustered into functional modules that interact with each other through the same type of epistasis. Here, we propose and study three epistatic network models that are inspired by the duplication-divergence mechanism to gain insight into the evolutionary basis of monochromaticity and to test if it can be explained as the outcome of a neutral evolutionary hypothesis. We show that the epistatic networks formed by these stochastic evolutionary models have monochromaticity conflict distributions that are centered close to zero and are statistically significantly different from their randomized counterparts. In particular, the last model we propose yields a strictly monochromatic solution. Our results agree with the monochromaticity findings in real organisms and point toward the possible role of a neutral mechanism in the evolution of this phenomenon.

  20. Quasi-neutral theory of epidemic outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Oscar A; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Some epidemics have been empirically observed to exhibit outbreaks of all possible sizes, i.e., to be scale-free or scale-invariant. Different explanations for this finding have been put forward; among them there is a model for "accidental pathogens" which leads to power-law distributed outbreaks without apparent need of parameter fine tuning. This model has been claimed to be related to self-organized criticality, and its critical properties have been conjectured to be related to directed percolation. Instead, we show that this is a (quasi) neutral model, analogous to those used in Population Genetics and Ecology, with the same critical behavior as the voter-model, i.e. the theory of accidental pathogens is a (quasi)-neutral theory. This analogy allows us to explain all the system phenomenology, including generic scale invariance and the associated scaling exponents, in a parsimonious and simple way. PMID:21760930

  1. Neutral line chaos and phase space structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, Grant R.; Speiser, Theodore W.; Martin, Richard F., Jr.; Dusenbery, Paul B.

    1991-01-01

    Phase space structure and chaos near a neutral line are studied with numerical surface-of-section (SOS) techniques and analytic methods. Results are presented for a linear neutral line model with zero crosstail electric field. It was found that particle motion can be divided into three regimes dependening on the value of the conserved canonical momentum, Py, and the conserved Hamiltonian, h. The phase space structure, using Poincare SOS plots, is highly sensitive to bn = Bn/B0 variations, but not to h variations. It is verified that the slow motion preserves the action, Jz, as evaluated by Sonnerup (1971), when the period of the fast motion is smaller than the time scale of the slow motion. Results show that the phase space structure and particle chaos depend sensitively upon Py and bn, but are independent of h.

  2. The Neutralization of Ion-Rocket Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Harold R.

    1961-01-01

    The experimental ion-beam behavior obtained without neutralizers is compared with both simple collision theory and plasma-wave theory. This comparison indicates that plasma waves play an important part in beam behavior, although the present state of plasma-wave theory does not permit more than a qualitative comparison. The theories of immersed-emitter and electron-trap neutralizer operation are discussed; and, to the extent permitted by experimental data, the theory is compared with experimental results. Experimental data are lacking completely at the present time for operation in space. The results that might be expected in space and the means of simulating such operation in Earth-bound facilities, however, are discussed.

  3. Neutralization enzyme immunoassay for influenza virus.

    PubMed Central

    Benne, C A; Harmsen, M; De Jong, J C; Kraaijeveld, C A

    1994-01-01

    A neutralization enzyme immunoassay (N-EIA) was developed for the detection of antibody titer rises in sera of patients infected with influenza A (H3N2) virus. In this N-EIA, a selected strain of influenza A (H3N2) virus was added to monolayers of LLC-MK2 cells in microtiter plates. After 24 h, the replicated virus could be demonstrated with a virus-specific enzyme-labeled monoclonal antibody. Preincubation of the influenza virus with convalescent-phase sera of patients infected with influenza A (H3N2) virus resulted 1 day later in decreased absorbance values that could be used for calculation of neutralization titers. From use of paired serum samples from 10 patients with a history of flu-like symptoms, the results obtained with N-EIA correlated well (r = 0.83) with those of the standard hemagglutination inhibition test. PMID:8027355

  4. Neutral beam source commercialization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.J.

    1980-06-01

    The basic tasks of this Phase II project were to: generate a set of design drawings suitable for quantity production of sources of this design; fabricate a functional neutral beam source incorporating as many of the proposed design changes as proved feasible; and document the procedures and findings developed during the contract. These tasks have been accomplished and represent a demonstrated milestone in the industrialization of this complete device.

  5. A neutral redox-switchable [2]rotaxane.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J-C; Fahrenbach, A C; Trabolsi, A; Friedman, D C; Dey, S K; Gothard, C M; Shveyd, A K; Gasa, T B; Spruell, J M; Olson, M A; Wang, C; Jacquot de Rouville, H-P; Botros, Y Y; Stoddart, J F

    2011-10-21

    A limited range of redox-active, rotaxane-based, molecular switches exist, despite numerous potential applications for them as components of nanoscale devices. We have designed and synthesised a neutral, redox-active [2]rotaxane, which incorporates an electron-deficient pyromellitic diimide (PmI)-containing ring encircling two electron-rich recognition sites in the form of dioxynaphthalene (DNP) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) units positioned along the rod section of its dumbbell component. Molecular modeling using MacroModel guided the design of the mechanically interlocked molecular switch. The binding affinities in CH(2)Cl(2) at 298 K between the free ring and two electron-rich guests--one (K(a) = 5.8 × 10(2) M(-1)) containing a DNP unit and the other (K(a) = 6.3 × 10(3) M(-1)) containing a TTF unit--are strong: the one order of magnitude difference in their affinities favouring the TTF unit suggested to us the feasibility of integrating these three building blocks into a bistable [2]rotaxane switch. The [2]rotaxane was obtained in 34% yield by relying on neutral donor-acceptor templation and a double copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and spectroelectrochemistry (SEC) were employed to stimulate and observe switching by this neutral bistable rotaxane in solution at 298 K, while (1)H NMR spectroscopy was enlisted to investigate switching upon chemical oxidation. The neutral [2]rotaxane is a chemically robust and functional switch with potential for applications in device settings. PMID:21879130

  6. Cluster Observations of Neutral Sheet Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volwerk, M.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Zhang, T. L.; Eichelberger, H.-U.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Balogh, A.

    In the period of early July through the end of October 2001, the Cluster spacecraft had their apogee in the Earth's magnetotail at approximately 19 R_{rm E}. This allowed us to study substorm related phenomena in the neutral sheet. We investigated the FGM data for neutral sheet crossings during strong activity (AE), and in particular looked at ULF waves. For this presentation we will first look at three days: July 17, August 22 and September 15, 2001. Spectral analysis shows that the main power is in compressional waves, similar to the results of {em Bauer et al.} [JGR 100, 23737, 1995] with a significant peak at 30 - 60 mHz. Having four spacecraft, we can de- termine the propagation direction and velocity of the waves, using cross correlation of the bandpass filtered data to get the time lag between the spacecraft and the rela- tive location of the spacecraft. As expected, we find that the waves propagate mainly perpendicular to the magnetic field, either earthward or tailward. The velocity of the waves varies from 60 - 250 km s^{-1}. The propagation direction of the waves may be dependent on the local plasma flow direction or amplitude. Not every neutral sheet crossing shows evidence of these ULF waves near 30 - 60 mHz. There are several days in which the spectral power falls off much more quickly than in the days men- tioned before. Examples are: August 12 and 29 and September 24, 2001. The main spectral power for these days is at frequencies of 60 - 200 mHz. An indication for the difference between these two sets of observations can be found in the AE index. The days with strong ULF wave power at 30 - 60 mHz are during neutral sheet crossings at the onset or expansion phase of a substorm, whereas the days without these waves are crossings that occur during substorm recovery phase, or during quiescent times.

  7. Stability of Stochastic Neutral Cellular Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ling; Zhao, Hongyong

    In this paper, we study a class of stochastic neutral cellular neural networks. By constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional and employing the nonnegative semi-martingale convergence theorem we give some sufficient conditions ensuring the almost sure exponential stability of the networks. The results obtained are helpful to design stability of networks when stochastic noise is taken into consideration. Finally, two examples are provided to show the correctness of our analysis.

  8. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Nitz, D. E.; Chisholm, J.; Sobeck, J.

    2009-10-01

    The spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are more complex than spectra of other rare earth species. The resulting high density of lines in the visible makes Ce ideal for use in metal halide (MH) High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Inclusion of cerium-iodide in a lamp dose can improve both the Color Rendering Index and luminous efficacy of a MH-HID lamp. Basic spectroscopic data including absolute atomic transition probabilities for Ce I and Ce II are needed for diagnosing and modeling these MH-HID lamps. Recent work on Ce II [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2000 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. [4pt] [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [0pt] [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  9. Antibody neutralization of retargeted measles viruses.

    PubMed

    Lech, Patrycja J; Pappoe, Roland; Nakamura, Takafumi; Tobin, Gregory J; Nara, Peter L; Russell, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    The measles virus (MV) vaccine lineage is a promising oncolytic but prior exposure to the measles vaccine or wild-type MV strains limits treatment utility due to the presence of anti-measles antibodies. MV entry can be redirected by displaying a polypeptide ligand on the Hemagglutinin (H) C-terminus. We hypothesized that retargeted MV would escape neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing the H receptor-binding surface and be less susceptible to neutralization by human antisera. Using chimeric H proteins, with and without mutations that ablate MV receptor binding, we show that retargeted MVs escape mAbs that target the H receptor-binding surface by virtue of mutations that ablate infection via SLAM and CD46. However, C-terminally displayed domains do not mediate virus entry in the presence of human antibodies that bind to the underlying H domain. In conclusion, utility of retargeted oncolytic measles viruses does not extend to evasion of human serum neutralization. PMID:24725950

  10. Solar-Driven Neutral Density Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms flowing into the solar system are attracted by the solar gravitational force, repelled by solar hydrogen Ly-alpha radiation pressure, and are ionized, primarily, through charge exchange with the solar wind protons. The solar cycle variation of the radiation pressure causes the net central solar force to fluctuate between attraction and repulsion resulting in the modulation of the neutral hydrogen density about the usual time independent model. The calculation presented here shows that the time dependent downstream density is strongly modulated by a large number of travelling neutral density waves. The waves possess a continuous range of wavelengths as is to be expected for a Maxwellian gas subjected to several eleven year cycle variations during its journey through the solar system. The amplitudes of the density modulation were found to be quite large. The backscattered glow was found to depend on the position of the detector and the phase of the solar cycle. At the most favorable condition a deviation of the order of 25% from the time dependent glow might be observed.

  11. Neutral color semitransparent microstructured perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Eperon, Giles E; Burlakov, Victor M; Goriely, Alain; Snaith, Henry J

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium. PMID:24467381

  12. Niche versus neutrality: a dynamical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhny, Michael; Seri, Efrat; Chocron, Rachel; Flather, Curtis H; Kadmon, Ronen; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the forces shaping ecological communities is of crucial importance for basic science and conservation. After 50 years in which ecological theory has focused on either stable communities driven by niche-based forces or nonstable "neutral" communities driven by demographic stochasticity, contemporary theories suggest that ecological communities are driven by the simultaneous effects of both types of mechanisms. Here we examine this paradigm using the longest available records for the dynamics of tropical trees and breeding birds. Applying a macroecological approach and fluctuation analysis techniques borrowed from statistical physics, we show that both stabilizing mechanisms and demographic stochasticity fail to play a dominant role in shaping assemblages over time. Rather, community dynamics in these two very different systems is predominantly driven by environmental stochasticity. Clearly, the current melding of niche and neutral theories cannot account for such dynamics. Our results highlight the need for a new theory of community dynamics integrating environmental stochasticity with weak stabilizing forces and suggest that such theory may better describe the dynamics of ecological communities than current neutral theories, deterministic niche-based theories, or recent hybrids. PMID:25226179

  13. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J.

    1992-05-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  14. Intense diagnostic neutral beam development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Henins, I. ); Fonck, R.J.; Kim, Y.J. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics)

    1992-01-01

    For the next-generation, burning tokamak plasmas such as ITER, diagnostic neutral beams and beam spectroscopy will continue to be used to determine a variety of plasma parameters such as ion temperature, rotation, fluctuations, impurity content, current density profile, and confined alpha particle density and energy distribution. Present-day low-current, long-pulse beam technology will be unable to provide the required signal intensities because of higher beam attenuation and background bremsstrahlung radiation in these larger, higher-density plasmas. To address this problem, we are developing a short-pulse, intense diagnostic neutral beam. Protons or deuterons are accelerated using magnetic-insulated ion-diode technology, and neutralized in a transient gas cell. A prototype 25-kA, 100-kV, 1-{mu}s accelerator is under construction at Los Alamos. Initial experiments will focus on ITER-related issues of beam energy distribution, current density, pulse length, divergence, propagation, impurity content, reproducibility, and maintenance.

  15. Neutral behavior of shared polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew G.

    1997-01-01

    Several cases have been described in the literature where genetic polymorphism appears to be shared between a pair of species. Here we examine the distribution of times to random loss of shared polymorphism in the context of the neutral Wright–Fisher model. Order statistics are used to obtain the distribution of times to loss of a shared polymorphism based on Kimura’s solution to the diffusion approximation of the Wright–Fisher model. In a single species, the expected absorption time for a neutral allele having an initial allele frequency of ½ is 2.77 N generations. If two species initially share a polymorphism, that shared polymorphism is lost as soon as either of two species undergoes fixation. The loss of a shared polymorphism thus occurs sooner than loss of polymorphism in a single species and has an expected time of 1.7 N generations. Molecular sequences of genes with shared polymorphism may be characterized by the count of the number of sites that segregate in both species for the same nucleotides (or amino acids). The distribution of the expected numbers of these shared polymorphic sites also is obtained. Shared polymorphism appears to be more likely at genetic loci that have an unusually large number of segregating alleles, and the neutral coalescent proves to be very useful in determining the probability of shared allelic lineages expected by chance. These results are related to examples of shared polymorphism in the literature. PMID:9223256

  16. Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 111 Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms (Web, free access)   Data for ground state electron configurations and ionization energies for the neutral atoms (Z = 1-104) including references.

  17. Choline for neutralizing naphthenic acid in fuel and lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Ries, D.G.; Roof, G.L.

    1986-07-15

    A method is described of neutralizing at least a portion of the naphthenic acids present in fuel and lubricating oils which contain naphthenic acids which comprises treating these oils with a neutralizing amount of choline.

  18. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) neutral beam design

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Brook, J.W.; Spampinato, P.T.; Mueller, J.P.; Luzzi, T.E.; Sedgley, D.W. . Space Systems Div.)

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics on ITER neutral beam design: ion dump; neutralizer and module gas flow analysis; vacuum system; cryogenic system; maintainability; power distribution; and system cost.

  19. The influence of stray magnetic fields on ion beam neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y.-C.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation is described of a comparison between the ion beam neutralization characteristics of a local neutralizer (within approximately 5 cm of the beam edge) and those associated with a distant one (approximately 1 meter away from the thruster). The influence of magnetic fields in the vicinity of the neutralizer cathode orifice which are either parallel or normal to the neutralizer axis is assessed. The plasma property profiles which reflect the influence of the magnetic fields are measured. The results suggest that magnetic fields at the region of a neutralizer cathode orifice influence its ability to couple to the ion beam. They reveal that there is a potential jump from the neutralizer cathode orifice to the plasma which exists close to the orifice. This potential drop is found to increase as the axial component of magnetic flux density increases. A magnetic field perpendicular to the neutralizer axis induces a potential rise a few centimeters downstream from the neutralizer cathode.

  20. 67. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NEUTRALIZER BUILDING, LOOKING AT CONDENSERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NEUTRALIZER BUILDING, LOOKING AT CONDENSERS, NEUTRALIZERS AND STORAGE TANKS, APRIL 11, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL