Science.gov

Sample records for desy scientific annual

  1. Scientific Directory 1977 and Annual Bibliography 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Scientific Reports.

    The Scientific Directory and Annual Bibliography of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is intended for reference use by research workers in the biomedical sciences. It presents a broad outline of NIH organizational structure, the professional staff, and their scientific and technical publications covering work done at NIH. The volume also…

  2. Graphics at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Peter K.

    1989-12-01

    After a short history of computer graphics at DESY the introduction of graphic workstations based on true and "quasi" standards is described. An overview of graphics hardware and software at DESY is given as well as the communication facilities used. Some remarks about current and future development finish the paper.

  3. The DESY Grid Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, A.; Gellrich, A.; Kemp, Y.; Leffhalm, K.; Ozerov, D.; Wegner, P.

    2012-12-01

    DESY is one of the world-wide leading centers for research with particle accelerators, synchrotron light and astroparticles. DESY participates in LHC as a Tier-2 center, supports on-going analyzes of HERA data, is a leading partner for ILC, and runs the National Analysis Facility (NAF) for LHC and ILC in the framework of the Helmholtz Alliance, Physics at the Terascale. For the research with synchrotron light major new facilities are operated and built (FLASH, PETRA-III, and XFEL). DESY furthermore acts as Data-Tier1 centre for the Neutrino detector IceCube. Established within the EGI-project DESY operates a grid infrastructure which supports a number of virtual Organizations (VO), incl. ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb. Furthermore, DESY hosts some of HEP and non-HEP VOs, such as the HERA experiments and ILC as well as photon science communities. The support of the new astroparticle physics VOs IceCube and CTA is currently set up. As the global structure of the grid offers huge resources which are perfect for batch-like computing, DESY has set up the National Analysis Facility (NAF) which complements the grid to allow German HEP users for efficient data analysis. The grid infrastructure and the NAF use the same physics data which is distributed via the grid. We call the conjunction of grid and NAF the DESY Grid Centre. In the contribution to CHEP2012 we will in depth discuss the conceptional and operational aspects of our multi-VO and multi-community Grid Centre and present the system setup. We will in particular focus on the interplay of Grid and NAF and present experiences of the operations.

  4. Centrally managed tapes at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Hell, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tapes at DESY are managed by the computer center and thus offer virtually unlimited storage space to the DESY computer center users. This paper describes the most recent version of the DESY tape management system, its predecessors having been in service for many years.

  5. The FLASHForward facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschikhin, A.; Behrens, C.; Bohlen, S.; Dale, J.; Delbos, N.; di Lucchio, L.; Elsen, E.; Erbe, J.-H.; Felber, M.; Foster, B.; Goldberg, L.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gruse, J.-N.; Hidding, B.; Hu, Zhanghu; Karstensen, S.; Knetsch, A.; Kononenko, O.; Libov, V.; Ludwig, K.; Maier, A. R.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Pannek, F.; Schaper, L.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiber, S.; Schwinkendorf, J.-P.; Steel, H.; Streeter, M.; Tauscher, G.; Wacker, V.; Weichert, S.; Wunderlich, S.; Zemella, J.; Osterhoff, J.

    2016-01-01

    The FLASHForward project at DESY is a pioneering plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment that aims to produce, in a few centimetres of ionised hydrogen, beams with energy of order GeV that are of quality sufficient to be used in a free-electron laser. The plasma is created by ionising a gas in a gas cell with a multi-TW laser system. The plasma wave will be driven by high-current-density electron beams from the FLASH linear accelerator. The laser system can also be used to provide optical diagnostics of the plasma and electron beams due to the <30 fs synchronisation between the laser and the driving electron beam. The project will explore both external and internal witness-beam injection techniques. The operation parameters of the experiment are discussed, as well as the scientific programme.

  6. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Julie A.; Robertson, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    This is the 2013 Annual Report for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility. This report includes information on university-run research projects along with a description of the program and the capabilities offered researchers.

  7. Progress in Scientific and Technical Communications, 1968 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Council for Science and Technology, Washington, DC. Committee on Scientific and Technical Information.

    This sixth annual report describes progress achieved by the Federal Government in improving the communication of scientific and technical information to support and enhance national science and technology. Included in the report are details regarding the scientific and technical activities of individual Federal Agencies, such as the Atomic Energy…

  8. TCGA Third Annual Scientific Symposium - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Monday, May 12 - Tuesday, May 13, 2014 National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. This open scientific meeting will consist of collaborative workshops, poster sessions, and plenary sessions. Registration is now open.

  9. Detector developments at DESY.

    PubMed

    Wunderer, Cornelia B; Allahgholi, Aschkan; Bayer, Matthias; Bianco, Laura; Correa, Jonathan; Delfs, Annette; Göttlicher, Peter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Jack, Stefanie; Klyuev, Alexander; Lange, Sabine; Marras, Alessandro; Niemann, Magdalena; Pithan, Florian; Reza, Salim; Sheviakov, Igor; Smoljanin, Sergej; Tennert, Maximilian; Trunk, Ulrich; Xia, Qingqing; Zhang, Jiaguo; Zimmer, Manfred; Das, Dipayan; Guerrini, Nicola; Marsh, Ben; Sedgwick, Iain; Turchetta, Renato; Cautero, Giuseppe; Giuressi, Dario; Menk, Ralf; Khromova, Anastasiya; Pinaroli, Giovanni; Stebel, Luigi; Marchal, Julien; Pedersen, Ulrik; Rees, Nick; Steadman, Paul; Sussmuth, Mark; Tartoni, Nicola; Yousef, Hazem; Hyun, HyoJung; Kim, KyungSook; Rah, Seungyu; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Mezza, Davide; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Krueger, Hans; Klanner, Robert; Schwandt, Joem; Graafsma, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    With the increased brilliance of state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation sources and the advent of free-electron lasers (FELs) enabling revolutionary science with EUV to X-ray photons comes an urgent need for suitable photon imaging detectors. Requirements include high frame rates, very large dynamic range, single-photon sensitivity with low probability of false positives and (multi)-megapixels. At DESY, one ongoing development project - in collaboration with RAL/STFC, Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Diamond, and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory - is the CMOS-based soft X-ray imager PERCIVAL. PERCIVAL is a monolithic active-pixel sensor back-thinned to access its primary energy range of 250 eV to 1 keV with target efficiencies above 90%. According to preliminary specifications, the roughly 10 cm × 10 cm, 3.5k × 3.7k monolithic sensor will operate at frame rates up to 120 Hz (commensurate with most FELs) and use multiple gains within 27 µm pixels to measure 1 to ∼100000 (500 eV) simultaneously arriving photons. DESY is also leading the development of the AGIPD, a high-speed detector based on hybrid pixel technology intended for use at the European XFEL. This system is being developed in collaboration with PSI, University of Hamburg, and University of Bonn. The AGIPD allows single-pulse imaging at 4.5 MHz frame rate into a 352-frame buffer, with a dynamic range allowing single-photon detection and detection of more than 10000 photons at 12.4 keV in the same image. Modules of 65k pixels each are configured to make up (multi)megapixel cameras. This review describes the AGIPD and the PERCIVAL concepts and systems, including some recent results and a summary of their current status. It also gives a short overview over other FEL-relevant developments where the Photon Science Detector Group at DESY is involved. PMID:26698052

  10. Accelerating scientific discovery : 2007 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, P.; Dave, P.; Drugan, C.

    2008-11-14

    As a gateway for scientific discovery, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) works hand in hand with the world's best computational scientists to advance research in a diverse span of scientific domains, ranging from chemistry, applied mathematics, and materials science to engineering physics and life sciences. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, researchers are using the IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer at the ALCF to study and explore key scientific problems that underlie important challenges facing our society. For instance, a research team at the University of California-San Diego/ SDSC is studying the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease. The researchers plan to use the knowledge they gain to discover new drugs to treat the disease and to identify risk factors for other diseases that are equally prevalent. Likewise, scientists from Pratt & Whitney are using the Blue Gene to understand the complex processes within aircraft engines. Expanding our understanding of jet engine combustors is the secret to improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Lessons learned from the scientific simulations of jet engine combustors have already led Pratt & Whitney to newer designs with unprecedented reductions in emissions, noise, and cost of ownership. ALCF staff members provide in-depth expertise and assistance to those using the Blue Gene/L and optimizing user applications. Both the Catalyst and Applications Performance Engineering and Data Analytics (APEDA) teams support the users projects. In addition to working with scientists running experiments on the Blue Gene/L, we have become a nexus for the broader global community. In partnership with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, we have created an environment where the world's most challenging computational science problems can be addressed. Our expertise in high-end scientific computing enables us to provide guidance for applications

  11. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  12. The 20th Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation Scientific Retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2014-06-01

    The 20th Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was held from October 24 to 26, 2013, in National Harbor, Maryland. This event is held annually for the purpose of convening a diverse group of leading experimental and clinical researchers from academia, industry, and government to present and discuss critical and emerging topics relevant to prostate cancer (PCa) biology, and the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PCa patients, with a focus on results that will lend to treatments for the most life-threatening stages of this disease. The themes that were highlighted at this year's event included: (i) mechanisms of PCa initiation and progression: cellular origins, neurons and neuroendocrine PCa, long non-coding RNAs, epigenetics, tumor cell metabolism, tumor-immune interactions, and novel molecular mechanisms; (ii) advancements in precision medicine strategies and predictive biomarkers of progression, survival, and drug sensitivities, including the analysis of circulating tumor cells and cell-free tumor DNA-new methods for liquid biopsies; (iii) new treatments including epigenomic therapy and immunotherapy, discovery of new treatment targets, and defining and targeting mechanisms of resistance to androgen-axis therapeutics; and (iv) new experimental and clinical epidemiology methods and techniques, including PCa population studies using patho-epidemiology. PMID:24719035

  13. Novel Aspects of the DESI Data Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufore, Lucas; Honscheid, Klaus; Elliott, Ann; Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion of the universe. It will obtain optical spectra for tens of millions of galaxies and quasars, constructing a 3-dimensional map spanning the nearby universe to 10 billion light years. The survey will be conducted on the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory starting in 2018. In order to achieve these scientific goals the DESI collaboration is building a high throughput spectrograph capable of observing thousands of spectra simultaneously. In this presentation we discuss the DESI instrument control and data acquisition system that is currently being developed to operate the 5,000 fiber positioners in the focal plane, the 10 spectrographs each with three CDD cameras and every other aspect of the instrument. Special emphasis will be given to novel aspects of the design including the use of inexpensive Linux-based microcontrollers such as the Raspberry PI to control a number of DESI hardware components.

  14. The 22nd annual prostate cancer foundation scientific retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2016-09-01

    The 22nd Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was convened in Washington, D.C. from October 8 to 10, 2015. This event is the foremost scientific conference in the world focusing on basic, translational, and clinical prostate cancer research with the highest potential for accelerating the understanding of prostate cancer biology and improving the lives and outcomes of prostate cancer patients. Topics highlighted during the 2015 Retreat included: (i) new strategies and treatments for localized high-risk, hormone-naïve, oligometastatic, castrate-resistant, and treatment-refractory prostate cancer settings; (ii) the biology and genomics of tumor heterogeneity and tumor evolution; (iii) new understandings on the mechanisms and targeting of oncogenic drivers of prostate cancer; (iv) bioengineering of novel therapies and drug delivery methods; (v) innovative approaches to tumor immunotherapy; (vi) emerging molecular imaging technologies with improved sensitivity and specificity; and (vii) advancements in prognostic and predictive biomarkers and precision medicine strategies. Prostate 76:1037-1052, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27272144

  15. Highlights from the scientific and educational abstracts presented at the ASER 2015 annual scientific meeting and postgraduate course.

    PubMed

    Myers, Lee A; Herr, Keith D

    2016-06-01

    The American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) 2015 Annual Scientific Meeting and Postgraduate Course offered dedicated learning sessions, oral presentations, and digital exhibits on a broad spectrum of topics in emergency radiology, including traumatic and non-traumatic emergencies, quality, communication, education, technological innovations, and the evolving identity of the emergency radiology subspecialty. This article highlights the scientific and educational abstracts presented at the meeting. PMID:26884403

  16. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ayanna U.; Talaty, Nari; Cooks, R G; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  17. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

    2008-10-23

    This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

  18. The DESI Wide Field Corrector Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Doel, Peter; Sholl, Michael J.; Liang, Ming; Brooks, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Gutierrez, Gaston; Kent, Stephen; Lampton, Michael; Miller, Timothy; Sprayberry, David

    2014-01-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic instrument (DESI) is a 5000 fiber multi-object spectrometer system under development for installation on the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Kitt Peak 4m telescope (the Mayall telescope). DESI is designed to perform a 14,000˚ (square) galaxy and Quasi-Stellar Object (QSO) redshift survey to improve estimates of the dark energy equation of state. The survey design imposes numerous constraints on a prime focus corrector design, including field of view, geometrical blur, stability, fiber injection efficiency, zenith angle, mass and cost. The DESI baseline wide-field optical design described herein provides a 3.2˚ diameter field of view with six 0.8- 1.14m diameter lenses and an integral atmospheric dispersion compensator.

  19. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Annual Report: Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E

    2005-02-07

    Large-scale scientific computation and all of the disciplines that support and help to validate it have been placed at the focus of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) initiative of the Office of Science of the Department of Energy (DOE). The maturation of computational simulation as a tool of scientific and engineering research is underscored in the November 2004 statement of the Secretary of Energy that, ''high performance computing is the backbone of the nation's science and technology enterprise''. LLNL operates several of the world's most powerful computers--including today's single most powerful--and has undertaken some of the largest and most compute-intensive simulations ever performed. Ultrascale simulation has been identified as one of the highest priorities in DOE's facilities planning for the next two decades. However, computers at architectural extremes are notoriously difficult to use efficiently. Furthermore, each successful terascale simulation only points out the need for much better ways of interacting with the resulting avalanche of data. Advances in scientific computing research have, therefore, never been more vital to LLNL's core missions than at present. Computational science is evolving so rapidly along every one of its research fronts that to remain on the leading edge, LLNL must engage researchers at many academic centers of excellence. In Fiscal Year 2004, the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) served as one of LLNL's main bridges to the academic community with a program of collaborative subcontracts, visiting faculty, student internships, workshops, and an active seminar series. The ISCR identifies researchers from the academic community for computer science and computational science collaborations with LLNL and hosts them for short- and

  20. The New Hyperspectral Sensor Desis on the Multi-Payload Platform Muses Installed on the Iss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R.; Avbelj, J.; Carmona, E.; Eckardt, A.; Gerasch, B.; Graham, L.; Günther, B.; Heiden, U.; Ickes, J.; Kerr, G.; Knodt, U.; Krutz, D.; Krawczyk, H.; Makarau, A.; Miller, R.; Perkins, R.; Walter, I.

    2016-06-01

    The new hyperspectral instrument DLR Earth Sensing Imaging Spectrometer (DESIS) will be developed and integrated in the Multi-User-System for Earth Sensing (MUSES) platform installed on the International Space Station (ISS). The DESIS instrument will be launched to the ISS mid of 2017 and robotically installed in one of the four slots of the MUSES platform. After a four month commissioning phase the operational phase will last at least until 2020. The MUSES / DESIS system will be commanded and operated by the publically traded company TBE (Teledyne Brown Engineering), which initiated the whole program. TBE provides the MUSES platform and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops the instrument DESIS and establishes a Ground Segment for processing, archiving, delivering and calibration of the image data mainly used for scientific and humanitarian applications. Well calibrated and harmonized products will be generated together with the Ground Segment established at Teledyne. The article describes the Space Segment consisting of the MUSES platform and the instrument DESIS as well as the activities at the two (synchronized) Ground Segments consisting of the processing methods, product generation, data calibration and product validation. Finally comments to the data policy are given.

  1. ACP research and scientific coordination: Annual performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.

    1992-09-17

    This research grant addresses two primary objectives: 1. Conduct of specific research tasks under the DOE Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP), and 2. Provision of scientific coordination for the Atmospheric Chemistry Program. In summary, the project is progressing essentially as expected, with some minor exceptions. Higher than anticipated demands within Objective 2, associated primarily with the ACP Ozone Project and the recompetition of the National Laboratories protion of ACP, have resulted in a somewhat higher proportionate emphasis on the coordination activities associated with this objective. Also, the immediate need for pre-campaign modeling of the North Pacific has resulted in an acceleration of the Pacific modeling task relative to other tasks, particularly the Atlantic modeling task. Modeling activities in general have been delayed somewhat because of the noted Objective 2 demands and because of the extended time that was necessary to complete financial agreements for this grant.

  2. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R; Bodtker, L K

    2003-03-11

    The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is jointly administered by the Computing Applications and Research Department (CAR) and the University Relations Program (URP), and this joint relationship expresses its mission. An extensively externally networked ISCR cost-effectively expands the level and scope of national computational science expertise available to the Laboratory through CAR. The URP, with its infrastructure for managing six institutes and numerous educational programs at LLNL, assumes much of the logistical burden that is unavoidable in bridging the Laboratory's internal computational research environment with that of the academic community. As large-scale simulations on the parallel platforms of DOE's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) become increasingly important to the overall mission of LLNL, the role of the ISCR expands in importance, accordingly. Relying primarily on non-permanent staffing, the ISCR complements Laboratory research in areas of the computer and information sciences that are needed at the frontier of Laboratory missions. The ISCR strives to be the ''eyes and ears'' of the Laboratory in the computer and information sciences, in keeping the Laboratory aware of and connected to important external advances. It also attempts to be ''feet and hands, in carrying those advances into the Laboratory and incorporating them into practice. In addition to conducting research, the ISCR provides continuing education opportunities to Laboratory personnel, in the form of on-site workshops taught by experts on novel software or hardware technologies. The ISCR also seeks to influence the research community external to the Laboratory to pursue Laboratory-related interests and to train the workforce that will be required by the Laboratory. Part of the performance of this function is interpreting to the external community appropriate (unclassified) aspects of the Laboratory's own contributions

  3. Large Grain Superconducting RF Cavities at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Brinkmann, A.; Ermakov, A.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Matheisen, A.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Singer, X.; Spiwek, M.; Wen, H.; Brokmeier, H. G.

    2007-08-09

    The DESY R and D program on cavities fabricated from large grain niobium explores the potential of this material for the production of approx. 1000 nine-cell cavities for the European XFEL. The program investigates basic material properties, comparing large grain material to standard sheet niobium, as well as fabrication and preparation aspects. Several single-cell cavities of TESLA shape have been fabricated from large grain niobium. A gradient up to 41 MV/m at Q0 = 1.4{center_dot}1010 (TB = 2K) was measured after electropolishing. The first three large grain nine-cell cavities worldwide have been produced under contract of DESY with ACCEL Instruments Co. The first tests have shown that all three cavities reach an accelerating gradient up to 30 MV/m after BCP (Buffered Chemical Polishing) treatment, what exceeds the XFEL requirements for RF test in the vertical cryostat.

  4. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and Professional Employees. 630.301 Section 630.301 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Annual Leave § 630.301 Annual leave...

  5. British Society for Haematology, Slide session, Annual Scientific Meeting, Bournemouth, 2007.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, M; Braithwaite, J; Burthem, J; Crotty, G; Gibson, B; Hutchinson, C; Jackson, G H; Layton, M; Lucas, G; Macartney, C; Matthey, F; Pardoe, L; Radia, D; Webb, S

    2008-04-01

    Eight cases discussed by experts at the 2007 Annual Scientific Meeting of the British Society of Haematology are presented as at the meeting, with a discussion of the morphological features, digital information and differential diagnosis being followed by further information and a final diagnosis. Additionally, digital slides of two of the cases were available to be viewed by the internet with the opportunity for delegates to suggest diagnoses. PMID:18284418

  6. Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year’s meeting. PMID:23870663

  7. The NAF: National analysis facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, Andreas; Kemp, Yves

    2010-04-01

    Within the framework of a broad collaboration among German particle physicists, the strategic Helmholtz Alliance "Physics a the Terascale", an analysis facility has been set up at DESY. The facility is intended to provide the best possible analysis infrastructure for researches of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ILC experiments and also for theory researchers. In a first part of the contribution, we will present the concept of the NAF and its place in the existing distributed grid landscape of the experiments. In a second part, the building blocks of the NAF will be detailed with an emphasis on technical implementations of some parts: - Usage of VOMS for separating grid resources between collaboration-wide and NAF-specific resources. - interactive and batch cluster and integration with PROOF. - usage of grid proxies to access work group servers and AFS. - the usage and operation of Lustre for fast data access. A special focus is the seamless integration of the facility into the two geographically separated DESY sites and its implications. In a third part, the experience of running the facility for one year will be reported.

  8. Hydroforming of Tesla Cavities at Desy

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; H. Kaiser; X. Singer; I. Gonin; I. Zhelezov; T. Khabibullin; P. Kneisel; K. Saito

    2000-07-01

    Since several years the development of seamless niobium cavity fabrication by hydro forming is being pursued at DESY. This technique offers the possibility of lower cost of fabrication and perhaps better rf performance of the cavities because of the elimination of electron-beam welds, which in the standard fabrication technique have sometimes lead to inferior cavity performance due to defects. Several single cell 1300 MHz cavities have been formed from high purity seamless niobium tubes, which are under computer control expanded with internal pressure while simultaneously being swaged axially. The seamless tubes have been made by either back extrusion and flow forming or by spinning or deep drawing. Standard surface treatment techniques such as high temperature post purification, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), electropolishing (EP) and high pressure ultra pure water rinsing (HPR) have been applied to these cavities. The cavities exhibited high Q - values of 2 x 10{sup 10} at 2K and residual resistances as low as 3 n{Omega} after the removal of a surface layer of app. 100 {micro}m by BCP. Surprisingly, even at high gradients up to the maximum measured values of E{sub acc} {approx} 33 MV/m the Q-value did not decrease in the absence of field emission as often observed. After electropolishing of additional 100 {micro}m one of the cavities reached an accelerating gradient of E{sub acc} {ge} 42 MV/m.

  9. Teaming Up for Women's Health: The 2015 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting.

    PubMed

    Breitkopf, Daniel M; Demosthenes, Lauren D; Phelan, Sharon T

    2015-11-01

    63rd Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 2-6 May, 2015, San Francisco, CA, USA. In response to major practice changes in obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN), the 2015 Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists responded with modification of the program organization, methods of presenting the information (debates, hands on, flip classrooms) and increased emphasis on current clinical research. The Presidential Program covered broad themes of changes in healthcare technology, teamwork in OB/GYN practice and the importance of advocating for patients. Over 400 abstracts representing a broad range of clinical and basic science research were presented. Changes in the Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting should allow the membership to be more prepared and pro-active as the practice of OB/GYN evolves. PMID:26618933

  10. Scientific overview: CSCI-CITAC annual general meeting and young investigator's forum 2011.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Farzad; Schmidt, Anna R; Belrose, Jillian C

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, members of the Clinician Investigator Trainee Association of Canada - Association des cliniciens-chercheurs en formation du Canada (CITAC-ACCFC) and the Canadian Society for Clinician Investigators (CSCI) held a joint Annual General Meeting (AGM) and Young Investigator Forum (YIF) September 12-14 in Ottawa, ON, Canada. The theme of the meeting was "The Role of Government and Regulatory Organizations in Shaping the Environment of the Clinician Scientist". The meeting was well attended by established clinician scientists and clinician investigator trainees from across Canada. The aim of this scientific overview is to highlight the research presented by trainees at both the oral plenary session as well as the poster presentation sessions of this meeting. This work covers a wide variety of medical disciplines, focusing on translational medicine, from the basic sciences to clinical application. PMID:23374600

  11. Prostate cancer: what did we learn from the 2012 Annual Scientific Meeting of ASCO?

    PubMed

    Burgess, Earle F; Raghavan, Derek

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, management of prostate cancer has benefited from an expanding array of new pharmacological options that are the result, in part, of an increased understanding of, and ability to target, androgen signaling. Further characterization of additional molecular pathways relevant to prostate cancer tumorigenesis has identified new molecular targets in prostate cancer that may be amenable to therapeutic intervention with novel agents. In addition, novel radioisotope therapies and cytotoxic agents have shown significant anticancer efficacy with manageable patterns of toxicity, and will eventually have to be integrated into our algorithms of therapy. This review summarizes recent findings in clinical prostate cancer research reported at the 2012 Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and addresses their relevance to clinical practice. PMID:23413606

  12. Abstracts for the ninth annual scientific conference of the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) association

    SciTech Connect

    Fernhoff, P.M.

    1996-03-29

    The Ninth Annual Scientific Conference of the Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) Association (USA) met in Atlanta on July 20, 1994. The 17 papers which were presented ranged from those which explored the molecular origins of PWS to those that studied the most effective medical, behavioral, and nutritional management of affected children and adults. Several important messages emerged. The first was that although most patients with PWS have an interstitial deletion of 15q11q13 of paternal origin, and a smaller percentage of patients have maternal disomy, there can be several other morphologic alterations of chromosome 15 which cause PWS. As our understanding of these changes at the molecular level improves, we will better understand the nature of these unusual rearrangements. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Tenth annual scientific conference of the Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA), July 19, 1995, Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, V.A.; Hudgins, L.; Cassidy, S.B. |

    1996-09-06

    Each year for the last 10 years, scientists conducting research on Prader-Willi syndrome have come together to exchange information during a scientific conference held in conjunction with the annual Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA) meeting. Presentations based on submitted abstracts encompass such varied fields as genetics, endocrinology, pediatrics, nutrition, psychology, psychiatry, and education. This year`s scientific conference was held in Seattle, Washington, on July 19, 1995, in conjunction with the 14th PWSA (USA) meeting held July 20-23. Seventeen reports were presented at the scientific meeting, the abstracts of which follow.

  14. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... system established under 5 U.S.C. chapter 43 and 5 CFR part 430, subparts B and C, or other applicable... subject to 5 U.S.C. 5383; or (2) Holds a senior-level (SL) or scientific or professional (ST) position... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Annual leave accrual and...

  15. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... system established under 5 U.S.C. chapter 43 and 5 CFR part 430, subparts B and C, or other applicable... subject to 5 U.S.C. 5383; or (2) Holds a senior-level (SL) or scientific or professional (ST) position... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual leave accrual and...

  16. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... system established under 5 U.S.C. chapter 43 and 5 CFR part 430, subparts B and C, or other applicable... subject to 5 U.S.C. 5383; or (2) Holds a senior-level (SL) or scientific or professional (ST) position... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Annual leave accrual and...

  17. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... system established under 5 U.S.C. chapter 43 and 5 CFR part 430, subparts B and C, or other applicable... subject to 5 U.S.C. 5383; or (2) Holds a senior-level (SL) or scientific or professional (ST) position... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annual leave accrual and...

  18. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI): The NOAO DECam Legacy Imaging Survey and DESI Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, David J.; Blum, Robert D.; Castander, Francisco Javier; Dey, Arjun; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Foucaud, Sebastien; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David; Lang, Dustin; Levi, Michael; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam D.; Newman, Jeffrey; Nord, Brian; Nugent, Peter E.; Patej, Anna; Reil, Kevin; Rudnick, Gregory; Rykoff, Eli S.; Ford Schlafly, Eddie; Stark, Casey; Valdes, Francisco; Walker, Alistair R.; Weaver, Benjamin; DECam Legacy Survey Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The DECam Legacy Survey will conduct a 3-band imaging survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) extragalactic footprint. The Dark Energy Camera (DECam) will be used to image the 6700 square degree footprint overlapping SDSS in the region -20 < Dec < +30 deg, to depths of g=24.7, r=23.9, z=23.0. The survey will be conducted from Fall 2014 through Spring 2017, with periodic data releases beginning in March 2015. These releases will include catalogs constructed with the Tractor-based multi-wavelength forced photometry applied to the DECam and WISE satellite data.The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will observe 24 million galaxies and quasars in a 14,000 square degree extragalactic footprint. The targeting in that footprint will be provided by a combination of these DECam data, the MOSAIC camera on the Mayall 4-meter, and the 90Prime camera on the Bok Telescope.

  19. The 1992 annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In 1992 the Santa Fe Institute hosted more than 100 short- and long-term research visitors who conducted a total of 212 person-months of residential research in complex systems. To date this 1992 work has resulted in more than 50 SFI Working Papers and nearly 150 publications in the scientific literature. The Institute's book series in the sciences of complexity continues to grow, now numbering more than 20 volumes. The fifth annual complex systems summer school brought nearly 60 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to Santa Fe for an intensive introduction to the field. Research on complex systems - the focus of work at SFI - involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex adaptive behavior range upwards from DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complex behavior include spin glasses, cellular automata, and genetic algorithms. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simple components; (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, and the Gross National Product (GNP) of an economy); and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions.

  20. 1992 annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In 1992 the Santa Fe Institute hosted more than 100 short- and long-term research visitors who conducted a total of 212 person-months of residential research in complex systems. To date this 1992 work has resulted in more than 50 SFI Working Papers and nearly 150 publications in the scientific literature. The Institute`s book series in the sciences of complexity continues to grow, now numbering more than 20 volumes. The fifth annual complex systems summer school brought nearly 60 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to Santa Fe for an intensive introduction to the field. Research on complex systems-the focus of work at SFI-involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex adaptive behavior range upwards from DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complex behavior include spin glasses, cellular automata, and genetic algorithms. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simple components; (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy); and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions.

  1. Overview of the 78th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The 78(th)Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society was held in Tokyo on March 21-23, 2014. The main theme was "Cardiology in the Information Era: From Bench to Community". Because of technological advancements, including computer networking, a vast amount of information from basic and clinical research is being generated in a short time period. This information has great potential to contribute to human health, and some of the results are presented. However, we must remain vigilant, for there are many risks inherent in information generation. To ensure high-quality information, we need to obtain enough knowledge to focus on not only the medicine, but also ethics, and methodology. Moreover, we need to train the specialists, establish economic support, and create a regulatory framework. More than 15,000 people, including paramedical specialists, attended this meeting. The most popular sessions included those on "Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Aortic Stenosis", "Diabetes Mellitus", "Atrial Fibrillation", "Pulmonary Hypertension", and "Diuretics To Treat Heart Failure". Even in rather small sessions, attendees participated in discussion, identified opportunities to expand or start research, and were able to update their clinical knowledge. The meeting was successfully completed with a discussion of the future of cardiology. PMID:25109361

  2. Scientific overview: CSCI-CITAC annual general meeting and young investigator's forum 2010.

    PubMed

    Berger, Mike; Bosse, Dominick; Kuruvilla, M Sara; Lang, Pencilla; Murray, Jean-Christophe; Nguyen, Long Viet

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the annual general meeting of the Clinical Investigator Trainee Association of Canada - Association des cliniciens-chercheurs en formation du Canada (CITAC-ACCFC) and the Canadian Society for Clinician Investigators (CSCI) was held between September 20 and 22 in Ottawa. Several globally-renowned scientists, including this year's CSCI/Royal College Henry Friesen Award recipient, Dr. Paul Kubes, Distinguished Scientist Award recipient, Dr. Gideon Koren and Joe Doupe Young Investigator Award recipient, Dr. Torsten Neil, discussed a variety of topics relating to the role of technology in medicine. The meeting was well attended by clinician scientists and trainees from across Canada and offered trainees mentorship and networking opportunities in addition to showcasing their research at the young investigator forum. The aim of this scientific overview is to highlight the research presented by trainees at both the oral plenary session as well as the poster presentation sessions of this meeting. Similar to last year's meeting [1], research questions being investigated by trainees covered the spectrum of medical disciplines, encompassing both basic science as well as clinical areas, and are summarized below. PMID:21463544

  3. Scientific overview: CSCI - CITAC Annual General Meeting and Young Investigator's Forum 2012.

    PubMed

    Antoun, Ghadi; Ram, Véronique D; Wang, Xin; Wilcox, Jared T; Yoon, Ju-Yoon

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, the Annual General Meeting of the Clinical Investigator Trainee Association of Canada - Association des cliniciens-chercheurs en formation du Canada (CITAC - ACCFC) and the Canadian Society of Clinician Investigators (CSCI) was held 19-21 September in Ottawa. Several globally-renowned scientists, including 2012 Friesen International Prize recipient, Dr. Marc Tessier-Lavigne, the CSCI/Royal College Henry Friesen Award recipient, Dr. Morley Hollenberg, and the recipient of the Joe Doupe Young Investigator Award, Dr. Phillip Awadalla, presented on a range of topics on research in basic and translational science in medicine. This year's CITAC Symposium featured presentations by Dr. Alain Beaudet, Dr. Michael Strong and Dr. Vivek Goel on the Role of Physician Scientists in Public Health and Policy, which was followed by a lively discussion on the role of basic science and clinical research in patient-oriented policy development. This scientific overview highlights the research presented by trainees at both the oral plenary and poster presentation sessions. As at previous meetings, research questions investigated by this year's trainees span multiple medical disciplines; from basic science to clinical research to medical education. Below is a summary of the presentations showcased at the Young Investigator's Forum. PMID:24088329

  4. Scientific overview: CSCI-CITAC Annual General Meeting and Young Investigators' Forum 2014.

    PubMed

    Keow, Jonathan; Zhao, Eric; Samuel, Nardin; Dey, Ayan; Schneider, Raphael; Chen, Michael; Wang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Society of Clinician Investigators (CSCI) and Clinical Investigator Trainee Association of Canada/Association des cliniciens-chercheurs en formation du Canada (CITAC/ACCFC) annual general meeting (AGM) was held in Toronto during November 21-24, 2015 for the first time in conjunction with the University of Toronto Clinician-Investigator Program Research Day. The overall theme for this year's meeting was the role of mentorship in career development, with presentations from Dr. Chaim Bell (University of Toronto), Dr. Shurjeel Choudhri (Bayer Healthcare), Dr. Ken Croitoru (University of Toronto), Dr. Astrid Guttman (University of Toronto), Dr. Prabhat Jha (University of Toronto) and Dr. Sheila Singh (McMaster University). The keynote speakers of the 2014 AGM included Dr. Qutayba Hamid, who was presented with the Distinguished Scientist Award, Dr. Ravi Retnakaran, who was presented with the Joe Doupe Award, and Dr. Lorne Babiuk, who was the CSCI-RCPSC Henry Friesen Award winner. The highlight of the conference was, once again, the outstanding scientific presentations from the numerous clinician investigator (CI) trainees from across the country who presented at the Young Investigators' Forum. Their research topics spanned the diverse fields of science and medicine, ranging from basic science to cutting-edge translational research, and their work has been summarized in this review. Over 120 abstracts were presented at this year's meeting. This work was presented during two poster sessions, with the six most outstanding submitted abstracts presented in the form of oral presentations during the President's Forum. PMID:26278424

  5. Coupling of Ultrafast LC with Mass Spectrometry by DESI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Chen, Hao

    2014-10-01

    Recently we reported a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) interface to combine liquid chromatography (LC) with mass spectrometry (MS) using a new LC eluent splitting strategy through a tiny orifice on LC capillary tube [ J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 286 (2014)]. The interface introduces negligible dead volume and back pressure, thereby allowing "near real-time" MS detection, fast LC elution, and online MS-directed purification. This study further evaluates the LC/DESI-MS performance with focus of using ultra-fast LC. Using a monolithic C18 column, metabolites in urine can be separated within 1.6 min and can be online collected for subsequent structure elucidation (e.g., by NMR, UV, IR) in a recovery yield up to 99%. Using a spray solvent with alkaline pH, negative ions could be directly generated for acidic analytes (e.g., ibuprofen) in acidic LC eluent by DESI, offering a novel protocol to realize "wrong-way around" ionization for LC/MS analysis. In addition, DESI-MS is found to be compatible with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) for the first time.

  6. Annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1997. A report by the Scientific Advisory Board of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Annual report number 6

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Section 2904(h) of Title 10, United States Code, requires that an annual report of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) be submitted to Congress no later than March 15 of each year. The Annual Report is required to describe the actions of the SAB during the preceding year and to provide any recommendations, including recommendations related to projects, programs, information exchange, and additional legislation within the scope of SERDP. This is the sixth Annual Report of the SERDP SAB and includes SAB activities and Program recommendations during FY97. Specifically, SERDP should focus on research that is: essential for the solution of major defense mission-readiness related problems; scientifically plausible; focused on areas where progress under other program sponsorship in DoD and/or other agencies is not sufficient or satisfactory; catalytic in nature to initiate, organize, and accelerate essential research in partnership with the Federal and private sector; and provides sufficient proof-of-principle demonstrations to attract follow-on Research Development Test and Engineering (RDT and E) support.

  7. National Society of Black Physicists XXV Annual Day of Scientific Lectures and 21st Annual Meeting - NSBP '98: The Next Generation/12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students - NCPBS '98: Physics/Life in Motion

    SciTech Connect

    MacKellar, Alan

    1999-02-28

    The 12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students (NCBPS) was held jointly with the Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) March 4-8, 1998 in Lexington, Ky. The Proceedings consists of scientific talks and abstracts given by NSBP members and students attending the NCBPS meeting. One joint session of general scientific interest was held, with NCBPS students, NSBP members, and about 75 high school students from the state of Kentucky present. NCBPS session included ''How to get into Graduate School'', ''How to Survive in Graduate School'', and a Panel on ''Opportunities for Physics Graduates.'' The report by AIP: ''Survey of Participants of the 12th Annual NCBPS'' is included in the Proceedings.

  8. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (16th, Rochester, New York, October 12-14, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Laurie Schultz, Ed.

    Based on the theme of recruiting, tenuring, and promoting technical communication faculty, this proceedings presents the agenda for the 1989 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC), a report on the annual business meeting, and a proposal to create a CPTSC Program Review Board. Appendixes present…

  9. Modulators for the S-band test linac at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, M.; Choroba, S.; Hameister, J.; Lewin, H.

    1995-07-05

    The development of adequate modulators for high peak power klystrons is one of the focus points for linear collider R&D programs. For the DESY/THD S-band linear collider study 150 MW rf-pulse power at 50 Hz repetition rate and 3 {mu}s pulse duration is required [1]. Two different modulator schemes are under investigation. One is the conventional line type pulser, using a pulse forming network and a step up transformer, the other one is a hard tube pulser, using a dc power source at the full klystron voltage and a switch tube. This paper is focused on the modulator development for the S-band Test Linac at DESY. After a short overview over the test linac and a brief description of the 150 MW S-band klystron the circuitry of the line type pulse (LTP) is given. A hard tube pulser (HTP), which switches the high voltage directly from a storage capacitor to the klystron, has been built up at DESY. Circuitry and the results of the commissioning of the switch tube are reported. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Highlights of the annual scientific meeting of the 22nd congress of the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology (ESSR) 2015.

    PubMed

    Sellon, E; Grainger, A J; Robinson, P

    2016-01-01

    The meeting included a larger-than-usual number of scientific presentations covering a wide range of MSK topics, with new information related to imaging findings, imaging techniques, and interventional procedures. A large number of electronic posters were also available for review by the meeting participants, significantly adding to the educational content of the meeting. These are still available for review on the EPOS database via the ESSR website. The 23rd annual congress of the ESSR will be held in Zurich on June 9-11, 2016 where the main topic will be the knee and ankle. PMID:26385784

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (24th, Austin, Texas, October 16-18, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication.

    Based on the theme of connections in technical and scientific communication, this proceedings presents 47 papers delivered at the 1997 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into 10 sections: (1) Theoretical Connections; (2) Legal and Ethical Connections;…

  12. An Evaluation of the North Carolina Annual Report on School Violence: Scientific Realism in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, William L.; Stacey, Dennis

    To analyze perceptions of what constitutes a safe school. different perceptions of what constitutes a safe school, an assessment of the first 4 years of North Carolina's Annual Report on School Violence (ARSV) is reported here. The ARSV is a collection of data on specific acts of violence occurring on school property. Data on acts of violence were…

  13. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D; McGraw, J

    2004-02-12

    The University Relations Program (URP) encourages collaborative research between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California campuses. The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) actively participates in such collaborative research, and this report details the Fiscal Year 2003 projects jointly served by URP and ISCR.

  14. 1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report provides a summary of many of the research projects completed by the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) during 1993. These research efforts continue to focus on two general areas: the study of, and search for, underlying scientific principles governing complex adaptive systems, and the exploration of new theories of computation that incorporate natural mechanisms of adaptation (mutation, genetics, evolution).

  15. Deep inelastic events containing two forward jets at DESY HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Kwiecinski, J.; Lewis, C.A.; Martin, A.D.

    1998-01-01

    We use the Balitskij-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov (BFKL) equation to calculate the rate of deep inelastic scattering events containing two forward jets (adjacent to the proton remnants) at DESY HERA. We compare the production of two forward jets with that of only one forward jet (the {open_quotes}Mueller{close_quotes} process). We obtain a stable prediction for this two to one jet ratio, which may serve as a measure of the BFKL vertex function. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

  17. Seventy sixth scientific assembly and annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The RSNA Program Committee has again assembled a fine selection of scientific paper presentations from the over 2,800 abstracts that were submitted this year. The final program offers a total of 1,130 papers in 12 subspecialties and divided among the nine time slots during the week. The subspecialties covered are: Cardiovascular Radiology; Gastrointestinal Radiology; General Radiology; Genitourinary Radiology; Neuroradiology/Head and Neck; Nuclear Medicine; Pediatric Radiology; Physics; Musculoskeletal Radiology; Therapeutic Radiology and Radiobiology and Ultrasound.

  18. The European XFEL Free Electron Laser at DESY

    ScienceCinema

    Weise, Hans [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Germany

    2009-09-01

    The European X-ray Free-Electron laser Facility (XFEL) is going to be built in an international collaboration at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Germany, and the Technical Design Report was published in 2006. The official project is expected for summer 2007. This new facility will offer photon beams at wavelengths as short as 1 angstrom with highest peak brilliance being more than 100 million times higher than present day synchrotron radiation sources. The radiation has a high degree of transverse coherence and the pulse duration is reduced from {approx}100 picoseconds (typ. for SR light sources) down to the {approx}10 femtosecond time domain. The overall layout of the XFEL will be described. This includes the envisaged operation parameters for the linear accelerator using superconducting TESLA technology. The complete design is based on the actually operated FLASH free-electron laser at DESY. Experience with the operation during first long user runs at wavelengths from 30 to 13 nm will be described in detail.

  19. Annual review of selected dental literature: report of the Committee on Scientific Investigation of the American Academy of Restorative Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jendresen, M D; Allen, E P; Bayne, S C; Donovan, T E; Hansson, T L; Klooster, J; Preston, J D

    1993-07-01

    The annual review of selected dental literature this year cites 384 published papers and reports. This year's review contains more editorial comment than reviews of years passed. New data on the biological responses to materials is emphasized in several sections. Observations on new compounds able to prevent plaque formation are presented. Clinically relevant advances in knowledge concerning the etching of different tooth structures are reported along with the effect of etching procedures on the dental pulp. Evaluation of periodontal diseases in all age groups is a topic. Limitations of current diagnostic techniques in periodontal disease, temporomandibular disorders, and implant therapy are included. There are new views on the use of dental amalgam. The future use of dental mercury is predicted. Interest in new ceramic systems is indicated as the demand for esthetics continues. Clinical information is emphasized over scientific information throughout this year's review. PMID:8366458

  20. How to write research papers and grants: 2011 Asian Pacific Society for Respirology Annual Scientific Meeting Postgraduate Session.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Peter R; Naughton, Matthew T; Calverley, Peter; Zeng, Guangqiao; Beasley, Richard; Robinson, Bruce; Lee, Y C Gary

    2012-07-01

    This review article summarizes the content of a series of interrelated workshop presentations from the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology held in Shanghai in November, 2011. The article describes tips and strategies for writing research papers and research grant applications and includes discussion of: the role of pulmonologists in research; the debates around the use of the journal impact factor; tips for writing manuscripts and publishing research in high-impact journals; how journals assess manuscripts and the most common reasons editors reject manuscripts; how to write grant applications and what grant panels look for in successful proposals; and how to undertake research in resource-limited countries. PMID:22452595

  1. Institute for scientific computing research;fiscal year 1999 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D

    2000-03-28

    Large-scale scientific computation, and all of the disciplines that support it and help to validate it, have been placed at the focus of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The Laboratory operates the computer with the highest peak performance in the world and has undertaken some of the largest and most compute-intensive simulations ever performed. Computers at the architectural extremes, however, are notoriously difficult to use efficiently. Even such successes as the Laboratory's two Bell Prizes awarded in November 1999 only emphasize the need for much better ways of interacting with the results of large-scale simulations. Advances in scientific computing research have, therefore, never been more vital to the core missions of the Laboratory than at present. Computational science is evolving so rapidly along every one of its research fronts that to remain on the leading edge, the Laboratory must engage researchers at many academic centers of excellence. In FY 1999, the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) has expanded the Laboratory's bridge to the academic community in the form of collaborative subcontracts, visiting faculty, student internships, a workshop, and a very active seminar series. ISCR research participants are integrated almost seamlessly with the Laboratory's Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC), which, in turn, addresses computational challenges arising throughout the Laboratory. Administratively, the ISCR flourishes under the Laboratory's University Relations Program (URP). Together with the other four Institutes of the URP, it must navigate a course that allows the Laboratory to benefit from academic exchanges while preserving national security. Although FY 1999 brought more than its share of challenges to the operation of an academic-like research enterprise within the context of a national security laboratory, the results declare the challenges well met and well

  2. CPTSC 2001: Managing Change and Growth in Technical and Scientific Communication. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (28th, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 11-13, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maylath, Bruce, Ed.

    This proceedings presents 43 papers delivered at the 2001 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings include the following: "Act IV: On Being Less Invisible" (Bill Karis); "Building a Community of Professional Communicators by Mapping Needs and Assets" (Stuart Blythe);…

  3. Publication rates of manuscript presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Annual Scientific Conference between 1999 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2011-01-01

    Publication is the ultimate desired end point of scientific research. However, oral manuscript presentations of research studies are often referenced in textbooks, journal articles, and industry white papers, and, as a result, influence treatment care plans. No data exist for the actual publication rate of podiatric foot and ankle surgery oral manuscript presentations. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the actual publication rates of oral manuscript presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) Annual Scientific Conference over 10 years. Print or electronic media for the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference official program between 1999 and 2008 were obtained. Each year's official program was hand searched for any oral manuscript presentation, and, when identified, the title and authors were individually searched through electronic internet-based search engines to determine whether an oral manuscript presentation had been followed by publication of a full-text article. Additionally, pertinent journals were hand searched for potential articles. A total of 67.5% (139/206) oral manuscript presentations were ultimately published in 1 of 12 medical journals in a mean of 14.5 months. All journals except one (91.7%) represented peer-reviewed journals. The publication rate of oral manuscript presentations at the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference is similar to or greater than orthopaedic subspecialties, including foot and ankle surgery, publication rates. Based on the above, attendees of the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference should be aware that the majority of oral manuscript material presented at the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference can be considered as accurate because they survive the rigors of the peer-review process more than two thirds of the time. PMID:21549618

  4. A first calibration study for PINGU at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Shanidze, R.; Collaboration: IceCube-PINGU Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    PINGU, the Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade, aims at lowering the neutrino detection threshold of the IceCube neutrino telescope to a few GeV by adding new in-fill strings to the existing IceCube/DeepCore array. The main goal of the upgrade is to provide sensitivity to the neutrino mass hierarchy utilizing atmospheric neutrinos. Precision reconstruction of the neutrino direction and energy, which is a prerequisite for the determination of the mass hierarchy, requires accurate in-situ calibration and monitoring of the PINGU digital optical modules (PDOMs) and high-level control of systematic effects like those caused by uncertainties in the optical ice properties and sensitivity of the PDOM in ice. These proceedings present an early status of calibration studies for PINGU performed at DESY.

  5. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI): The Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelstein, Jerry; DESI Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will conduct a large-area galaxy and quasi-stellar object redshift survey from the Mayall Telescope. It includes of ten spectrographs each recording 500 simultaneous object spectra collected by 5,000 positioned optical fibers in the focal plane of an 8-square degree telescope corrector. The spectrographs use dichroic filters to divide light into three optical channels that together cover the 360 - 980 nm pass band with a spectral resolution of 2,000 to 5,100. Each channel includes a volume phase holographic grating (VPHG) and a 5-element camera that images spectra onto a cryostatic detector. We describe the spectrograph design and predicted performance and the production of the first spectrograph's optical elements.

  6. 1991 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    1991 was continued rapid growth for the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) as it broadened its interdisciplinary research into the organization, evolution and operation of complex systems and sought deeply the principles underlying their dynamic behavior. Research on complex systems--the focus of work at SFI--involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex behavior range upwards from proteins and DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complexity include nonlinear equations, spin glasses, cellular automata, genetic algorithms, classifier systems, and an array of other computational models. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simples components, (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy), and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions. The importance of understanding such systems in enormous: many of the most serious challenges facing humanity--e.g., environmental sustainability, economic stability, the control of disease--as well as many of the hardest scientific questions--e.g., protein folding, the distinction between self and non-self in the immune system, the nature of intelligence, the origin of life--require deep understanding of complex systems.

  7. 1991 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    1991 was continued rapid growth for the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) as it broadened its interdisciplinary research into the organization, evolution and operation of complex systems and sought deeply the principles underlying their dynamic behavior. Research on complex systems--the focus of work at SFI--involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex behavior range upwards from proteins and DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complexity include nonlinear equations, spin glasses, cellular automata, genetic algorithms, classifier systems, and an array of other computational models. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simples components, (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy), and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions. The importance of understanding such systems in enormous: many of the most serious challenges facing humanity--e.g., environmental sustainability, economic stability, the control of disease--as well as many of the hardest scientific questions--e.g., protein folding, the distinction between self and non-self in the immune system, the nature of intelligence, the origin of life--require deep understanding of complex systems.

  8. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (19th, Boise, Idaho, October 8-10, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riordan, Daniel G., Ed.

    Based on the theme of broadening the base of academic, industrial and professional connections, this proceedings presents papers delivered at the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into four sections: Models for Connecting Academia, Industries, and the…

  9. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (17th, San Diego, California, October 11-13, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zappen, James P., Ed.; Katz, Susan, Ed.

    Based on the theme of assessment, this proceedings presents papers and discussions from the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Three papers in the proceedings discussing curricula are: "Model(s) for Educating Professional Communicators" (Marilyn M. Cooper); "Summary of Discussion of…

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (14th, Orlando, Florida, October 7-9, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geonetta, Sam C., Ed.

    Based on the notion of "reaching out," this proceedings presents papers from the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication. Papers in the proceedings are: "Southern Tech's Technical Writing Certificate" (William S. Pfeiffer); "Reach Out and Quack Someone" (Daniel R. Jones); "Reaching Out: A Rationale for…

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (18th, Cincinnati, Ohio, October 10-12, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zappen, James P., Ed.; Katz, Susan, Ed.

    Based on the theme of issues, questions, and controversies in program development and review, this proceedings presents papers delivered at the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into four sections: Benchmarks for Quality: Developing Criteria for…

  12. Merits of online electrochemistry liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EC/LS DESI MS).

    PubMed

    Looi, Wen Donq; Brown, Blake; Chamand, Laura; Brajter-Toth, Anna

    2016-03-01

    A new online electrochemistry/liquid sample desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EC/LS DESI MS) system with a simple electrochemical thin-layer flow-through cell was developed and tested using N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPA) as a model probe. Although oxidation of DMPA is observed as a result of ionization of LS in positive ion mode LS DESI, application of voltage to the online electrochemical (EC) cell in EC/LS DESI MS increases yields of oxidation products. An advantage of LS DESI MS is its sensitivity in aqueous electrolyte solutions, which improves efficiency of electrochemical reactions in EC/LS DESI MS. In highly conductive low pH aqueous buffer solutions, oxidation efficiency is close to 100 %. EC/ESI MS typically requires mixed aqueous/organic solvents and low electrolyte concentrations for efficient ionization in MS, limiting efficiency of electrochemistry online with MS. Independently, the results verify higher electrochemical oxidation efficiency during positive mode ESI than during LS DESI. Graphical abstract Detection of DMPA oxidation in online electrochemical cell with EC/LS DESI MS. PMID:26886744

  13. Detecting Cheatgrass on the Colorado Plateau using Landsat data: A tutorial for the DESI software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.

    2011-01-01

    Invasive plant species disrupt native ecosystems and cause economic harm to public lands. In this report, an example of applying the Detection of Early Season Invasives software to mapping cheatgrass infestations is given. A discussion of each step of the DESI process is given, including selection of Landsat images. Tutorial data, covering a semi-arid area in southern Utah, are distributed with this report. Tips on deriving the inputs required to run DESI are provided. An approach for evaluating and adjusting detection parameters by examining interim products of DESI is discussed.

  14. Meeting Highlights of the 11th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, Los Angeles, February 1–3, 2008

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This paper features the most interesting presentations and discussions of the 2008 Annual Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, which were held in Los Angeles from February 1 to 3, 2008. With more than 1100 attendees, this was the largest of the SCMR meetings ever. Among this year's highlights were scientific reports on CMR-based risk assessment, non-contrast tissue characterization, 3 T data, and interventional CMR. PMID:19128420

  15. Proceedings of the 24th Day of Scientific lectures and 20th Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.H; Carwell, H.V.

    1999-11-29

    The National Society of Black Physicists will hold its Twentieth annual meeting and its XXIIII Day of Scientific Lectures at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on March 27th - 30th, 1997. The meeting provides a major opportunity for African American physicists and students to present their current research and discuss issues germane to the constituency. It is therefore crucial to have the broadest cross-section of the membership at each meeting. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was chosen as the site of the 20th annual meeting because of its historical significance to Physics (being one of the first national laboratories in the United States) and the laboratories continuing support of the goals and objectives of the society.

  16. Data preservation for the HERA experiments at DESY using dCache technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krücker, Dirk; Schwank, Karsten; Fuhrmann, Patrick; Lewendel, Birgit; South, David M.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the status of the data preservation project at DESY for the HERA experiments and present the latest design of the storage which is a central element for bit- preservation. The HEP experiments based at the HERA accelerator at DESY collected large and unique datasets during the period from 1992 to 2007. As part of the ongoing DPHEP data preservation efforts at DESY, these datasets must be transferred into storage systems that keep the data available for ongoing studies and guarantee safe long term access. To achieve a high level of reliability, we use the dCache distributed storage solution and make use of its replication capabilities and tape interfaces. We also investigate a recently introduced Small File Service that allows for the fully automatic creation of tape friendly container files.

  17. Level of clinical evidence presented at the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy Annual Scientific Meeting over 5 years (2010-2014).

    PubMed

    Kay, Jeffrey; de Sa, Darren; Shallow, Scott; Simunovic, Nicole; Safran, Marc R; Philippon, Marc J; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2015-12-01

    The International Society for Hip Arthroscopy (ISHA) Annual Scientific Meeting is at the forefront of informing today's orthopaedic surgeons and society of the rapid advances in the exponentially growing field of hip arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and observe any trends in the level of clinical evidence in the papers and posters presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meeting from 2010 to 2014. The online abstracts of the paper and poster presentations presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meetings were independently evaluated by two reviewers (582 total resulting presentations). Two reviewers screened these results for clinical studies and graded the quality of evidence from level I (i.e. randomized trials) to IV (i.e. case series) based on the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons classification system. Four hundred and twenty-eight presentations met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Overall, 10.1% of the presentations were level I, 12.8% were level II, 30.1% were level III and 47.0% were level IV evidence. Over time, from 2010 to 2014, we observed an increase in the percentage of level II paper presentations, an increase in the proportion of level III poster presentations, and a decrease in the proportion of both level IV paper and poster presentations. Significant non-random improvement in the level of evidence presented was noted for the poster presentations (P = 0.012) but not for the paper presentations (P = 0.61) over the study period. Statistical trends demonstrate ISHA's increased awareness and commitment to presenting higher quality evidence as the availability of this evidence increases. PMID:27011857

  18. Level of clinical evidence presented at the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy Annual Scientific Meeting over 5 years (2010–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Jeffrey; de SA, Darren; Shallow, Scott; Simunovic, Nicole; Safran, Marc R.; Philippon, Marc J.; Ayeni, Olufemi R.

    2015-01-01

    The International Society for Hip Arthroscopy (ISHA) Annual Scientific Meeting is at the forefront of informing today’s orthopaedic surgeons and society of the rapid advances in the exponentially growing field of hip arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and observe any trends in the level of clinical evidence in the papers and posters presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meeting from 2010 to 2014. The online abstracts of the paper and poster presentations presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meetings were independently evaluated by two reviewers (582 total resulting presentations). Two reviewers screened these results for clinical studies and graded the quality of evidence from level I (i.e. randomized trials) to IV (i.e. case series) based on the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons classification system. Four hundred and twenty-eight presentations met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Overall, 10.1% of the presentations were level I, 12.8% were level II, 30.1% were level III and 47.0% were level IV evidence. Over time, from 2010 to 2014, we observed an increase in the percentage of level II paper presentations, an increase in the proportion of level III poster presentations, and a decrease in the proportion of both level IV paper and poster presentations. Significant non-random improvement in the level of evidence presented was noted for the poster presentations (P = 0.012) but not for the paper presentations (P = 0.61) over the study period. Statistical trends demonstrate ISHA’s increased awareness and commitment to presenting higher quality evidence as the availability of this evidence increases. PMID:27011857

  19. The effect of electrospray solvent composition on desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) efficiency and spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Green, F M; Salter, T L; Gilmore, I S; Stokes, P; O'Connor, G

    2010-04-01

    In desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) the interaction between the electrospray and the surface is key to two important analytical parameters, the spatial resolution and the sensitivity. We evaluate the effect of the electrospray solvent type, organic solvent fraction with water, analyte solubility and substrate wettability on DESI erosion diameter and material transferral into useful ion signal. To do this five amino acids, glycine, alanine, valine, leucine and phenylalanine are prepared as thin films on three substrates, UV/ozone treated glass, glass and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Four different solvents, acetonitrile (ACN), methanol (MeOH), ethanol (EtOH) and propan-2-ol (IPA), are used with organic solvent fractions with water varying from 0.1 to 1. These model systems allow the solubility or wettability to be kept constant as other parameters are varied. Additionally, comparison with electrospray ionisation (ESI) allows effects of ionisation efficiency to be determined. It is shown that the DESI efficiency is linearly dependent on the solubility (for these materials at least) and for analytes with solubilities below 1.5 g kg(-1), additional strategies may be required for DESI to be effective. We show that the DESI erosion diameter improves linearly with organic solvent fraction, with an organic solvent fraction of 0.9 instead of 0.5 leading to a 2 fold improvement. Furthermore, this leads to a 35 fold increase in DESI efficiency, defined as the molecular ion yield per unit area. It is shown that these improvements correlate with smaller droplet sizes rather than surface wetting or ionisation. PMID:20349538

  20. Qualitative analysis of seized cocaine samples using desorption electrospray ionization- mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Stojanovska, Natasha; Tahtouh, Mark; Kelly, Tamsin; Beavis, Alison; Fu, Shanlin

    2015-05-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a useful technique for the qualitative analysis of compounds found in seized drug material. In this study, DESI-MS was utilized in the screening analysis of illicit cocaine samples. The technique was also applied to the geographical origin determination of these samples. The limit of detection was determined to be 24.3 µg (or 3.47 µg/mm(2) ) and the analysis time was less than 1 minute per sample. The intra-day and inter-day precision for the detection of cocaine was 11 % and 42 %, respectively; therefore the quantitative data provided by DESI-MS was limited in its use for accurate determination of cocaine concentration in a sample. Using the quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometer, the presence of cocaine and impurities detected were confirmed by accurate tandem MS data. The qualitative chemical profiles obtained using DESI-MS were compared to two popular analysis techniques, GC-MS and LC-MS. The effects of a range of adulterants including caffeine, procaine, levamisole, lignocaine, paracetamol, and atropine on the detectability of cocaine were also investigated. It was found that the addition of these adulterants in a cocaine sample did not prevent the detection of the analyte itself (there was slight enhancement in some samples), which was useful in drug detection. The detection of truxillines in the seized samples by DESI-MS aided in the preliminary determination of geographical origin, i.e., Bolivian, Peruvian or Colombian leaf origin. The application of DESI-MS to the qualitative analysis and screening of seized cocaine samples demonstrates the potential and applicability of the technique to the fast chemical profiling of illicit samples. PMID:24943809

  1. Meeting report: British Society for Research on Ageing (BSRA) annual scientific meeting 2012, Aston University, Birmingham, 3rd to 4th July 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the British Society for Research on Ageing (BSRA) annual scientific meeting 2012 was aging mechanisms and mitigants. The themes covered included epigenetics, stem cells and regeneration, aging pathways and molecules, the aging bladder and bowel, as well as updates from the New Dynamics of Ageing (NDA) programme. The topics incorporated new directions for staple aging research in caloric restriction (CR), inflammation, immunesenescence, neurodegeneration, homeostasis and stress resistance, as well as newer research areas such as bioengineering of tissues, including the internal anal sphincter and thymus. PMID:24472617

  2. Forensic applications of desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Morelato, Marie; Beavis, Alison; Kirkbride, Paul; Roux, Claude

    2013-03-10

    Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an emerging analytical technique that enables in situ mass spectrometric analysis of specimens under ambient conditions. It has been successfully applied to a large range of forensically relevant materials. This review assesses and highlights forensic applications of DESI-MS including the analysis and detection of illicit drugs, explosives, chemical warfare agents, inks and documents, fingermarks, gunshot residues and drugs of abuse in urine and plasma specimens. The minimal specimen preparation required for analysis and the sensitivity of detection achieved offer great advantages, especially in the field of forensic science. PMID:23498998

  3. Abstracts for the 59th Annual Scientific Meeting (November 2011) by American Society of Cytopathology (ASC) at Baltimore, MD, USA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    These are peer-reviewed poster-platform submissions finalized by the Scientific Program Committee. A total of 153 abstracts (14 Platforms [PP1 through PP14] & 139 Posters [1 through 139]) were selected from 161 submissions to be considered for presentation during November 4 – 8, 2011, at the Hilton Baltimore Hotel, to pathologists, cytopathologists, cytotechnologists, residents, fellows, students, and other members of cytopathology-related medical and scientific fields.

  4. A Report on the 30th Annual Conference of the International Association of Scientific and Technological University Libraries (IATUL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripathi, Manorama

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to report on the 30th IATUL Annual Conference held in Leuven, Belgium, 1-4 June, 2009. Design/methodology/approach: The paper summarises the major themes of the conference as well as giving some specific details of developments at the Indira Gandhi National Open University in India, which supplement the author's…

  5. DETECTION OF INTACT PROTEINS WITH DESI-MS: APPLICATION TO MICROORGANISM BIOMARKER DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DESI-MS was evaluated with proteins that range in molecular weight from 12 KDa to 66 KDa. Lyophilized protein samples were rehydrated with water, deposited on Plexiglas, and dried. In some experiments buckminsterfullerene (bucky ball, C60) was used as an additive to the nebulizing gas. Optimized ...

  6. Reactive DESI-MS imaging of biological tissues with dicationic ion-pairing compounds.

    PubMed

    Lostun, Dragos; Perez, Consuelo J; Licence, Peter; Barrett, David A; Ifa, Demian R

    2015-03-17

    This work illustrates reactive desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) with a stable dication on biological tissues. Rat brain and zebra fish tissues were investigated with reactive DESI-MS in which the dictation forms a stable bond with biological tissue fatty acids and lipids. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to characterize the dication (DC9) and to identify linked lipid-dication compounds formed. The fragment m/z 85 common to both DC9 fragmentation and DC9-lipid fragmentation was used to confirm that DC9 is indeed bonded with the lipids. Lipid signals in the range of m/z 250-350 and phosphoethanolamines (PE) m/z 700-800 observed in negative ion mode were also detected in positive ion mode with reactive DESI-MS with enhanced signal intensity. Reactive DESI-MS imaging in positive ion mode of rat brain and zebra fish tissues allowed enhanced detection of compounds commonly observed in the negative ion mode. PMID:25710577

  7. "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory", 12th DESY Workshop on Elementary Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The bi-annual international conference "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory" has been held at Weimar, Germany, from April 27 to May 02, 2014. It has been the 12th conference of this series, started in 1992. The main focus of the conference are precision calculations of multi- loop and multi-leg processes in elementary particle physics for processes at present and future high-energy facilities within and beyond the Standard Model. At present many physics questions studied deal with processes at the LHC and future facilities like the ILC. A growing number of contributions deals with important developments in the field of computational technologies and algorithmic methods, including large-scale computer algebra, efficient methods to compute large numbers of Feynman diagrams, analytic summation and integration methods of various kinds, new related function spaces, precise numerical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. The present conference has been attended by more than 110 participants from all over the world, presenting more than 75 contributions, most of which have been written up for these pro- ceedings. The present volume demonstrates in an impressive way the enormous development of the field during the last few years, reaching the level of 5-loop calculations in QCD and a like- wise impressive development in massive next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order processes. Computer algebraic and numerical calculations require terabyte storage and many CPU years, even after intense parallelization, to obtain state-of-the-art theoretical predictions. The city of Weimar gave a suitable frame to the conference, with its rich history, especially in literature, music, arts, and architecture. Goethe, Schiller, Wieland, Herder, Bach and Liszt lived there and created many of their masterpieces. The many young participants signal that our field is prosperous and faces an exciting future. The conference hotel "Kaiserin Augusta" offered a warm hospitality and

  8. Publication rates of poster presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons annual scientific conference between 1999 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Abicht, Bradley P; Donnenwerth, Michael P; Borkosky, Sara L; Plovanich, Elizabeth J; Roukis, Thomas S

    2012-01-01

    Publication is the desired end point of scientific research. Ultimately, it is desired that research presented in poster format at a scientific conference will be developed into a report and become published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Moreover, poster presentations of research studies are often referenced and, as a result, influence treatment care plans. No data exist for the actual publication rate of podiatric foot and ankle surgery poster presentations. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the actual publication rates of poster presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) annual scientific conference (ASC) during a 10-year period. Print or electronic media for the ACFAS ASC official program from 1999 to 2008 were obtained. Each year's official program was manually searched for any poster presentation and, when identified, the authors and title were individually searched using Internet-based search engines to determine whether a poster presentation had been followed by publication. Of the 825 posters, 198 (24%) poster presentations were ultimately published in 1 of 32 medical journals within a weighted mean of 17.6 months. Of the 32 journals, 25 (78.1%) represented peer-reviewed journals. The publication rate of poster presentations at the ACFAS ASC was less than that of oral manuscripts presented at the same meeting during the same period and was also less than the orthopedic subspecialty poster presentation publication rates. Therefore, attendees of the ACFAS ASC should be aware that only a few of the posters presented at the ACFAS ASC will be valid because they will not survive the rigors of publication 76% of the time. Additionally, more stringent selection criteria should be used so that the selected poster presentations can ultimately withstand the publication process. PMID:22196458

  9. 18th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer. 30 October-2 November 2003, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Marincola, Francesco M; Wang, Ena; Atkins, Michael B

    2004-01-01

    The 18th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc) was held at the Hyatt Regency, Bethesda, MD, close to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus. The meeting was organised on behalf of the society by Neil Berinstein from Aventis Pasteur, Toronto, Canada, Janice P Dutcher from Our Lady of Mercy Medical Center, Bronx, NY and Francesco M Marincola from the NIH, Bethesda, MD. The 2003 meeting included 57 oral presentations and > 100 poster presentations. There were > 800 registrants to the Annual Meeting and the multiple satellite symposia. The iSBTc, formerly the Society of Biological Therapy (SBT), was founded by R Oldham in 1984. Its membership has been rapidly growing of late, with > 500 members at present. The purpose of the iSBTc is to bring together those diverse individuals actively investigating biologic agents and biological response modifiers in the treatment of cancer, including clinicians and basic scientists from industry, government and academia. The President of the Society is Dr Michael B Atkins from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA and the Vice President is Ulrich Keilholz from UKBF, Free University Berlin, Germany. PMID:14680473

  10. Design considerations and analysis of potential applications of a high power ultraviolet FEL at the TESLA test facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, C.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    1999-02-01

    A possibility of constructing a high power ultraviolet free electron laser at the TESLA test facility at DESY is discussed. The proposed facility consists of a tunable master oscillator (P av˜10 mW, P peak˜10 kW, λ≃200-350 nm) and an FEL amplifier with a tapered undulator. The average and peak radiation power at the exit of the FEL amplifier is about 7 kW and 220 GW, respectively. Installation of such a facility can significantly extend scientific potential of the TESLA test facility. The UV free electron laser can be used to construct a polarized, monochromatic gamma-source with the ultimate yield up to 10 12 gamma-quanta per second and the maximal energy of about 100 MeV. An intensive gamma-source can also form the base for constructing the test facility for the TESLA positron generation system. Another accelerator application of the proposed facility is verification of the main technical solutions for the laser and the optical system to be used in the gamma-gamma option of the TESLA collider. A high average power UV laser is also promising for industrial applications.

  11. Publication rates of abstracts presented at annual scientific meetings: how does the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists compare?

    PubMed

    Bydder, Sean A; Joseph, David J; Spry, Nigel A

    2004-03-01

    The abstract to publication ratio (APR) is a measure of the quality of scientific meetings. The aim of the present study was to determine the publication rate of abstracts presented at annual Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists (RANZCR) conferences, and to identify the publishing journals. All free paper research abstracts (oral or poster) presented by RANZCR radiologists, radiation oncologists and trainees at the four consecutive meetings between 1996 and 1999 were identified retrospectively from conference programmes. The PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed/) was searched to determine whether or not the abstract had been published as a full paper. Of the 480 free paper research abstracts, 168 (35%) had been published as full articles. The overall abstract to publication ratio for radiology was 29% and for radiation oncology was 41%. Papers were published in a variety of journals but Australasian Radiology accounted for 27%. The mean time between presentation and publication was 16.5 months (median 17 months). These overall abstract to publication ratios are lower than those reported for overseas-based meetings in each respective area. Guidelines to scientific committees could increase the APR by more rigorous selection of abstracts. Future research should look at barriers to the publication of research findings, and identify ways to assist the publication process. PMID:15027917

  12. Improved DESI-MS Performance using Edge Sampling and aRotational Sample Stage

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    The position of the surface to be analyzed relative to the sampling orifice or capillary into the mass spectrometer has been known to dramatically affect the observed signal levels in desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESIMS). In analyses of sample spots on planar surfaces, DESI-MS signal intensities as much as five times greater were routinely observed when the bottom of the sampling capillary was appropriately positioned beneath the surface plane ( edge sampling") compared to when the capillary just touched the surface. To take advantage of the optimum "edge sampling" geometry and to maximize the number of samples that could be analyzed in this configuration, a rotational sample stage was integrated into a typical DESI-MS setup. The rapid quantitative determination of caffeine in two diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape) spiked with an isotopically labeled internal standard demonstrated the utility of this approach.

  13. Gesellschaft fuer angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik, Scientific Annual Meeting, Technische Universitaet Wien, Vienna, Austria, Apr. 5-9, 1988, Reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Various papers on applied mathematics and mechanics are presented. The general topics considered include: numerical treatment of implicit differential equations and differential algebraic systems; software for scientific calculation; structural analysis and simulation; stochastic methods; biomathematics; interpolation and approximation; quadrature; optimization; methods in operations research; enclosures for linear and nonlinear equations; enclosures for functional equations; ordinary differential equations and dynamical systems; ordinary differential and difference equations; and numerics of stiff differential equations. Also addressed are: waves, analysis, applications, and numerics in partial differential equations; large systems of linear equations; multigrid methods; iterative processes in applied function theory; discrete mathematics and informatics; fundamentals, special methods, and shells in FEM; beams and special applications; fundamentals, solid mechanics, and fluid mechanics in BEM.

  14. An advanced draft genome assembly of a desi type chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Parween, Sabiha; Nawaz, Kashif; Roy, Riti; Pole, Anil K.; Venkata Suresh, B.; Misra, Gopal; Jain, Mukesh; Yadav, Gitanjali; Parida, Swarup K.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Chattopadhyay, Debasis

    2015-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important pulse legume crop. We previously reported a draft genome assembly of the desi chickpea cultivar ICC 4958. Here we report an advanced version of the ICC 4958 genome assembly (version 2.0) generated using additional sequence data and an improved genetic map. This resulted in 2.7-fold increase in the length of the pseudomolecules and substantial reduction of sequence gaps. The genome assembly covered more than 94% of the estimated gene space and predicted the presence of 30,257 protein-coding genes including 2230 and 133 genes encoding potential transcription factors (TF) and resistance gene homologs, respectively. Gene expression analysis identified several TF and chickpea-specific genes with tissue-specific expression and displayed functional diversification of the paralogous genes. Pairwise comparison of pseudomolecules in the desi (ICC 4958) and the earlier reported kabuli (CDC Frontier) chickpea assemblies showed an extensive local collinearity with incongruity in the placement of large sequence blocks along the linkage groups, apparently due to use of different genetic maps. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based mining of intra-specific polymorphism identified more than four thousand SNPs differentiating a desi group and a kabuli group of chickpea genotypes. PMID:26259924

  15. DESI-MS/MS of Chemical Warfare Agents and Related Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Paul A.

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were used to headspace ­sample chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products from glass vials and glass vials containing spiked media, including Dacron swabs, office carpet, paper and fabric. The interface of the Z-spray source was modified to permit safe introduction of the SPME fibers for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (DESI-MS) analysis. A "dip and shoot" method was also developed for the rapid sampling and DESI-MS analysis of chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products in liquid samples. Sampling was performed by simply dipping fused silica, stainless steel or SPME tips into the organic or aqueous samples. Replicate analyses were completed within several minutes under ambient conditions with no sample pre-treatment, resulting in a significant increase in sample throughput. The developed sample handling and analysis method was applied to the determination of chemical warfare agent content in samples containing unknown chemical and/or biological warfare agents. Ottawa sand was spiked with sulfur mustard, extracted with water and autoclaved to ensure sterility. Sulfur mustard was completely hydrolysed during the extraction/autoclave step and thiodiglycol was identified by DESI-MS, with analyses generally being completed within 1 min using the "dip and shoot" method.

  16. Detection of saccharides by reactive desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) using modified phenylboronic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Hao

    2010-01-01

    We have reported previously a method for the detection of sugars via in-situ derivatization with phenylboronic acid PhB(OH)2 using reactive desorption electrospray ionization (DESI, Chen et al., Chem. Commun. (2006) 597-599). The present study describes an improved method that employs modified phenylboronic acids including 3-nitrophenylboronic acid and N-methyl-4-pyridineboronic acid iodide. In contrast to using PhB(OH)2, enhanced sensitivity of using 3-nitrophenylboronic acid was observed due to the stabilization of the resulting boronate ester anion by the electron-withdrawing nitro group and the limit of detections (LODs) for glucose in water using 3-nitrophenylbornic acid and phenylboronic acid were determined to be 0.11 mM and 0.40 mM, respectively. In the case of N-methyl-4-pyridineboronic acid iodide, the corresponding LOD is 6.9 [mu]M and the higher sensitivity obtained is attributed to the efficient ionization of both the reactive DESI reagent and reaction product since the precursor acid with a quaternary ammonium group is pre-charged. In this case, additional important features are found: (i) unlike using phenylboronic acid or 3-nitrophenylbornic acid, the experiment, performed in the positive ion mode, is applicable to neutral and acidic saccharide solutions, facilitating the analysis of biological fluids without the need to adjust pH; (ii) simply by changing the spray solvent from water to acetonitrile, the method can be used for direct glucose analyses of both urine and serum samples via online desalting, due to the low solubility of salts of these biofluids in the sprayed organic solvent; (iii) in comparison with other sugar derivatizing reagents such as the Girard's reagent T, the N-methyl-4-pyridineboronic acid iodide shows higher reactivity in the reactive DESI; and (iv) the ions of saccharide DESI reaction products undergo extensive ring or glycosidic bond cleavage upon CID, a feature that might be useful in the structure elucidation of

  17. Differential response of kabuli and desi chickpea genotypes toward inoculation with PGPR in different soils

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Asma; Mirza, Muhammad S.; Shah, Tariq M.; Malik, Kauser A.; Hafeez, Fauzia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pakistan is among top three chickpea producing countries but the crop is usually grown on marginal lands without irrigation and fertilizer application which significantly hampers its yield. Soil fertility and inoculation with beneficial rhizobacteria play a key role in nodulation and yield of legumes. Four kabuli and six desi chickpea genotypes were, therefore, evaluated for inoculation response with IAA-producing Ochrobactrum ciceri Ca-34T and nitrogen fixing Mesorhizobium ciceri TAL-1148 in single and co-inoculation in two soils. The soil type 1 was previously unplanted marginal soil having low organic matter, P and N contents compared to soil type 2 which was a fertile routinely legume-cultivated soil. The effect of soil fertility status was pronounced and fertile soil on average, produced 31% more nodules, 62% more biomass and 111% grain yield than marginal soil. Inoculation either with O. ciceri alone or its co-inoculation with M. ciceri produced on average higher nodules (42%), biomass (31%), grains yield (64%) and harvest index (72%) in both chickpea genotypes over non-inoculated controls in both soils. Soil 1 showed maximum relative effectiveness of Ca-34T inoculation for kabuli genotypes while soil 2 showed for desi genotypes except B8/02. Desi genotype B8/02 in soil type 1 and Pb-2008 in soil type 2 showed significant yield increase as compared to respective un-inoculated controls. Across bacterial inoculation treatments, grain yield was positively correlated to growth and yield contributing parameters (r = 0.294* to 0.838*** for desi and r = 0.388* to 0.857** for kabuli). PCA and CAT-PCA analyses clearly showed a site-specific response of genotype x bacterial inoculation. Furthermore, the inoculated bacterial strains were able to persist in the rhizosphere showing colonization on root and within nodules. Present study shows that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculation should be integrated with national chickpea breading program in

  18. The Ecology, the Environment, and the Evolution of Technical Communication. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (25th, Lewes, Delaware, October 15-17, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication.

    This proceedings presents 40 papers delivered at the 1998 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into sections on the Ecology of Technology; Environmental Shifts; and Evolving Perspectives. Representative papers in the proceedings include: "Mixing Oil and…

  19. Science, Technology, and Communication: Program Design in the Past, Present, and Future. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (26th, Santa Fe, New Mexico, October 14-16, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rude, Carolyn, Ed.

    Based on the theme of the past, present, and future of science, technology, and communication programs, this proceedings presents 49 papers delivered at the 1999 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into 12 subsections: The Shape of Programs: Past,…

  20. Models for Strategic Program Development. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (27th, Menomonie, Wisconsin, October 19-21, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maylath, Bruce, Ed.

    This document presents 48 papers delivered at the 2000 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into 14 subsections: (1) Keynote Presentation: "Global Classroom Project (T. K. Herrington); (2) Opening Session Address: "What Industry Looks for in Technical…

  1. Critical Interfaces for Engineers and Scientists, 4 Appraisals. Proceedings of the Annual Joint Meeting of the Engineering Manpower Commission of Engineers Joint Council and the Scientific Manpower Commission, New York, May 18, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, John D.

    Contained in this booklet are the speeches given at the annual joint meeting of the Engineering Manpower Commission and the Scientific Manpower Commission. Each dealt with some problem aspect of the engineer-scientist interface. The presentation by Rear Admiral W. C. Hushing of the U. S. Navy was entitled "The Impact of High Performance Science…

  2. Monitoring of changes in lipid profiles during PLK1 knockdown in cancer cells using DESI MS.

    PubMed

    Jayashree, Balasubramanyam; Srimany, Amitava; Jayaraman, Srinidhi; Bhutra, Anjali; Janakiraman, Narayanan; Chitipothu, Srujana; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Baddireddi, Lakshmi Subhadra; Elchuri, Sailaja; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-08-01

    The importance of the polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) gene is increasing substantially both as a biomarker and as a target for highly specific cancer therapy. This is due to its involvement in multiple points of cell progression and carcinogenesis. PLK1 inhibitors' efficacy in treating human cancers has been limited due to the lack of a specific targeting strategy. Here, we describe a method of targeted downregulation of PLK1 in cancer cells and the concomitant rapid detection of surface lipidomic perturbations using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS). The efficient delivery of siRNA targeting PLK1 gene selectively to the cancer cells is achieved by targeting overexpressed cell surface epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) by the EpDT3 aptamer. The chimeric aptamer (EpDT3-siPLK1) showed the knockdown of PLK1 gene expression and PLK1 protein levels by quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. The abundant surface lipids, phosphatidylcholines (PCs), such as PC(32:1) (m/z 754.6), PC(34:1) (m/z 782.6), and PC(36:2) (m/z 808.6), were highly expressed in MCF-7 and WERI-RB1 cancer cells compared to normal MIO-M1 cells and they were observed using DESI MS. These overexpressed cell surface lipids in the cancer cells were downregulated upon the treatment of EpDT3-siPLK1 chimera indicating a novel role of PLK1 to regulate surface lipid expression in addition to the efficient selective cancer targeting ability. Our results indicate that DESI MS has a potential ability to rapidly monitor aptamer-mediated cancer therapy and accelerate the drug discovery process. Graphical abstract Binding of aptamer chimera to the cells and changes in lipid profile. PMID:27277815

  3. Transatlantic Transport of Fermilab 3.9 GHZ Cryomodule to DESY

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Grimm, C.; Olis, D.; Schappert, Warren; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    In an exchange of technology agreement, Fermilab has built and delivered a 3.9 GHz (3rd harmonic) cryomodule to Deutsches Elektron-Synchrotron (DESY) Laboratory to be installed in the TTF/FLASH beamline. Transport to Hamburg, Germany was completed via a combination of flatbed air ride truck and commercial aircraft, while minimizing transition or handling points. Initially, destructive testing of fragile components, transport and corresponding alignment stability studies were performed in order to assess the risk associated with transatlantic travel of a fully assembled cryomodule. Data logged triaxial acceleration results of the transport with a comparison to the transport study predicted values are presented.

  4. Analysis of DESY-Flash LLRF Measurements for the ILC Heavy Beam Loading Test

    SciTech Connect

    Cancelo, Gustavo; Chase, Brian; Davidsaver, Michael; Carwardine, J.; Simrock, Stefan; Ayvazyan, Valeri; Grecki, Mariusz; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2009-06-01

    In September 2008 the DESY-FLASH accelerator was run with up to 550, 3 nano-coulomb bunches at 5 Hz repetition rate. This test is part of a longer-term study aimed at validating ILC parameters by operation as close as possible to ILC beam currents and RF gradients. The present paper reports on the analysis that has been done in order to understand the RF control system performance during this test. Actual klystron power requirements and beam stability are evaluated with heavy beam loading conditions. Results include suggested improvements for upcoming tests in 2009.

  5. Blotting Assisted by Heating and Solvent Extraction for DESI-MS Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Elaine C.; Mirabelli, Mario F.; Perez, Consuelo J.; Ifa, Demian R.

    2013-06-01

    Imprints of potato sprout ( Solanum tuberosum L.), gingko leaves (Gingko biloba L. ) and strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. ) were successfully imaged by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) on TLC plates through blotting assisted by heating and/or solvent extraction. Ion images showing the distribution of significant compounds such as glycoalkaloid toxins in potato sprout, ginkgolic acids and flavonoids in ginkgo leaves, and sugars and anthocyanidin in strawberry were obtained. Practical implications of this work include analysis of a wide range of irregular or soft materials by different imprinting conditions without requiring the addition of matrices or use of specific kinds of surfaces.

  6. HPTLC/DESI-MS Imaging of Tryptic Protein Digests Separated in Two Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J; Schulz, Michael; Schorcht, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was demonstrated as a method to detect and identify peptides from two-dimensional separations of cytochrome c and myoglobin tryptic digests on ProteoChrom HPTLC Cellulose sheets. Data-dependent tandem mass spectra were acquired during lane scans across the TLC plates. Peptides and the corresponding proteins were identified using a protein database search software. Two-dimensional distributions of identified peptides were mapped for each separated protein digest. Sequence coverages for cytochrome c and myoglobin were 81% and 74%, respectively. These compared well to those determined using the more standard HPLC/ESI-MS/MS approach (89% and 84%, respectively). Preliminary results show that use of more sensitive instrumentation has the potential for improved detection of peptides with low Rf values and improvement in sequence coverage. However, less multiple charging and more sodiation were seen in HPTLC/DESI-MS spectra relative to HPLC/ESI-MS spectra, which can affect peptide identification by MS/MS. Methods to increase multiple charging and reduce the extent of sodiation are currently under investigation.

  7. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže E-mail: PVMcDonald@lbl.gov E-mail: BAReid@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2014-05-01

    We present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant — DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ∼ 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is ∼ 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. We do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors — these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  8. The National Analysis Facility at DESY - status and use cases by the participating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, S.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Haupt, A.; Kemp, Y.; Langenbruch, C.; Leffhalm, K.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.; Stadie, H.

    2011-12-01

    The German National Analysis Facility (NAF) was set up at DESY, starting end of 2007 in the context of the Helmholtz Alliance "Physics at the Terascale". The NAF complements the DESY and the German Grid resources, and hence offers users from the German HEP institutes the best possible environment for data analysis. In the first part, the key aspects and components of the NAF are briefly presented with an emphasis on recent improvements. In the second part, the use cases of the three participating LHC experiments, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, will be presented. Differences and commonalities in the usage of the NAF will be shown. Special emphasis will be placed on the usage of PROOF, whose usage on the NAF has been pioneered by CMS. It is now adapted by ATLAS. The third part will concentrate on how the NAF was used for detector optimisation studies in the preparation of one of the ILC Lol's (ILD 2009), as well as how CALICE uses the NAF for the analysis of their data taken in several test beam experiments performed for detector R & D. Finally, future developments of the NAF are presented.

  9. SINBAD-The accelerator R&D facility under construction at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, U.; Assmann, R.; Brinkmann, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hartl, I.; Hüning, M.; Kärtner, F.; Fallahi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Nie, Y.; Osterhoff, J.; Schlarb, H.; Zhu, J.; Maier, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    The SINBAD facility (Short INnovative Bunches and Accelerators at DESY) is a long-term dedicated accelerator research and development facility currently under construction at DESY. It will be located in the premises of the old DORIS accelerator complex and host multiple independent experiments cost-effectively accessing the same central infrastructure like a central high power laser. With the removal of the old DORIS accelerator being completed, the refurbishment of the technical infrastructure is currently starting up. The presently ongoing conversion of the area into the SINBAD facility and the currently foreseen layout is described. The first experiment will use a compact S-band linac for the production of ultra-short bunches at hundred MeV. Once established, one of the main usages will be to externally inject electrons into a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator to boost the energy to GeV-level while maintaining a usable beam quality, ultimately aiming to drive an FEL. The second experiment already under planning is the setup of an attosecond radiation source with advanced technology. Further usage of the available space and infrastructure is revised and national and international collaborations are being established.

  10. Advances in Large Grain/Single Crystal SC Resonators at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; A. Brinkmann; A. Ermakov; J. Iversen; G. Kreps; A. Matheisen; D. Proch; D. Reschke; X. Singer; M. Spiwek; H. We; P. Kneisel; M. Pekeler

    2007-08-01

    The main aim of the DESY large grain R&D program is to check whether this option is reasonable to apply for fabrication of ca. 1'000 XFEL cavities. Two aspects are being pursued. On one hand the basic material investigation, on the other hand the material availability, fabrication and preparation procedure. Several single cell large grain cavities of TESLA shape have been fabricated and tested. The best accelerating gradients of 41 MV/m was measured on electropolished cavity. First large grain nine-cell cavities worldwide have been produced under contract of DESY with ACCEL Instruments Co. All three cavities fulfil the XFEL specification already in first RF test after only BCP (Buffered Chemical Polishing) treatment and 800 degrees C annealing. Accelerating gradient of 27 - 29 MV/m was reached. A fabrication method of single crystal cavity of ILC like shape was proposed. A single cell single crystal cavity was build at the company ACCEL. Accelerating gradient of 37.5 MV/m reached after only 112 microns BCP and in situ baking 120 degrees C for 6 hrs with the quality factor higher as 2x1010. The developed method can be extended on fabrication of multi cell single crystal cavities.

  11. Analysis of Metabolic Changes in Plant Pathosystems by Imprint Imaging DESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, Alessandra; Perez, Consuelo J.; Hamid, Tanam S.; Bayfield, Mark A.; Ifa, Demian R.

    2015-04-01

    The response of plants to microbial pathogens is based on the production of secondary metabolites. The complexity of plant-pathogen interactions makes their understanding a challenging task for metabolomic studies requiring powerful analytical approaches. In this paper, the ability of ambient mass spectrometry to provide a snapshot of plant metabolic response to pathogen invasion was tested. The fluctuations of glycoalkaloids present in sprouted potatoes infected by the phytopathogen Pythium ultimum were monitored by imprint imaging desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). After 8 d from the inoculation, a decrease of the relative abundance of potato glycoalkaloids α-solanine ( m/z 706) and α-chaconine ( m/z 722) was observed, whereas the relative intensity of solanidine ( m/z 398), solasodenone ( m/z 412), solanaviol ( m/z 430), solasodiene ( m/z 396), solaspiralidine ( m/z 428), γ-solanine/γ-chaconine ( m/z 560) , β-solanine ( m/z 706), and β-chaconine ( m/z 722) increased. The progression of the disease, expressed by the development of brown necrotic lesions on the potato, led to the further decrease of all the glycoalkaloid metabolites. Therefore, the applicability of imprint imaging DESI-MS in studying the plant metabolic changes in a simple pathosystem was demonstrated with minimal sample preparation.

  12. Upgrade of the H^--injection system at the DESY proton Linac III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleffner, C.-M.; Holtkamp, N.; Jacobs, G.; Nagl, M.; Deitinghoff, H.; Paramonov, V.

    1997-05-01

    In the near future an upgrade of the injection system of the proton linac at DESY is foreseen. Two different types of H^--sources are operated at DESY. The new rf-driven volume source is cesium free. On a long-term basis this source is planned to replace the operating magnetron source. For reasons of reliability of the proton linac and further developments of sources parallel operation of two sources should be possible at the the Alvarez linac. Each source has a separate RFQ to accelerate the ions to an energy of 750 keV. A new transport line with one dipole, 8 quadrupoles and one intermediate buncher was designed to match the beam between both RFQs and the Alvarez linac. The codes COPPOC and TRANSPORT were used for determining the length of the transport line and the parameters of the dipole and the buncher. Because of the high currents of more than 20 mA the estimate of the space charge forces is of special interest. The macro-particle-code PARMTRA takes into account the particle-to-particle electric forces among all particles. The properties of the beam line have been studied in connection with the effects of the final beam quality after acceleration with the 50 MeV Alvarez linac.

  13. Scientific Journalism in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, the problems of scientific journalism and activities of Armenian science journalists are presented. Scientific journalism in the world, forms of its activities, Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) press-releases and their subjects, ArAS website "Mass Media News" section, annual and monthly calendars of astronomical events, and "Astghagitak" online journal are described. Most interesting astronomical subjects involved in scientific journalism, reasons for non-satisfactory science outreach and possible solutions are discussed.

  14. A VUV free electron laser at the TESLA test facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbach, J.; Tesla Fel Study Group

    1996-02-01

    We present the layout of a single pass free electron laser (FEL) to be driven by the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY. The TTF is a test-bed for high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting acceleration sections for a future linear collider. Due to its unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a FEL. We aim at a photon wavelength of λ = 6 nm utilizing the TTF after it has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties are discussed.

  15. Review of R&D at DESY on ingot niobium for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navitski, Aliaksandr; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Singer, Waldemar; Singer, Xenia

    2015-12-01

    An R&D program at DESY exploring the potential of the production of 1.3 GHz TESLA shape cavities from large grain or ingot niobium material has been carried out as a feasibility study for using ingot niobium material for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser project. The most important issues like feasibility of the fabrication of niobium discs from ingots, material properties, cavity fabrication, treatment, and finally the cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) performance of the cavity in the accelerator modules are presented and discussed. At least 25% higher intrinsic quality factor comparing to conventional fine-grain niobium and high accelerating gradient of up to 45 MV/m have been demonstrated during the cryogenic RF tests both in the vertical cryostats and in a completely assembled accelerating cryo-module.

  16. Potential applications of the dielectric wakefield accelerators in the SINBAD facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y. C.; Assmann, R.; Dorda, U.; Marchetti, B.; Weikum, M.; Zhu, J.; Hüning, M.

    2016-09-01

    Short, high-brightness relativistic electron bunches can drive ultra-high wakefields in the dielectric wakefield accelerators (DWFAs). This effect can be used to generate high power THz coherent Cherenkov radiation, accelerate a witness bunch with gradient two or three orders of magnitude larger than that in the conventional RF linear accelerators, introduce energy modulation within the driving bunch itself, etc. The paper studies potential applications of the DWFAs in the SINBAD facility at DESY. The simulations show that the ultra-short relativistic bunches from the SINBAD injector ARES can excite accelerating wakefields with peak amplitudes as high as GV/m at THz frequencies in proper DWFA structures. In addition, it illustrates that the DWFA structure can serve as a dechirper to compensate the correlated energy spread of the bunches accelerated by the laser plasma wakefield accelerator.

  17. HARWI-II, The New High-Energy Beamline for Materials Science at HASYLAB/DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Beckmann, Felix; Lippmann, Thomas; Metge, Joachim; Dose, Thomas; Donath, Tilman; Schreyer, Andreas; Tischer, Markus; Liss, Klaus Dieter

    2004-05-12

    The GKSS Forschungszentrum Geesthacht, Germany, will setup a new high-energy beamline specialized for texture, strain and imaging measurements for materials science at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB of the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY. Four different experiments will be installed at the new wiggler HARWI-II. The high pressure cell will be run by the GFZ Potsdam, Germany, the high-energy diffractometer together with a microtomography camera will be run by the GKSS. A further station will allow space for the diffraction enhanced imaging setup. The optics will provide for a small white beam (0.5 mm x 0.5 mm) and a large monochromatic X-ray beam (50 mm x 10 mm) with an energy range of 20 to 250 keV.

  18. Review of R&D at DESY on ingot niobium for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Navitski, Aliaksandr Sekutowicz, Jacek Singer, Waldemar Singer, Xenia

    2015-12-04

    An R&D program at DESY exploring the potential of the production of 1.3 GHz TESLA shape cavities from large grain or ingot niobium material has been carried out as a feasibility study for using ingot niobium material for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser project. The most important issues like feasibility of the fabrication of niobium discs from ingots, material properties, cavity fabrication, treatment, and finally the cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) performance of the cavity in the accelerator modules are presented and discussed. At least 25% higher intrinsic quality factor comparing to conventional fine-grain niobium and high accelerating gradient of up to 45 MV/m have been demonstrated during the cryogenic RF tests both in the vertical cryostats and in a completely assembled accelerating cryo-module.

  19. A Combined Desorption Ionization by Charge Exchange (DICE) and Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Source for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S.; Miller, Scott A.; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H]+ or [M + metal]+ ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies.

  20. A combined desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S; Miller, Scott A; Attygalle, Athula B

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H](+) or [M + metal](+) ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies. PMID:21472555

  1. A Comparison of DESI-MS and LC-MS for the Lipidomic Profiling of Human Cancer Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Jones, Emrys A.; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Golf, Ottmar; Kumar, Sacheen; Huang, Juzheng; Kudo, Hiromi; Goldin, Rob D.; Hanna, George B.; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we make a direct comparison between desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and ultraperformance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS) platforms for the profiling of glycerophospholipid (GPL) species in esophageal cancer tissue. In particular, we studied the similarities and differences in the range of GPLs detected and the congruency of their relative abundances as detected by each analytical platform. The main differences between mass spectra of the two modalities were found to be associated with the variance in adduct formation of common GPLs, rather than the presence of different GPL species. Phosphatidylcholines as formate adducts in UPLC-ESI-MS accounted for the majority of differences in negative ion mode and alkali metal adducts of phosphatidylcholines in DESI-MS for positive ion mode. Comparison of the relative abundance of GPLs, normalized to a common peak, revealed a correlation coefficient of 0.70 ( P < 0.001). The GPL profile detected by DESI-MS is congruent to UPLC-ESI-MS, which reaffirms the role of DESI-MS for lipidomic profiling and a potential premise for quantification.

  2. A Comparison of DESI-MS and LC-MS for the Lipidomic Profiling of Human Cancer Tissue.

    PubMed

    Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Jones, Emrys A; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Golf, Ottmar; Kumar, Sacheen; Huang, Juzheng; Kudo, Hiromi; Goldin, Rob D; Hanna, George B; Takats, Zoltan

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we make a direct comparison between desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) and ultraperformance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS) platforms for the profiling of glycerophospholipid (GPL) species in esophageal cancer tissue. In particular, we studied the similarities and differences in the range of GPLs detected and the congruency of their relative abundances as detected by each analytical platform. The main differences between mass spectra of the two modalities were found to be associated with the variance in adduct formation of common GPLs, rather than the presence of different GPL species. Phosphatidylcholines as formate adducts in UPLC-ESI-MS accounted for the majority of differences in negative ion mode and alkali metal adducts of phosphatidylcholines in DESI-MS for positive ion mode. Comparison of the relative abundance of GPLs, normalized to a common peak, revealed a correlation coefficient of 0.70 (P < 0.001). The GPL profile detected by DESI-MS is congruent to UPLC-ESI-MS, which reaffirms the role of DESI-MS for lipidomic profiling and a potential premise for quantification. PMID:26466600

  3. On-probe pyrolysis desorption ecectrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry for the analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An on-probe pyrolyzer has been constructed and interfaced with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) for the rapid analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products. The detection and analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products of peptides, proteins and the synthetic polymer pol...

  4. Prospects of Hybrid Plasma- and Radiofrequency-Based Electron Acceleration at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Gruener, Florian; Elsen, Eckhard; Floettmann, Klaus; Foster, Brian; Brinkmann, Reinhard; Schmidt, Bernhard; Schlarb, Holger; Stephan, Frank

    2012-10-01

    The field of particle acceleration in plasma wakes has seen remarkable progress in recent years. Accelerating gradients of more than 10 GV/m can now be readily achieved using either ultra-short intense laser pulses or particle beams as wake drivers. The demonstration of the first GeV electron beams and a general trend towards improved reproducibility, beam quality and control over the involved plasma processes has led to plasma-acceleration techniques beginning to draw considerable interest in the traditional accelerator community. As a consequence, DESY, Germany's leading accelerator center, has established a research program for plasma-based novel acceleration techniques with the goal of exploiting the synergetic combination of conventional and new accelerator technology. Such a concept offers an attractive pathway to study many mechanisms occurring in plasma-based accelerators, for example electron-beam-emittance evolution, extreme bunch compression, the controlled emission of betatron radiation, and staging of accelerating units. In addition, it is assumed that bypassing the difficult-to-master process of particle self-injection, which is utilized in all current laser-plasma acceleration schemes, will greatly enhance the reliability of such machines compared to the state-of-the-art.

  5. Properties of hadronic final states in diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering at DESY HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Crittenden, J.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hebbel, K.; Hillert, S.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martens, J.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, R.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Viani, A. Lopez-Duran; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Bodmann, B.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Yildirim, A.; Ziegler, A.; Carli, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Lohrmann, E.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Maddox, E.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C.; Ferrando, J.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Corso, F. Dal; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Sztuk, J.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Breitweg, J.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2002-03-01

    Characteristics of the hadronic final state of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events ep-->eXp were studied in the kinematic range 4DESY ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 13.8 pb-1. The events were tagged by identifying the diffractively scattered proton using the leading proton spectrometer. The properties of the hadronic final state X were studied in its center-of-mass frame using thrust, thrust angle, sphericity, energy flow, transverse energy flow, and ``seagull'' distributions. As the invariant mass of the system increases, the final state becomes more collimated, more aligned, and more asymmetric in the average transverse momentum with respect to the direction of the virtual photon. Comparisons of the properties of the hadronic final state with predictions from various Monte Carlo model generators suggest that the final state is dominated by qq&;g states at the parton level.

  6. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Rossbach, J.

    1995-12-31

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of {lambda} = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-10{sup 22}photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%. Each 800 {mu}s long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz.

  7. Transatlantic transport of Fermilab 3.9 GHz cryomodule for TTF/FLASH to DESY

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Vocean, V.; Grimm, C.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    In an exchange of technology agreement, Fermilab built and will deliver a 3.9 GHz (3rd harmonic) cryomodule to DESY to be installed in the TTF/FLASH beamline. This cryomodule delivery will involve a combination of flatbed air ride truck and commercial aircraft transport to Hamburg Germany. A description of the isolation and damping systems that maintain alignment during transport and protect fragile components is provided. Initially, transport and corresponding alignment stability studies were performed in order to assess the risk associated with transatlantic travel of a fully assembled cryomodule. Shock loads were applied to the cryomodule by using a coldmass mockup to prevent subjecting actual critical components (such as the cavities and input couplers) to excessive forces. Accumulative and peak shock loads were applied through over-the-road testing and using a pendulum hammer apparatus, respectively. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) studies were implemented to define location of instrumentation for transport studies and provide modal frequencies and shapes. Shock and vibration measurement results of transport studies and stabilization techniques are discussed.

  8. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... identical, similar and related products (21 CFR 310.6). Deferral of requirements is not appropriate for the... in the Federal Register of May 25, 1971 (36 FR 9475). (iii) Certain Insulin Preparations (DESI...

  9. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... identical, similar and related products (21 CFR 310.6). Deferral of requirements is not appropriate for the... in the Federal Register of May 25, 1971 (36 FR 9475). (iii) Certain Insulin Preparations (DESI...

  10. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... identical, similar and related products (21 CFR 310.6). Deferral of requirements is not appropriate for the... in the Federal Register of May 25, 1971 (36 FR 9475). (iii) Certain Insulin Preparations (DESI...

  11. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... identical, similar and related products (21 CFR 310.6). Deferral of requirements is not appropriate for the... in the Federal Register of May 25, 1971 (36 FR 9475). (iii) Certain Insulin Preparations (DESI...

  12. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... identical, similar and related products (21 CFR 310.6). Deferral of requirements is not appropriate for the... in the Federal Register of May 25, 1971 (36 FR 9475). (iii) Certain Insulin Preparations (DESI...

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (12th, Oxford, Ohio, February 13-15, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Marilyn Schauer, Ed.

    The papers in this proceedings of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC) conference discuss collaboration with other disciplines, with business and industry, and with research foundations, reflecting the readiness to reach out that characterizes CPTSC in its second decade. Papers in the proceedings are:…

  14. FLASH, the Free-Electron Laser at DESY: Machine Performance and Recent Highlights from User Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurth, Wilfried

    2010-03-01

    FLASH, the Free-Electron Laser at DESY in Hamburg is a world-wide unique facility delivering intense ultra-short coherent radiation pulses in the wavelength range between 47 and 6.8 nm. FLASH is a high-gain free-electron laser based on a superconducting linear accelerator currently running at 1GeV. Laser amplification and saturation in the so-called SASE (self-amplified spontaneous emission) mode is achieved with a single pass of the electron bunch through a 30m undulator. A machine upgrade which has been started recently will boost the energy to 1.2 GeV expanding the wavelength range to below 5nm. After the upgrade FLASH will also include the seeding experiment sFLASH where an external laser will overlap with the electron beam to seed the SASE process. First beam with the upgraded facility is expected in spring 2010. Since 2005 FLASH has been operating as a user facility serving a large variety of experiments. The unprecedented brilliance of the femtosecond coherent pulses in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray regime has been used to study nonlinear process in laser-matter interaction for atoms and molecules, to gain new insights in the properties of matter under extreme conditions and to perform single shot lens-less imaging of nano-sized objects. Furthermore, the pulse duration of less than 30 femtoseconds has allowed to gain new insights in ultrafast dynamics of matter. In the talk I will review machine performance and give examples of highlight experiments.

  15. Lipid dynamics in zebrafish embryonic development observed by DESI-MS imaging and nanoelectrospray-MS.

    PubMed

    Pirro, V; Guffey, S C; Sepúlveda, M S; Mahapatra, C T; Ferreira, C R; Jarmusch, A K; Cooks, R G

    2016-06-01

    The zebrafish Danio rerio is a model vertebrate organism for understanding biological mechanisms. Recent studies have explored using zebrafish as a model for lipid-related diseases, for in vivo fish bioassays, and for embryonic toxicity experiments. Mass spectrometry (MS) and MS imaging are established tools for lipid profiling and spatial mapping of biomolecules and offer rapid, sensitive, and simple analytical protocols for zebrafish analysis. When ambient ionization techniques are used, ions are generated in native environmental conditions, requiring neither sample preparation nor separation of molecules prior to MS. We used two direct MS techniques to describe the dynamics of the lipid profile during zebrafish embryonic development from 0 to 96 hours post-fertilization and to explore these analytical approaches as molecular diagnostic assays. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) MS imaging followed by nanoelectrospray (nESI) MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) were used in positive and negative ion modes, allowing the detection of a large variety of phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylinositols, free fatty acids, triacylglycerols, ubiquinone, squalene, and other lipids, and revealed information on the spatial distributions of lipids within the embryo and on lipid molecular structure. Differences were observed in the relative ion abundances of free fatty acids, triacylglycerols, and ubiquinone - essentially localized to the yolk - across developmental stages, whereas no relevant differences were found in the distribution of complex membrane glycerophospholipids, indicating conserved lipid constitution. Embryos exposed to trichloroethylene for 72 hours exhibited an altered lipid profile, indicating the potential utility of this technique for testing the effects of environmental contaminants. PMID:27120110

  16. Inspection of a Spherical Triple VLS-Grating for Self-Seeding of FLASH at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, Frank; Lammert, Heiner; Reichardt, Gerd; Hahn, Ulrich; Treusch, Rolf; Reininger, Ruben

    2007-01-01

    To take benefit from the improved brilliance of the laser-like source, proposed beamlines at Free Electron Lasers (FEL) require optical elements of excellent precision, characterised by slope errors beyond the state of the art limit of 0.5μrad rms for plane and spherical shape. Part of the monochromator beamline for self-seeding at the vacuum-ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (FLASH) at DESY is a triple Variable Line Spacing (VLS) grating of spherical shape. The three grating structures on a common substrate will cover the wavelength range from 6.4 to 60nm The challenging specifications of these grating structures are characterised by a slope error of less than 0.25μrad rms and very stringent parameters for the VLS-polynomial. These grating structures have been measured by use of the Nano Optic Measuring Machine (NOM) at BESSY. Based on the principle of deflectometry the BESSY-NOM represents the latest generation of slope measuring metrology instruments. The NOM enables the inspection of optical components with a measurement uncertainty in the range of 0.05μrad rms. This is a five to tenfold improvement compared to state of the art metrology tools of today. Here it is demonstrated how these outstanding metrology capabilities have been applied for a sound characterisation of a challenging precision optical component with error limits five times below the specifications. In the shown example the grating's figure accuracy has been characterised by linescans and surface mapping measurements of the optical active sections. In additional measurements under Littrow condition the higher order diffraction signals of the laser pencil beam have been traced to measure the groove density variation of the different grating-structures with a lateral resolution of 1mm. In contrast to the sparse and point like measurements of the manufacturer, these high resolution measurements yield a "slope deviation equivalent" resulting from imperfections in the line density variation.

  17. Inspection of a Spherical Triple VLS-Grating for Self-Seeding of FLASH at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, Frank; Lammert, Heiner; Reichardt, Gerd; Hahn, Ulrich; Treusch, Rolf; Reininger, Ruben

    2007-01-19

    To take benefit from the improved brilliance of the laser-like source, proposed beamlines at Free Electron Lasers (FEL) require optical elements of excellent precision, characterised by slope errors beyond the state of the art limit of 0.5{mu}rad rms for plane and spherical shape. Part of the monochromator beamline for self-seeding at the vacuum-ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (FLASH) at DESY is a triple Variable Line Spacing (VLS) grating of spherical shape. The three grating structures on a common substrate will cover the wavelength range from 6.4 to 60nm The challenging specifications of these grating structures are characterised by a slope error of less than 0.25{mu}rad rms and very stringent parameters for the VLS-polynomial. These grating structures have been measured by use of the Nano Optic Measuring Machine (NOM) at BESSY. Based on the principle of deflectometry the BESSY-NOM represents the latest generation of slope measuring metrology instruments. The NOM enables the inspection of optical components with a measurement uncertainty in the range of 0.05{mu}rad rms. This is a five to tenfold improvement compared to state of the art metrology tools of today. Here it is demonstrated how these outstanding metrology capabilities have been applied for a sound characterisation of a challenging precision optical component with error limits five times below the specifications. In the shown example the grating's figure accuracy has been characterised by linescans and surface mapping measurements of the optical active sections. In additional measurements under Littrow condition the higher order diffraction signals of the laser pencil beam have been traced to measure the groove density variation of the different grating-structures with a lateral resolution of 1mm. In contrast to the sparse and point like measurements of the manufacturer, these high resolution measurements yield a 'slope deviation equivalent' resulting from imperfections in the line density variation.

  18. NERSC Annual Report 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John

    2003-01-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2002 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects), and information about NERSC's current and planned systems and service

  19. NERSC Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John; Bashor, Jon; Yarris, Lynn; McCullough, Julie; Preuss, Paul; Bethel, Wes

    2005-04-15

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  20. NRCC annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This annual report of the National Research for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC) Division describes the program of research workshops, software development, and scientific research of the Division in 1979. This year marked the first full calendar year of activity of the Division. Initial staffing in the core scientific areas was completed by the addition of a crystallographer.

  1. NERSC Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Hules , John

    2006-07-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  2. Overview of the 80(th) Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society - The Past, Present and Future of Cardiovascular Medicine in Japan - - The 5(th) Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun; Satoh, Kimio; Fukuda, Koji; Sugimura, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Yasuharu; Nakano, Makoto; Tsuburaya, Ryuji; Aoki, Tatsuo; Hao, Kiyotaka; Nishimiya, Kensuke; Ito, Kenta; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-07-25

    The 80(th)Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society was held in Sendai, Japan, on March 18-20, 2016, which coincided with the 5(th)anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake that hit the Tohoku area on March 11, 2011. Thus, the main themes for this meeting were "The Past, Present and Future of Cardiovascular Medicine in Japan" and "The 5(th)Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake". Despite the provincial location, approximately 15,000 people attended during the 3-day meeting, and there were in-depth discussions in each of the various sessions on these themes. Especially, to our great pleasure, the Japanese Royals, Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, kindly visited the panel exhibition of the Great East Japan Earthquake and spoke words of appreciation to us. The meeting successfully completed and we sincerely appreciate the great cooperation and support from all affiliates. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1689-1694). PMID:27385500

  3. Seasonal prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in desi fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus) in and around Gannavaram, Andhra Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Sreedevi, C; Jyothisree, Ch; Rama Devi, V; Annapurna, P; Jeyabal, L

    2016-09-01

    A study was carried out to know the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in desi fowl in and nearby villages of Gannavaram, Andhra Pradesh for a period of 1 year. Screening of 492 samples comprising faecal samples and gastrointestinal tracts from freshly slaughtered desi birds at local poultry shops and samples from post mortem examinations at NTR College of Veterinary Science, Gannavaram revealed 63.21 % of gastrointestinal parasites. Faecal samples were examined by floatation technique using salt solution and samples positive for coccidian oocysts were sporulated in 2.5 % potassium dichromate solution for species identification. Adult worms were identified after routine processing and mounting. The species identified includes Davainea proglottina, Raillietina cesticillus and Raillietina echinobothrida in cestodes (32.47 %), Ascaridia galli, Capillaria annulata, Heterakis gallinarum in nematodes (39.87 %), Eimeria tenella, Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria necatrix in Eimeria spp. (39.87 %). Ascaridia galli and R. cesticillus and A. galli and Eimeria spp. were common in mixed infection (12.86 %). Ascaridia galli was the more prevalent species. No trematode parasite was identified during the study period. Significant (p = 0.001) relationship between the seasonality and prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites was observed (χ2 = 17.46, df = 2). Data revealed high prevalence in rainy season (43.41 %) followed by summer (38.91 %) and winter (17.68 %) seasons for all parasites except for A. galli and C. annulata infections which were higher in summer season. Results indicated high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in desi fowl in study area emphasizing the need of improved management practices of backyard poultry. PMID:27605762

  4. DESI-MS2: a rapid and innovative method for trace analysis of six cytostatic drugs in health care setting.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Giovanni; Fioretti, Marzia; Rocca, Lucia Mainero; Curini, Roberta

    2012-05-01

    With the aim of establishing exposure levels for hospital personnel preparing and administering cytostatic drugs (CDs), here, we present an innovative screening method based on the use of the desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) interface coupled with a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer. A rapid, simple, and sensitive procedure was developed for the simultaneous surface monitoring of cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, methotrexate, vincristine, gemcitabine, and cytarabine. Since analytes were in the solid state, a novel approach based on the use of passive samplers was combined with the direct analysis of wipes. A PTFE-printed glass slide was used as a passive sampler, while hydrophobic centers of Swiffer® cloths were judged extremely efficient as wipe samplers. After the sampling period, the CD collectors were directly processed with the DESI-MS system without any further treatment. MS/MS confirmatory analysis was conducted using selected reaction monitoring in the positive ion mode and detection limits were evaluated. Values were at the picograms per square millimeter levels on the passive collector and at the picograms per square centimeter levels for the wipe ones. Direct determination on solid-state samples combined with mass spectrometry selectivity provided a powerful tool so far unapplied to occupational hygiene. PMID:22200922

  5. Scientific Misconduct.

    PubMed

    Gross, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Scientific misconduct has been defined as fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. Scientific misconduct has occurred throughout the history of science. The US government began to take systematic interest in such misconduct in the 1980s. Since then, a number of studies have examined how frequently individual scientists have observed scientific misconduct or were involved in it. Although the studies vary considerably in their methodology and in the nature and size of their samples, in most studies at least 10% of the scientists sampled reported having observed scientific misconduct. In addition to studies of the incidence of scientific misconduct, this review considers the recent increase in paper retractions, the role of social media in scientific ethics, several instructional examples of egregious scientific misconduct, and potential methods to reduce research misconduct. PMID:26273897

  6. Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometric Imaging of the Distribution of Rohitukine in the Seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. F

    PubMed Central

    Mohana Kumara, Patel; Srimany, Amitava; Arunan, Suganya; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani; Uma Shaanker, Ramanan; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometric imaging of all parts of the seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. f (Meliaceae) was performed to reconstruct the molecular distribution of rohitukine (Rh) and related compounds. The species accumulates Rh, a prominent chromone alkaloid, in its seeds, fruits, and stem bark. Rh possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and immuno-modulatory properties. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis detected Rh as well as its glycosylated, acetylated, oxidized, and methoxylated analogues. Rh was predominantly distributed in the main roots, collar region of the stem, and young leaves. In the stem and roots, Rh was primarily restricted to the cortex region. The identities of the metabolites were assigned based on both the fragmentation patterns and exact mass analyses. We discuss these results, with specific reference to the possible pathways of Rh biosynthesis and translocation during seedling development in D. binectariferum. PMID:27362422

  7. Development and validation of a DESI-HRMS/MS method for the fast profiling of esomeprazole and its metabolites in rat plasma: a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandra; Castrati, Luca; Colombo, Paolo; Flammini, Lisa; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Bettini, Ruggero; Elviri, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    The advances in pharmaceutical development and drug discovery impose the availability of reliable high-throughput screening methods for the rapid evaluation of drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (PK) in biological samples. Here, a desorption electrospray mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) method has been developed and validated for the PK profiling of esomeprazole and its metabolites (5-hydroxyomeprazole and omeprazole sulfone) in rat plasma. Rats were treated with an esomeprazole solution (2.5 mg/mL) for endovenous administration and the analyte levels were profiled over 2 h after liquid-liquid extraction from plasma. MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments were performed by using a DESI-LTQ-Orbitrap XL instrument and an on-spot fixed time analysis on PMMA surfaces. Validation was performed for the esomeprazole. The DESI-MS/MS method exhibited for the esomepazole excellent sensitivity (limit of detection (LOD)=60 ng/mL), linearity (0.2-20 µg/mL concentration range; y=23848(±361)X, n=15; r(2) =0.987) and precision (RSD<9%) by using an internal standard method. The PK results were discussed in terms of Area Under the Curve, Cmax and Tmax . Data reliability was demonstrated by comparison with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method (p>0.05). The data achieved demonstrated that the DESI-MS method is suitable for sensitive and fast profiling of a drug and its metabolites at the therapeutic concentration levels. PMID:25922056

  8. Scientific Fraud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodstein, David

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of fraud in the presentation of results of scientific research cites cases looks at variations in the degree of misrepresentation, kinds and intents of fraud, attention given by public agencies (National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, Public Health Service), and differences between scientific and civil fraud. (MSE)

  9. Trace detection of non-uniformly distributed analytes on surfaces using mass transfer and large-area desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soparawalla, Santosh; Salazar, Gary A; Sokol, Ewa; Perry, Richard H; Cooks, R Graham

    2010-08-01

    Ambient ionization methods such as desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) allow the analysis of chemicals adsorbed at surfaces without the need for sample (or surface) pretreatment. A limitation of current implementations of these ionization sources is the small size of the area that can be sampled. This makes examination of surfaces of large areas time-consuming because of the need to raster across the surface. This paper describes a DESI source that produces a spray plume with an effective desorption/ionization area of 3.6 cm(2), some 200 times larger than given by conventional DESI sources. Rhodamine 6G and several drugs of abuse (codeine, heroin and diazepam) were used to demonstrate the ability to use large-area DESI MS to perform rapid (a few seconds) representative sampling of areas of the order of several square centimetres without scanning the probe across the surface. The large area ion source displayed high sensitivity (limits of detection in the high nanogram range) and high reproducibility (approximately 20 to 35% relative standard deviation). The rapid analysis of even larger surfaces (hundreds of cm(2)) for traces of explosives is possible using a sorbent surface wipe followed by large-area DESI interrogation performed directly on the wipe material. The performance of this mass transfer dry wipe method was examined by determination of the limits of detection of several explosives. Surfaces with different topographies and compositions were also tested. Using this method, absolute limits of detection observed for HMX and RDX from plastic surfaces and skin were found to be as low as 10 ng cm(-2). The concentration of residue from large surface areas in this technique allowed the detection of 100 ng of explosives from surfaces with areas ranging from 1.00 x 10(3) cm(2) to 1.40 x 10(4) cm(2). PMID:20539884

  10. NERSC 1998 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John

    1999-03-01

    This 1998 annual report from the National Scientific Energy Research Computing Center (NERSC) presents the year in review of the following categories: Computational Science; Computer Science and Applied Mathematics; and Systems and Services. Also presented are science highlights in the following categories: Basic Energy Sciences; Biological and Environmental Research; Fusion Energy Sciences; High Energy and Nuclear Physics; and Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Other Projects.

  11. NERSC 2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John

    2001-12-12

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2001 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects); information about NERSC's current systems and services; descriptions of Berkeley Lab's current research and development projects in applied mathematics, computer science, and computational science; and a brief summary of NERSC's Strategic Plan for 2002-2005.

  12. Scientific Globish versus scientific English.

    PubMed

    Tychinin, Dmitry N; Kamnev, Alexander A

    2013-10-01

    The proposed adoption of 'scientific Globish' as a simplified language standard for scholarly communication may appeal to authors who have difficulty with English proficiency. However, Globish might not justify the hopes being pinned on it and might open the door to further deterioration of the quality of English-language scientific writing. PMID:23928006

  13. Scientific Misconduct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodstein, David

    2002-01-01

    Explores scientific fraud, asserting that while few scientists actually falsify results, the field has become so competitive that many are misbehaving in other ways; an example would be unreasonable criticism by anonymous peer reviewers. (EV)

  14. Search for resonance decays to a ν¯ plus jet in e+p scattering at DESY HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitweg, J.; Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Amelung, C.; Bornheim, A.; Brock, I.; Coböken, K.; Crittenden, J.; Deffner, R.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Barret, O.; Brook, N. H.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Goebel, F.; Goers, S.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hasell, D.; Hebbel, K.; Hillert, S.; Kasemann, M.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Lindemann, L.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martens, J.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Rohde, M.; Savin, A. A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Sievers, M.; Stonjek, S.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Lopez-Duran Viani, A.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Straub, P. B.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Parenti, A.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Eisenhardt, S.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bussey, P. J.; Bell, M.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; MacDonald, N.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Sinclair, L. E.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Waugh, R.; Bohnet, I.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Meyer-Larsen, A.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Carli, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Kçira, D.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Mallik, U.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Park, I. H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; Wing, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, M.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Botje, M.; Brümmer, N.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; van Sighem, A.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Vossebeld, J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; Dosselli, U.; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Turcato, M.; Voci, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Okrasiński, J. R.; Saull, P. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Wichmann, R.; Williams, D. C.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Polenz, S.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Simmons, D.; Butterworth, J. M.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlak, R.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Gadaj, T.; Deppe, O.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Badgett, W. F.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Foudas, C.; Mattingly, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wildschek, T.; Wodarczyk, M.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C.; Cole, J. E.; Frisken, W. R.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2001-03-01

    A study of the ν¯-jet mass spectrum in e+p-->ν¯X events at a center-of-mass energy 300 GeV has been performed with the ZEUS detector at the HERA collider at DESY using an integrated luminosity of 47.7 pb-1. The mass spectrum is in good agreement with that expected from standard model processes over the ν¯-jet mass range studied. No significant excess attributable to the decay of a narrow resonance is observed. By using both e+p-->e+X and e+p-->ν¯X data, mass-dependent limits are set on the s-channel production of scalar and vector resonant states. Couplings to first-generation quarks are considered and limits are presented as a function of the e+q and ν¯q branching ratios. These limits are used to constrain the production of leptoquarks and R-parity violating squarks.

  15. Electrospun Nanofiber Mats as "Smart Surfaces" for Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI MS)-Based Analysis and Imprint Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, R G; Ganayee, Mohd Azhardin; Pradeep, T

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS)-based molecular analysis and imprint imaging using electrospun nylon-6 nanofiber mats are demonstrated for various analytical contexts. Uniform mats of varying thicknesses composed of ∼200 nm diameter fibers were prepared using needleless electrospinning. Analytical applications requiring rapid understanding of the analytes in single drops, dyes, inks, and/or plant extracts incorporated directly into the nanofibers are discussed with illustrations. The possibility to imprint patterns made of printing inks, plant parts (such as petals, leaves, and slices of rhizomes), and fungal growth on fruits with their faithful reproductions on the nanofiber mats is illustrated with suitable examples. Metabolites were identified by tandem mass spectrometry data available in the literature and in databases. The results highlight the significance of electrospun nanofiber mats as smart surfaces to capture diverse classes of compounds for rapid detection or to imprint imaging under ambient conditions. Large surface area, appropriate chemical functionalities exposed, and easiness of desorption due to weaker interactions of the analyte species are the specific advantages of nanofibers for this application. PMID:27159150

  16. Simulations of laser-wakefield acceleration with external electron-bunch injection for REGAE experiments at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenyuk, Julia; Mehrling, Timon; Tsung, Frank S.; Floettman, Klaus; Osterhoff, Jens

    2012-12-21

    We present particle-in-cell simulations for future laser-plasma wakefield experiments with external bunch injection at the REGAE accelerator facility at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. Two effects have been studied in detail: emittance evolution of electron bunches externally injected into a wake, and longitudinal bunch compression inside the wakefield. Results show significant transverse emittance growth during the injection process, if the electron bunch is not matched to its intrinsic betatron motion inside the wakefield. This might introduce the necessity to include beam-matching sections upstream of each plasma-accelerator section with fundamental implications on the design of staged laser wakefield accelerators. When externally injected at the zero-field crossing of the laser-driven wake, the electron bunch may undergo significant compression in longitudinal direction and be accelerated simultaneously due to the gradient in the acting force. The mechanism would allow for production of single high-energy, ultra-short (on the order of one femtosecond) bunches at REGAE. The optimal conditions for maximal bunch compression are discussed in the presented studies.

  17. Scientific millenarianism

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1997-12-01

    Today, for the first time, scientific concerns are seriously being addressed that span future times--hundreds, even thousands, or more years in the future. One is witnessing what the author calls scientific millenarianism. Are such concerns for the distant future exercises in futility, or are they real issues that, to the everlasting gratitude of future generations, this generation has identified, warned about and even suggested how to cope with in the distant future? Can the four potential catastrophes--bolide impact, CO{sub 2} warming, radioactive wastes and thermonuclear war--be avoided by technical fixes, institutional responses, religion, or by doing nothing? These are the questions addressed in this paper.

  18. The Extreme Conditions Beamline at PETRA III, DESY: Possibilities to conduct time resolved monochromatic diffraction experiments in dynamic and laser heated DAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, H.-P.; Morgenroth, W.; Ehnes, A.; Berghäuser, A.; Winkler, B.; Franz, H.; Weckert, E.

    2010-03-01

    We present plans for the new Extreme Conditions Beamline at PETRA III, DESY, Germany. The beamline is being designed and built with the specific goal to explore time resolved high-pressure and -temperature x-ray diffraction experiments in the dynamic and laser heated diamond anvil cell. Within we discuss the conceptual design of the optical components and experimental setup to conduct monochromatic high-pressure powder diffraction experiments in the sub-second time regime.

  19. Scientific Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Gail W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how scientific documentation is taught in three 50-minute sessions in a technical writing course. Tells how session one distinguishes between in-text notes, footnotes, and reference entries; session two discusses the author-year system of citing references; and session three is concerned with the author-number system of reference…

  20. Scientific Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association (NJ1), 2004

    2004-01-01

    Scientific inquiry reflects how scientists come to understand the natural world, and it is at the heart of how students learn. From a very early age, children interact with their environment, ask questions, and seek ways to answer those questions. Understanding science content is significantly enhanced when ideas are anchored to inquiry…

  1. [Scientific presentation].

    PubMed

    Kraft, Giuliano

    2002-01-01

    To give a correct and effective scientific presentation, is an arduous task that asks for close examination of basic techniques of communication. This article proposes indications and suggestions to help public speakers to be communicators, to use visual aids and it explains how to capture the audience attention. PMID:12599721

  2. Scientific Claims versus Scientific Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, John

    1991-01-01

    Provides activities that help students to understand the importance of the scientific method. The activities include the science of fusion and cold fusion; a group activity that analyzes and interprets the events surrounding cold fusion; and an application research project concerning a current science issue. (ZWH)

  3. Scientific Misconduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2002-12-01

    These cases provide a good basis for discussions of scientific ethics, particularly with respect to the responsibilities of colleagues in collaborative projects. With increasing numbers of students working in cooperative or collaborative groups, there may be opportunities for more than just discussion—similar issues of responsibility apply to the members of such groups. Further, this is an area where, “no clear, widely accepted standards of behavior exist” (1). Thus there is an opportunity to point out to students that scientific ethics, like science itself, is incomplete and needs constant attention to issues that result from new paradigms such as collaborative research. Finally, each of us can resolve to pay more attention to the contributions we and our colleagues make to collaborative projects, applying to our own work no less critical an eye than we would cast on the work of those we don’t know at all.

  4. Tuning of 2.998 GHz S-band hybrid buncher for injector upgrade of LINAC II at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y. C.; Liebig, C.; Hüning, M.; Schmitz, M.

    2014-10-01

    The injector upgrade of LINAC II at DESY aims to improve its reliability and mitigate the radiological activation of components due to electron loss at relatively high energy of hundreds of MeV. Therefore, a 2.998 GHz hybrid buncher has been developed and will be installed in between an existing 2.998 GHz pre-buncher and LINAC II. It comprises a 1-cell standing-wave (SW) section for rapid electron acceleration and a 13-cells traveling-wave (TW) section for further beam bunching and acceleration. This paper focuses on its radio-frequency tuning procedure. The tuning strategy combines a non-resonant bead-pull measurement of complex electric field and a linear model for local reflection coefficient calculation. It is demonstrated that imaginary part of the local reflection coefficient represents the field distribution straightforwardly, based on which the structure can be tuned from cell to cell. During tuning, special attention has been paid to the field enhancement in the SW section to ensure its beam-capturing capability. Field amplitude and phase, global and local reflection coefficients have been analyzed for two different frequencies simultaneously, i.e. the intrinsic frequency of the structure and the target frequency, to avoid over-tuning. The tuning result is satisfying. For the target frequency, field unflatness of the TW section has been reduced from ±9% to ±4%, and field in the SW section has been enhanced significantly. Meanwhile, in the TW section, the deviation of phase advances between adjacent cells from the nominal value 120° has been reduced from the range ±5° to ±2°. By using ASTRA simulation, it has been verified that the residual detuning of the structure is acceptable in view of the beam dynamics performance.

  5. NSLS annual report 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Klaffky, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1984-01-01

    The first comprehensive Annual Report of the National Synchrotron Light Source comes at a time of great activity and forward motion for the facility. In the following pages we outline the management changes that have taken place in the past year, the progress that has been made in the commissioning of the x-ray ring and in the enhanced utilization of the uv ring, together with an extensive discussion of the interesting scientific experiments that have been carried out.

  6. Linking Research to Policy, Practice, and Education: Lessons Learned, Tasks Ahead. Program Abstracts. Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (53rd, Washington, DC, November 17-21, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerontologist, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This publication contains abstracts from the 53rd annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of America. The abstracts are arranged numerically by the session number in which they appear. Several abstracts are listed under each of the 388 sessions. Although the sessions are not limited to one topic, the dominant theme is education concerning all…

  7. Summer Events at the Scientific Library | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two exciting events are coming this summer from the Scientific Library—the annual Student Science Jeopardy Tournament and the Summer Video Series. This year, the 10th Annual Student Science Jeopardy Tournament will be held on Wednesday, July 20, beginning at 10 a.m. in the auditorium of Building 549. The event will also be streamed live to the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), room E1203.

  8. Free-electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY: toward a tunable short-pulsed soft x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerth, Christopher

    2001-12-01

    A high peak current, low emittance, short pulse electron beam can produce intense, laser-like radiation in a single pass through a long periodic magnetic structure. The construction of such free-electron lasers (FELs) based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) has become feasible by recent advances in accelerator technologies. Since SASE FELs do not require any optical components they are promising sources for the generation of intense, sub- picosecond laser pulses which are continuously tunable over a wide wavelength range in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray region. In the first phase of the VUV-FEL (phase I) at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY, SASE was achieved for the first time in the VUV at wavelengths between 80 and 180 nm. The concept of the VUV FEL at DESY and first experimental results are presented. The second phase of the TESLA Test Facility (phase II), which includes an increase of the electron beam energy to 1 GeV, aims at the construction of a SASE FEL operating in the soft X-ray region. An overview of the current status and the activities toward a soft X-ray FEL user facility is given.

  9. PREDON Scientific Data Preservation 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaconu, C.; Kraml, S.; Surace, C.; Chateigner, D.; Libourel, T.; Laurent, A.; Lin, Y.; Schaming, M.; Benbernou, S.; Lebbah, M.; Boucon, D.; Cérin, C.; Azzag, H.; Mouron, P.; Nief, J.-Y.; Coutin, S.; Beckmann, V.

    Scientific data collected with modern sensors or dedicated detectors exceed very often the perimeter of the initial scientific design. These data are obtained more and more frequently with large material and human efforts. A large class of scientific experiments are in fact unique because of their large scale, with very small chances to be repeated and to superseded by new experiments in the same domain: for instance high energy physics and astrophysics experiments involve multi-annual developments and a simple duplication of efforts in order to reproduce old data is simply not affordable. Other scientific experiments are in fact unique by nature: earth science, medical sciences etc. since the collected data is "time-stamped" and thereby non-reproducible by new experiments or observations. In addition, scientific data collection increased dramatically in the recent years, participating to the so-called "data deluge" and inviting for common reflection in the context of "big data" investigations. The new knowledge obtained using these data should be preserved long term such that the access and the re-use are made possible and lead to an enhancement of the initial investment. Data observatories, based on open access policies and coupled with multi-disciplinary techniques for indexing and mining may lead to truly new paradigms in science. It is therefore of outmost importance to pursue a coherent and vigorous approach to preserve the scientific data at long term. The preservation remains nevertheless a challenge due to the complexity of the data structure, the fragility of the custom-made software environments as well as the lack of rigorous approaches in workflows and algorithms. To address this challenge, the PREDON project has been initiated in France in 2012 within the MASTODONS program: a Big Data scientific challenge, initiated and supported by the Interdisciplinary Mission of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). PREDON is a study group formed by

  10. Scientific Teaching Targeting Faculty from Diverse Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Christopher S.; Ales, Jo Dale; Pomarico, Steven M.; Wischusen, E. William; Siebenaller, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    We offered four annual professional development workshops called STAR (for Scientific Teaching, Assessment, and Resources) modeled after the National Academies Summer Institute (SI) on Undergraduate Education in Biology. In contrast to the SI focus on training faculty from research universities, STAR's target was faculty from community…

  11. Use of intermediate focus for grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering experiments at the beamline P03 of PETRA III, DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, G.; Buffet, A.; Döhrmann, R.; Yu, S.; Roth, S. V.; Körstgens, V.; Müller-Buschbaum, P.; Gedde, U.; Hedenqvist, M.

    2014-04-15

    We describe the new experimental possibilities of the micro- and nanofocus X-ray scattering beamline P03 of the synchrotron source PETRA III at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), which arise from experiments with smaller beam sizes in the micrometer range. This beamline has been upgraded recently to perform new kinds of experiments. The use of an intermediate focus allows for reducing the beam size of microfocused hard X-rays while preserving a large working distance between the focusing elements and the focus position. For the first time, this well-known methodology has been employed to grazing incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS/GIWAXS). As examples, we highlight the applications to in situ studies using microfluidic devices in GISAXS geometry as well as the investigation of the crystallinity of thin films in GIWAXS geometry.

  12. Scientific Word Processors Proliferate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Analytical Chemistry, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Briefly describes most of the currently available scientific word processing software packages. Unless noted, these products (including Molecular Presentation Graphics, ProofWriter, Spellbinder Scientific, Volkswriter Scientific, and WordMARC) run on the IBM PC family of microcomputers. (JN)

  13. Probing Molecular Associations of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Samples from CalNex 2010 with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, R. E.; Nguyen, T. B.; Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Hayes, P. L.; Liu, S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Russell, L. M.; Nizkorodov, S.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    This project focuses on analyzing the identities of molecules that comprise oligomers in size resolved aerosol fractions. Since oligomers are generally too large and polar to be measured by typical GC/MS analysis, soft ionization with high resolution mass spectrometry is used to extend the range of observable compounds. Samples collected during CalNex 2010 in Bakersfield and Los Angeles and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in a photochemical chamber by photooxidation of diesel (DSL) fuel and isoprene (ISO) under humid, high-NOx conditions have been analyzed with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and a high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The nano-DESI is a soft ionization technique that allows molecular ions to be observed and the Orbitrap has sufficient resolution to determine the elemental composition of almost all species above the detection limit. A large fraction of SOA is made up of high molecular weight oligomers which are thought to form through acid catalyzed reactions of photo-chemically processed volatile organic compounds (VOC). The formation of oligomers is influenced by the VOCs available, the amount of atmospheric sulfate and nitrate, and the magnitude of photo-chemical processing, among other potential influences. We present the elemental composition of chemical species in size resolved SOA samples with six-hour time resolution, providing the first time resolved data set for the study of these oligomers in atmospheric samples. We present a comparison of the degree of overlap between the ambient and chamber experiments as a novel method to examine sources for this fraction of SOA. Possible formation pathways and sources of observed compounds are analyzed by comparison to other concurrent measurements at the site.

  14. Plate tectonics: Scientific revolution or scientific program?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, Jean-Claude

    In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas S. Kuhn suggested that science progresses discontinuously: As a scientific theory becomes obsolete, a period of crisis results, at the end of which the old theory is overthrown and replaced by a new, sounder, more complete theory [Kuhn, 1962]. After the scientific community has accepted the new [paradigm,] it undertakes only routine research until a new crisis occurs, usually as a result of an anomalous experiment that accidentally happens to be critical.

  15. Tick-borne encephalitis as a notifiable disease--Status quo and the way forward. Report of the 17th annual meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2015-07-01

    The 17th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE), a group of neurologists, general practicioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists, was held under the title "Tick-borne encephalitis as a notifiable disease--status quo and the way forward". The conference agenda was divided into three parts on the first day: "Epidemiology & Risk areas", "Poster Walk: Epidemiological Update in Europe", and "News in TBE Research". On the second day, a World Café Working Session took place where the participants could choose three tables out of six to join for discussion. Key topics on current epidemiological developments and investigations, risk areas, cases, travel and mobility, TBE in children, vaccination rates, and latest news on vaccination were presented and extensively discussed. PMID:26025269

  16. A report from the 60th Annual Scientific Session & Expo and I2 (Innovation and Intervention) Summit of the American College of Cardiology (April 2-5, 2011 - New Orleans, Louisiana, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2011-05-01

    As jazz and indeed most music has rhythm at its very core, so does life with the heart steadily pumping blood to the body. But as in jazz rhythm, irregular rhythm is paired with changes in pitch and velocity making melody and harmony, so it is to a large extent in heart disease, with irregular rhythm, irregular pumping effectiveness, arterial stiffness and so many diverse alterations completely changing the melody of life. Pairing music with the heart makes New Orleans a very reasonable place for the American College of Cardiology's scientific session to be held. To keep pace with the rhythm and the music, the following report will complement the meeting by briefly reviewing news reported during the oral and poster sessions that have a direct impact on treatments for cardiovascular diseases and risk factors. PMID:22013568

  17. Tick-borne encephalitis--a notifiable disease: report of the 15th Annual Meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2013-09-01

    The 15th Meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE)--a group of neurologists, general practicioners, clinicians, travel physicans, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists--was held under the title "Tick-Borne Encephalitis--a notifiable disease". With the inclusion of TBE in the list of notifiable diseases, an important measure was established to continue improving the level of evidence on TBE in Europe to better help guide policies and methods to lower the burden of this disease. Due to differences in diagnosis, case definition, and reporting in European countries, the overall epidemiology and burden of TBE remains unclear. During the meeting, important issues regarding epidemiology, risk areas, vaccination rates, and latest news on vaccination were presented and extensively discussed. A poster session provided an overview of the epidemiological situation 2012 in 13 European countries. PMID:23831368

  18. Tick-borne encephalitis-still on the map: Report of the 18th annual meeting of the international scientific working group on tick-borne encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2016-07-01

    The 18th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE)-a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians and epidemiologists-was held under the title 'Tick-borne encephalitis-still on the map'. The conference agenda was divided into six sessions: 'National Implementation of EU notifiable disease status', 'Virology', 'Epidemiology and Risk areas & Poster Walk Epidemiological Update', 'Clinic', 'Environmental Factors' and 'New Findings and Diagnosis'. Key topics such as 'TBE as a notifiable disease-results of the third European survey', 'TBE vaccines over the years', 'Overview of flaviviruses', 'TBE virus phylogenetics', 'Current epidemiological developments and investigations', 'Clinical aspects', 'TBE in veterinary medicine', 'Laboratory diagnostic', 'Occupational risk', 'Allergy, obesity, and vaccination' were presented and extensively discussed. PMID:27189584

  19. The soft x-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY: beamlines, diagnostics and end-stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedtke, K.; Azima, A.; von Bargen, N.; Bittner, L.; Bonfigt, S.; Düsterer, S.; Faatz, B.; Frühling, U.; Gensch, M.; Gerth, Ch; Guerassimova, N.; Hahn, U.; Hans, T.; Hesse, M.; Honkavaar, K.; Jastrow, U.; Juranic, P.; Kapitzki, S.; Keitel, B.; Kracht, T.; Kuhlmann, M.; Li, W. B.; Martins, M.; Núñez, T.; Plönjes, E.; Redlin, H.; Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Schneider, J. R.; Schreiber, S.; Stojanovic, N.; Tavella, F.; Toleikis, S.; Treusch, R.; Weigelt, H.; Wellhöfer, M.; Wabnitz, H.; Yurkov, M. V.; Feldhaus, J.

    2009-02-01

    FLASH, the Free-electron LASer in Hamburg, is a worldwide unique source for extremely bright ultra-short laser-like pulses tunable in a wide spectral range in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray region (Ackermann et al 2007 Nat. Photonics 1 336-42). To fully exploit the features of this new generation of light sources, a user facility with efficient radiation transport to the experimental area and novel online photon diagnostics capable of characterizing the unique parameters of the FLASH radiation has been built. It serves a broad user community active in many scientific fields ranging from atomic and molecular physics to plasma and solid state physics as well as chemistry and biology. A special focus is placed on the exploitation of the ultra-short FLASH pulses using pump-probe techniques. Thus, the facility is equipped with optical and THz sources synchronized to FLASH. This paper gives a detailed overview of the FLASH user facility.

  20. CMS Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect

    de la Rubia, T D; Shang, S P; Rennie, G; Fluss, M; Westbrook, C

    2005-07-29

    Glance at the articles in this report, and you will sense the transformation that is reshaping the landscape of materials science and chemistry. This transformation is bridging the gaps among chemistry, materials science, and biology--ushering in a wealth of innovative technologies with broad scientific impact. The emergence of this intersection is reinvigorating our strategic investment into areas that build on our strength of interdisciplinary science. It is at the intersection that we position our strategic vision into a future where we will provide radical materials innovations and solutions to our national-security programs and other sponsors. Our 2004 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. We have organized this report into two major sections: research themes and our dynamic teams. The research-theme sections focus on achievements arising from earlier investments while addressing future challenges. The dynamic teams section illustrates the directorate's organizational structure of divisions, centers, and institutes that support a team environment across disciplinary and institutional boundaries. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national-security mission. By maintaining an organizational structure that offers an environment of collaborative problem-solving opportunities, we are able to nurture the discoveries and breakthroughs required for future successes.

  1. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE): an underestimated risk…still: report of the 14th annual meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2012-06-01

    Today, the risk of getting tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is still underestimated in many parts of Europe and worldwide. Therefore, the 14th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE) - a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists - was held under the title "Tick-borne encephalitis: an underestimated risk…still". Among the discussed issues were: TBE, an underestimated risk in children, a case report in two Dutch travelers, the very emotional report of a tick victim, an overview of the epidemiological situation, investigations to detect new TBE cases in Italy, TBE virus (TBEV) strains circulation in Northern Europe, TBE Program of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), efforts to increase the TBE vaccination rate in the Czech Republic, positioning statement of the World Health Organization (WHO), and TBE in dogs. To answer the question raised above: Yes, the risk of getting TBE is underestimated in children and adults, because awareness is still too low. It is still underestimated in several areas of Europe, where, for a lack of human cases, TBEV is thought to be absent. It is underestimated in travelers, because they still do not know enough about the risk, and diagnostic awareness in non-endemic countries is still low. PMID:22765977

  2. High Throughput Screening of High-Affinity Ligands for Proteins with Anion-Binding Sites using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  3. Probing Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and Laboratory-Generated SOA with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Hayes, Patrick L.; Liu, Shang; Jimenez, Jose L.; Russell, Lynn M.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2013-01-30

    Aerosol samples from the 2010 CalNex field study in Bakersfield (BF) and Los Angeles (LA) were analyzed using positive mode nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in a photochemical chamber by photooxidation of diesel (DSL) fuel and isoprene (ISO) under humid, high-NOx conditions, was analyzed for comparison. Three groups of organic compounds with zero, one, or two nitrogen atoms in their molecular formulas (0N, 1N, 2N) were compared in detail. The composition of ambient SOA exhibited greater overlap with DSL than with ISO. The overlap of the chamber experiments with the BF data was relatively consistent throughout the day while the overlap with LA data increased significantly in the noon-6pm sample, consistent with the SOA plume arriving from downtown Los Angeles. BF samples were more oxidized, contained more organic nitrogen, and had more overlap with the chamber data compared to LA samples. The addition of gaseous ammonia (NH3) to the DSL experiment was necessary to generate many of the 2N compounds observed in BF. This analysis demonstrates that DSL and ISO were important sources but cannot account for all of the observed ambient compounds indicating that other sources of organics were also likely important.

  4. WWW: The Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blystone, Robert V.; Blodgett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific method is the principal methodology by which biological knowledge is gained and disseminated. As fundamental as the scientific method may be, its historical development is poorly understood, its definition is variable, and its deployment is uneven. Scientific progress may occur without the strictures imposed by the formal…

  5. 3 CFR - Scientific Integrity

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scientific Integrity Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of March 9, 2009 Scientific Integrity Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies Science and the scientific process must inform and guide decisions of my Administration on a wide range of...

  6. Scientific Literacy: Whose Responsibility?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Thomas P.

    1970-01-01

    Identifies various components of scientific literacy and characteristics of scientifically literate people. Discusses factors inhibiting scientific literacy. Suggested remedies: federal support for special programs, redesign of teacher education programs and science content courses at all levels, and setting up means of interpreting science to the…

  7. Redefining the "Scientific Method".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiece, Kelly R.; Colosi, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Surveys 15 introductory biology textbooks for their presentation of the scientific method. Teaching the scientific method involves more than simplified steps and subjectivity--human politics, cultural influences, and chance are all a part of science. Presents an activity for students to experience the scientific method. (Contains 34 references.)…

  8. Scientific dishonesty and good scientific practice.

    PubMed

    Andersen, D; Axelsen, N H; Riis, P

    1993-04-01

    Scientific dishonesty has been the subject of much public interest in recent years. Although the problem has had a low profile in Denmark, there is no reason to believe that it is non-existent. Several preconditions known to be important prevail here as well as in other countries, such as pressure to publish and severe competition for research grants and senior academic positions. The Danish Medical Research Council (DMRC) decided to respond to this problem by preparing a report on scientific dishonesty with suggestions to the research institutions on rules for good scientific practice and procedures for investigation of suspected dishonesty. To this end, an investigatory system was suggested. The system should consist of two regional committees and one national committee. They should be headed by high court judges and experienced health sciences researchers as members. The committees will investigate cases reported to them and conclude on whether dishonesty has been established and on whether the scientific work should be retracted. Sanctions shall remain the task of the institutions. Preventive measures comprise open access to and a long storage period for scientific data. PMID:8495601

  9. Scientific integrity memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-03-01

    U.S. President Barack Obama signed a presidential memorandum on 9 March to help restore scientific integrity in government decision making. The memorandum directs the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to develop a strategy within 120 days that ensures that "the selection of scientists and technology professionals for science and technology positions in the executive branch is based on those individuals' scientific and technological knowledge, credentials, and experience; agencies make available to the public the scientific or technological findings or conclusions considered or relied upon in policy decisions; agencies use scientific and technological information that has been subject to well-established scientific processes such as peer review; and agencies have appropriate rules and procedures to ensure the integrity of the scientific process within the agency, including whistleblower protection."

  10. Versatile sample environments and automation for biological solution X-ray scattering experiments at the P12 beamline (PETRA III, DESY)

    PubMed Central

    Blanchet, Clement E.; Spilotros, Alessandro; Schwemmer, Frank; Graewert, Melissa A.; Kikhney, Alexey; Jeffries, Cy M.; Franke, Daniel; Mark, Daniel; Zengerle, Roland; Cipriani, Florent; Fiedler, Stefan; Roessle, Manfred; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2015-01-01

    A high-brilliance synchrotron P12 beamline of the EMBL located at the PETRA III storage ring (DESY, Hamburg) is dedicated to biological small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and has been designed and optimized for scattering experiments on macromolecular solutions. Scatterless slits reduce the parasitic scattering, a custom-designed miniature active beamstop ensures accurate data normalization and the photon-counting PILATUS 2M detector enables the background-free detection of weak scattering signals. The high flux and small beam size allow for rapid experiments with exposure time down to 30–50 ms covering the resolution range from about 300 to 0.5 nm. P12 possesses a versatile and flexible sample environment system that caters for the diverse experimental needs required to study macromolecular solutions. These include an in-vacuum capillary mode for standard batch sample analyses with robotic sample delivery and for continuous-flow in-line sample purification and characterization, as well as an in-air capillary time-resolved stopped-flow setup. A novel microfluidic centrifugal mixing device (SAXS disc) is developed for a high-throughput screening mode using sub-microlitre sample volumes. Automation is a key feature of P12; it is controlled by a beamline meta server, which coordinates and schedules experiments from either standard or nonstandard operational setups. The integrated SASFLOW pipeline automatically checks for consistency, and processes and analyses the data, providing near real-time assessments of overall parameters and the generation of low-resolution models within minutes of data collection. These advances, combined with a remote access option, allow for rapid high-throughput analysis, as well as time-resolved and screening experiments for novice and expert biological SAXS users. PMID:25844078

  11. The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress?

    SciTech Connect

    Wojick, D E; Warnick, W L; Carroll, B C; Crowe, J

    2006-06-01

    With the United States federal government spending billions annually for research and development, ways to increase the productivity of that research can have a significant return on investment. The process by which science knowledge is spread is called diffusion. It is therefore important to better understand and measure the benefits of this diffusion of knowledge. In particular, it is important to understand whether advances in Internet searching can speed up the diffusion of scientific knowledge and accelerate scientific progress despite the fact that the vast majority of scientific information resources continue to be held in deep web databases that many search engines cannot fully access. To address the complexity of the search issue, the term global discovery is used for the act of searching across heterogeneous environments and distant communities. This article discusses these issues and describes research being conducted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI).

  12. 5 CFR 534.504 - Annual adjustment in pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annual adjustment in pay. 534.504 Section 534.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific and Professional Positions § 534.504 Annual adjustment in pay. Effective at the beginning of...

  13. 5 CFR 534.504 - Annual adjustment in pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual adjustment in pay. 534.504 Section 534.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific and Professional Positions § 534.504 Annual...

  14. 5 CFR 534.504 - Annual adjustment in pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Annual adjustment in pay. 534.504 Section 534.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific and Professional Positions § 534.504 Annual...

  15. 5 CFR 534.504 - Annual adjustment in pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Annual adjustment in pay. 534.504 Section 534.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific and Professional Positions § 534.504 Annual...

  16. Age and Scientific Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Stephen

    1979-01-01

    The long-standing belief that age is negatively associated with scientific productivity and creativity is shown to be based upon incorrect analysis of data. Studies reported in this article suggest that the relationship between age and scientific performance is influenced by the operation of the reward system. (Author)

  17. Scientific Ability and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    Following an introductory definition of "scientific ability and creativity", product-oriented, personality and social psychological approaches to studying scientific ability are examined with reference to competence and performance. Studies in the psychometric versus cognitive psychological paradigms are dealt with in more detail. These two…

  18. Scientific rigor through videogames.

    PubMed

    Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2014-11-01

    Hypothesis-driven experimentation - the scientific method - can be subverted by fraud, irreproducibility, and lack of rigorous predictive tests. A robust solution to these problems may be the 'massive open laboratory' model, recently embodied in the internet-scale videogame EteRNA. Deploying similar platforms throughout biology could enforce the scientific method more broadly. PMID:25300714

  19. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2009 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R. Allen; Mitchell K. Meyer; Frances Marshall; Mary Catherine Thelen; Jeff Benson

    2010-11-01

    This report describes activities of the ATR NSUF from FY-2008 through FY-2009 and includes information on partner facilities, calls for proposals, users week and education programs. The report also contains project information on university research projects that were awarded by ATR NSUF in the fiscal years 2008 & 2009. This research is university-proposed researcher under a user facility agreement. All intellectual property from these experiments belongs to the university per the user agreement.

  20. Scientific data requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Each Scientific Data Requirement (SDR) is summarized in terms of professional discipline, research program, technical description, related parameters, geographical extent, resolution, error tolerance,space-based sensors systems, personnel, implementation expert, notes, and references.

  1. Russia's scientific legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-01-01

    Many insights of Russian scientists are unknown or long-forgotten outside of Russia. Making the Russian literature accessible to the international scientific community could stimulate new lines of research.

  2. Report: Scientific Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of scientific software, including evaluation and selection of commercial software products; program exchanges, catalogs, and other information sources; major data analysis packages; statistics and chemometrics software; and artificial intelligence. (JN)

  3. Anatomy of Scientific Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Kim, Pan-Jun; Jeong, Hawoong

    2015-01-01

    The quest for historically impactful science and technology provides invaluable insight into the innovation dynamics of human society, yet many studies are limited to qualitative and small-scale approaches. Here, we investigate scientific evolution through systematic analysis of a massive corpus of digitized English texts between 1800 and 2008. Our analysis reveals great predictability for long-prevailing scientific concepts based on the levels of their prior usage. Interestingly, once a threshold of early adoption rates is passed even slightly, scientific concepts can exhibit sudden leaps in their eventual lifetimes. We developed a mechanistic model to account for such results, indicating that slowly-but-commonly adopted science and technology surprisingly tend to have higher innate strength than fast-and-commonly adopted ones. The model prediction for disciplines other than science was also well verified. Our approach sheds light on unbiased and quantitative analysis of scientific evolution in society, and may provide a useful basis for policy-making. PMID:25671617

  4. STARPROBE: Scientific rationale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H. (Editor); Randolph, J. E. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The scientific rationale and instrumentation problems in the areas of solar internal dynamics and relativity, solar plasma and particle dynamics, and solar atmosphere structure were studied. Current STARPROBE mission and system design concepts are summarized.

  5. Final Scientific Report (FSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Granzin, Bill

    2010-11-29

    The Flambeau River Papers Manufacturing Conversion for Energy Efficiency Project has identified the following goals and objectives: 1. A low pressure accumulator tank will be installed to capture low pressure gases for reuse. The estimated cost is $2.1 million with an energy savings of $500,000 annually or enough natural gas savings to heat 590 average Wisconsin homes. 2. Replace the steam turbine and upgrade Paper Machine #3, the largest of Flambeau River Papers machines, at a cost of $6.265 million. The result will save enough natural gas to heat 141 average homes, or about $1.2-million each year. 3. Install a new cyclonic and cell fracturing technology dryer to reduce moisture in both sludge and biomass wastes. The estimated cost of this task is $1.5-million with an annual energy savings of $700,000. It will also eliminate all coal burning at Flambeau River Papers (7,200 tons of coal annually).

  6. Scientific Data Management Center Scientific Data Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlow, T J; Liu, L; Pu, C; Gupta, A; Ludaescher, B; Altintas, I; Vouk, M; Bitzer, D; Singh, M; Rosnick, D

    2003-01-31

    The Internet is becoming the preferred method for disseminating scientific data from a variety of disciplines. This has resulted in information overload on the part of the scientists, who are unable to query all of the relevant sources, even if they knew where to find them, what they contained, how to interact with them, and how to interpret the results. Thus instead of benefiting from this information rich environment, scientists become experts on a small number of sources and use those sources almost exclusively. Enabling information based scientific advances, in domains such as functional genomics, requires fully utilizing all available information. We are developing an end-to-end solution using leading-edge automatic wrapper generation, mediated query, and agent technology that will allow scientists to interact with more information sources than currently possible. Furthermore, by taking a workflow-based approach to this problem, we allow them to easily adjust the dataflow between the various sources to address their specific research needs.

  7. Scientific/Techical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Chris Leighton, Neutron Scattering Society of American; Mr. J. Ardie Dillen, MRS Director of Finance and Administration

    2012-11-07

    The ACNS provides a focal point for the North American neutron user community, strengthening ties within this diverse group, and promoting neutron research in related disciplines. The conference thus serves a dual role as both a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides a forum for scientific discussion of neutron-enabled research in fields as diverse as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, elementary excitations, fundamental physics, and development of neutron instrumentation. This is achieved through a combination of invited oral presentations, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. Adequate opportunity for spontaneous discussion and collaboration is also built into the ACNS program in order to foster free exchange of new scientific ideas and the potential for use of powerful neutron scattering methods beyond the current realms of application. The sixth American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2012) provided essential information on the breadth and depth of current neutron-related research worldwide. A strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks showcased recent scientific results in neutron science in a wide range of fields, including soft and hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications, and neutron physics.

  8. The Scientific Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodia, Becky

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the Cornell Science Challenge, an annual science fair held at Olin Hall at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. This science fair features seventh graders from East Middle School in New York who have been mentored for three months by actual scientists (graduate students, faculty members, laboratory technicians, and…

  9. The future scientific CCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, J. R.; Elliott, T.; Collins, S.; Marsh, H.; Blouke, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Since the first introduction of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) in 1970, CCDs have been considered for applications related to memories, logic circuits, and the detection of visible radiation. It is pointed out, however, that the mass market orientation of CCD development has left largely untapped the enormous potential of these devices for advanced scientific instrumentation. The present paper has, therefore, the objective to introduce the CCD characteristics to the scientific community, taking into account prospects for further improvement. Attention is given to evaluation criteria, a summary of current CCDs, CCD performance characteristics, absolute calibration tools, quantum efficiency, aspects of charge collection, charge transfer efficiency, read noise, and predictions regarding the characteristics of the next generation of silicon scientific CCD imagers.

  10. PLAGIARISM IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader’s own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  11. Plagiarism in scientific publishing.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2012-12-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader's own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  12. Scientific ballooning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Fumiyoshi

    Activities in scientific ballooning in Japan during 1998-1999 are reported. The total number of scientific balloons flown in Japan in 1998 and 1999 was sixteen, eight flights in each year. The scientific objectives were observations of high energy cosmic electrons, air samplings at various altitudes, monitoring of atmospheric ozone density, Galactic infrared observations, and test flights of new type balloons. Balloon expeditions were conducted in Antarctica by the National Institute of Polar Research, in Russia, in Canada and in India in collaboration with foreign countries' institutes to investigate cosmic rays, Galactic infrared radiation, and Earth's atmosphere. There were three flights in Antarctica, four flights in Russia, three flights in Canada and two flights in India. Four test balloons were flown for balloon technology, which included pumpkin-type super-pressure balloon and a balloon made with ultra-thin polyethylene film of 3.4 μm thickness.

  13. Etiquette in scientific publishing.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vinod

    2013-10-01

    Publishing a scientific article in a journal with a high impact factor and a good reputation is considered prestigious among one's peer group and an essential achievement for career progression. In the drive to get their work published, researchers can forget, either intentionally or unintentionally, the ethics that should be followed in scientific publishing. In an environment where "publish or perish" rules the day, some authors might be tempted to bend or break rules. This special article is intended to raise awareness among orthodontic journal editors, authors, and readers about the types of scientific misconduct in the current publishing scenario and to provide insight into the ways these misconducts are managed by the Committee of Publishing Ethics. Case studies are presented, and various plagiarism detection software programs used by publishing companies are briefly described. PMID:24075666

  14. NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Horace G.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1988, the Scientific Visualization Studio(SVS) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has produced scientific visualizations of NASA s scientific research and remote sensing data for public outreach. These visualizations take the form of images, animations, and end-to-end systems and have been used in many venues: from the network news to science programs such as NOVA, from museum exhibits at the Smithsonian to White House briefings. This presentation will give an overview of the major activities and accomplishments of the SVS, and some of the most interesting projects and systems developed at the SVS will be described. Particular emphasis will be given to the practices and procedures by which the SVS creates visualizations, from the hardware and software used to the structures and collaborations by which products are designed, developed, and delivered to customers. The web-based archival and delivery system for SVS visualizations at svs.gsfc.nasa.gov will also be described.

  15. Making better scientific figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Ed; McNeall, Doug

    2016-04-01

    In the words of the UK government chief scientific adviser "Science is not finished until it's communicated" (Walport 2013). The tools to produce good visual communication have never been so easily accessible to scientists as at the present. Correspondingly, it has never been easier to produce and disseminate poor graphics. In this presentation, we highlight some good practice and offer some practical advice in preparing scientific figures for presentation to peers or to the public. We identify common mistakes in visualisation, including some made by the authors, and offer some good reasons not to trust defaults in graphics software. In particular, we discuss the use of colour scales and share our experiences in running a social media campaign (http://tiny.cc/endrainbow) to replace the "rainbow" (also "jet", or "spectral") colour scale as the default in (climate) scientific visualisation.

  16. Recording Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, Geof

    2006-01-09

    The way we record knowledge, and the web of technical, formal, and social practices that surrounds it, inevitably affects the knowledge that we record. The ways we hold knowledge about the past - in handwritten manuscripts, in printed books, in file folders, in databases - shape the kind of stories we tell about that past. In this talk, I look at how over the past two hundred years, information technology has affected the nature and production of scientific knowledge. Further, I explore ways in which the emergent new cyberinfrastructure is changing our relationship to scientific practice.

  17. FY 2014 LDRD Annual Report Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Tomchak, Dena

    2015-02-01

    The FY 2014 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enahnces technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  18. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    White, Julia C.

    2005-04-17

    This 2004 Annual Report describes the research and accomplishments of staff and users of the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), located in Richland, Washington. EMSL is a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization, operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The resources and opportunities within the facility are an outgrowth of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to fundamental research for understanding and resolving environmental and other critical scientific issues.

  19. Scientific Inquiry 'R' Us.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourdeau, Virginia D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the role that informal interpretative programs and facilities can play in providing inquiry-oriented science experiences. Presents two examples of scientific inquiry programs: investigating wetlands and investigating density. In both examples, participants formulate questions, collect data, and attempt to answer their own questions. (DLH)

  20. Scientific Discovery for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaikowski, Lori; Lichtman, Paul; Quarless, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    The scientific discovery process comes alive for 70 minority students each year at Uniondale High School in New York where students have won top awards for "in-house" projects. Uniondale High School is in a middle-income school district where over 95% of students are from minority groups. Founded in 2000, the Uniondale High School Research Program…

  1. Mario Bunge's Scientific Realism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Alberto

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents and comments on Mario Bunge's scientific realism. After a brief introduction in Sects. 1 and 2 outlines Bunge's conception of realism. Focusing on the case of quantum mechanics, Sect. 3 explores how his approach plays out for problematic theories. Section 4 comments on Bunge's project against the background of the current debate on realism in contemporary analytic philosophy.

  2. Scientific and Technical English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaclavik, Jaroslav

    Technical English differs from everyday English because of the specialized contexts in which it is used and because of the specialized interests of scientists and engineers. This text provides exercises in technical and scientific exposition in the following fields: mathematics, physics, temperature effects, mechanics, dynamics, conservation of…

  3. Erastosthenes in Scientific Garb.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiVincenzo, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    How mathematics subject matter can be enhanced through the scientific reasoning method, how this integration can be achieved, adaptations needed for a modified approach, and resulting attainments are all considered. Prime numbers using the Sieve of Erastosthenes are the vehicle through which the approach is described. (MNS)

  4. Mario Bunge's Scientific Realism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and comments on Mario Bunge's scientific realism. After a brief introduction in Sects. 1 and 2 outlines Bunge's conception of realism. Focusing on the case of quantum mechanics, Sect. 3 explores how his approach plays out for problematic theories. Section 4 comments on Bunge's project against the background of the current…

  5. [Scientific sex education].

    PubMed

    1977-01-01

    Sex education should help men and women to realize themselves to the complete fullness of their personality; it should teach respect and comprehension toward life, women, and the family. Sex education can modify those traditional attitudes related to family and society which too often result in irresponsible paternity; sex education should be integrated into the teaching of other scientific disciplines. PMID:12309624

  6. Assessing Scientific Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Assessing student-led, open-ended scientific inquiry holds a unique problem for classroom teachers because of the diverse skills and content that emerge from student work. This article provides tangible strategies for teachers to assess divergent student-generated inquiry in a manner that is manageable for teachers, informative for students, and…

  7. Projecting the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uthe, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the gas laws are an excellent vehicle for introducing the steps of the scientific method. Students can use balloons and a simple apparatus to observe changes in various gas parameters, develop ideas about the changes they see, collect numerical data, test their ideas, derive simple equations for the relationships, and use the…

  8. Scientific Component Technology Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S; Bosl, B; Dahlgren, T; Kumfert, G; Smith, S

    2003-02-07

    The laboratory has invested a significant amount of resources towards the development of high-performance scientific simulation software, including numerical libraries, visualization, steering, software frameworks, and physics packages. Unfortunately, because this software was not designed for interoperability and re-use, it is often difficult to share these sophisticated software packages among applications due to differences in implementation language, programming style, or calling interfaces. This LDRD Strategic Initiative investigated and developed software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address problems of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology is an extension of scripting and object-oriented software development techniques that specifically focuses on the needs of software interoperability. Component approaches based on CORBA, COM, and Java technologies are widely used in industry; however, they do not support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. Our research focused on the unique requirements of scientific computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections among components, language interoperability for scientific languages, and data distribution support for massively parallel SPMD components.

  9. Is risk analysis scientific?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Sven Ove; Aven, Terje

    2014-07-01

    This article discusses to what extent risk analysis is scientific in view of a set of commonly used definitions and criteria. We consider scientific knowledge to be characterized by its subject matter, its success in developing the best available knowledge in its fields of study, and the epistemic norms and values that guide scientific investigations. We proceed to assess the field of risk analysis according to these criteria. For this purpose, we use a model for risk analysis in which science is used as a base for decision making on risks, which covers the five elements evidence, knowledge base, broad risk evaluation, managerial review and judgment, and the decision; and that relates these elements to the domains experts and decisionmakers, and to the domains fact-based or value-based. We conclude that risk analysis is a scientific field of study, when understood as consisting primarily of (i) knowledge about risk-related phenomena, processes, events, etc., and (ii) concepts, theories, frameworks, approaches, principles, methods and models to understand, assess, characterize, communicate, and manage risk, in general and for specific applications (the instrumental part). PMID:24919396

  10. Framing for Scientific Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berland, Leema K.; Hammer, David

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, research on students' scientific argumentation has progressed to a recognition of nascent resources: Students can and do argue when they experience the need and possibility of persuading others who may hold competing views. Our purpose in this article is to contribute to this progress by applying the perspective of framing to the…

  11. Scientific Imagination in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stableford, Brian M.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the conflict between the religious and scientific imaginations as existing between the intellectual realms of unquestioning faith and constant questioning. Relates this conflict to writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, e.g., Bacon, Kepler, Wilkins, Godwin, Harrington, Campanella, Cyrano, Le Bret, Defoe, Swift, Voltiare,…

  12. Serendipity and Scientific Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenman, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of penicillin is cited in a discussion of the role of serendipity as it relates to scientific discovery. The importance of sagacity as a personality trait is noted. Successful researchers have questioning minds, are willing to view data from several perspectives, and recognize and appreciate the unexpected. (JW)

  13. Assessing Scientific Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, John M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A method for assessing scientific performance based on relationships displayed numerically in published documents is proposed and illustrated using published documents in pediatric oncology for the period 1979-1982. Contributions of a major clinical investigations group, the Childrens Cancer Study Group, are analyzed. Twenty-nine references are…

  14. Scientific and Artistic Authority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The differences and similarities between science and art are commonly discussed in various disciplines, e.g. collective versus individual, truth versus imagination, fact versus fiction, and more. Both art and science involve communication. Both artists and scientists have responsibilities of integrity in the arena of intellectual property. However, an artist has a primary responsibility to his/her personal artistic vision and craft. A scientist has a very clearly defined responsibility to scientific method as a collective practice, i.e. generally accepted scientific knowledge, norms of data collection and analysis as well as norms of communication. In presenting a work of art to an audience, it is accepted that different people will interpret the art through different lens. In science communication, we hope that the audience's understanding is in line with scientific interpretation. When science and art meet, how do we come to an understanding of what the intended message should be and how it should or must be received. Accuracy in fact is important in science, as is accuracy of the message whether it is a process, model, image or story. How do we mediate this tension in collaborative projects? How do we celebrate the artistic nature of an artwork based on science when there is tension between the artistic merit and the scientific content? Authority of the artist, scientist, and organization must be satisfied.

  15. Ethics and Scientific Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benos, Dale J.; Fabres, Jorge; Farmer, John; Gutierrez, Jessica P.; Hennessy, Kristin; Kosek, David; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Olteanu, Dragos; Russell, Tara; Wang, Kai

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes the major categories of ethical violations encountered during submission, review, and publication of scientific articles. We discuss data fabrication and falsification, plagiarism, redundant and duplicate publication, conflict of interest, authorship, animal and human welfare, and reviewer responsibility. In each section,…

  16. Professional Scientific Blog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beke, Tamás

    2009-01-01

    The professional blog is a weblog that on the whole meets the requirements of scientific publication. In my opinion it bears a resemblance to digital notice boards, where the competent specialists of the given branch of science can place their ideas, questions, possible solutions and can raise problems. Its most important function can be…

  17. Program Supports Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Stephan

    1994-01-01

    Primary purpose of General Visualization System (GVS) computer program is to support scientific visualization of data generated by panel-method computer program PMARC_12 (inventory number ARC-13362) on Silicon Graphics Iris workstation. Enables user to view PMARC geometries and wakes as wire frames or as light shaded objects. GVS is written in C language.

  18. Scientific and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balzer, Harley D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses scientific and technical education in the Soviet Union (based in part on extensive interviews with Soviet scientists and engineers), focusing on system of secondary education, preparing students for advanced study, renewed emphasis on specialized secondary schools, higher education/training, and future developments. (Author/JN)

  19. Turning Scientific Presentations into Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aruffo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    To increase students' confidence in giving scientific presentations, students were shown how to present scientific findings as a narrative story. Students who were preparing to give a scientific talk attended a workshop in which they were encouraged to experience the similarities between telling a personal anecdote and presenting scientific data.…

  20. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2016, Chicago.

    PubMed

    Mano, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-25

    The 65(th)Annual Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at McCormick Place, Chicago, from April 2-4, 2016. The ACC Scientific Sessions are one of the 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the USA and one of the major scientific meetings of cardiology in the world. It had an attendance of 18,769 and over 2,000 oral and poster abstracts, including 8 late-breaking clinical trials. This report presents the key presentations and the highlights from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2016 in Chicago. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1308-1313). PMID:27151567

  1. Predicting Scholars' Scientific Impact

    PubMed Central

    Mazloumian, Amin

    2012-01-01

    We tested the underlying assumption that citation counts are reliable predictors of future success, analyzing complete citation data on the careers of scientists. Our results show that i) among all citation indicators, the annual citations at the time of prediction is the best predictor of future citations, ii) future citations of a scientist's published papers can be predicted accurately ( for a 1-year prediction, ) but iii) future citations of future work are hardly predictable. PMID:23185311

  2. Theory, Modeling and Simulation Annual Report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David A; Garrett, Bruce C; Straatsma, TP; Jones, Donald R; Studham, Scott; Harrison, Robert J; Nichols, Jeffrey A

    2001-11-01

    This annual report describes the 2000 research accomplishments for the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation (TM and S) directorate, one of the six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility and is the centerpiece of the DOE commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems.

  3. Theory, Modeling and Simulation Annual Report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David A.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Straatsma, Tp; Jones, Donald R.; Studham, Ronald S.; Harrison, Robert J.; Nichols, Jeffrey A.

    2001-11-01

    This annual report describes the 2000 research accomplishments for the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation (TM&S) directorate, one of the six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility and is the centerpiece of the DOE commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems.

  4. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  5. Scientific Resource EXplorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Z.; Wormuth, A.; Smith, A.; Arca, J.; Lu, Y.; Sayfi, E.

    2014-12-01

    Inquisitive minds in our society are never satisfied with curatedimages released by a typical public affairs office. They always want tolook deeper and play directly on original data. However, most scientificdata products are notoriously hard to use. They are immensely large,highly distributed and diverse in format. In this presentation,we will demonstrate Resource EXplorer (REX), a novel webtop applicationthat allows anyone to conveniently explore and visualize rich scientificdata repositories, using only a standard web browser. This tool leverageson the power of Webification Science (w10n-sci), a powerful enabling technologythat simplifies the use of scientific data on the web platform.W10n-sci is now being deployed at an increasing number of NASA data centers,some of which are the largest digital treasure troves in our nation.With REX, these wonderful scientific resources are open for teachers andstudents to learn and play.

  6. Observatory ends scientific investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-3), which was instrumental in the discovery of the first suspected black hole, wound up its scientific investigation at the end of 1980. Spacecraft science operations were terminated after 8½ years of operation. Named Copernicus, OAO-3 performed consistently beyond design specifications and 7½ years beyond project requirements. Its performance profile, according to the NASA-Goddard engineers and scientists, was ‘astonishing.’While formal scientific investigations were ended December 31, a series of engineering tests are still being made until February 15. At that time, all contact with the spacecraft will end. Project engineers are uncertain whether Copernicus will orient itself permanently toward the sun, begin a permanent orbital tumbling action, or a variation of both.

  7. Scientific publications in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Magar, A

    2012-09-01

    Scientific publications have become a mainstay of communication among readers, academicians, researchers and scientists worldwide. Although, its existence dates back to 17 th century in the West, Nepal is still struggling to take few steps towards improving its local science for last 50 years. Since the start of the first medical journal in 1963, the challenges remains as it were decades back regarding role of authors, peer reviewers, editors and even publishers in Nepal. Although, there has been some development in terms of the number of articles being published and appearances of the journals, yet there is a long way to go. This article analyzes the past and present scenario, and future perspective for scientific publications in Nepal. PMID:23281460

  8. Sherlock Holmes: scientific detective.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Laura J

    2004-09-01

    Sherlock Holmes was intended by his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, to be a 'scientific detective'. Conan Doyle criticized his predecessor Edgar Allan Poe for giving his creation - Inspector Dupin - only the 'illusion' of scientific method. Conan Doyle believed that he had succeeded where Poe had failed; thus, he has Watson remark that Holmes has 'brought detection as near an exact science as it will ever be brought into the world.' By examining Holmes' methods, it becomes clear that Conan Doyle modelled them on certain images of science that were popular in mid- to late-19th century Britain. Contrary to a common view, it is also evident that rather than being responsible for the invention of forensic science, the creation of Holmes was influenced by the early development of it. PMID:15350761

  9. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  10. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively