Science.gov

Sample records for detailed numerical modeling

  1. Three-dimensional detailed numerical model of a field-scale rotary kiln incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, C.B.; Cundy, V.A.; Sterling, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    A detailed three-dimensional numerical model of baseline (support burners only) operation in a rotary kiln incinerator is presented. The focus of this model is on gas-phase fluid mechanics, neglecting solid waste combustion and radiative heat transfer. The model is compared to experimental data, and although relatively crude, it demonstrates remarkably good qualitative and quantitative predictive capability. The model demonstrates that thermal buoyancy is the cause of observed vertical stratification near the exit of the modeled kiln. The model also suggests that the addition of turbulence mixing air actually increases the degree of stratification rather than augmenting mixing, as had been previously suggested. Elucidating the mechanism by which this occurs has resulted in a reinterpretation of the experimental data. The model also suggests that there is probably a zone of recirculation across the kiln exit plane. A parametric study using the model shows that the location and quantity of leak air into the kiln have a major influence on the flow inside the kiln. The study suggests that preheating turbulence air may have little effect on gas-phase mixing. Overall, this modeling study has demonstrated that a relatively simple numerical model of a rotary kiln incinerator can provide valuable insight into the process, especially when used in conjunction with experimental data. 21 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Numerical Study on a Detailed Air Flows in an Urban Area Using a CFD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, detailed air flows in an urban area were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. For this model buildings used as the surface boundary in the model were constructed using Los Angeles Region Imagery Acquisition Consortium 2 Geographic Information System (LARIAC2 GIS) data. Three target areas centered at the cross roads of Broadway & 7th St., Olive & 12th St., and Wilshire blvd. & Carondelet, Los Angeles, California were considered. The size of each numerical domain is 400 m, 400 m, and 200 m in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions, respectively. The grid sizes in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions are 2 m, 2 m, and 2 m, respectively. Based on the inflow wind data provided by California Air Resources Board, detailed flow characteristics were investigated for each target area. Descending air flow were developed at the leeward area of tall building and ascending air current were occurred on the windward area of tall building. Vertically rotating vortices were formed in spaces between buildings, so-called, street canyons and horizontally rotating vortices appeared near cross roads. When flows came into narrow street canyon from wide street canyon, channeling effects appeared and flow speed increased for satisfying mass continuity.

  3. Science Support for Space-Based Droplet Combustion: Drop Tower Experiments and Detailed Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, Anthony J.; Dryer, Frederick L.

    1997-01-01

    This program supports the engineering design, data analysis, and data interpretation requirements for the study of initially single component, spherically symmetric, isolated droplet combustion studies. Experimental emphasis is on the study of simple alcohols (methanol, ethanol) and alkanes (n-heptane, n-decane) as fuels with time dependent measurements of drop size, flame-stand-off, liquid-phase composition, and finally, extinction. Experiments have included bench-scale studies at Princeton, studies in the 2.2 and 5.18 drop towers at NASA-LeRC, and both the Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC-1, FSDC-2) and the free Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) studies aboard the shuttle. Test matrix and data interpretation are performed through spherically-symmetric, time-dependent numerical computations which embody detailed sub-models for physical and chemical processes. The computed burning rate, flame stand-off, and extinction diameter are compared with the respective measurements for each individual experiment. In particular, the data from FSDC-1 and subsequent space-based experiments provide the opportunity to compare all three types of data simultaneously with the computed parameters. Recent numerical efforts are extending the computational tools to consider time dependent, axisymmetric 2-dimensional reactive flow situations.

  4. Toward a detailed physical modelling of wildfires: physical considerations and numerical results (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morvan, D.

    2010-12-01

    In introduction to the elaboration of detailed physical models able to reproduce the behaviour of wildfires, we reviewed the physical phenomena and the length scales, contributing to the interaction between atmosphere and fire, between vegetation and fire, i.e. all physical mechanisms affecting the behaviour of a wildfire propagating through a vegetation layer. Two main mechanisms of heat transfer were clearly identified to control the propagation of a line fire through a fuel layer: the radiation heat transfer coming from soot particles located in the flaming zone and the convection heat transfer between the hot gases and the vegetation. The relative importance of these two modes of heat transfer depends on the ratio between two forces: the buoyancy due to the vertical elevation of hot gases above the burning zone and the horizontal wind flow in pushing the hot gases toward the unburned vegetation. For a surface fire propagating through an horizontal fuel layer, the dominance of one mode of heat transfer compared to the other one, is manisfested by the existence of two regimes of propagation: plume dominated fires (when radiation heat transfer is dominant) and wind driven fire (when convection heat transfer is dominant). From the point of view of the prediction concerning the behaviour of these two classes of fire, these two regimes of propagation are not fully equivalent. In some sense, the second one (wind driven fires) is more easily predictable, because its rate of spread (ROS) varies more or less linearly with the wind speed velocity. The improvement of knowledge concerning the domain of existence of these two regimes of fire propagation and the consequences upon the fire behaviour are at the origin of the development of a new class of fire models, based on a full description of the physics governing the coupling between fire, atmosphere and vegetation. In a second part we developed theoretical bases for a “fully” physical model to simulate in detail the

  5. A detailed numerical model for flat-plate solar thermal devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cadafalch, J.

    2009-12-15

    A one-dimensional transient numerical model for flat-plate solar thermal devices is here presented. The model permits the analysis of different configurations and components such as multiple-glazing, transparent insulation, air-gaps, surface coatings, opaque insulation and energy accumulation in water or PCM internal stores. In order to obtain information of practical interest, the solar thermal devices are modelled following virtual testing procedures in accordance to the experimental test methods described by European and International standards. This paper describes the basis of the model and shows some comparison of numerical and experimental data as an example of the validation process that has been carried out in order to assess the credibility of the numerical model. For simplicity, the explanation is restricted to standard multiple-glazed flat-plate collectors. The use of the model in other more complicated configurations as in transparently insulated covers or integrated collector storage devices with phase change materials will be presented in other separate papers. (author)

  6. Detailed numerical modeling of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium in hypersonic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, U.; Maas, U.; Warnatz, J. )

    1993-03-01

    Interest in hypersonic flows has created a large demand for physicochemical models for air flow computations around reentry bodies. Detailed physicochemical models for air in chemical and thermal nonequilibrium are needed for a realistic prediction of hypersonic flowfields. In this paper we develop a model, based on elementary physicochemical processes, for a detailed description of chemical nonequilibrium together with the excitation of internal DOFs. This model is implemented in a 2D Navier-Stokes code in order to show the strong influence of thermal nonequilibrium on the flowfields. The algorithm presented here is based on a fully conservative discretization of the inviscid fluxes in the conservation equations and uses the chain rule conservation law form for the viscous fluxes. The large system of ordinary differential and algebraic equations resulting from the spatial discretization is solved by a time-accurate semiimplicit extrapolation method. 34 refs.

  7. A numerical scheme for modelling reacting flow with detailed chemistry and transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Knio, Omar M.; Najm, Habib N.; Paul, Phillip H.

    2003-09-01

    An efficient projection scheme is developed for the simulation of reacting flow with detailed kinetics and transport. The scheme is based on a zero-Mach-number formulation of the compressible conservation equations for an ideal gas mixture. It is a modified version of the stiff operator-split scheme developed by Knio, Najm & Wyckoff (1999, J. Comput. Phys. 154, 428). Similar to its predecessor, the new scheme relies on Strang splitting of the discrete evolution equations, where diffusion is integrated in two half steps that are symmetrically distributed around a single stiff step for the reaction source terms. The diffusive half-step is integrated using an explicit single-step, multistage, Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (RKC) method, which replaces the explicit, multi-step, fractional sub-step approach used in the previous formulation. This modification maintains the overall second-order convergence properties of the scheme and enhances the efficiency of the computations by taking advantage of the extended real-stability region of the RKC scheme. Two additional efficiency-enhancements are also explored, based on an extrapolation procedure for the transport coefficients and on the use of approximate Jacobian data evaluated on a coarse mesh. By including these enhancement schemes, performance tests using 2D computations with a detailed C{sub 1}C{sub 2} methane-air mechanism and a detailed mixture-averaged transport model indicate that speedup factors of about 15 are achieved over the previous split-stiff scheme.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of wind turbine wakes: detailed comparisons of two codes focusing on effects of numerics and subgrid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to be unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to be unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.

  10. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to bemore » unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.« less

  11. OpenSMOKE++: An object-oriented framework for the numerical modeling of reactive systems with detailed kinetic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuoci, A.; Frassoldati, A.; Faravelli, T.; Ranzi, E.

    2015-07-01

    OpenSMOKE++ is a general framework for numerical simulations of reacting systems with detailed kinetic mechanisms, including thousands of chemical species and reactions. The framework is entirely written in object-oriented C++ and can be easily extended and customized by the user for specific systems, without having to modify the core functionality of the program. The OpenSMOKE++ framework can handle simulations of ideal chemical reactors (plug-flow, batch, and jet stirred reactors), shock-tubes, rapid compression machines, and can be easily incorporated into multi-dimensional CFD codes for the modeling of reacting flows. OpenSMOKE++ provides useful numerical tools such as the sensitivity and rate of production analyses, needed to recognize the main chemical paths and to interpret the numerical results from a kinetic point of view. Since simulations involving large kinetic mechanisms are very time consuming, OpenSMOKE++ adopts advanced numerical techniques able to reduce the computational cost, without sacrificing the accuracy and the robustness of the calculations. In the present paper we give a detailed description of the framework features, the numerical models available, and the implementation of the code. The possibility of coupling the OpenSMOKE++ functionality with existing numerical codes is discussed. The computational performances of the framework are presented, and the capabilities of OpenSMOKE++ in terms of integration of stiff ODE systems are discussed and analyzed with special emphasis. Some examples demonstrating the ability of the OpenSMOKE++ framework to successfully manage large kinetic mechanisms are eventually presented.

  12. The Importance of a Detailed Vehicle Modelling in the Numerical Prediction of Railway Ground Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroussis, G.; Bergeret, E.; Conti, C.; Verlinden, O.

    With the development of continuous technological innovation, the railway transport is presented as an interesting alternative to the road traffic. Some drawbacks exist, one of the most problematic being certainly the vibrations induced by the railway traffic. The presented research wants to establish a reliable methodology in order to evaluate, from the design stage of a vehicle or of a track, the efforts transmitted by the vehicle to the track/soil system and consequently the level of vibrations in the surroundings. An analysis of the interaction between the track and the soil has been performed in order to show when the track/soil uncoupling can be assumed, with the aim of working in two stages. The first step is based on the vertical dynamic behaviour of the vehicle/track subsystem, taking into account any irregularity in the rail surface. For the soil subsystem (second step), recent publications showed that the finite/infinite element method can be an interesting alternative to boundary element method. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the real benefit of the vehicle modelling in this kind of problem. Typical railway applications (Brussels tram, Thalys HST) are proposed, showing among others that significant reduction of ground vibration level can be obtained by modifying the dynamic characteristics of the vehicle.

  13. Numerical modeling and analysis of static and ballistic behavior of multilayered/multiphase composite materials using detailed microstructural discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovicic, Jovan M.

    The goal of this work is to analyze the static and ballistic performance of multi material systems using a detailed finite element analysis. As more complex materials systems are introduced in engineering practice, the design engineer faces the dilemma of utilizing homogenization techniques or detailed numerical models. The latter offers a number of advantages, such as the ability to introduce separate constitutive laws and failure criteria for each phase, at the expense of computation cost. This is particularly important in ballistic performance of armor where the sequence of failure of each phase plays a major role in the energy absorption. Here, we present an automatic geometry generation algorithm for composite materials that can generate complex composite geometries spanning several unit cells. This capability is utilized to study the following phenomena: (1) Static behavior of textile composites: A comparative study of textile composites with different reinforcement architecture that shows the origins of non-linearity and the dependence of elastic parameters on the geometry of the unit cell; (2) Impact behavior of textile composites: The role of textile architecture in impact energy absorption; (3) Ballistic properties of ceramic sphere composites with textile composite backings. A detailed study of a new gradient design concept is presented using a full finite element discretization method that shows that although ceramic spheres embedded in epoxy exhibit a slightly lower energy absorption than the monolithic ceramic at the same areal density, they provide the advantage of ease of complex shape conformable manufacturing. A comparison with ballistic experiments on such material demonstrates that the analysis captures several aspects of this phenomenon.

  14. The Finer Details: Climate Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    If you want to know whether you will need sunscreen or an umbrella for tomorrow's picnic, you can simply read the local weather report. However, if you are calculating the impact of gas combustion on global temperatures, or anticipating next year's rainfall levels to set water conservation policy, you must conduct a more comprehensive investigation. Such complex matters require long-range modeling techniques that predict broad trends in climate development rather than day-to-day details. Climate models are built from equations that calculate the progression of weather-related conditions over time. Based on the laws of physics, climate model equations have been developed to predict a number of environmental factors, for example: 1. Amount of solar radiation that hits the Earth. 2. Varying proportions of gases that make up the air. 3. Temperature at the Earth's surface. 4. Circulation of ocean and wind currents. 5. Development of cloud cover. Numerical modeling of the climate can improve our understanding of both the past and, the future. A model can confirm the accuracy of environmental measurements taken. in, the past and can even fill in gaps in those records. In addition, by quantifying the relationship between different aspects of climate, scientists can estimate how a future change in one aspect may alter the rest of the world. For example, could an increase in the temperature of the Pacific Ocean somehow set off a drought on the other side of the world? A computer simulation could lead to an answer for this and other questions. Quantifying the chaotic, nonlinear activities that shape our climate is no easy matter. You cannot run these simulations on your desktop computer and expect results by the time you have finished checking your morning e-mail. Efficient and accurate climate modeling requires powerful computers that can process billions of mathematical calculations in a single second. The NCCS exists to provide this degree of vast computing capability.

  15. A numerical study of a two-dimensional H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar detonation using a detailed chemical reaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Oran, E.S.; Weber, J.W. Jr.; Stefaniw, E.I.; Lefebvre, M.H.; Anderson, J.D. Jr.

    1998-04-01

    Two-dimensional computations of the propagation of a detonation in a low-pressure, argon-diluted mixture of hydrogen and oxygen were performed using a detailed chemical reaction mechanism. Cellular structure developed after an initial perturbation was applied to a one-dimensional solution placed on a two-dimensional grid. The energy-release pattern in a detonation cell showed that, in addition to the primary release of energy behind the Mach stem, there is a secondary energy release that starts about two-thirds of the way through the cell. Reignition, which occurs as transverse waves collide, results in an explosion that spreads over a region and releases a considerable amount of energy.Resolution tests showed convergence of the detonation mode (number of triple points or transverse waves) reached at the end of the computations, as well as global and local energy release. The computations were performed on massively parallel Connection Machines for which new approaches were developed to maximize the speed and efficiency of integrations.

  16. Clinical professional governance for detailed clinical models.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Goossen-Baremans, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the need for Detailed Clinical Models for contemporary Electronic Health Systems, data exchange and data reuse. It starts with an explanation of the components related to Detailed Clinical Models with a brief summary of knowledge representation, including terminologies representing clinic relevant "things" in the real world, and information models that abstract these in order to let computers process data about these things. Next, Detailed Clinical Models are defined and their purpose is described. It builds on existing developments around the world and accumulates in current work to create a technical specification at the level of the International Standards Organization. The core components of properly expressed Detailed Clinical Models are illustrated, including clinical knowledge and context, data element specification, code bindings to terminologies and meta-information about authors, versioning among others. Detailed Clinical Models to date are heavily based on user requirements and specify the conceptual and logical levels of modelling. It is not precise enough for specific implementations, which requires an additional step. However, this allows Detailed Clinical Models to serve as specifications for many different kinds of implementations. Examples of Detailed Clinical Models are presented both in text and in Unified Modelling Language. Detailed Clinical Models can be positioned in health information architectures, where they serve at the most detailed granular level. The chapter ends with examples of projects that create and deploy Detailed Clinical Models. All have in common that they can often reuse materials from earlier projects, and that strict governance of these models is essential to use them safely in health care information and communication technology. Clinical validation is one point of such governance, and model testing another. The Plan Do Check Act cycle can be applied for governance of Detailed Clinical Models

  17. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  18. Global detailed geoid computation and model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Vincent, S.

    1974-01-01

    Comparisons and analyses were carried out through the use of detailed gravimetric geoids which we have computed by combining models with a set of 26,000 1 deg x 1 deg mean free air gravity anomalies. The accuracy of the detailed gravimetric geoid computed using the most recent Goddard earth model (GEM-6) in conjunction with the set of 1 deg x 1 deg mean free air gravity anomalies is assessed at + or - 2 meters on the continents of North America, Europe, and Australia, 2 to 5 meters in the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic areas, and 5 to 10 meters in other areas where surface gravity data are sparse. The R.M.S. differences between this detailed geoid and the detailed geoids computed using the other satellite gravity fields in conjuction with same set of surface data range from 3 to 7 meters.

  19. Detailed Numerical Simulation of the Graniteville Train Collision

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R. L.

    2005-10-24

    An unfortunate accident occurred in Graniteville, South Carolina on 6 January, 2005 when a train carrying a variety of hazardous chemicals collided with a stationary train parked on a siding rail (spur). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) runs prognostic atmospheric simulations of the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA) on an operational basis in the event of such airborne releases. Although forecast information was provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a higher-resolution simulation was later performed to examine influences of local topography on plume migration. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) was used to simulate meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. This report discusses comparisons of simulated meteorology with local observations and applications using two separate transport models. Results from the simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time. Use of a dense gas model to simulate localized effects indicates agreement with fatalities in the immediate area and visible damage to vegetation.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving turbulent luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoustre, Vivien; Arias, Paul; Roy, Somesh; Wang, Wei; Luo, Zhaoyu; Haworth, Dan; Im, Hong; Lu, Tianfeng; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Sankaran, Ramanan; Trouve, Arnaud

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO2, H2O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

  2. Numerical Study for Detailed Flow Fields and Performance of the Savonius-Type Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Rempfer, Dietmar

    2011-11-01

    The Savonius-type rotor is simple in structure, has good starting characteristics, relatively low operating speeds, and an ability to accept wind from any direction, although it has a lower efficiency than other vertical axis wind turbines. So far a number of experimental investigations have been carried out to study the performance of the Savonius rotor, however, there is a lack of detailed descriptions of the flow field. The aim of this paper is to numerically explore the non-linear two-dimensional unsteady flow over a Savonius rotor and develop a simulation method for predicting its aerodynamic performance. The simulations are based on Star CCM+. The motion of the blades is solved by using a moving mesh. Different turbulence models are compared. Parameters such as mesh density, wall y+, and boundary conditions will be discussed. Numerical simulation results are compared with experimental data. Separation of the flow at the blade tips is well modeled. The characteristics of flow fields details are studied, including boundary layer, moment coefficient, and pressure distribution. The wall shear on each surface of the blades is studied to look into the position of the separation point. Computational fluid dynamics is proven to be an effective approach for the investigation of the Savonius-type rotor, on the premise of proper theory and reasonable assumption. It also provides a basis for optimization of the Savonius wind turbine.

  3. On the physical and chemical details of alumina atomic layer deposition: A combined experimental and numerical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dongqing; Ma, Lulu; Xie, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Chris; Jen, Tien Chien

    2015-03-15

    Alumina thin film is typically studied as a model atomic layer deposition (ALD) process due to its high dielectric constant, high thermal stability, and good adhesion on various wafer surfaces. Despite extensive applications of alumina ALD in microelectronics industries, details on the physical and chemical processes are not yet well understood. ALD experiments are not able to shed adequate light on the detailed information regarding the transient ALD process. Most of current numerical approaches lack detailed surface reaction mechanisms, and their results are not well correlated with experimental observations. In this paper, the authors present a combined experimental and numerical study on the details of flow and surface reactions in alumina ALD using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Results obtained from experiments and simulations are compared and correlated. By experiments, growth rate on five samples under different deposition conditions is characterized. The deposition rate from numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental results. Details of precursor distributions in a full cycle of ALD are studied numerically to bridge between experimental observations and simulations. The 3D transient numerical model adopts surface reaction kinetics and mechanisms based on atomic-level studies to investigate the surface deposition process. Surface deposition is shown as a strictly self-limited process in our numerical studies. ALD is a complex strong-coupled fluid, thermal and chemical process, which is not only heavily dependent on the chemical kinetics and surface conditions but also on the flow and material distributions.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Robert N.

    2007-01-01

    The modelling of ocean circulation is important not only for its own sake, but also in terms of the prediction of weather patterns and the effects of climate change. This book introduces the basic computational techniques necessary for all models of the ocean and atmosphere, and the conditions they must satisfy. It describes the workings of ocean models, the problems that must be solved in their construction, and how to evaluate computational results. Major emphasis is placed on examining ocean models critically, and determining what they do well and what they do poorly. Numerical analysis is introduced as needed, and exercises are included to illustrate major points. Developed from notes for a course taught in physical oceanography at the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University, this book is ideal for graduate students of oceanography, geophysics, climatology and atmospheric science, and researchers in oceanography and atmospheric science. Features examples and critical examination of ocean modelling and results Demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches Includes exercises to illustrate major points and supplement mathematical and physical details

  5. Numerical modeling of Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Chable, S.; Rogier, F.

    2005-05-16

    A stationary plasma thruster is numerically studied using different levels. An one dimensional modeling is first analyzed and compared with experimental results. A simplified model of oscillations thruster is proposed and used to control the amplitude of oscillations. A two dimensional numerical method is discussed and applied to the computation of the flow in the exhaust.

  6. Detailed modelling of the 21-cm forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelin, B.

    2016-01-01

    The 21-cm forest is a promising probe of the Epoch of Reionization. The local state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is encoded in the spectrum of a background source (radio-loud quasars or gamma-ray burst afterglow) by absorption at the local 21-cm wavelength, resulting in a continuous and fluctuating absorption level. Small-scale structures (filaments and minihaloes) in the IGM are responsible for the strongest absorption features. The absorption can also be modulated on large scales by inhomogeneous heating and Wouthuysen-Field coupling. We present the results from a simulation that attempts to preserve the cosmological environment while resolving some of the small-scale structures (a few kpc resolution in a 50 h-1 Mpc box). The simulation couples the dynamics and the ionizing radiative transfer and includes X-ray and Lyman lines radiative transfer for a detailed physical modelling. As a result we find that soft X-ray self-shielding, Ly α self-shielding and shock heating all have an impact on the predicted values of the 21-cm optical depth of moderately overdense structures like filaments. A correct treatment of the peculiar velocities is also critical. Modelling these processes seems necessary for accurate predictions and can be done only at high enough resolution. As a result, based on our fiducial model, we estimate that LOFAR should be able to detect a few (strong) absorptions features in a frequency range of a few tens of MHz for a 20 mJy source located at z = 10, while the SKA would extract a large fraction of the absorption information for the same source.

  7. Numerical models of galactic dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elstner, Detlef

    The state of the art for dynamo models in spiral galaxies is reviewed. The comparison of numerical models with special properties of observed magnetic fields yields constraints for the turbulent diffusivity and the α-effect. The derivation of the turbulence parameters from the vertical structure of the interstellar medium gives quite reasonable values for modelling the regular magnetic fields in galaxies with an α2Ω-dynamo. Considering the differences of the turbulence between spiral arms and interarm regions, the observed interarm magnetic fields are recovered in the numerical models due to the special properties of the α2Ω-dynamo.

  8. Numerical modeling of nonintrusive inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.; Morgan, J.; Sale, K.

    1992-12-01

    A wide variety of nonintrusive inspection systems have been proposed in the past several years for the detection of hidden contraband in airline luggage and shipping containers. The majority of these proposed techniques depend on the interaction of radiation with matter to produce a signature specific to the contraband of interest, whether drugs or explosives. In the authors` role as diagnostic specialists in the Underground Test Program over the past forty years, L-Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a technique expertise in the combined numerical and experimental modeling of these types of system. Based on their experience, they are convinced that detailed numerical modeling provides a much more accurate estimate of the actual performance of complex experiments than simple analytical modeling. Furthermore, the construction of detailed numerical prototypes allows experimenters to explore the entire region of parameter space available to them before committing their ideas to hardware. This sort of systematic analysis has often led to improved experimental designs and reductions in fielding costs. L-Division has developed an extensive suite of computer codes to model proposed experiments and possible background interactions. These codes allow one to simulate complex radiation sources, model 3-dimensional system geometries with {open_quotes}real world{close_quotes} complexity, specify detailed elemental distributions, and predict the response of almost any type of detector. In this work several examples are presented illustrating the use of these codes in modeling experimental systems at LLNL and their potential usefulness in evaluating nonintrusive inspection systems is discussed.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  10. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrazine Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meagher, Nancy E.; Bates, Kami R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to develop and validate a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. Hydrazine is used extensively in aerospace propulsion, and although liquid hydrazine is not considered detonable, many fuel handling systems create multiphase mixtures of fuels and fuel vapors during their operation. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the decomposition chemistry of hydrazine under a variety of conditions can be of value in assessing potential operational hazards in hydrazine fuel systems. To gain such knowledge, a reasonable starting point is the development and validation of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. A reasonably complete mechanism was published in 1996, however, many of the elementary steps included had outdated rate expressions and a thorough investigation of the behavior of the mechanism under a variety of conditions was not presented. The current work has included substantial revision of the previously published mechanism, along with a more extensive examination of the decomposition behavior of hydrazine. An attempt to validate the mechanism against the limited experimental data available has been made and was moderately successful. Further computational and experimental research into the chemistry of this fuel needs to be completed.

  11. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Model for TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2005-01-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for 2,4,6-tri-nitrotoluene (TNT) has been developed to explore problems of explosive performance and soot formation during the destruction of munitions. The TNT mechanism treats only gas-phase reactions. Reactions for the decomposition of TNT and for the consumption of intermediate products formed from TNT are assembled based on information from the literature and on current understanding of aromatic chemistry. Thermodynamic properties of intermediate and radical species are estimated by group additivity. Reaction paths are developed based on similar paths for aromatic hydrocarbons. Reaction-rate constant expressions are estimated from the literature and from analogous reactions where the rate constants are available. The detailed reaction mechanism for TNT is added to existing reaction mechanisms for RDX and for hydrocarbons. Computed results show the effect of oxygen concentration on the amount of soot precursors that are formed in the combustion of RDX and TNT mixtures in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures.

  12. Numerical FEM modeling in dental implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roateşi, Iulia; Roateşi, Simona

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to a numerical approach of the stress and displacement calculation of a system made up of dental implant, ceramic crown and surrounding bone. This is the simulation of a clinical situation involving both biological - the bone tissue, and non-biological - the implant and the crown, materials. On the other hand this problem deals with quite fine technical structure details - the threads, tapers, etc with a great impact in masticatory force transmission. Modeling the contact between the implant and the bone tissue is important to a proper bone-implant interface model and implant design. The authors proposed a three-dimensional numerical model to assess the biomechanical behaviour of this complex structure in order to evaluate its stability by determining the risk zones. A comparison between this numerical analysis and clinical cases is performed and a good agreement is obtained.

  13. Detailed Performance Model for Photovoltaic Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Mancilla-David, F.; Ellis, K.; Muljadi, E.; Jenkins, P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a modified current-voltage relationship for the single diode model. The single-diode model has been derived from the well-known equivalent circuit for a single photovoltaic cell. The modification presented in this paper accounts for both parallel and series connections in an array.

  14. Mathematical modeling of electrocardiograms: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Boulakia, Muriel; Cazeau, Serge; Fernández, Miguel A; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric; Zemzemi, Nejib

    2010-03-01

    This paper deals with the numerical simulation of electrocardiograms (ECG). Our aim is to devise a mathematical model, based on partial differential equations, which is able to provide realistic 12-lead ECGs. The main ingredients of this model are classical: the bidomain equations coupled to a phenomenological ionic model in the heart, and a generalized Laplace equation in the torso. The obtention of realistic ECGs relies on other important features--including heart-torso transmission conditions, anisotropy, cell heterogeneity and His bundle modeling--that are discussed in detail. The numerical implementation is based on state-of-the-art numerical methods: domain decomposition techniques and second order semi-implicit time marching schemes, offering a good compromise between accuracy, stability and efficiency. The numerical ECGs obtained with this approach show correct amplitudes, shapes and polarities, in all the 12 standard leads. The relevance of every modeling choice is carefully discussed and the numerical ECG sensitivity to the model parameters investigated. PMID:20033779

  15. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  16. Detailed Physical Trough Model for NREL's Solar Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A.

    2010-10-01

    Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software package made available by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory, and the US Department of Energy. SAM contains hourly system performance and economic models for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, photovoltaic, solar hot-water, and generic fuel-use technologies. Versions of SAM prior to 2010 included only the parabolic trough model based on Excelergy. This model uses top-level empirical performance curves to characterize plant behavior, and thus is limited in predictive capability for new technologies or component configurations. To address this and other functionality challenges, a new trough model; derived from physical first principles was commissioned to supplement the Excelergy-based empirical model. This new 'physical model' approaches the task of characterizing the performance of the whole parabolic trough plant by replacing empirical curve-fit relationships with more detailed calculations where practical. The resulting model matches the annual performance of the SAM empirical model (which has been previously verified with plant data) while maintaining run-times compatible with parametric analysis, adding additional flexibility in modeled system configurations, and providing more detailed performance calculations in the solar field, power block, piping, and storage subsystems.

  17. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  18. Transient Catalytic Combustor Model With Detailed Gas and Surface Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Mellish, Benjamin P.; Miller, Fletcher J.; Tien, James S.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we numerically investigate the transient combustion of a premixed gas mixture in a narrow, perfectly-insulated, catalytic channel which can represent an interior channel of a catalytic monolith. The model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase and a transient, thermally thin solid phase. The gas phase is one-dimensional, but it does account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow via appropriate heat and mass transfer coefficients. The model neglects axial conduction in both the gas and in the solid. The model includes both detailed gas-phase reactions and catalytic surface reactions. The reactants modeled so far include lean mixtures of dry CO and CO/H2 mixtures, with pure oxygen as the oxidizer. The results include transient computations of light-off and system response to inlet condition variations. In some cases, the model predicts two different steady-state solutions depending on whether the channel is initially hot or cold. Additionally, the model suggests that the catalytic ignition of CO/O2 mixtures is extremely sensitive to small variations of inlet equivalence ratios and parts per million levels of H2.

  19. Precise numerical modeling of next generation multimode fiber based links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymiuk, L.; Stepniak, G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to numerically model modern multimode fiber based links we are required to take into account modal and chromatic dispersion, profile dispersion and spectral dependent coupling. In this paper we propose a complete numerical model which not only is precise but also versatile. Additionally to the detailed mathematical description of the model we provide also a bunch of numerical calculations performed with the use of the model.

  20. Numerical Modelling of Gelating Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Babovsky, Hans

    2008-09-01

    The numerical simulation of the gel phase transition of an aerosol system is an interesting and demanding task. Here, we follow an approach first discussed in [6, 8] which turns out as a useful numerical tool. We investigate several improvements and generalizations. In the center of interest are coagulation diffusion systems, where the aerosol dynamics is supplemented with diffusive spreading in physical space. This leads to a variety of scenarios (depending on the coagulation kernel and the diffusion model) for the spatial evolution of the gelation area.

  1. San Joaquin-Tulare Conjunctive Use Model: Detailed model description

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-03-01

    The San Joaquin - Tulare Conjunctive Use Model (SANTUCM) was originally developed for the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program to evaluate possible scenarios for long-term management of drainage and drainage - related problems in the western San Joaquin Valley of California. A unique aspect of this model is its coupling of a surface water delivery and reservoir operations model with a regional groundwater model. The model also performs salinity balances along the tributaries and along the main stem of the San Joaquin River to allow assessment of compliance with State Water Resources Control Board water quality objectives for the San Joaquin River. This document is a detailed description of the various subroutines, variables and parameters used in the model.

  2. Visualized numerical assessment for near infrared diffuse optical tomography with contrast-and-size detail analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Pan, Min-Cheng; Pan, Min-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose an objective contrast-and-size detail (CSD) analysis for near infrared diffuse optical tomography (NIR DOT), of which the concept is derived from the subjective contrast detail (CD) analysis. We define a measure for numerical CSD analysis based on the resolution estimation of contrast and size. Following that, the contrast-and-size map of resolution can be calculated and displayed for each corresponding image in the map; furthermore, a CSD resolution curve can be plotted by calculating the average value of the projection corresponding to the physical quantity/axis (size or contrast). To provide some worked examples about the proposed CSD analysis evaluating the imaging performance of different reconstruction methods, Tikhonov regularization and edge-preserving regularization with different weighting functions were employed. Results suggested that using edge-preserving regularization with the generalized Lorentzian weighting function is the most attractive for the estimation of absorption-coefficient images.

  3. Detailed numerical investigation of 90∘ scattering of energetic particles interacting with magnetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, G.; Shalchi, A.

    2014-04-15

    In the present paper, we re-visit a well-known problem in diffusion theory, namely the 90∘ scattering problem. We use a test-particle code to compute the pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficient at 90∘ for different values of the turbulent magnetic field strength and the magnetic rigidity. We consider a slab model and compare our numerical findings with the analytical result provided by second-order quasilinear theory. We show that the latter theory accurately describes 90∘ scattering. We also replace the slab model by a more realistic two-component model to explore the influence of the turbulence model on 90∘ scattering.

  4. Numerical Modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakis, Iraklis; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Pajewski, Lara

    2014-05-01

    Numerical methods are needed in order to solve Maxwell's equations in complicated and realistic problems. Over the years a number of numerical methods have been developed to do so. Amongst them the most popular are the finite element, finite difference implicit techniques, frequency domain solution of Helmontz equation, the method of moments, transmission line matrix method. However, the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) is considered to be one of the most attractive choice basically because of its simplicity, speed and accuracy. FDTD first introduced in 1966 by Kane Yee. Since then, FDTD has been established and developed to be a very rigorous and well defined numerical method for solving Maxwell's equations. The order characteristics, accuracy and limitations are rigorously and mathematically defined. This makes FDTD reliable and easy to use. Numerical modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a very useful tool which can be used in order to give us insight into the scattering mechanisms and can also be used as an alternative approach to aid data interpretation. Numerical modelling has been used in a wide range of GPR applications including archeology, geophysics, forensic, landmine detection etc. In engineering, some applications of numerical modelling include the estimation of the effectiveness of GPR to detect voids in bridges, to detect metal bars in concrete, to estimate shielding effectiveness etc. The main challenges in numerical modelling of GPR for engineering applications are A) the implementation of the dielectric properties of the media (soils, concrete etc.) in a realistic way, B) the implementation of the geometry of the media (soils inhomogeneities, rough surface, vegetation, concrete features like fractures and rock fragments etc.) and C) the detailed modelling of the antenna units. The main focus of this work (which is part of the COST Action TU1208) is the accurate and realistic implementation of GPR antenna units into the FDTD

  5. Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1991-01-03

    We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell.

  6. Numerical models of complex diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yu.; Talbot, C.; Poliakov, A. N. B.

    1993-12-01

    Numerically modelled diapirs that rise into overburdens with viscous rheology produce a large variety of shapes. This work uses the finite-element method to study the development of diapirs that rise towards a surface on which a diapir-induced topography creeps flat or disperses ("erodes") at different rates. Slow erosion leads to diapirs with "mushroom" shapes, moderate erosion rate to "wine glass" diapirs and fast erosion to "beer glass"- and "column"-shaped diapirs. The introduction of a low-viscosity layer at the top of the overburden causes diapirs to develop into structures resembling a "Napoleon hat". These spread lateral sheets.

  7. Numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of burning plasma is very complicated physics, which is dominated by multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena. To understand such phenomena, numerical simulations are indispensable. Fundamentals of numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling are briefly discussed in this paper. In addition, the parallelization technique such as open multi processing (OpenMP) and message passing interface (MPI) parallel programing are introduced and the loop-level parallelization is shown as an example.

  8. Large-signal numerical and analytical HBT models

    SciTech Connect

    Teeter, D.A.; East, J.R.; Mains, R.K.; Haddad, G.I. )

    1993-05-01

    Several large-signal HBT models are investigated in this paper to determine their usefulness at millimeter-wave frequencies. The most detailed model involves numerically solving moments of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. A description of the numerical model is given along with several simulated results. The numerical model is then used to evaluate two analytical HBT models, the conventional Gummel-Poon model and a modified Ebers-Moll model. It is found that the commonly used Gummel-Poon model exhibits poor agreement with numerical and experimental data at millimeter-wave frequencies due to neglect of transit-time delays. Improved agreement between measured and modeled data result by including transit-time effects in an Ebers-Moll model. This simple model has direct application to millimeter-wave power amplifier and oscillator design. Several measured results are presented to help verify the simple model.

  9. Detail view of lamp in law library; Jennewein modeled symbols ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of lamp in law library; Jennewein modeled symbols of the four seasons on the lamp's aluminum supports - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 3. DETAIL VIEW OF DIRECT DRIVE STERLING 'DOLPHIN T' MODEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL VIEW OF DIRECT DRIVE STERLING 'DOLPHIN T' MODEL 4 CYLINDER, GASOLINE TRACTOR-TYPE ENGINE WITH FALKBIBBY FLEXIBLE COUPLING - Central Railroad of New Jersey, Newark Bay Lift Bridge, Spanning Newark Bay, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  11. 21. INTERIOR, DOUBLE STAIRWAY LEADING TO MODEL HALL, DETAIL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. INTERIOR, DOUBLE STAIRWAY LEADING TO MODEL HALL, DETAIL OF ONE FLIGHT (5 x 7 negative; 8 x 10 print) - Patent Office Building, Bounded by Seventh, Ninth, F & G Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 46. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF INFLOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF INFLOW CONTROLLER WITH ORIGINAL CAPACITOR BANK. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  13. 45. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 20 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 20 GALLON PER MINUTE INFLOW CONTROLLER AND DIFFERENTIAL PRESSURE REGULATOR. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  14. 44. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 20 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 20 GALLON PER MINUTE INFLOW CONTROLLER AND RELAY PANEL. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  15. 40. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF ATCHAFALAYA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF ATCHAFALAYA FLOODWAY SECTION. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  16. Numerical Modeling of Nanoelectronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Bowen, R. Chris; Boykin, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Nanoelectronic Modeling 3-D (NEMO 3-D) is a computer program for numerical modeling of the electronic structure properties of a semiconductor device that is embodied in a crystal containing as many as 16 million atoms in an arbitrary configuration and that has overall dimensions of the order of tens of nanometers. The underlying mathematical model represents the quantummechanical behavior of the device resolved to the atomistic level of granularity. The system of electrons in the device is represented by a sparse Hamiltonian matrix that contains hundreds of millions of terms. NEMO 3-D solves the matrix equation on a Beowulf-class cluster computer, by use of a parallel-processing matrix vector multiplication algorithm coupled to a Lanczos and/or Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm that solves for eigenvalues. In a recent update of NEMO 3-D, a new strain treatment, parameterized for bulk material properties of GaAs and InAs, was developed for two tight-binding submodels. The utility of the NEMO 3-D was demonstrated in an atomistic analysis of the effects of disorder in alloys and, in particular, in bulk In(x)Ga(l-x)As and in In0.6Ga0.4As quantum dots.

  17. HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

    2008-12-22

    There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

  18. A mass conserving level set method for detailed numerical simulation of liquid atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Kun; Shao, Changxiao; Yang, Yue; Fan, Jianren

    2015-10-01

    An improved mass conserving level set method for detailed numerical simulations of liquid atomization is developed to address the issue of mass loss in the existing level set method. This method introduces a mass remedy procedure based on the local curvature at the interface, and in principle, can ensure the absolute mass conservation of the liquid phase in the computational domain. Three benchmark cases, including Zalesak's disk, a drop deforming in a vortex field, and the binary drop head-on collision, are simulated to validate the present method, and the excellent agreement with exact solutions or experimental results is achieved. It is shown that the present method is able to capture the complex interface with second-order accuracy and negligible additional computational cost. The present method is then applied to study more complex flows, such as a drop impacting on a liquid film and the swirling liquid sheet atomization, which again, demonstrates the advantages of mass conservation and the capability to represent the interface accurately.

  19. Benefits of detailed models of muscle activation and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, S. L.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent biophysical and physiological studies identified some of the detailed mechanisms involved in excitation-contraction coupling, muscle contraction, and deactivation. Mathematical models incorporating these mechanisms allow independent estimates of key parameters, direct interplay between basic muscle research and the study of motor control, and realistic model behaviors, some of which are not accessible to previous, simpler, models. The existence of previously unmodeled behaviors has important implications for strategies of motor control and identification of neural signals. New developments in the analysis of differential equations make the more detailed models feasible for simulation in realistic experimental situations.

  20. Modeling Biodegradation and Reactive Transport: Analytical and Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y; Glascoe, L

    2005-06-09

    The computational modeling of the biodegradation of contaminated groundwater systems accounting for biochemical reactions coupled to contaminant transport is a valuable tool for both the field engineer/planner with limited computational resources and the expert computational researcher less constrained by time and computer power. There exists several analytical and numerical computer models that have been and are being developed to cover the practical needs put forth by users to fulfill this spectrum of computational demands. Generally, analytical models provide rapid and convenient screening tools running on very limited computational power, while numerical models can provide more detailed information with consequent requirements of greater computational time and effort. While these analytical and numerical computer models can provide accurate and adequate information to produce defensible remediation strategies, decisions based on inadequate modeling output or on over-analysis can have costly and risky consequences. In this chapter we consider both analytical and numerical modeling approaches to biodegradation and reactive transport. Both approaches are discussed and analyzed in terms of achieving bioremediation goals, recognizing that there is always a tradeoff between computational cost and the resolution of simulated systems.

  1. Numerical modeling of explosions for nuclear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring the Earth for underground nuclear explosions requires a detailed understanding of the explosion source. In this context, "source" refers to the source of seismic waves, and it is generated by the complex nonlinear near-source motion that accompanies the nuclear explosion. In particular, nuclear monitoring requires understanding the transition from the hydrodynamic to elastic regimes, and propagation of waveforms from the source to stations at distances of hundreds to thousands of kilometers. In the transition region, shear strength is critically important, as are changes in shear strength as the shock wave propagates. Numerical modeling using 1D spherically symmetric, 2D axisymmetric and full 3D calculations provides important insights into the seismic source and the waveforms it generates. Important considerations for numerical modeling include emplacement conditions (tamped or in a cavity), source type (chemical or nuclear), material models for strength and strength reduction, and geologic conditions including topography and tectonic stresses in the source region. In addition to calculating the near source ground motion, we propagate the near source solution to regional and teleseismic distances where the observations of seismic signals from nuclear explosions are made. The objectives of nuclear monitoring are detection of seismic events (earthquakes, quarry blasts and other sources in addition to nuclear explosions), accurate location of these events, discrimination of nuclear explosions from other types of sources, and estimation of nuclear explosion yield. Numerical modeling is particularly important for discrimination and yield estimation. Numerical modeling is used to understand unexpected anomalies that occur, such as the large surface waves generated by the three North Korean nuclear tests, which may have been caused by a difference in tectonic stress state between North Korea and other test sites. Another important issue that can be addressed

  2. 43. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 200 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 200 GALLON PER MINUTE INFLOW CONTROLLER WITH NEW PROGRAMMER, LOCATED ALONG THE NATCHEZ SECTION OF THE MODEL. NOTE CONTROL BUILDING AT LEFT. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  3. 42. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 200 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 200 GALLON PER MINUTE INFLOW CONTROLLER WITH NEW PROGRAMMER, LOCATED ALONG THE NATCHEZ SECTION OF THE MODEL. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  4. Capabilities and limitations of detailed hillslope hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstert, Axel

    1999-01-01

    Hillslope hydrological modelling is considered to be of great importance for the understanding and quantification of hydrological processes in hilly or mountainous landscapes. In recent years a few comprehensive hydrological models have been developed at the hillslope scale which have resulted in an advanced representation of hillslope hydrological processes (including their interactions), and in some operational applications, such as in runoff and erosion studies at the field scale or lateral flow simulation in environmental and geotechnical engineering. An overview of the objectives of hillslope hydrological modelling is given, followed by a brief introduction of an exemplary comprehensive hillslope model, which stimulates a series of hydrological processes such as interception, evapotranspiration, infiltration into the soil matrix and into macropores, lateral and vertical subsurface soil water flow both in the matrix and preferential flow paths, surface runoff and channel discharge. Several examples of this model are presented and discussed in order to determine the model's capabilities and limitations. Finally, conclusions about the limitations of detailed hillslope modelling are drawn and an outlook on the future prospects of hydrological models on the hillslope scale is given.The model presented performed reasonable calculations of Hortonian surface runoff and subsequent erosion processes, given detailed information of initial soil water content and soil hydraulic conditions. The vertical and lateral soil moisture dynamics were also represented quite well. However, the given examples of model applications show that quite detailed climatic and soil data are required to obtain satisfactory results. The limitations of detailed hillslope hydrological modelling arise from different points: difficulties in the representations of certain processes (e.g. surface crusting, unsaturated-saturated soil moisture flow, macropore flow), problems of small-scale variability

  5. Numerical modeling for dilute and dense sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have successfully implemented a numerical model for spray-combustion calculations. In this model, the governing gas-phase equations in Eulerian coordinate are solved by a time-marching multiple pressure correction procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. The droplet-phase equations in Lagrangian coordinate are solved by a stochastic discrete particle technique. In order to simplify the calculation procedure for the circulating droplets, the effective conductivity model is utilized. The k-epsilon models are utilized to characterize the time and length scales of the gas phase in conjunction with turbulent modulation by droplets and droplet dispersion by turbulence. This method entails random sampling of instantaneous gas flow properties and the stochastic process requires a large number of computational parcels to produce the satisfactory dispersion distributions even for rather dilute sprays. Two major improvements in spray combustion modelings were made. Firstly, we have developed a probability density function approach in multidimensional space to represent a specific computational particle. Secondly, we incorporate the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model for handling the dense spray effects. This breakup model is based on the reasonable assumption that atomization and drop breakup are indistinguishable processes within a dense spray near the nozzle exit. Accordingly, atomization is prescribed by injecting drops which have a characteristic size equal to the nozzle exit diameter. Example problems include the nearly homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulent particle dispersion, and the non-evaporating, evaporating, and burning dense sprays. Comparison with experimental data will be discussed in detail.

  6. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis of detailed soot particle size distribution in laminar premixed ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jasdeep; Patterson, Robert I.A.; Kraft, Markus; Wang, Hai

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, the prediction of a soot model [J. Appel, H. Bockhorn, M. Frenklach, Combust. Flame 121 (2000) 122-136] is compared to a recently published set of highly detailed soot particle size distributions [B. Zhao, Z. Yang, Z. Li, M.V. Johnston, H. Wang, Proc. Combust. Inst. 30 (2005)]. A stochastic approach is used to obtain soot particle size distributions (PSDs). The key features of the measured and simulated particle size distributions are identified and used as a simple way of comparing PSDs. The sensitivity of the soot PSDs to the parameters defining parts of the soot model, such as soot inception, particle and PAH collision efficiency and enhancement, and surface activity is investigated. Incepting soot particle size is found to have a very significant effect on the small-size end of the PSDs, especially the position of the trough for a bimodal soot PSDs. A new model for the decay in the surface activity is proposed in which the activity of the soot particle depends only on the history of that particle and the local temperature in the flame. This is a first attempt to use local flame variables to define the surface aging which has major impact on the prediction of the large-size end of the PSDs. Using these modifications to the soot model it is possible to improve the agreement between some of the points of interest in the simulated and measured PSDs. The paper achieves the task to help advance the soot models to predict soot PSD in addition to soot volume fraction and number density, which has been the focus of the literature. (author)

  7. Numerical studies of the heterogeneous combustion of char using detailed chemistry.

    PubMed

    Miessen, G; Behrendt, F; Deutschmann, O; Warnatz, J

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of graphite is used as a model system for the combustion of char. In order to understand this oxidation process a stagnation-point flow of an oxygen stream on a graphite surface is investigated numerically. The chemical reactions in the gas phase as well as on the surface are modelled by a series of elementary steps. The surface reactions take into consideration the different surface complexes formed, the influence of the geometry of the graphite surface and the interaction of gas-phase molecules with surface complexes. The rate coefficients used are estimated by applying methods of the microkinetic analysis of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The mechanism is used to simulate the combustion rate of a graphite surface and the ratio of CO to CO2 formed on the surface. The simulation results are compared with experimental data and a good agreement is achieved. Furthermore, the fraction of char-bound nitrogen converted to N2 and N2O is calculated. PMID:11219686

  8. Detailed numerical investigation of the Bohm limit in cosmic ray diffusion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A. E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com

    2014-04-10

    A standard model in cosmic ray diffusion theory is the so-called Bohm limit in which the particle mean free path is assumed to be equal to the Larmor radius. This type of diffusion is often employed to model the propagation and acceleration of energetic particles. However, recent analytical and numerical work has shown that standard Bohm diffusion is not realistic. In the present paper, we perform test-particle simulations to explore particle diffusion in the strong turbulence limit in which the wave field is much stronger than the mean magnetic field. We show that there is indeed a lower limit of the particle mean free path along the mean field. In this limit, the mean free path is directly proportional to the unperturbed Larmor radius like in the traditional Bohm limit, but it is reduced by the factor δB/B {sub 0} where B {sub 0} is the mean field and δB the turbulent field. Although we focus on parallel diffusion, we also explore diffusion across the mean field in the strong turbulence limit.

  9. The Effects of Highly Detailed Urban Roughness Parameters on a Sea-Breeze Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varquez, Alvin Christopher G.; Nakayoshi, Makoto; Kanda, Manabu

    2015-03-01

    We consider the effects of detailed urban roughness parameters on a sea-breeze simulation. An urban roughness database, constructed using a new aerodynamic parametrization derived from large-eddy simulations, was incorporated as a surface boundary condition in the advanced Weather Research and Forecasting model. The zero-plane displacement and aerodynamic roughness length at several densely built-up urban grids were three times larger than conventional values due to the consideration of building-height variability. A comparison between simulations from the modified model and its default version, which uses uniform roughness parameters within a conventional method, was conducted for a 2-month period during summer. Results showed a significant improvement in the simulation of surface wind speed but not with temperature. From the 2-month study period, a day with an evident sea-breeze penetration was selected and simulated at higher temporal resolution. Sea-breeze penetration weakened and was more delayed over urbanized areas. The slow sea-breeze penetration also lessened heat advection downwind allowing stronger turbulent mixing and a deeper boundary layer above urban areas. Horizontal wind-speed reduction due to the increased urban surface drag reached heights of several hundreds of metres due to the strong convection.

  10. Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Blurock, Edward; Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Sirjean, Baptiste; Warth, V.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of limiting the environmental impact of transportation, this paper reviews new directions which are being followed in the development of more predictive and more accurate detailed chemical kinetic models for the combustion of fuels. In the first part, the performance of current models, especially in terms of the prediction of pollutant formation, is evaluated. In the next parts, recent methods and ways to improve these models are described. An emphasis is given on the development of detailed models based on elementary reactions, on the production of the related thermochemical and kinetic parameters, and on the experimental techniques available to produce the data necessary to evaluate model predictions under well defined conditions. PMID:21597604

  11. Cost-effective and detailed modelling of compressor manifold vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Eijk, A.; Egas, G.; Smeulers, J.P.M.

    1996-12-01

    In systems with large reciprocating compressors, so-called compressor manifold vibrations can contribute to fatigue failure of the pipe system. These vibrations are excited by pulsation-induced forces and by forces generated by the compressor. This paper describes an advanced and accurate method for predicting vibration levels and cyclic stresses in critical parts of the piping, based on detailed modelling of the pulsations and compressor parts. Although detailed finite element modelling is applied, the method can compete in ease of use with analytical methods and is far more accurate. The effectiveness of this approach will be demonstrated by a case study in which a detailed compressor manifold vibration analysis has been carried out. The compressor is used for underground storage of natural gas.

  12. NUMERICAL MODELS FOR PREDICTING WATERSHED ACIDIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three numerical models of watershed acidification, including the MAGIC II, ETD, and ILWAS models, are reviewed, and a comparative study is made of the specific process formulations that are incorporated in the models to represent hydrological, geochemical, and biogeochemical proc...

  13. Lessons learned in detailed clinical modeling at Intermountain Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Oniki, Thomas A; Coyle, Joseph F; Parker, Craig G; Huff, Stanley M

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Intermountain Healthcare has a long history of using coded terminology and detailed clinical models (DCMs) to govern storage of clinical data to facilitate decision support and semantic interoperability. The latest iteration of DCMs at Intermountain is called the clinical element model (CEM). We describe the lessons learned from our CEM efforts with regard to subjective decisions a modeler frequently needs to make in creating a CEM. We present insights and guidelines, but also describe situations in which use cases conflict with the guidelines. We propose strategies that can help reconcile the conflicts. The hope is that these lessons will be helpful to others who are developing and maintaining DCMs in order to promote sharing and interoperability. Methods We have used the Clinical Element Modeling Language (CEML) to author approximately 5000 CEMs. Results Based on our experience, we have formulated guidelines to lead our modelers through the subjective decisions they need to make when authoring models. Reported here are guidelines regarding precoordination/postcoordination, dividing content between the model and the terminology, modeling logical attributes, and creating iso-semantic models. We place our lessons in context, exploring the potential benefits of an implementation layer, an iso-semantic modeling framework, and ontologic technologies. Conclusions We assert that detailed clinical models can advance interoperability and sharing, and that our guidelines, an implementation layer, and an iso-semantic framework will support our progress toward that goal. PMID:24993546

  14. Transient Numerical Modeling of Catalytic Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a transient model of catalytic combustion suitable for isolated channels and monolith reactors. The model is a lumped two-phase (gas and solid) model where the gas phase is quasi-steady relative to the transient solid. Axial diffusion is neglected in the gas phase; lateral diffusion, however, is accounted for using transfer coefficients. The solid phase includes axial heat conduction and external heat loss due to convection and radiation. The combustion process utilizes detailed gas and surface reaction models. The gas-phase model becomes a system of stiff ordinary differential equations while the solid phase reduces, after discretization, into a system of stiff ordinary differential-algebraic equations. The time evolution of the system came from alternating integrations of the quasi-steady gas and transient solid. This work outlines the numerical model and presents some sensitivity studies on important parameters including internal transfer coefficients, catalytic surface site density, and external heat-loss (if applicable). The model is compared to two experiments using CO fuel: (1) steady-state conversion through an isothermal platinum (Pt) tube and (2) transient propagation of a catalytic reaction inside a small Pt tube. The model requires internal mass-transfer resistance to match the experiments at lower residence times. Under mass-transport limited conditions, the model reasonably predicted exit conversion using global mass-transfer coefficients. Near light-off, the model results did not match the experiment precisely even after adjustment of mass-transfer coefficients. Agreement improved for the first case after adjusting the surface kinetics such that the net rate of CO adsorption increased compared to O2. The CO / O2 surface mechanism came from a sub-set of reactions in a popular CH4 / O2 mechanism. For the second case, predictions improved for lean conditions with increased external heat loss or adjustment of the kinetics as in the

  15. A time dependent anatomically detailed model of cardiac conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxberg, B. E.; Grumbach, M. P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the determinants of transitions in cardiac electrical activity from normal patterns to dysrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation, we are constructing an anatomically and physiologically detailed finite element simulation of myocardial electrical propagation. A healthy human heart embedded in paraffin was sectioned to provide a detailed anatomical substrate for model calculations. The simulation of propagation includes anisotropy in conduction velocity due to fiber orientation as well as gradients in conduction velocities, absolute and relative refractory periods, action potential duration and electrotonic influence of nearest neighbors. The model also includes changes in the behaviour of myocardial tissue as a function of the past local activity. With this model, we can examine the significance of fiber orientation and time dependence of local propagation parameters on dysrhythmogenesis.

  16. Towards a detailed soot model for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mosbach, Sebastian; Celnik, Matthew S.; Raj, Abhijeet; Kraft, Markus; Zhang, Hongzhi R.; Kubo, Shuichi; Kim, Kyoung-Oh

    2009-06-15

    In this work, we present a detailed model for the formation of soot in internal combustion engines describing not only bulk quantities such as soot mass, number density, volume fraction, and surface area but also the morphology and chemical composition of soot aggregates. The new model is based on the Stochastic Reactor Model (SRM) engine code, which uses detailed chemistry and takes into account convective heat transfer and turbulent mixing, and the soot formation is accounted for by SWEEP, a population balance solver based on a Monte Carlo method. In order to couple the gas-phase to the particulate phase, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism describing the combustion of Primary Reference Fuels (PRFs) is extended to include small Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as pyrene, which function as soot precursor species for particle inception in the soot model. Apart from providing averaged quantities as functions of crank angle like soot mass, volume fraction, aggregate diameter, and the number of primary particles per aggregate for example, the integrated model also gives detailed information such as aggregate and primary particle size distribution functions. In addition, specifics about aggregate structure and composition, including C/H ratio and PAH ring count distributions, and images similar to those produced with Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), can be obtained. The new model is applied to simulate an n-heptane fuelled Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine which is operated at an equivalence ratio of 1.93. In-cylinder pressure and heat release predictions show satisfactory agreement with measurements. Furthermore, simulated aggregate size distributions as well as their time evolution are found to qualitatively agree with those obtained experimentally through snatch sampling. It is also observed both in the experiment as well as in the simulation that aggregates in the trapped residual gases play a vital role in the soot

  17. Detailed mathematical models of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewinter, F.; Raag, V.

    1972-01-01

    Two new models for the design and performance analysis of RTG's are outlined in this paper. The first model assumes a small-signal transient-type calculational sequence that permits the separation of steady-state operation of the generator from its dynamic behavior. The second model uses a numerical (finite difference) solution of the performance equations of the RTG. Both models enable the investigation of transient and steady-state performance of RTG's. Simplifying assumptions have been kept to a minimum in the new RTG models and these models enable the inclusion of generator end losses, axial temperature gradients and heat interchange between thermoelements and thermal insulation in RTG performance calculations in a self-consistent manner.

  18. NTP system simulation and detailed nuclear engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) & detailed nuclear engine modeling; modeling and engineering simulation of nuclear thermal rocket systems; nuclear thermal rocket simulation system; INSPI-NTVR core axial flow profiles; INSPI-NTRV core axial flow profiles; specific impulse vs. chamber pressure; turbine pressure ratio vs. chamber pressure; NERVA core axial flow profiles; P&W XNR2000 core axial flow profiles; pump pressure rise vs. chamber pressure; streamline of jet-induced flow in cylindrical chamber; flow pattern of a jet-induced flow in a chamber; and radiative heat transfer models.

  19. Numerical wind speed simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1981-09-01

    A relatively simple stochastic model for simulating wind speed time series that can be used as an alternative to time series from representative locations is described in this report. The model incorporates systematic seasonal variation of the mean wind, its standard deviation, and the correlation speeds. It also incorporates systematic diurnal variation of the mean speed and standard deviation. To demonstrate the model capabilities, simulations were made using model parameters derived from data collected at the Hanford Meteorology Station, and results of analysis of simulated and actual data were compared.

  20. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  1. Detailed Configuration Calculations for Non-LTE Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Christopher J.; Abdallah, Joseph, Jr.; Clark, Robert E. H.; Kilcrease, David P.

    1998-11-01

    We continue our work to explore the feasibility of creating detailed atomic models for radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of ICF applications. By further optimizing our atomic data codes we are able to create non-LTE models with a level of complexity approximately one order of magnitude greater (in size) than previously obtained. We present emissivities for gold which include on the order of 75,000 configurations per temperature-density point. The inclusion of additional configurations has yielded improved results for quantities such as the ion fraction distributions, but the question of spectral convergence is yet unanswered. The creation of still larger models will be discussed as well as comparison with experiment and other theories. The possibility of using these models for in-line simulations will also be discussed.

  2. Modeling the detailed Lyman-α line profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoell, Micha; Haberreiter, Margit; Schmutz, Werner; Shapiro, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The variability of the solar spectral irradiance is an important driver in global circulation models. The Lyman-α spectral line is of particular interest as it exhibits a high variability and has strong impact on the ozone concentration and temperature in the Earth's atmosphere. For a complete understanding of the variation of the Lyman-α line it is important to be able to model its detailed line profile. We present recent work on the improvement of the modeling efforts of this important spectral line. We employ an updated version of the COde for Solar Irradiance (COSI) along with existing model atmospheres with an improved implementation of the temperature and turbulent velocity in the chromosphere and transition region. With the latest modifications we are able to reproduce high resolution observations taken with the SUMER instrument onboard of SOHO. This is an important step towards the reliable reconstruction of the irradiance in the Lyman-α spectral line.

  3. Numerical models for the evaluation of geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    We have carried out detailed simulations of various fields in the USA (Bada, New Mexico; Heber, California); Mexico (Cerro Prieto); Iceland (Krafla); and Kenya (Olkaria). These simulation studies have illustrated the usefulness of numerical models for the overall evaluation of geothermal systems. The methodology for modeling the behavior of geothermal systems, different approaches to geothermal reservoir modeling and how they can be applied in comprehensive evaluation work are discussed.

  4. Numerical Modeling in Geodynamics: Success, Failure and Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.

    2005-12-01

    tuning model variables are greater than two, test carefully the effect of each of the variables on the modeled phenomenon. Remember: With four exponents I can fit an elephant (E. Fermi, physicist). (vii) Make your numerical model as accurate as possible, but never put the aim to reach a great accuracy: Undue precision of computations is the first symptom of mathematical illiteracy (N. Krylov, mathematician). How complex should be a numerical model? A model which images any detail of the reality is as useful as a map of scale 1:1 (J. Robinson, economist). This message is quite important for geoscientists, who study numerical models of complex geodynamical processes. I believe that geoscientists will never create a model of the real Earth dynamics, but we should try to model the dynamics such a way to simulate basic geophysical processes and phenomena. Does a particular model have a predictive power? Each numerical model has a predictive power, otherwise the model is useless. The predictability of the model varies with its complexity. Remember that a solution to the numerical model is an approximate solution to the equations, which have been chosen in believe that they describe dynamic processes of the Earth. Hence a numerical model predicts dynamics of the Earth as well as the mathematical equations describe this dynamics. What methodological advances are still needed for testable geodynamic modeling? Inverse (time-reverse) numerical modeling and data assimilation are new methodologies in geodynamics. The inverse modeling can allow to test geodynamic models forward in time using restored (from present-day observations) initial conditions instead of unknown conditions.

  5. Detailed Modeling of Higher Order Hierarchical Kepler Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Joanna; Orosz, Jerome A.

    2016-06-01

    Most stars have stellar companions (i.e. they exist in double, triple, or higher order configurations). Binary star systems are those which contain two stars. These systems are valued scientifically because they allow for the measurement of fundamental stellar properties such as masses and radii. These properties in turn allow for detailed studies of stellar evolution. The Kepler space telescope has discovered roughly 2900 eclipsing binary stars in its field of view. Various studies have shown that roughly 20% of the Kepler eclipsing binaries contain companions are are most likely triple star systems. We present a preliminary survey of the orbital properties of the tertiary bodies in a sample of thirty triple systems. In addition, a small number of the triple systems show eclipse events due to the third star. We present the results of detailed modeling of two of these systems, and discuss how in some cases these triple systems allow for extremely precise measurements of the fundamental stellar parameters.

  6. Survey of numerical electrostimulation models.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J Patrick

    2016-06-21

    This paper evaluates results of a survey of electrostimulation models of myelinated nerve. Participants were asked to determine thresholds of excitation for 18 cases involving different characteristics of the neuron, the stimulation waveform, and the electrode arrangement. Responses were received from 7 investigators using 10 models. Excitation thresholds differed significantly among these models. For example, with a 2 ms monophasic stimulus pulse and an electrode/fiber distance of 1 cm, thresholds from the least to greatest value differed by a factor of 8.3; with a 5 μs pulse, thresholds differed by the factor 3.8. Significant differences in reported simulations point to the need for experimental validation. Additional efforts are needed to develop computational models for unmyelinated C-fibers, A-delta fibers, CNS neurons, and CNS Synapses. PMID:27223870

  7. Survey of numerical electrostimulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, J. Patrick

    2016-06-01

    This paper evaluates results of a survey of electrostimulation models of myelinated nerve. Participants were asked to determine thresholds of excitation for 18 cases involving different characteristics of the neuron, the stimulation waveform, and the electrode arrangement. Responses were received from 7 investigators using 10 models. Excitation thresholds differed significantly among these models. For example, with a 2 ms monophasic stimulus pulse and an electrode/fiber distance of 1 cm, thresholds from the least to greatest value differed by a factor of 8.3; with a 5 μs pulse, thresholds differed by the factor 3.8. Significant differences in reported simulations point to the need for experimental validation. Additional efforts are needed to develop computational models for unmyelinated C-fibers, A-delta fibers, CNS neurons, and CNS Synapses.

  8. Accuracy details in realistic CFD modeling of an industrial centrifugal pump in direct and reverse modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páscoa, J. C.; Silva, F. J.; Pinheiro, J. S.; Martins, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Numerical computation of the flowfield inside a pump is herein used as a numerical laboratory, subject to the limitations of modeling assumptions and to experimental verification. A numerical computation of the flow inside a real industrial centrifugal pump is performed that includes a very sophisticated geometry. Conversely to other computations, in this test case no simplification of the geometry was introduced. Numerical computations are obtained using Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. A detailed analysis of the turbulent flowstructure is performed for the design point and two off design conditions. Additional computations were performed in order to compare the numerical and experimental pump characteristics; these were obtained under normalized testing conditions. Further computations are presented for the pump working in reverse turbine mode (PAT). Detailed analyses of the flow allow a comparison of the internal flow losses when the pump is operating in direct and reverse mode. This is also useful to help in the selection of an adequate pump geometry that can work in both modes with best efficiency.

  9. Light in Tropical Forest Models: What Detail Matters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkin, A.; Bentley, L. P.; Asner, G. P.; Malhi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Representations of light in models of tropical forests are typically unconstrained by field data and rife with assumptions, and for good reason: forest light environments are highly variable, difficult and onerous to predict, and the value of improved prediction is unclear. Still, the question remains: how detailed must our models be to be accurate enough, yet simple enough to be able to scale them from plots to landscapes? Here we use field data to constrain 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D light models and integrate them with simple forest models to predict net primary production (NPP) across an Andes-to-Amazon elevation transect in Peru. Field data consist of novel vertical light profile measurements coupled with airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) data from the Carnegie Airborne Observatory. Preliminary results indicate that while 1-D models may be "good-enough" and highly-scalable where forest structure is relatively homogenous, more complex models become important as forest structure becomes more heterogeneous. We discuss the implications our results hold for prediction of NPP under a changing climate, and suggest paths forward for useful proxies of light availability in forests to improve and scale up forest models.

  10. Bio-butanol: Combustion properties and detailed chemical kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Black, G.; Curran, H.J.; Pichon, S.; Simmie, J.M.; Zhukov, V.

    2010-02-15

    Autoignition delay time measurements were performed at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1 and 2 for butan-1-ol at reflected shock pressures of 1, 2.6 and 8 atm at temperatures from 1100 to 1800 K. High-level ab initio calculations were used to determine enthalpies of formation and consequently bond dissociation energies for each bond in the alcohol. A detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of 1399 reactions involving 234 species was constructed and tested against the delay times and also against recent jet-stirred reactor speciation data with encouraging results. The importance of enol chemistry is highlighted. (author)

  11. Detailed Modeling of Grounding Solutions for the ITER ICRF Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrytsya, V.; Dumortier, P.; Messiaen, A.; Louche, F.; Durodié, F.

    2011-12-01

    The excitation of non-TEM modes around the ITER ICRF antenna plug can considerably increase the level of RF voltages and currents on the ITER plug. First study of these modes and a solution to avoid them in the ITER ion cyclotron range of frequencies were reported in [1]. In this work a detailed analysis of electrical properties of the ITER ICRF antenna with the plug was studied for different grounding solutions with CST Microwave Studio® [2]. Conclusions of an earlier work [ 1 ] were confirmed on the detailed model of the antenna with the plug. Different grounding contacts (capacitive, galvanic and mixed capacitive-galvanic) as well as their distribution inside the plug gap were analyzed. It was shown that capacitive and mixed capacitive-galvanic grounding are less effective because they demand high values of the capacitance and are more sensitive to the frequency and antenna spectrum. In particular a galvanic grounding realized by the contacts put around the perimeter of the plug gap at lm behind the front face of the antenna is the most suitable solution from the electromagnetic point of view. An optimization of the layout and arrangement of the contacts in order to assess and optimize the current distribution on them is under way. Measurements on a scaled mock-up of the complete antenna and the plug are under way for modeling results confirmation.

  12. Detailed Modeling and Analysis of the CPFM Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, William H.; Lloyd, Steven A.; DeMajistre, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of photolysis rate coefficients (or "j-values") is essential to determining the photochemical reaction rates that define ozone loss and other crucial processes in the atmosphere. j-Values can be calculated with radiative transfer models, derived from actinic flux observations, or inferred from trace gas measurements. The principal objective of this study is to cross-validate j-values from the Composition and Photodissociative Flux Measurement (CPFM) instrument during the Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region In Summer (POLARIS) and SAGE I11 Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) field campaigns with model calculations and other measurements and to use this detailed analysis to improve our ability to determine j-values. Another objective is to analyze the spectral flux from the CPFM (not just the j-values) and, using a multi-wavelength/multi-species spectral fitting technique, determine atmospheric composition.

  13. Waste glass melter numerical and physical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Peters, R.D.; Lessor, D.L.; Lowery, P.S.; Elliott, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    Results of physical and numerical simulation modeling of high-level liquid waste vitrification melters are presented. Physical modeling uses simulant fluids in laboratory testing. Visualization results provide insight into convective melt flow patterns from which information is derived to support performance estimation of operating melters and data to support numerical simulation. Numerical simulation results of several melter configurations are presented. These are in support of programs to evaluate melter operation characteristics and performance. Included are investigations into power skewing and alternating current electric field phase angle in a dual electrode pair reference design and bi-modal convective stability in an advanced design. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A Detailed Level Kinetics Model of NO Vibrational Energy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Gilmore, John; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Several contemporary problems have pointed to the desirability of a detailed level kinetics approach to modeling the distribution of vibrational energy in NO. Such a model is necessary when vibrational redistribution reactions are insufficient to maintain a Boltzmann distribution over the vibrational energy states. Recent calculations of the rate constant for the first reaction of the Zeldovich mechanism (N2 + O (goes to) NO + N) have suggested that the product NO is formed in high vibrational states. In shock layer flowfields, the product NO molecules may experience an insufficient number of collisions to establish a Boltzmann distribution over vibrational states, thus necessitating a level kinetics model. In other flows, such as expansions of high temperature air, fast, near-resonance vibrational energy exchanges with N2 and O2 may also require a level specific model for NO because of the relative rates of vibrational exchange and redistribution. The proposed report will integrate computational and experimental components to construct such a model for the NO molecule.

  15. Numerical modeling of runback water on ice protected aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical simulation for 'running wet' aircraft anti-icing systems is developed. The model includes breakup of the water film, which exists in regions of direct impingement, into individual rivulets. The wetness factor distribution resulting from the film breakup and the rivulet configuration on the surface are predicted in the numerical solution procedure. The solid wall is modeled as a multilayer structure and the anti-icing system used is of the thermal type utilizing hot air and/or electrical heating elements embedded with the layers. Details of the calculation procedure and the methods used are presented.

  16. Numerical modeling for underground nuclear test monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Steven R.; Kamm, James R.

    The symposium for Numerical Modeling for Underground Nuclear Test Monitoring was held March 23-25 in Durango, Colo. Funded by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (OACN) and hosted by the Source Region Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the meetings's purpose was to discuss the state-of-the-art in numerical simulations of nuclear explosion phenomenology with applications to test-ban monitoring. In particular, we wished to focus on the uniqueness of model fits to data, the measurement and characterization of material response models, advanced modeling techniques, and applications of modeling to monitoring problems.The concept for the meeting arose through discussions with Marv Denny, who was on assignment at Department of Energy Headquarters from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In these conversations, the following question was discussed: how are numerical modeling techniques being used to understand the effects of explosion- source phenomenology on test-ban treaty monitoring? Numerical studies are becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of capabilities for proliferation monitoring; this trend has accelerated with the curtailment of the nuclear testing program. During these discussions, the issue of the uniqueness and limitations of numerical models arose. It was decided to address these questions by convening a group of experts to present and discuss the problems associated with modeling of close-in data from explosions.

  17. The impact of model detail on power grid resilience measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, S.; Kleis, K.; Schultz, P.; Kurths, J.; Hellmann, F.

    2016-05-01

    Extreme events are a challenge to natural as well as man-made systems. For critical infrastructure like power grids, we need to understand their resilience against large disturbances. Recently, new measures of the resilience of dynamical systems have been developed in the complex system literature. Basin stability and survivability respectively assess the asymptotic and transient behavior of a system when subjected to arbitrary, localized but large perturbations in frequency and phase. To employ these methods that assess power grid resilience, we need to choose a certain model detail of the power grid. For the grid topology we considered the Scandinavian grid and an ensemble of power grids generated with a random growth model. So far the most popular model that has been studied is the classical swing equation model for the frequency response of generators and motors. In this paper we study a more sophisticated model of synchronous machines that also takes voltage dynamics into account, and compare it to the previously studied model. This model has been found to give an accurate picture of the long term evolution of synchronous machines in the engineering literature for post fault studies. We find evidence that some stable fix points of the swing equation become unstable when we add voltage dynamics. If this occurs the asymptotic behavior of the system can be dramatically altered, and basin stability estimates obtained with the swing equation can be dramatically wrong. We also find that the survivability does not change significantly when taking the voltage dynamics into account. Further, the limit cycle type asymptotic behaviour is strongly correlated with transient voltages that violate typical operational voltage bounds. Thus, transient voltage bounds are dominated by transient frequency bounds and play no large role for realistic parameters.

  18. Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.; Smoot, L.D.

    1989-08-01

    This study has been supported by a consortium of nine industrial and governmental sponsors. Work was initiated on May 1, 1985 and completed August 31, 1989. The central objective of this work was to develop, evaluate and apply a practical combustion model for utility boilers, industrial furnaces and gasifiers. Key accomplishments have included: Development of an advanced first-generation, computer model for combustion in three dimensional furnaces; development of a new first generation fouling and slagging submodel; detailed evaluation of an existing NO{sub x} submodel; development and evaluation of an improved radiation submodel; preparation and distribution of a three-volume final report: (a) Volume 1: General Technical Report; (b) Volume 2: PCGC-3 User's Manual; (c) Volume 3: Data Book for Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Combustion Models; and organization of a user's workshop on the three-dimensional code. The furnace computer model developed under this study requires further development before it can be applied generally to all applications; however, it can be used now by specialists for many specific applications, including non-combusting systems and combusting geseous systems. A new combustion center was organized and work was initiated to continue the important research effort initiated by this study. 212 refs., 72 figs., 38 tabs.

  19. Urban scale air quality modelling using detailed traffic emissions estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrego, C.; Amorim, J. H.; Tchepel, O.; Dias, D.; Rafael, S.; Sá, E.; Pimentel, C.; Fontes, T.; Fernandes, P.; Pereira, S. R.; Bandeira, J. M.; Coelho, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric dispersion of NOx and PM10 was simulated with a second generation Gaussian model over a medium-size south-European city. Microscopic traffic models calibrated with GPS data were used to derive typical driving cycles for each road link, while instantaneous emissions were estimated applying a combined Vehicle Specific Power/Co-operative Programme for Monitoring and Evaluation of the Long-range Transmission of Air Pollutants in Europe (VSP/EMEP) methodology. Site-specific background concentrations were estimated using time series analysis and a low-pass filter applied to local observations. Air quality modelling results are compared against measurements at two locations for a 1 week period. 78% of the results are within a factor of two of the observations for 1-h average concentrations, increasing to 94% for daily averages. Correlation significantly improves when background is added, with an average of 0.89 for the 24 h record. The results highlight the potential of detailed traffic and instantaneous exhaust emissions estimates, together with filtered urban background, to provide accurate input data to Gaussian models applied at the urban scale.

  20. Detailed investigation of flowfields within large scale hypersonic inlet models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seebaugh, W. R.; Doran, R. W.; Decarlo, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted to determine the characteristics of the internal flows in model passages representative of hypersonic inlets and also sufficiently large for meaningful data to be obtained. Three large-scale inlet models, each having a different compression ratio, were designed to provide high performance and approximately uniform static-pressure distributions at the throat stations. A wedge forebody was used to simulate the flowfield conditions at the entrance of the internal passages, thus removing the actual vehicle forebody from consideration in the design of the wind-tunnel models. Tests were conducted in a 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel at a nominal test Mach number of 7.4 and freestream unit Reynolds number of 2,700,000 per foot. From flowfield survey data the inlet entrance, the entering inviscid and viscous flow conditions were determined prior to the analysis of the data obtained in the internal passages. Detailed flowfield survey data were obtained near the centerlines of the internal passages to define the boundary-layer development on the internal surfaces and the internal shock-wave configuration. Finally, flowfield data were measured across the throats of the inlet models to evaluate the internal performance of the internal passages. These data and additional results from surface instrumentation and flow visualization studies were utilized to determine the internal flowfield patterns and the inlet performance.

  1. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Heufer, K. Alexander; Sarathy, S. Mani; Curran, Henry J.; Davis, Alexander C.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.

    2012-09-28

    To help overcome the world’s dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailedmore » kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C–H and C–C bond dissociation energies. In addition, the proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes.« less

  2. Ferrofluids: Modeling, numerical analysis, and scientific computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Ignacio

    This dissertation presents some developments in the Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) describing the behavior of ferrofluids. The most widely accepted PDE model for ferrofluids is the Micropolar model proposed by R.E. Rosensweig. The Micropolar Navier-Stokes Equations (MNSE) is a subsystem of PDEs within the Rosensweig model. Being a simplified version of the much bigger system of PDEs proposed by Rosensweig, the MNSE are a natural starting point of this thesis. The MNSE couple linear velocity u, angular velocity w, and pressure p. We propose and analyze a first-order semi-implicit fully-discrete scheme for the MNSE, which decouples the computation of the linear and angular velocities, is unconditionally stable and delivers optimal convergence rates under assumptions analogous to those used for the Navier-Stokes equations. Moving onto the much more complex Rosensweig's model, we provide a definition (approximation) for the effective magnetizing field h, and explain the assumptions behind this definition. Unlike previous definitions available in the literature, this new definition is able to accommodate the effect of external magnetic fields. Using this definition we setup the system of PDEs coupling linear velocity u, pressure p, angular velocity w, magnetization m, and magnetic potential ϕ We show that this system is energy-stable and devise a numerical scheme that mimics the same stability property. We prove that solutions of the numerical scheme always exist and, under certain simplifying assumptions, that the discrete solutions converge. A notable outcome of the analysis of the numerical scheme for the Rosensweig's model is the choice of finite element spaces that allow the construction of an energy-stable scheme. Finally, with the lessons learned from Rosensweig's model, we develop a diffuse-interface model describing the behavior of two-phase ferrofluid flows and present an energy-stable numerical scheme for this model. For a

  3. Numerical flow modeling of power plant windboxes

    SciTech Connect

    LaRose, J.A.; Hopkins, M.W.

    1995-12-31

    Numerical flow modeling has become an increasingly important design and analysis tool for improving the air distribution to power plant burners. Uniform air distribution allows the burners to perform as designed to achieve the lowest possible emissions and best fuel burn-out. Modifications can be made internal to the existing windbox to improve the burner-to-burner and burner peripheral air distributions. These modifications can include turning vanes, flow splitters, perforated plate, and burner shrouding. Numerical modeling allows the analysis of design trade-offs between adding flow resistance, fan power, and windbox modification construction cost. Numerical modeling has advantages over physical modeling in that actual geometric scales and air temperatures are used. Advantages over a field data based study include the ability to quickly and cheaply analyze a variety of design options without actually modifying the windbox, and the availability of significantly more data with which to interpret the results. Costs to perform a numerical study are generally one-half to one-third of the cost to perform a physical flow model and can be one-forth of the cost to perform a field study. The continued development of affordable, high speed, large memory workstations and reliable, commercially available computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software allows practical analyses of power plant windboxes. This paper discusses (1) the impact of air distribution on burner performance, (2) the methodology used to perform numerical flow modeling of power plant windboxes, and (3) the results from several windbox analyses including available post-modification observations.

  4. An improved numerical model for wave rotor design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict both the unsteady flows within a wave rotor and the steady averaged flows in the ports. The model is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional, unsteady, and perfect gas flow. Besides the dominant wave behavior, it is also capable of predicting the effects of finite tube opening time, leakage from the tube ends, and viscosity. The relative simplicity of the model makes it useful for design, optimization, and analysis of wave rotor cycles for any application. This paper discusses some details of the model and presents comparisons between the model and two laboratory wave rotor experiments.

  5. A Two-Zone Multigrid Model for SI Engine Combustion Simulation Using Detailed Chemistry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ge, Hai-Wen; Juneja, Harmit; Shi, Yu; Yang, Shiyou; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-01-01

    An efficient multigrid (MG) model was implemented for spark-ignited (SI) engine combustion modeling using detailed chemistry. The model is designed to be coupled with a level-set-G-equation model for flame propagation (GAMUT combustion model) for highly efficient engine simulation. The model was explored for a gasoline direct-injection SI engine with knocking combustion. The numerical results using the MG model were compared with the results of the original GAMUT combustion model. A simpler one-zone MG model was found to be unable to reproduce the results of the original GAMUT model. However, a two-zone MG model, which treats the burned and unburned regionsmore » separately, was found to provide much better accuracy and efficiency than the one-zone MG model. Without loss in accuracy, an order of magnitude speedup was achieved in terms of CPU and wall times. To reproduce the results of the original GAMUT combustion model, either a low searching level or a procedure to exclude high-temperature computational cells from the grouping should be applied to the unburned region, which was found to be more sensitive to the combustion model details.« less

  6. Numerical noise in ocean and estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.; Carey, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate methods for solving the shallow water equations may lead to solutions exhibiting large fictitious, numerically-induced oscillations. The analysis of the discrete dispersion relation and modal solutions of small wavelengths provides a powerful technique for assessing the sensitivity of alternative numerical schemes to irregular data which may lead to such oscillatory numerical noise. For those schemes where phase speed vanishes at a finite wavenumber or there are multiple roots for wavenumber, oscillation modes can exist which are uncoupled from the dynamics of the problem. The discrete modal analysis approach is used here to identify two classes of spurious oscillation modes associated respectively with the two different asymptotic limits corresponding to estuarine and large scale ocean models. The analysis provides further insight into recent numerical results for models which include large spatial scales and Coriolis acceleration. ?? 1984.

  7. Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

    2008-10-28

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

  8. Numerical Based Linear Model for Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Li,Y.; Krinsky, S.; Rehak, M.

    2009-05-04

    In this paper, we discuss an algorithm for constructing a numerical linear optics model for dipole magnets from a 3D field map. The difference between the numerical model and K. Brown's analytic approach is investigated and clarified. It was found that the optics distortion due to the dipoles' fringe focusing must be properly taken into account to accurately determine the chromaticities. In NSLS-II, there are normal dipoles with 35-mm gap and dipoles for infrared sources with 90-mm gap. This linear model of the dipole magnets is applied to the NSLS-II lattice design to match optics parameters between the DBA cells having dipoles with different gaps.

  9. Blood flow distribution in an anatomically detailed arterial network model: criteria and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Pablo J; Watanabe, Sansuke M; Dari, Enzo A; Passos, Marco Aurélio R F; Feijóo, Raúl A

    2014-11-01

    Development of blood flow distribution criteria is a mandatory step toward developing computational models and numerical simulations of the systemic circulation. In the present work, we (i) present a systematic approach based on anatomical and physiological considerations to distribute the blood flow in a 1D anatomically detailed model of the arterial network and (ii) develop a numerical procedure to calibrate resistive parameters in terminal models in order to effectively satisfy such flow distribution. For the first goal, we merge data collected from the specialized medical literature with anatomical concepts such as vascular territories to determine blood flow supply to specific (encephalon, kidneys, etc.) and distributed (muscles, skin, etc.) organs. Overall, 28 entities representing the main specific organs are accounted for in the detailed description of the arterial topology that we use as model substrate. In turn, 116 vascular territories are considered as the basic blocks that compose the distributed organs throughout the whole body. For the second goal, Windkessel models are used to represent the peripheral beds, and the values of the resistive parameters are computed applying a Newton method to a parameter identification problem to guarantee the supply of the correct flow fraction to each terminal location according to the given criteria. Finally, it is shown that, by means of the criteria developed, and for a rather standard set of model parameters, the model predicts physiologically realistic pressure and flow waveforms. PMID:24682727

  10. DETAILED DECOMPOSITION OF GALAXY IMAGES. II. BEYOND AXISYMMETRIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Chien Y.; Ho, Luis C.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter E-mail: lho@obs.carnegiescience.ed E-mail: rix@mpia-hd.mpg.d

    2010-06-15

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) fitting algorithm (GALFIT, ver. 3) with new capabilities to study the structural components of galaxies and other astronomical objects in digital images. Our technique improves on previous 2D fitting algorithms by allowing for irregular, curved, logarithmic and power-law spirals, ring, and truncated shapes in otherwise traditional parametric functions like the Sersic, Moffat, King, Ferrer, etc., profiles. One can mix and match these new shape features freely, with or without constraints, and apply them to an arbitrary number of model components of numerous profile types, so as to produce realistic-looking galaxy model images. Yet, despite the potential for extreme complexity, the meaning of the key parameters like the Sersic index, effective radius, or luminosity remains intuitive and essentially unchanged. The new features have an interesting potential for use to quantify the degree of asymmetry of galaxies, to quantify low surface brightness tidal features beneath and beyond luminous galaxies, to allow more realistic decompositions of galaxy subcomponents in the presence of strong rings and spiral arms, and to enable ways to gauge the uncertainties when decomposing galaxy subcomponents. We illustrate these new features by way of several case studies that display various levels of complexity.

  11. Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, S.D.; Smoot, L.D.

    1989-08-01

    The need to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions commercial furnaces has prompted energy companies to search for optimized operating conditions and improved designs in their fossil-fuel burning facilities. Historically, companies have relied on the use of empirical correlations and pilot-plant data to make decisions about operating conditions and design changes. The high cost of collecting data makes obtaining large amounts of data infeasible. The main objective of the data book is to provide a single source of detailed three-dimensional combustion and combustion-related data suitable for comprehensive combustion model evaluation. Five tasks were identified as requirements to achieve the main objective. First, identify the types of data needed to evaluate comprehensive combustion models, and establish criteria for selecting the data. Second, identify and document available three-dimensional combustion data related to pulverized coal combustion. Third, collect and evaluate three-dimensional data cases, and select suitable cases based on selection criteria. Fourth, organize the data sets into an easy-to-use format. Fifth, evaluate and interpret the nature and quality of the data base. 39 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs.

  12. Numerical Modeling of Ocean Acoustic Wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappert, Frederick

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Navy requires real-time ``acoustic performance prediction'' models in order to optimize sonar tactics in naval combat situations. The need for numerical models that solve the acoustic wave equation in realistic ocean environments is being met by a collaborative effort between university researchers, industrial contractors, and navy laboratory workers. This paper discusses one particularly successful numerical model, called the PE/SSF model, that was originally developed by the author. Here PE stands for Parabolic Equation, a good approximation to the elliptic Helmholtz equation; and SSF stands for the Split-Step Fourier algorithm, a highly efficient marching algorithm for solving parabolic type equations. These techniques are analyzed, and examples are displayed of ocean acoustic wavefields generated by the PE/SSF model.

  13. Detailed numerical simulation of shock-body interaction in 3D multicomponent flow using the RKDG numerical method and ”DiamondTorre” GPU algorithm of implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, Boris; Levchenko, Vadim

    2016-02-01

    Interaction between a shock wave and an inhomogeneity in fluid has complicated behavior, including vortex and turbulence generating, mixing, shock wave scattering and reflection. In the present paper we deal with the numerical simulation of the considered process. The Euler equations of unsteady inviscid compressible three-dimensional flow are used into the four-equation model of multicomponent flow. These equations are discretized using the RKDG numerical method. It is implemented with the help of the DiamondTorre algorithm, so the effective GPGPU solver is obtained having outstanding computing properties. With its use we carry out several sets of numerical experiments of shock-bubble interaction problem. The bubble deformation and mixture formation is observed.

  14. Comparison of Detailed and Simplified Models of Human Atrial Myocytes to Recapitulate Patient Specific Properties.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Daniel M; Fenton, Flavio H; Narayan, Sanjiv M; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2016-08-01

    Computer studies are often used to study mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation (AF). A crucial component in these studies is the electrophysiological model that describes the membrane potential of myocytes. The models vary from detailed, describing numerous ion channels, to simplified, grouping ionic channels into a minimal set of variables. The parameters of these models, however, are determined across different experiments in varied species. Furthermore, a single set of parameters may not describe variations across patients, and models have rarely been shown to recapitulate critical features of AF in a given patient. In this study we develop physiologically accurate computational human atrial models by fitting parameters of a detailed and of a simplified model to clinical data for five patients undergoing ablation therapy. Parameters were simultaneously fitted to action potential (AP) morphology, action potential duration (APD) restitution and conduction velocity (CV) restitution curves in these patients. For both models, our fitting procedure generated parameter sets that accurately reproduced clinical data, but differed markedly from published sets and between patients, emphasizing the need for patient-specific adjustment. Both models produced two-dimensional spiral wave dynamics for that were similar for each patient. These results show that simplified, computationally efficient models are an attractive choice for simulations of human atrial electrophysiology in spatially extended domains. This study motivates the development and validation of patient-specific model-based mechanistic studies to target therapy. PMID:27494252

  15. Comparison of Detailed and Simplified Models of Human Atrial Myocytes to Recapitulate Patient Specific Properties

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Flavio H.; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Computer studies are often used to study mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation (AF). A crucial component in these studies is the electrophysiological model that describes the membrane potential of myocytes. The models vary from detailed, describing numerous ion channels, to simplified, grouping ionic channels into a minimal set of variables. The parameters of these models, however, are determined across different experiments in varied species. Furthermore, a single set of parameters may not describe variations across patients, and models have rarely been shown to recapitulate critical features of AF in a given patient. In this study we develop physiologically accurate computational human atrial models by fitting parameters of a detailed and of a simplified model to clinical data for five patients undergoing ablation therapy. Parameters were simultaneously fitted to action potential (AP) morphology, action potential duration (APD) restitution and conduction velocity (CV) restitution curves in these patients. For both models, our fitting procedure generated parameter sets that accurately reproduced clinical data, but differed markedly from published sets and between patients, emphasizing the need for patient-specific adjustment. Both models produced two-dimensional spiral wave dynamics for that were similar for each patient. These results show that simplified, computationally efficient models are an attractive choice for simulations of human atrial electrophysiology in spatially extended domains. This study motivates the development and validation of patient-specific model-based mechanistic studies to target therapy. PMID:27494252

  16. Tsunami inundation modelling based on detailed roughness maps of densely populated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayer, G.; Leschka, S.; Nöhren, I.; Larsen, O.; Günther, H.

    2010-08-01

    An important part within the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) project was the detailed numerical investigation of the impact of tsunamis in densely populated coastal areas of Indonesia. This work, carried out by the German Research Centre Geesthacht (GKSS), in co-operation with DHI-WASY, also provides the basis for the preparation of high resolution hazard and risk maps by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). In this paper a method is described of how to prepare very detailed roughness maps for scenario computations performed with the MIKE 21 Flow Model FM in three highly resolved (~10 m) priority regions, namely Kuta (Bali), Padang (West-Sumatra), and Cilacap (southern coast of Java). Roughness values are assigned to 43 land use classes, e.g. different types of buildings, rural and urban sub-areas, by using equivalent coefficients found in literature or by performing numerical experiments. Comparisons of simulations using differentiated roughness maps with simulations using constant values (a widely used approach) are presented and it is demonstrated that roughness takes considerable influence on run-up and inundation. Out of all simulations, the results of the worst case scenarios for each of the three priority areas are discussed. Earthquakes with magnitudes of MW=8.5 or higher lead to considerable inundation in all study sites. A spatially distinguished consideration of roughness has been found to be necessary for detailed modelling onshore.

  17. Ensemble-type numerical uncertainty information from single model integrations

    SciTech Connect

    Rauser, Florian Marotzke, Jochem; Korn, Peter

    2015-07-01

    We suggest an algorithm that quantifies the discretization error of time-dependent physical quantities of interest (goals) for numerical models of geophysical fluid dynamics. The goal discretization error is estimated using a sum of weighted local discretization errors. The key feature of our algorithm is that these local discretization errors are interpreted as realizations of a random process. The random process is determined by the model and the flow state. From a class of local error random processes we select a suitable specific random process by integrating the model over a short time interval at different resolutions. The weights of the influences of the local discretization errors on the goal are modeled as goal sensitivities, which are calculated via automatic differentiation. The integration of the weighted realizations of local error random processes yields a posterior ensemble of goal approximations from a single run of the numerical model. From the posterior ensemble we derive the uncertainty information of the goal discretization error. This algorithm bypasses the requirement of detailed knowledge about the models discretization to generate numerical error estimates. The algorithm is evaluated for the spherical shallow-water equations. For two standard test cases we successfully estimate the error of regional potential energy, track its evolution, and compare it to standard ensemble techniques. The posterior ensemble shares linear-error-growth properties with ensembles of multiple model integrations when comparably perturbed. The posterior ensemble numerical error estimates are of comparable size as those of a stochastic physics ensemble.

  18. Numerical model for organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutiš, E.; Bussac, M. N.; Masenelli, B.; Carrard, M.; Zuppiroli, L.

    2001-01-01

    An extensive numerical model recently developed for the multilayer organic light-emitting diode is described and applied to a set of real devices. The model contains a detailed description of electrical contacts including dipolar layer formation, thermionic and tunneling injection, space charge effects, field dependent mobilities and recombination processes. The model is applied to simulate several single layer devices and the family of bilayer devices made in our group. It provides insight into the energy level shifts, internal electric fields and charge distribution (and consequently recombination) throughout the device. Finally, the analysis is extended to the optimization of bilayer device.

  19. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  20. A patch-based cross masking model for natural images with detail loss and additive defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucheng; Allebach, Jan P.

    2015-03-01

    Visual masking is an effect that contents of the image reduce the detectability of a given target signal hidden in the image. The effect of visual masking has found its application in numerous image processing and vision tasks. In the past few decades, numerous research has been conducted on visual masking based on models optimized for artificial targets placed upon unnatural masks. Over the years, there is a tendency to apply masking model to predict natural image quality and detection threshold of distortion presented in natural images. However, to our knowledge few studies have been conducted to understand the generalizability of masking model to different types of distortion presented in natural images. In this work, we measure the ability of natural image patches in masking three different types of distortion, and analyse the performance of conventional gain control model in predicting the distortion detection threshold. We then propose a new masking model, where detail loss and additive defects are modeled in two parallel vision channels and interact with each other via a cross masking mechanism. We show that the proposed cross masking model has better adaptability to various image structures and distortions in natural scenes.

  1. Numerical comparison of strong Langmuir turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Mei-Mei; Nicholson, D. R.

    1987-01-01

    Two models of Langmuir turbulence, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and the Zakharov equations, are solved numerically for an initial value problem in which the electric field evolves from an almost flat initial condition via the modulational instability and finally saturates into a set of solitons. The two models agree well with each other only when the initial dimensionless electric field has an amplitude less than unity. An analytic soliton gas model consisting of equal-amplitude, randomly spaced, zero-speed solitons is remarkably good at reproducing the time-averaged Fourier spectra in both cases.

  2. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  3. Numerical modeling of flow through orifice meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholesiami, M. Z.; Patel, B. R.

    1988-03-01

    Numerical modeling is performed for turbulent flow through orifice meters using Creare's computer program FLUENT. FLUENT solves the time averaged Navier-Stokes equations in 2-D and 3-D Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates. Turbulence is simulated using a two equation k-epsilon or algebraic stress turbulence model. It is shown that an 80 x 60 grid distribution is sufficient to resolve the flow field around the orifice. The variations in discharge coefficient are studied as a result of variation in beta ratio, Reynolds number, upstream and downstream boundary conditions, pipe surface roughness, and upstream swirl. The effects of beta ratio and Reynolds number on the discharge coefficient are shown to be similar to the experimental data. It is also shown that the surface roughness can increase the discharge coefficient by about 0.7 percent for the range of roughness heights encountered in practice. The numerical modeling approach would be most effective if it is combined with a systematic experimental program that can supply the necessary boundary conditions. It is recommended that numerical modeling be used for the study of other flow meters.

  4. Numerical Modelling Of Pumpkin Balloon Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, D.

    Tensys have been involved in the numerical formfinding and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures for 15 years. They have recently broadened this range of activities into the `lighter than air' field with significant involvement in aerostat and heavy-lift hybrid airship design. Since early 2004 they have been investigating pumpkin balloon instability on behalf of the NASA ULDB programme. These studies are undertaken using inTENS, an in-house finite element program suite based upon the Dynamic Relaxation solution method and developed especially for the non-linear analysis and patterning of membrane structures. The paper describes the current state of an investigation that started with a numerical simulation of the lobed cylinder problem first studied by Calladine. The influence of material properties and local geometric deformation on stability is demonstrated. A number of models of complete pumpkin balloons have then been established, including a 64-gore balloon with geometry based upon Julian Nott's Endeavour. This latter clefted dramatically upon initial inflation, a phenomenon that has been reproduced in the numerical model. Ongoing investigations include the introduction of membrane contact modelling into inTENS and correlation studies with the series of large-scale ULDB models currently in preparation.

  5. A Numerical Model for Atomtronic Circuit Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng W.; Straatsma, Cameron J. E.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2015-07-16

    A model for studying atomtronic devices and circuits based on finite-temperature Bose-condensed gases is presented. The approach involves numerically solving equations of motion for atomic populations and coherences, derived using the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and the Heisenberg picture. The resulting cluster expansion is truncated at a level giving balance between physics rigor and numerical demand mitigation. This approach allows parametric studies involving time scales that cover both the rapid population dynamics relevant to nonequilibrium state evolution, as well as the much longer time durations typical for reaching steady-state device operation. This model is demonstrated by studying the evolution of a Bose-condensed gas in the presence of atom injection and extraction in a double-well potential. In this configuration phase locking between condensates in each well of the potential is readily observed, and its influence on the evolution of the system is studied.

  6. Numerical model for atomtronic circuit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Weng W.; Straatsma, Cameron J. E.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2015-07-01

    A model for studying atomtronic devices and circuits based on finite-temperature Bose-condensed gases is presented. The approach involves numerically solving equations of motion for atomic populations and coherences, derived using the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and the Heisenberg picture. The resulting cluster expansion is truncated at a level giving balance between physics rigor and numerical demand mitigation. This approach allows parametric studies involving time scales that cover both the rapid population dynamics relevant to nonequilibrium state evolution, as well as the much longer time durations typical for reaching steady-state device operation. The model is demonstrated by studying the evolution of a Bose-condensed gas in the presence of atom injection and extraction in a double-well potential. In this configuration phase locking between condensates in each well of the potential is readily observed, and its influence on the evolution of the system is studied.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilseven, E.; Mendoza, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems. PMID:26986435

  9. Infrared radiation parameterizations in numerical climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Kratz, David P.; Ridgway, William

    1991-01-01

    This study presents various approaches to parameterizing the broadband transmission functions for utilization in numerical climate models. One-parameter scaling is applied to approximate a nonhomogeneous path with an equivalent homogeneous path, and the diffuse transmittances are either interpolated from precomputed tables or fit by analytical functions. Two-parameter scaling is applied to parameterizing the carbon dioxide and ozone transmission functions in both the lower and middle atmosphere. Parameterizations are given for the nitrous oxide and methane diffuse transmission functions.

  10. Towards the assimilation of MODIS reflectance into the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrois, L.; Cosme, E.; Dumont, M.; Lafaysse, M.; Morin, S.; Libois, Q.; Picard, G.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations of snow on the ground are used for numerous scientific and operational applications such as avalanche hazard forecasting. Although the chain of models used in French mountain ranges for meteorological analysis and forecast (SAFRAN) and detailed snowpack modeling (SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus) usually perform reasonably well, significant differences with snowpack observations are common and are primarily attributed to the uncertainties in meteorological input and to the heterogeneity of snowpack conditions at all scales. So far, no snow observation is assimilated into this model chain, so that simulation errors can accumulate over the winter season. Current efforts are devoted to the assimilation of data from visible and near-infrared imagers into the snowpack model. These efforts rely on the recently developed "TARTES" optical scheme that computes reflectances at various wavelengths using the vertical profile of the physical properties of snow predicted by the snowpack model. In a first step, we performed ensemble simulations by perturbing the atmospheric forcing consistently with its estimated uncertainty. These experiments showed that the simulated snowpack evolution is extremely sensitive to this uncertainty, and that the assimilation of observations can greatly improve model results. In a second step, we performed assimilation experiments using synthetic imager observations and a particle filter. The experiments were carried out for the location of Col du Lautaret area (French Alps) over 5 hydrologic seasons. They provide a good insight about the potential and limitations of assimilating imager data to improve the representation of the snowpack.

  11. Avoiding numerical pitfalls in social force models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Gerta; Treml, Franz; Gödel, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The social force model of Helbing and Molnár is one of the best known approaches to simulate pedestrian motion, a collective phenomenon with nonlinear dynamics. It is based on the idea that the Newtonian laws of motion mostly carry over to pedestrian motion so that human trajectories can be computed by solving a set of ordinary differential equations for velocity and acceleration. The beauty and simplicity of this ansatz are strong reasons for its wide spread. However, the numerical implementation is not without pitfalls. Oscillations, collisions, and instabilities occur even for very small step sizes. Classic solution ideas from molecular dynamics do not apply to the problem because the system is not Hamiltonian despite its source of inspiration. Looking at the model through the eyes of a mathematician, however, we realize that the right hand side of the differential equation is nondifferentiable and even discontinuous at critical locations. This produces undesirable behavior in the exact solution and, at best, severe loss of accuracy in efficient numerical schemes even in short range simulations. We suggest a very simple mollified version of the social force model that conserves the desired dynamic properties of the original many-body system but elegantly and cost efficiently resolves several of the issues concerning stability and numerical resolution.

  12. Numerical modeling of the acoustic guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine; Derveaux, Grégoire; Joly, Patrick; Bécache, Eliane

    2003-10-01

    An interactive DVD has been created, based on a numerical model of the acoustic guitar. In a first chapter, the retained physical model is described and illustrated, from the pluck to the 3D radiation field. The second chapter is devoted to the presentation of the numerical tools used for solving the equations of the model. Numerical simulations of plate vibrations and radiated sound pressure are shown in the third chapter. A number of simulated sounds are presented and analyzed in the fourth chapter. In addition, the DVD includes a discussion between a guitar maker, an acoustician, a guitar player and a mathematician. This discussion is entitled ``towards a common language.'' Its aim is to show the interest of simulations with respect to complementary professional approaches of the instrument. This DVD received the Henri Poincaré Prize from the 8th Research Film Festival of Nancy (June 2003), sponsored by the CNRS, in the category ``Documents for the scientific community and illustrations of the research for teaching purpose.''

  13. Avoiding numerical pitfalls in social force models.

    PubMed

    Köster, Gerta; Treml, Franz; Gödel, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The social force model of Helbing and Molnár is one of the best known approaches to simulate pedestrian motion, a collective phenomenon with nonlinear dynamics. It is based on the idea that the Newtonian laws of motion mostly carry over to pedestrian motion so that human trajectories can be computed by solving a set of ordinary differential equations for velocity and acceleration. The beauty and simplicity of this ansatz are strong reasons for its wide spread. However, the numerical implementation is not without pitfalls. Oscillations, collisions, and instabilities occur even for very small step sizes. Classic solution ideas from molecular dynamics do not apply to the problem because the system is not Hamiltonian despite its source of inspiration. Looking at the model through the eyes of a mathematician, however, we realize that the right hand side of the differential equation is nondifferentiable and even discontinuous at critical locations. This produces undesirable behavior in the exact solution and, at best, severe loss of accuracy in efficient numerical schemes even in short range simulations. We suggest a very simple mollified version of the social force model that conserves the desired dynamic properties of the original many-body system but elegantly and cost efficiently resolves several of the issues concerning stability and numerical resolution. PMID:23848804

  14. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  15. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Maria Ida; Neufeld, Esra; Akinnagbe, Esther; Bower, Kelsey; Wolf, Johanna; Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Sharma, Deepika; Lloyd, Bryn; Wilm, Bertram J.; Wyss, Michael; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Jakab, Andras; Makris, Nikos; Cohen, Ethan D.; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang; Angelone, Leonardo M.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1–2 mm and with 10–50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named “MIDA”. The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i) structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) data to image the vasculature, and iii) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25901747

  16. Multiscale numerical modeling of levee breach processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M. W.; Akkerman, I.; Bazilevs, Y.

    2010-12-01

    One of the dominant failure modes of levees during flood and storm surge events is erosion-based breach formation due to high velocity flow over the back (land-side) slope. Modeling the breaching process numerically is challenging due to both physical and geometric complexity that develops and evolves during the overtopping event. The surface water flows are aerated and sediment-laden mixtures in the supercritical and turbulent regimes. The air/water free surface may undergo perturbations on the same order as the depth or even topological change (breaking). Likewise the soil/fluid interface is characterized by evolving headcuts, which are essentially moving discontinuities in the soil surface elevation. The most widely used models of levee breaching are nevertheless based on depth-integrated models of flow, sediment transport, and bed morphology. In this work our objective is to explore models with less restrictive modeling assumptions, which have become computationally tractable due to advances in both numerical methods and high-performance computing hardware. In particular, we present formulations of fully three-dimensional flow, transport, and morphological evolution for overtopping and breaching processes and apply recently developed finite element and level set methods to solve the governing equations for relevant test problems.

  17. Numerical simulations and modeling of turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenot, B.

    Turbulent combustion is the basic physical phenomenon responsible for efficient energy release by any internal combustion engine. However it is accompanied by other undesirable phenomena such as noise, pollutant species emission or damaging instabilities that may even lead to the system desctruction. It is then crucial to control this phenomenon, to understand all its mecanisms and to master it in industrial systems. For long time turbulent combustion has been explored only through theory and experiment. But the rapid increase of computers power during the last years has allowed an important development of numerical simulation, that has become today an essential tool for research and technical design. Direct numerical simulation has then allowed to rapidly progress in the knowledge of turbulent flame structures, leading to new modelisations for steady averaged simulations. Recently large eddy simulation has made a new step forward by refining the description of complex and unsteady flames. The main problem that arises when performing numerical simulation of turbulent combustion is linked to the description of the flame front. Being very thin, it can not however be reduced to a simple interface as it is the location of intense chemical transformation and of strong variations of thermodynamical quantities. Capturing the internal structure of a zone with a thickness of the order of 0.1 mm in a computation with a mesh step 10 times larger being impossible, it is necessary to model the turbulent flame. Models depend on the chemical structure of the flame, on the ambiant turbulence, on the combustion regime (flamelets, distributed combustion, etc.) and on the reactants injection mode (premixed or not). One finds then a large class of models, from the most simple algebraic model with a one-step chemical kinetics, to the most complex model involving probablity density functions, cross-correlations and multiple-step or fully complex chemical kinetics.

  18. AEETES: A solar reflux receiver thermal performance numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, R. E., Jr.

    1991-12-01

    Reflux solar receivers for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems are currently being investigated by several companies and laboratories. In support of these efforts, the AEETES thermal performance numerical model has been developed to predict thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe reflux receivers. The formulation of the AEETES numerical model, which is applicable to axisymmetric geometries with asymmetric incident fluxes, is presented in detail. Thermal efficiency predictions agree to within 4.1 percent with test data from on-sun tests of a pool-boiler reflux receiver. Predicted absorber and sidewall temperatures agree with thermocouple data to within 3.3. percent and 7.3 percent, respectively. The importance of accounting for the asymmetric incident fluxes is demonstrated in comparisons with predictions using azimuthally averaged variables. The predicted receiver heat losses are characterized in terms of convective, solar and infrared radiative, and conductive heat transfer mechanisms.

  19. Numerical modelling of swirling diffusive flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Santos, Teresa; Perez, Ruben; Szasz, Robert Z.; Gutkowski, Artur N.; Castro, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics has been used to study the mixing and combustion of two confined jets whose setup and operating conditions are those of the benchmark of Roback and Johnson. Numerical model solves 3D transient Navier Stokes for turbulent and reactive flows. Averaged velocity profiles using RNG swirl dominated k-epsilon model have been validated with experimental measurements from other sources for the non reactive case. The combustion model is Probability Density Function. Bearing in mind the annular jet has swirl number over 0.5, a vortex breakdown appears in the axis of the burner. Besides, the sudden expansion with a ratio of 2 in diameter between nozzle exits and the test chamber produces the boundary layer separation with the corresponding torus shape recirculation. Contrasting the mixing and combustion models, the last one produces the reduction of the vortex breakdown.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Shear Bands and Dynamic Fracture in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, Colin James

    Understanding the failure of metals at high strain rate is of utmost importance in the design of a broad range of engineering systems. Numerical methods offer the ability to analyze such complex physics and aid the design of structural systems. The objective of this research will be to develop reliable finite element models for high strain rate failure modelling, incorporating shear bands and fracture. Shear band modelling is explored first, and the subsequent developments are extended to incorporate fracture. Mesh sensitivity, the spurious dependence of failure on the discretization, is a well known hurdle in achieving reliable numerical results for shear bands and fracture, or any other strain softening model. Mesh sensitivity is overcome by regularization, and while details of regularization techniques may differ, all are similar in that a length scale is introduced which serves as a localization limiter. This dissertation contains two main contributions, the first of which presents several developments in shear band modeling. The importance of using a monolithic nonlinear solver in combination with a PDE model accounting for thermal diffusion is demonstrated. In contrast, excluding one or both of these components leads to unreliable numerical results. The Pian-Sumihara stress interpolants are also employed in small and finite deformation and shown to significantly improve the computational cost of shear band modelling. This is partly due to the fact that fewer unknowns than an irreducible discretization result from the same mesh, and more significantly, the fact that convergence of numerical results upon mesh refinement is improved drastically. This means coarser meshes are adequate to resolve shear bands, alleviating some of the computational cost of numerical modelling, which are notoriously significant. Since extremely large deformations are present during shear banding, a mesh to mesh transfer algorithm is presented for the Pian Sumihara element and used as

  1. Numerical modeling of flowing soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Federico; Benzi, Roberto; Bernaschi, Massimo; Perlekar, Prasad; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Succi, Sauro

    2012-11-01

    The structural properties of soft-flowing and non-ergodic materials, such as emulsions, foams and gels shares similarities with the three basic states of matter (solid, liquid and gas). The macroscopic properties are characterized by non-standard features such as non-Newtonian rheology, long-time relaxation, caging effects, enhanced viscosity, structural arrest, hysteresis, dynamic disorder, aging and related phenomena. Large scale non-homogeneities can develop, even under simple shear conditions, by means of the formation of macroscopic bands of widely different viscosities (``shear banding'' phenomena). We employ a numerical model based on the Lattice Boltzmann method to perform numerical simulations of soft-matter under flowing conditions. Results of 3d simulations are presented and compared to previous 2d investigations.

  2. Receiving water quality assessment: comparison between simplified and detailed integrated urban modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Mannina, Giorgio; Viviani, Gaspare

    2010-01-01

    Urban water quality management often requires use of numerical models allowing the evaluation of the cause-effect relationship between the input(s) (i.e. rainfall, pollutant concentrations on catchment surface and in sewer system) and the resulting water quality response. The conventional approach to the system (i.e. sewer system, wastewater treatment plant and receiving water body), considering each component separately, does not enable optimisation of the whole system. However, recent gains in understanding and modelling make it possible to represent the system as a whole and optimise its overall performance. Indeed, integrated urban drainage modelling is of growing interest for tools to cope with Water Framework Directive requirements. Two different approaches can be employed for modelling the whole urban drainage system: detailed and simplified. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. Specifically, detailed approaches can offer a higher level of reliability in the model results, but can be very time consuming from the computational point of view. Simplified approaches are faster but may lead to greater model uncertainty due to an over-simplification. To gain insight into the above problem, two different modelling approaches have been compared with respect to their uncertainty. The first urban drainage integrated model approach uses the Saint-Venant equations and the 1D advection-dispersion equations, for the quantity and for the quality aspects, respectively. The second model approach consists of the simplified reservoir model. The analysis used a parsimonious bespoke model developed in previous studies. For the uncertainty analysis, the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) procedure was used. Model reliability was evaluated on the basis of capacity of globally limiting the uncertainty. Both models have a good capability to fit the experimental data, suggesting that all adopted approaches are equivalent both for quantity and quality. The

  3. Posttraumatic Orbital Emphysema: A Numerical Model

    PubMed Central

    Skorek, Andrzej; Kłosowski, Paweł; Plichta, Łukasz; Zmuda Trzebiatowski, Marcin; Lemski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture) of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features—thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall). The observation was made from 1 · 10−3 to 1 · 10−2 second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found. PMID:25309749

  4. Posttraumatic orbital emphysema: a numerical model.

    PubMed

    Skorek, Andrzej; Kłosowski, Paweł; Plichta, Lukasz; Raczyńska, Dorota; Zmuda Trzebiatowski, Marcin; Lemski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture) of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features-thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall). The observation was made from 1 · 10(-3) to 1 · 10(-2) second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found. PMID:25309749

  5. Numerical modeling of vertical cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.W.; Hadley, G.R.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is a diode laser whose optical cavity is formed by growing or depositing DBR mirror stacks that sandwich an active gain region. The resulting short cavity supports lasing into a single longitudinal mode normal to the wafer, making these devices ideal for a multitude of applications, ranging from high-speed communication to high-power sources (from 2D arrays). This report describes the development of a numerical VCSEL model, whose goal is to both further their understanding of these complex devices and provide a tool for accurate design and data analysis.

  6. HCCI in a CFR engine: experiments and detailed kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Smith, R; Torres, J; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    1999-11-05

    Single cylinder engine experiments and chemical kinetic modeling have been performed to study the effect of variations in fuel, equivalence ratio, and intake charge temperature on the start of combustion and the heat release rate. Neat propane and a fuel blend of 15% dimethyl-ether in methane have been studied. The results demonstrate the role of these parameters on the start of combustion, efficiency, imep, and emissions. Single zone kinetic modeling results show the trends consistent with the experimental results.

  7. Toward a detailed computational model for the mammalian circadian clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Goldbeter, Albert

    2003-06-01

    We present a computational model for the mammalian circadian clock based on the intertwined positive and negative regulatory loops involving the Per, Cry, Bmal1, Clock, and Rev-Erb genes. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can give rise to sustained circadian oscillations in continuous darkness, characterized by an antiphase relationship between Per/Cry/Rev-Erb and Bmal1 mRNAs. Sustained oscillations correspond to the rhythms autonomously generated by suprachiasmatic nuclei. For other parameter values, damped oscillations can also be obtained in the model. These oscillations, which transform into sustained oscillations when coupled to a periodic signal, correspond to rhythms produced by peripheral tissues. When incorporating the light-induced expression of the Per gene, the model accounts for entrainment of the oscillations by light-dark cycles. Simulations show that the phase of the oscillations can then vary by several hours with relatively minor changes in parameter values. Such a lability of the phase could account for physiological disorders related to circadian rhythms in humans, such as advanced or delayed sleep phase syndrome, whereas the lack of entrainment by light-dark cycles can be related to the non-24h sleep-wake syndrome. The model uncovers the possible existence of multiple sources of oscillatory behavior. Thus, in conditions where the indirect negative autoregulation of Per and Cry expression is inoperative, the model indicates the possibility that sustained oscillations might still arise from the negative autoregulation of Bmal1 expression.

  8. Detailed and global chemical kinetics model for hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M.; Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    Detailed and global chemical kinetic computations for hydrogen-air mixtures have been performed to describe flame propagation, flame structure and ignition phenomena. Simulations of laminar flame speeds, flame compositions and shock tube ignition delay times have been successfully performed. Sensitivity analysis was applied to determine the governing rate-controlling reactions for the experimental data sets examined. In the flame propagation and structure studies, the reactions, OH + H{sub 2} = H{sub 2}0 + H, 0 + H{sub 2} = OH + H and 0 + OH = 0{sub 2} + H were the most important in flames. The shock tube ignition delay time study indicated the H + 0{sub 2} + M = H0{sub 2} + M (M = N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}) and 0 + OH = 0{sub 2} + H reactions controlled ignition. A global rate expression for a one-step overall reaction was developed and validated against experimental hydrogen-air laminar flame speed data. The global reaction expression was determined to be 1.8 {times} 10{sup 13} exp({minus}17614K/T)[H{sub 2}]{sup 1.0}[O{sub 2}]{sup 0.5} for the single step reaction H{sub 2} + 1/2O{sub 2} = H{sub 2}O.

  9. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  10. Detailed investigation of cavitation and supercavitation around different geometries using various turbulence and mass transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, M. R.; Roohi, E.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper cavitation around 3D hemispherical head-form body as well as disk and conical cavitators were studied numerically with particular emphasis on detailed comparisons of the various turbulence and mass transfer models. Dynamic and unsteady behaviors of cavitation were simulated using the large eddy simulation (LES) and k-ω SST turbulence models together with Kunz, Sauer and Zwart mass transfer models. In addition, the compressive volume of fluid (VOF) method is used to track the cavity interface. Simulation is performed under the framework of the OpenFOAM package. Discussions on the boundary layer separation, re-entrant jet, cavity cloud, vortices and pressure/volume fraction contours over a broad range of cavitation numbers, especially in very low cavitation numbers, are provided. Our numerical results compared fairly well with experimental data and a wide set of analytical relations. Our results indicate that the most accurate solutions will be obtained with the LES/ Kunz approach. Moreover, for the first time, we present a correlation between the cavity length and diameter for hemispherical head-form bodies.

  11. Detailed atomic modeling of Sn plasmas for the EUV source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, A.; Sunahara, A.; Nishihawra, K.; Nishikawa, T.; Koike, F.; Tanuma, H.

    2008-05-01

    An atomic model of Sn plasmas is developed to calculate coefficients of radiative transfer, based on the calculated atomic data using the Hullac code. We find that the emission spectrum and conversion efficiency depend critically on the wavelength and spectral structure of the 4d-4f transition arrays. Satellite lines, which have a significant contribution to the emission, are determined after iterative calculations by changing the number of levels in the atomic model. We also correct transition wavelengths through comparison with experiments. Using the present emissivity and opacity, the radiation hydrodynamics simulation will be carried out toward the optimization of the EUV source.

  12. PWR internal flow modeling with fuel assemblies details

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, E.; Yan, J.; Karoutas, Z.; Gehin, J.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.

    2012-07-01

    This study is an example of a massive parallel computing of the coolant flow in a nuclear reactor. It resolves the flow velocities in each assembly on pin level and predicts the flow distribution in complex geometries such as the lower and upper reactor plenums. The size of the developed model (1.035 billion cells) required the runs to be executed on the NCCS clusters (www.nccs.gov). STAR-CCM+ code (www.ed-adapco.com) was installed on two clusters: JAGUARXT5 and FROST, both of which were capable of executing this model. (authors)

  13. Detailed modeling of microwave energy deposition in EBT devices

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Goldfinger, R.C.

    1983-08-01

    Ray-tracing studies have been combined with a simple wave power balance model to provide a complete, albeit approximate, description of microwave power deposition in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT-I), EBT-Scale (EBT-S), and EBT Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) devices. Electron cyclotron absorption of ordinary and extraordinary waves by the combined core plasma and relativistic annuli is calculated using a fully relativistic damping package developed for the RAYS geometrical optics code. The rays are traced in finite-beta bumpy cylinder plasma equilibria that are obtained from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) two-dimensional (2-D) equilibrium code. These results for direct, single-pass absorption are combined with results from a statistical model for the deposition of multiply reflected and mode-converted waves to obtain estimates of the power deposited in the core, surface, and annulus plasma components. Wave absorption by the annuli and by the core components at the fundamental and second harmonic resonances, reflection and Budden tunneling of the extraordinary mode at the right-hand cutoff, and conversion between ordinary and extraordinary modes upon wall reflection are the processes included in the power balance model. Experimental measurements of wave power flux on the cavity wall in EBT-S made with a simple microwave calorimeter are in good agreement with predictions of the model for a variety of operating configurations.

  14. Reconstructing protein remodeled membranes in molecular detail from mesoscopic models

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, Edward; Cui, Haosheng; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for “inverse coarse graining,” rebuilding a higher resolution model from a lower resolution one, in order to rebuild protein coats for remodeled membranes of complex topology. The specific case of membrane remodeling by N-BAR domain containing proteins is considered here, although the overall method is general and thus applicable to other membrane remodeling phenomena. Our approach begins with a previously developed, discretized mesoscopic continuum membrane model (EM2) which has been shown to capture the reticulated membrane topologies often observed for N-BAR/liposome systems by electron microscopy (EM). The information in the EM2 model — directions of the local curvatures and a low resolution sample of the membrane surface — is then used to construct a coarse-grained (CG) system with one site per lipid and 26 sites per protein. We demonstrate the approach on pieces of EM2 structures with three different topologies that have been observed by EM: A tubule, a “Y” junction, and a torus. We show that the approach leads to structures that are stable under subsequent constant temperature CG simulation, and end by considering the future application of the methodology as a hybrid approach that combines experimental information with computer modeling. PMID:21503332

  15. Numerical models of sunspot formation and fine structure.

    PubMed

    Rempel, Matthias

    2012-07-13

    Sunspots are central to our understanding of solar (and stellar) magnetism in many respects. On the large scale, they link the magnetic field observable in the photosphere to the dynamo processes operating in the solar interior. Properly interpreting the constraints that sunspots impose on the dynamo process requires a detailed understanding of the processes involved in their formation, dynamical evolution and decay. On the small scale, they give an insight into how convective energy transport interacts with the magnetic field over a wide range of field strengths and inclination angles, leading to sunspot fine structure observed in the form of umbral dots and penumbral filaments. Over the past decade, substantial progress has been made on both observational and theoretical sides. Advanced ground- and space-based observations have resolved, for the first time, the details of umbral dots and penumbral filaments and discovered similarities in their substructures. Numerical models have advanced to the degree that simulations of entire sunspots with sufficient resolution to resolve sunspot fine structure are feasible. A combination of improved helioseismic inversion techniques with seismic forward modelling provides new views on the subsurface structure of sunspots. In this review, we summarize recent progress, with particular focus on numerical modelling. PMID:22665895

  16. Convecting reference frames and invariant numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihlo, Alexander; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2014-09-01

    In the recent paper by Bernardini et al. [1] the discrepancy in the performance of finite difference and spectral models for simulations of flows with a preferential direction of propagation was studied. In a simplified investigation carried out using the viscous Burgers equation the authors attributed the poorer numerical results of finite difference models to a violation of Galilean invariance in the discretization and propose to carry out the computations in a reference frame moving with the bulk velocity of the flow. Here we further discuss this problem and relate it to known results on invariant discretization schemes. Non-invariant and invariant finite difference discretizations of Burgers equation are proposed and compared with the discretization using the remedy proposed by Bernardini et al.

  17. The numerical renormalization group and multi-orbital impurity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Andreas; Stadler, K. M.; von Delft, J.; Yin, Z. P.; Kotliar, G.; Mitchell, Andrew

    The numerical renormalization group (NRG) is a highly versatile and accurate method for the simulation of (effective) fermionic impurity models. Despite that the cost of NRG is exponential in the number of orbitals, by now, symmetric three-band calculations have become available on a routine level. Here we present a recent detailed study on the spin-orbital separation in a three-band Hund metal with relevance for iron-pnictides via the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). In cases, finally, where the orbital symmetry is broken, we demonstrate that interleaved NRG still offers an accurate alternative approach within the NRG with dramatically improved numerical efficiency at comparable accuracy relative to conventional NRG.

  18. Numerical modelling of morphodynamics—Vilaine Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vested, Hans Jacob; Tessier, Caroline; Christensen, Bo Brahtz; Goubert, Evelyne

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to develop a method to simulate long-term morphodynamics of estuaries dominated by fine sediments, which are subject to both tidal flow and meteorologically induced variations in freshwater run-off and wave conditions. The method is tested on the Vilaine Estuary located in South Brittany, France. The estuary is subject to a meso-macrotidal regime. The semi-diurnal tidal range varies from around 2.5 to 5 m at neap and spring, respectively. The freshwater input is controlled by a dam located approximately 8 km from the mouth of the estuary. Sediments are characterised as mostly fines, but more sandy areas are also found. The morphology of the estuary is highly influenced by the dam. It is very dynamic and changes in a complicated manner with the run-off from the dam, the tide and the wave forcing at the mouth of the estuary. Extensive hydrodynamic and sediment field data have been collected in the past and provide a solid scientific basis for studying the estuary. Based on a conceptual understanding of the morphodynamics, a numerical morphological model with coupled hydrodynamic, surface wave and sediment transport models is formulated. The numerical models are calibrated to reproduce sediment concentrations, tidal flat altimetry and overall sediment fluxes. Scaling factors are applied to a reference year to form quasi-realistic hydrodynamic forcing and river run-off, which allow for the simulations to be extended to other years. The simulation results are compared with observed bathymetric changes in the estuary during the period 1998-2005. The models and scaling factors are applied to predict the morphological development over a time scale of up to 10 years. The influence of the initial conditions and the sequence of external hydrodynamic forcing, with respect to the morphodynamic response of the estuary, are discussed.

  19. Adaptive Numerical Algorithms in Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Gabor; vanderHolst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; DeZeeuw, Darren; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Nakib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2010-01-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising of several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit numerical

  20. Adaptive numerical algorithms in space weather modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; van der Holst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Najib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2012-02-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different relevant physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit

  1. Numerical modeling of dish-Stirling reflux solar receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, R. E.

    Using reflux solar receivers to collect solar energy for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems is currently being investigated by several organizations, including Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. In support of this program, Sandia has developed two numerical models describing the energy transfer within and thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe receivers. Both models are applicable to axisymmetric geometries and they both consider the radiative and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer from the receiver housing, and the energy transfer to the receiver working fluid. In these models, the radiative transfer within the receiver is analyzed using a two-band (solar and infrared) net-radiation formulation for enclosure radiation. Empirical convective correlations describe the convective heat transfer from the cavity to the surroundings. The primary difference between the models is the level of detail in modeling the heat conduction through the receiver walls. The more detailed model uses a two-dimensional finite control volume method, whereas the simpler model uses a one-dimensional thermal resistance approach.

  2. Numerical modeling of dish-Stirling reflux solar receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Using reflux solar receivers to collect solar energy for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems is currently being investigated by several organizations, including Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. In support of this program, Sandia has developed two numerical models describing the energy transfer within and thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe receivers. Both models are applicable to axisymmetric geometries and they both consider the radiative and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer from the receiver housing, and the energy transfer to the receiver working fluid. In these models, the radiative transfer within the receiver is analyzed using a two-band (solar and infrared) net-radiation formulation for enclosure radiation. Empirical convective correlations describe the convective heat transfer from the cavity to the surroundings. The primary difference between the models is the level of detail in modeling the heat conduction through the receiver walls. The more detailed model uses a two-dimensional finite control volume method, whereas the simpler model uses a one-dimensional thermal resistance approach. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Probing spatial homogeneity with LTB models: a detailed discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redlich, M.; Bolejko, K.; Meyer, S.; Lewis, G. F.; Bartelmann, M.

    2014-10-01

    Do current observational data confirm the assumptions of the cosmological principle, or is there statistical evidence for deviations from spatial homogeneity on large scales? To address these questions, we developed a flexible framework based on spherically symmetric, but radially inhomogeneous Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models with synchronous Big Bang. We expanded the (local) matter density profile in terms of flexible interpolation schemes and orthonormal polynomials. A Monte Carlo technique in combination with recent observational data was used to systematically vary the shape of these profiles. In the first part of this article, we reconsider giant LTB voids without dark energy to investigate whether extremely fine-tuned mass profiles can reconcile these models with current data. While the local Hubble rate and supernovae can easily be fitted without dark energy, however, model-independent constraints from the Planck 2013 data require an unrealistically low local Hubble rate, which is strongly inconsistent with the observed value; this result agrees well with previous studies. In the second part, we explain why it seems natural to extend our framework by a non-zero cosmological constant, which then allows us to perform general tests of the cosmological principle. Moreover, these extended models facilitate explorating whether fluctuations in the local matter density profile might potentially alleviate the tension between local and global measurements of the Hubble rate, as derived from Cepheid-calibrated type Ia supernovae and CMB experiments, respectively. We show that current data provide no evidence for deviations from spatial homogeneity on large scales. More accurate constraints are required to ultimately confirm the validity of the cosmological principle, however.

  4. Efficient estimation of detailed single-neuron models.

    PubMed

    Huys, Quentin J M; Ahrens, Misha B; Paninski, Liam

    2006-08-01

    Biophysically accurate multicompartmental models of individual neurons have significantly advanced our understanding of the input-output function of single cells. These models depend on a large number of parameters that are difficult to estimate. In practice, they are often hand-tuned to match measured physiological behaviors, thus raising questions of identifiability and interpretability. We propose a statistical approach to the automatic estimation of various biologically relevant parameters, including 1) the distribution of channel densities, 2) the spatiotemporal pattern of synaptic input, and 3) axial resistances across extended dendrites. Recent experimental advances, notably in voltage-sensitive imaging, motivate us to assume access to: i) the spatiotemporal voltage signal in the dendrite and ii) an approximate description of the channel kinetics of interest. We show here that, given i and ii, parameters 1-3 can be inferred simultaneously by nonnegative linear regression; that this optimization problem possesses a unique solution and is guaranteed to converge despite the large number of parameters and their complex nonlinear interaction; and that standard optimization algorithms efficiently reach this optimum with modest computational and data requirements. We demonstrate that the method leads to accurate estimations on a wide variety of challenging model data sets that include up to about 10(4) parameters (roughly two orders of magnitude more than previously feasible) and describe how the method gives insights into the functional interaction of groups of channels. PMID:16624998

  5. DANA: distributed numerical and adaptive modelling framework.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Nicolas P; Fix, Jérémy

    2012-01-01

    DANA is a python framework ( http://dana.loria.fr ) whose computational paradigm is grounded on the notion of a unit that is essentially a set of time dependent values varying under the influence of other units via adaptive weighted connections. The evolution of a unit's value are defined by a set of differential equations expressed in standard mathematical notation which greatly ease their definition. The units are organized into groups that form a model. Each unit can be connected to any other unit (including itself) using a weighted connection. The DANA framework offers a set of core objects needed to design and run such models. The modeler only has to define the equations of a unit as well as the equations governing the training of the connections. The simulation is completely transparent to the modeler and is handled by DANA. This allows DANA to be used for a wide range of numerical and distributed models as long as they fit the proposed framework (e.g. cellular automata, reaction-diffusion system, decentralized neural networks, recurrent neural networks, kernel-based image processing, etc.). PMID:22994650

  6. Detailed numerical analysis of photon emission from a single light emitter coupled with a nanofiber Bragg cavity.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Masazumi; Schell, Andreas W; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-06-27

    Coupling of a single dipole with a nanofiber Bragg cavity (NFBC) approximating an actually fabricated structure was numerically analyzed using three dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations for different dipole positions. For the given model structure, the Purcell factor and coupling efficiency reached to 19.1 and 82%, respectively, when the dipole is placed outside the surface of the fiber. Interestingly, these values are very close to the highest values of 20.2 and 84% obtained for the case when the dipole was located inside the fiber at the center. The analysis performed in this study will be useful in improving the performance of single-photon emitter-related quantum devices using NFBCs. PMID:27410656

  7. Submarine sand volcanos: experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, P.; Ngoma, J.; Delenne, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid overpressure at the bottom of a soil layer may generate fracturation in preferential paths for a cohesive material. But the case of sandy soils is rather different: a significant internal flow is allowed within the material and can potentially induce hydro-mechanical instabilities whose most common example is fluidization. Many works have been devoted to fluidization but very few have the issue of initiation and development of a fluidized zone inside a granular bed, prior entire fluidization of the medium. In this contribution, we report experimental results and numerical simulations on a model system of immersed sand volcanos generated by a localized upward spring of liquid, injected at constant flow-rate at the bottom of a granular layer. Such a localized state of fluidization is relevant for some industrial processes (spouted bed, maintenance of navigable waterways,…) and for several geological issues (kimberlite volcano conduits, fluid venting, oil recovery in sandy soil, More precisely, what is presented here is a comparison between experiments, carried out by direct visualization throughout the medium, and numerical simulations, based on DEM modelling of the grains coupled to resolution of NS equations in the liquid phase (LBM). There is a very good agreement between the experimental phenomenology and the simulation results. When the flow-rate is increased, three regimes are successively observed: static bed, fluidized cavity that does not extend to the top of the layer, and finally fluidization over the entire height of layer that creates a fluidized chimney. A very strong hysteretic effect is present here with an extended range of stability for fluidized cavities when flow-rate is decreased back. This can be interpreted in terms force chains and arches. The influences of grain diameter, layer height and injection width are studied and interpreted using a model previously developed by Zoueshtiagh [1]. Finally, growing rate of the fluidized zone and

  8. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  9. Numerical Modeling of Ocular Dysfunction in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Vera, J.; Myers, J. G.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A. J.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Upon introduction to microgravity, the near-loss of hydrostatic pressure causes a marked cephalic (headward) shift of fluid in an astronaut's body. The fluid shift, along with other factors of spaceflight, induces a cascade of interdependent physiological responses which occur at varying time scales. Long-duration missions carry an increased risk for the development of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath, kinking of the optic nerve and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. In the cases of VIIP found to date, the initial onset of symptoms occurred after several weeks to several months of spaceflight, by which time the gross bodily fluid distribution is well established. We are developing a suite of numerical models to simulate the effects of fluid shift on the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems. These models calculate the modified mean volumes, flow rates and pressures that are characteristic of the altered quasi-homeostatic state in microgravity, including intracranial and intraocular pressures. The results of the lumped models provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element biomechanics simulation of the globe, optic nerve head and retrobulbar subarachnoid space. The integrated set of models will be used to investigate the evolution of the biomechanical stress state in the ocular tissues due to long-term exposure to microgravity.

  10. Numerical modeling of transport barrier formation

    SciTech Connect

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2010-04-01

    In diverse media the characteristics of mass and heat transfer may undergo spontaneous and abrupt changes in time and space. This can lead to the formation of regions with strongly reduced transport, so called transport barriers (TB). The presence of interfaces between regions with qualitatively and quantitatively different transport characteristics impose severe requirements to methods and numerical schemes used by solving of transport equations. In particular the assumptions made in standard methods about the solution behavior by representing its derivatives fail in points where the transport changes abruptly. The situation is complicated further by the fact that neither the formation time nor the positions of interfaces are known a priori. A numerical approach, operating reliably under such conditions, is proposed. It is based on the introduction of a new dependent variable related to the variation after one time step of the original one integrated over the volume. In the vicinity of any grid knot the resulting differential equation is approximated by a second order ordinary differential equation with constant coefficients. Exact analytical solutions of these equations are conjugated between knots by demanding the continuity of the total solution and its first derivative. As an example the heat transfer in media with heat conductivity decreasing abruptly when the temperature e-folding length exceeds a critical value is considered. The formation of TB both at a heating power above the critical level and caused with radiation energy losses non-linearly dependent on the temperature is modeled.

  11. Multigrid Method for Modeling Multi-Dimensional Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xiaoqing; Liu, Chaoqun; Liao, Changming; Liu, Zhining; McCormick, Steve

    1996-01-01

    A highly accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for modeling 3-D reacting flows with detailed chemistry. A contravariant velocity-based governing system is developed for general curvilinear coordinates to maintain simplicity of the continuity equation and compactness of the discretization stencil. A fully-implicit backward Euler technique and a third-order monotone upwind-biased scheme on a staggered grid are used for the respective temporal and spatial terms. An efficient semi-coarsening multigrid method based on line-distributive relaxation is used as the flow solver. The species equations are solved in a fully coupled way and the chemical reaction source terms are treated implicitly. Example results are shown for a 3-D gas turbine combustor with strong swirling inflows.

  12. Numerical modelling and image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Gibson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The development of diffuse optical tomography as a functional imaging modality has relied largely on the use of model-based image reconstruction. The recovery of optical parameters from boundary measurements of light propagation within tissue is inherently a difficult one, because the problem is nonlinear, ill-posed and ill-conditioned. Additionally, although the measured near-infrared signals of light transmission through tissue provide high imaging contrast, the reconstructed images suffer from poor spatial resolution due to the diffuse propagation of light in biological tissue. The application of model-based image reconstruction is reviewed in this paper, together with a numerical modelling approach to light propagation in tissue as well as generalized image reconstruction using boundary data. A comprehensive review and details of the basis for using spatial and structural prior information are also discussed, whereby the use of spectral and dual-modality systems can improve contrast and spatial resolution. PMID:19581256

  13. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  14. Two numerical models for landslide dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungr, Oldrich; McDougall, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Two microcomputer-based numerical models (Dynamic ANalysis (DAN) and three-dimensional model DAN (DAN3D)) have been developed and extensively used for analysis of landslide runout, specifically for the purposes of practical landslide hazard and risk assessment. The theoretical basis of both models is a system of depth-averaged governing equations derived from the principles of continuum mechanics. Original features developed specifically during this work include: an open rheological kernel; explicit use of tangential strain to determine the tangential stress state within the flowing sheet, which is both more realistic and beneficial to the stability of the model; orientation of principal tangential stresses parallel with the direction of motion; inclusion of the centripetal forces corresponding to the true curvature of the path in the motion direction and; the use of very simple and highly efficient free surface interpolation methods. Both models yield similar results when applied to the same sets of input data. Both algorithms are designed to work within the semi-empirical framework of the "equivalent fluid" approach. This approach requires selection of material rheology and calibration of input parameters through back-analysis of real events. Although approximate, it facilitates simple and efficient operation while accounting for the most important characteristics of extremely rapid landslides. The two models have been verified against several controlled laboratory experiments with known physical basis. A large number of back-analyses of real landslides of various types have also been carried out. One example is presented. Calibration patterns are emerging, which give a promise of predictive capability.

  15. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  16. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Diesel Combustion with Oxygenated Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H J; Fisher, E M; Glaude, P-A; Marinov, N M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Flynn, P F; Durrett, R P; zur Loye, A O; Akinyemi, O C; Dryer, F L

    2000-01-11

    mixing model to study the premixed, rich ignition process. Using n-heptane as a representative diesel fuel, they showed that addition of an oxygenated additive, methanol, to the fuel reduced the concentrations of a number of hydrocarbon species in the products of the rich ignition. Specifically, methanol addition reduced the total concentrations of acetylene, ethylene and 1,3-butadiene, as well as propargyl and vinyl radicals, in the ignition products. These are the same species shown in a number of studies [4-6] to be responsible for formation of aromatic and polycyclic aromatic species in flames, species which lead eventually to production of soot. Flynn et al. did not, however, examine the kinetic processes responsible for the computed reduction in production of soot precursor species. At least two hypotheses have been advanced to explain the role that oxygenated species play in diesel ignition and the reduction in the concentrations of these species. The first is that the additive, methanol in the case of Flynn et al., does not contain any C-C bonds and cannot then produce significant levels of the species such as acetylene, ethylene or the unsaturated radicals which are known to lead to aromatic species. The second hypothesis is that the product distribution changes very naturally as oxygen is added and the overall equivalence ratio is reduced. In the present study, we repeat the ignition calculations of Flynn et al. and include a number of other oxygenated species to determine which of these theories is more applicable to this model.

  17. Numerical modeling of combustion dynamics in a lean premixed combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.M.; Smith, C.E.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a time-accurate, 2-D axi-symmetric CFD model to accurately predict combustion dynamics in a premixed pipe combustor driven by mixture feed variation. Independently measured data, including the magnitude and frequency of combustor pressure, were used to evaluate the model. The Smagorinsky, RGN k-{var{underscore}epsilon}, and molecular viscosity models were used to describe the subgrid turbulence, and a one-step, finite-rate reaction to equilibrium products model was used to describe the subgrid chemistry. Swirl source terms were included within the premix passage's computational domain and allowed the model to retain known boundary conditions at the choked flow inlet and the constant pressure exit. To ensure pressure waves were accurately captured, 1-D numerical analyses were first performed to assess the effects of boundary conditions, temporal and spatial differencing, time step, and grid size. It was found that the selected numerical details produced little numerical dissipation of the pressure waves. Then, 2-D axisymmetric analyses were performed in which the inlet temperature was varied. It was found that increases in the inlet temperature (keeping a constant mass flow rate) had a large effect on the unsteady combustor behavior since reaction and advection rates were increased. The correct trend of decreasing rms pressures with increasing inlet temperature was predicted. This agreement in rms pressure behavior supports the ability of the CFD model to accurately capture unsteady heat release and its coupling with resonant acoustic waves in multi-dimensional combustor systems. The effect of subgrid turbulence model was small for the unstable cases studied here.

  18. Benchmarking numerical freeze/thaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Molson, John; Grenier, Christophe; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The modeling of freezing and thawing of water in porous media is of increasing interest, and for which very different application areas exist. For instance, the modeling of permafrost regression with respect to climate change issues is one area, while others include geotechnical applications in tunneling and for borehole heat exchangers which operate at temperatures below the freezing point. The modeling of these processes requires the solution of a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations for flow and heat transport in space and time. Different code implementations have been developed in the past. Analytical solutions exist only for simple cases. Consequently, an interest has arisen in benchmarking different codes with analytical solutions, experiments and purely numerical results, similar to the long-standing DECOVALEX and the more recent "Geothermal Code Comparison" activities. The name for this freezing/ thawing benchmark consortium is INTERFROST. In addition to the well-known so-called Lunardini solution for a 1D case (case T1), two different 2D problems will be presented, one which represents melting of a frozen inclusion (case TH2) and another which represents the growth or thaw of permafrost around a talik (case TH3). These talik regions are important for controlling groundwater movement within a mainly frozen ground. First results of the different benchmark results will be shown and discussed.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Suspension HVOF Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, M.; Moghtadernejad, S.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme is used to simulate suspension high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying process. The mass, momentum, energy, and species equations are solved together with the realizable k-ɛ turbulence model to simulate the gas phase. Suspension is assumed to be a mixture of solid particles [mullite powder (3Al2O3·2SiO2)], ethanol, and ethylene glycol. The process involves premixed combustion of oxygen-propylene, and non-premixed combustion of oxygen-ethanol and oxygen-ethylene glycol. One-step global reaction is used for each mentioned reaction together with eddy dissipation model to compute the reaction rate. To simulate the droplet breakup, Taylor Analogy Breakup model is applied. After the completion of droplet breakup, and solvent evaporation/combustion, the solid suspended particles are tracked through the domain to determine the characteristics of the coating particles. Numerical simulations are validated against the experimental results in the literature for the same operating conditions. Seven or possibly eight shock diamonds are captured outside the nozzle. In addition, a good agreement between the predicted particle temperature, velocity, and diameter, and the experiment is obtained. It is shown that as the standoff distance increases, the particle temperature and velocity reduce. Furthermore, a correlation is proposed to determine the spray cross-sectional diameter and estimate the particle trajectories as a function of standoff distance.

  20. Foehn wind detection using numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimescu, A.; Caian, M.

    2010-09-01

    In Romania, foehn is a short-lived atmospheric phenomenon, of a low to average intensity, not always highlighted by weather station observations. When such situations occur additional data are resorted to, rendering a continuous, aggregate image, in comparison to the punctual information yielded by weather stations. This paper aims to describe how foehn is detected in northern Oltenia (the Inner Carpathian-Balkan Curvature), using numerical modelling. Results generated by the RegCM3 Regional Climatic Model thus represent an undisputed tool, their most important advantage being the 10-km spatial resolution. The presence of foehn in northern Oltenia and its climatic peculiarities have been disclosed through the analysis in time and space of the meteorological elements specific to the phenomenon (air temperature, wind speed and direction etc) over a 40-year interval (1961-2000). The paper presents a new methodology that can be used to estimate the probability of production and the foehn characteristics (intensity, duration etc.). Interpretation of the RegCM3 model results has led to the statistical analysis of foehn occurrences within the studied area during the cold season (December, January and February). The resulted climatology, with fine resolution, can be used in foehn forecast of predictability.

  1. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Su, Yanqing; Parmigiani, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the complex non-linear physics that governs volcanic eruptions is contingent on our ability to characterize the dynamics of bubbles and its effect on the ascending magma. The exsolution and migration of bubbles has also a great impact on the heat and mass transport in and out of magma bodies stored at shallow depths in the crust. Multiphase systems like magmas are by definition heterogeneous at small scales. Although mixture theory or homogenization methods are convenient to represent multiphase systems as a homogeneous equivalent media, these approaches do not inform us on possible feedbacks at the pore-scale and can be significantly misleading. In this presentation, we discuss the development and application of bubble-scale multiphase flow modeling to address the following questions : How do bubbles impact heat and mass transport in magma chambers ? How efficient are chemical exchanges between the melt and bubbles during magma decompression? What is the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the deformation of bubbles while the magma is sheared? Addressing these questions requires powerful numerical methods that accurately model the balance between viscous, capillary and pressure stresses. We discuss how these bubble-scale models can provide important constraints on the dynamics of magmas stored at shallow depth or ascending to the surface during an eruption.

  2. Numerical modeling of polar mesocyclones generation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Dennis; Stepanenko, Victor

    2013-04-01

    parameters, lateral boundary conditions are varied in the typically observed range. The approach is fully nonlinear: we use a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic mesoscale model NH3D_MPI [1] coupled with one-dimensional water body model LAKE. A key method used in the present study is the analysis of eddy kinetic and available potential energy budgets. References 1. Mikushin, D.N., and Stepanenko, V.M., The implementation of regional atmospheric model numerical algorithms for CBEA-based clusters. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Parallel Processing and Applied Mathematics, 2010, vol. 6067, p. 525-534. 2. Rasmussen, E., and Turner, J. (eds), Polar Lows: Mesoscale Weather Systems in the Polar Regions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, 612 pp. 3. Yanase, W., and Niino, H., Dependence of Polar Low Development on Baroclinicity and Physical Processes: An Idealized High-Resolution Experiment, J. Atmos. Sci., 2006, vol. 64, p. 3044-3067.

  3. Numerical geometry of map and model assessment.

    PubMed

    Wriggers, Willy; He, Jing

    2015-11-01

    We are describing best practices and assessment strategies for the atomic interpretation of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) maps. Multiscale numerical geometry strategies in the Situs package and in secondary structure detection software are currently evolving due to the recent increases in cryo-EM resolution. Criteria that aim to predict the accuracy of fitted atomic models at low (worse than 8Å) and medium (4-8 Å) resolutions remain challenging. However, a high level of confidence in atomic models can be achieved by combining such criteria. The observed errors are due to map-model discrepancies and due to the effect of imperfect global docking strategies. Extending the earlier motion capture approach developed for flexible fitting, we use simulated fiducials (pseudoatoms) at varying levels of coarse-graining to track the local drift of structural features. We compare three tracking approaches: naïve vector quantization, a smoothly deformable model, and a tessellation of the structure into rigid Voronoi cells, which are fitted using a multi-fragment refinement approach. The lowest error is an upper bound for the (small) discrepancy between the crystal structure and the EM map due to different conditions in their structure determination. When internal features such as secondary structures are visible in medium-resolution EM maps, it is possible to extend the idea of point-based fiducials to more complex geometric representations such as helical axes, strands, and skeletons. We propose quantitative strategies to assess map-model pairs when such secondary structure patterns are prominent. PMID:26416532

  4. Numerical Models of Ophiolite Genesis and Obduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilmette, C.; Beaumont, C.; Jamieson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ophiolites are relics of oceanic lithosphere tectonically emplaced in continental settings. They are diagnostic features of continental suture zones, where they mark past plate boundaries. Even after having been studied for more than 40 years, the mechanisms involved in the genesis and subsequent obduction of ophiolites over continental margins are still debated. We present the results of 2D thermal-mechanical numerical models that successfully reproduce characteristics of natural examples like the Semail, Bay of Islands, Yarlung-Zangbo, and Coast Range ophiolites. The numerical models are upper mantle scale and use pressure-, temperature- and strain-dependent viscous-plastic rheologies. Both divergent and convergent velocity boundary conditions are used and tectonic boundary forces are monitored. The models start with the rifting of a stable continent, followed by development of an ocean ridge and accretion of oceanic lithosphere at a total rate of 3 cm/y. Once a specified ocean size/age is achieved, the velocity boundary conditions are reversed leading to convergence and the spontaneous inception of a suduction zone at the mid-ocean ridge. We present results for models including different ages of oceans (40 to 90 Ma) and different convergence velocities (5 to 15 cm/y). The interaction between the lower plate passive margin and the oceanic upper plate results in 5 different tectonic styles. These differ mainly by the presence or absence of oceanic spreading in the upper plate (back-arc basin), leading to supra-subduction zone ophiolites vs. MORB-type, and by the behaviour of the oceanic slab, e.g., slab rollback vs. breakoff. The evolution of effective slab pull is interpreted to be the major control on the resulting tectonic style. Low effective slab pull models (young oceans and fast convergence rates) fail to obduct an ophiolite. Strong effective slab pull models (old oceans and lower convergence rates) result in subduction zone retreat and spontaneous oceanic

  5. Numerical models of wind-driven circulation in lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Powell, T.M.; Dillon, T.M.

    1976-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of numerical modelling of large-scale wind-driven circulation in lakes is presented. The governing equations which describe this motion are discussed along with the appropriate numerical techniques necessary to solve them in lakes. The numerical models are categorized into three large primary groups: the layered models, the Ekman-type models, and the other three-dimensional models. Discussions and comparison of models are given and future research directions are suggested. ?? 1976.

  6. Numerical modeling of subaqueous sand dune morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doré, Arnaud; Bonneton, Philippe; Marieu, Vincent; Garlan, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    The morphodynamic evolution of subaqueous sand dunes is investigated, using a 2-D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes numerical model. A laboratory experiment where dunes are generated under stationary unidirectional flow conditions is used as a reference case. The model reproduces the evolution of the erodible bed until a state of equilibrium is reached. In particular, the simulation exhibits the different stages of the bed evolution, e.g., the incipient ripple generation, the nonlinear bed form growing phase, and the dune field equilibrium phase. The results show good agreement in terms of dune geometrical dimensions and time to equilibrium. After the emergence of the first ripple field, the bed growth is driven by cascading merging sequences between bed forms of different heights. A sequence extracted from the simulation shows how the downstream bed form is first eroded before merging with the upstream bed form. Superimposed bed forms emerge on the dune stoss sides during the simulation. An analysis of the results shows that they emerge downstream of a slight deflection on the dune profile. The deflection arises due to a modification of the sediment flux gradient consecutive to a reduction in the turbulence relaxation length while the upstream bed form height decreases. As they migrate, superimposed bed forms grow on the dune stoss side and eventually provoke the degeneration of the dune crest. Cascading merging sequences and superimposed bed forms dynamics both influence the dune field evolution and size and therefore play a fundamental role in the dune field self-organization process.

  7. Understanding Etna flank instability through numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apuani, Tiziana; Corazzato, Claudia; Merri, Andrea; Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    As many active volcanoes, Mount Etna shows clear evidence of flank instability, and different mechanisms were suggested to explain this flank dynamics, based on the recorded deformation pattern and character. Shallow and deep deformations, mainly associated with both eruptive and seismic events, are concentrated along recognised fracture and fault systems, mobilising the eastern and south-eastern flank of the volcano. Several interacting causes were postulated to control the phenomenon, including gravity force, magma ascent along the feeding system, and a very complex local and/or regional tectonic activity. Nevertheless, the complexity of such dynamics is still an open subject of research and being the volcano flanks heavily urbanised, the comprehension of the gravitative dynamics is a major issue for public safety and civil protection. The present research explores the effects of the main geological features (in particular the role of the subetnean clays, interposed between the Apennine-Maghrebian flysch and the volcanic products) and the role of weakness zones, identified by fracture and fault systems, on the slope instability process. The effects of magma intrusions are also investigated. The problem is addressed by integrating field data, laboratory tests and numerical modelling. A bi- and tri-dimensional stress-strain analysis was performed by a finite difference numerical code (FLAC and FLAC3D), mainly aimed at evaluating the relationship among geological features, volcano-tectonic structures and magmatic activity in controlling the deformation processes. The analyses are well supported by dedicated structural-mechanical field surveys, which allowed to estimate the rock mass strength and deformability parameters. To take into account the uncertainties which inevitably occur in a so complicated model, many efforts were done in performing a sensitivity analysis along a WNW-ESE section crossing the volcano summit and the Valle del Bove depression. This was

  8. Numerical model of circumpolar Antarctic ice shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive floating ice shelves in the Antarctic have been proposed to explain the discrepancies between Pleistocene high sea levels shown by dated coral reefs and coeval low sea levels inferred from glacial ice volumes calculated from oxygen isotope ratios in deep sea cores. A numerical model using the floating shelf creep analysis of Weertman (1957) has provided a plausible basis for the acceptance of such shelves. Shelf outer limits were set at 55/sup 0/S in East Antarctica and 58/sup 0/S in West Antarctica, based in part on diatom-deficient deep sea sediments deposited prior to the Holocene. Precipitation varied from 10 gm cm/sup -2/yr/sup -1/ at 75/sup 0/S to 80 gm cm/sup -2/yr/sup -1/ at 55/sup 0/S. Mean air temperatures varied from -35/sup 0/C at the 75/sup 0/S coast to -17/sup 0/C at the outer limits. Isotope ratios were those of present Antarctic precipitation at corresponding model shelf temperatures. In the calculation, a steady state is assumed. Integration begins at the coast with summation over successive years as creep and continental ice discharge move the integration element to the outer limits. The oceanic oxygen isotope ratio change required by the discrepancies in the record is 0.40 to 0.50 ppmil. Using the flow law constant of 4.2 and a creep activation energy of 134 kjoules mol/sup -1/, the resulting change is 0.44 ppmil. Difference results reflect the uncertainties associated with the critical creep constants used in the modeling. Nevertheless, the results suggest that a quantity of Antarctic shelf ice comparable to ice volumes in major Northern glacial areas existed at times during the Pleistocene.

  9. Numerical Modelling of Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael D.

    Mesoscale atmospheric dispersion is more complicated than smaller-scale dispersion because the mean wind field can no longer be considered steady or horizontally homogeneous over mesoscale time and space scales. Wind shear also plays a more important role on the mesoscale, and horizontal dispersion can be enhanced and even dominated by vertical wind shear through either the simultaneous or delayed interaction of horizontal differential advection and vertical mixing over one or two diurnal periods. The CSU mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modelling system has been used in this study to simulate the transport and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon gas for episodic releases made during two North American mesoscale dispersion field experiments, the 1980 Great Plains tracer experiment and the 1983 Cross-Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX). Ground -level and elevated tracer concentrations were measured out to distances of 600 km from the source in the first experiment and 1100 km in the second. The physiography of the two experimental domains was quite different, permitting isolation and examination of the roles of terrain forcing and differential advection in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. Suites of numerical experiments of increasing complexity were carried out for both case studies. The experiments differed in the realism of their representation of both the synoptic-scale flow and the underlying terrain. The Great Plains nocturnal low-level jet played an important role in the first case while temporal changes in the synoptic -scale flow were very significant in the second case. The contributions of differential advection and mesoscale deformation to mesoscale dispersion dominated those of small-scale turbulent diffusion for both cases, and Pasquill's (1962) delayed-shear-enhancement mechanism for lateral dispersion was found to be particularly important. This study was also the first quantitative evaluation of the CSU mesoscale dispersion modelling system with

  10. Numerical modeling of odorant uptake in the rat nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Geoffrey C; Scherer, Peter W; Zhao, Kai; Mozell, Maxwell M

    2007-03-01

    An anatomically accurate 3-dimensional numerical model of the right rat nasal cavity was developed and used to compute low, medium, and high flow rate inspiratory and expiratory mucosal odorant uptake (imposed patterning) for 3 odorants with different mucus solubilities. The computed surface mass flux distributions were compared with anatomic receptor gene expression zones identified in the literature. In general, simulations predicted that odorants that were highly soluble in mucus were absorbed dorsally and medially, corresponding roughly to receptors from one of the gene expression zones. Insoluble odorants tended to be absorbed more peripherally in the rat olfactory region corresponding to the other 2 zones. These findings also agreed in general with the electroolfactogram measurements and the voltage-sensitive dye measurements reported in the literature. This numerical approach is the first to predict detailed odorant flux information across the olfactory mucosa in the rat nasal cavity during inspiratory and expiratory flow and to relate it to anatomic olfactory receptor location, physiological function, and biochemical experiment. This numerical technique can allow us to separate the contributions of imposed and inherent patterning mechanisms on the rat olfactory mucosa. PMID:17220517

  11. GEOSIM: A numerical model for geophysical fluid flow simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Karen A.; Miller, Timothy L.; Lu, Huei-Iin

    1991-01-01

    A numerical model which simulates geophysical fluid flow in a wide range of problems is described in detail, and comparisons of some of the model's results are made with previous experimental and numerical studies. The model is based upon the Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations in spherical coordinates, which can be reduced to a cylindrical system when latitudinal walls are used near the pole and the ratio of latitudinal length to the radius of the sphere is small. The equations are approximated by finite differences in the meridional plane and spectral decomposition in the azimuthal direction. The user can specify a variety of boundary and initial conditions, and there are five different spectral truncation options. The results of five validation cases are presented: (1) the transition between axisymmetric flow and baroclinic wave flow in the side heated annulus; (2) the steady baroclinic wave of the side heated annulus; (3) the wave amplitude vacillation of the side heated annulus; (4) transition to baroclinic wave flow in a bottom heated annulus; and (5) the Spacelab Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (spherical) experiment.

  12. Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs.

  13. An operational phenological model for numerical pollen prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheifinger, Helfried

    2010-05-01

    The general prevalence of seasonal allergic rhinitis is estimated to be about 15% in Europe, and still increasing. Pre-emptive measures require both the reliable assessment of production and release of various pollen species and the forecasting of their atmospheric dispersion. For this purpose numerical pollen prediction schemes are being developed by a number of European weather services in order to supplement and improve the qualitative pollen prediction systems by state of the art instruments. Pollen emission is spatially and temporally highly variable throughout the vegetation period and not directly observed, which precludes a straightforward application of dispersion models to simulate pollen transport. Even the beginning and end of flowering, which indicates the time period of potential pollen emission, is not (yet) available in real time. One way to create a proxy for the beginning, the course and the end of the pollen emission is its simulation as function of real time temperature observations. In this work the European phenological data set of the COST725 initiative forms the basis of modelling the beginning of flowering of 15 species, some of which emit allergic pollen. In order to keep the problem as simple as possible for the sake of spatial interpolation, a 3 parameter temperature sum model was implemented in a real time operational procedure, which calculates the spatial distribution of the entry dates for the current day and 24, 48 and 72 hours in advance. As stand alone phenological model and combined with back trajectories it is thought to support the qualitative pollen prediction scheme at the Austrian national weather service. Apart from that it is planned to incorporate it in a numerical pollen dispersion model. More details, open questions and first results of the operation phenological model will be discussed and presented.

  14. An exploratory numerical model of rocky shore profile evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Hironori; Dickson, Mark E.; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-09-01

    Rocky shores occur along much of the world's coastline and include a wide range of coastal morphologies, such as intertidal shore platforms. Considerable research effort has been placed on trying to understand developmental processes on rocky shores, but progress has been forestalled because these landscapes develop slowly and preserve little evidence of evolution through time. This paper presents a new exploratory numerical model developed to study long-term shore profile evolution on rock coasts. The model purposely considers only a limited number of processes, each represented in a highly abstracted way. Despite these simplifications, the model exhibits a large range of emergent shore profile shapes. This behavior is enabled both by broader spatial representation of the driving erosion forces and the flexibility provided by a grid discretization scheme. Initial model testing shows the development of varied rocky profile geometries, ranging from steep plunging cliffs, cliffs with narrow benches, and cliffs with a variety of shore platform shapes. Most of the model geometries are similar to those observed in the field, and model behavior is robust and internally consistent across a relatively large parameter space. This paper provides a detailed description of the new model and its subsequent testing. Emphasis is placed on comparison of model results with published field observations in which morphometric relationships are described between shore platform gradient and tidal range, and platform elevation and platform width. The model adequately simulates these morphometric relationships, while retaining its ability to simulate a wide range of profile shapes. The simplicity of process representations, and the limited number of processes implemented, means that model outputs can be interpreted reasonably easily. Hence, an opportunity is now provided, following the testing described in this paper, to use the model to systematically investigate the broader controlling

  15. Validation of Numerical Shallow Water Models for Tidal Lagoons

    SciTech Connect

    Eliason, D.; Bourgeois, A.

    1999-11-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the case of a stratified, tidally forced lagoon. This solution, especially its energetics, is useful for the validation of numerical shallow water models under stratified, tidally forced conditions. The utility of the analytical solution for validation is demonstrated for a simple finite difference numerical model. A comparison is presented of the energetics of the numerical and analytical solutions in terms of the convergence of model results to the analytical solution with increasing spatial and temporal resolution.

  16. Advanced in turbulence physics and modeling by direct numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    The advent of direct numerical simulations of turbulence has opened avenues for research on turbulence physics and turbulence modeling. Direct numerical simulation provides values for anything that the scientist or modeler would like to know about the flow. An overview of some recent advances in the physical understanding of turbulence and in turbulence modeling obtained through such simulations is presented.

  17. Numerical considerations for Lagrangian stochastic dispersion models: Eliminating rogue trajectories, and the importance of numerical accuracy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behavior in the numerical solution. This paper discusses numerical considerations when solving the Langevin-based particle velo...

  18. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Liu

    2000-03-03

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models.

  19. Numerical modeling of twisted stacked tape cables for magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, Francesco; Zermeño, Victor M. R.; Takayasu, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    In view of high-temperature superconductor (HTS) magnet applications, the concept of Twisted Stacked Tape Cable (TSTC) made of HTS coated conductors is very promising because of the easy manufacturing process and of the very high tape length usage efficiency. For the use of these cables in magnet applications, where the cables carry high current while subjected to the strong magnetic field generated by the rest of the magnet, the possibility of being able to calculate in detail current and field distributions is very welcome, particularly for evaluating the cable's performance during the charge of the magnet. The numerical modeling of this kind of cable is particularly challenging because of the twisted geometry. In this paper, we use a 3-D finite element model to compute the magnetization AC losses of a twisted superconductor and current repartition among the tapes in a cable composed of four HTS coated conductor tapes. The utilized model is able to simulate not only twisted geometries, but also the contact resistance of the electrical terminations used to inject the current. The latter can importantly influence the current repartition between the tapes, especially in short samples. The model is also able to take into account the angular dependence of the critical current on the local magnetic field, whose relative orientation with respect to the tape needs to be locally evaluated as a consequence of the twisted geometry.

  20. A Numerical Model for the Microcirculation in Skeletal Muscle Fascia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank G.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2002-11-01

    A numerical model for blood flow in a microvascular network has been developed. The model uses the complete network topology of rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia that was reconstructed from microscopic images. The fascia's network is composed of a feeding arterial network, a collecting venous network, and bundles of capillaries. The flow in the network's vessels is characterized by low Reynolds and Womersley numbers. The model consideres that the microvessels are distensible by pressure and that the arterioles are actively contractile. The blood has non-Newtonian apparent viscosity and blood cells are distributed at bifurcations according to the flow rates into the side branches. These properties have previously been determined experimentally. The method of indefinite admittances is used to compute the flow in the network. The apparent viscosity is computed from local values of hematocrit, shear, and vessel diameter. The model provides detailed information about the flow in all of the network's vessels. Statistical properties of the network, such as the overall flowrate through the network or distributions of pressure, shear stress, and hematocrit in the network are determined. Results for the flow in arterial, venous, and capillary vessels are compared.

  1. A Refined Numerical Model for Sorted Bedform Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, A. B.; Coco, G.; Green, M. O.; Hume, T. M.; Thieler, E. R.

    2005-05-01

    Murray and Thieler (2004) hypothesized that a feedback operating on a poorly sorted seabed, and subsequent emergent interactions, lead to development of large-scale grain-size sorted patterns (`sorted bedforms') on inner continental shelves that have traditionally been referred to as `rippled scour depressions.' Unlike familiar bedforms that grow because of an interaction between bed topography and sediment flux, the initiation and evolution of these sorted bedforms results from a coupling between bed composition and sediment flux. In essence, larger wave ripples form in coarser patches, and these inhibit fine-sediment accumulation and enhance fine sediment flux over the patch by enhancing vertical mixing. As an initial test of the hypothesis, Murray and Thieler developed an exploratory numerical model that produced sorted bedforms exhibiting the main characteristics of the patterns observed in nature. Murray and Thieler's initial model parametrically treated the coupling between bed composition and sediment flux. We further developed the model, incorporating more detailed parameterizations, including: 1) empirical predictions of ripple dimensions as a function of bed composition and near-bed wave conditions; 2) near-bed wave-orbital motions that do not involve a shallow-water assumption; 3) calculations of the vertical profiles of suspended-sediment concentration and mean-current velocities that result from wave and current motions interacting with the ripples; and 4) bedload transport. We tested the sensitivity of model behavior to the parameterizations adopted by conducting numerical experiments using wave, depth, and current conditions measured off the coastline of Tairua (New Zealand). We performed two tests: a comparison of predicted ripple characteristics and sediment concentration profiles with tripod observations; and a comparison of the large-scale geometry emerging from model simulations with some of the features observed during bathymetric surveys

  2. Revisiting the Concept of Level of Detail in 3d City Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biljecki, F.; Zhao, J.; Stoter, J.; Ledoux, H.

    2013-09-01

    This review paper discusses the concept of level of detail in 3D city modelling, and is a first step towards a foundation for a standardised definition. As an introduction, a few level of detail specifications, outlooks and approaches are given from the industry. The paper analyses the general uncertainties and shortcomings around the concept of level of detail in 3D city modelling such as ordinality and inconsistencies, and identifies factors that constitute a specific level of detail. The paper proposes a framework for a new consistent LoD definition which would consolidate present and future LoD paradigms, gives an example of an LoD specification, discusses open questions such as the contexts for which 3D city models are used in practice, and gives prospects for a future quantification and sorting of levels of detail.

  3. Detailed Physical Modeling Reveals the Magnetar Nature of a Transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guever, T.; Oezel, F.; Goegues, E.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) belong to a class of neutron stars believed to harbor the strongest magnetic fields in the universe, as indicated by their energetic bursts and their rapid spindowns. However, a direct measurement of their surface field strengths has not been made to date. It is also not known whether AXP outbursts result from changes in the neutron star magnetic field or crust properties. Here we report the first, spectroscopic measurement of the surface magnetic field strength of an AXP, XTE J1810-197, and solidify its magnetar nature. The field strength obtained from detailed spectral analysis and modeling is remarkably close to the value inferred from the rate of spindown of this source and remains nearly constant during numerous observations spanning over two orders of magnitude in source flux. The surface temperature, on the other hand, declines steadily and dramatically following the 2003 outburst of this source. Our findings demonstrate that heating occurs in the upper neutron star crust during an outburst and sheds light on the transient behaviour of AXPs.

  4. The Rheasilvia Crater on Rotating Vesta: Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, B.; Kamyshenkov, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Dawn mission to the asteroid Vesta delivers valuable new data about this differentiated planetary body (see Russel ea., Jaumann ea., Schenk ea., Science, 11 May 2012). The youngest of giant impact craters on Vesta, Rheasilvia, is an important "window" into Vesta structure and history. Numerical SPH modeling of the Rheasilvia impact formation (Jutzi and Asphaug, 2010-12, Jutzi ea., 2012) revealed the main details of the event. We use alternatively 2D SALE-based code to study some details better resolved in the Eulerian hydrocodes (Ivanov ea., 2011-12). We continue the modeling and now the target rotation (centripetal accelerations) is added to the code (in 2D we can model only vertical impact at the pole). The problem of the initial rotating target shape is solving numerically: the liquid 3-layer sphere ("basalt" crust, "dunite" mantle, iron core) is gradually spin up and starts to oscillate around an equilibrium elliptic shape. At the moment of maximum average velocity all velocities are zeroed and the target approaches to its equilibrium more slowly. A few iterations allow us to reach the state where the model run, restarted with strength switched on, demonstrates only near boundaries material damage. After ~3000 s of this "dry" run the model restarts again with zeroed damage and velocities and the impacting projectile. For the 5 hours rotation period, 40 km crust and 100 km core the (a-c)/a flattening is about 0.165 v.s 0.196 for 285x229 km ellipsoid used for mapping (Jaumann ea., 2012). The core flattening is about 0.15. After the impact the crater is formed and flattening increases to ~0.168 for crust and mantle and to 0.156 for the core (crust and mantle ellipses are fitted for the uncratered hemisphere). Hence, the Rheasilvia-scale impact may slightly change the effective asteroid shape. Older large impacts visible on Vesta (Schenk ea., 2012) should be modeled in future to trace the shape evolution. The Rheasilvia-scale impact results in the mantle uplift

  5. Numerical daemons in hydrological modeling: Effects on uncertainty assessment, sensitivity analysis and model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavetski, D.; Clark, M. P.; Fenicia, F.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrologists often face sources of uncertainty that dwarf those normally encountered in many engineering and scientific disciplines. Especially when representing large scale integrated systems, internal heterogeneities such as stream networks, preferential flowpaths, vegetation, etc, are necessarily represented with a considerable degree of lumping. The inputs to these models are themselves often the products of sparse observational networks. Given the simplifications inherent in environmental models, especially lumped conceptual models, does it really matter how they are implemented? At the same time, given the complexities usually found in the response surfaces of hydrological models, increasingly sophisticated analysis methodologies are being proposed for sensitivity analysis, parameter calibration and uncertainty assessment. Quite remarkably, rather than being caused by the model structure/equations themselves, in many cases model analysis complexities are consequences of seemingly trivial aspects of the model implementation - often, literally, whether the start-of-step or end-of-step fluxes are used! The extent of problems can be staggering, including (i) degraded performance of parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis algorithms, (ii) erroneous and/or misleading conclusions of sensitivity analysis, parameter inference and model interpretations and, finally, (iii) poor reliability of a calibrated model in predictive applications. While the often nontrivial behavior of numerical approximations has long been recognized in applied mathematics and in physically-oriented fields of environmental sciences, it remains a problematic issue in many environmental modeling applications. Perhaps detailed attention to numerics is only warranted for complicated engineering models? Would not numerical errors be an insignificant component of total uncertainty when typical data and model approximations are present? Is this really a serious issue beyond some rare isolated

  6. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  7. Numerical modelling of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) bacterial contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Tomasz; Doré, William J.; Lyons, Kieran; Nolan, Glenn D.

    2014-05-01

    Bivalve shellfish such as oysters and mussels can concentrate human pathogens when grown in areas impacted by municipal wastewater. Under EU regulation this risk to consumers is controlled by determining the sanitary quality of bivalve shellfish production areas based on the concentration of Escherichia coli present in shellfish flesh. The authors present a modelling approach to simulate an uptake of E. coli from seawater and subsequent depuration by Mytilus edulis. The model that dynamically predicts E. coli concentration in the mussel tissue is embedded within a 3-D numerical modelling system comprising hydrodynamic, biogeochemical, shellfish ecophysiological and the newly proposed microbial modules. The microbial module has two state variables, namely, the concentrations of E. coli in water and in the mussel tissue. Novel formulations to calculate the filtration rates by mussels and the resulting uptake of bacteria are proposed; these rates are updated at every computational time step. Concentrations of E. coli in seawater are also updated accordingly taking into account the amounts ingested by mussels. The model has been applied to Bantry Bay in the south-west of Ireland. The results indicate that the model is capable of reproducing the official classification of shellfish waters in the bay based on monthly sampling at several stations. The predicted filtration rates and ratios of E. coli in water and mussels also compare well with the literature. The model thus forms a tool that may be used to assist in the classification of shellfish waters at much greater spatial and temporal detail than that offered by a field monitoring programme. Moreover, it can also aid in designing an efficient monitoring programme. The model can also be utilised to determine the contribution of individual point sources of pollution on the microbial loading in mussels and, when incorporated into an operational framework, it can provide a short-term forecasting of microbial

  8. 3-D numerical modeling of plume-induced subduction initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Marzieh; Gerya, taras; Sobolev, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of mechanisms involved in formation of a new subduction zone can help us to better understand plate tectonics. Despite numerous previous studies, it is still unclear how and where an old oceanic plate starts to subduct beneath the other plate. One of the proposed scenarios for nucleation of subduction is plume-induced subduction initiation, which was investigated in detail, using 2-D models, by Ueda et al. (2008). Recently. Gerya et al. (2015), using 3D numerical models, proposed that plume-lithosphere interaction in the Archean led to the subduction initiation and onset of plate tectonic. In this study, we aim to pursue work of Ueda et al. (2008) by incorporation of 3-D thermo-mechanical models to investigate conditions leading to oceanic subduction initiation as a result of thermal-chemical mantle plume-lithosphere interaction in the modern earth. Results of our experiments show four different deformation regimes in response to plume-lithosphere interaction, that are a) self-sustaining subduction initiation where subduction becomes self-sustained, b) freezing subduction initiation where subduction stops at shallow depths, c) slab break-off where subducting circular slab breaks off soon after formation and d) plume underplating where plume does not pass through the lithosphere but spreads beneath it (failed subduction initiation). These different regimes depend on several parameters such as plume's size, composition and temperature, lithospheric brittle/plastic strength, age of the oceanic lithosphere and presence/absence of lithospheric heterogeneities. Results show that subduction initiates and becomes self-sustained when lithosphere is older than 10 Myr and non-dimensional ratio of the plume buoyancy force and lithospheric strength above the plume is higher than 2.

  9. Biotic origin for Mima mounds supported by numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Emmanuel J.; Perron, J. Taylor; Johnson, Donald L.

    2014-02-01

    Mima mounds are ~ 1-m-high hillocks found on every continent except Antarctica. Despite often numbering in the millions within a single field, their origin has been a mystery, with proposed explanations ranging from glacial processes to seismic shaking. One hypothesis proposes that mounds in North America are built by burrowing mammals to provide refuge from seasonally saturated soils. We test this hypothesis with a numerical model, parameterized with measurements of soil transport by gophers from a California mound field, that couples animal behavior with geomorphic processes. The model successfully simulates the development of the mounds as well as key details such as the creation of vernal pools, small intermound basins that provide habitat for endemic species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the modeled mound fields is similar to actual mound fields and provides an example of self-organized topographic features. We conclude that, scaled by body mass, Mima mounds are the largest structures built by nonhuman mammals and may provide a rare example of an evolutionary coupling between landforms and the organisms that create them.

  10. Biotic Origin for Mima Mounds Supported by Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, E. J.; Perron, J.; Johnson, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mima mounds are ~1-m-high hillocks found on every continent except Antarctica. Despite often numbering in the millions within a single field, their origin has been a mystery, with proposed explanations ranging from glacial processes to seismic shaking. One hypothesis proposes that mounds in North America are built by burrowing mammals to provide refuge from seasonally saturated soils. We test this hypothesis with a numerical model, parameterized with measurements of soil transport by gophers from a California mound field, that couples animal behavior with geomorphic processes. The model successfully simulates the development of the mounds, as well as key details such as the creation of vernal pools, small intermound basins that provide habitat for endemic species. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the spatial structure of the modeled mound fields is similar to actual mound fields and provides an example of self-organized topographic features. We conclude that, scaled by body mass, Mima mounds are the largest structures built by non-human mammals, and may provide a rare example of an evolutionary coupling between landforms and the organisms that create them.

  11. Numerical bifurcation analysis of immunological models with time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzyanina, Tatyana; Roose, Dirk; Bocharov, Gennady

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, a large number of mathematical models that are described by delay differential equations (DDEs) have appeared in the life sciences. To analyze the models' dynamics, numerical methods are necessary, since analytical studies can only give limited results. In turn, the availability of efficient numerical methods and software packages encourages the use of time delays in mathematical modelling, which may lead to more realistic models. We outline recently developed numerical methods for bifurcation analysis of DDEs and illustrate the use of these methods in the analysis of a mathematical model of human hepatitis B virus infection.

  12. PROGRESS IN DETAILED KINETIC MODELING OF THE COMBUSTION OF OXYGENATED COMPONENTS OF BIOFUELS

    PubMed Central

    Sy Tran, Luc; Sirjean, Baptiste; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    Due to growing environmental concerns and diminishing petroleum reserves, a wide range of oxygenated species has been proposed as possible substitutes to fossil fuels: alcohols, methyl esters, acyclic and cyclic ethers. After a short review the major detailed kinetic models already proposed in the literature for the combustion of these molecules, the specific classes of reactions considered for modeling the oxidation of acyclic and cyclic oxygenated molecules respectively, are detailed. PMID:23700355

  13. Numerically Controlled Machining Of Wind-Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovtun, John B.

    1990-01-01

    New procedure for dynamic models and parts for wind-tunnel tests or radio-controlled flight tests constructed. Involves use of single-phase numerical control (NC) technique to produce highly-accurate, symmetrical models in less time.

  14. Numerical modeling of waveguide heated microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, S.; Schwer, D.A.; Merkle, C.L.

    1993-12-01

    Waveguide-heated microwave plasmas for space propulsion applications are analyzed by a two-dimensional numerical solution of the combined Navier-Stokes and Maxwell equations. Two waveguide configurations -- one purely transmitting and the other with a reflecting end wall -- are considered. Plasma stability and absorption characteristics are studied and contrasted with the characteristic of resonant cavity heated plasmas. In addition, preliminary estimates of the overall efficiency and the thrust and specific impulse of the propulsion system are also made. The computational results are used to explain experimental trends and to better understand the working of these devices.

  15. Software Simplifies the Sharing of Numerical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    To ease the sharing of climate models with university students, Goddard Space Flight Center awarded SBIR funding to Reston, Virginia-based Parabon Computation Inc., a company that specializes in cloud computing. The firm developed a software program capable of running climate models over the Internet, and also created an online environment for people to collaborate on developing such models.

  16. Detailed model of the thorax as a volume conductor based on the visible human man data.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, P; Hyttinen, J; Heinonen, T; Malmivuo, J

    1998-01-01

    A large number of computerized conductivity models of the human thorax have been created to study bioelectric phenomena in human beings. Devised models have varied greatly in the level of anatomical detail incorporated thus restricting the accuracy and validity of conducted simulations. This paper introduces a highly detailed anatomically accurate three-dimensional computer model of the conductive anatomy of the human thorax for calculating electric fields generated by equivalent bioelectric sources and different externally applied sources. The anatomy of the devised model is based on high resolution colour cryosection images of the US National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Man data set and is comprised of more anatomical detail than prior computer models. The model is based on the finite difference method and is readily applicable for the analysis of a wide range of biomedical field problems, such as electrocardiography, impedance cardiography, tissue stimulations, and especially, in development of measurement systems. PMID:9667039

  17. Combining a Detailed Building Energy Model with a Physically-Based Urban Canopy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Bruno; Norford, Leslie; Pigeon, Grégoire; Britter, Rex

    2011-09-01

    A scheme that couples a detailed building energy model, EnergyPlus, and an urban canopy model, the Town Energy Balance (TEB), is presented. Both models are well accepted and evaluated within their individual scientific communities. The coupled scheme proposes a more realistic representation of buildings and heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, which allows a broader analysis of the two-way interactions between the energy performance of buildings and the urban climate around the buildings. The scheme can be used to evaluate the building energy models that are being developed within the urban climate community. In this study, the coupled scheme is evaluated using measurements conducted over the dense urban centre of Toulouse, France. The comparison includes electricity and natural gas energy consumption of buildings, building façade temperatures, and urban canyon air temperatures. The coupled scheme is then used to analyze the effect of different building and HVAC system configurations on building energy consumption, waste heat released from HVAC systems, and outdoor air temperatures for the case study of Toulouse. Three different energy efficiency strategies are analyzed: shading devices, economizers, and heat recovery.

  18. The GISS model of the global atmosphere. [Goddard Institute for Space Studies numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.; Stone, P. H.; Halem, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Hogan, J. S.; Druyan, L. M.; Quirk, W. J.; Russell, G.; Lacis, A. A.; Tenenbaum, J.

    1974-01-01

    A description and numerical results are presented for a global atmospheric circulation model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS). The model version described is a 9-level primitive-equation model in sigma coordinates. It includes a realistic distribution of continents, oceans and topography. Detailed calculations of energy transfer by solar and terrestrial radiation make use of cloud and water vapor fields calculated by the model. The model hydrologic cycle includes two precipitation mechanisms: large-scale supersaturation and a parameterization of subgrid-scale cumulus convection. Results are presented both from a comparison of the 13th to the 43rd days (January) of one integration with climatological statistics, and from five short-range forecasting experiments. In the extended integration, the near-equilibrium January-mean model atmosphere exhibits an energy cycle in good agreement with observational estimates, together with generally realistic zonal mean fields of winds, temperature, humidity, transports, diabatic heating, evaporation, precipitation, and cloud cover.

  19. Material model library for explicit numerical codes

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.; Dial, B.W.

    1982-08-01

    A material model logic structure has been developed which is useful for most explicit finite-difference and explicit finite-element Lagrange computer codes. This structure has been implemented and tested in the STEALTH codes to provide an example for researchers who wish to implement it in generically similar codes. In parallel with these models, material parameter libraries have been created for the implemented models for materials which are often needed in DoD applications.

  20. Numerical MHD codes for modeling astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldoba, A. V.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Lii, P. S.; Comins, M. L.; Dyda, S.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Godunov-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Miyoshi and Kusano (2005) solver which can be used to solve various astrophysical hydrodynamic and MHD problems. The energy equation is in the form of entropy conservation. The code has been implemented on several different coordinate systems: 2.5D axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates, 2D Cartesian coordinates, 2D plane polar coordinates, and fully 3D cylindrical coordinates. Viscosity and diffusivity are implemented in the code to control the accretion rate in the disk and the rate of penetration of the disk matter through the magnetic field lines. The code has been utilized for the numerical investigations of a number of different astrophysical problems, several examples of which are shown.

  1. KRAKEN, a numerical model of RHIC impedances

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.; Mane, V.

    1995-05-01

    The simulation code KRAKEN confirms analytical predictions of head-tail stability criteria, in the presence of momentum dependent linear coupling. It also confirms that resistive wall transverse wake fields are not a serious threat to strong head-tail stability in RHIC, at the vulnerable stage of proton injection. Equation 10, derived from the perspective of two macroparticles, potentially offers a very convenient seminumerical evaluation of the effects of arbitrary transverse wake potentials. It remains to be seen how well the two macroparticle results correlate with simulations using, say, 100 macroparticles. KRAKEN is still under rapid development. Future plans are to include resonant wakefields, multiple bunches, space charge wakefields, betatron detuning, and a connection to the detailed RHIC impedance database.

  2. Cumulus clouds - Numerical models, observations and entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J.

    1983-01-01

    The first computer simulation of the organization phase of a buoyant atmospheric thermal is described. Although crude, it showed the spontaneous development of a rounded tight-gradient 'cap' and internal vortical circulation. The complexities involved in these 'field of motion' models in part motivated the development of entity models, based upon laboratory thermals. These one-dimensional models and their uses with observations are briefly described as well as their limitations. Finally, an application of Schlesinger's three-dimensional model to a GATE cumulus situation clarifies many apparently conflicting observations and postulates, thereby raising further challenging questions to be addressed jointly by the more sophisticated measuring and modeling tools available in the 1980's.

  3. Axisymmetric Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2005-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred considerable interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models. In recent work by the author, a quasi-one-dimensional, finite rate chemistry CFD model was utilized to study the gasdynamics and performance characteristics of PDREs over a range of blowdown pressure ratios from 1-1000. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and enable first-order parametric studies of the effect of several nozzle and extension geometries on PDRE performance over a wide range of conditions. However, the quasi-one-dimensional approach is limited in that it cannot properly capture the multidimensional blast wave and flow expansion downstream of the PDRE, nor can it resolve nozzle flow separation if present. Moreover, the previous work was limited to single-pulse calculations. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite rate chemistry model is described and utilized to study these issues in greater detail. Example Mach number contour plots showing the multidimensional blast wave and nozzle exhaust plume are shown. The performance results are compared with the quasi-one-dimensional results from the previous paper. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions are calculated in order to determine the effect of viscous

  4. Numerical modeling of laser thermal propulsion flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. D.; Thoenes, J.

    1984-01-01

    An review of the problems associated with modeling laser thermal propulsion flows, a synopsis of the status of such models, and the attributes of a successful model are presented. The continuous gaseous hydrogen laser-supported combustion wave (LSCW) thruster, for which a high-energy laser system (preferably space-based) should exist by the time the propulsion technology is developed, is considered in particular. The model proposed by Raizer (1970) is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional flow at constant pressure with heat conduction as the principal heat transfer mechanism. Consideration is given to subsequent models which account for radiative transfer into the ambient gas; provide a two-dimensional generalization of Raizer's analysis for the subsonic propagation of laser sparks in air; include the effect of forward plasma radiation in a one-dimensional model; and attempt a time-dependent (elliptic) solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow in a simple axisymmetric thruster. Attention is also given to thruster and nozzle flow models and thermodynamic and transport properties.

  5. Effects of detailed droplet heating models on turbulent sprays vaporization behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawid, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of three different droplet heating models on the vaporization history and internal structure of turbulent liquid fuel sprays were investigated. The models considered were the infinite-diffusion, diffusion-limit, and effective-conductivity models. A numerical solution for the models was developed and implemented in the KIVA-II computer code. Low temperature and relatively high temperature numerical studies were conducted. The low temperature computations were compared with existing experimental data. The comparisons showed that while the infinite-diffusion and diffusion-limit models respectively overpredicted and underpredicted the fuel vapor peak concentration and distribution in the combustor, the effective-conductivity model gave results that were in better agreement with measurements. A limited study for the high temperature case was performed due to lack of experimental data and predictions using the three models were compared with each other.

  6. Effects of detailed droplet heating models on turbulent sprays vaporization behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawid, M. A.

    1993-06-01

    The effects of three different droplet heating models on the vaporization history and internal structure of turbulent liquid fuel sprays were investigated. The models considered were the infinite-diffusion, diffusion-limit, and effective-conductivity models. A numerical solution for the models was developed and implemented in the KIVA-II computer code. Low temperature and relatively high temperature numerical studies were conducted. The low temperature computations were compared with existing experimental data. The comparisons showed that while the infinite-diffusion and diffusion-limit models respectively overpredicted and underpredicted the fuel vapor peak concentration and distribution in the combustor, the effective-conductivity model gave results that were in better agreement with measurements. A limited study for the high temperature case was performed due to lack of experimental data and predictions using the three models were compared with each other.

  7. Numerical modeling of fresh concrete flow through porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolařík, F.; Patzák, B.; Zeman, J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper focuses on a numerical modeling of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in a porous domain. It presents combination of a homogenization approach to obtain permeability from the underlying micro-structure with coupling of a Stokes and Darcy flow through the interface on the macro level. As a numerical method we employed the Finite Element method. The results obtained from the homogenization approach are validated against fully resolved solution computed by direct numerical simulation.

  8. Paleoclimate validation of a numerical climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Schelling, F.J.; Church, H.W.; Zak, B.D.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-04-01

    An analysis planned to validate regional climate model results for a past climate state at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, against paleoclimate evidence for the period is described. This analysis, which will use the GENESIS model of global climate nested with the RegCM2 regional climate model, is part of a larger study for DOE`s Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project that is evaluating the impacts of long term future climate change on performance of the potential high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The planned analysis and anticipated results are presented.

  9. On numerical modeling of one-dimensional geothermal histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models of one-dimensional geothermal histories are one way of understanding the relations between tectonics and transient thermal structure in the crust. Such models can be powerful tools for interpreting geochronologic and thermobarometric data. A flexible program to calculate these models on a microcomputer is available and examples of its use are presented. Potential problems with this approach include the simplifying assumptions that are made, limitations of the numerical techniques, and the neglect of convective heat transfer. ?? 1989.

  10. Numerical modelling of fracture in human arteries.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, A; Pandolfi, A

    2008-10-01

    We present 3D finite element models of atherosclerotic arteries, used to investigate the influence of the geometry and tissue properties on the plaque rupture caused by overexpansion. We adopted a geometry reconstructed from a contiguous set of in vitro magnetic resonance images of a damaged artery. The artery wall is divided in three layers (adventitia, media and intima) and is discretized into tetrahedral finite elements. The artery material is described with a hyperelastic two-fiber anisotropic model proposed by Holzapfel et al. 2000. A new constitutive framework for arterial wall mechanics and a comparative study of material models. J Elasticity 61(1):1-48, while the plaque is assumed to be transversely isotropic. Cracks induced by mechanical actions are represented through cohesive surfaces, and are allowed to develop along solid elements boundaries only. Fractures are explicitly introduced in the discretized model at the locations where the tensile strength of the material is reached. PMID:19230149

  11. Numerical Calculation of Model Rocket Trajectories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the use of model rocketry to teach the principles of Newtonian mechanics. Included are forces involved; calculations for vertical launches; two-dimensional trajectories; and variations in mass, drag, and launch angle. (CW)

  12. Modelling asteroid brightness variations. I - Numerical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karttunen, H.

    1989-01-01

    A method for generating lightcurves of asteroid models is presented. The effects of the shape of the asteroid and the scattering law of a surface element are distinctly separable, being described by chosen functions that can easily be changed. The shape is specified by means of two functions that yield the length of the radius vector and the normal vector of the surface at a given point. The general shape must be convex, but spherical concavities producing macroscopic shadowing can also be modeled.

  13. Influence of a detailed model of man on proton depth/dose calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kase, P. G.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a detailed radiation shielding model of man is discussed. This model will be used to plan for manned space missions in which sensitive human tissues may be subjected to excessive radiation. The model has two configurations: standing and seated. More than 2500 individual elements were used to depict the external conformation, skeleton, and principal organs. The model is briefly described and several examples of its application to mission planning are given.

  14. Evaluation of wave runup predictions from numerical and parametric models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Thompson, David M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    Wave runup during storms is a primary driver of coastal evolution, including shoreline and dune erosion and barrier island overwash. Runup and its components, setup and swash, can be predicted from a parameterized model that was developed by comparing runup observations to offshore wave height, wave period, and local beach slope. Because observations during extreme storms are often unavailable, a numerical model is used to simulate the storm-driven runup to compare to the parameterized model and then develop an approach to improve the accuracy of the parameterization. Numerically simulated and parameterized runup were compared to observations to evaluate model accuracies. The analysis demonstrated that setup was accurately predicted by both the parameterized model and numerical simulations. Infragravity swash heights were most accurately predicted by the parameterized model. The numerical model suffered from bias and gain errors that depended on whether a one-dimensional or two-dimensional spatial domain was used. Nonetheless, all of the predictions were significantly correlated to the observations, implying that the systematic errors can be corrected. The numerical simulations did not resolve the incident-band swash motions, as expected, and the parameterized model performed best at predicting incident-band swash heights. An assimilated prediction using a weighted average of the parameterized model and the numerical simulations resulted in a reduction in prediction error variance. Finally, the numerical simulations were extended to include storm conditions that have not been previously observed. These results indicated that the parameterized predictions of setup may need modification for extreme conditions; numerical simulations can be used to extend the validity of the parameterized predictions of infragravity swash; and numerical simulations systematically underpredict incident swash, which is relatively unimportant under extreme conditions.

  15. Numerical model of crater lake eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, M.; Gisler, G.; Weaver, R.; Gittings, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from a numerical investigation of subaqueous eruptions involving superheated steam released through a lake mimicking the volcanic setting at Mt. Ruapehu. The simulations were conducted using an adaptive mesh, multi-material, hydrodynamics code with thermal conduction SAGE, (Simple Adaptive Grid Eulerian). Parameters investigated include eruption pressure, lake level and mass of superheated vapor. The simulations produced a spectrum of eruption styles from vapor cavities to radial jets that resulted in hazards that ranged from small-scale waves to high amplitude surges that reached and cascaded over the edge of the crater rim. There was an overall tendency for lake surface activity to increase (including wave amplitude) with increasing mass of superheated vapor and eruption pressure. Surface waves were induced by the formation and collapse of a gas cavity. The collapse of the cavity is considered to play a major role in the characteristic features observed during a subaqueous eruption. The additional mass of superheated vapor produced a larger cavity that displaced a larger area of the lake surface resulting in fast moving surges upon the collapse of the cavity. High lake levels (>90 m) appear to suppress the development of explosive jetting activity when eruption pressures are <10 MPa. At very large eruption pressures (>10 MPa), vertical jets and radial ejections of steam and water can occur in water depths >90 m. Less explosive eruption styles can produce hazardous events such as lahars by the outward movement of surface waves over the crater rim.

  16. Mathematical and Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Flows.

    PubMed

    Vedovoto, João M; Serfaty, Ricardo; Da Silveira Neto, Aristeu

    2015-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the development and implementation of a computational framework to perform numerical simulations of low Mach number turbulent flows over complex geometries. The algorithm under consideration is based on a classical predictor-corrector time integration scheme that employs a projection method for the momentum equations. The domain decomposition strategy is adopted for distributed computing, displaying very satisfactory levels of speed-up and efficiency. The Immersed Boundary Methodology is used to characterize the presence of a complex geometry. Such method demands two separate grids: An Eulerian, where the transport equations are solved with a Finite Volume, second order discretization and a Lagrangian domain, represented by a non-structured shell grid representing the immersed geometry. The in-house code developed was fully verified by the Method of Manufactured Solutions, in both Eulerian and Lagrangian domains. The capabilities of the resulting computational framework are illustrated on four distinct cases: a turbulent jet, the Poiseuille flow, as a matter of validation of the implemented Immersed Boundary methodology, the flow over a sphere covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers, and finally, with the intention of demonstrating the applicability of Large Eddy Simulations - LES - in an industrial problem, the turbulent flow inside an industrial fan. PMID:26131642

  17. Saturn's North Polar Hexagon Numerical Modeling Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Juberias, R.; Sayanagi, K. M.; Dowling, T. E.

    2008-12-01

    In 1980, Voyager images revealed the presence of a circumpolar wave at 78 degrees planetographic latitude in the northern hemisphere of Saturn. It was notable for having a dominant planetary wavenumber-six zonal mode, and for being stationary with respect to Saturn's Kilometric Radiation rotation rate measured by Voyager. The center of this hexagonal feature was coincident with the center of a sharp eastward jet with a peak speed of 100 ms-1 and it had a meridional width of about 4 degrees. This hexagonal feature was confirmed in 1991 through ground-based observations, and it was observed again in 2006 with the Cassini VIMS instrument. The latest observations highlight the longevity of the hexagon and suggest that it extends at least several bars deep into the atmosphere. We use the Explicit Planetary Isentropic Code (EPIC) to perform high-resolution numerical simulations of this unique feature. We show that a wavenumber six instability mode arises naturally from initially barotropic jets when seeded with weak random turbulence. We also discuss the properties of the wave activity on the background vertical stability, zonal wind, planetary rotation rate and adjacent vortices. Computational resources were provided by the New Mexico Computing Applications Center and New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and the Comparative Planetology Laboratory at the University of Louisville.

  18. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisian, C. T.; Presser, Cary; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  19. Detailed analysis of an Eigen quasispecies model in a periodically moving sharp-peak landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Armando G. M.

    2010-09-01

    The Eigen quasispecies model in a periodically moving sharp-peak landscape considered in previous seminal works [M. Nilsson and N. Snoad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 191 (2000)10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.191] and [C. Ronnewinkel , in Theoretical Aspects of Evolutionary Computing, edited by L. Kallel, B. Naudts, and A. Rogers (Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, 2001)] is analyzed in greater detail. We show here, through a more rigorous analysis, that results in those papers are qualitatively correct. In particular, we obtain a phase diagram for the existence of a quasispecies with the same shape as in the above cited paper by C. Ronnewinkel , with upper and lower thresholds for the mutation rate between which a quasispecies may survive. A difference is that the upper value is larger and the lower value is smaller than the previously reported ones, so that the range for quasispecies existence is always larger than thought before. The quantitative information provided might also be important in understanding genetic variability in virus populations and has possible applications in antiviral therapies. The results in the quoted papers were obtained by studying the populations only at some few genomes. As we will show, this amounts to diagonalizing a 3×3 matrix. Our work is based instead in a different division of the population allowing a finer control of the populations at various relevant genetic sequences. The existence of a quasispecies will be related to Perron-Frobenius eigenvalues. Although huge matrices of sizes 2ℓ , where ℓ is the genome length, may seem necessary at a first look, we show that such large sizes are not necessary and easily obtain numerical and analytical results for their eigenvalues.

  20. Numerical Poisson-Boltzmann Model for Continuum Membrane Systems.

    PubMed

    Botello-Smith, Wesley M; Liu, Xingping; Cai, Qin; Li, Zhilin; Zhao, Hongkai; Luo, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Membrane protein systems are important computational research topics due to their roles in rational drug design. In this study, we developed a continuum membrane model utilizing a level set formulation under the numerical Poisson-Boltzmann framework within the AMBER molecular mechanics suite for applications such as protein-ligand binding affinity and docking pose predictions. Two numerical solvers were adapted for periodic systems to alleviate possible edge effects. Validation on systems ranging from organic molecules to membrane proteins up to 200 residues, demonstrated good numerical properties. This lays foundations for sophisticated models with variable dielectric treatments and second-order accurate modeling of solvation interactions. PMID:23439886

  1. Numerical model for the Programmable Multirole Furnace (PMZF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Panzarella, C. H.; Destro-Sidik, K. E.; Krolikowski, C. R.; Licht, B. W.

    1993-01-01

    The present account of the Programmable Multizone Furnace numerical model uses various examples to illustrate the ways in which the model serves as an optimization, test, prediction, and visualization tool; a numerical PID-control algorithm obtains the desired sample temperature distributions and allows the model to solve an inverse heat transfer problem where the desired sample temperature profile is the input and the required heater power distribution is the output of numerical simulations. Parametric studies show how the total power consumption of the furnace is affected by such design variables as the conductivity.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Ophthalmic Response to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. S.; Myers, J. G.; Mulugeta, L.; Vera, J.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate ophthalmic changes in spaceflight, we would like to predict the impact of blood dysregulation and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) on Intraocular Pressure (IOP). Unlike other physiological systems, there are very few lumped parameter models of the eye. The eye model described here is novel in its inclusion of the human choroid and retrobulbar subarachnoid space (rSAS), which are key elements in investigating the impact of increased ICP and ocular blood volume. Some ingenuity was required in modeling the blood and rSAS compartments due to the lack of quantitative data on essential hydrodynamic quantities, such as net choroidal volume and blood flowrate, inlet and exit pressures, and material properties, such as compliances between compartments.

  3. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gunzburger, Max

    2015-02-17

    We have treated the modeling, analysis, numerical analysis, and algorithmic development for nonlocal models of diffusion and mechanics. Variational formulations were developed and finite element methods were developed based on those formulations for both steady state and time dependent problems. Obstacle problems and optimization problems for the nonlocal models were also treated and connections made with fractional derivative models.

  4. Numerical Considerations for Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Models: Eliminating Rogue Trajectories, and the Importance of Numerical Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brian N.

    2016-07-01

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex atmospheric flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behaviour in the numerical solution. Here we discuss numerical strategies for solving the non-linear Langevin-based particle velocity evolution equation that eliminate such unphysical behaviour in both Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulation applications. Extremely large or `rogue' particle velocities are caused when the numerical integration scheme becomes unstable. Such instabilities can be eliminated by using a sufficiently small integration timestep, or in cases where the required timestep is unrealistically small, an unconditionally stable implicit integration scheme can be used. When the generalized anisotropic turbulence model is used, it is critical that the input velocity covariance tensor be realizable, otherwise unphysical behaviour can become problematic regardless of the integration scheme or size of the timestep. A method is presented to ensure realizability, and thus eliminate such behaviour. It was also found that the numerical accuracy of the integration scheme determined the degree to which the second law of thermodynamics or `well-mixed condition' was satisfied. Perhaps more importantly, it also determined the degree to which modelled Eulerian particle velocity statistics matched the specified Eulerian distributions (which is the ultimate goal of the numerical solution). It is recommended that future models be verified by not only checking the well-mixed condition, but perhaps more importantly by checking that computed Eulerian statistics match the Eulerian statistics specified as inputs.

  5. Cost model relationships between textile manufacturing processes and design details for transport fuselage elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metschan, Stephen L.; Wilden, Kurtis S.; Sharpless, Garrett C.; Andelman, Rich M.

    1993-01-01

    Textile manufacturing processes offer potential cost and weight advantages over traditional composite materials and processes for transport fuselage elements. In the current study, design cost modeling relationships between textile processes and element design details were developed. Such relationships are expected to help future aircraft designers to make timely decisions on the effect of design details and overall configurations on textile fabrication costs. The fundamental advantage of a design cost model is to insure that the element design is cost effective for the intended process. Trade studies on the effects of processing parameters also help to optimize the manufacturing steps for a particular structural element. Two methods of analyzing design detail/process cost relationships developed for the design cost model were pursued in the current study. The first makes use of existing databases and alternative cost modeling methods (e.g. detailed estimating). The second compares design cost model predictions with data collected during the fabrication of seven foot circumferential frames for ATCAS crown test panels. The process used in this case involves 2D dry braiding and resin transfer molding of curved 'J' cross section frame members having design details characteristic of the baseline ATCAS crown design.

  6. Numerical modeling of the interstellar medium in galactic disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, A.; Bregman, J. N.; Norman, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    We have been developing detailed hydrodynamic models of the global interstellar medium in the hope of understanding the mass and volume occupied by various phases, as well as their structure and kinematics. In our model, the gas is modeled by one fluid while representative Pop 1 stars are modeled by a second fluid. The two fluids are coupled in that the gas forms into stars at a rate given by a Schmidt law while stellar mass loss returns matter into the gas phase (on a time scale of 100 Myr). Also, the stars heat the gas through stellar winds and the gas cools through optically thin radiation. The time behavior of these two fluids is studied in two spatial dimensions with the Eulerian finite difference numerical hydrodynamic code Zen. The two spatial dimensions are along the plane of a disk (x, total length of 2 kpc) and perpendicular to the disk (z, total height of +/- 15 kpc) and a galactic gravitational field in the z direction, typical of that at the solar circle, is imposed upon the simulation; self-gravity and rotation are absent. For the boundary conditions, outflow is permitted at the top and bottom of the grid (z = +/- 15 kpc) while periodic boundary conditions are imposed upon left and right sides of the grid. As initial conditions, we assumed a gaseous distribution like that seen for the H1 by earlier researchers, although the results are insensitive to the initial conditions. We have run simulations in which the heating due to stars, parameterized as a stellar wind velocity, a, is varied from low (a = 150 km/s), to intermediate (a = 300 km/s), to high (a = 600 km/s). Since the intermediate case is roughly equivalent to the Galactic energy injection rate from supernovae, this summary will concentrate on results from this simulation.

  7. Numerical modeling of fluid migration in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M. J.; Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that fluids play a crucial role in subduction evolution. For example, mechanical weakening along tectonic interfaces, due to high fluid pressure, may enable oceanic subduction. Hence, the fluid content seems to be a critical parameter for subduction initiation. Studies have also shown a correlation between the location of slab dehydration and intermediate seismic activity. Furthermore, expelled fluids from the subduction slab affect the melting temperature, consequently, contributing to partial melting in the wedge above the down-going plate and extensive volcanism. In summary, fluids have a great impact on tectonic processes and therefore should be incorporated into geodynamic numerical models. Here we use existing approaches to couple and solve fluid flow equations in the SLIM-3D thermo-mechanical code. SLIM-3D is a three-dimensional thermo-mechanical code capable of simulating lithospheric deformation with elasto-visco-plastic rheology. It has been successfully applied to model geodynamic processes at different tectonic settings, including subduction zones. However, although SLIM-3D already includes many features, fluid migration has not been incorporated into the model yet. To this end, we coupled solid and fluid flow assuming that fluids flow through a porous and deformable solid. Thereby, we introduce a two-phase flow into the model, in which the Stokes flow is coupled with the Darcy law for fluid flow. Ultimately, the evolution of porosity is governed by a compaction pressure and the advection of the porous solid. We show the details of our implementation of the fluid flow into the existing thermo-mechanical finite element code and present first results of benchmarks and experiments. We are especially interested in the coupling of subduction processes and the evolution of the magmatic arc. Thereby, we focus on the key factors controlling magma emplacement and its influence on subduction processes.

  8. Numerical modeling and experimental testing of a solar grill

    SciTech Connect

    Olwi, I.; Khalifa, A. )

    1993-02-01

    The sun provides a free, nonpolluting and everlasting source of energy. Considerable research has been carried out to utilize solar energy for purposes such as water heating, high temperature ovens, and conversion to electrical energy. One of the interesting forms for utilizing solar energy is cooking. The main disadvantage of solar energy systems has been the low efficiency attained in most of its practical applications. It is expected, however, that due to continuing decreases in the availability of other energy sources such as oil and coal, along with the safety problems associated with nuclear energy, man's need for utilization of solar energy will increase, thus leading him to find the ways and means to develop adequate and efficient solar-powered systems. In camps, where tents are used to accommodate people, cooking is done via conventional gas stoves. This usually takes place in extremely crowded areas which become highly fireprone. Solar oven cookers seem to be a viable alternative considering both economy and safety. Among the various forms of solar cookers, the oven-type solar cooker is known to be the best in terms of efficiency. One of the most practical and efficient forms of solar oven cookers is the outdoor portable solar grill (Bar-B-Q), developed by Khalifa et al. The solar grill is a light and portable unit that utilizes solar energy to grill meat. One of the best types of grilling with this cooker is the well-known Shish Kebab or Bar-B-Q. A detailed description for the design of the solar grill is provided as follows. This paper is aimed at providing experimental results and formulating a numerical model for the solar grill. Results of the two approaches are then compared to verify the validity of the numerical simulation. An experimental and theoretical investigation was conducted on the solar grill in order to study the factors that affect its design and performance.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Left-Handed Metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G J; Champagne, N J; Sharpe, R M

    2001-11-06

    The EIGER method of moments program with periodic Green's function was used to model a periodic array of strips and split-ring resonators. Left-handed propagation due to negative index of refraction is demonstrated in a frequency band. The effective material parameters versus frequency are extracted from the EIGER solution.

  10. A statistical approach to develop a detailed soot growth model using PAH characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, Abhijeet; Celnik, Matthew; Shirley, Raphael; Sander, Markus; Patterson, Robert; West, Richard; Kraft, Markus

    2009-04-15

    A detailed PAH growth model is developed, which is solved using a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm. The model describes the structure and growth of planar PAH molecules, and is referred to as the kinetic Monte Carlo-aromatic site (KMC-ARS) model. A detailed PAH growth mechanism based on reactions at radical sites available in the literature, and additional reactions obtained from quantum chemistry calculations are used to model the PAH growth processes. New rates for the reactions involved in the cyclodehydrogenation process for the formation of 6-member rings on PAHs are calculated in this work based on density functional theory simulations. The KMC-ARS model is validated by comparing experimentally observed ensembles on PAHs with the computed ensembles for a C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and a C{sub 6}H{sub 6} flame at different heights above the burner. The motivation for this model is the development of a detailed soot particle population balance model which describes the evolution of an ensemble of soot particles based on their PAH structure. However, at present incorporating such a detailed model into a population balance is computationally unfeasible. Therefore, a simpler model referred to as the site-counting model has been developed, which replaces the structural information of the PAH molecules by their functional groups augmented with statistical closure expressions. This closure is obtained from the KMC-ARS model, which is used to develop correlations and statistics in different flame environments which describe such PAH structural information. These correlations and statistics are implemented in the site-counting model, and results from the site-counting model and the KMC-ARS model are in good agreement. Additionally the effect of steric hindrance in large PAH structures is investigated and correlations for sites unavailable for reaction are presented. (author)