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Sample records for detecting anomalous process

  1. Detection of anomalous events

    DOEpatents

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  2. Reasoning about anomalies: a study of the analytical process of detecting and identifying anomalous behavior in maritime traffic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, Maria; Falkman, Göran; Ziemke, Tom; Kronhamn, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    The goal of visual analytical tools is to support the analytical reasoning process, maximizing human perceptual, understanding and reasoning capabilities in complex and dynamic situations. Visual analytics software must be built upon an understanding of the reasoning process, since it must provide appropriate interactions that allow a true discourse with the information. In order to deepen our understanding of the human analytical process and guide developers in the creation of more efficient anomaly detection systems, this paper investigates how is the human analytical process of detecting and identifying anomalous behavior in maritime traffic data. The main focus of this work is to capture the entire analysis process that an analyst goes through, from the raw data to the detection and identification of anomalous behavior. Three different sources are used in this study: a literature survey of the science of analytical reasoning, requirements specified by experts from organizations with interest in port security and user field studies conducted in different marine surveillance control centers. Furthermore, this study elaborates on how to support the human analytical process using data mining, visualization and interaction methods. The contribution of this paper is twofold: (1) within visual analytics, contribute to the science of analytical reasoning with practical understanding of users tasks in order to develop a taxonomy of interactions that support the analytical reasoning process and (2) within anomaly detection, facilitate the design of future anomaly detector systems when fully automatic approaches are not viable and human participation is needed.

  3. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  4. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  5. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Matsekh, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  6. Anomalous change detection in imagery

    DOEpatents

    Theiler, James P.; Perkins, Simon J.

    2011-05-31

    A distribution-based anomaly detection platform is described that identifies a non-flat background that is specified in terms of the distribution of the data. A resampling approach is also disclosed employing scrambled resampling of the original data with one class specified by the data and the other by the explicit distribution, and solving using binary classification.

  7. Symmetrized local co-registration optimization for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt E; Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    The goal of anomalous change detection (ACD) is to identify what unusual changes have occurred in a scene, based on two images of the scene taken at different times and under different conditions. The actual anomalous changes need to be distinguished from the incidental differences that occur throughout the imagery, and one of the most common and confounding of these incidental differences is due to the misregistration of the images, due to limitations of the registration pre-processing applied to the image pair. We propose a general method to compensate for residual misregistration in any ACD algorithm which constructs an estimate of the degree of 'anomalousness' for every pixel in the image pair. The method computes a modified misregistration-insensitive anomalousness by making local re-registration adjustments to minimize the local anomalousness. In this paper we describe a symmetrized version of our initial algorithm, and find significant performance improvements in the anomalous change detection ROC curves for a number of real and synthetic data sets.

  8. Anomalous human behavior detection: an adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Coen; Halma, Arvid; Schutte, Klamer

    2013-05-01

    Detection of anomalies (outliers or abnormal instances) is an important element in a range of applications such as fault, fraud, suspicious behavior detection and knowledge discovery. In this article we propose a new method for anomaly detection and performed tested its ability to detect anomalous behavior in videos from DARPA's Mind's Eye program, containing a variety of human activities. In this semi-unsupervised task a set of normal instances is provided for training, after which unknown abnormal behavior has to be detected in a test set. The features extracted from the video data have high dimensionality, are sparse and inhomogeneously distributed in the feature space making it a challenging task. Given these characteristics a distance-based method is preferred, but choosing a threshold to classify instances as (ab)normal is non-trivial. Our novel aproach, the Adaptive Outlier Distance (AOD) is able to detect outliers in these conditions based on local distance ratios. The underlying assumption is that the local maximum distance between labeled examples is a good indicator of the variation in that neighborhood, and therefore a local threshold will result in more robust outlier detection. We compare our method to existing state-of-art methods such as the Local Outlier Factor (LOF) and the Local Distance-based Outlier Factor (LDOF). The results of the experiments show that our novel approach improves the quality of the anomaly detection.

  9. Anomalous Cases of Astronaut Helmet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolph, Chester; Moore, Andrew J.; Schubert, Matthew; Woodell, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    An astronaut's helmet is an invariant, rigid image element that is well suited for identification and tracking using current machine vision technology. Future space exploration will benefit from the development of astronaut detection software for search and rescue missions based on EVA helmet identification. However, helmets are solid white, except for metal brackets to attach accessories such as supplementary lights. We compared the performance of a widely used machine vision pipeline on a standard-issue NASA helmet with and without affixed experimental feature-rich patterns. Performance on the patterned helmet was far more robust. We found that four different feature-rich patterns are sufficient to identify a helmet and determine orientation as it is rotated about the yaw, pitch, and roll axes. During helmet rotation the field of view changes to frames containing parts of two or more feature-rich patterns. We took reference images in these locations to fill in detection gaps. These multiple feature-rich patterns references added substantial benefit to detection, however, they generated the majority of the anomalous cases. In these few instances, our algorithm keys in on one feature-rich pattern of the multiple feature-rich pattern reference and makes an incorrect prediction of the location of the other feature-rich patterns. We describe and make recommendations on ways to mitigate anomalous cases in which detection of one or more feature-rich patterns fails. While the number of cases is only a small percentage of the tested helmet orientations, they illustrate important design considerations for future spacesuits. In addition to our four successful feature-rich patterns, we present unsuccessful patterns and discuss the cause of their poor performance from a machine vision perspective. Future helmets designed with these considerations will enable automated astronaut detection and thereby enhance mission operations and extraterrestrial search and rescue.

  10. Anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with ENSO

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K.M.; Ho, C.H.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, we study the structure of anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using re-analysis data obtained from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) and outputs from GEOS climate model simulations. Our results show a very pronounced tropospheric warming over the equatorial central Pacific, with a double maxima located in 15{degrees}N and 15{degrees}/S, symmetric about the equator. This anomaly is in agreement with those found in earlier studies based on satellite estimates and is consistent with the predictions of Rossby wave dynamics. Most interestingly, we find a strong stratospheric temperature signal, which is tightly coupled to, but of opposite sign to the tropospheric anomaly. This temperature anomaly pattern is validated by the GCM simulations with respect to anomalous ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) forcing. The role of interaction between radiation and hydrologic cycle in producing and maintaining the ENSO anomalies is also investigated. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Detecting Anomalous Insiders in Collaborative Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative information systems (CISs) are deployed within a diverse array of environments that manage sensitive information. Current security mechanisms detect insider threats, but they are ill-suited to monitor systems in which users function in dynamic teams. In this paper, we introduce the community anomaly detection system (CADS), an unsupervised learning framework to detect insider threats based on the access logs of collaborative environments. The framework is based on the observation that typical CIS users tend to form community structures based on the subjects accessed (e.g., patients’ records viewed by healthcare providers). CADS consists of two components: 1) relational pattern extraction, which derives community structures and 2) anomaly prediction, which leverages a statistical model to determine when users have sufficiently deviated from communities. We further extend CADS into MetaCADS to account for the semantics of subjects (e.g., patients’ diagnoses). To empirically evaluate the framework, we perform an assessment with three months of access logs from a real electronic health record (EHR) system in a large medical center. The results illustrate our models exhibit significant performance gains over state-of-the-art competitors. When the number of illicit users is low, MetaCADS is the best model, but as the number grows, commonly accessed semantics lead to hiding in a crowd, such that CADS is more prudent. PMID:24489520

  12. Optical Detection of Anomalous Nitrogen in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    VLT Opens New Window towards Our Origins Summary A team of European astronomers [1] has used the UVES spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope to perform a uniquely detailed study of Comet LINEAR (C/2000 WM1) . This is the first time that this powerful instrument has been employed to obtain high-resolution spectra of a comet. At the time of the observations in mid-March 2002, Comet LINEAR was about 180 million km from the Sun, moving outwards after its perihelion passage in January. As comets are believed to carry "pristine" material - left-overs from the formation of the solar system, about 4,600 million years ago - studies of these objects are important to obtain clues about the origins of the solar system and the Earth in particular. The high quality of the data obtained of this moving 9th-magnitude object has permitted a determination of the cometary abundance of various elements and their isotopes [2]. Of particular interest is the unambiguous detection and measurement of the nitrogen-15 isotope. The only other comet in which this isotope has been observed is famous Comet Hale-Bopp - this was during the passage in 1997, when it was much brighter than Comet LINEAR. Most interestingly, Comet LINEAR and Comet Hale-Bopp display the same isotopic abundance ratio, about 1 nitrogen-15 atom for each 140 nitrogen-14 atoms ( 14 N/ 15 N = 140 ± 30) . That is about half of the terrestrial value (272). It is also very different from the result obtained by means of radio measurements of Comet Hale-Bopp ( 14 N/ 15 N = 330 ± 75). Optical and radio measurements concern different molecules (CN and HCN, respectively), and this isotopic anomaly must be explained by some differentiation mechanism. The astronomers conclude that part of the cometary nitrogen is trapped in macromolecules attached to dust particles . The successful entry of UVES into cometary research now opens eagerly awaited opportunities for similiar observations in other, comparatively faint comets. These

  13. A structural framework for anomalous change detection and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    We present a spatially adaptive scheme for automatically searching a pair of images of a scene for unusual and interesting changes. Our motivation is to bring into play structural aspects of image features alongside the spectral attributes used for anomalous change detection (ACD). We leverage a small but informative subset of pixels, namely edge pixels of the images, as anchor points of a Delaunay triangulation to jointly decompose the images into a set of triangular regions, called trixels, which are spectrally uniform. Such decomposition helps in image regularization by simple-function approximation on a feature-adaptive grid. Applying ACD to this trixel grid instead of pixels offers several advantages. It allows: (1) edge-preserving smoothing of images, (2) speed-up of spatial computations by significantly reducing the representation of the images, and (3) the easy recovery of structure of the detected anomalous changes by associating anomalous trixels with polygonal image features. The latter facility further enables the application of shape-theoretic criteria and algorithms to characterize the changes and recognize them as interesting or not. This incorporation of spatial information has the potential to filter out some spurious changes, such as due to parallax, shadows, and misregistration, by identifying and filtering out those that are structurally similar and spatially pervasive. Our framework supports the joint spatial and spectral analysis of images, potentially enabling the design of more robust ACD algorithms.

  14. Use of sonification in the detection of anomalous events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballora, Mark; Cole, Robert J.; Kruesi, Heidi; Greene, Herbert; Monahan, Ganesh; Hall, David L.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the construction of a soundtrack that fuses stock market data with information taken from tweets. This soundtrack, or auditory display, presents the numerical and text data in such a way that anomalous events may be readily detected, even by untrained listeners. The soundtrack generation is flexible, allowing an individual listener to create a unique audio mix from the available information sources. Properly constructed, the display exploits the auditory system's sensitivities to periodicities, to dynamic changes, and to patterns. This type of display could be valuable in environments that demand high levels of situational awareness based on multiple sources of incoming information.

  15. Supervised detection of anomalous light curves in massive astronomical catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-20

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  16. Supervised Detection of Anomalous Light Curves in Massive Astronomical Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-01

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  17. Characterization of diffusion processes: Normal and anomalous regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Samuel B.; de Oliveira, Gilson F.; de Oliveira, Luimar C.; Passerat de Silans, Thierry; Chevrollier, Martine; Oriá, Marcos; de S. Cavalcante, Hugo L. D.

    2016-04-01

    Many man-made and natural processes involve the diffusion of microscopic particles subject to random or chaotic, random-like movements. Besides the normal diffusion characterized by a Gaussian probability density function, whose variance increases linearly in time, so-called anomalous-diffusion regimes can also take place. They are characterized by a variance growing slower (subdiffusive) or faster (superdiffusive) than normal. In fact, many different underlying processes can lead to anomalous diffusion, with qualitative differences between mechanisms producing subdiffusion and mechanisms resulting in superdiffusion. Thus, a general description, encompassing all three regimes and where the specific mechanisms of each system are not explicit, is desirable. Here, our goal is to present a simple method of data analysis that enables one to characterize a model-less diffusion process from data observation, by observing the temporal evolution of the particle spread. To generate diffusive processes in different regimes, we use a Monte-Carlo routine in which both the step-size and the time-delay of the diffusing particles follow Pareto (inverse-power law) distributions, with either finite or diverging statistical momenta. We discuss on the application of this method to real systems.

  18. Anomalous diffusion and scaling in coupled stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Golan; Nemenman, Ilya

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by problems in biochemical kinetics, we study statistical properties of an overdamped Langevin processes with the friction coefficient depending on the state of a similar, unobserved, process. Integrating out the latter, we derive the Pocker-Planck the friction coefficient of the first depends on the state of the second. Integrating out the latter, we derive the Focker-Planck equation for the probability distribution of the former. This has the fonn of diffusion equation with time-dependent diffusion coefficient, resulting in an anomalous diffusion. The diffusion exponent can not be predicted using a simple scaling argument, and anomalous scaling appears as well. The diffusion exponent of the Weiss-Havlin comb model is derived as a special case, and the same exponent holds even for weakly coupled processes. We compare our theoretical predictions with numerical simulations and find an excellent agreement. The findings caution against treating biochemical systems with unobserved dynamical degrees of freedom by means of standandard, diffusive Langevin descritpion.

  19. Weak ergodicity breaking, irreproducibility, and ageing in anomalous diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Metzler, Ralf

    2014-01-14

    Single particle traces are standardly evaluated in terms of time averages of the second moment of the position time series r(t). For ergodic processes, one can interpret such results in terms of the known theories for the corresponding ensemble averaged quantities. In anomalous diffusion processes, that are widely observed in nature over many orders of magnitude, the equivalence between (long) time and ensemble averages may be broken (weak ergodicity breaking), and these time averages may no longer be interpreted in terms of ensemble theories. Here we detail some recent results on weakly non-ergodic systems with respect to the time averaged mean squared displacement, the inherent irreproducibility of individual measurements, and methods to determine the exact underlying stochastic process. We also address the phenomenon of ageing, the dependence of physical observables on the time span between initial preparation of the system and the start of the measurement.

  20. Anomalous diffusion for a correlated process with long jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokowski, Tomasz

    2011-09-01

    We discuss diffusion properties of a dynamical system, which is characterised by long-tail distributions and finite correlations. The particle velocity has the stable Lévy distribution; it is assumed as a jumping process (the kangaroo process) with a variable jumping rate. Both the exponential and the algebraic form of the covariance-defined for the truncated distribution-are considered. It is demonstrated by numerical calculations that the stationary solution of the master equation for the case of power-law correlations decays with time, but a simple modification of the process makes the tails stable. The main result of the paper is a finding that-in contrast to the velocity fluctuations-the position variance may be finite. It rises with time faster than linearly: the diffusion is anomalously enhanced. On the other hand, a process which follows from a superposition of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck-Lévy processes always leads to position distributions with a divergent variance which means accelerated diffusion.

  1. Detection of the Anomalous Velocity with Subpicosecond Time Resolution in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, Shekhar; Pierz, Klaus; Bieler, Mark

    2015-12-01

    We report on the time-resolved detection of the anomalous velocity, constituting charge carriers moving perpendicular to an electric driving field, in undoped GaAs quantum wells. For this we optically excite the quantum wells with circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses, thereby creating a state which breaks time-inversion symmetry. We then employ a quasi-single-cycle terahertz pulse as an electric driving field to induce the anomalous velocity. The electromagnetic radiation emitted from the anomalous velocity is studied with a subpicosecond time resolution and reveals intriguing results. We are able to distinguish between intrinsic (linked to the Berry curvature) and extrinsic (linked to scattering) contributions to the anomalous velocity both originating from the valence band and observe local energy space dependence of the anomalous velocity. Our results thus constitute a significant step towards noninvasive probing of the anomalous velocity locally in the full energy-momentum space and enable the investigation of many popular physical effects such as the anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect on ultrafast time scales.

  2. Detection of the Anomalous Velocity with Subpicosecond Time Resolution in Semiconductor Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshi, Shekhar; Pierz, Klaus; Bieler, Mark

    2015-12-18

    We report on the time-resolved detection of the anomalous velocity, constituting charge carriers moving perpendicular to an electric driving field, in undoped GaAs quantum wells. For this we optically excite the quantum wells with circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses, thereby creating a state which breaks time-inversion symmetry. We then employ a quasi-single-cycle terahertz pulse as an electric driving field to induce the anomalous velocity. The electromagnetic radiation emitted from the anomalous velocity is studied with a subpicosecond time resolution and reveals intriguing results. We are able to distinguish between intrinsic (linked to the Berry curvature) and extrinsic (linked to scattering) contributions to the anomalous velocity both originating from the valence band and observe local energy space dependence of the anomalous velocity. Our results thus constitute a significant step towards noninvasive probing of the anomalous velocity locally in the full energy-momentum space and enable the investigation of many popular physical effects such as the anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect on ultrafast time scales. PMID:26722942

  3. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOEpatents

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  4. A tutorial on inverse problems for anomalous diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Bangti; Rundell, William

    2015-03-01

    Over the last two decades, anomalous diffusion processes in which the mean squares variance grows slower or faster than that in a Gaussian process have found many applications. At a macroscopic level, these processes are adequately described by fractional differential equations, which involves fractional derivatives in time or/and space. The fractional derivatives describe either history mechanism or long range interactions of particle motions at a microscopic level. The new physics can change dramatically the behavior of the forward problems. For example, the solution operator of the time fractional diffusion diffusion equation has only limited smoothing property, whereas the solution for the space fractional diffusion equation may contain weak singularity. Naturally one expects that the new physics will impact related inverse problems in terms of uniqueness, stability, and degree of ill-posedness. The last aspect is especially important from a practical point of view, i.e., stably reconstructing the quantities of interest. In this paper, we employ a formal analytic and numerical way, especially the two-parameter Mittag-Leffler function and singular value decomposition, to examine the degree of ill-posedness of several ‘classical’ inverse problems for fractional differential equations involving a Djrbashian-Caputo fractional derivative in either time or space, which represent the fractional analogues of that for classical integral order differential equations. We discuss four inverse problems, i.e., backward fractional diffusion, sideways problem, inverse source problem and inverse potential problem for time fractional diffusion, and inverse Sturm-Liouville problem, Cauchy problem, backward fractional diffusion and sideways problem for space fractional diffusion. It is found that contrary to the wide belief, the influence of anomalous diffusion on the degree of ill-posedness is not definitive: it can either significantly improve or worsen the conditioning of

  5. Automated Detection of Anomalous Shipping Manifests to Identify Illicit Trade

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Chikkagoudar, Satish

    2013-11-12

    We describe an approach to analyzing trade data which uses clustering to detect similarities across shipping manifest records, classification to evaluate clustering results and categorize new unseen shipping data records, and visual analytics to provide to support situation awareness in dynamic decision making to monitor and warn against the movement of radiological threat materials through search, analysis and forecasting capabilities. The evaluation of clustering results through classification and systematic inspection of the clusters show the clusters have strong semantic cohesion and offer novel ways to detect transactions related to nuclear smuggling.

  6. Specializing network analysis to detect anomalous insider actions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Zhang, Wen; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative information systems (CIS) enable users to coordinate efficiently over shared tasks in complex distributed environments. For flexibility, they provide users with broad access privileges, which, as a side-effect, leave such systems vulnerable to various attacks. Some of the more damaging malicious activities stem from internal misuse, where users are authorized to access system resources. A promising class of insider threat detection models for CIS focuses on mining access patterns from audit logs, however, current models are limited in that they assume organizations have significant resources to generate label cases for training classifiers or assume the user has committed a large number of actions that deviate from “normal” behavior. In lieu of the previous assumptions, we introduce an approach that detects when specific actions of an insider deviate from expectation in the context of collaborative behavior. Specifically, in this paper, we introduce a specialized network anomaly detection model, or SNAD, to detect such events. This approach assesses the extent to which a user influences the similarity of the group of users that access a particular record in the CIS. From a theoretical perspective, we show that the proposed model is appropriate for detecting insider actions in dynamic collaborative systems. From an empirical perspective, we perform an extensive evaluation of SNAD with the access logs of two distinct environments: the patient record access logs a large electronic health record system (6,015 users, 130,457 patients and 1,327,500 accesses) and the editing logs of Wikipedia (2,394,385 revisors, 55,200 articles and 6,482,780 revisions). We compare our model with several competing methods and demonstrate SNAD is significantly more effective: on average it achieves 20–30% greater area under an ROC curve. PMID:23399988

  7. Multiphoton Process and Anomalous Potential of Cell Membrane by Laser Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Kaixi; Zhao, Qingxun; Cui, Zhiyun; Zhar, Ping; Dong, Lifang

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, by the use of quantum biology and quantum optics, the laser induced potential variation of cell membrane has been studied. Theoretically, we have found a method of calculating the monophoton and multiphoton processes in the formation of the anomalous potential of cell membrane. In contrast with the experimental results, our numerical result is in the same order. Therefore, we have found the possibility of cancer caused by the laser induced anomalous cell potential.

  8. Anomalous Experiences, Trauma, and Symbolization Processes at the Frontiers between Psychoanalysis and Cognitive Neurosciences.

    PubMed

    Rabeyron, Thomas; Loose, Tianna

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous or exceptional experiences are uncommon experiences which are usually interpreted as being paranormal by those who report them. These experiences have long remained difficult to explain, but current progress in cognitive neuroscience and psychoanalysis sheds light on the contexts in which they emerge, as well as on their underlying processes. Following a brief description of the different types of anomalous experiences, we underline how they can be better understood at the frontiers between psychoanalysis and cognitive neurosciences. In this regard, three main lines of research are discussed and illustrated, alongside clinical cases which come from a clinical service specializing in anomalous experiences. First, we study the links between anomalous experiences and hallucinatory processes, by showing that anomalous experiences frequently occur as a specific reaction to negative life events, in which case they mainly take the form of non-pathological hallucinations. Next, we propose to analyze these experiences from the perspective of their traumatic aspects and the altered states of consciousness they often imply. Finally, these experiences are considered to be the consequence of a hypersensitivity that can be linked to an increase in psychic permeability. In conclusion, these different processes lead us to consider anomalous experiences as primary forms of symbolization and transformation of the subjective experience, especially during, or after traumatic situations. PMID:26732646

  9. Anomalous Experiences, Trauma, and Symbolization Processes at the Frontiers between Psychoanalysis and Cognitive Neurosciences

    PubMed Central

    Rabeyron, Thomas; Loose, Tianna

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous or exceptional experiences are uncommon experiences which are usually interpreted as being paranormal by those who report them. These experiences have long remained difficult to explain, but current progress in cognitive neuroscience and psychoanalysis sheds light on the contexts in which they emerge, as well as on their underlying processes. Following a brief description of the different types of anomalous experiences, we underline how they can be better understood at the frontiers between psychoanalysis and cognitive neurosciences. In this regard, three main lines of research are discussed and illustrated, alongside clinical cases which come from a clinical service specializing in anomalous experiences. First, we study the links between anomalous experiences and hallucinatory processes, by showing that anomalous experiences frequently occur as a specific reaction to negative life events, in which case they mainly take the form of non-pathological hallucinations. Next, we propose to analyze these experiences from the perspective of their traumatic aspects and the altered states of consciousness they often imply. Finally, these experiences are considered to be the consequence of a hypersensitivity that can be linked to an increase in psychic permeability. In conclusion, these different processes lead us to consider anomalous experiences as primary forms of symbolization and transformation of the subjective experience, especially during, or after traumatic situations. PMID:26732646

  10. Anomalous/Fractional Diffusion in Particle Acceleration Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    This talk is aimed at reviewing a certain number of theoretical aspects concerning the relation between stochastic acceleration and anomalous/fractional transport of particles. As a matter of fact, anomalous velocity-space diffusion is required within any stochastic acceleration scenario to explain the formation of the ubiquitous power-law tail of non-thermal particles, as observed e.g. in the accelerated distribution of electrons during solar flares. I will establish a classification scheme for stochastic acceleration models involving turbulence in magnetized plasmas. This classification takes into account both the properties of the accelerating electromagnetic field, and the nature of the spatial transport (possibly fractional) of charged particles in the acceleration region. I will also discuss recent attempts to obtain spatially non-local and fractional diffusion equations directly from first principles, starting either from the Fokker-Planck equation in the large mean free-path regime or the Boltzmann equation involving velocity-space relaxation toward the kappa distribution instead of the standard Maxwellian distribution.

  11. Towards entropy detection of anomalous mass and momentum exchange in incompressible fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naterer, G. F.; Rinn, D.

    2002-08-01

    An entropy-based approach is presented for assessment of computational accuracy in incompressible flow problems. It is shown that computational entropy can serve as an effective parameter in detecting erroneous or anomalous predictions of mass and momentum transport in the flow field. In the present paper, the fluid flow equations and second law of thermodynamics are discretized by a Galerkin finite-element method with linear, isoparametric triangular elements. It is shown that a weighted entropy residual is closely related to truncation error; this relationship is examined in an application problem involving incompressible flow through a converging channel. In particular, regions exhibiting anomalous flow behaviour, such as under-predicted velocities, appear together with analogous trends in the weighted entropy residual. It is anticipated that entropy-based error detection can provide important steps towards improved accuracy in computational fluid flow. Copyright

  12. Detecting anomalous CO 2 flux using space borne spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Prasun K.; van der Meer, Freek; van Dijk, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Over the time-scale, earth's atmospheric CO 2 concentration has varied and that is mostly determined by balance among the geochemical processes including burial of organic carbon in sediments, silicate rock weathering and volcanic activity. The best recorded atmospheric CO 2 variability is derived from Vostok ice core that records last four glacial/interglacial cycles. The present CO 2 concentration of earth's atmosphere has exceeded far that it was predicted from the ice core data. Other than rapid industrialization and urbanization since last century, geo-natural hazards such as volcanic activity, leakage from hydrocarbon reservoirs and spontaneous combustion of coal contribute a considerable amount of CO 2 to the atmosphere. Spontaneous combustion of coal is common occurrence in most coal producing countries and sometimes it could be in an enormous scale. Remote sensing has already proved to be a significant tool in coalfire identification and monitoring studies. However, coalfire related CO 2 quantification from remote sensing data has not endeavoured yet by scientific communities because of low spectral resolution of commercially available remote sensing data and relatively sparse CO 2 plume than other geological hazards like volcanic activity. The present research has attempted two methods to identify the CO 2 flux emitted from coalfires in a coalmining region in north China. Firstly, a band rationing method was used for column atmospheric retrieval of CO 2 and secondly atmospheric models were simulated in fast atmospheric signature code (FASCOD) to understand the local radiation transport and then the model was implemented with the inputs from hyperspectral remote sensing data. It was observed that retrieval of columnar abundance of CO 2 with the band rationing method is faster as less simulation required in FASCOD. Alternatively, the inversion model could retrieve CO 2 concentration from a (certain) source because it excludes the uncertainties in the higher

  13. Uncorrelated versus independent elliptically-contoured distributions for anomalous change detection in hyperspectral imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Scovel, James C

    2008-01-01

    The detection of actual changes in a pair of images is confounded by the inadvertent but pervasive differences that inevitably arise whenever two pictures are taken of the same scene, but at different times and under different conditions. These differences include effects due to illumination, calibration, misregistration, etc. If the actual changes are assumed to be rare, then one can 'learn' what the pervasive differences are, and can identify the deviations from this pattern as the anomalous changes. A recently proposed framework for anomalous change detection recasts the problem as one of binary classification between pixel pairs in the data and pixel pairs that are independently chosen from the two images. When an elliptically-contoured (EC) distribution is assumed for the data, then analytical expressions can be derived for the measure of anomalousness of change. However, these expression are only available for a limited class of EC distributions. By replacing independent pixel pairs with uncorrelated pixel pairs, an approximate solution can be found for a much broader class of EC distributions. The performance of this approximation is investigated analytically and empirically, and includes experiments comparing the detection of real changes in real data.

  14. Real-time detection and classification of anomalous events in streaming data

    DOEpatents

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Goodall, John R.; Iannacone, Michael D.; Laska, Jason A.; Harrison, Lane T.

    2016-04-19

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The events can be displayed to a user in user-defined groupings in an animated fashion. The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The atypical traffic patterns can then be classified as being of interest or not. In one particular example, in a network environment, the classification can be whether the network traffic is malicious or not.

  15. Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

    2009-05-29

    This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were

  16. Detection of Anomalous Insiders in Collaborative Environments via Relational Analysis of Access Logs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Malin, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative information systems (CIS) are deployed within a diverse array of environments, ranging from the Internet to intelligence agencies to healthcare. It is increasingly the case that such systems are applied to manage sensitive information, making them targets for malicious insiders. While sophisticated security mechanisms have been developed to detect insider threats in various file systems, they are neither designed to model nor to monitor collaborative environments in which users function in dynamic teams with complex behavior. In this paper, we introduce a community-based anomaly detection system (CADS), an unsupervised learning framework to detect insider threats based on information recorded in the access logs of collaborative environments. CADS is based on the observation that typical users tend to form community structures, such that users with low a nity to such communities are indicative of anomalous and potentially illicit behavior. The model consists of two primary components: relational pattern extraction and anomaly detection. For relational pattern extraction, CADS infers community structures from CIS access logs, and subsequently derives communities, which serve as the CADS pattern core. CADS then uses a formal statistical model to measure the deviation of users from the inferred communities to predict which users are anomalies. To empirically evaluate the threat detection model, we perform an analysis with six months of access logs from a real electronic health record system in a large medical center, as well as a publicly-available dataset for replication purposes. The results illustrate that CADS can distinguish simulated anomalous users in the context of real user behavior with a high degree of certainty and with significant performance gains in comparison to several competing anomaly detection models. PMID:25485309

  17. Anomalous low frequency dissipation processes in metal springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSalvo, Riccardo; Di Cintio, Arianna; Marchesoni, Fabio; Bhawal, Abhik

    2010-05-01

    The dissipation processes of leaf springs used in seismic isolation chains of Gravitational Wave detectors have been studied. A low frequency phase transition from visco us-like to fractal-like dissipation, controlled by Self Organized Criticality of dislocations, was observed. The new understandings suggest different best practices for the operations of the seismic isolation chains of the second generation of Gravitational Wave observatories and require new techniques and materials for the third generation.

  18. Workshop targets development of geodetic transient detection methods: 2009 SCEC Annual Meeting: Workshop on transient anomalous strain detection; Palm Springs, California, 12-13 September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray-Moraleda, Jessica R.; Lohman, Rowena

    2010-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) is a community of researchers at institutions worldwide working to improve understanding of earthquakes and mitigate earthquake risk. One of SCEC's priority objectives is to “develop a geodetic network processing system that will detect anomalous strain transients.” Given the growing number of continuously recording geodetic networks consisting of hundreds of stations, an automated means for systematically searching data for transient signals, especially in near real time, is critical for network operations, hazard monitoring, and event response. The SCEC Transient Detection Test Exercise began in 2008 to foster an active community of researchers working on this problem, explore promising methods, and combine effective approaches in novel ways. A workshop was held in California to assess what has been learned thus far and discuss areas of focus as the project moves forward.

  19. Anomalous diffusion due to hindering by mobile obstacles undergoing Brownian motion or Orstein-Ulhenbeck processes.

    PubMed

    Berry, Hugues; Chaté, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    In vivo measurements of the passive movements of biomolecules or vesicles in cells consistently report "anomalous diffusion," where mean-squared displacements scale as a power law of time with exponent α<1 (subdiffusion). While the detailed mechanisms causing such behaviors are not always elucidated, movement hindrance by obstacles is often invoked. However, our understanding of how hindered diffusion leads to subdiffusion is based on diffusion amidst randomly located immobile obstacles. Here, we have used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate transient subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with various modes of mobility. Our simulations confirm that the anomalous regimes rapidly disappear when the obstacles move by Brownian motion. By contrast, mobile obstacles with more confined displacements, e.g., Orstein-Ulhenbeck motion, are shown to preserve subdiffusive regimes. The mean-squared displacement of tracked protein displays convincing power laws with anomalous exponent α that varies with the density of Orstein-Ulhenbeck (OU) obstacles or the relaxation time scale of the OU process. In particular, some of the values we observed are significantly below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles in two dimensions. Therefore, our results show that subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with OU type of motion may account for the large variation range exhibited by experimental measurements in living cells and may explain that some experimental estimates are below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles. PMID:25353510

  20. Anomalous diffusion due to hindering by mobile obstacles undergoing Brownian motion or Orstein-Ulhenbeck processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Hugues; Chaté, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    In vivo measurements of the passive movements of biomolecules or vesicles in cells consistently report "anomalous diffusion," where mean-squared displacements scale as a power law of time with exponent α <1 (subdiffusion). While the detailed mechanisms causing such behaviors are not always elucidated, movement hindrance by obstacles is often invoked. However, our understanding of how hindered diffusion leads to subdiffusion is based on diffusion amidst randomly located immobile obstacles. Here, we have used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate transient subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with various modes of mobility. Our simulations confirm that the anomalous regimes rapidly disappear when the obstacles move by Brownian motion. By contrast, mobile obstacles with more confined displacements, e.g., Orstein-Ulhenbeck motion, are shown to preserve subdiffusive regimes. The mean-squared displacement of tracked protein displays convincing power laws with anomalous exponent α that varies with the density of Orstein-Ulhenbeck (OU) obstacles or the relaxation time scale of the OU process. In particular, some of the values we observed are significantly below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles in two dimensions. Therefore, our results show that subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with OU type of motion may account for the large variation range exhibited by experimental measurements in living cells and may explain that some experimental estimates are below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles.

  1. Dynamical approach to anomalous diffusion: Response of Lévy processes to a perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefán, György; Floriani, Elena; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    1994-10-01

    Lévy statistics are derived from a dynamical system, which can be either Hamiltonian or not, using a master equation approach. We compare these predictions to the random walk approach recently developed by Zumofen and Klafter for both the nonstationary [Phys. Rev. E 47, 851 (1993)] and stationary [Physica A 196, 102 (1993)] case. We study the unperturbed dynamics of the system analytically and numerically and evaluate the time evolution of the second moment of the probability distribution. We also study the response of the dynamical system undergoing anomalous diffusion to an external perturbation and show that if the slow regression to equilibrium of the variable ``velocity'' is triggered by the perturbation, the process of diffusion of the ``space'' variable takes place under nonstationary conditions and a conductivity steadily increasing with time is generated in the early part of the response process. In the regime of extremely long times the conductivity becomes constant with a value, though, that does not correspond to the prescriptions of the ordinary Green-Kubo treatments.

  2. Detecting determinism from point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Mormann, Florian; Kreuz, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The detection of a nonrandom structure from experimental data can be crucial for the classification, understanding, and interpretation of the generating process. We here introduce a rank-based nonlinear predictability score to detect determinism from point process data. Thanks to its modular nature, this approach can be adapted to whatever signature in the data one considers indicative of deterministic structure. After validating our approach using point process signals from deterministic and stochastic model dynamics, we show an application to neuronal spike trains recorded in the brain of an epilepsy patient. While we illustrate our approach in the context of temporal point processes, it can be readily applied to spatial point processes as well.

  3. Study of the anomalous process {gamma}{pi}{yields}{pi}{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Alkofer, R.

    1995-08-01

    The {gamma}{pi} {yields} {pi}{pi} form factor, F{sup 3{pi}}(s), is calculated in generalized impulse approximation within the Dyson-Schwinger Equation framework. This is an anomalous process and as such its form is a fundamentally important characteristic of the quantum field theoretical structure of QCD because it signals the breaking of the U{sub A} symmetry by quantization. There is only one experimental measurement of F{sup 3{pi}}(s) at s {approximately} 8m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, which has large errors, however, there is an approved experiment at CEBAF to study F{sup 3{pi}}(s) in the reaction {gamma}{pi}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} near threshold. This is to be done by measuring {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}n cross sections near t {approx_equal} {sup -}m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}. Present calculations of F{sup 3{pi}}(s) are either unrelated to QCD or rely on {open_quotes}low-energy{close_quotes} expansions. The approach we employ, which manifestly incorporates the large space-like-q{sup 2} renormalization group properties of QCD and allows a realistic extrapolation to small space-like-q{sup 2}, allows us to go beyond such {open_quotes}low-energy{close_quotes} expansions and relate F{sup 3{pi}}(s) to the structure of the effective quark-quark interaction in the infrared. Our preliminary results are encouraging. The chiral limit value, F{sup 3{pi}}(s=0), obtained in our approach agrees with that which one expects from the connection between anomalous processes and the quantization of QCD. Our results also indicate that the form factor grows smoothly away from the chiral point. Our detailed calculation will allow us to address the question of the reliability of the extrapolation to the pion mass shell that is necessary in interpreting the data.

  4. Unconscious processes improve lie detection.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Marc-André; Greifeneder, Rainer; Scharmach, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The capacity to identify cheaters is essential for maintaining balanced social relationships, yet humans have been shown to be generally poor deception detectors. In fact, a plethora of empirical findings holds that individuals are only slightly better than chance when discerning lies from truths. Here, we report 5 experiments showing that judges' ability to detect deception greatly increases after periods of unconscious processing. Specifically, judges who were kept from consciously deliberating outperformed judges who were encouraged to do so or who made a decision immediately; moreover, unconscious thinkers' detection accuracy was significantly above chance level. The reported experiments further show that this improvement comes about because unconscious thinking processes allow for integrating the particularly rich information basis necessary for accurate lie detection. These findings suggest that the human mind is not unfit to distinguish between truth and deception but that this ability resides in previously overlooked processes. PMID:24219784

  5. Detection, visualization and evaluation of anomalous coronary anatomy on 16-slice multidetector-row CT.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Peter M A; Dorgelo, Joost; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2004-12-01

    Early identification and evaluation of relatively frequent anomalous coronary anatomy is quite relevant because of the occurrence of sudden cardiac death or related symptoms of myocardial ischemia. Selective coronary angiography (CAG) is invasive, expensive and cannot always provide the required information adequately. Recently, non-invasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) have been shown to provide a good anatomical view of the coronary artery tree. This study aims to demonstrate the value of 16-MDCT for evaluation of anomalous coronary anatomy. In 13 patients scanned using 16-MDCT, six different coronary anomalies were diagnosed [two absent left main, one single vessel left coronary artery (LCA), three LCA originating from the right (two with interarterial course), six right coronary artery originating from the left, one double left anterior descending (LAD)]. Mean diagnostic quality, recorded by two observers using a 5-point scale (1= non-diagnostic to 5= excellent diagnostic quality), resulted in a mean score of 3.73 (SD 1.19) without any non-diagnostic result. MDCT offers an accurate diagnostic modality to visualize the origin and course of anomalous coronary arteries by a three-dimensional display of anatomy. Shortcomings in CAG can be overcome by the use of contrast-enhanced MDCT. PMID:15452665

  6. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. Anomalous shutdowns can occur as a result of bright object violations which trigger the Bright Scene Detection or Software Global Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur as a result of SBC hardware problems. The recovery from anomalous shutdown procedure consists of four tests: 1} a signal processing electronics check, 2} a slow high voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, 3} a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the full operating voltage, and 4} a Fold Test. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on Proposal 12738 from Cycle 19.

  7. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    This proposal is designed to permit recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. Anomalous shutdowns can occur as a result of bright object violations which trigger the Bright Scene Detection or Software Global Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur as a result of SBC hardware problems. The recovery from anomalous shutdown procedure consists of four tests: a signal processing electronics check, a slow high voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the full operating voltage, and lastly, a Fold Test. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on proposal 11884, visits 1 to 4.

  8. Quantized spin waves in single Co/Pt dots detected by anomalous Hall effect based ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, N. Furuta, M.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.; Shimatsu, T.

    2014-12-15

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) based ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were carried out on perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer single dots of 0.4–3 μm in diameter. The resonance behavior was measured by detecting the decrease of perpendicular magnetization component due to magnetization precession. Resonance behavior was observed as a clear decrease of Hall voltages, and the obtained resonance fields were consistent with the results of vector-network-analyzer FMR. Spin-waves with cylindrical symmetry became significant by decreasing the dot diameter, and quantized multiple resonances were observed in the dot of 0.4 μm in diameter. The AHE based FMR proposed here is a powerful method to approach magnetization dynamics including spin waves and non-linear behavior excited in a finite nanostructure.

  9. Detection of Anomalous Machining Damages in Inconel 718 and TI 6-4 by Eddy Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.; Shimon, M.; Nakagawa, N.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports on an eddy current (EC) study aimed at detecting anomalous machining damages in Inconel 718 and Ti 6-4 samples, including (i) surface discontinuities such as re-depositing of chips onto the machined surface, and (ii) microstructural damages manifested as a white surface layer and a subsurface layer of distorted grains, typically tens of microns thick. A series of pristine and machine-damaged coupons were studied by EC scans using a differential probe operated at 2 MHz to detect discontinuous surface anomalies, and by swept high frequency EC (SHFEC) measurements from 0.5 MHz to 65.5 MHz using proprietary detection coils to detect surface microstructural damages. In general, the EC c-scan data from machine-damaged surfaces show spatial variations with larger standard deviations than those from the undamaged surfaces. In some cases, the c-scan images exhibit characteristic bipolar indications in good spatial correlation with surface anomalies revealed by optical microscopy and laser profilometry. Results of the SHFEC measurements indicate a reduced near-surface conductivity of the damaged surfaces compared to the undamaged surfaces.

  10. Error Detection Processes in Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allwood, Carl Martin

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study which analyzed problem solvers' error detection processes by instructing subjects to think aloud when solving statistical problems. Effects of evaluative episodes on error detection, detection of different error types, error detection processes per se, and relationship of error detection behavior to problem-solving proficiency…

  11. Anomalous reaction-transport processes: The dynamics beyond the law of mass action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Daniel; Fedotov, Sergei; Méndez, Vicenç

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we reconsider the mass action law (MAL) for the anomalous reversible reaction A⇄B with diffusion. We provide a mesoscopic description of this reaction when the transitions between two states A and B are governed by anomalous (heavy-tailed) waiting-time distributions. We derive the set of mesoscopic integro-differential equations for the mean densities of reacting and diffusing particles in both states. We show that the effective reaction rate memory kernels in these equations and the uniform asymptotic states depend on transport characteristics such as jumping rates. This is in contradiction with the classical picture of MAL. We find that transport can even induce an extinction of the particles such that the density of particles A or B tends asymptotically to zero. We verify analytical results by Monte Carlo simulations and show that the mesoscopic densities exhibit a transient growth before decay.

  12. Anomalous diffusion and non-monotonic relaxation processes in Ge-Se liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Can; Raty, Jean-Yves; Micoulaut, Matthieu

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamical properties of liquid GexSe100-x as a function of Ge content by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations for a certain number of temperatures in the liquid state. The focus is set on ten compositions (where x ≤ 33%) encompassing the reported flexible to rigid and rigid to stressed-rigid transitions. We examine diffusion coefficients, diffusion activation energies, glassy relaxation behavior, and viscosity of these liquids from Van Hove correlation and intermediate scattering functions. At fixed temperature, all properties/functions exhibit an anomalous behavior with Ge content in the region 18%-22%, and provide a direct and quantitative link to the network rigidity.

  13. Leveraging Social Networks to Detect Anomalous Insider Actions in Collaborative Environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Zhang, Wen; Malin, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative information systems (CIS) enable users to coordinate efficiently over shared tasks. T hey are often deployed in complex dynamic systems that provide users with broad access privileges, but also leave the system vulnerable to various attacks. Techniques to detect threats originating from beyond the system are relatively mature, but methods to detect insider threats are still evolving. A promising class of insider threat detection models for CIS focus on the communities that manifest between users based on the usage of common subjects in the system. However, current methods detect only when a user’s aggregate behavior is intruding, not when specific actions have deviated from expectation. In this paper, we introduce a method called specialized network anomaly detection (SNAD) to detect such events. SNAD assembles the community of users that access a particular subject and assesses if similarities of the community with and without a certain user are sufficiently different. We present a theoretical basis and perform an extensive empirical evaluation with the access logs of two distinct environments: those of a large electronic health record system (6,015 users, 130,457 patients and 1,327,500 accesses) and the editing logs of Wikipedia (2,388,955 revisors, 55,200 articles and 6,482,780 revisions). We compare SNAD with several competing methods and demonstrate it is significantly more effective: on average it achieves 20–30% greater area under an ROC curve. PMID:25621314

  14. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  15. Ant Colony Optimization detects anomalous aerosol variations associated with the Chile earthquake of 27 February 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhoondzadeh, M.

    2015-04-01

    This study attempts to acknowledge AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) seismo-atmospheric anomalies around the time of the Chile earthquake of 27 February 2010. Since AOD precursor alone might not be useful as an accurate and stand alone criteria for the earthquake anomalies detection, therefore it would be more appropriate to use and integrate a variety of other precursors to reduce the uncertainty of potential detected seismic anomalies. To achieve this aim, eight other precursors including GPS-TEC (Total Electron Content), H+, He+, O+ densities (cm-3) and total ion density (cm-3) from IAP experiment, electron density (cm-3) and electron temperature (K) from ISL experiment and VLF electric field from ICE experiment have been surveyed to detect unusual variations around the time and location of the Chile earthquake. Moreover, three methods including Interquartile, ANN (Artificial Neural Network) and ACO (Ant Colony Optimization) have been implemented to observe the discord patterns in time series of the AOD precursor. All of the methods indicate a clear abnormal increase in time series of AOD data, 2 days prior to event. Also a striking anomaly is observed in time series of TEC data, 6 days preceding the earthquake. Using the analysis of ICE data, a prominent anomaly is detected in the VLF electric field measurement, 1 day before the earthquake. The time series of H+, He+, O+ densities (cm-3) and total ion density (cm-3) from IAP and also electron density (cm-3) and electron temperature (K) from ISL, illustrate the abnormal behaviors, 3 days before the event. It should be noted that the acknowledgment of the different lead times in outcomes of the implemented precursors strictly depend on the proper understanding of Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere (LAI) coupling mechanism during seismic activities. It means that these different anomalies dates between LAI precursors can be a hint of truthfulness of multi-precursors analysis.

  16. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp2 carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations. PMID:25331874

  17. The Anomalous Process γπ → ππ and its Impact on the π0 Transition Form Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubis, Bastian

    2014-12-01

    The process γπ → ππ, in the limit of vanishing photon and pion energies, is determined by the chiral anomaly. This reaction can be investigated experimentally using Primakoff reactions, as currently done at COMPASS. We derive a dispersive representation that allows one to extract the chiral anomaly from cross-section measurements up to 1 GeV, where effects of the ρ resonance are included model-independently via the ππ P-wave phase shift. We discuss how this amplitude serves as an important input to a dispersion-theoretical analysis of the π0 transition form factor, which in turn is a vital ingredient to the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

  18. Impact of mesoscale meteorological processes on anomalous radar propagation conditions over the northern Adriatic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telišman Prtenjak, Maja; Horvat, Igor; Tomažić, Igor; Kvakić, Marko; Viher, Mladen; Grisogono, Branko

    2015-09-01

    The impact of mesoscale structures on the occurrence of anomalous propagation (AP) conditions for radio waves, including ducts, superrefractive, and subrefractive conditions, was studied. The chosen meteorological situations are the bora wind and the sporadic sea/land breeze (SB/LB) during three selected cases over a large portion of the northern Adriatic. For this purpose, we used available radio soundings and numerical mesoscale model simulations (of real cases and their sensitivity tests) at a horizontal resolution of 1.5 km and 81 vertical levels. The model simulated the occurrences of AP conditions satisfactorily, although their intensities and frequency were underestimated at times. Certain difficulties appeared in reproducing the vertical profile of the modified refractive index, which is mainly dependent on the accuracy of the modeled humidity. The spatial distributions of summer AP conditions reveal that the surface layer above the sea (roughly between 30 and 100 m asl) is often covered by superrefractive conditions and ducts. The SB is highly associated with the formations of AP conditions: (i) in the first 100 m asl, where trapping and superrefractive conditions form because of the advection of cold and moist air, and (ii) inside the transition layer between the SB body and the elevated return flow in the form of subrefractive conditions. When deep convection occurs, all three types of AP conditions are caused by the downdraft beneath the cumulonimbus cloud base in its mature phase that creates smaller but marked pools of cold and dry air. The bora wind usually creates a pattern of AP conditions associated with the hydraulic jump and influences distribution of AP conditions over the sea surface.

  19. Online Deviation Detection for Medical Processes

    PubMed Central

    Christov, Stefan C.; Avrunin, George S.; Clarke, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Human errors are a major concern in many medical processes. To help address this problem, we are investigating an approach for automatically detecting when performers of a medical process deviate from the acceptable ways of performing that process as specified by a detailed process model. Such deviations could represent errors and, thus, detecting and reporting deviations as they occur could help catch errors before harm is done. In this paper, we identify important issues related to the feasibility of the proposed approach and empirically evaluate the approach for two medical procedures, chemotherapy and blood transfusion. For the evaluation, we use the process models to generate sample process executions that we then seed with synthetic errors. The process models describe the coordination of activities of different process performers in normal, as well as in exceptional situations. The evaluation results suggest that the proposed approach could be applied in clinical settings to help catch errors before harm is done. PMID:25954343

  20. Noise as a mechanism of anomalous face processing among persons with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Bruce K.; Spencer, Justine M. Y.; King, Jelena P.; Sekuler, Allison B.; Bennett, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that people with Schizophrenia (SCZ) have altered visual perception and cognition, including impaired face processing. However, the mechanism(s) underlying this observation are not yet known. Eye movement studies have found that people with SCZ do not direct their gaze to the most informative regions of the face (e.g., the eyes). This suggests that SCZ patients may be less able to extract the most relevant face information and therefore have decreased calculation efficiency. In addition, research with non-face stimuli indicates that SCZ is associated with increased levels of internal noise. Importantly, both calculation efficiency and internal noise have been shown to underpin face perception among healthy observers. Therefore, the current study applies noise masking to upright and inverted faces to determine if face processing deficits among those with SCZ are the result of changes in calculation efficiency, internal noise, or both. Consistent with previous results, SCZ participants exhibited higher contrast thresholds in order to identify masked target faces. However, higher thresholds were associated with increases in internal noise but unrelated to changes in calculation efficiency. These results suggest that SCZ-related face processing deficits are the result of a decreased noise-to-signal ratio. The source of increased processing noise among these patients is unclear, but may emanate from abnormal neural dynamics. PMID:23882228

  1. Event-Related Potentials Reveal Anomalous Morphosyntactic Processing in Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantiani, Chiara; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Perego, Paolo; Molteni, Massimo; Guasti, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    In the light of the literature describing oral language difficulties in developmental dyslexia (DD), event-related potentials were used in order to compare morphosyntactic processing in 16 adults with DD (aged 20-28 years) and unimpaired controls. Sentences including subject-verb agreement violations were presented auditorily, with grammaticality…

  2. Semantic Processing Persists despite Anomalous Syntactic Category: ERP Evidence from Chinese Passive Sentences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wu, Fuyun; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    The syntax-first model and the parallel/interactive models make different predictions regarding whether syntactic category processing has a temporal and functional primacy over semantic processing. To further resolve this issue, an event-related potential experiment was conducted on 24 Chinese speakers reading Chinese passive sentences with the passive marker BEI (NP1 + BEI + NP2 + Verb). This construction was selected because it is the most-commonly used Chinese passive and very much resembles German passives, upon which the syntax-first hypothesis was primarily based. We manipulated semantic consistency (consistent vs. inconsistent) and syntactic category (noun vs. verb) of the critical verb, yielding four conditions: CORRECT (correct sentences), SEMANTIC (semantic anomaly), SYNTACTIC (syntactic category anomaly), and COMBINED (combined anomalies). Results showed both N400 and P600 effects for sentences with semantic anomaly, with syntactic category anomaly, or with combined anomalies. Converging with recent findings of Chinese ERP studies on various constructions, our study provides further evidence that syntactic category processing does not precede semantic processing in reading Chinese. PMID:26125621

  3. Semantic Processing Persists despite Anomalous Syntactic Category: ERP Evidence from Chinese Passive Sentences

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wu, Fuyun; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    The syntax-first model and the parallel/interactive models make different predictions regarding whether syntactic category processing has a temporal and functional primacy over semantic processing. To further resolve this issue, an event-related potential experiment was conducted on 24 Chinese speakers reading Chinese passive sentences with the passive marker BEI (NP1 + BEI + NP2 + Verb). This construction was selected because it is the most-commonly used Chinese passive and very much resembles German passives, upon which the syntax-first hypothesis was primarily based. We manipulated semantic consistency (consistent vs. inconsistent) and syntactic category (noun vs. verb) of the critical verb, yielding four conditions: CORRECT (correct sentences), SEMANTIC (semantic anomaly), SYNTACTIC (syntactic category anomaly), and COMBINED (combined anomalies). Results showed both N400 and P600 effects for sentences with semantic anomaly, with syntactic category anomaly, or with combined anomalies. Converging with recent findings of Chinese ERP studies on various constructions, our study provides further evidence that syntactic category processing does not precede semantic processing in reading Chinese. PMID:26125621

  4. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  5. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  6. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:25770525

  7. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Barklow, T.; Baur, U. |

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is {approximately} 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than {Omicron}(10{sup {minus}2}). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed.

  8. Anomalous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this composite image of spiral galaxy M106 (NGC 4258), optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey is shown as yellow, radio data from the Very Large Array appears as purple, X-ray data from Chandra is coded blue, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope appears red. Two anomalous arms, which aren't visible at optical wavelengths, appear as purple and blue emission.

  9. Feeling the past: the absence of experimental evidence for anomalous retroactive influences on text processing.

    PubMed

    Traxler, Matthew J; Foss, Donald J; Podali, Ruchira; Zirnstein, Megan

    2012-11-01

    In two self-paced reading experiments, we investigated the hypothesis that information moves backward in time to influence prior behaviors (Bem Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 100:407-425, 2011a). In two of Bem's experiments, words were presented after target pictures in a pleasantness judgment task. In a condition in which the words were consistent with the emotional valence of the picture, reaction times to the pictures were significantly shorter , as compared with a condition in which the words were inconsistent with the emotional valence of the picture. Bem Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 100:407-425, (2011a) interpreted these results as showing a "retroactive priming" effect resulting from precognition. To test the precognition hypothesis, we adapted a standard repetition priming paradigm from psycholinguistics. In the experiments, participants read a set of texts. In one condition, the participants read the same text twice. In other conditions, participants read two different texts. The precognition hypothesis predicts that readers who encounter the same text twice will experience reductions in processing load during their first encounter with the text. Hence, these readers' average reading times should be shorter than those of readers who encounter the target text only once. Our results indicated that readers processed the target text faster the second time they read it. Also, their reading times decreased as their experience with the self-paced reading procedure increased. However, participants read the target text equally quickly during their initial encounter with the text, whether or not the text was subsequently repeated. Thus, the experiments demonstrated normal repetition priming and practice effects but offered no evidence for retroactive influences on text processing. PMID:22815066

  10. Anomalous variation in the wireless signals propagation associated with earthquake preparation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Velichkova-Yotsova, Sylvia; Pulinets, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    propagation correlated with earthquake preparation processes. Our observations revealed a phenomena associated with the artificially enhancement of the intensity 3.5GHz signals by using WiMax technology (no change in the transmitting level) as a result of electric and electrochemical processes in atmosphere over the regions of ongoing earthquake preparation. To illustrate the nature of such variations in the range of 3.5GHz in relation to earthquake processes we present two case studies: 1/ for M5.8 of May 22, 2012 in Bulgaria and 2/ for M6.9 of May 24, 2014 in Aegean Sea. Concerning the M5.8 of May 22, 2012 the abnormal intensity modulation started on 05.17.2012 (five days in advance) and reached 200% increase. Epicenter of the M5.8 of May 25 was on 15 km from the wireless receiver. Concerning and M6.9 of May 24, 2014 in Aegean Sea abnormal signal was observed on May 22 (two days in advance) with 30% intensity increase. Epicenter of M6.9 of May 24 was at 260 km from the wireless receiver. Most likely the observed increase in the intensity is a direct result of the change in the atmospheric properties in the Atmospheric boundary level (ABL) triggered by intensification of radon and other gases release, which lead to change in lowers atmosphere conductivity, already suggested by Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling concept (Pulinets and Ouzounov, 2011). Another possible reason is the forward scattering of WiMax signal (similar to meteor wakes scattering) on aerosol layers formed over the earthquake preparation zone. We are registering an effect of systematic increase (with different rate) at 3.5 GHz associated with the regional seismicity and no significant intensify modulation with an absence of major seismicity in the region.

  11. Intelligent Signal Processing for Detection System Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C Y; Petrich, L I; Daley, P F; Burnham, A K

    2004-12-05

    A wavelet-neural network signal processing method has demonstrated approximately tenfold improvement over traditional signal-processing methods for the detection limit of various nitrogen and phosphorus compounds from the output of a thermionic detector attached to a gas chromatograph. A blind test was conducted to validate the lower detection limit. All fourteen of the compound spikes were detected when above the estimated threshold, including all three within a factor of two above the threshold. In addition, two of six spikes were detected at levels of 1/2 the concentration of the nominal threshold. Another two of the six would have been detected correctly if we had allowed human intervention to examine the processed data. One apparent false positive in five nulls was traced to a solvent impurity, whose presence was subsequently identified by analyzing a solvent aliquot evaporated to 1% residual volume, while the other four nulls were properly classified. We view this signal processing method as broadly applicable in analytical chemistry, and we advocate that advanced signal processing methods should be applied as directly as possible to the raw detector output so that less discriminating preprocessing and post-processing does not throw away valuable signal.

  12. Intelligent Signal Processing for Detection System Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C Y; Petrich, L I; Daley, P F; Burnham, A K

    2004-06-18

    A wavelet-neural network signal processing method has demonstrated approximately tenfold improvement in the detection limit of various nitrogen and phosphorus compounds over traditional signal-processing methods in analyzing the output of a thermionic detector attached to the output of a gas chromatograph. A blind test was conducted to validate the lower detection limit. All fourteen of the compound spikes were detected when above the estimated threshold, including all three within a factor of two above. In addition, two of six were detected at levels 1/2 the concentration of the nominal threshold. We would have had another two correct hits if we had allowed human intervention to examine the processed data. One apparent false positive in five nulls was traced to a solvent impurity, whose presence was identified by running a solvent aliquot evaporated to 1% residual volume, while the other four nulls were properly classified. We view this signal processing method as broadly applicable in analytical chemistry, and we advocate that advanced signal processing methods be applied as directly as possible to the raw detector output so that less discriminating preprocessing and post-processing does not throw away valuable signal.

  13. Photon detection with parallel asynchronous processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, D. D.; Perera, A. G. U.

    1990-01-01

    An approach to photon detection with a parallel asynchronous signal processor is described. The visible or IR photon-detection capability of the silicon p(+)-n-n(+) detectors and the parallel asynchronous processing are addressed separately. This approach would permit an independent analog processing channel to be dedicated to every pixel. A laminar architecture consisting of a stack of planar arrays of the devices would form a 2D array processor with a 2D array of inputs located directly behind a focal-plane detector array. A 2D image data stream would propagate in neuronlike asynchronous pulse-coded form through the laminar processor. Such systems can integrate image acquisition and image processing. Acquisition and processing would be performed concurrently as in natural vision systems. The possibility of multispectral image processing is addressed.

  14. Proactive detection of bones in poultry processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, W. D. R.; Stewart, John

    2009-05-01

    Bones continue to be a problem of concern for the poultry industry. Most further processed products begin with the requirement for raw material with minimal bones. The current process for generating deboned product requires systems for monitoring and inspecting the output product. The current detection systems are either people palpitating the product or X-ray systems. The current performance of these inspection techniques are below the desired levels of accuracies and are costly. We propose a technique for monitoring bones that conduct the inspection operation in the deboning the process so as to have enough time to take action to reduce the probability that bones will end up in the final product. This is accomplished by developing active cones with built in illumination to backlight the cage (skeleton) on the deboning line. If the bones of interest are still on the cage then the bones are not in the associated meat. This approach also allows for the ability to practice process control on the deboning operation to keep the process under control as opposed to the current system where the detection is done post production and does not easily present the opportunity to adjust the process. The proposed approach shows overall accuracies of about 94% for the detection of the clavicle bones.

  15. Signal processing aspects of windshear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aalfs, David D.; Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1993-01-01

    Low-altitude windshear (LAWS) has been identified as a major hazard to aircraft, particularly during takeoff and landing. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been involved with developing technology to detect LAWS. A key element in this technology is high resolution pulse Doppler weather radar equipped with signal and data processing to provide timely information about possible hazardous conditions.

  16. Detection of branching points in noisy processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Michael; Liebscher, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Processes in engineering mechanics often contain branching points at which the system can follow different physical paths. In this paper a method for the detection of these branching points is proposed for processes that are affected by noise. It is assumed that a bundle of process records are available from numerical simulations or from experiments, and branching points are concealed by the noise of the process. The bundle of process records is then evaluated at a series of discrete values of the independent process coordinates. At each discrete point of the process, the associated point set of process values is investigated with the aid of cluster analysis. The detected branching points are verified with a recursive algorithm. The revealed information about the branching points can be used to identify the physical and mechanical background for the branching. This helps to better understand a mechanical system and to design it optimal for a specific purpose. The proposed method is demonstrated by means of both a numerical example and a practical example of a crashworthiness investigation.

  17. Eggshell defects detection based on color processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alegre, Maria C.; Ribeiro, Angela; Guinea, Domingo; Cristobal, Gabriel

    2000-03-01

    The automatic classification of defective eggs constitutes a fundamental issue at the poultry industry for both economical and sanitary reasons. The early separation of eggs with spots and cracks is a relevant task as the stains can leak while progressing on the conveyor-belts, degrading all the mechanical parts. Present work is focused on the implementation of an artificial vision system for detecting in real time defective eggs at the poultry farm. First step of the algorithmic process is devoted to the detection of the egg shape to fix the region of interest. A color processing is then performed only on the eggshell to obtain an image segmentation that allows the discrimination of defective eggs from clean ones in critic time. The results are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed visual process on a wide sample of both defective and non-defective eggs.

  18. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  19. Novel image processing approach to detect malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, David; Ferrer, Belen; Cojoc, Dan; Finaurini, Sara; Mico, Vicente; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a novel image processing algorithm providing good preliminary capabilities for in vitro detection of malaria. The proposed concept is based upon analysis of the temporal variation of each pixel. Changes in dark pixels mean that inter cellular activity happened, indicating the presence of the malaria parasite inside the cell. Preliminary experimental results involving analysis of red blood cells being either healthy or infected with malaria parasites, validated the potential benefit of the proposed numerical approach.

  20. Using Statistical Process Control for detecting anomalies in multivariate spatiotemporal Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, Milan; Mahecha, Miguel; Gans, Fabian; Rodner, Erik; Bodesheim, Paul; Guanche-Garcia, Yanira; Brenning, Alexander; Denzler, Joachim; Reichstein, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The number of available Earth observations (EOs) is currently substantially increasing. Detecting anomalous patterns in these multivariate time series is an important step in identifying changes in the underlying dynamical system. Likewise, data quality issues might result in anomalous multivariate data constellations and have to be identified before corrupting subsequent analyses. In industrial application a common strategy is to monitor production chains with several sensors coupled to some statistical process control (SPC) algorithm. The basic idea is to raise an alarm when these sensor data depict some anomalous pattern according to the SPC, i.e. the production chain is considered 'out of control'. In fact, the industrial applications are conceptually similar to the on-line monitoring of EOs. However, algorithms used in the context of SPC or process monitoring are rarely considered for supervising multivariate spatio-temporal Earth observations. The objective of this study is to exploit the potential and transferability of SPC concepts to Earth system applications. We compare a range of different algorithms typically applied by SPC systems and evaluate their capability to detect e.g. known extreme events in land surface processes. Specifically two main issues are addressed: (1) identifying the most suitable combination of data pre-processing and detection algorithm for a specific type of event and (2) analyzing the limits of the individual approaches with respect to the magnitude, spatio-temporal size of the event as well as the data's signal to noise ratio. Extensive artificial data sets that represent the typical properties of Earth observations are used in this study. Our results show that the majority of the algorithms used can be considered for the detection of multivariate spatiotemporal events and directly transferred to real Earth observation data as currently assembled in different projects at the European scale, e.g. http://baci-h2020.eu

  1. Systems and methods for detecting and processing

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Michael M.; Yoshimura, Ann S.

    2006-03-28

    Embodiments of the present invention provides systems and method for detecting. Sensing modules are provided in communication with one or more detectors. In some embodiments, detectors are provided that are sensitive to chemical, biological, or radiological agents. Embodiments of sensing modules include processing capabilities to analyze, perform computations on, and/or run models to predict or interpret data received from one or more detectors. Embodiments of sensing modules form various network configurations with one another and/or with one or more data aggregation devices. Some embodiments of sensing modules include power management functionalities.

  2. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  3. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  4. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO2 thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Sylvestre, A.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-01

    Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and capacitance-frequency (C-f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO2 thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C-V anomalous) is observed in the C-V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C-V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO2 interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60-0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti3+ ions. Both the C-V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO2 arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  5. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  6. The dispersion and detection patterns of mtDNA-assigned red fox Vulpes vulpes scats in Tasmania are anomalous

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Clive A; Obendorf, David; Pereira, Filipe; Edwards, Ivo; Hall, Graham P

    2014-01-01

    Models used for resource allocation in eradication programmes must be based on replicated data of known quality and have proven predictive accuracy, or they may provide a false indication of species presence and/or distribution. In the absence of data corroborating the presence of extant foxes Vulpes vulpes in Tasmania, a habitat-specific model based upon mtDNA data (Sarre et al. 2012. Journal Applied Ecology, 50, 459–468) implied that foxes were widespread. Overall, 61 of 9940 (0·6%) surveyed scats were assigned as mtDNA fox positive by the fox eradication programme (FEP). We investigated the spatiotemporal distribution of the 61 mtDNA-assigned fox scats and modelled the probability of replicating scat detection in independent surveys using detection dogs based upon empirically derived probabilities of scat detection success obtained by the FEP using imported fox scats. In a prior mainland study, fox genotypes were recurrently detected in a consecutive four-day pool of scats. In Tasmania, only three contemporaneously collected scat pairs of unknown genotype were detected by the FEP within an area corresponding to a conservatively large mainland fox home range (639 ha) in a decade. Nearest neighbour pairs were widely spaced (mean = 7·0 km; circular area = 153 km2) and generated after a mean of 281 days. The majority of assigned mtDNA positive scats were found in urban and peri-urban environments corresponding to small mainland fox home ranges (30–45 ha) that imply higher scat density and more certain replication. Using the lowest empirically determined scat detection success for dogs, the failure to replicate fox scat detection on 34 of 36 occasions in a large (639 ha) home range is highly improbable (P = 0·00001) and suggestive of Type I error. Synthesis and applications. Type I error, which may have various sources, should be considered when scat mtDNA data are few, accumulated over many years, uncorroborated by observations of extant

  7. Detection of anomalous Hall voltages in ultrahigh-mobility two-dimensional hole gases generated by optical spin orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukov, D. A.; Plaut, A. S.; Henini, M.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Nicoll, C. A.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    By combining optical spin orientation and an externally applied longitudinal electric field, transverse charge accumulation has been detected in very high-mobility two-dimensional hole gases by measuring the transverse voltage drop across simple Hall devices. Our results indicate intrinsic band-structure (rather than extrinsic skew scattering) derived spin-orbit coupling as the underlying mechanism of this spin-polarized transport effect.

  8. Higher-order statistical moments and a procedure that detects potentially anomalous years as two alternative methods describing alterations in continuous environmental data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arismendi, Ivan; Johnson, Sherri L.; Dunham, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Statistics of central tendency and dispersion may not capture relevant or desired characteristics of the distribution of continuous phenomena and, thus, they may not adequately describe temporal patterns of change. Here, we present two methodological approaches that can help to identify temporal changes in environmental regimes. First, we use higher-order statistical moments (skewness and kurtosis) to examine potential changes of empirical distributions at decadal extents. Second, we adapt a statistical procedure combining a non-metric multidimensional scaling technique and higher density region plots to detect potentially anomalous years. We illustrate the use of these approaches by examining long-term stream temperature data from minimally and highly human-influenced streams. In particular, we contrast predictions about thermal regime responses to changing climates and human-related water uses. Using these methods, we effectively diagnose years with unusual thermal variability and patterns in variability through time, as well as spatial variability linked to regional and local factors that influence stream temperature. Our findings highlight the complexity of responses of thermal regimes of streams and reveal their differential vulnerability to climate warming and human-related water uses. The two approaches presented here can be applied with a variety of other continuous phenomena to address historical changes, extreme events, and their associated ecological responses.

  9. Technical Note: Higher-order statistical moments and a procedure that detects potentially anomalous years as two alternative methods describing alterations in continuous environmental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arismendi, I.; Johnson, S. L.; Dunham, J. B.

    2015-03-01

    Statistics of central tendency and dispersion may not capture relevant or desired characteristics of the distribution of continuous phenomena and, thus, they may not adequately describe temporal patterns of change. Here, we present two methodological approaches that can help to identify temporal changes in environmental regimes. First, we use higher-order statistical moments (skewness and kurtosis) to examine potential changes of empirical distributions at decadal extents. Second, we adapt a statistical procedure combining a non-metric multidimensional scaling technique and higher density region plots to detect potentially anomalous years. We illustrate the use of these approaches by examining long-term stream temperature data from minimally and highly human-influenced streams. In particular, we contrast predictions about thermal regime responses to changing climates and human-related water uses. Using these methods, we effectively diagnose years with unusual thermal variability and patterns in variability through time, as well as spatial variability linked to regional and local factors that influence stream temperature. Our findings highlight the complexity of responses of thermal regimes of streams and reveal their differential vulnerability to climate warming and human-related water uses. The two approaches presented here can be applied with a variety of other continuous phenomena to address historical changes, extreme events, and their associated ecological responses.

  10. Predicting clutter during anomalous propagation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Susan C.; Maurer, Donald E.; Musser, Keith L.

    1988-06-01

    Excessive clutter caused by anomalous propagation conditions severely degrades radar performance in many regions of the world. This article describes methods that can be used to predict anomalous clutter amplitude for site-specific radar parameters, terrain features, and atmospheric conditions and to predict the effects of radar Doppler processing on evaporation-ducted sea clutter.

  11. OGLE-III DETECTION OF THE ANOMALOUS GALACTIC BULGE RED GIANT BRANCH BUMP: EVIDENCE OF ENHANCED HELIUM ENRICHMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nataf, D. M.; Gould, A.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Udalski, A.

    2011-04-01

    We measure the red giant branch bump (RGBB) of the Galactic bulge, the most metal-rich RGBB ever detected. The RGBB luminosity function peaks at the expected brightness, but its number density is very low relative to Galactic globular cluster calibrations, implying the Galactic bulge has a higher helium enrichment parameter {Delta}Y/{Delta}Z {>=} 4.0 for Y {approx} 0.35 rather than the standard 2.0 with Y = 0.27, which we suggest may be a common feature of galactic spheroids. The RGBB is (0.71 {+-} 0.02) mag fainter than the red clump (RC) in I toward the densest stellar regions imaged by the OGLE-III Galactic bulge photometric survey, (|l| {<=} 4, 2 {approx}< |b| {<=} 4). The number density of RGBB stars is (12.7 {+-} 2.0)% that of RC stars. The brightness dispersion of the RGBB is significantly lower than that of the RC, a result that is difficult to explain as the RGBB luminosity is known to vary significantly with metallicity. Sight lines that have two RCs have two RGBBs with similar properties to one another, an expected outcome if the Milky Way's bulge is X-shaped. We also find preliminary evidence of the Galactic bulge asymptotic giant branch bump, at a brightness of {approx}1.06 mag brighter than the RC in I and with a number density {approx}1.5% that of the RC. Accounting for the RGBB has a small effect on the best-fit parameters of the RC, shifting its best-fit peak brightness and reducing its brightness dispersion by {approx}0.015 mag each.

  12. Detection of anomalous crop condition and soil variability mapping using a 26 year Landsat record and the Palmer crop moisture index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venteris, E. R.; Tagestad, J. D.; Downs, J. L.; Murray, C. J.

    2015-07-01

    Cost-effective and reliable vegetation monitoring methods are needed for applications ranging from traditional agronomic mapping, to verifying the safety of geologic injection activities. A particular challenge is defining baseline crop conditions and subsequent anomalies from long term imagery records (Landsat) in the face of large spatiotemporal variability. We develop a new method for defining baseline crop response (near peak growth) using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from 26 years (1986-2011) of Landsat data for 400 km2 surrounding a planned geologic carbon sequestration site near Jacksonville, Illinois. The normal score transform (yNDVI) was applied on a field by field basis to accentuate spatial patterns and level differences due to planting times. We tested crop type and soil moisture (Palmer crop moisture index (CMI)) as predictors of expected crop condition. Spatial patterns in yNDVI were similar between corn and soybeans - the two major crops. Linear regressions between yNDVI and the cumulative CMI (CCMI) exposed complex interactions between crop condition, field location (topography and soils), and annual moisture. Wet toposequence positions (depressions) were negatively correlated to CCMI and dry positions (crests) positively correlated. However, only 21% of the landscape showed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) linear relationship. To map anomalous crop conditions, we defined a tolerance interval based on yNDVI statistics. Tested on an independent image (2013), 63 of 1483 possible fields showed unusual crop condition. While the method is not directly suitable for crop health assessment, the spatial patterns in correlation between yNDVI and CCMI have potential applications for pest damage detection and edaphological soil mapping, especially in the developing world.

  13. Assessing bimodality to detect the presence of a dual cognitive process.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jonathan B; Dale, Rick

    2013-03-01

    Researchers have long sought to distinguish between single-process and dual-process cognitive phenomena, using responses such as reaction times and, more recently, hand movements. Analysis of a response distribution's modality has been crucial in detecting the presence of dual processes, because they tend to introduce bimodal features. Rarely, however, have bimodality measures been systematically evaluated. We carried out tests of readily available bimodality measures that any researcher may easily employ: the bimodality coefficient (BC), Hartigan's dip statistic (HDS), and the difference in Akaike's information criterion between one-component and two-component distribution models (AIC(diff)). We simulated distributions containing two response populations and examined the influences of (1) the distances between populations, (2) proportions of responses, (3) the amount of positive skew present, and (4) sample size. Distance always had a stronger effect than did proportion, and the effects of proportion greatly differed across the measures. Skew biased the measures by increasing bimodality detection, in some cases leading to anomalous interactive effects. BC and HDS were generally convergent, but a number of important discrepancies were found. AIC(diff) was extremely sensitive to bimodality and identified nearly all distributions as bimodal. However, all measures served to detect the presence of bimodality in comparison to unimodal simulations. We provide a validation with experimental data, discuss methodological and theoretical implications, and make recommendations regarding the choice of analysis. PMID:22806703

  14. Life Detection System DTIVA for Monitoring Parameter in Fossilization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Garcia-Descalzo, L.; Cockell, C. S.; Schwendner, P.; Rettberg, P.; Beblo-Vranesevic, K.; Bohmeier, M.; Rabbow, E.; Westall, F.; Gaboyer, F.; Walter, N.; Moissl-Eichinger, M.; Perras, A.; Amils, R.; Malki, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Monaghan, E.; Marteinsson, V.; Vannier, P.

    2016-05-01

    Using Life Detection System LDS we followed the physicochemical parameter in a growth culture under fossilization/mineralization-induced process with the objectives of biomarkers detection. Biomarkers study is crucial for the search for life on Mars.

  15. Olfactory processing: detection of rapid changes.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Krone, Franziska; Walker, Susannah; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Changes in the olfactory environment have a rather poor chance of being detected. Aim of the present study was to determine, whether the same (cued) or different (uncued) odors can generally be detected at short inter stimulus intervals (ISI) below 2.5 s. Furthermore we investigated, whether inhibition of return, an attentional phenomenon facilitating the detection of new stimuli at longer ISI, is present in the domain of olfaction. Thirteen normosmic people (3 men, 10 women; age range 19-27 years; mean age 23 years) participated. Stimulation was performed using air-dilution olfactometry with 2 odors: phenylethylalcohol and hydrogen disulfide. Reaction time to target stimuli was assessed in cued and uncued conditions at ISIs of 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 s. There was a significant main effect of ISI, indicating that odors presented only 1 s apart are missed frequently. Uncued presentation facilitated detection at short ISIs, implying that changes of the olfactory environment are detected better than presentation of the same odor again. Effects in relation to "olfactory inhibition of return," on the other hand, are not supported by our results. This suggests that attention works different for the olfactory system compared with the visual and auditory systems. PMID:25911421

  16. Error Detection Processes during Observational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Blandin, Yannick; Wright, David L.; Shea, Charles H.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether a faded knowledge of results (KR) frequency during observation of a model's performance enhanced error detection capabilities. During the observation phase, participants observed a model performing a timing task and received KR about the model's performance on each trial or on one of two…

  17. Windshear detection radar signal processing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This final report briefly summarizes research work at Clemson in the Radar Systems Laboratory under the NASA Langley Research Grant NAG-1-928 in support of the Antenna and Microwave Branch, Guidance and Control Division, program to develop airborne sensor technology for the detection of low altitude windshear. A bibliography of all publications generated by Clemson personnel is included. An appendix provides abstracts of all publications.

  18. Detection of Thermometer Clustering in the Calibration of Large Batches of Industrial Thermometers for the LHC by Automated Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavese, F.; Ichim, D.; Ciarlini, P.; Balle, C.; Casas-Cubillos, J.

    2003-09-01

    The complete procedure to calibrate thermometers is a complex process, especially when several thousand semiconductor-type thermometers are used and must be individually calibrated, as in the case of the instrumentation of the new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN. Indeed, the similarity of the characteristics of semiconducting thermometers is more limited than that of wire-wound thermometers. The span of the characteristics spread can appear as a homogeneous set, or can show clusters (groups) of characteristics. In the latter case, one of the reasons for clustering may be the fabrication process by batches of numerous devices on the same wafer. Consequently, the detection of the groups can be useful, from the supplier point of view, to give information relevant to improving the fabrication uniformity. From the user point of view, it is useful for making a guess of the possible thermometer stability with time, when this is a must, as in the LHC case. In fact, thermometers showing characteristics outlying or in small clusters should be considered to be potentially anomalous. In addition, the identification of anomalous groups allows the detection of artifacts due to the experimental process. For a large number of thermometers, this analysis requires the use of automated procedures and, consequently, automated decisions that avoid false effects. The paper describes the mathematical methodology adopted for the identification of the clusters, based on the mixed-effect modeling of the thermometer characteristics.

  19. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-01

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, …) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1—contraband material in the sea containers, case 2—-explosives in soil (landmines), case 3—explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  20. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-10

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, ...) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1--contraband material in the sea containers, case 2 - explosives in soil (landmines), case 3 - explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  1. Detecting jaundice by using digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Ramos, J.; Toxqui-Quitl, C.; Villa Manriquez, F.; Orozco-Guillen, E.; Padilla-Vivanco, A.; Sánchez-Escobar, JJ.

    2014-03-01

    When strong Jaundice is presented, babies or adults should be subject to clinical exam like "serum bilirubin" which can cause traumas in patients. Often jaundice is presented in liver disease such as hepatitis or liver cancer. In order to avoid additional traumas we propose to detect jaundice (icterus) in newborns or adults by using a not pain method. By acquiring digital images in color, in palm, soles and forehead, we analyze RGB attributes and diffuse reflectance spectra as the parameter to characterize patients with either jaundice or not, and we correlate that parameters with the level of bilirubin. By applying support vector machine we distinguish between healthy and sick patients.

  2. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain. PMID:26565270

  3. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain.

  4. Contamination detection NDE for cleaning process inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinelli, W. J.; Dicristina, V.; Sonnenfroh, D.; Blair, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the joining of multilayer materials, and in welding, the cleanliness of the joining surface may play a large role in the quality of the resulting bond. No non-intrusive techniques are currently available for the rapid measurement of contamination on large or irregularly shaped structures prior to the joining process. An innovative technique for the measurement of contaminant levels in these structures using laser based imaging is presented. The approach uses an ultraviolet excimer laser to illuminate large and/or irregular surface areas. The UV light induces fluorescence and is scattered from the contaminants. The illuminated area is viewed by an image-intensified CCD (charge coupled device) camera interfaced to a PC-based computer. The camera measures the fluorescence and/or scattering from the contaminants for comparison with established standards. Single shot measurements of contamination levels are possible. Hence, the technique may be used for on-line NDE testing during manufacturing processes.

  5. Signal processing in cryogenic particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryev, Y. N.; Jang, Y. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. J.; Yoon, W. S.; Kim, Y. H.

    2011-04-01

    We describe a signal-processing program for a data acquisition system for cryogenic particle detectors. The program is based on an optimal-filtering method for high-resolution measurement of calorimetric signals with a significant amount of noise of unknown origin and non-stationary behavior. The program was applied to improve the energy resolution of the alpha particle spectrum of an 241Am source.

  6. Processing of GPR data from NIITEK landmine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarsky, Justin J.; Broach, J. T.; Bishop, Steven S.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, a signal processing approach for wide-bandwidth ground-penetrating-radar imagery from Non-Intrusive Inspection Technology, Incorporated (NIITEK) vehicle-mounted landmine detection sensor is investigated. The approach consists of a sequence of processing steps, which include signal filtering, image enhancement and detection. Filtering strategies before detection aid in image visualization by reducing ground bounce, systematic effects and redundant signals. Post-filter image processing helps by enhancing landmine signatures in the NIITEK radar imagery. Study results from applying this signal processing approach are presented for test minefield lane data, which were collected during 2002 from an Army test site.

  7. Detecting causality in policy diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Grabow, Carsten; Macinko, James; Silver, Diana; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    A universal question in network science entails learning about the topology of interaction from collective dynamics. Here, we address this question by examining diffusion of laws across US states. We propose two complementary techniques to unravel determinants of this diffusion process: information-theoretic union transfer entropy and event synchronization. In order to systematically investigate their performance on law activity data, we establish a new stochastic model to generate synthetic law activity data based on plausible networks of interactions. Through extensive parametric studies, we demonstrate the ability of these methods to reconstruct networks, varying in size, link density, and degree heterogeneity. Our results suggest that union transfer entropy should be preferred for slowly varying processes, which may be associated with policies attending to specific local problems that occur only rarely or with policies facing high levels of opposition. In contrast, event synchronization is effective for faster enactment rates, which may be related to policies involving Federal mandates or incentives. This study puts forward a data-driven toolbox to explain the determinants of legal activity applicable to political science, across dynamical systems, information theory, and complex networks. PMID:27586609

  8. An anomalous extinction law in the Cep OB3b young cluster: Evidence for dust processing during gas dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Thomas S.; Prchlik, Jakub J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Pipher, Judith L.; Naylor, Tim; Jeffries, R. D.

    2014-05-10

    We determine the extinction law through Cep OB3b, a young cluster of 3000 stars undergoing gas dispersal. The extinction is measured toward 76 background K giants identified with MMT/Hectospec spectra. Color excess ratios were determined toward each of the giants using V and R photometry from the literature, g, r, i, and z photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and J, H, and K{sub s} photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. These color excess ratios were then used to construct the extinction law through the dusty material associated with Cep OB3b. The extinction law through Cep OB3b is intermediate between the R{sub V} = 3.1 and R{sub V} = 5 laws commonly used for the diffuse atomic interstellar medium and dense molecular clouds, respectively. The dependence of the extinction law on line-of-sight A{sub V} is investigated and we find the extinction law becomes shallower for regions with A{sub V} > 2.5 mag. We speculate that the intermediate dust law results from dust processing during the dispersal of the molecular cloud by the cluster.

  9. Communication: Probing anomalous diffusion in frequency space

    SciTech Connect

    Stachura, Sławomir; Kneller, Gerald R.

    2015-11-21

    Anomalous diffusion processes are usually detected by analyzing the time-dependent mean square displacement of the diffusing particles. The latter evolves asymptotically as W(t) ∼ 2D{sub α}t{sup α}, where D{sub α} is the fractional diffusion constant and 0 < α < 2. In this article we show that both D{sub α} and α can also be extracted from the low-frequency Fourier spectrum of the corresponding velocity autocorrelation function. This offers a simple method for the interpretation of quasielastic neutron scattering spectra from complex (bio)molecular systems, in which subdiffusive transport is frequently encountered. The approach is illustrated and validated by analyzing molecular dynamics simulations of molecular diffusion in a lipid POPC bilayer.

  10. Global positioning system interference and satellite anomalous event monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Lukas M.

    Global Positioning System satellite Signal Quality Monitoring (SQM) is required to ensure the integrity of the received signal for aviation safety-critical systems. Failure mitigation is not addressed since failure detection ensures system integrity. The GPS Anomalous Event Monitor (GAEM) is introduced, consisting of a GPS receiver serving as an anomaly sensor, and the Software Defined Radio, allowing for a thorough analysis of signal malfunction modes through advanced signal processing techniques. Algorithms to monitor the GPS signal by the anomaly sensor are developed and in case of possible signal inconsistencies the signal is analyzed by the Software Defined Radio. For the purpose of quality monitoring it is essential to understand the impact of the radio frequency front-end on the received signal, and implicitly onto the signal parameter estimation process; otherwise a signal inconsistency may be flagged which is induced by the monitoring system. Thus, radio frequency front-end induced errors are examined and the statistics for signal parameter estimators are derived. As the statistics of an anomalous signal are unknown, a non-parametric, non-homoscedastic (uncommon variance of sample space) statistical test is developed. Berry-Esseen bounds are introduced to quantify convergence and to establish confidence levels. The algorithm is applied to the detection of signal anomalies, with emphasis on interference detection. The algorithms to detect GPS signal anomalies are verified with experimental data. The performance of the interference detection algorithms is demonstrated through data collection in a shielded measurement chamber. Actual GPS signals in combination with interference sources such as narrowband, wideband and pulsed interference were broadcast in the chamber. Subsequently, case studies from continuous GPS monitoring are included and observed anomalies are discussed. The performance demonstration of the GPS anomalous event monitor is concluded with a

  11. HIGH RESOLUTION RESISTIVITY LEAK DETECTION DATA PROCESSING & EVALUATION MEHTODS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD JS

    2007-10-04

    This document has two purposes: {sm_bullet} Describe how data generated by High Resolution REsistivity (HRR) leak detection (LD) systems deployed during single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval operations are processed and evaluated. {sm_bullet} Provide the basic review requirements for HRR data when Hrr is deployed as a leak detection method during SST waste retrievals.

  12. On Anomalous Quark Triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous quark triangles with one axial and two vector currents are studied in special kinematics when one of the vector currents carries a soft momentum. According to the Adler-Bardeen theorem the anomalous longitudinal part of the triangle is not renormalized in the chiral limit. We show that perturbative corrections the transversal part of the triangle is also absent. This nonrenormalization, in difference with the longitudinal part, holds on only perturbatively.

  13. Post-processing for improving hyperspectral anomaly detection accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jee-Cheng; Jiang, Chi-Ming; Huang, Chen-Liang

    2015-10-01

    Anomaly detection is an important topic in the exploitation of hyperspectral data. Based on the Reed-Xiaoli (RX) detector and a morphology operator, this research proposes a novel technique for improving the accuracy of hyperspectral anomaly detection. Firstly, the RX-based detector is used to process a given input scene. Then, a post-processing scheme using morphology operator is employed to detect those pixels around high-scoring anomaly pixels. Tests were conducted using two real hyperspectral images with ground truth information and the results based on receiver operating characteristic curves, illustrated that the proposed method reduced the false alarm rates of the RXbased detector.

  14. Sequential Detection of Fission Processes for Harbor Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Walston, S E; Chambers, D H

    2015-02-12

    With the large increase in terrorist activities throughout the world, the timely and accurate detection of special nuclear material (SNM) has become an extremely high priority for many countries concerned with national security. The detection of radionuclide contraband based on their γ-ray emissions has been attacked vigorously with some interesting and feasible results; however, the fission process of SNM has not received as much attention due to its inherent complexity and required predictive nature. In this paper, on-line, sequential Bayesian detection and estimation (parameter) techniques to rapidly and reliably detect unknown fissioning sources with high statistical confidence are developed.

  15. Dual left anterior descending artery with anomalous origin of long LAD from pulmonary artery - rare coronary anomaly detected on computed tomography coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Aditi; Narula, Harneet

    2016-01-01

    Dual left anterior descending artery is a rare coronary artery anomaly showing two left anterior descending arteries. Short anterior descending artery usually arises from the left coronary artery, while long anterior descending artery has anomalous origin and course. Dual left anterior descending artery with origin of long anterior descending artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a very rare coronary artery anomaly which has not been reported previously in the literature. We present the computed tomography coronary angiographic findings of this rare case in a young female patient who presented with atypical chest pain. PMID:27413266

  16. Detecting link failures in complex network processes using remote monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhal, R.; Abad Torres, J.; Roy, S.

    2015-11-01

    We study whether local structural changes in a complex network can be distinguished from passive remote time-course measurements of the network's dynamics. Specifically the detection of link failures in a network synchronization process from noisy measurements at a single network component is considered. By phrasing the detection task as a Maximum A Posteriori Probability hypothesis testing problem, we are able to obtain conditions under which the detection is (1) improved over the a priori and (2) asymptotically perfect, in terms of the network spectrum and graph. We find that, in the case where the detector has knowledge of the network's state, perfect detection is possible under general connectivity conditions regardless of the measurement location. When the detector does not have state knowledge, a remote signature permits improved but not perfect detection, under the same connectivity conditions. At its essence, detectability is achieved because of the close connection between a network's topology, its eigenvalues and local response characteristics.

  17. Multiple populations in the Sagittarius nuclear cluster M 54 and in other anomalous globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    M 54 is the central cluster of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. This stellar system is now in process of being disrupted by the tidal interaction with the Milky Way and represents one of the building blocks of the Galactic Halo. Recent discoveries, based on the synergy of photometry and spectroscopy have revealed that the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of some massive, anomalous, Globular Clusters (GCs) host stellar populations with different content of heavy elements. In this paper, I use multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry to detect and characterize multiple stellar populations in M 54. I provide empirical evidence that this GC shares photometric and spectroscopic similarities with the class of anomalous GCs. These findings make it tempting to speculate that, similarly to Sagittarius nuclear cluster M 54, other anomalous GCs were born in an extra-Galactic environment.

  18. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  19. Analysis of quantitative phase detection based on optical information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wang; Tu, Jiang-Chen; Chun, Kuang-Tao; Yu, Han-Wang; Xin, Du

    2009-07-01

    Phase object exists widely in nature, such as biological cells, optical components, atmospheric flow field and so on. The phase detection of objects has great significance in the basic research, nondestructive testing, aerospace, military weapons and other areas. The usual methods of phase object detection include interference method, grating method, schlieren method, and phase-contrast method etc. These methods have their own advantages, but they also have some disadvantages on detecting precision, environmental requirements, cost, detection rate, detection range, detection linearity in various applications, even the most sophisticated method-phase contrast method mainly used in microscopic structure, lacks quantitative analysis of the size of the phase of the object and the relationship between the image contrast and the optical system. In this paper, various phase detection means and the characteristics of different applications are analyzed based on the optical information processing, and a phase detection system based on optical filtering is formed. Firstly the frequency spectrum of the phase object is achieved by Fourier transform lens in the system, then the frequency spectrum is changed reasonably by the filter, at last the image which can represent the phase distribution through light intensity is achieved by the inverse Fourier transform. The advantages and disadvantages of the common used filters such as 1/4 wavelength phase filter, high-pass filter and edge filter are analyzed, and their phase resolution is analyzed in the same optical information processing system, and the factors impacting phase resolution are pointed out. The paper draws a conclusion that there exists an optimal filter which makes the detect accuracy best for any application. At last, we discussed how to design an optimal filter through which the ability of the phase testing of optical information processing system can be improved most.

  20. Landscape Measures of Rangeland Condition in the BLM Owyhee Pilot Project: Shrub Canopy Mapping, Vegetation Classification, and Detection of Anomalous Land Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Tagestad, Jerry D.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2007-12-28

    In 2006, the BLM tasked PNNL to collaborate in research being conducted under the Owyhee Uplands Pilot Project to assess rangeland condition. The objective of this effort was to provide Owyhee Uplands Pilot Project with a sophisticated suite of data and tools to assist in evaluating the health and condition of the Owyhee Uplands study area. We focused on three technical areas. The first involved enhancing existing algorithms to estimate shrub canopy cover in the Lower Reynolds Creek Watershed. The second task involved developing and applying a strategy to assess and compare three vegetation map products for the Idaho portion of the Owyhee study area. The third task developed techniques and data that can be used to identify areas exhibiting anomalous rangeland conditions (for example exotic plants or excessive bare soil exposure). This report documents the methods used, results obtained, and conclusions drawn.

  1. Anomalous spectral dependence of optical polarization and its impact on spin detection in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Puttisong, Y.; Huang, Y. Q.; Buyanova, I. A.; Chen, W. M.; Yang, X. J.; Subagyo, A.; Sueoka, K.; Murayama, A.

    2014-09-29

    We show that circularly polarized emission light from InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) ensembles under optical spin injection from an adjacent GaAs layer can switch its helicity depending on emission wavelengths and optical excitation density. We attribute this anomalous behavior to simultaneous contributions from both positive and negative trions and a lower number of photo-excited holes than electrons being injected into the QDs due to trapping of holes at ionized acceptors and a lower hole mobility. Our results call for caution in reading out electron spin polarization by optical polarization of the QD ensembles and also provide a guideline in improving efficiency of spin light emitting devices that utilize QDs.

  2. Using support vector machines for anomalous change detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Steinwart, Ingo; Llamocca, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We cast anomalous change detection as a binary classification problem, and use a support vector machine (SVM) to build a detector that does not depend on assumptions about the underlying data distribution. To speed up the computation, our SVM is implemented, in part, on a graphical processing unit. Results on real and simulated anomalous changes are used to compare performance to algorithms which effectively assume a Gaussian distribution. In this paper, we investigate the use of support vector machines (SVMs) with radial basis kernels for finding anomalous changes. Compared to typical applications of SVMs, we are operating in a regime of very low false alarm rate. This means that even for relatively large training sets, the data are quite meager in the regime of operational interest. This drives us to use larger training sets, which in turn places more of a computational burden on the SVM. We initially considered three different approaches to to address the need to work in the very low false alarm rate regime. The first is a standard SVM which is trained at one threshold (where more reliable estimates of false alarm rates are possible) and then re-thresholded for the low false alarm rate regime. The second uses the same thresholding approach, but employs a so-called least squares SVM; here a quadratic (instead of a hinge-based) loss function is employed, and for this model, there are good theoretical arguments in favor of adjusting the threshold in a straightforward manner. The third approach employs a weighted support vector machine, where the weights for the two types of errors (false alarm and missed detection) are automatically adjusted to achieve the desired false alarm rate. We have found in previous experiments (not shown here) that the first two types can in some cases work well, while in other cases they do not. This renders both approaches unreliable for automated change detection. By contrast, the third approach reliably produces good results, but at

  3. Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaerna, T; Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2007-02-09

    The principal objective of this two-year study is to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection/location using array processing. We address a strategy to obtain significantly improved precision in the location of low-magnitude events compared with current fully-automatic approaches, combined with a low false alarm rate. We have developed and evaluated a prototype automatic system which uses as a basis regional array processing with fixed, carefully calibrated, site-specific parameters in conjuction with improved automatic phase onset time estimation. We have in parallel developed tools for Matched Field Processing for optimized detection and source-region identification of seismic signals. This narrow-band procedure aims to mitigate some of the causes of difficulty encountered using the standard array processing system, specifically complicated source-time histories of seismic events and shortcomings in the plane-wave approximation for seismic phase arrivals at regional arrays.

  4. Advanced Information Processing System - Fault detection and error handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is designed to provide a fault tolerant and damage tolerant data processing architecture for a broad range of aerospace vehicles, including tactical and transport aircraft, and manned and autonomous spacecraft. A proof-of-concept (POC) system is now in the detailed design and fabrication phase. This paper gives an overview of a preliminary fault detection and error handling philosophy in AIPS.

  5. Detection of hazelnut in foods using ELISA: challenges related to the detectability in processed foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Cucu, Tatiana; Devreese, Bart; Trashin, Stanislav; Kerkaert, Barbara; Rogge, Maarten; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Hazelnuts are widely used nowadays, and can pose a serious threat to allergic consumers due to cross-contamination that may occur during processing. This might lead to the presence of hidden hazelnut in foods. Therefore, reliable tests are needed to detect hazelnut, especially in processed foods. A hazelnut-specific indirect competitive ELISA based on polyclonal chicken antibodies was developed. The polyclonal antibodies were raised against modified hazelnut proteins in order to improve the detectability of hazelnut proteins in processed foods. The assay showed a detection limit of 1.36 microg hazelnut protein/mL of 5 mM urea in phosphate-buffered saline buffer (pH 7.4). Limited cross-reactivity with walnut and pecan nut was observed; no cross-reactivity was observed with other food ingredients. Blank cookies spiked before analysis showed recoveries of 73-107%. However, cookies spiked before baking showed that the detectability was severely decreased. Addition of lactose to the cookies, which led to more severe modification through the Maillard reaction, led to an increase in the detectability. These results indicate that using antibodies developed toward allergens modified through food processing-simulating reactions is a better approach for detection. PMID:22468353

  6. Comparison of formant detection methods used in speech processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belean, Bogdan

    2013-11-01

    The paper describes time frequency representations of speech signal together with the formant significance in speech processing applications. Speech formants can be used in emotion recognition, sex discrimination or diagnosing different neurological diseases. Taking into account the various applications of formant detection in speech signal, two methods for detecting formants are presented. First, the poles resulted after a complex analysis of LPC coefficients are used for formants detection. The second approach uses the Kalman filter for formant prediction along the speech signal. Results are presented for both approaches on real life speech spectrograms. A comparison regarding the features of the proposed methods is also performed, in order to establish which method is more suitable in case of different speech processing applications.

  7. Asynchronous Processing of a Constellation of Geostationary and Polar-Orbiting Satellites for Fire Detection and Smoke Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyer, E. J.; Peterson, D. A.; Curtis, C. A.; Schmidt, C. C.; Hoffman, J.; Prins, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Fire Locating and Monitoring of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) system converts satellite observations of thermally anomalous pixels into spatially and temporally continuous estimates of smoke release from open biomass burning. This system currently processes data from a constellation of 5 geostationary and 2 polar-orbiting sensors. Additional sensors, including NPP VIIRS and the imager on the Korea COMS-1 geostationary satellite, will soon be added. This constellation experiences schedule changes and outages of various durations, making the set of available scenes for fire detection highly variable on an hourly and daily basis. Adding to the complexity, the latency of the satellite data is variable between and within sensors. FLAMBE shares with many fire detection systems the goal of detecting as many fires as possible as early as possible, but the FLAMBE system must also produce a consistent estimate of smoke production with minimal artifacts from the changing constellation. To achieve this, NRL has developed a system of asynchronous processing and cross-calibration that permits satellite data to be used as it arrives, while preserving the consistency of the smoke emission estimates. This talk describes the asynchronous data ingest methodology, including latency statistics for the constellation. We also provide an overview and show results from the system we have developed to normalize multi-sensor fire detection for consistency.

  8. Processing bronchial sonograms to detect respiratory cycle fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh; Zhdanov, D. S.; Zemlyakov, I. Yu; Svetlik, M. V.

    2014-10-01

    This article describes the authors' results of work on the development of a method for the automated assessment of the state of the human bronchopulmonary system based on acoustic data. In particular, the article covers the method of detecting breath sounds on bronchial sonograms obtained during the auscultation process.

  9. Signal processing techniques for clutter filtering and wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Deshpande, Manohar D

    1991-01-01

    An extended Prony algorithm applicable to signal processing techniques for clutter filtering and windshear detection is discussed. The algorithm is based upon modelling the radar return as a time series, and appears to offer potential for improving hazard factor estimates in the presence of strong clutter returns.

  10. Analytical solutions for anomalous dispersion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, D.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2014-06-01

    Groundwater flow and transport often occur in a highly heterogeneous environment (potentially heterogeneous at multiple spatial scales) and is impacted by geochemical reactions, advection, diffusion, and other pore scale processes. All these factors can give rise to large-scale anomalous dispersive behavior that can make complex model representation and prediction of plume concentrations challenging due to difficulties unraveling all the complexities associated with the governing processes, flow medium, and their parameters. An alternative is to use upscaled stochastic models of anomalous dispersion, and this is the approach used here. Within a probabilistic framework, we derive a number of analytical solutions for several anomalous dispersion models. The anomalous dispersion models are allowed to be either non-Gaussian (α-stable Lévy), correlated, or nonstationary from the Lagrangian perspective. A global sensitivity analysis is performed to gain a greater understanding of the extent to which uncertainty in the parameters associated with the anomalous behavior can be narrowed by examining concentration measurements from a network of monitoring wells and to demonstrate the computational speed of the solutions. The developed analytical solutions are encoded and available for use in the open source computational framework MADS (http://mads.lanl.gov).

  11. Image processing and fusion to detect navigation obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yamada, Kimio

    1998-07-01

    Helicopters flying at low altitude in the visual flight rules often crash against obstacles such as a power transmission line. This paper describes the image sensors to detect obstacles and the several image processing techniques to derive and enhance the targets in the images. The images including obstacles were collected both on the ground and by air using an infrared (IR) camera and a color video camera in different backgrounds, distances, and weather conditions. Collected results revealed that IR images have an advantage over color images to detect obstacles in many environments. Several image processing techniques have been evaluated to improve the qualities of collected images. For example, fusion of IR and color images, several filters, such as the Median filter or the adaptive filter have been tested. Information that the target is thin and long, which characterizes the shape of power lines, has been introduced to derive power lines. It has been shown that these processes can greatly reduce the noise and enhance the contrast, no matter how the background is. It has also been demonstrated that there is a good prospect that these processes will help develop the algorithm for automatic obstacle detection and warning.

  12. Colored models for anomalous nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.J.S.; Saly, R.; Romo, W.J.; Sundaresan, M.K.; Campbell, B.; Elias, V.

    1983-04-01

    There seems to be good experimental evidence that anomalous nuclei are produced in heavy-ion collisions; they are anomalous in that they have an abnormally short mean free path, for example, in nuclear emulsions. Here we consider the possibility that anomalous nuclei are combinations of a colored anomalous particle fragment (based on theories with spontaneous breakdown of color symmetry) with ordinary nucleons. Phenomenological implications of various possible models in which the anomalous particle fragment is considered to be a colored particle with the color symmetry SU(3)/sub c/ explicitly broken are given.

  13. Detection, information fusion, and temporal processing for intelligence in recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.

    1996-12-31

    The use of intelligence in vision recognition uses many different techniques or tools. This presentation discusses several of these techniques for recognition. The recognition process is generally separated into several steps or stages when implemented in hardware, e.g. detection, segmentation and enhancement, and recognition. Several new distortion-invariant filters, biologically-inspired Gabor wavelet filter techniques, and morphological operations that have been found very useful for detection and clutter rejection are discussed. These are all shift-invariant operations that allow multiple object regions of interest in a scene to be located in parallel. We also discuss new algorithm fusion concepts by which the results from different detection algorithms are combined to reduce detection false alarms; these fusion methods utilize hierarchical processing and fuzzy logic concepts. We have found this to be most necessary, since no single detection algorithm is best for all cases. For the final recognition stage, we describe a new method of representing all distorted versions of different classes of objects and determining the object class and pose that most closely matches that of a given input. Besides being efficient in terms of storage and on-line computations required, it overcomes many of the problems that other classifiers have in terms of the required training set size, poor generalization with many hidden layer neurons, etc. It is also attractive in its ability to reject input regions as clutter (non-objects) and to learn new object descriptions. We also discuss its use in processing a temporal sequence of input images of the contents of each local region of interest. We note how this leads to robust results in which estimation efforts in individual frames can be overcome. This seems very practical, since in many scenarios a decision need not be made after only one frame of data, since subsequent frames of data enter immediately in sequence.

  14. Process for the detection of micro-cracks

    DOEpatents

    Lapinski, Norman; Sather, Allen

    1979-01-01

    A process for the nondestructive testing of ceramic objects to detect the presence of defects and micro-cracks in the surface in which a solution of silver nitrate is applied to the surface of the object which penetrates into the surface defects, drying the object so that the silver nitrate remains in the defects, and preparing an X-ray radiograph whereby any defects and micro-cracks will appear in the radiograph.

  15. Process and apparatus for detecting presence of plant substances

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J.A.

    1990-12-31

    Disclosed is a process for detecting the presence of plant substances in a particular environment which comprises the steps of: (1) Measuring the background K40 gamma ray radiation level in a particular environment with a 1.46 MeV gamma ray counter system; (2) measuring the amount of K40 gamma ray radiation emanating from a package containing said plant substance being passed through said environment with said counter; and (3) generating an alarm signal when the total K40 gamma ray radiation reaches a predetermined level over and above the background level. Also disclosed is the apparatus and system used to conduct the process.

  16. Process and apparatus for detecting presence of plant substances

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for detecting the presence of plant substances in a particular environment which comprises the steps of: (1) Measuring the background K40 gamma ray radiation level in a particular environment with a 1.46 MeV gamma ray counter system; (2) measuring the amount of K40 gamma ray radiation emanating from a package containing said plant substance being passed through said environment with said counter; and (3) generating an alarm signal when the total K40 gamma ray radiation reaches a predetermined level over and above the background level. Also disclosed is the apparatus and system used to conduct the process.

  17. Interstellar Processes Leading to Molecular Deuterium Enrichment and Their Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large deuterium (D) enrichments in meteoritic materials indicate that interstellar organic materials survived incorporation into parent bodies within the forming Solar System. These enrichments are likelier due to one or more of four distinct astrochemical processes. These are (1) low temperature gas phase ion-molecule reactions; (2) low temperature gas-grain reactions; (3) gas phase unimolecular photodissociation, and (4) ultraviolet photolysis in D-enriched ice mantles. Each of these processes should be associated with molecular carriers having, distinct regiochemical signatures (D placement on the product molecules, correlation with specific chemical functionalities, etc.). These processes are reviewed and specific spectroscopic signatures for the detection of these processes in space are identified and described.

  18. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  19. Lunar Crescent Detection Based on Image Processing Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar, Mostafa; Moalem, Peyman; Badri, Mohamad Ali

    2014-11-01

    For many years lunar crescent visibility has been studied by many astronomers. Different criteria have been used to predict and evaluate the visibility status of new Moon crescents. Powerful equipment such as telescopes and binoculars have changed capability of observations. Most of conventional statistical criteria made wrong predictions when new observations (based on modern equipment) were reported. In order to verify such reports and modify criteria, not only previous statistical parameters should be considered but also some new and effective parameters like high magnification, contour effect, low signal to noise, eyestrain and weather conditions should be viewed. In this paper a new method is presented for lunar crescent detection based on processing of lunar crescent images. The method includes two main steps, first, an image processing algorithm that improves signal to noise ratio and detects lunar crescents based on circular Hough transform (CHT). Second using an algorithm based on image histogram processing to detect the crescent visually. Final decision is made by comparing the results of visual and CHT algorithms. In order to evaluate the proposed method, a database, including 31 images are tested. The illustrated method can distinguish and extract the crescent that even the eye can't recognize. Proposed method significantly reduces artifacts, increases SNR and can be used easily by both groups astronomers and who want to develop a new criterion as a reliable method to verify empirical observation.

  20. RSRM Nozzle Anomalous Throat Erosion Investigation Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Wendel, Gary M.

    1998-01-01

    In September, 1996, anomalous pocketing erosion was observed in the aft end of the throat ring of the nozzle of one of the reusable solid rocket motors (RSRM 56B) used on NASA's space transportation system (STS) mission 79. The RSRM throat ring is constructed of bias tape-wrapped carbon cloth/ phenolic (CCP) ablative material. A comprehensive investigation revealed necessary and sufficient conditions for occurrence of the pocketing event and provided rationale that the solid rocket motors for the subsequent mission, STS-80, were safe to fly. The nozzles of both of these motors also exhibited anomalous erosion similar to, but less extensive than that observed on STS-79. Subsequent to this flight, the investigation to identify both the specific causes and the corrective actions for elimination of the necessary and sufficient conditions for the pocketing erosion was intensified. A detailed fault tree approach was utilized to examine potential material and process contributors to the anomalous performance. The investigation involved extensive constituent and component material property testing, pedigree assessments, supplier audits, process audits, full scale processing test article fabrication and evaluation, thermal and thermostructural analyses, nondestructive evaluation, and material performance tests conducted using hot fire simulation in laboratory test beds and subscale and full scale solid rocket motor static test firings. This presentation will provide an over-view of the observed anomalous nozzle erosion and the comprehensive, fault-tree based investigation conducted to resolve this issue.

  1. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-21

    Capacitance-voltage (C–V) and capacitance-frequency (C–f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C–V anomalous) is observed in the C–V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C–V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO{sub 2} interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60–0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti{sup 3+} ions. Both the C–V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  2. Ability of NCAR RegCM2 in reproducing the dominant physical processes during the anomalous rainfall episodes in the summer of 1991 over the Yangtze-Huaihe valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zhao, Y. C.; Ding, Y. H.

    2002-03-01

    The excessively torrential rainfall over the Yangtze-Huaihe valley during the summer of 1991 is simulated with an updated version of the second generation NCAR regional climate model (RegCM2) as a case study to evaluate the model's performance in reproducing the daily precipitation and the associated physical factors contributing to the generation of the anomalous rainfall. This simulation is driven by large-scale atmospheric lateral boundary conditions derived from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) analysis. The simulation period is May to August 1991. The model domain covers East Asia and its adjacent oceanic regions, The model resolution is 60 km x 60 km in the horizontal and 23 layers in the vertical. The model can reasonably reproduce the daily precipitation events over East Asia for the summer of 1991, especially in the Yangtze-Huaihe valley where the anomalous rainfall occurred. The spatial and temporal structure of some important physical variables and processes related to the generation of the anomalous rainfall are analyzed, The time evolution of simulated upward vertical motion and horizontal convergence agrees with the five rainfall episodes over this subregion. The water vapor feeding the rainfall is mostly transported by the horizontal atmospheric motions from outside of the region rather than from local sources. The subtropical high over the western Pacific Ocean controls the progress and retreat of the summer monsoon over East Asia, and the RegCM2 can simulate the northward migration and southward retreat of subtropical high over the western Pacific Ocean. Furthermore, the model can represent the daily variation of the low level jet, which is crucial in the water vapor transport to the Yangtze-Huaihe valley.

  3. Processing Ocean Images to Detect Large Drift Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veenstra, Tim

    2009-01-01

    A computer program processes the digitized outputs of a set of downward-looking video cameras aboard an aircraft flying over the ocean. The purpose served by this software is to facilitate the detection of large drift nets that have been lost, abandoned, or jettisoned. The development of this software and of the associated imaging hardware is part of a larger effort to develop means of detecting and removing large drift nets before they cause further environmental damage to the ocean and to shores on which they sometimes impinge. The software is capable of near-realtime processing of as many as three video feeds at a rate of 30 frames per second. After a user sets the parameters of an adjustable algorithm, the software analyzes each video stream, detects any anomaly, issues a command to point a high-resolution camera toward the location of the anomaly, and, once the camera has been so aimed, issues a command to trigger the camera shutter. The resulting high-resolution image is digitized, and the resulting data are automatically uploaded to the operator s computer for analysis.

  4. System and process for detecting and monitoring surface defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Mark K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A system and process for detecting and monitoring defects in large surfaces such as the field joints of the container segments of a space shuttle booster motor. Beams of semi-collimated light from three non-parallel fiber optic light panels are directed at a region of the surface at non-normal angles of expected incidence. A video camera gathers some portion of the light that is reflected at an angle other than the angle of expected reflectance, and generates signals which are analyzed to discern defects in the surface. The analysis may be performed by visual inspection of an image on a video monitor, or by inspection of filtered or otherwise processed images. In one alternative embodiment, successive predetermined regions of the surface are aligned with the light source before illumination, thereby permitting efficient detection of defects in a large surface. Such alignment is performed by using a line scan gauge to sense the light which passes through an aperture in the surface. In another embodiment a digital map of the surface is created, thereby permitting the maintenance of records detailing changes in the location or size of defects as the container segment is refurbished and re-used. The defect detection apparatus may also be advantageously mounted on a fixture which engages the edge of a container segment.

  5. Network Detection in Raster Data Using Marked Point Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Kruse, C.; Rottensteiner, F.; Soergel, U.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new approach for the automatic detection of network structures in raster data. The model for the network structure is represented by a graph whose nodes and edges correspond to junction-points and to connecting line segments, respectively; nodes and edges are further described by certain parameters. We embed this model in the probabilistic framework of marked point processes and determine the most probable configuration of objects by stochastic sampling. That is, different graph configurations are constructed randomly by modifying the graph entity parameters, by adding and removing nodes and edges to/ from the current graph configuration. Each configuration is then evaluated based on the probabilities of the changes and an energy function describing the conformity with a predefined model. By using the Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler, a global optimum of the energy function is determined. We apply our method to the detection of river and tidal channel networks in digital terrain models. In comparison to our previous work, we introduce constraints concerning the flow direction of water into the energy function. Our goal is to analyse the influence of different parameter settings on the results of network detection in both, synthetic and real data. Our results show the general potential of our method for the detection of river networks in different types of terrain.

  6. Remote sensing and characterization of anomalous debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Beavers, W.; Lambour, R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Kansky, J.; Stansbery, E.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of orbital debris data shows a band of anomalously high debris concentration in the altitude range between 800 and 1000 km. Analysis indicates that the origin is the leaking coolant fluid from nuclear power sources that powered a now defunct Soviet space-based series of ocean surveillance satellites. A project carried out to detect, track and characterize a sample of the anomalous debris is reported. The nature of the size and shape of the sample set, and the possibility of inferring the composition of the droplets were assessed. The technique used to detect, track and characterize the sample set is described and the results of the characterization analysis are presented. It is concluded that the nature of the debris is consistent with leaked Na-K fluid, although this cannot be proved with the remote sensing techniques used.

  7. Apparatus and process for microbial detection and enumeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Grana, D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus and process for detecting and enumerating specific microorganisms from large volume samples containing small numbers of the microorganisms is presented. The large volume samples are filtered through a membrane filter to concentrate the microorganisms. The filter is positioned between two absorbent pads and previously moistened with a growth medium for the microorganisms. A pair of electrodes are disposed against the filter and the pad electrode filter assembly is retained within a petri dish by retainer ring. The cover is positioned on base of petri dish and sealed at the edges by a parafilm seal prior to being electrically connected via connectors to a strip chart recorder for detecting and enumerating the microorganisms collected on filter.

  8. Respiratory rate detection algorithms by photoplethysmography signal processing.

    PubMed

    Lee, E M; Kim, N H; Trang, N T; Hong, J H; Cha, E J; Lee, T S

    2008-01-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) offers the clinically meaningful parameters, such as, heart rate, and respiratory rate. In this study, we presented three respiratory signal detection algorithms using photoplethysmography raw data generated from commercial PPG sensor: (1)Min-Max (2)Peak-to-Peak (3)Pulse Shape. As reference signal, nasal sensor signal was acquired simultaneously and compared and analyzed. We used two types of moving average filtering technique to process three PPG parameters. In laboratory experiment, 6 subjects' PPG signals were measured when they respire ten and fifteen, and arbitrary times per minute. From the results, following conclusions were drawn. Min-Max and Peak-to-Peak algorithms perform better than Pulse shape algorithm. They can be used to detect respiratory rate. But, Pulse Shape algorithm was accurate for subject 4 only. More experimental data is necessary to improve the accuracy and reliability. PMID:19162865

  9. Beta function and anomalous dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-orders beta-function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the 2-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows us to determine the anomalous dimension of the fermion masses at the infrared fixed point, and the resulting values compare well with the lattice determinations.

  10. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  11. Process and apparatus for detecting presence of plant substances

    DOEpatents

    Kirby, John A.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and process for detecting the presence of plant substances in a particular environment which comprises the steps of: measuring the background K40 gamma ray radiation level in a particular environment with a 1.46 MeV gamma ray counter system; measuring the amount of K40 gamma ray radiation emanating from a package containing a plant substance being passed through an environment with a counter; and generating an alarm signal when the total K40 gamma ray radiation reaches a predetermined level over and above the background level.

  12. Atomic force microscopy to detect internal live processes in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukin, M. E.; Guz, N. V.; Vasilyev, S.; Sokolov, I.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study surface oscillations coming from internal live processes of insects. With a specially designed AFM stage to keep an insect motion partially restricted, the AFM can record internal oscillations on different parts of the insect. We demonstrate the method for a fly, mosquito, and lady beetle. We show that AFM can provide information about the spectral behavior that has not been studied so far, 10-600 Hz range, detecting amplitudes down to subnanometer level.

  13. Process and apparatus for detecting presence of plant substances

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J.A.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes an apparatus and process for detecting the presence of plant substances in a particular environment. It comprises: measuring the background K40 gamma ray radiation level in a particular environment with a 1.46 MeV gamma ray counter system; measuring the amount of K40 gamma ray radiation emanating from a package containing a plant substance being passed through an environment with a counter; and generating an alarm signal when the total K40 gamma ray radiation reaches a predetermined level over and above the background level.

  14. Signal processing techniques for atrial fibrillation source detection.

    PubMed

    Ambadkar, Minal; Leonelli, Fabio M; Sankar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    In clinical practice, Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most common and critical cardiac arrhythmia encountered. The treatment that can ensure permanent AF removal is catheter ablation, where cardiologists destroy the affected cardiac muscle cells with RF or Laser. In this procedure it is necessary to know exactly from which part of the heart AF triggers are originated. Various signal processing algorithms provide a strong tool to track AF sources. This study proposes, signal processing techniques that can be exploited for characterization, analysis and source detection of AF signals. These algorithms are implemented on Electrocardiogram (ECG) and intracardiac signals which contain important information that allows the analysis of anatomic and physiologic aspects of the whole cardiac muscle. PMID:25570578

  15. Bisous model-Detecting filamentary patterns in point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, E.; Stoica, R. S.; Kipper, R.; Saar, E.

    2016-07-01

    The cosmic web is a highly complex geometrical pattern, with galaxy clusters at the intersection of filaments and filaments at the intersection of walls. Identifying and describing the filamentary network is not a trivial task due to the overwhelming complexity of the structure, its connectivity and the intrinsic hierarchical nature. To detect and quantify galactic filaments we use the Bisous model, which is a marked point process built to model multi-dimensional patterns. The Bisous filament finder works directly with the galaxy distribution data and the model intrinsically takes into account the connectivity of the filamentary network. The Bisous model generates the visit map (the probability to find a filament at a given point) together with the filament orientation field. Using these two fields, we can extract filament spines from the data. Together with this paper we publish the computer code for the Bisous model that is made available in GitHub. The Bisous filament finder has been successfully used in several cosmological applications and further development of the model will allow to detect the filamentary network also in photometric redshift surveys, using the full redshift posterior. We also want to encourage the astro-statistical community to use the model and to connect it with all other existing methods for filamentary pattern detection and characterisation.

  16. Gaussian Process for Activity Modeling and Anomaly Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.; Rosenhahn, B.; Yang, M. Ying

    2015-08-01

    Complex activity modeling and identification of anomaly is one of the most interesting and desired capabilities for automated video behavior analysis. A number of different approaches have been proposed in the past to tackle this problem. There are two main challenges for activity modeling and anomaly detection: 1) most existing approaches require sufficient data and supervision for learning; 2) the most interesting abnormal activities arise rarely and are ambiguous among typical activities, i.e. hard to be precisely defined. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to model complex activities and detect anomalies by using non-parametric Gaussian Process (GP) models in a crowded and complicated traffic scene. In comparison with parametric models such as HMM, GP models are nonparametric and have their advantages. Our GP models exploit implicit spatial-temporal dependence among local activity patterns. The learned GP regression models give a probabilistic prediction of regional activities at next time interval based on observations at present. An anomaly will be detected by comparing the actual observations with the prediction at real time. We verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed model on the QMUL Junction Dataset. Furthermore, we provide a publicly available manually labeled ground truth of this data set.

  17. Flashing anomalous color contrast.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2004-01-01

    A new visual phenomenon that we call flashing anomalous color contrast is described. This phenomenon arises from the interaction between a gray central disk and a chromatic annulus surrounded by black radial lines. In an array of such figures, the central gray disk no longer appears gray, but assumes a color complementary to that of the surrounding annulus. The induced color appears: (1) vivid and saturated; (2) self-luminous, not a surface property; (3) flashing with eye or stimulus movement; (4) floating out of its confines; and (5) stronger in extrafoveal than in foveal vision. The strength of the effect depends on the number, length, width, and luminance contrast of the radial lines. The results suggest that the chromatic ring bounding the inner tips of the black radial lines induces simultaneous color contrast, whereas the radial lines elicit, in conjunction with the gray disk and the ring, the flashing, vividness, and high saturation of the effect. The stimulus properties inducing the illusion suggest that flashing anomalous color contrast may be based on asynchronous interactions among multiple visual pathways. PMID:15518215

  18. Coherent detection and digital signal processing for fiber optic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Ezra

    The drive towards higher spectral efficiency in optical fiber systems has generated renewed interest in coherent detection. We review different detection methods, including noncoherent, differentially coherent, and coherent detection, as well as hybrid detection methods. We compare the modulation methods that are enabled and their respective performances in a linear regime. An important system parameter is the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) utilized in transmission. Polarization-multiplexed quadrature-amplitude modulation maximizes spectral efficiency and power efficiency as it uses all four available DOF contained in the two field quadratures in the two polarizations. Dual-polarization homodyne or heterodyne downconversion are linear processes that can fully recover the received signal field in these four DOF. When downconverted signals are sampled at the Nyquist rate, compensation of transmission impairments can be performed using digital signal processing (DSP). Software based receivers benefit from the robustness of DSP, flexibility in design, and ease of adaptation to time-varying channels. Linear impairments, including chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization-mode dispersion (PMD), can be compensated quasi-exactly using finite impulse response filters. In practical systems, sampling the received signal at 3/2 times the symbol rate is sufficient to enable an arbitrary amount of CD and PMD to be compensated for a sufficiently long equalizer whose tap length scales linearly with transmission distance. Depending on the transmitted constellation and the target bit error rate, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) should have around 5 to 6 bits of resolution. Digital coherent receivers are naturally suited for the implementation of feedforward carrier recovery, which has superior linewidth tolerance than phase-locked loops, and does not suffer from feedback delay constraints. Differential bit encoding can be used to prevent catastrophic receiver failure due

  19. Signal detection in FDA AERS database using Dirichlet process.

    PubMed

    Hu, Na; Huang, Lan; Tiwari, Ram C

    2015-08-30

    In the recent two decades, data mining methods for signal detection have been developed for drug safety surveillance, using large post-market safety data. Several of these methods assume that the number of reports for each drug-adverse event combination is a Poisson random variable with mean proportional to the unknown reporting rate of the drug-adverse event pair. Here, a Bayesian method based on the Poisson-Dirichlet process (DP) model is proposed for signal detection from large databases, such as the Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) database. Instead of using a parametric distribution as a common prior for the reporting rates, as is the case with existing Bayesian or empirical Bayesian methods, a nonparametric prior, namely, the DP, is used. The precision parameter and the baseline distribution of the DP, which characterize the process, are modeled hierarchically. The performance of the Poisson-DP model is compared with some other models, through an intensive simulation study using a Bayesian model selection and frequentist performance characteristics such as type-I error, false discovery rate, sensitivity, and power. For illustration, the proposed model and its extension to address a large amount of zero counts are used to analyze statin drugs for signals using the 2006-2011 AERS data. PMID:25924820

  20. Statistical method for detecting structural change in the growth process.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimoto, Atsushi

    2008-03-01

    Due to competition among individual trees and other exogenous factors that change the growth environment, each tree grows following its own growth trend with some structural changes in growth over time. In the present article, a new method is proposed to detect a structural change in the growth process. We formulate the method as a simple statistical test for signal detection without constructing any specific model for the structural change. To evaluate the p-value of the test, the tube method is developed because the regular distribution theory is insufficient. Using two sets of tree diameter growth data sampled from planted forest stands of Cryptomeria japonica in Japan, we conduct an analysis of identifying the effect of thinning on the growth process as a structural change. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method is useful to identify the structural change caused by thinning. We also provide the properties of the method in terms of the size and power of the test. PMID:17608782

  1. Diffraction tomographic signal processing algorithms for tunnel detection

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.

    1993-08-01

    Signal processing algorithms have been developed for wave based imaging using diffraction tomography. The basis for this image reconstruction procedure is the generalized projection slice theorem (GPST) which, for homogeneous waves, is an analytic relationship between the spatial Fourier transform of the acquired data and the spatial Fourier transform of the spatial profile (object function) of the object being imaged. Imaging within geophysical diffraction tomography when only homogeneous waves are considered can then be accomplished by inversion of the GPST using standard numerical techniques. In an attenuating background medium or when eddy currents or static fields are considered, a generalized GPST can be derived that involves both real and complex spatial frequencies. In this case, direct Fourier inversion is not possible because of the presence of the complex frequencies. Although direct inversion and, hence, complete imaging is not possible for such cases, the generalized CPST`S can be used to analytically shift the location of data templates matched to specified targets and these templates can, in turn, be correlated with acquired data to detect and estimate the location of the specified targets. Since GPST`s are used directly in the detection problem, there is no need to numerically invert the intergal transform of the object function. For this reason, target detection can be accomplished in a computationally efficient manner independent of the type of measurement or background geologic conditions. A number of GPST`s are derived and the use of GPST`s for both imaging and detection of subsurface voids is demonstrated in several recent applications.

  2. Single- and Dual-Process Models of Biased Contingency Detection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Decades of research in causal and contingency learning show that people’s estimations of the degree of contingency between two events are easily biased by the relative probabilities of those two events. If two events co-occur frequently, then people tend to overestimate the strength of the contingency between them. Traditionally, these biases have been explained in terms of relatively simple single-process models of learning and reasoning. However, more recently some authors have found that these biases do not appear in all dependent variables and have proposed dual-process models to explain these dissociations between variables. In the present paper we review the evidence for dissociations supporting dual-process models and we point out important shortcomings of this literature. Some dissociations seem to be difficult to replicate or poorly generalizable and others can be attributed to methodological artifacts. Overall, we conclude that support for dual-process models of biased contingency detection is scarce and inconclusive. PMID:27025532

  3. Effects of image processing on the detective quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Chang-Lae; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na

    2010-04-01

    Digital radiography has gained popularity in many areas of clinical practice. This transition brings interest in advancing the methodologies for image quality characterization. However, as the methodologies for such characterizations have not been standardized, the results of these studies cannot be directly compared. The primary objective of this study was to standardize methodologies for image quality characterization. The secondary objective was to evaluate affected factors to Modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) according to image processing algorithm. Image performance parameters such as MTF, NPS, and DQE were evaluated using the international electro-technical commission (IEC 62220-1)-defined RQA5 radiographic techniques. Computed radiography (CR) images of hand posterior-anterior (PA) for measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR), slit image for measuring MTF, white image for measuring NPS were obtained and various Multi-Scale Image Contrast Amplification (MUSICA) parameters were applied to each of acquired images. In results, all of modified images were considerably influence on evaluating SNR, MTF, NPS, and DQE. Modified images by the post-processing had higher DQE than the MUSICA=0 image. This suggests that MUSICA values, as a post-processing, have an affect on the image when it is evaluating for image quality. In conclusion, the control parameters of image processing could be accounted for evaluating characterization of image quality in same way. The results of this study could be guided as a baseline to evaluate imaging systems and their imaging characteristics by measuring MTF, NPS, and DQE.

  4. Real-Time Plasma Process Condition Sensing and Abnormal Process Detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2010-01-01

    The plasma process is often used in the fabrication of semiconductor wafers. However, due to the lack of real-time etching control, this may result in some unacceptable process performances and thus leads to significant waste and lower wafer yield. In order to maximize the product wafer yield, a timely and accurately process fault or abnormal detection in a plasma reactor is needed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is one of the most frequently used metrologies in in-situ process monitoring. Even though OES has the advantage of non-invasiveness, it is required to provide a huge amount of information. As a result, the data analysis of OES becomes a big challenge. To accomplish real-time detection, this work employed the sigma matching method technique, which is the time series of OES full spectrum intensity. First, the response model of a healthy plasma spectrum was developed. Then, we defined a matching rate as an indictor for comparing the difference between the tested wafers response and the health sigma model. The experimental results showed that this proposal method can detect process faults in real-time, even in plasma etching tools. PMID:22219683

  5. STIS MAMA Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the STIS FUV MAMA or NUV MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flags are used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of three separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high voltage ramp-up, and 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage followed by a fold analysis test {See STIS ISR 98-02R}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13150.

  6. COS NUV Detector Recovery after Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the NUV-MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high-voltage ramp-up, 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage, and 4} fold analysis test {See COS TIR 2010-01}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13129. Adjustments were made the the Software Global Monitor {SGM} to account for an increase in the dark counts due to window glow and to align the SGM to previously obtained Fold Analysis event data.

  7. COS NUV Detector Recovery After Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the NUV-MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMAâ??s health after an anomalous shutdown: signal processing electronics check, slow, intermediate voltage high-voltage ramp-up, ramp-up to full operating voltage, and fold analysis test {See COS TIR 2010-01}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 18 proposal 12430.

  8. COS NUV Detector Recovery After Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the NUV-MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMAâ_Ts health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high-voltage ramp-up, 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage, and 4} fold analysis test {See COS TIR 2010-01}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes almost the same steps as Cycle 19 proposal 12723. Adjustments were made the the Software Global Monitor {SGM} to account for an increase in the dark counts due to window glow and to align the SGM to previously obtained Fold Analysis event data.

  9. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage. The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, high-voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, 3} a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the nominal operating HV, and 4} fold analysis test. Each must be completed successfully before proceeding onto the next. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on Proposal 13163 from Cycle 20. For additional MAMA recovery information, see STIS ISR 98-02R.

  10. STIS MAMA Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the STIS FUV MAMA or NUV MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flags are used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of three separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMAâ_Ts health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high voltage ramp-up, and 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage followed by a fold analysis test {See STIS ISR 98-02R}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 19 proposal 12779.

  11. Process fault detection and nonlinear time series analysis for anomaly detection in safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.L.; Mullen, M.F.; Wangen, L.E.

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we discuss two advanced techniques, process fault detection and nonlinear time series analysis, and apply them to the analysis of vector-valued and single-valued time-series data. We investigate model-based process fault detection methods for analyzing simulated, multivariate, time-series data from a three-tank system. The model-predictions are compared with simulated measurements of the same variables to form residual vectors that are tested for the presence of faults (possible diversions in safeguards terminology). We evaluate two methods, testing all individual residuals with a univariate z-score and testing all variables simultaneously with the Mahalanobis distance, for their ability to detect loss of material from two different leak scenarios from the three-tank system: a leak without and with replacement of the lost volume. Nonlinear time-series analysis tools were compared with the linear methods popularized by Box and Jenkins. We compare prediction results using three nonlinear and two linear modeling methods on each of six simulated time series: two nonlinear and four linear. The nonlinear methods performed better at predicting the nonlinear time series and did as well as the linear methods at predicting the linear values.

  12. Anomalous reflections from the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givishvili, G. V.; Leshchenko, L. N.

    2013-09-01

    The existence of anomalous ionospheric reflections was shown on the basis of vertical soundings at the Moskow station. They are observed at heights of 100-200 km. These anomalous reflections are not related to the main Ne( h) ionospheric profile. Morphological characteristics of such reflections are presented: the daily, seasonal, and cyclic dependences of their appearance.

  13. Anomalous electrodynamic explosions in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, H.

    1986-06-01

    The recently reported Graneau experiments on electrodynamic explosions in liquids, which reveal anomalous longitudinal electrodynamic forces of the order of 10/sup 4/ times greater than expected, verify the need for a term in the law of electrodynamics that corresponds to the ion/electron mass ratio. This confirms an earlier theoretical interpretation of the anomalous cathode reaction forces found in the vacuum arc.

  14. Particle contamination formation and detection in magnetron sputtering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.; Weiss, C.A.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C.

    1996-10-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination can cause electrical shorting, pin holes, problems with photolithography, adhesion failure, as well as visual and cosmetic defects. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique that provides real-time, {ital in-situ} imaging of particles > 0.3 {mu}m in diameter. Using this technique, the causes, sources and influences on particles in plasma and non-plasma and non-plasma processes may be independently evaluated and corrected. Several studies employing laser light scattering have demonstrated both homogeneous and heterogeneous causes of particle contamination. In this paper, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. In this region, film redeposition is followed by filament or nodule growth and enhanced trapping which increases filament growth. Eventually the filaments effectively ``short circuit`` the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes heating failure of the filament fracturing and ejecting the filaments into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor (IC) fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests that this mechanism may be universal to many sputtering processes.

  15. Space–time-bounded quantum fields for detection processes

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo, Fernando J.; Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a quantum field detection model comprising two types of detection procedures: maximal detection, where the initial state of the system and detectors undergoes an irreversible evolution, and minimal detection, where the system–detector interaction consists of a small, reversible coupling and posterior maximal detection performed over the detector system. Combined, these detection procedures allow for a time-dependent description of signalling experiments involving yes/no type of questions. A particular minimal detection model, stable in the presence of the vacuum, is presented and studied, successfully reproducing the localization of the state after a detection. PMID:24711717

  16. Direct detection of DNA conformation in hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, George; Tsortos, Achilleas; Bender, Florian; Ferapontova, Elena E; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-02-21

    DNA hybridization studies at surfaces normally rely on the detection of mass changes as a result of the addition of the complementary strand. In this work we propose a mass-independent sensing principle based on the quantitative monitoring of the conformation of the immobilized single-strand probe and of the final hybridized product. This is demonstrated by using a label-free acoustic technique, the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D), and oligonucleotides of specific sequences which, upon hybridization, result in DNAs of various shapes and sizes. Measurements of the acoustic ratio ΔD/ΔF in combination with a "discrete molecule binding" approach are used to confirm the formation of straight hybridized DNA molecules of specific lengths (21, 75, and 110 base pairs); acoustic results are also used to distinguish between single- and double-stranded molecules as well as between same-mass hybridized products with different shapes, i.e., straight or "Y-shaped". Issues such as the effect of mono- and divalent cations to hybridization and the mechanism of the process (nucleation, kinetics) when it happens on a surface are carefully considered. Finally, this new sensing principle is applied to single-nucleotide polymorphism detection: a DNA hairpin probe hybridized to the p53 target gene gave products of distinct geometrical features depending on the presence or absence of the SNP, both readily distinguishable. Our results suggest that DNA conformation probing with acoustic wave sensors is a much more improved detection method over the popular mass-related, on/off techniques offering higher flexibility in the design of solid-phase hybridization assays. PMID:22248021

  17. Lightning Detection Efficiency Analysis Process: Modeling Based on Empirical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A ground based lightning detection system employs a grid of sensors, which record and evaluate the electromagnetic signal produced by a lightning strike. Several detectors gather information on that signal s strength, time of arrival, and behavior over time. By coordinating the information from several detectors, an event solution can be generated. That solution includes the signal s point of origin, strength and polarity. Determination of the location of the lightning strike uses algorithms based on long used techniques of triangulation. Determination of the event s original signal strength relies on the behavior of the generated magnetic field over distance and time. In general the signal from the event undergoes geometric dispersion and environmental attenuation as it progresses. Our knowledge of that radial behavior together with the strength of the signal received by detecting sites permits an extrapolation and evaluation of the original strength of the lightning strike. It also limits the detection efficiency (DE) of the network. For expansive grids and with a sparse density of detectors, the DE varies widely over the area served. This limits the utility of the network in gathering information on regional lightning strike density and applying it to meteorological studies. A network of this type is a grid of four detectors in the Rondonian region of Brazil. The service area extends over a million square kilometers. Much of that area is covered by rain forests. Thus knowledge of lightning strike characteristics over the expanse is of particular value. I have been developing a process that determines the DE over the region [3]. In turn, this provides a way to produce lightning strike density maps, corrected for DE, over the entire region of interest. This report offers a survey of that development to date and a record of present activity.

  18. Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2011-02-15

    The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

  19. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.

  20. Spectrum of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics describe an Abelian plasma where conduction and chiral currents are simultaneously present and constrained by the second law of thermodynamics. At high frequencies the magnetic currents play the leading role, and the spectrum is dominated by two-fluid effects. The system behaves instead as a single fluid in the low-frequency regime where the vortical currents induce potentially large hypermagnetic fields. After deriving the physical solutions of the generalized Appleton-Hartree equation, the corresponding dispersion relations are scrutinized and compared with the results valid for cold plasmas. Hypermagnetic knots and fluid vortices can be concurrently present at very low frequencies and suggest a qualitatively different dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities.

  1. A preamplification approach to GMO detection in processed foods.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, S; Cirillo, A; Di Bernardo, G; Galderisi, U; Cipollaro, M

    2010-03-01

    DNA is widely used as a target for GMO analysis because of its stability and high detectability. Real-time PCR is the method routinely used in most analytical laboratories due to its quantitative performance and great sensitivity. Accurate DNA detection and quantification is dependent on the specificity and sensitivity of the amplification protocol as well as on the quality and quantity of the DNA used in the PCR reaction. In order to enhance the sensitivity of real-time PCR and consequently expand the number of analyzable target genes, we applied a preamplification technique to processed foods where DNA can be present in low amounts and/or in degraded forms thereby affecting the reliability of qualitative and quantitative results. The preamplification procedure utilizes a pool of primers targeting genes of interest and is followed by real-time PCR reactions specific for each gene. An improvement of Ct values was found comparing preamplified vs. non-preamplified DNA. The strategy reported in the present study will be also applicable to other fields requiring quantitative DNA testing by real-time PCR. PMID:19823811

  2. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  3. Detecting geomorphic processes and change with high resolution topographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, Simon; Hurst, Martin; Grieve, Stuart; Clubb, Fiona; Milodowski, David; Attal, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    The first global topographic dataset was released in 1996, with 1 km grid spacing. It is astonishing that in only 20 years we now have access to tens of thousands of square kilometres of LiDAR data at point densities greater than 5 points per square meter. This data represents a treasure trove of information that our geomorphic predecessors could only dream of. But what are we to do with this data? Here we explore the potential of high resolution topographic data to dig deeper into geomorphic processes across a wider range of landscapes and using much larger spatial coverage than previously possible. We show how this data can be used to constrain sediment flux relationships using relief and hillslope length, and how this data can be used to detect landscape transience. We show how the nonlinear sediment flux law, proposed for upland, soil mantled landscapes by Roering et al. (1999) is consistent with a number of topographic tests. This flux law allows us to predict how landscapes will respond to tectonic forcing, and we show how these predictions can be used to detect erosion rate perturbations across a range of tectonic settings.

  4. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  5. Techniques of EMG signal analysis: detection, processing, classification and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M.S.; Mohd-Yasin, F.

    2006-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) signals can be used for clinical/biomedical applications, Evolvable Hardware Chip (EHW) development, and modern human computer interaction. EMG signals acquired from muscles require advanced methods for detection, decomposition, processing, and classification. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the various methodologies and algorithms for EMG signal analysis to provide efficient and effective ways of understanding the signal and its nature. We further point up some of the hardware implementations using EMG focusing on applications related to prosthetic hand control, grasp recognition, and human computer interaction. A comparison study is also given to show performance of various EMG signal analysis methods. This paper provides researchers a good understanding of EMG signal and its analysis procedures. This knowledge will help them develop more powerful, flexible, and efficient applications. PMID:16799694

  6. Tests of anomalous quartic couplings at the Next Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Éboli, O. J. P.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Mizukoshi, J. K.

    1998-08-01

    We analyze the potential of the Next Linear e+e- Collider to study anomalous quartic vector-boson interactions through the processes e+e--->W+W-Z and ZZZ. In the framework of SU(2)L⊗U(1)Y chiral Lagrangians, we examine all effective operators of order p4 that lead to four-gauge-boson interactions but do not induce anomalous trilinear vertices. In our analysis, we take into account the decay of the vector bosons to fermions and evaluate the efficiency in their reconstruction. We obtain the bounds that can be placed on the anomalous quartic interactions and we study the strategies to distinguish the possible couplings.

  7. Optimizing Urine Processing Protocols for Protein and Metabolite Detection

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Nazema Y; DuBois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Will, Thompson J; Grenier, Carole; Burke, Emily; Fraser, Matthew O; Amundsen, Cindy L; Murphy, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Background In urine, factors such as timing of voids, and duration at room temperature (RT) may affect the quality of recovered protein and metabolite data. Additives may aid with detection, but can add more complexity in sample collection or analysis. We aimed to identify the optimal urine processing protocol for clinically-obtained urine samples that allows for the highest protein and metabolite yields with minimal degradation. Methods Healthy women provided multiple urine samples during the same day. Women collected their first morning (1st AM) void and another “random void”. Random voids were aliquotted with: 1) no additive; 2) boric acid (BA); 3) protease inhibitor (PI); or 4) both BA + PI. Of these aliquots, some were immediately stored at 4°C, and some were left at RT for 4 hours. Proteins and individual metabolites were quantified, normalized to creatinine concentrations, and compared across processing conditions. Sample pools corresponding to each processing condition were analyzed using mass spectrometry to assess protein degradation. Results Ten Caucasian women between 35-65 years of age provided paired 1st morning and random voided urine samples. Normalized protein concentrations were slightly higher in 1st AM compared to random “spot” voids. The addition of BA did not significantly change proteins, while PI significantly improved normalized protein concentrations, regardless of whether samples were immediately cooled or left at RT for 4 hours. In pooled samples, there were minimal differences in protein degradation under the various conditions we tested. In metabolite analyses, there were significant differences in individual amino acids based on the timing of the void. Conclusions For comparative translational research using urine, information about void timing should be collected and standardized. For urine samples processed in the same day, BA does not appear to be necessary while the addition of PI enhances protein yields, regardless of 4

  8. Detection of Space-debris Using Space-Based Integrated Detection and Image Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzazy, M.; Justice, J.

    2014-09-01

    Detection and cataloguing of space-debris is paramount to satellite operations. Space debris vary in size from very small objects 10-4 m2 to large objects approximately > 1 m2. The detection of small debris using earth-based telescopes and detection systems present a great challenge; long integration time, and large blur due to atmospheric turbulence. Space-based detection systems are usually expensive and have limited image processing capabilities to detect and track space debris. In this paper we describe the development of a relatively inexpensive space-based integrated sensor/processor that allows the detection of objects as small as 10-4 m2 at 50 km range (equivalent to star magnitude 10). The sensor noise floor is equivalent to star magnitude 12. The sensor field of regard is 60°x120°. The elevation field of regard is covered by two 25 mega-pixel focal plane arrays, each with 4 cm aperture covering 30 degrees field of view. A gimbal is then used to scan the sensor in the azimuthal direction. The sensor frame rate to cover the full field of regard is 10 frames/sec. The FPA outputs are processed onboard to register the images, remove background stars, identify the debris, and determine their coordinate and sidereal motion relative to the camera frame of reference. Image registration: rotation and translation to sub-pixel level was achieved using Radon transformation and fast Fourier transform techniques. The image registration algorithm was optimized to run on an FPGA. Star background is then removed from the registered images and the location and sidereal motion of the debris are then determined. The image processing system uses stars with magnitudes between 5 and 7 along with a look-up table map of the sky to convert the debris coordinate system to an inertial coordinate system which is then transmitted to the ground. A high fidelity simulation model has been developed and used to guide and test the image processing algorithms. The high fidelity simulation

  9. Effects of crystal orientation on electronic band structure and anomalous shift of higher critical point in VO2 thin films during the phase transition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Huang, Ting; You, Qinghu; Zhang, Jinzhong; Li, Wenwu; Wu, Jiada; Hu, Zhigao; Chu, Junhao

    2015-12-01

    The phase transition behaviour of vanadium dioxide (VO2) with different thicknesses has been investigated by temperature-dependent optical transmittance and Raman spectra. It is found that the crystal orientation has a great effect on the metal-insulator transition (MIT) of VO2 films. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the films are polycrystalline and exhibit the characteristics of the monoclinic phase. The preferential growth crystal orientation (0 2 0) is converted to the (\\bar{1} 1 1) plane with the film thickness increasing. It is believed that the (\\bar{1} 1 1) plane is the reflection of a twinned structure with (0 1 1) crystal orientation, which will lead to the arrangements of oxygen atoms and vanadium atoms deviating from the pure monoclinic structure. It is found that the highest order transition (E 3) is highly susceptible to the crystal orientation, whereas the lowest order transition (E 1) is nearly unaffected by it. The E 3 exhibits an anomalous temperature dependence with an abrupt blue-shift (˜0.5 eV) in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition (MIT) for VO2 film with a thickness of 84 nm. The findings show that the empty {σ*} band can be driven close to the Fermi level when the (0 2 0) orientation is converted to the (\\bar{1} 1 1) orientation. Compared to the VO2 films with thicknesses of 39 and 57 nm, the E 3 decreases by 0.8 eV and the E 2 increases by about 0.1 eV at the insulator state for the VO2 film with a thickness of 84 nm. The abnormal electronic transition and the variation of energy band is likely caused by the lattice distortion and V-V dimerisation deviation from the monoclinic {{a}\\text{m}} axis.

  10. Over-the-Horizon Anomalous VHF Propagation and Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, M.; Barbara, A. K.; Ruzhin, Ya. Yu.; Hayakawa, M.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review current activities for the identification of earthquake (EQ) precursors and their epicentres. Starting with a brief description on the background to approaches using ultra-low (ULF), extremely low (ELF), very low/low (VLF/LF), medium (MF), high (HF), very high frequency (VHF) etc. radio waves for short-term EQ prediction, the paper concentrates on those characteristics of anomalous VHF reception from frequency-modulation (FM) radio transmissions and broadcast television (TV) signals in relation to EQ precursors. The possible ways to identify an impending EQ and its epicentre position as defined and observed by workers from a variety of studies fall within the purview of the paper. In attempts to find pre-EQ energy exchange and coupling processes between the lithosphere and atmosphere, the paper highlights some relevant observations of surface latent heat flux, sonic detection and ranging (SODAR) echograms and LF propagation. Explanations on possible causes leading to such anomalous reception are reviewed with reported results in association with pre-seismic induced modifications to tropospheric and ionospheric parameters.

  11. High-Speed Observer: Automated Streak Detection for the Aerospike Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieckhoff, T. J.; Covan, M. A.; OFarrell, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A high-frame-rate digital video camera, installed on test stands at Stennis Space Center (SSC), has been used to capture images of the aerospike engine plume during test. These plume images are processed in real time to detect and differentiate anomalous plume events. Results indicate that the High-Speed Observer (HSO) system can detect anomalous plume streaking events that are indicative of aerospike engine malfunction.

  12. Does facial processing prioritize change detection?: change blindness illustrates costs and benefits of holistic processing.

    PubMed

    Wilford, Miko M; Wells, Gary L

    2010-11-01

    There is broad consensus among researchers both that faces are processed more holistically than other objects and that this type of processing is beneficial. We predicted that holistic processing of faces also involves a cost, namely, a diminished ability to localize change. This study (N = 150) utilized a modified change-blindness paradigm in which some trials involved a change in one feature of an image (nose, chin, mouth, hair, or eyes for faces; chimney, porch, window, roof, or door for houses), whereas other trials involved no change. People were better able to detect the occurrence of a change for faces than for houses, but were better able to localize which feature had changed for houses than for faces. Half the trials used inverted images, a manipulation that disrupts holistic processing. With inverted images, the critical interaction between image type (faces vs. houses) and task (change detection vs. change localization) disappeared. The results suggest that holistic processing reduces change-localization abilities. PMID:20935169

  13. Photogrammetric processing of hexagon stereo data for change detection studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabha, E. Anantha; Shashivardhan Reddy, P.; Narender, B.; Muralikrishnan, S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Hexagon satellite data acquired as a part of USA Corona program has been declassified and is accessible to general public. This image data was acquired in high resolution much before the launch of civilian satellites. However the non availability of interior and exterior orientation parameters is the main bottle neck in photogrammetric processing of this data. In the present study, an attempt was made to orient and adjust Hexagon stereo pair through Rigorous Sensor Model (RSM) and Rational Function Models (RFM). The study area is part of Western Ghats in India. For rigorous sensor modelling an arbitrary camera file is generated based on the information available in the literature and few assumptions. A terrain dependent RFM was generated for the stereo data using Cartosat-1 reference data. The model accuracy achieved for both RSM and RFM was better than one pixel. DEM and orthoimage were generated with a spacing of 50 m and Ground Sampling Distance (GSD) of 6 m to carry out the change detection with a special emphasis on water bodies with reference to recent Cartosat-1 data. About 72 new water bodies covering an area of 2300 hectares (23 sq. km) were identified in Cartosat-1 orthoimage that were not present in Hexagon data. The image data from various Corona programs like Hexagon provide a rich source of information for temporal studies. However photogrammetric processing of the data is a bit tedious due to lack of information about internal sensor geometry.

  14. Multispectral (IR and MMW) processing for automatic target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Francis J.; Swistak, Joseph E.

    1990-10-01

    Automatic Target Recognition algorithms have been developed with limited success over the last few years. The processing to extract military targets from background clutter has difficulty under noisy, real-world conditions. Fusion of data from different wavelength sensors has been one approach to improve performance. The underlying theory is that signature data from different areas of the electro-magnetic spectrum will be complementary and clutter is frequency dependent. Recent work based on both statistical classification, and feature analysis in the thermal infrared and millimeter wave spectra, has shown interesting trends. We will provide a description of the IR/MMW target classification algorithms, the fusion architecture we employed, and processes used to search for the optimum features. Two distinct search and detect schemes were tested with different results. Data acquisition and reduction issues which affect algorithm experiments will also be discussed. A software based algorithm development test-bed was built at Textron to implement the multispectral targeting experiments. The effect of a modular, programmable test-bed on such experiments is to increase productivity and allow multivariate evaluatio ns.

  15. Algorithms for lineaments detection in processing of multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, D.; Jelev, G.; Atanassov, V.; Koprinkova-Hristova, Petia; Alexiev, K.

    2014-10-01

    Satellite remote sensing is a universal tool to investigate the different areas of Earth and environmental sciences. The advancement of the implementation capabilities of the optoelectronic devices which are long-term-tested in the laboratory and the field and are mounted on-board of the remote sensing platforms further improves the capability of instruments to acquire information about the Earth and its resources in global, regional and local scales. With the start of new high-spatial and spectral resolution satellite and aircraft imagery new applications for large-scale mapping and monitoring becomes possible. The integration with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) allows a synergistic processing of the multi-source spatial and spectral data. Here we present the results of a joint project DFNI I01/8 funded by the Bulgarian Science Fund focused on the algorithms of the preprocessing and the processing spectral data by using the methods of the corrections and of the visual and automatic interpretation. The objects of this study are lineaments. The lineaments are basically the line features on the earth's surface which are a sign of the geological structures. The geological lineaments usually appear on the multispectral images like lines or edges or linear shapes which is the result of the color variations of the surface structures. The basic geometry of a line is orientation, length and curve. The detection of the geological lineaments is an important operation in the exploration for mineral deposits, in the investigation of active fault patterns, in the prospecting of water resources, in the protecting people, etc. In this study the integrated approach for the detecting of the lineaments is applied. It combines together the methods of the visual interpretation of various geological and geographical indications in the multispectral satellite images, the application of the spatial analysis in GIS and the automatic processing of the multispectral images by Canny

  16. Protein immobilization and detection on laser processed polystyrene surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Kollia, Zoe; Palles, Dimitrios; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Cefalas, Alkiviadis-Constantinos; Petrou, Panagiota S.; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2011-09-15

    The bovine serum albumin (BSA)-polystyrene (PS) interface layer is laser photo activated at 157 nm for site selective multiple target-protein immobilization. The 5-15 nm photon induced interface layer has different chemical, wetting, and stiffness properties than the PS photon processed surface. The irradiated areas exhibit target-protein binding, followed by localized probe-target protein detection. The photon induced chemical modification of the BSA-PS interface layer is identified by: (1) Morphological, imaging, and analysis of surface parameters with atomic force microscopy, (2) spectroscopic shift (4 cm{sup -1}), of the amide I group and formation of new C=N, NH{sub 2}, C-O, C=O, and O-C=O groups following irradiation, identified with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and (3) the different hydrophilic/hydrophobic and force-distance response of the bare PS and BSA-PS surfaces. Near field edge diffraction (Fresnel) fluorescence imaging specifies the threshold photon energy and the fluence required to optically detect the protein binding on the photon induced BSA-PS interface layer. By approximating the Fresnel integrals with analytical functions, the threshold photon energy and the fluence are expressed as the sum of zero, first, and second order harmonic terms of two characteristic diffracted modes and they are specified to be 8.73x10{sup -9} Jand623 J m{sup -2}, respectively. Furthermore, a bioarray of three probe-target proteins is fabricated with 1.5 {mu}m spatial resolution using a 157 nm laser microstepper. The methodology eliminates the use of intermediate polymer layers between the blocking BSA protein and the PS substrate in bioarray fabrication.

  17. Local Seismic Event Detection Using Image Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. D.; Fouch, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The large footprint of regularly-spaced broadband seismometers afforded by EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) [www.usarray.org] presents an unprecedented opportunity to develop novel seismic array processing methods. Here we report preliminary results from a new automated method for detecting small local seismic events within the footprint of the TA using image processing techniques. The overarching goal is to develop a new methodology for automated searches of large seismic datasets for signals that are difficult to detect by traditional means, such as STA/LTA triggering algorithms. We first process the raw broadband data for each station by bandpass filtering at 7-19 Hz and integrating the absolute value of the velocity waveform over a sequence of 5-second intervals. We further combine the integrated values of all three orthogonal channels into a single new time series with a 5-second sampling rate. This new time series is analogous to a measurement of the total seismic energy recorded at the station in each 5-second interval; we call this time series Integrated Ground Motion (IGM). Each sample is compared to a sliding longer-term average to remove diurnal and long-term noise effects. We create an image file by mapping each station location to an equivalent position in a blank image array, and use a modified Voronoi tessellation algorithm to assign each pixel in the image to the IGM value of the nearest station. We assign a value of zero if the pixel is more than a maximum distance from the nearest station. We apply 2-dimensional spatial image filtering techniques to remove large-scale features affecting much of the image, as we assume these likely result from teleseismic events. We also filter the time series to remove very small-scale features from noise spikes affecting a single seismic station. The resulting image contains only features of regional scale affecting 2 or more stations. For each of the remaining image features, we find the center

  18. Detection of Satellite Attitude Jitter Based on Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Tong, X.; Ye, Z.; Tang, X.; Xu, Y.; Li, L.; Wang, F.; Xie, H.; Xie, J.; Li, T.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution satellite imageries (HRSIs) always suffer from mechanical vibration during scan, resulting in attitude jitter and non-ignorable errors in geo-positioning and mapping. Therefore, it is critical to detect and estimate the attitude jitter for further possible compensation to explore the full geometric potential of HRSI. We bring up with a solution to detect the attitude jitter effect based on image processing using images recorded by a sensor system with parallax observation. Three methods of attitude jitter detection are investigated. The first one is based on analysis of the co-registration errors between images with very small parallax observation (e.g. different bands of multispectral image). The second one is based on stereo images using sensor imaging models to investigate the geometric inconsistance in image space. The third one is based on analysis of the co-registration errors of two DOM products from the images. Phase correlation, geometric constraint cross correlation and least squares matching are used in our methods correspondingly for high accuracy image matching, and the RANSAC algorithm is adopted to remove mismatched points and outliers. Finally, the image disparities from each method are used to investigate the effect and characteristic of satellite attitude jitter. We applied our methods on different satellites to investigate their attitude jitter characteristics. Results of experiment with multispectral images obtained by the ASTER camera equipped on Terra satellite showed that there exist more than one frequency with amplitude up to 0.3 pixel. Experimental results with panchromatic image strips captured by LROC revealed that there exist at least two attitude jitter frequencies with amplitude up to 0.6 pixel. Three methods were all used to investigate the attitude jitter of Chinese ZY-3 satellite and the results from different methods showed good consistency, and a distinct periodic attitude fluctuation with frequency around 0.65Hz

  19. Anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  20. Anomalous Earthquakes Associated With Nyiragongo Volcano (D.R. Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, A.; Ekström, G.

    2007-12-01

    The Virunga Volcanic Complex, located in the Western Rift Valley of the East African Rift, is the site of a series of unusual earthquakes. Five anomalous events, each of moderate size (4.6detection in an area in which many smaller events are routinely detected and located. The frequency content of these anomalous earthquakes was compared with those from local events found in global catalogs, and it was shown that these five events are greatly depleted in frequencies above 0.1 Hz. At 1 Hz, the difference in spectral amplitude between detected and undetected earthquakes of similar size and location is between two and three orders of magnitude. Centroid-moment-tensor solutions were computed for each event. The earthquakes are highly non-double-couple in nature, each having a large CLVD component of the moment tensor. Their focal mechanisms are stable and robust, and are highly irregular in character. Surface waves are also well fit by a source model composed of a series of vertical forces. The first three earthquakes occurred within days of the eruption of Nyiragongo in January 2002, while the last two events are not linked to major eruptive activity at either Nyiragongo or its neighbor, Nyamuragira. Systematic differences in frequency spectra were seen between these two groups although all five have similar focal mechanisms. These variations are potentially due to a difference in physical mechanism of the source. A variety of potential source processes are explored, including slip on a conical ring-fault, massive stoping within a buried magma chamber, and degassing/phreatomagmatic explosions.

  1. CB detection and early warning--fusing disparate sensors into the detection process: program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birenzvige, Amnon; Sickenberger, David W.; Reyes, Felix; Underwood, William J.; Reiff, Christian G.; Gonski, David; Fargues, Monique P.; Nelson, Bruce N.

    2003-04-01

    the signatures generated by the conventional and the (simulated) chemical rounds. This paper will be followed by other papers that will provide more details information gained by the various sensors and describe how fusing the data enhance the reliability of the CB detection process.

  2. Risk assessment as an evolved threat detection and analysis process.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, D Caroline; Griebel, Guy; Pobbe, Roger; Blanchard, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    Risk assessment is a pattern of activities involved in detection and analysis of threat stimuli and the situations in which the threat is encountered. It is a core process in the choice of specific defenses, such as flight, freezing, defensive threat and defensive attack, that counter the threat and minimize the danger it poses. This highly adaptive process takes into account important characteristics, such as type and location (including distance from the subject) of the threat, as well as those (e.g. presence of an escape route or hiding place) of the situation, combining them to predict which specific defense is optimal with that particular combination of threat and situation. Risk assessment is particularly associated with ambiguity either of the threat stimulus or of the outcome of available defensive behaviors. It is also crucial in determining that threat is no longer present, permitting a return to normal, nondefensive behavior. Although risk assessment has been described in detail in rodents, it is also a feature of human defensive behavior, particularly in association with ambiguity. Rumination may be a specifically human form of risk assessment, more often expressed by women, and highly associated with anxiety. Risk assessment behaviors respond to drugs effective against generalized anxiety disorder; however, flight, a dominant specific defense in many common situations, shows a pharmacological response profile closer to that of panic disorder. Risk assessment and flight also appear to show some consistent differences in terms of brain regional activation patterns, suggesting a potential biological differentiation of anxiety and fear/panic systems. An especially intriguing possibility is that mirror neurons may respond to some of the same types of situational differences that are analyzed during risk assessment, suggesting an additional functional role for these neurons. PMID:21056591

  3. Anomalous discrete symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z. )

    1992-12-01

    We examine an interesting scenario to solve the domain-wall problem recently suggested by Preskill, Trivedi, Wilczek, and Wise. The effective potential is calculated in the presence of the QCD axial anomaly. It is shown that some discrete symmetries such as {ital CP} and {ital Z}{sub 2} can be anomalous due to a so-called {ital K} term induced by instantons. We point out that the {ital Z}{sub 2} domain-wall problem in the two-doublet standard model can be resolved by two types of solutions: the {ital CP}-conserving one and the {ital CP}-breaking one. In the first case, there exist two {ital Z}{sub 2}-related local minima whose energy splitting is provided by the instanton effect. In the second case, there is only one unique vacuum so that the domain walls do not form at all. The consequences of this new source of {ital CP} violation are discussed and shown to be well within the experimental limits in weak interactions.

  4. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  5. Digital Image Processing Technique for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Cabrera, R.; Guzmán-Sepúlveda, J. R.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; May-Arrioja, D. A.; Ruiz-Pinales, J.; Ibarra-Manzano, O. G.; Aviña-Cervantes, G.; Parada, A. González

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of death in women and the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Primary prevention in the early stages of the disease becomes complex as the causes remain almost unknown. However, some typical signatures of this disease, such as masses and microcalcifications appearing on mammograms, can be used to improve early diagnostic techniques, which is critical for women’s quality of life. X-ray mammography is the main test used for screening and early diagnosis, and its analysis and processing are the keys to improving breast cancer prognosis. As masses and benign glandular tissue typically appear with low contrast and often very blurred, several computer-aided diagnosis schemes have been developed to support radiologists and internists in their diagnosis. In this article, an approach is proposed to effectively analyze digital mammograms based on texture segmentation for the detection of early stage tumors. The proposed algorithm was tested over several images taken from the digital database for screening mammography for cancer research and diagnosis, and it was found to be absolutely suitable to distinguish masses and microcalcifications from the background tissue using morphological operators and then extract them through machine learning techniques and a clustering algorithm for intensity-based segmentation.

  6. Impact of thermal processing on ELISA detection of peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tong-Jen; Maks, Nicole

    2013-06-19

    This study examined the effect of heat treatment on the solubility of peanut proteins and compared the performances of two commercial ELISA kits (Veratox Quantitative Peanut Allergen Test and BioKits Peanut Assay Kit) for quantitation of peanut residues as affected by different heat treatments (moist and dry heat) and detection targets (mixture of proteins vs specific protein). Both laboratory-prepared and commercial peanut flour preparations were used for the evaluation. The two ELISA kits tended to underestimate the levels of protein in samples that were subjected to elevated heat, respectively, by more than 60- or 400-fold lower for the autoclaved samples and by as much as 70- or 2000-fold lower for the dark-roast commercial flour samples. The BioKits test, which employs antibodies specific to a heat labile protein (Ara h 1), in general exhibited a greater degree of underestimation. These results suggest that commercial ELISA kits may not be able to accurately determine the amount of proteins present in thermally processed foods due to changes in the solubility and immunoreactivity of the target proteins. Users need to be aware of such limitations before applying ELISA kits for evaluation of food allergen control programs. PMID:23473340

  7. Probing Interfacial Processes on Graphene Surface by Mass Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2013-03-01

    In this work we studied the mass density of graphene, probed interfacial processes on graphene surface and examined the formation of graphene oxide by mass detection. The graphene layers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method on copper foils and transfer-printed on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The mass density of single layer graphene was measured by investigating the mechanical resonance of the QCM. Moreover, we extended the developed technique to probe the binding dynamics of proteins on the surface of graphene, were able to obtain nonspecific binding constant of BSA protein of graphene surface in aqueous solution. The time trace of resonance signal showed that the BSA molecules rapidly saturated by filling the available binding sites on graphene surface. Furthermore, we monitored oxidation of graphene surface under oxygen plasma by tracing the changes of interfacial mass of the graphene controlled by the shifts in Raman spectra. Three regimes were observed the formation of graphene oxide which increases the interfacial mass, the release of carbon dioxide and the removal of small graphene/graphene oxide flakes. Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) grant no. 110T304, 109T209, Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (IRG) grant no 256458, Turkish Academy of Science (TUBA-Gebip).

  8. Temporal variations of the anomalous oxygen component, 1977 - 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Klecker, B.; Galvin, A. B.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is of the long term temporal variations of 6.6 to 12 MeV/nucleon anomalous oxygen at 1 AU covering the period 1977 to 1984. This time interval included the recent solar maximum, with the recovery at neutron monitor energies beginning in 1982. During this time interval, 6.6 to 12 MeV/nucleon 0 fluxes decreased by at least a factor of 50, and indeed remained below the instrumental detection threshold after 1979. By late 1984, neutron monitors had recovered to roughly 1979 levels from the 1982 solar maximum, and anomalous O still remained below the detection threshold.

  9. Model-Based Signal Processing: Correlation Detection With Synthetic Seismograms

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Harris, D; Pasyanos, M; Blair, S; Matt, R

    2006-08-30

    Recent applications of correlation methods to seismological problems illustrate the power of coherent signal processing applied to seismic waveforms. Examples of these applications include detection of low amplitude signals buried in ambient noise and cross-correlation of sets of waveforms to form event clusters and accurately measure delay times for event relocation and/or earth structure. These methods rely on the exploitation of the similarity of individual waveforms and have been successfully applied to large sets of empirical observations. However, in cases with little or no empirical event data, such as aseismic regions or exotic event types, correlation methods with observed seismograms will not be possible due to the lack of previously observed similar waveforms. This study uses model-based signals computed for three-dimensional (3D) Earth models to form the basis for correlation detection. Synthetic seismograms are computed for fully 3D models estimated from the Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) method. MCMC uses stochastic sampling to fit multiple seismological data sets. Rather than estimate a single ''optimal'' model, MCMC results in a suite of models that sample the model space and incorporates uncertainty through variability of the models. The variability reflects our ignorance of Earth structure, due to limited resolution, data and modeling errors, and produces variability in the seismic waveform response. Model-based signals are combined using a subspace method where the synthetic signals are decomposed into an orthogonal basis by singular-value decomposition (SVD) and the observed waveforms are represented with a linear combination of a sub-set of eigenvectors (signals) associated with the most significant eigenvalues. We have demonstrated the method by modeling long-period (80-10 seconds) regional seismograms for a moderate (M{approx}5) earthquake near the China-North Korea border. Synthetic seismograms are computed with the Spectral Element Method

  10. Nonlinear processing of radar data for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosz, Elizabeth E.; DeJong, Keith; Duvoisin, Herbert A.; Solomon, Geoff Z.; Steinway, William J.; Warren, Albert

    2004-09-01

    Outstanding landmine detection has been achieved by the Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS system) in government-run field tests. The use of anomaly detection using principal component analysis (PCA) on the return of ground penetrating radar (GPR) coupled with metal detection is the key to the success of the HSTAMIDS-like system algorithms. Indications of nonlinearities and asymmetries in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data point to modifications to the current PCA algorithm that might prove beneficial. Asymmetries in the distribution of PCA projections of field data have been quantified in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data. An initial correction for the observed asymmetries has improved the False Alarm Rate (FAR) on this data.

  11. Anomalous zones in Gulf Coast Salt domes with special reference to Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Thoms, R.L.; Autin, W.J.; McCulloh, R.P.; Denzler, S.; Byrne, K.O.

    1993-07-01

    Anomalous features in Gulf Coast Salt domes exhibit deviations from normally pure salt and vary widely in form from one dome to the next, ranging considerably in length and width. They have affected both conventional and solution mining in several ways. Gas outbursts, insolubles, and potash (especially carnallite) have led to the breakage of tubing in a number of caverns, and caused irregular shapes of many caverns through preferential leaching. Such anomalous features essentially have limited the lateral extent of conventional mining at several salt mines, and led to accidents and even the closing of several other mines. Such anomalous features, are often aligned in anomalous zones, and appear to be related to diapiric processes of salt dome development. Evidence indicates that anomalous zones are found between salt spines, where the differential salt intrusion accumulates other materials: Anhydrite bands which are relatively strong, and other, weaker impurities. Shear zones and fault displacement detected at Big Hill and Weeks Island domes have not yet had any known adverse impacts on SPR oil storage, but new caverns at these sites conceivably may encounter some potentially adverse conditions. Seismic reflection profiles at Big Hill dome have shown numerous fractures and faults in the caprock, and verified the earlier recognition of a major shear zone transecting the entire salt stock and forming a graben in the overlying caprock. Casing that is placed in such zones can be at risk. Knowledge of these zones should create awareness of possible effects rather than preclude the future emplacement of caverns. To the extent possible, major anomalous zones and salt stock boundaries should be avoided. Shear zones along overhangs may be particularly hazardous, and otherwise unknown valleys in the top of salt may occur along shear zones. These zones often can be mapped geophysically, especially with high-resolution seismic techniques.

  12. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  13. Cloud detection using SEVIRI IR channels for the GERB processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipe, Alessandro; Gonzalez Sotelino, Luis; Baeck, Pieter-Jan; Clerbaux, Nicolas; Dewitte, Steven

    2010-05-01

    The first Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument was launched during the summer 2002 together with the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on board of the Meteosat-8 satellite. This broadband radiometer aims to deliver near real-time estimates of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) solar and thermal radiative fluxes at high temporal resolution thanks to the geostationary orbit. Such goal is performed at the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium by running the L20 GERB processing which generates these fluxes at several spatial resolutions from the directional filtered radiance measurements of the instrument. This processing consists of successive components, one of them being a radiance-to-flux conversion. Such conversion is carried out in the solar region by using information from a scene identification of SEVIRI data. This scheme estimates the cloud mask over the whole SEVIRI/GERB field-of-view with solely visible SEVIRI channels. While this method gives good results during daytime, it cannot be applied during nighttime. Nevertheless, cloud mask information is valuable to study clouds and aerosols thermal radiative forcing. Thus, a nighttime cloud mask would benefit the GERB flux products in the thermal region. A majority of cloud detection schemes found in the literature relies on multispectral threshold tests applied to equivalent brightness temperatures (BTs) or brightness temperature differences (BTDs) associated to the 3.9, 8.7, 10.8 and 12 µm bands. These thresholds are commonly estimated using skin surface temperatures as well as water vapor and temperature profiles from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. However, such dependency on external NWP models cannot guarantee the required stability and accuracy of these cloud masks for climate datasets. Therefore, in this contribution we present a cloud detection method mainly based for every pixel and SEVIRI IR channels on its 60 days time--series of BTs acquired at the

  14. HR 4453 - An anomalously bright UV source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polidan, R. S.; Oegerle, W. R.; Margon, B.

    1980-01-01

    Crawford et al. (1979) reported that HR 4453 has an anomalously large UV flux in the 1350-1600 A band. This paper reports results of the UV spectrophotometry of HR 4453 obtained with the Copernicus satellite. Portions of the spectrum from 1120 to 2660 A were scanned, but no stellar signal was detected in any wavelength interval. This result is consistent with both components of the binary being normal A2A stars. UV variability or a source other than HR 4453 must be invoked to explain the observations of Crawford et al.

  15. Processing Satellite Imagery To Detect Waste Tire Piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skiles, Joseph; Schmidt, Cynthia; Wuinlan, Becky; Huybrechts, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    A methodology for processing commercially available satellite spectral imagery has been developed to enable identification and mapping of waste tire piles in California. The California Integrated Waste Management Board initiated the project and provided funding for the method s development. The methodology includes the use of a combination of previously commercially available image-processing and georeferencing software used to develop a model that specifically distinguishes between tire piles and other objects. The methodology reduces the time that must be spent to initially survey a region for tire sites, thereby increasing inspectors and managers time available for remediation of the sites. Remediation is needed because millions of used tires are discarded every year, waste tire piles pose fire hazards, and mosquitoes often breed in water trapped in tires. It should be possible to adapt the methodology to regions outside California by modifying some of the algorithms implemented in the software to account for geographic differences in spectral characteristics associated with terrain and climate. The task of identifying tire piles in satellite imagery is uniquely challenging because of their low reflectance levels: Tires tend to be spectrally confused with shadows and deep water, both of which reflect little light to satellite-borne imaging systems. In this methodology, the challenge is met, in part, by use of software that implements the Tire Identification from Reflectance (TIRe) model. The development of the TIRe model included incorporation of lessons learned in previous research on the detection and mapping of tire piles by use of manual/ visual and/or computational analysis of aerial and satellite imagery. The TIRe model is a computational model for identifying tire piles and discriminating between tire piles and other objects. The input to the TIRe model is the georeferenced but otherwise raw satellite spectral images of a geographic region to be surveyed

  16. Asymptotic Behavior of Anomalous Diffusions Driven by alpha -Stable Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michna, Z.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we discuss decomposition principle for alpha -stable Lévy processes. We investigate asymptotic properties of components and stochastic integrals driven by such processes providing an important class of anomalous diffusions. We consider two case studies with integrands being fractional Brownian motion and gamma process.

  17. Detecting Buried Archaeological Remains by the Use of Geophysical Data Processing with 'Diffusion Maps' Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical methods are prompt, non-invasive and low-cost tool for quantitative delineation of buried archaeological targets. However, taking into account the complexity of geological-archaeological media, some unfavourable environments and known ambiguity of geophysical data analysis, a single geophysical method examination might be insufficient (Khesin and Eppelbaum, 1997). Besides this, it is well-known that the majority of inverse-problem solutions in geophysics are ill-posed (e.g., Zhdanov, 2002), which means, according to Hadamard (1902), that the solution does not exist, or is not unique, or is not a continuous function of observed geophysical data (when small perturbations in the observations will cause arbitrary mistakes in the solution). This fact has a wide application for informational, probabilistic and wavelet methodologies in archaeological geophysics (Eppelbaum, 2014a). The goal of the modern geophysical data examination is to detect the geophysical signatures of buried targets at noisy areas via the analysis of some physical parameters with a minimal number of false alarms and miss-detections (Eppelbaum et al., 2011; Eppelbaum, 2014b). The proposed wavelet approach to recognition of archaeological targets (AT) by the examination of geophysical method integration consists of advanced processing of each geophysical method and nonconventional integration of different geophysical methods between themselves. The recently developed technique of diffusion clustering combined with the abovementioned wavelet methods was utilized to integrate the geophysical data and detect existing irregularities. The approach is based on the wavelet packet techniques applied as to the geophysical images (or graphs) versus coordinates. For such an analysis may be utilized practically all geophysical methods (magnetic, gravity, seismic, GPR, ERT, self-potential, etc.). On the first stage of the proposed investigation a few tens of typical physical-archaeological models (PAM

  18. Research on intelligent detection and processing technology of laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haili; Jiang, Huilin

    2005-01-01

    Aimed at the influence of turbulent atmosphere effect on laser pulse detection, it discusses the key factors that affect the signal test in this paper. Based on it, the article also discusses two key techniques, namely, floating threshold value and AGC (Automatic Gain Control) technology in detail, especially about the technique of floating threshold value. According to discussion about intelligent detection technology of laser pulse, the system designs a low noise detecting unit of laser pulse, tests its performance by the experiment, and validates correctness of the results.

  19. Size-varying small target detection for infrared image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Zhu, Ran; Long, Yunli; An, Wei; Zhou, Yiyu

    2015-10-01

    IRST (Infrared Search and Track) has been applied to many military or civil fields such as precise guidance, aerospace, early warning. As a key technique, small target detection based on infrared image plays an important role. However, infrared targets have their own characteristics, such as target size variation, which make the detection work quite difficult. In practical application, the target size may vary due to many reasons, such as optic angle of sensors, imaging distance, environment and so on. For conventional detection methods, it is difficult to detect such size-varying targets, especially when the backgrounds have strong clutters. This paper presents a novel method to detect size-varying infrared targets in a cluttered background. It is easy to find that the target region is salient in infrared images. It means that target region have a signature of discontinuity with its neighboring regions and concentrates in a relatively small region, which can be considered as a homogeneous compact region, and the background is consistent with its neighboring regions. Motivated by the saliency feature and gradient feature, we introduce minimum target intensity (MTI) to measure the dissimilarity between different scales, and use mean gradient to restrict the target scale in a reasonable range. They are integrated to be multiscale MTI filter. The proposed detection method is designed based on multiscale MTI filter. Firstly, salient region is got by morphological low-pass filtering, where the potential target exists in. Secondly, the candidate target regions are extracted by multiscale minimum target intensity filter, which can effectively give the optimal target size. At last, signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) is used to segment targets, which is computed based on optimal scale of candidate targets. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method can achieve both higher detection precision and robustness in complex background.

  20. Anomalous azygos vein: a potential danger during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Sieunarine, K; May, J; White, G H; Harris, J P

    1997-08-01

    A report of a patient with an azygos lobe and an associated anomalous azygos vein covering the upper thoracic sympathetic chain. This anomaly poses a significant risk during the procedure of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. A chest X-ray is useful in detecting this anomaly and alerting the surgeon to potential problems. PMID:9287933

  1. Relative Saliency in Change Signals Affects Perceptual Comparison and Decision Processes in Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2011-01-01

    Change detection requires perceptual comparison and decision processes on different features of multiattribute objects. How relative salience between two feature-changes influences the processes has not been addressed. This study used the systems factorial technology to investigate the processes when detecting changes in a Gabor patch with visual…

  2. Processing of radar data for landmine detection: nonlinear transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosz, E. E.; Duvoisin, H.; Konduri, R.; Solomon, G. Z.

    2005-06-01

    The Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS system) has achieved outstanding performance in government-run field tests due to its use of anomaly detection using principal component analysis (PCA) on the return of ground penetrating radar (GPR) coupled with metal detection. Indications of nonlinearities and asymmetries in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data point to modifications to the current PCA algorithm that might prove beneficial. Asymmetries in the distribution of PCA projections of field data have been quantified in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data. The data suggest a logarithmic correction to the data. Such a correction has been applied and has improved the FAR on this data set. The increase in performance is comparable to the increase shown using the simpler asymmetric rescaling method.

  3. Falling Person Detection Using Multi-Sensor Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toreyin, B. Ugur; Soyer, A. Birey; Onaran, Ibrahim; Cetin, E. Enis

    2007-12-01

    Falls are one of the most important problems for frail and elderly people living independently. Early detection of falls is vital to provide a safe and active lifestyle for elderly. Sound, passive infrared (PIR) and vibration sensors can be placed in a supportive home environment to provide information about daily activities of an elderly person. In this paper, signals produced by sound, PIR and vibration sensors are simultaneously analyzed to detect falls. Hidden Markov Models are trained for regular and unusual activities of an elderly person and a pet for each sensor signal. Decisions of HMMs are fused together to reach a final decision.

  4. Physical Meaning of the Optimum Measurement Process in Quantum Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaki, Masao; Kozuka, Haruhisa; Hirota, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    The optimum measurement processes are represented as the optimum detection operators in the quantum detection theory. The error probability by the optimum detection operators goes beyond the standard quantum limit automatically. However the optimum detection operators are given by pure mathematical descriptions. In order to realize a communication system overcoming the standard quantum limit, we try to give the physical meaning of the optimum detection operators.

  5. Protecting Student Intellectual Property in Plagiarism Detection Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butakov, Sergey; Barber, Craig

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of the Internet along with increasing computer literacy has made it easy and tempting for digital natives to copy-paste someone's work. Plagiarism is now a burning issue in education, industry and even in the research community. In this study, the authors concentrate on plagiarism detection with particular focus on the…

  6. Protecting Students' Intellectual Property in the Web Plagiarism Detection Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butakov, Sergey; Dyagilev, Vadim; Tskhay, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Learning management systems (LMS) play a central role in communications in online and distance education. In the digital era, with all the information now accessible at students' fingertips, plagiarism detection services (PDS) have become a must-have part of LMS. Such integration provides a seamless experience for users, allowing PDS to check…

  7. Anomalous temperature dependence of the IR spectrum of polyalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helenius, V.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Kotila, S.; Nieminen, J.; Lohikoski, R.; Timonen, J.

    1997-12-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the infrared spectra of acetanilide (ACN), tryptophan-(alanine) 15, and tyrosine-(alanine) 15. No sidebands of the amide-I vibration were observed in the polypeptides, but two anomalous sidebands of the NH stretch with a similar temperature dependence as that of the anomalous amide-I vibrational mode at 1650 cm -1 of crystalline ACN were detected. Fermi resonance combined with the appearance of a red-shifted sideband of NH stretch through coupling to lattice modes seems to explain this band structure. Observations are indicative of excitons that may occur in polypeptides as well as in single crystals of ACN.

  8. Hic Sunt Leones: Anomalous Scaling In Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, L.; Gabellani, S.; Provenzale, A.; Rebora, N.

    In recent years the spatio-temporal intermittency of precipitation fields has often been quantified in terms of scaling and/or multifractal behaviour. In this work we anal- yse the spatial scaling properties of precipitation intensity fields measured during the GATE radar experiment, and compare the results with those obtained from surrogate data generated by nonlinearly filtered, linear stochastic processes and from random shuffling of the original data. The results of the study suggest a spurious nature of the spatial multifractal behaviour of the GATE fields and indicate that claims of multifrac- tality and anomalous scaling in rainfall may have to be reconsidered.

  9. Timely online chatter detection in end milling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yang; Zhang, Yun; Zhou, Huamin; Li, Dequn; Liu, Hongqi; Qiao, Haiyu; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Chatter is one of the most unexpected and uncontrollable phenomenon during the milling operation. It is very important to develop an effective monitoring method to identify the chatter as soon as possible, while existing methods still cannot detect it before the workpiece has been damaged. This paper proposes an energy aggregation characteristic-based Hilbert-Huang transform method for online chatter detection. The measured vibration signal is firstly decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) using ensemble empirical mode decomposition. Feature IMFs are then selected according to the majority energy rule. Subsequently Hilbert spectral analysis is applied on these feature IMFs to calculate the Hilbert time/frequency spectrum. Two indicators are proposed to quantify the spectrum and thresholds are automatically calculated using Gaussian mixed model. Milling experiments prove the proposed method to be effective in protecting the workpiece from severe chatter damage within acceptable time complexity.

  10. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-09-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neural networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  11. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-04-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neutral networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  12. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  13. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  14. Detecting phonemes and letters in text: interactions between different types and levels of processes.

    PubMed

    Schneider, V I; Healy, A F

    1993-11-01

    In six experiments, subjects detected phonemes or letters in text presented auditorily or visually. Experiments 1 and 2 provided support for the hypothesis that a mismatch between the phoneme and letter representations of a target leads to detection errors. In addition, visual word unitization processes were implicated. Experiments 3 and 4 provided support for the hypothesis that the Gestalt goodness of pattern affected detection errors when subjects searched for letters. Experiments 5 and 6 demonstrated that the effects of unitization on the detection of letters in common words were decreased by altering the familiar configuration of the test words. The combined results of all six experiments lead to the conclusion that both visual and phonetic processes influence letter detection, that these processes communicate through a type of cross-checking, and that there are at least two levels of visual (and perhaps of phonetic) processing involved in the letter detection task. PMID:8289652

  15. Evaluation of pre-processing, thresholding and post-processing steps for very small target detection in infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardımcı, Ozan; Ulusoy, Ä.°lkay

    2016-05-01

    Pre-processing, thresholding and post-processing stages are very important especially for very small target detection from infrared images. The effects of these stages to the final detection performance are measured in this study. Various methods for each stage are compared based on the final detection performance, which is defined by precision and recall values. Among various methods, the best method for each stage is selected and proved. For the pre-processing stage, local block based methods perform the best, nearly for all thresholding methods. The best thresholding method is chosen as the one, which does not need any user defined parameter. Finally, the post processing method, which is suitable for the best performing pre-processing and thesholding methods is selected.

  16. Anomalous Microwave Emission in HII regions: is it really anomalous ? The case of RCW 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Roberta; Ingallinera, Adriano; Agliozzo, Claudia; Tibbs, Christopher; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Umana, Grazia; Dickinson, Clive; Trigiglio, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The detection of an excess of emission at microwave frequencies with respect to the predicted free-free emission has been reportedfor several Galactic HII regions. Here, we investigate the case of RCW 49, for which the Cosmic Background Imager tentatively (~ 3 sigma) detected Anomalous Microwave Emission at 31 GHz on angular scales of 7'. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we carried out a multi-frequency (5 GHz, 19 GHz and 34 GHz) continuum study of the region, complemented by observations of the H109 alpha radio recombination line. The analysis shows that: 1) the spatial correlation between the microwave and IR emission persists on angular scales from 3.4' to 0.4'', although the degree of the correlation slightly decreases at higher frequencies and on smaller angular scales; 2) the spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz are globally in agreement with optically thin free-free emission, however, ~ 30 % of these are positive and much greater than -0.1, consistently with a stellar wind scenario; 3) no major evidence for inverted free-free radiation is found, indicating that this is likely not the cause of the Anomalous Emission in RCW 49. Although our results cannot rule out the spinning dust hypothesis to explain the tentative detection of Anomalous Microwave emission in RCW 49, they emphasize the complexity of astronomical sources very well known and studied such as HII regions, and suggest that, at least in these objects, the reported excess of emissionmight be ascribed to alternative mechanisms such as stellar winds and shocks.

  17. Weld line detection and process control for welding automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sang-Min; Cho, Man-Ho; Lee, Ho-Young; Cho, Taik-Dong

    2007-03-01

    Welding has been widely used as a process to join metallic parts. But because of hazardous working conditions, workers tend to avoid this task. Techniques to achieve the automation are the recognition of joint line and process control. A CCD (charge coupled device) camera with a laser stripe was applied to enhance the automatic weld seam tracking in GMAW (gas metal arc welding). The adaptive Hough transformation having an on-line processing ability was used to extract laser stripes and to obtain specific weld points. The three-dimensional information obtained from the vision system made it possible to generate the weld torch path and to obtain information such as the width and depth of the weld line. In this study, a neural network based on the generalized delta rule algorithm was adapted to control the process of GMAW, such as welding speed, arc voltage and wire feeding speed. The width and depth of the weld joint have been selected as neurons in the input layer of the neural-network algorithm. The input variables, the width and depth of the weld joint, are determined by image information. The voltage, weld speed and wire feed rate are represented as the neurons in the output layer. The results of the neural-network learning applied to the welding are as follows: learning ratio 0.5, momentum ratio 0.7, the number of hidden layers 2 and the number of hidden units 8. They have significant influence on the weld quality.

  18. Auditory Processing Speed and Signal Detection in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korboot, P. J.; Damiani, N.

    1976-01-01

    Two differing explanations of schizophrenic processing deficit were examined: Chapman and McGhie's and Yates'. Thirty-two schizophrenics, classified on the acute-chronic and paranoid-nonparanoid dimensions, and eight neurotics were tested on two dichotic listening tasks. (Editor)

  19. Decision Processes in Discrimination: Fundamental Misrepresentations of Signal Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    In the first part of this article, I describe a new approach to studying decision making in discrimination tasks that does not depend on the technical assumptions of signal detection theory (e.g., normality of the encoding distributions). Applying these new distribution-free tests to data from three experiments, I show that base rate and payoff manipulations had substantial effects on the participants' encoding distributions but no effect on their decision rules, which were uniformly unbiased in equal and unequal base rate conditions and in symmetric and asymmetric payoff conditions. In the second part of the article, I show that this seemingly paradoxical result is readily explained by the sequential sampling models of discrimination. I then propose a new, "model-free" test for response bias that seems to more properly identify both the nature and direction of the biases induced by the classical bias manipulations.

  20. Children's Responses to Anomalous Scientific Data: How Is Conceptual Change Impeded?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Clark A.; Malhotra, Betina A.

    2002-01-01

    Four experiments with 4th, 5th, and 6th graders addressed conceptual change in response to anomalous data about empirical regularities in science. Impedance to conceptual change in response to anomalous data could potentially occur at any of four cognitive processes: observation, interpretation, generalization, or retention. In the four…

  1. Anomalous Micellization of Pluronic Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Amanda; Ryu, Chang Y.

    2014-03-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) - poly(propylene oxide) - poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymers, commercially known as Pluronics, are a unique family of amphiphilic triblock polymers, which self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution. These copolymers have shown promise in therapeutic, biomedical, cosmetic, and nanotech applications. As-received samples of Pluronics contain low molecular weight impurities (introduced during the manufacturing and processing), that are ignored in most applications. It has been observed, however, that in semi-dilute aqueous solutions, at concentrations above 1 wt%, the temperature dependent micellization behavior of the Pluronics is altered. Anomalous behavior includes a shift of the critical micellization temperature and formation of large aggregates at intermediate temperatures before stable sized micelles form. We attribute this behavior to the low molecular weight impurities that are inherent to the Pluronics which interfere with the micellization process. Through the use of Dynamic Light Scattering and HPLC, we compared the anomalous behavior of different Pluronics of different impurity levels to their purified counterparts.

  2. ANOMALOUSLY PRESSURED GAS DISTRIBUTION IN THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-03-31

    Anomalously pressured gas (APG) assets, typically called ''basin-center'' gas accumulations, represent either an underdeveloped or undeveloped energy resource in the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB). Historically, the exploitation of these gas resources has proven to be very difficult and costly. In this topical report, an improved exploration strategy is outlined in conjunction with a more detailed description of new diagnostic techniques that more efficiently detect anomalously pressured, gas-charged domains. The ability to delineate gas-charged domains occurring below a regional velocity inversion surface allows operators to significantly reduce risk in the search for APG resources. The Wind River Basin was chosen for this demonstration because of the convergence of public data availability (i.e., thousands of mud logs and DSTs and 2400 mi of 2-D seismic lines); the evolution of new diagnostic techniques; a 175 digital sonic log suite; a regional stratigraphic framework; and corporate interest. In the exploration scheme discussed in this topical report, the basinwide gas distribution is determined in the following steps: (1) A detailed velocity model is established from sonic logs, 2-D seismic lines, and, if available, 3-D seismic data. In constructing the seismic interval velocity field, automatic picking technology using continuous, statistically-derived interval velocity selection, as well as conventional graphical interactive methodologies are utilized. (2) Next, the ideal regional velocity/depth function is removed from the observed sonic or seismic velocity/depth profile. The constructed ideal regional velocity/depth function is the velocity/depth trend resulting from the progressive burial of a rock/fluid system of constant rock/fluid composition, with all other factors remaining constant. (3) The removal of the ideal regional velocity/depth function isolates the anomalously slow velocities and allows the evaluation of (a) the regional velocity

  3. Ultrasonic imaging system for in-process fabric defect detection

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Lawrence, William P.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    An ultrasonic method and system are provided for monitoring a fabric to identify a defect. A plurality of ultrasonic transmitters generate ultrasonic waves relative to the fabric. An ultrasonic receiver means responsive to the generated ultrasonic waves from the transmitters receives ultrasonic waves coupled through the fabric and generates a signal. An integrated peak value of the generated signal is applied to a digital signal processor and is digitized. The digitized signal is processed to identify a defect in the fabric. The digitized signal processing includes a median value filtering step to filter out high frequency noise. Then a mean value and standard deviation of the median value filtered signal is calculated. The calculated mean value and standard deviation are compared with predetermined threshold values to identify a defect in the fabric.

  4. Neoclassical and anomalous transport in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas with electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1995-08-01

    Neoclassical and anomalous transport fluxes are determined for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas with weak electrostatic fluctuations. The neoclassical and anomalous fluxes are defined based on the ensemble-averaged kinetic equation with the statistically averaged nonlinear term. The anomalous forces derived from that quasilinear term induce the anomalous particle and heat fluxes. The neoclassical banana-plateau particle and heat fluxes and the bootstrap current are also affected by the fluctuations through the parallel anomalous forces and the modified parallel viscosities. The quasilinear term, the anomalous forces, and the anomalous particle and heat fluxes are evaluated from the fluctuating part of the drift kinetic equation. The averaged drift kinetic equation with the quasilinear term is solved for the plateau regime to derive the parallel viscosities modified by the fluctuations. The entropy production rate due to the anomalous transport processes is formulated and used to identify conjugate pairs of the anomalous fluxes and forces, which are connected by the matrix with the Onsager symmetry. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. OPAD data analysis. [Optical Plumes Anomaly Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Kraft, Richard; Whitaker, Kevin; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.; Wallace, Tim L.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained in the framework of an Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program intended to create a rocket engine health monitor based on spectrometric detections of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the exhaust plume are analyzed. The major results include techniques for handling data noise, methods for registration of spectra to wavelength, and a simple automatic process for estimating the metallic component of a spectrum.

  6. Multisensor Network System for Wildfire Detection Using Infrared Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, I.; Serrano, A.; Vergara, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the next step in the evolution of multi-sensor wireless network systems in the early automatic detection of forest fires. This network allows remote monitoring of each of the locations as well as communication between each of the sensors and with the control stations. The result is an increased coverage area, with quicker and safer responses. To determine the presence of a forest wildfire, the system employs decision fusion in thermal imaging, which can exploit various expected characteristics of a real fire, including short-term persistence and long-term increases over time. Results from testing in the laboratory and in a real environment are presented to authenticate and verify the accuracy of the operation of the proposed system. The system performance is gauged by the number of alarms and the time to the first alarm (corresponding to a real fire), for different probability of false alarm (PFA). The necessity of including decision fusion is thereby demonstrated. PMID:23843734

  7. Low-power signal processing devices for portable ECG detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shuenn-Yuh; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Pin; Kao, Wei-Chun

    2008-01-01

    An analog front end for diagnosing and monitoring the behavior of the heart is presented. This sensing front end has two low-power processing devices, including a 5(th)-order Butterworth operational transconductance-C (OTA-C) filter and an 8-bit successive approximation analog-to-digital converter (SAADC). The components fabricated in a 0.18-microm CMOS technology feature with power consumptions of 453 nW (filter) and 940 nW (ADC) at a supply voltage of 1 V, respectively. The system specifications in terms of output noise and linearity associated with the two integrated circuits are described in this paper. PMID:19163002

  8. Detecting fast, online reasoning processes in clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Flores, Amanda; Cobos, Pedro L; López, Francisco J; Godoy, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    In an experiment that used the inconsistency paradigm, experienced clinical psychologists and psychology students performed a reading task using clinical reports and a diagnostic judgment task. The clinical reports provided information about the symptoms of hypothetical clients who had been previously diagnosed with a specific mental disorder. Reading times of inconsistent target sentences were slower than those of control sentences, demonstrating an inconsistency effect. The results also showed that experienced clinicians gave different weights to different symptoms according to their relevance when fluently reading the clinical reports provided, despite the fact that all the symptoms were of equal diagnostic value according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The diagnostic judgment task yielded a similar pattern of results. In contrast to previous findings, the results of the reading task may be taken as direct evidence of the intervention of reasoning processes that occur very early, rapidly, and online. We suggest that these processes are based on the representation of mental disorders and that these representations are particularly suited to fast retrieval from memory and to making inferences. They may also be related to the clinicians' causal reasoning. The implications of these results for clinician training are also discussed. PMID:24274045

  9. Magnetic effects in anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, M.

    1992-12-31

    Spectacular enhancements of magnetic x-ray scattering have been predicted and observed experimentally. These effects are the result of resonant phenomena closely related to anomalous dispersion, and they are strongest at near-edge resonances. The theory of these resonances will be developed with particular attention to the symmetry properties of the scatterer. While the phenomena to be discussed concern magnetic properties the transitions are electric dipole or electric quadrupole in character and represent a subset of the usual anomalous dispersion phenomena. The polarization dependence of the scattering is also considered, and the polarization dependence for magnetic effects is related to that for charge scattering and to Templeton type anisotropic polarization phenomena. It has been found that the strongest effects occur in rare-earths and in actinides for M shell edges. In addition to the scattering properties the theory is applicable to ``forward scattering`` properties such as the Faraday effect and circular dichroism.

  10. Automatic endpoint detection to support the systematic review process.

    PubMed

    Blake, Catherine; Lucic, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Preparing a systematic review can take hundreds of hours to complete, but the process of reconciling different results from multiple studies is the bedrock of evidence-based medicine. We introduce a two-step approach to automatically extract three facets - two entities (the agent and object) and the way in which the entities are compared (the endpoint) - from direct comparative sentences in full-text articles. The system does not require a user to predefine entities in advance and thus can be used in domains where entity recognition is difficult or unavailable. As with a systematic review, the tabular summary produced using the automatically extracted facets shows how experimental results differ between studies. Experiments were conducted using a collection of more than 2million sentences from three journals Diabetes, Carcinogenesis and Endocrinology and two machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM) and a general linear model (GLM). F1 and accuracy measures for the SVM and GLM differed by only 0.01 across all three comparison facets in a randomly selected set of test sentences. The system achieved the best performance of 92% for objects, whereas the accuracy for both agent and endpoints was 73%. F1 scores were higher for objects (0.77) than for endpoints (0.51) or agents (0.47). A situated evaluation of Metformin, a drug to treat diabetes, showed system accuracy of 95%, 83% and 79% for the object, endpoint and agent respectively. The situated evaluation had higher F1 scores of 0.88, 0.64 and 0.62 for object, endpoint, and agent respectively. On average, only 5.31% of the sentences in a full-text article are direct comparisons, but the tabular summaries suggest that these sentences provide a rich source of currently underutilized information that can be used to accelerate the systematic review process and identify gaps where future research should be focused. PMID:26003938