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Sample records for detecting anomalous process

  1. Detection of anomalous events

    DOEpatents

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  2. Reasoning about anomalies: a study of the analytical process of detecting and identifying anomalous behavior in maritime traffic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, Maria; Falkman, Göran; Ziemke, Tom; Kronhamn, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    The goal of visual analytical tools is to support the analytical reasoning process, maximizing human perceptual, understanding and reasoning capabilities in complex and dynamic situations. Visual analytics software must be built upon an understanding of the reasoning process, since it must provide appropriate interactions that allow a true discourse with the information. In order to deepen our understanding of the human analytical process and guide developers in the creation of more efficient anomaly detection systems, this paper investigates how is the human analytical process of detecting and identifying anomalous behavior in maritime traffic data. The main focus of this work is to capture the entire analysis process that an analyst goes through, from the raw data to the detection and identification of anomalous behavior. Three different sources are used in this study: a literature survey of the science of analytical reasoning, requirements specified by experts from organizations with interest in port security and user field studies conducted in different marine surveillance control centers. Furthermore, this study elaborates on how to support the human analytical process using data mining, visualization and interaction methods. The contribution of this paper is twofold: (1) within visual analytics, contribute to the science of analytical reasoning with practical understanding of users tasks in order to develop a taxonomy of interactions that support the analytical reasoning process and (2) within anomaly detection, facilitate the design of future anomaly detector systems when fully automatic approaches are not viable and human participation is needed.

  3. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  4. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  5. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Matsekh, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  6. Anomalous change detection in imagery

    DOEpatents

    Theiler, James P.; Perkins, Simon J.

    2011-05-31

    A distribution-based anomaly detection platform is described that identifies a non-flat background that is specified in terms of the distribution of the data. A resampling approach is also disclosed employing scrambled resampling of the original data with one class specified by the data and the other by the explicit distribution, and solving using binary classification.

  7. Symmetrized local co-registration optimization for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt E; Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    The goal of anomalous change detection (ACD) is to identify what unusual changes have occurred in a scene, based on two images of the scene taken at different times and under different conditions. The actual anomalous changes need to be distinguished from the incidental differences that occur throughout the imagery, and one of the most common and confounding of these incidental differences is due to the misregistration of the images, due to limitations of the registration pre-processing applied to the image pair. We propose a general method to compensate for residual misregistration in any ACD algorithm which constructs an estimate of the degree of 'anomalousness' for every pixel in the image pair. The method computes a modified misregistration-insensitive anomalousness by making local re-registration adjustments to minimize the local anomalousness. In this paper we describe a symmetrized version of our initial algorithm, and find significant performance improvements in the anomalous change detection ROC curves for a number of real and synthetic data sets.

  8. Anomalous human behavior detection: an adaptive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Coen; Halma, Arvid; Schutte, Klamer

    2013-05-01

    Detection of anomalies (outliers or abnormal instances) is an important element in a range of applications such as fault, fraud, suspicious behavior detection and knowledge discovery. In this article we propose a new method for anomaly detection and performed tested its ability to detect anomalous behavior in videos from DARPA's Mind's Eye program, containing a variety of human activities. In this semi-unsupervised task a set of normal instances is provided for training, after which unknown abnormal behavior has to be detected in a test set. The features extracted from the video data have high dimensionality, are sparse and inhomogeneously distributed in the feature space making it a challenging task. Given these characteristics a distance-based method is preferred, but choosing a threshold to classify instances as (ab)normal is non-trivial. Our novel aproach, the Adaptive Outlier Distance (AOD) is able to detect outliers in these conditions based on local distance ratios. The underlying assumption is that the local maximum distance between labeled examples is a good indicator of the variation in that neighborhood, and therefore a local threshold will result in more robust outlier detection. We compare our method to existing state-of-art methods such as the Local Outlier Factor (LOF) and the Local Distance-based Outlier Factor (LDOF). The results of the experiments show that our novel approach improves the quality of the anomaly detection.

  9. Anomalous Cases of Astronaut Helmet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolph, Chester; Moore, Andrew J.; Schubert, Matthew; Woodell, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    An astronaut's helmet is an invariant, rigid image element that is well suited for identification and tracking using current machine vision technology. Future space exploration will benefit from the development of astronaut detection software for search and rescue missions based on EVA helmet identification. However, helmets are solid white, except for metal brackets to attach accessories such as supplementary lights. We compared the performance of a widely used machine vision pipeline on a standard-issue NASA helmet with and without affixed experimental feature-rich patterns. Performance on the patterned helmet was far more robust. We found that four different feature-rich patterns are sufficient to identify a helmet and determine orientation as it is rotated about the yaw, pitch, and roll axes. During helmet rotation the field of view changes to frames containing parts of two or more feature-rich patterns. We took reference images in these locations to fill in detection gaps. These multiple feature-rich patterns references added substantial benefit to detection, however, they generated the majority of the anomalous cases. In these few instances, our algorithm keys in on one feature-rich pattern of the multiple feature-rich pattern reference and makes an incorrect prediction of the location of the other feature-rich patterns. We describe and make recommendations on ways to mitigate anomalous cases in which detection of one or more feature-rich patterns fails. While the number of cases is only a small percentage of the tested helmet orientations, they illustrate important design considerations for future spacesuits. In addition to our four successful feature-rich patterns, we present unsuccessful patterns and discuss the cause of their poor performance from a machine vision perspective. Future helmets designed with these considerations will enable automated astronaut detection and thereby enhance mission operations and extraterrestrial search and rescue.

  10. Anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with ENSO

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K.M.; Ho, C.H.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, we study the structure of anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using re-analysis data obtained from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) and outputs from GEOS climate model simulations. Our results show a very pronounced tropospheric warming over the equatorial central Pacific, with a double maxima located in 15{degrees}N and 15{degrees}/S, symmetric about the equator. This anomaly is in agreement with those found in earlier studies based on satellite estimates and is consistent with the predictions of Rossby wave dynamics. Most interestingly, we find a strong stratospheric temperature signal, which is tightly coupled to, but of opposite sign to the tropospheric anomaly. This temperature anomaly pattern is validated by the GCM simulations with respect to anomalous ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) forcing. The role of interaction between radiation and hydrologic cycle in producing and maintaining the ENSO anomalies is also investigated. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Detecting Anomalous Insiders in Collaborative Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative information systems (CISs) are deployed within a diverse array of environments that manage sensitive information. Current security mechanisms detect insider threats, but they are ill-suited to monitor systems in which users function in dynamic teams. In this paper, we introduce the community anomaly detection system (CADS), an unsupervised learning framework to detect insider threats based on the access logs of collaborative environments. The framework is based on the observation that typical CIS users tend to form community structures based on the subjects accessed (e.g., patients’ records viewed by healthcare providers). CADS consists of two components: 1) relational pattern extraction, which derives community structures and 2) anomaly prediction, which leverages a statistical model to determine when users have sufficiently deviated from communities. We further extend CADS into MetaCADS to account for the semantics of subjects (e.g., patients’ diagnoses). To empirically evaluate the framework, we perform an assessment with three months of access logs from a real electronic health record (EHR) system in a large medical center. The results illustrate our models exhibit significant performance gains over state-of-the-art competitors. When the number of illicit users is low, MetaCADS is the best model, but as the number grows, commonly accessed semantics lead to hiding in a crowd, such that CADS is more prudent. PMID:24489520

  12. Optical Detection of Anomalous Nitrogen in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    VLT Opens New Window towards Our Origins Summary A team of European astronomers [1] has used the UVES spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope to perform a uniquely detailed study of Comet LINEAR (C/2000 WM1) . This is the first time that this powerful instrument has been employed to obtain high-resolution spectra of a comet. At the time of the observations in mid-March 2002, Comet LINEAR was about 180 million km from the Sun, moving outwards after its perihelion passage in January. As comets are believed to carry "pristine" material - left-overs from the formation of the solar system, about 4,600 million years ago - studies of these objects are important to obtain clues about the origins of the solar system and the Earth in particular. The high quality of the data obtained of this moving 9th-magnitude object has permitted a determination of the cometary abundance of various elements and their isotopes [2]. Of particular interest is the unambiguous detection and measurement of the nitrogen-15 isotope. The only other comet in which this isotope has been observed is famous Comet Hale-Bopp - this was during the passage in 1997, when it was much brighter than Comet LINEAR. Most interestingly, Comet LINEAR and Comet Hale-Bopp display the same isotopic abundance ratio, about 1 nitrogen-15 atom for each 140 nitrogen-14 atoms ( 14 N/ 15 N = 140 ± 30) . That is about half of the terrestrial value (272). It is also very different from the result obtained by means of radio measurements of Comet Hale-Bopp ( 14 N/ 15 N = 330 ± 75). Optical and radio measurements concern different molecules (CN and HCN, respectively), and this isotopic anomaly must be explained by some differentiation mechanism. The astronomers conclude that part of the cometary nitrogen is trapped in macromolecules attached to dust particles . The successful entry of UVES into cometary research now opens eagerly awaited opportunities for similiar observations in other, comparatively faint comets. These

  13. A structural framework for anomalous change detection and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    We present a spatially adaptive scheme for automatically searching a pair of images of a scene for unusual and interesting changes. Our motivation is to bring into play structural aspects of image features alongside the spectral attributes used for anomalous change detection (ACD). We leverage a small but informative subset of pixels, namely edge pixels of the images, as anchor points of a Delaunay triangulation to jointly decompose the images into a set of triangular regions, called trixels, which are spectrally uniform. Such decomposition helps in image regularization by simple-function approximation on a feature-adaptive grid. Applying ACD to this trixel grid instead of pixels offers several advantages. It allows: (1) edge-preserving smoothing of images, (2) speed-up of spatial computations by significantly reducing the representation of the images, and (3) the easy recovery of structure of the detected anomalous changes by associating anomalous trixels with polygonal image features. The latter facility further enables the application of shape-theoretic criteria and algorithms to characterize the changes and recognize them as interesting or not. This incorporation of spatial information has the potential to filter out some spurious changes, such as due to parallax, shadows, and misregistration, by identifying and filtering out those that are structurally similar and spatially pervasive. Our framework supports the joint spatial and spectral analysis of images, potentially enabling the design of more robust ACD algorithms.

  14. Use of sonification in the detection of anomalous events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballora, Mark; Cole, Robert J.; Kruesi, Heidi; Greene, Herbert; Monahan, Ganesh; Hall, David L.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the construction of a soundtrack that fuses stock market data with information taken from tweets. This soundtrack, or auditory display, presents the numerical and text data in such a way that anomalous events may be readily detected, even by untrained listeners. The soundtrack generation is flexible, allowing an individual listener to create a unique audio mix from the available information sources. Properly constructed, the display exploits the auditory system's sensitivities to periodicities, to dynamic changes, and to patterns. This type of display could be valuable in environments that demand high levels of situational awareness based on multiple sources of incoming information.

  15. Supervised Detection of Anomalous Light Curves in Massive Astronomical Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-01

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  16. Supervised detection of anomalous light curves in massive astronomical catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-20

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  17. Characterization of diffusion processes: Normal and anomalous regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Samuel B.; de Oliveira, Gilson F.; de Oliveira, Luimar C.; Passerat de Silans, Thierry; Chevrollier, Martine; Oriá, Marcos; de S. Cavalcante, Hugo L. D.

    2016-04-01

    Many man-made and natural processes involve the diffusion of microscopic particles subject to random or chaotic, random-like movements. Besides the normal diffusion characterized by a Gaussian probability density function, whose variance increases linearly in time, so-called anomalous-diffusion regimes can also take place. They are characterized by a variance growing slower (subdiffusive) or faster (superdiffusive) than normal. In fact, many different underlying processes can lead to anomalous diffusion, with qualitative differences between mechanisms producing subdiffusion and mechanisms resulting in superdiffusion. Thus, a general description, encompassing all three regimes and where the specific mechanisms of each system are not explicit, is desirable. Here, our goal is to present a simple method of data analysis that enables one to characterize a model-less diffusion process from data observation, by observing the temporal evolution of the particle spread. To generate diffusive processes in different regimes, we use a Monte-Carlo routine in which both the step-size and the time-delay of the diffusing particles follow Pareto (inverse-power law) distributions, with either finite or diverging statistical momenta. We discuss on the application of this method to real systems.

  18. Anomalous diffusion and scaling in coupled stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Golan; Nemenman, Ilya

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by problems in biochemical kinetics, we study statistical properties of an overdamped Langevin processes with the friction coefficient depending on the state of a similar, unobserved, process. Integrating out the latter, we derive the Pocker-Planck the friction coefficient of the first depends on the state of the second. Integrating out the latter, we derive the Focker-Planck equation for the probability distribution of the former. This has the fonn of diffusion equation with time-dependent diffusion coefficient, resulting in an anomalous diffusion. The diffusion exponent can not be predicted using a simple scaling argument, and anomalous scaling appears as well. The diffusion exponent of the Weiss-Havlin comb model is derived as a special case, and the same exponent holds even for weakly coupled processes. We compare our theoretical predictions with numerical simulations and find an excellent agreement. The findings caution against treating biochemical systems with unobserved dynamical degrees of freedom by means of standandard, diffusive Langevin descritpion.

  19. Weak ergodicity breaking, irreproducibility, and ageing in anomalous diffusion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Metzler, Ralf

    2014-01-14

    Single particle traces are standardly evaluated in terms of time averages of the second moment of the position time series r(t). For ergodic processes, one can interpret such results in terms of the known theories for the corresponding ensemble averaged quantities. In anomalous diffusion processes, that are widely observed in nature over many orders of magnitude, the equivalence between (long) time and ensemble averages may be broken (weak ergodicity breaking), and these time averages may no longer be interpreted in terms of ensemble theories. Here we detail some recent results on weakly non-ergodic systems with respect to the time averaged mean squared displacement, the inherent irreproducibility of individual measurements, and methods to determine the exact underlying stochastic process. We also address the phenomenon of ageing, the dependence of physical observables on the time span between initial preparation of the system and the start of the measurement.

  20. Anomalous diffusion for a correlated process with long jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srokowski, Tomasz

    2011-09-01

    We discuss diffusion properties of a dynamical system, which is characterised by long-tail distributions and finite correlations. The particle velocity has the stable Lévy distribution; it is assumed as a jumping process (the kangaroo process) with a variable jumping rate. Both the exponential and the algebraic form of the covariance-defined for the truncated distribution-are considered. It is demonstrated by numerical calculations that the stationary solution of the master equation for the case of power-law correlations decays with time, but a simple modification of the process makes the tails stable. The main result of the paper is a finding that-in contrast to the velocity fluctuations-the position variance may be finite. It rises with time faster than linearly: the diffusion is anomalously enhanced. On the other hand, a process which follows from a superposition of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck-Lévy processes always leads to position distributions with a divergent variance which means accelerated diffusion.

  1. Detection of the Anomalous Velocity with Subpicosecond Time Resolution in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshi, Shekhar; Pierz, Klaus; Bieler, Mark

    2015-12-01

    We report on the time-resolved detection of the anomalous velocity, constituting charge carriers moving perpendicular to an electric driving field, in undoped GaAs quantum wells. For this we optically excite the quantum wells with circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses, thereby creating a state which breaks time-inversion symmetry. We then employ a quasi-single-cycle terahertz pulse as an electric driving field to induce the anomalous velocity. The electromagnetic radiation emitted from the anomalous velocity is studied with a subpicosecond time resolution and reveals intriguing results. We are able to distinguish between intrinsic (linked to the Berry curvature) and extrinsic (linked to scattering) contributions to the anomalous velocity both originating from the valence band and observe local energy space dependence of the anomalous velocity. Our results thus constitute a significant step towards noninvasive probing of the anomalous velocity locally in the full energy-momentum space and enable the investigation of many popular physical effects such as the anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect on ultrafast time scales.

  2. Detection of the Anomalous Velocity with Subpicosecond Time Resolution in Semiconductor Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshi, Shekhar; Pierz, Klaus; Bieler, Mark

    2015-12-18

    We report on the time-resolved detection of the anomalous velocity, constituting charge carriers moving perpendicular to an electric driving field, in undoped GaAs quantum wells. For this we optically excite the quantum wells with circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses, thereby creating a state which breaks time-inversion symmetry. We then employ a quasi-single-cycle terahertz pulse as an electric driving field to induce the anomalous velocity. The electromagnetic radiation emitted from the anomalous velocity is studied with a subpicosecond time resolution and reveals intriguing results. We are able to distinguish between intrinsic (linked to the Berry curvature) and extrinsic (linked to scattering) contributions to the anomalous velocity both originating from the valence band and observe local energy space dependence of the anomalous velocity. Our results thus constitute a significant step towards noninvasive probing of the anomalous velocity locally in the full energy-momentum space and enable the investigation of many popular physical effects such as the anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect on ultrafast time scales. PMID:26722942

  3. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOEpatents

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  4. A tutorial on inverse problems for anomalous diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Bangti; Rundell, William

    2015-03-01

    Over the last two decades, anomalous diffusion processes in which the mean squares variance grows slower or faster than that in a Gaussian process have found many applications. At a macroscopic level, these processes are adequately described by fractional differential equations, which involves fractional derivatives in time or/and space. The fractional derivatives describe either history mechanism or long range interactions of particle motions at a microscopic level. The new physics can change dramatically the behavior of the forward problems. For example, the solution operator of the time fractional diffusion diffusion equation has only limited smoothing property, whereas the solution for the space fractional diffusion equation may contain weak singularity. Naturally one expects that the new physics will impact related inverse problems in terms of uniqueness, stability, and degree of ill-posedness. The last aspect is especially important from a practical point of view, i.e., stably reconstructing the quantities of interest. In this paper, we employ a formal analytic and numerical way, especially the two-parameter Mittag-Leffler function and singular value decomposition, to examine the degree of ill-posedness of several ‘classical’ inverse problems for fractional differential equations involving a Djrbashian-Caputo fractional derivative in either time or space, which represent the fractional analogues of that for classical integral order differential equations. We discuss four inverse problems, i.e., backward fractional diffusion, sideways problem, inverse source problem and inverse potential problem for time fractional diffusion, and inverse Sturm-Liouville problem, Cauchy problem, backward fractional diffusion and sideways problem for space fractional diffusion. It is found that contrary to the wide belief, the influence of anomalous diffusion on the degree of ill-posedness is not definitive: it can either significantly improve or worsen the conditioning of

  5. Automated Detection of Anomalous Shipping Manifests to Identify Illicit Trade

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Chikkagoudar, Satish

    2013-11-12

    We describe an approach to analyzing trade data which uses clustering to detect similarities across shipping manifest records, classification to evaluate clustering results and categorize new unseen shipping data records, and visual analytics to provide to support situation awareness in dynamic decision making to monitor and warn against the movement of radiological threat materials through search, analysis and forecasting capabilities. The evaluation of clustering results through classification and systematic inspection of the clusters show the clusters have strong semantic cohesion and offer novel ways to detect transactions related to nuclear smuggling.

  6. Specializing network analysis to detect anomalous insider actions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Zhang, Wen; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative information systems (CIS) enable users to coordinate efficiently over shared tasks in complex distributed environments. For flexibility, they provide users with broad access privileges, which, as a side-effect, leave such systems vulnerable to various attacks. Some of the more damaging malicious activities stem from internal misuse, where users are authorized to access system resources. A promising class of insider threat detection models for CIS focuses on mining access patterns from audit logs, however, current models are limited in that they assume organizations have significant resources to generate label cases for training classifiers or assume the user has committed a large number of actions that deviate from “normal” behavior. In lieu of the previous assumptions, we introduce an approach that detects when specific actions of an insider deviate from expectation in the context of collaborative behavior. Specifically, in this paper, we introduce a specialized network anomaly detection model, or SNAD, to detect such events. This approach assesses the extent to which a user influences the similarity of the group of users that access a particular record in the CIS. From a theoretical perspective, we show that the proposed model is appropriate for detecting insider actions in dynamic collaborative systems. From an empirical perspective, we perform an extensive evaluation of SNAD with the access logs of two distinct environments: the patient record access logs a large electronic health record system (6,015 users, 130,457 patients and 1,327,500 accesses) and the editing logs of Wikipedia (2,394,385 revisors, 55,200 articles and 6,482,780 revisions). We compare our model with several competing methods and demonstrate SNAD is significantly more effective: on average it achieves 20–30% greater area under an ROC curve. PMID:23399988

  7. Multiphoton Process and Anomalous Potential of Cell Membrane by Laser Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Kaixi; Zhao, Qingxun; Cui, Zhiyun; Zhar, Ping; Dong, Lifang

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, by the use of quantum biology and quantum optics, the laser induced potential variation of cell membrane has been studied. Theoretically, we have found a method of calculating the monophoton and multiphoton processes in the formation of the anomalous potential of cell membrane. In contrast with the experimental results, our numerical result is in the same order. Therefore, we have found the possibility of cancer caused by the laser induced anomalous cell potential.

  8. Anomalous Experiences, Trauma, and Symbolization Processes at the Frontiers between Psychoanalysis and Cognitive Neurosciences.

    PubMed

    Rabeyron, Thomas; Loose, Tianna

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous or exceptional experiences are uncommon experiences which are usually interpreted as being paranormal by those who report them. These experiences have long remained difficult to explain, but current progress in cognitive neuroscience and psychoanalysis sheds light on the contexts in which they emerge, as well as on their underlying processes. Following a brief description of the different types of anomalous experiences, we underline how they can be better understood at the frontiers between psychoanalysis and cognitive neurosciences. In this regard, three main lines of research are discussed and illustrated, alongside clinical cases which come from a clinical service specializing in anomalous experiences. First, we study the links between anomalous experiences and hallucinatory processes, by showing that anomalous experiences frequently occur as a specific reaction to negative life events, in which case they mainly take the form of non-pathological hallucinations. Next, we propose to analyze these experiences from the perspective of their traumatic aspects and the altered states of consciousness they often imply. Finally, these experiences are considered to be the consequence of a hypersensitivity that can be linked to an increase in psychic permeability. In conclusion, these different processes lead us to consider anomalous experiences as primary forms of symbolization and transformation of the subjective experience, especially during, or after traumatic situations. PMID:26732646

  9. Anomalous Experiences, Trauma, and Symbolization Processes at the Frontiers between Psychoanalysis and Cognitive Neurosciences

    PubMed Central

    Rabeyron, Thomas; Loose, Tianna

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous or exceptional experiences are uncommon experiences which are usually interpreted as being paranormal by those who report them. These experiences have long remained difficult to explain, but current progress in cognitive neuroscience and psychoanalysis sheds light on the contexts in which they emerge, as well as on their underlying processes. Following a brief description of the different types of anomalous experiences, we underline how they can be better understood at the frontiers between psychoanalysis and cognitive neurosciences. In this regard, three main lines of research are discussed and illustrated, alongside clinical cases which come from a clinical service specializing in anomalous experiences. First, we study the links between anomalous experiences and hallucinatory processes, by showing that anomalous experiences frequently occur as a specific reaction to negative life events, in which case they mainly take the form of non-pathological hallucinations. Next, we propose to analyze these experiences from the perspective of their traumatic aspects and the altered states of consciousness they often imply. Finally, these experiences are considered to be the consequence of a hypersensitivity that can be linked to an increase in psychic permeability. In conclusion, these different processes lead us to consider anomalous experiences as primary forms of symbolization and transformation of the subjective experience, especially during, or after traumatic situations. PMID:26732646

  10. Anomalous/Fractional Diffusion in Particle Acceleration Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    This talk is aimed at reviewing a certain number of theoretical aspects concerning the relation between stochastic acceleration and anomalous/fractional transport of particles. As a matter of fact, anomalous velocity-space diffusion is required within any stochastic acceleration scenario to explain the formation of the ubiquitous power-law tail of non-thermal particles, as observed e.g. in the accelerated distribution of electrons during solar flares. I will establish a classification scheme for stochastic acceleration models involving turbulence in magnetized plasmas. This classification takes into account both the properties of the accelerating electromagnetic field, and the nature of the spatial transport (possibly fractional) of charged particles in the acceleration region. I will also discuss recent attempts to obtain spatially non-local and fractional diffusion equations directly from first principles, starting either from the Fokker-Planck equation in the large mean free-path regime or the Boltzmann equation involving velocity-space relaxation toward the kappa distribution instead of the standard Maxwellian distribution.

  11. Towards entropy detection of anomalous mass and momentum exchange in incompressible fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naterer, G. F.; Rinn, D.

    2002-08-01

    An entropy-based approach is presented for assessment of computational accuracy in incompressible flow problems. It is shown that computational entropy can serve as an effective parameter in detecting erroneous or anomalous predictions of mass and momentum transport in the flow field. In the present paper, the fluid flow equations and second law of thermodynamics are discretized by a Galerkin finite-element method with linear, isoparametric triangular elements. It is shown that a weighted entropy residual is closely related to truncation error; this relationship is examined in an application problem involving incompressible flow through a converging channel. In particular, regions exhibiting anomalous flow behaviour, such as under-predicted velocities, appear together with analogous trends in the weighted entropy residual. It is anticipated that entropy-based error detection can provide important steps towards improved accuracy in computational fluid flow. Copyright

  12. Detecting anomalous CO 2 flux using space borne spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Prasun K.; van der Meer, Freek; van Dijk, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Over the time-scale, earth's atmospheric CO 2 concentration has varied and that is mostly determined by balance among the geochemical processes including burial of organic carbon in sediments, silicate rock weathering and volcanic activity. The best recorded atmospheric CO 2 variability is derived from Vostok ice core that records last four glacial/interglacial cycles. The present CO 2 concentration of earth's atmosphere has exceeded far that it was predicted from the ice core data. Other than rapid industrialization and urbanization since last century, geo-natural hazards such as volcanic activity, leakage from hydrocarbon reservoirs and spontaneous combustion of coal contribute a considerable amount of CO 2 to the atmosphere. Spontaneous combustion of coal is common occurrence in most coal producing countries and sometimes it could be in an enormous scale. Remote sensing has already proved to be a significant tool in coalfire identification and monitoring studies. However, coalfire related CO 2 quantification from remote sensing data has not endeavoured yet by scientific communities because of low spectral resolution of commercially available remote sensing data and relatively sparse CO 2 plume than other geological hazards like volcanic activity. The present research has attempted two methods to identify the CO 2 flux emitted from coalfires in a coalmining region in north China. Firstly, a band rationing method was used for column atmospheric retrieval of CO 2 and secondly atmospheric models were simulated in fast atmospheric signature code (FASCOD) to understand the local radiation transport and then the model was implemented with the inputs from hyperspectral remote sensing data. It was observed that retrieval of columnar abundance of CO 2 with the band rationing method is faster as less simulation required in FASCOD. Alternatively, the inversion model could retrieve CO 2 concentration from a (certain) source because it excludes the uncertainties in the higher

  13. Uncorrelated versus independent elliptically-contoured distributions for anomalous change detection in hyperspectral imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Scovel, James C

    2008-01-01

    The detection of actual changes in a pair of images is confounded by the inadvertent but pervasive differences that inevitably arise whenever two pictures are taken of the same scene, but at different times and under different conditions. These differences include effects due to illumination, calibration, misregistration, etc. If the actual changes are assumed to be rare, then one can 'learn' what the pervasive differences are, and can identify the deviations from this pattern as the anomalous changes. A recently proposed framework for anomalous change detection recasts the problem as one of binary classification between pixel pairs in the data and pixel pairs that are independently chosen from the two images. When an elliptically-contoured (EC) distribution is assumed for the data, then analytical expressions can be derived for the measure of anomalousness of change. However, these expression are only available for a limited class of EC distributions. By replacing independent pixel pairs with uncorrelated pixel pairs, an approximate solution can be found for a much broader class of EC distributions. The performance of this approximation is investigated analytically and empirically, and includes experiments comparing the detection of real changes in real data.

  14. Real-time detection and classification of anomalous events in streaming data

    DOEpatents

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Goodall, John R.; Iannacone, Michael D.; Laska, Jason A.; Harrison, Lane T.

    2016-04-19

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The events can be displayed to a user in user-defined groupings in an animated fashion. The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The atypical traffic patterns can then be classified as being of interest or not. In one particular example, in a network environment, the classification can be whether the network traffic is malicious or not.

  15. Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

    2009-05-29

    This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were

  16. Detection of Anomalous Insiders in Collaborative Environments via Relational Analysis of Access Logs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Malin, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative information systems (CIS) are deployed within a diverse array of environments, ranging from the Internet to intelligence agencies to healthcare. It is increasingly the case that such systems are applied to manage sensitive information, making them targets for malicious insiders. While sophisticated security mechanisms have been developed to detect insider threats in various file systems, they are neither designed to model nor to monitor collaborative environments in which users function in dynamic teams with complex behavior. In this paper, we introduce a community-based anomaly detection system (CADS), an unsupervised learning framework to detect insider threats based on information recorded in the access logs of collaborative environments. CADS is based on the observation that typical users tend to form community structures, such that users with low a nity to such communities are indicative of anomalous and potentially illicit behavior. The model consists of two primary components: relational pattern extraction and anomaly detection. For relational pattern extraction, CADS infers community structures from CIS access logs, and subsequently derives communities, which serve as the CADS pattern core. CADS then uses a formal statistical model to measure the deviation of users from the inferred communities to predict which users are anomalies. To empirically evaluate the threat detection model, we perform an analysis with six months of access logs from a real electronic health record system in a large medical center, as well as a publicly-available dataset for replication purposes. The results illustrate that CADS can distinguish simulated anomalous users in the context of real user behavior with a high degree of certainty and with significant performance gains in comparison to several competing anomaly detection models. PMID:25485309

  17. Anomalous low frequency dissipation processes in metal springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSalvo, Riccardo; Di Cintio, Arianna; Marchesoni, Fabio; Bhawal, Abhik

    2010-05-01

    The dissipation processes of leaf springs used in seismic isolation chains of Gravitational Wave detectors have been studied. A low frequency phase transition from visco us-like to fractal-like dissipation, controlled by Self Organized Criticality of dislocations, was observed. The new understandings suggest different best practices for the operations of the seismic isolation chains of the second generation of Gravitational Wave observatories and require new techniques and materials for the third generation.

  18. Workshop targets development of geodetic transient detection methods: 2009 SCEC Annual Meeting: Workshop on transient anomalous strain detection; Palm Springs, California, 12-13 September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray-Moraleda, Jessica R.; Lohman, Rowena

    2010-01-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) is a community of researchers at institutions worldwide working to improve understanding of earthquakes and mitigate earthquake risk. One of SCEC's priority objectives is to “develop a geodetic network processing system that will detect anomalous strain transients.” Given the growing number of continuously recording geodetic networks consisting of hundreds of stations, an automated means for systematically searching data for transient signals, especially in near real time, is critical for network operations, hazard monitoring, and event response. The SCEC Transient Detection Test Exercise began in 2008 to foster an active community of researchers working on this problem, explore promising methods, and combine effective approaches in novel ways. A workshop was held in California to assess what has been learned thus far and discuss areas of focus as the project moves forward.

  19. Anomalous diffusion due to hindering by mobile obstacles undergoing Brownian motion or Orstein-Ulhenbeck processes.

    PubMed

    Berry, Hugues; Chaté, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    In vivo measurements of the passive movements of biomolecules or vesicles in cells consistently report "anomalous diffusion," where mean-squared displacements scale as a power law of time with exponent α<1 (subdiffusion). While the detailed mechanisms causing such behaviors are not always elucidated, movement hindrance by obstacles is often invoked. However, our understanding of how hindered diffusion leads to subdiffusion is based on diffusion amidst randomly located immobile obstacles. Here, we have used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate transient subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with various modes of mobility. Our simulations confirm that the anomalous regimes rapidly disappear when the obstacles move by Brownian motion. By contrast, mobile obstacles with more confined displacements, e.g., Orstein-Ulhenbeck motion, are shown to preserve subdiffusive regimes. The mean-squared displacement of tracked protein displays convincing power laws with anomalous exponent α that varies with the density of Orstein-Ulhenbeck (OU) obstacles or the relaxation time scale of the OU process. In particular, some of the values we observed are significantly below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles in two dimensions. Therefore, our results show that subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with OU type of motion may account for the large variation range exhibited by experimental measurements in living cells and may explain that some experimental estimates are below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles. PMID:25353510

  20. Anomalous diffusion due to hindering by mobile obstacles undergoing Brownian motion or Orstein-Ulhenbeck processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Hugues; Chaté, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    In vivo measurements of the passive movements of biomolecules or vesicles in cells consistently report "anomalous diffusion," where mean-squared displacements scale as a power law of time with exponent α <1 (subdiffusion). While the detailed mechanisms causing such behaviors are not always elucidated, movement hindrance by obstacles is often invoked. However, our understanding of how hindered diffusion leads to subdiffusion is based on diffusion amidst randomly located immobile obstacles. Here, we have used Monte Carlo simulations to investigate transient subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with various modes of mobility. Our simulations confirm that the anomalous regimes rapidly disappear when the obstacles move by Brownian motion. By contrast, mobile obstacles with more confined displacements, e.g., Orstein-Ulhenbeck motion, are shown to preserve subdiffusive regimes. The mean-squared displacement of tracked protein displays convincing power laws with anomalous exponent α that varies with the density of Orstein-Ulhenbeck (OU) obstacles or the relaxation time scale of the OU process. In particular, some of the values we observed are significantly below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles in two dimensions. Therefore, our results show that subdiffusion due to mobile obstacles with OU type of motion may account for the large variation range exhibited by experimental measurements in living cells and may explain that some experimental estimates are below the universal value predicted for immobile obstacles.

  1. Dynamical approach to anomalous diffusion: Response of Lévy processes to a perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefán, György; Floriani, Elena; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    1994-10-01

    Lévy statistics are derived from a dynamical system, which can be either Hamiltonian or not, using a master equation approach. We compare these predictions to the random walk approach recently developed by Zumofen and Klafter for both the nonstationary [Phys. Rev. E 47, 851 (1993)] and stationary [Physica A 196, 102 (1993)] case. We study the unperturbed dynamics of the system analytically and numerically and evaluate the time evolution of the second moment of the probability distribution. We also study the response of the dynamical system undergoing anomalous diffusion to an external perturbation and show that if the slow regression to equilibrium of the variable ``velocity'' is triggered by the perturbation, the process of diffusion of the ``space'' variable takes place under nonstationary conditions and a conductivity steadily increasing with time is generated in the early part of the response process. In the regime of extremely long times the conductivity becomes constant with a value, though, that does not correspond to the prescriptions of the ordinary Green-Kubo treatments.

  2. Study of the anomalous process {gamma}{pi}{yields}{pi}{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Alkofer, R.

    1995-08-01

    The {gamma}{pi} {yields} {pi}{pi} form factor, F{sup 3{pi}}(s), is calculated in generalized impulse approximation within the Dyson-Schwinger Equation framework. This is an anomalous process and as such its form is a fundamentally important characteristic of the quantum field theoretical structure of QCD because it signals the breaking of the U{sub A} symmetry by quantization. There is only one experimental measurement of F{sup 3{pi}}(s) at s {approximately} 8m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, which has large errors, however, there is an approved experiment at CEBAF to study F{sup 3{pi}}(s) in the reaction {gamma}{pi}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} near threshold. This is to be done by measuring {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}n cross sections near t {approx_equal} {sup -}m{sub {pi}}{sup 2}. Present calculations of F{sup 3{pi}}(s) are either unrelated to QCD or rely on {open_quotes}low-energy{close_quotes} expansions. The approach we employ, which manifestly incorporates the large space-like-q{sup 2} renormalization group properties of QCD and allows a realistic extrapolation to small space-like-q{sup 2}, allows us to go beyond such {open_quotes}low-energy{close_quotes} expansions and relate F{sup 3{pi}}(s) to the structure of the effective quark-quark interaction in the infrared. Our preliminary results are encouraging. The chiral limit value, F{sup 3{pi}}(s=0), obtained in our approach agrees with that which one expects from the connection between anomalous processes and the quantization of QCD. Our results also indicate that the form factor grows smoothly away from the chiral point. Our detailed calculation will allow us to address the question of the reliability of the extrapolation to the pion mass shell that is necessary in interpreting the data.

  3. Detecting determinism from point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Mormann, Florian; Kreuz, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The detection of a nonrandom structure from experimental data can be crucial for the classification, understanding, and interpretation of the generating process. We here introduce a rank-based nonlinear predictability score to detect determinism from point process data. Thanks to its modular nature, this approach can be adapted to whatever signature in the data one considers indicative of deterministic structure. After validating our approach using point process signals from deterministic and stochastic model dynamics, we show an application to neuronal spike trains recorded in the brain of an epilepsy patient. While we illustrate our approach in the context of temporal point processes, it can be readily applied to spatial point processes as well.

  4. Unconscious processes improve lie detection.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Marc-André; Greifeneder, Rainer; Scharmach, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The capacity to identify cheaters is essential for maintaining balanced social relationships, yet humans have been shown to be generally poor deception detectors. In fact, a plethora of empirical findings holds that individuals are only slightly better than chance when discerning lies from truths. Here, we report 5 experiments showing that judges' ability to detect deception greatly increases after periods of unconscious processing. Specifically, judges who were kept from consciously deliberating outperformed judges who were encouraged to do so or who made a decision immediately; moreover, unconscious thinkers' detection accuracy was significantly above chance level. The reported experiments further show that this improvement comes about because unconscious thinking processes allow for integrating the particularly rich information basis necessary for accurate lie detection. These findings suggest that the human mind is not unfit to distinguish between truth and deception but that this ability resides in previously overlooked processes. PMID:24219784

  5. Detection, visualization and evaluation of anomalous coronary anatomy on 16-slice multidetector-row CT.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Peter M A; Dorgelo, Joost; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2004-12-01

    Early identification and evaluation of relatively frequent anomalous coronary anatomy is quite relevant because of the occurrence of sudden cardiac death or related symptoms of myocardial ischemia. Selective coronary angiography (CAG) is invasive, expensive and cannot always provide the required information adequately. Recently, non-invasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) have been shown to provide a good anatomical view of the coronary artery tree. This study aims to demonstrate the value of 16-MDCT for evaluation of anomalous coronary anatomy. In 13 patients scanned using 16-MDCT, six different coronary anomalies were diagnosed [two absent left main, one single vessel left coronary artery (LCA), three LCA originating from the right (two with interarterial course), six right coronary artery originating from the left, one double left anterior descending (LAD)]. Mean diagnostic quality, recorded by two observers using a 5-point scale (1= non-diagnostic to 5= excellent diagnostic quality), resulted in a mean score of 3.73 (SD 1.19) without any non-diagnostic result. MDCT offers an accurate diagnostic modality to visualize the origin and course of anomalous coronary arteries by a three-dimensional display of anatomy. Shortcomings in CAG can be overcome by the use of contrast-enhanced MDCT. PMID:15452665

  6. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. Anomalous shutdowns can occur as a result of bright object violations which trigger the Bright Scene Detection or Software Global Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur as a result of SBC hardware problems. The recovery from anomalous shutdown procedure consists of four tests: 1} a signal processing electronics check, 2} a slow high voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, 3} a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the full operating voltage, and 4} a Fold Test. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on Proposal 12738 from Cycle 19.

  7. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    This proposal is designed to permit recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. Anomalous shutdowns can occur as a result of bright object violations which trigger the Bright Scene Detection or Software Global Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur as a result of SBC hardware problems. The recovery from anomalous shutdown procedure consists of four tests: a signal processing electronics check, a slow high voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the full operating voltage, and lastly, a Fold Test. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on proposal 11884, visits 1 to 4.

  8. Quantized spin waves in single Co/Pt dots detected by anomalous Hall effect based ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, N. Furuta, M.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.; Shimatsu, T.

    2014-12-15

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) based ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were carried out on perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer single dots of 0.4–3 μm in diameter. The resonance behavior was measured by detecting the decrease of perpendicular magnetization component due to magnetization precession. Resonance behavior was observed as a clear decrease of Hall voltages, and the obtained resonance fields were consistent with the results of vector-network-analyzer FMR. Spin-waves with cylindrical symmetry became significant by decreasing the dot diameter, and quantized multiple resonances were observed in the dot of 0.4 μm in diameter. The AHE based FMR proposed here is a powerful method to approach magnetization dynamics including spin waves and non-linear behavior excited in a finite nanostructure.

  9. Detection of Anomalous Machining Damages in Inconel 718 and TI 6-4 by Eddy Current Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C. H.; Shimon, M.; Nakagawa, N.

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports on an eddy current (EC) study aimed at detecting anomalous machining damages in Inconel 718 and Ti 6-4 samples, including (i) surface discontinuities such as re-depositing of chips onto the machined surface, and (ii) microstructural damages manifested as a white surface layer and a subsurface layer of distorted grains, typically tens of microns thick. A series of pristine and machine-damaged coupons were studied by EC scans using a differential probe operated at 2 MHz to detect discontinuous surface anomalies, and by swept high frequency EC (SHFEC) measurements from 0.5 MHz to 65.5 MHz using proprietary detection coils to detect surface microstructural damages. In general, the EC c-scan data from machine-damaged surfaces show spatial variations with larger standard deviations than those from the undamaged surfaces. In some cases, the c-scan images exhibit characteristic bipolar indications in good spatial correlation with surface anomalies revealed by optical microscopy and laser profilometry. Results of the SHFEC measurements indicate a reduced near-surface conductivity of the damaged surfaces compared to the undamaged surfaces.

  10. Anomalous reaction-transport processes: The dynamics beyond the law of mass action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Daniel; Fedotov, Sergei; Méndez, Vicenç

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we reconsider the mass action law (MAL) for the anomalous reversible reaction A⇄B with diffusion. We provide a mesoscopic description of this reaction when the transitions between two states A and B are governed by anomalous (heavy-tailed) waiting-time distributions. We derive the set of mesoscopic integro-differential equations for the mean densities of reacting and diffusing particles in both states. We show that the effective reaction rate memory kernels in these equations and the uniform asymptotic states depend on transport characteristics such as jumping rates. This is in contradiction with the classical picture of MAL. We find that transport can even induce an extinction of the particles such that the density of particles A or B tends asymptotically to zero. We verify analytical results by Monte Carlo simulations and show that the mesoscopic densities exhibit a transient growth before decay.

  11. Error Detection Processes in Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allwood, Carl Martin

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study which analyzed problem solvers' error detection processes by instructing subjects to think aloud when solving statistical problems. Effects of evaluative episodes on error detection, detection of different error types, error detection processes per se, and relationship of error detection behavior to problem-solving proficiency…

  12. Anomalous diffusion and non-monotonic relaxation processes in Ge-Se liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Can; Raty, Jean-Yves; Micoulaut, Matthieu

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamical properties of liquid GexSe100-x as a function of Ge content by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations for a certain number of temperatures in the liquid state. The focus is set on ten compositions (where x ≤ 33%) encompassing the reported flexible to rigid and rigid to stressed-rigid transitions. We examine diffusion coefficients, diffusion activation energies, glassy relaxation behavior, and viscosity of these liquids from Van Hove correlation and intermediate scattering functions. At fixed temperature, all properties/functions exhibit an anomalous behavior with Ge content in the region 18%-22%, and provide a direct and quantitative link to the network rigidity.

  13. Leveraging Social Networks to Detect Anomalous Insider Actions in Collaborative Environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Zhang, Wen; Malin, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative information systems (CIS) enable users to coordinate efficiently over shared tasks. T hey are often deployed in complex dynamic systems that provide users with broad access privileges, but also leave the system vulnerable to various attacks. Techniques to detect threats originating from beyond the system are relatively mature, but methods to detect insider threats are still evolving. A promising class of insider threat detection models for CIS focus on the communities that manifest between users based on the usage of common subjects in the system. However, current methods detect only when a user’s aggregate behavior is intruding, not when specific actions have deviated from expectation. In this paper, we introduce a method called specialized network anomaly detection (SNAD) to detect such events. SNAD assembles the community of users that access a particular subject and assesses if similarities of the community with and without a certain user are sufficiently different. We present a theoretical basis and perform an extensive empirical evaluation with the access logs of two distinct environments: those of a large electronic health record system (6,015 users, 130,457 patients and 1,327,500 accesses) and the editing logs of Wikipedia (2,388,955 revisors, 55,200 articles and 6,482,780 revisions). We compare SNAD with several competing methods and demonstrate it is significantly more effective: on average it achieves 20–30% greater area under an ROC curve. PMID:25621314

  14. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  15. Ant Colony Optimization detects anomalous aerosol variations associated with the Chile earthquake of 27 February 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhoondzadeh, M.

    2015-04-01

    This study attempts to acknowledge AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) seismo-atmospheric anomalies around the time of the Chile earthquake of 27 February 2010. Since AOD precursor alone might not be useful as an accurate and stand alone criteria for the earthquake anomalies detection, therefore it would be more appropriate to use and integrate a variety of other precursors to reduce the uncertainty of potential detected seismic anomalies. To achieve this aim, eight other precursors including GPS-TEC (Total Electron Content), H+, He+, O+ densities (cm-3) and total ion density (cm-3) from IAP experiment, electron density (cm-3) and electron temperature (K) from ISL experiment and VLF electric field from ICE experiment have been surveyed to detect unusual variations around the time and location of the Chile earthquake. Moreover, three methods including Interquartile, ANN (Artificial Neural Network) and ACO (Ant Colony Optimization) have been implemented to observe the discord patterns in time series of the AOD precursor. All of the methods indicate a clear abnormal increase in time series of AOD data, 2 days prior to event. Also a striking anomaly is observed in time series of TEC data, 6 days preceding the earthquake. Using the analysis of ICE data, a prominent anomaly is detected in the VLF electric field measurement, 1 day before the earthquake. The time series of H+, He+, O+ densities (cm-3) and total ion density (cm-3) from IAP and also electron density (cm-3) and electron temperature (K) from ISL, illustrate the abnormal behaviors, 3 days before the event. It should be noted that the acknowledgment of the different lead times in outcomes of the implemented precursors strictly depend on the proper understanding of Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere (LAI) coupling mechanism during seismic activities. It means that these different anomalies dates between LAI precursors can be a hint of truthfulness of multi-precursors analysis.

  16. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp2 carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations. PMID:25331874

  17. The Anomalous Process γπ → ππ and its Impact on the π0 Transition Form Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubis, Bastian

    2014-12-01

    The process γπ → ππ, in the limit of vanishing photon and pion energies, is determined by the chiral anomaly. This reaction can be investigated experimentally using Primakoff reactions, as currently done at COMPASS. We derive a dispersive representation that allows one to extract the chiral anomaly from cross-section measurements up to 1 GeV, where effects of the ρ resonance are included model-independently via the ππ P-wave phase shift. We discuss how this amplitude serves as an important input to a dispersion-theoretical analysis of the π0 transition form factor, which in turn is a vital ingredient to the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon.

  18. Impact of mesoscale meteorological processes on anomalous radar propagation conditions over the northern Adriatic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telišman Prtenjak, Maja; Horvat, Igor; Tomažić, Igor; Kvakić, Marko; Viher, Mladen; Grisogono, Branko

    2015-09-01

    The impact of mesoscale structures on the occurrence of anomalous propagation (AP) conditions for radio waves, including ducts, superrefractive, and subrefractive conditions, was studied. The chosen meteorological situations are the bora wind and the sporadic sea/land breeze (SB/LB) during three selected cases over a large portion of the northern Adriatic. For this purpose, we used available radio soundings and numerical mesoscale model simulations (of real cases and their sensitivity tests) at a horizontal resolution of 1.5 km and 81 vertical levels. The model simulated the occurrences of AP conditions satisfactorily, although their intensities and frequency were underestimated at times. Certain difficulties appeared in reproducing the vertical profile of the modified refractive index, which is mainly dependent on the accuracy of the modeled humidity. The spatial distributions of summer AP conditions reveal that the surface layer above the sea (roughly between 30 and 100 m asl) is often covered by superrefractive conditions and ducts. The SB is highly associated with the formations of AP conditions: (i) in the first 100 m asl, where trapping and superrefractive conditions form because of the advection of cold and moist air, and (ii) inside the transition layer between the SB body and the elevated return flow in the form of subrefractive conditions. When deep convection occurs, all three types of AP conditions are caused by the downdraft beneath the cumulonimbus cloud base in its mature phase that creates smaller but marked pools of cold and dry air. The bora wind usually creates a pattern of AP conditions associated with the hydraulic jump and influences distribution of AP conditions over the sea surface.

  19. Noise as a mechanism of anomalous face processing among persons with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Bruce K.; Spencer, Justine M. Y.; King, Jelena P.; Sekuler, Allison B.; Bennett, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that people with Schizophrenia (SCZ) have altered visual perception and cognition, including impaired face processing. However, the mechanism(s) underlying this observation are not yet known. Eye movement studies have found that people with SCZ do not direct their gaze to the most informative regions of the face (e.g., the eyes). This suggests that SCZ patients may be less able to extract the most relevant face information and therefore have decreased calculation efficiency. In addition, research with non-face stimuli indicates that SCZ is associated with increased levels of internal noise. Importantly, both calculation efficiency and internal noise have been shown to underpin face perception among healthy observers. Therefore, the current study applies noise masking to upright and inverted faces to determine if face processing deficits among those with SCZ are the result of changes in calculation efficiency, internal noise, or both. Consistent with previous results, SCZ participants exhibited higher contrast thresholds in order to identify masked target faces. However, higher thresholds were associated with increases in internal noise but unrelated to changes in calculation efficiency. These results suggest that SCZ-related face processing deficits are the result of a decreased noise-to-signal ratio. The source of increased processing noise among these patients is unclear, but may emanate from abnormal neural dynamics. PMID:23882228

  20. Semantic Processing Persists despite Anomalous Syntactic Category: ERP Evidence from Chinese Passive Sentences.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wu, Fuyun; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    The syntax-first model and the parallel/interactive models make different predictions regarding whether syntactic category processing has a temporal and functional primacy over semantic processing. To further resolve this issue, an event-related potential experiment was conducted on 24 Chinese speakers reading Chinese passive sentences with the passive marker BEI (NP1 + BEI + NP2 + Verb). This construction was selected because it is the most-commonly used Chinese passive and very much resembles German passives, upon which the syntax-first hypothesis was primarily based. We manipulated semantic consistency (consistent vs. inconsistent) and syntactic category (noun vs. verb) of the critical verb, yielding four conditions: CORRECT (correct sentences), SEMANTIC (semantic anomaly), SYNTACTIC (syntactic category anomaly), and COMBINED (combined anomalies). Results showed both N400 and P600 effects for sentences with semantic anomaly, with syntactic category anomaly, or with combined anomalies. Converging with recent findings of Chinese ERP studies on various constructions, our study provides further evidence that syntactic category processing does not precede semantic processing in reading Chinese. PMID:26125621

  1. Semantic Processing Persists despite Anomalous Syntactic Category: ERP Evidence from Chinese Passive Sentences

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Wu, Fuyun; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    The syntax-first model and the parallel/interactive models make different predictions regarding whether syntactic category processing has a temporal and functional primacy over semantic processing. To further resolve this issue, an event-related potential experiment was conducted on 24 Chinese speakers reading Chinese passive sentences with the passive marker BEI (NP1 + BEI + NP2 + Verb). This construction was selected because it is the most-commonly used Chinese passive and very much resembles German passives, upon which the syntax-first hypothesis was primarily based. We manipulated semantic consistency (consistent vs. inconsistent) and syntactic category (noun vs. verb) of the critical verb, yielding four conditions: CORRECT (correct sentences), SEMANTIC (semantic anomaly), SYNTACTIC (syntactic category anomaly), and COMBINED (combined anomalies). Results showed both N400 and P600 effects for sentences with semantic anomaly, with syntactic category anomaly, or with combined anomalies. Converging with recent findings of Chinese ERP studies on various constructions, our study provides further evidence that syntactic category processing does not precede semantic processing in reading Chinese. PMID:26125621

  2. Event-Related Potentials Reveal Anomalous Morphosyntactic Processing in Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantiani, Chiara; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Perego, Paolo; Molteni, Massimo; Guasti, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    In the light of the literature describing oral language difficulties in developmental dyslexia (DD), event-related potentials were used in order to compare morphosyntactic processing in 16 adults with DD (aged 20-28 years) and unimpaired controls. Sentences including subject-verb agreement violations were presented auditorily, with grammaticality…

  3. Online Deviation Detection for Medical Processes

    PubMed Central

    Christov, Stefan C.; Avrunin, George S.; Clarke, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Human errors are a major concern in many medical processes. To help address this problem, we are investigating an approach for automatically detecting when performers of a medical process deviate from the acceptable ways of performing that process as specified by a detailed process model. Such deviations could represent errors and, thus, detecting and reporting deviations as they occur could help catch errors before harm is done. In this paper, we identify important issues related to the feasibility of the proposed approach and empirically evaluate the approach for two medical procedures, chemotherapy and blood transfusion. For the evaluation, we use the process models to generate sample process executions that we then seed with synthetic errors. The process models describe the coordination of activities of different process performers in normal, as well as in exceptional situations. The evaluation results suggest that the proposed approach could be applied in clinical settings to help catch errors before harm is done. PMID:25954343

  4. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  5. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. PMID:25770525

  6. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  7. Anomalous gauge boson interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Barklow, T.; Baur, U. |

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the direct measurement of the trilinear vector boson couplings in present and future collider experiments. The major goals of such experiments will be the confirmation of the Standard Model (SM) predictions and the search for signals of new physics. We review our current theoretical understanding of anomalous trilinear gauge-boson self interactions. If the energy scale of the new physics is {approximately} 1 TeV, these low energy anomalous couplings are expected to be no larger than {Omicron}(10{sup {minus}2}). Constraints from high precision measurements at LEP and low energy charged and neutral current processes are critically reviewed.

  8. Anomalous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this composite image of spiral galaxy M106 (NGC 4258), optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey is shown as yellow, radio data from the Very Large Array appears as purple, X-ray data from Chandra is coded blue, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope appears red. Two anomalous arms, which aren't visible at optical wavelengths, appear as purple and blue emission.

  9. Feeling the past: the absence of experimental evidence for anomalous retroactive influences on text processing.

    PubMed

    Traxler, Matthew J; Foss, Donald J; Podali, Ruchira; Zirnstein, Megan

    2012-11-01

    In two self-paced reading experiments, we investigated the hypothesis that information moves backward in time to influence prior behaviors (Bem Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 100:407-425, 2011a). In two of Bem's experiments, words were presented after target pictures in a pleasantness judgment task. In a condition in which the words were consistent with the emotional valence of the picture, reaction times to the pictures were significantly shorter , as compared with a condition in which the words were inconsistent with the emotional valence of the picture. Bem Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 100:407-425, (2011a) interpreted these results as showing a "retroactive priming" effect resulting from precognition. To test the precognition hypothesis, we adapted a standard repetition priming paradigm from psycholinguistics. In the experiments, participants read a set of texts. In one condition, the participants read the same text twice. In other conditions, participants read two different texts. The precognition hypothesis predicts that readers who encounter the same text twice will experience reductions in processing load during their first encounter with the text. Hence, these readers' average reading times should be shorter than those of readers who encounter the target text only once. Our results indicated that readers processed the target text faster the second time they read it. Also, their reading times decreased as their experience with the self-paced reading procedure increased. However, participants read the target text equally quickly during their initial encounter with the text, whether or not the text was subsequently repeated. Thus, the experiments demonstrated normal repetition priming and practice effects but offered no evidence for retroactive influences on text processing. PMID:22815066

  10. Anomalous variation in the wireless signals propagation associated with earthquake preparation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Velichkova-Yotsova, Sylvia; Pulinets, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    propagation correlated with earthquake preparation processes. Our observations revealed a phenomena associated with the artificially enhancement of the intensity 3.5GHz signals by using WiMax technology (no change in the transmitting level) as a result of electric and electrochemical processes in atmosphere over the regions of ongoing earthquake preparation. To illustrate the nature of such variations in the range of 3.5GHz in relation to earthquake processes we present two case studies: 1/ for M5.8 of May 22, 2012 in Bulgaria and 2/ for M6.9 of May 24, 2014 in Aegean Sea. Concerning the M5.8 of May 22, 2012 the abnormal intensity modulation started on 05.17.2012 (five days in advance) and reached 200% increase. Epicenter of the M5.8 of May 25 was on 15 km from the wireless receiver. Concerning and M6.9 of May 24, 2014 in Aegean Sea abnormal signal was observed on May 22 (two days in advance) with 30% intensity increase. Epicenter of M6.9 of May 24 was at 260 km from the wireless receiver. Most likely the observed increase in the intensity is a direct result of the change in the atmospheric properties in the Atmospheric boundary level (ABL) triggered by intensification of radon and other gases release, which lead to change in lowers atmosphere conductivity, already suggested by Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling concept (Pulinets and Ouzounov, 2011). Another possible reason is the forward scattering of WiMax signal (similar to meteor wakes scattering) on aerosol layers formed over the earthquake preparation zone. We are registering an effect of systematic increase (with different rate) at 3.5 GHz associated with the regional seismicity and no significant intensify modulation with an absence of major seismicity in the region.

  11. Intelligent Signal Processing for Detection System Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C Y; Petrich, L I; Daley, P F; Burnham, A K

    2004-12-05

    A wavelet-neural network signal processing method has demonstrated approximately tenfold improvement over traditional signal-processing methods for the detection limit of various nitrogen and phosphorus compounds from the output of a thermionic detector attached to a gas chromatograph. A blind test was conducted to validate the lower detection limit. All fourteen of the compound spikes were detected when above the estimated threshold, including all three within a factor of two above the threshold. In addition, two of six spikes were detected at levels of 1/2 the concentration of the nominal threshold. Another two of the six would have been detected correctly if we had allowed human intervention to examine the processed data. One apparent false positive in five nulls was traced to a solvent impurity, whose presence was subsequently identified by analyzing a solvent aliquot evaporated to 1% residual volume, while the other four nulls were properly classified. We view this signal processing method as broadly applicable in analytical chemistry, and we advocate that advanced signal processing methods should be applied as directly as possible to the raw detector output so that less discriminating preprocessing and post-processing does not throw away valuable signal.

  12. Intelligent Signal Processing for Detection System Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, C Y; Petrich, L I; Daley, P F; Burnham, A K

    2004-06-18

    A wavelet-neural network signal processing method has demonstrated approximately tenfold improvement in the detection limit of various nitrogen and phosphorus compounds over traditional signal-processing methods in analyzing the output of a thermionic detector attached to the output of a gas chromatograph. A blind test was conducted to validate the lower detection limit. All fourteen of the compound spikes were detected when above the estimated threshold, including all three within a factor of two above. In addition, two of six were detected at levels 1/2 the concentration of the nominal threshold. We would have had another two correct hits if we had allowed human intervention to examine the processed data. One apparent false positive in five nulls was traced to a solvent impurity, whose presence was identified by running a solvent aliquot evaporated to 1% residual volume, while the other four nulls were properly classified. We view this signal processing method as broadly applicable in analytical chemistry, and we advocate that advanced signal processing methods be applied as directly as possible to the raw detector output so that less discriminating preprocessing and post-processing does not throw away valuable signal.

  13. Photon detection with parallel asynchronous processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, D. D.; Perera, A. G. U.

    1990-01-01

    An approach to photon detection with a parallel asynchronous signal processor is described. The visible or IR photon-detection capability of the silicon p(+)-n-n(+) detectors and the parallel asynchronous processing are addressed separately. This approach would permit an independent analog processing channel to be dedicated to every pixel. A laminar architecture consisting of a stack of planar arrays of the devices would form a 2D array processor with a 2D array of inputs located directly behind a focal-plane detector array. A 2D image data stream would propagate in neuronlike asynchronous pulse-coded form through the laminar processor. Such systems can integrate image acquisition and image processing. Acquisition and processing would be performed concurrently as in natural vision systems. The possibility of multispectral image processing is addressed.

  14. Proactive detection of bones in poultry processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, W. D. R.; Stewart, John

    2009-05-01

    Bones continue to be a problem of concern for the poultry industry. Most further processed products begin with the requirement for raw material with minimal bones. The current process for generating deboned product requires systems for monitoring and inspecting the output product. The current detection systems are either people palpitating the product or X-ray systems. The current performance of these inspection techniques are below the desired levels of accuracies and are costly. We propose a technique for monitoring bones that conduct the inspection operation in the deboning the process so as to have enough time to take action to reduce the probability that bones will end up in the final product. This is accomplished by developing active cones with built in illumination to backlight the cage (skeleton) on the deboning line. If the bones of interest are still on the cage then the bones are not in the associated meat. This approach also allows for the ability to practice process control on the deboning operation to keep the process under control as opposed to the current system where the detection is done post production and does not easily present the opportunity to adjust the process. The proposed approach shows overall accuracies of about 94% for the detection of the clavicle bones.

  15. Signal processing aspects of windshear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aalfs, David D.; Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1993-01-01

    Low-altitude windshear (LAWS) has been identified as a major hazard to aircraft, particularly during takeoff and landing. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been involved with developing technology to detect LAWS. A key element in this technology is high resolution pulse Doppler weather radar equipped with signal and data processing to provide timely information about possible hazardous conditions.

  16. Detection of branching points in noisy processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Michael; Liebscher, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Processes in engineering mechanics often contain branching points at which the system can follow different physical paths. In this paper a method for the detection of these branching points is proposed for processes that are affected by noise. It is assumed that a bundle of process records are available from numerical simulations or from experiments, and branching points are concealed by the noise of the process. The bundle of process records is then evaluated at a series of discrete values of the independent process coordinates. At each discrete point of the process, the associated point set of process values is investigated with the aid of cluster analysis. The detected branching points are verified with a recursive algorithm. The revealed information about the branching points can be used to identify the physical and mechanical background for the branching. This helps to better understand a mechanical system and to design it optimal for a specific purpose. The proposed method is demonstrated by means of both a numerical example and a practical example of a crashworthiness investigation.

  17. Eggshell defects detection based on color processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alegre, Maria C.; Ribeiro, Angela; Guinea, Domingo; Cristobal, Gabriel

    2000-03-01

    The automatic classification of defective eggs constitutes a fundamental issue at the poultry industry for both economical and sanitary reasons. The early separation of eggs with spots and cracks is a relevant task as the stains can leak while progressing on the conveyor-belts, degrading all the mechanical parts. Present work is focused on the implementation of an artificial vision system for detecting in real time defective eggs at the poultry farm. First step of the algorithmic process is devoted to the detection of the egg shape to fix the region of interest. A color processing is then performed only on the eggshell to obtain an image segmentation that allows the discrimination of defective eggs from clean ones in critic time. The results are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed visual process on a wide sample of both defective and non-defective eggs.

  18. Metabonomics for detection of nuclear materials processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Luxon, Bruce A.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Ansari, S.; Volk, David; Sarkar, S.; Alam, Mary Kathleen

    2010-08-01

    Tracking nuclear materials production and processing, particularly covert operations, is a key national security concern, given that nuclear materials processing can be a signature of nuclear weapons activities by US adversaries. Covert trafficking can also result in homeland security threats, most notably allowing terrorists to assemble devices such as dirty bombs. Existing methods depend on isotope analysis and do not necessarily detect chronic low-level exposure. In this project, indigenous organisms such as plants, small mammals, and bacteria are utilized as living sensors for the presence of chemicals used in nuclear materials processing. Such 'metabolic fingerprinting' (or 'metabonomics') employs nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to assess alterations in organismal metabolism provoked by the environmental presence of nuclear materials processing, for example the tributyl phosphate employed in the processing of spent reactor fuel rods to extract and purify uranium and plutonium for weaponization.

  19. Novel image processing approach to detect malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, David; Ferrer, Belen; Cojoc, Dan; Finaurini, Sara; Mico, Vicente; Garcia, Javier; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a novel image processing algorithm providing good preliminary capabilities for in vitro detection of malaria. The proposed concept is based upon analysis of the temporal variation of each pixel. Changes in dark pixels mean that inter cellular activity happened, indicating the presence of the malaria parasite inside the cell. Preliminary experimental results involving analysis of red blood cells being either healthy or infected with malaria parasites, validated the potential benefit of the proposed numerical approach.

  20. Using Statistical Process Control for detecting anomalies in multivariate spatiotemporal Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, Milan; Mahecha, Miguel; Gans, Fabian; Rodner, Erik; Bodesheim, Paul; Guanche-Garcia, Yanira; Brenning, Alexander; Denzler, Joachim; Reichstein, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The number of available Earth observations (EOs) is currently substantially increasing. Detecting anomalous patterns in these multivariate time series is an important step in identifying changes in the underlying dynamical system. Likewise, data quality issues might result in anomalous multivariate data constellations and have to be identified before corrupting subsequent analyses. In industrial application a common strategy is to monitor production chains with several sensors coupled to some statistical process control (SPC) algorithm. The basic idea is to raise an alarm when these sensor data depict some anomalous pattern according to the SPC, i.e. the production chain is considered 'out of control'. In fact, the industrial applications are conceptually similar to the on-line monitoring of EOs. However, algorithms used in the context of SPC or process monitoring are rarely considered for supervising multivariate spatio-temporal Earth observations. The objective of this study is to exploit the potential and transferability of SPC concepts to Earth system applications. We compare a range of different algorithms typically applied by SPC systems and evaluate their capability to detect e.g. known extreme events in land surface processes. Specifically two main issues are addressed: (1) identifying the most suitable combination of data pre-processing and detection algorithm for a specific type of event and (2) analyzing the limits of the individual approaches with respect to the magnitude, spatio-temporal size of the event as well as the data's signal to noise ratio. Extensive artificial data sets that represent the typical properties of Earth observations are used in this study. Our results show that the majority of the algorithms used can be considered for the detection of multivariate spatiotemporal events and directly transferred to real Earth observation data as currently assembled in different projects at the European scale, e.g. http://baci-h2020.eu

  1. Systems and methods for detecting and processing

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Michael M.; Yoshimura, Ann S.

    2006-03-28

    Embodiments of the present invention provides systems and method for detecting. Sensing modules are provided in communication with one or more detectors. In some embodiments, detectors are provided that are sensitive to chemical, biological, or radiological agents. Embodiments of sensing modules include processing capabilities to analyze, perform computations on, and/or run models to predict or interpret data received from one or more detectors. Embodiments of sensing modules form various network configurations with one another and/or with one or more data aggregation devices. Some embodiments of sensing modules include power management functionalities.

  2. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  3. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  4. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO2 thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Sylvestre, A.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-01

    Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and capacitance-frequency (C-f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO2 thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C-V anomalous) is observed in the C-V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C-V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO2 interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60-0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti3+ ions. Both the C-V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO2 arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  5. Ultrasound perfusion signal processing for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, MinWoo; Abbey, Craig K.; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced blood perfusion in a tissue mass is an indication of neo-vascularity and a sign of a potential malignancy. Ultrasonic pulsed-Doppler imaging is a preferred modality for noninvasive monitoring of blood flow. However, the weak blood echoes and disorganized slow flow make it difficult to detect perfusion using standard methods without the expense and risk of contrast enhancement. Our research measures the efficiency of conventional power-Doppler (PD) methods at discriminating flow states by comparing measurement performance to that of an ideal discriminator. ROC analysis applied to the experimental results shows that power Doppler methods are just 30-50 % efficient at perfusion flows less than 1ml/min, suggesting an opportunity to improve perfusion assessment through signal processing. A new perfusion estimator is proposed by extending the statistical discriminator approach. We show that 2-D perfusion color imaging may be enhanced using this approach.

  6. The dispersion and detection patterns of mtDNA-assigned red fox Vulpes vulpes scats in Tasmania are anomalous

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Clive A; Obendorf, David; Pereira, Filipe; Edwards, Ivo; Hall, Graham P

    2014-01-01

    Models used for resource allocation in eradication programmes must be based on replicated data of known quality and have proven predictive accuracy, or they may provide a false indication of species presence and/or distribution. In the absence of data corroborating the presence of extant foxes Vulpes vulpes in Tasmania, a habitat-specific model based upon mtDNA data (Sarre et al. 2012. Journal Applied Ecology, 50, 459–468) implied that foxes were widespread. Overall, 61 of 9940 (0·6%) surveyed scats were assigned as mtDNA fox positive by the fox eradication programme (FEP). We investigated the spatiotemporal distribution of the 61 mtDNA-assigned fox scats and modelled the probability of replicating scat detection in independent surveys using detection dogs based upon empirically derived probabilities of scat detection success obtained by the FEP using imported fox scats. In a prior mainland study, fox genotypes were recurrently detected in a consecutive four-day pool of scats. In Tasmania, only three contemporaneously collected scat pairs of unknown genotype were detected by the FEP within an area corresponding to a conservatively large mainland fox home range (639 ha) in a decade. Nearest neighbour pairs were widely spaced (mean = 7·0 km; circular area = 153 km2) and generated after a mean of 281 days. The majority of assigned mtDNA positive scats were found in urban and peri-urban environments corresponding to small mainland fox home ranges (30–45 ha) that imply higher scat density and more certain replication. Using the lowest empirically determined scat detection success for dogs, the failure to replicate fox scat detection on 34 of 36 occasions in a large (639 ha) home range is highly improbable (P = 0·00001) and suggestive of Type I error. Synthesis and applications. Type I error, which may have various sources, should be considered when scat mtDNA data are few, accumulated over many years, uncorroborated by observations of extant

  7. Detection of anomalous Hall voltages in ultrahigh-mobility two-dimensional hole gases generated by optical spin orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyukov, D. A.; Plaut, A. S.; Henini, M.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Nicoll, C. A.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    By combining optical spin orientation and an externally applied longitudinal electric field, transverse charge accumulation has been detected in very high-mobility two-dimensional hole gases by measuring the transverse voltage drop across simple Hall devices. Our results indicate intrinsic band-structure (rather than extrinsic skew scattering) derived spin-orbit coupling as the underlying mechanism of this spin-polarized transport effect.

  8. Higher-order statistical moments and a procedure that detects potentially anomalous years as two alternative methods describing alterations in continuous environmental data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arismendi, Ivan; Johnson, Sherri L.; Dunham, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Statistics of central tendency and dispersion may not capture relevant or desired characteristics of the distribution of continuous phenomena and, thus, they may not adequately describe temporal patterns of change. Here, we present two methodological approaches that can help to identify temporal changes in environmental regimes. First, we use higher-order statistical moments (skewness and kurtosis) to examine potential changes of empirical distributions at decadal extents. Second, we adapt a statistical procedure combining a non-metric multidimensional scaling technique and higher density region plots to detect potentially anomalous years. We illustrate the use of these approaches by examining long-term stream temperature data from minimally and highly human-influenced streams. In particular, we contrast predictions about thermal regime responses to changing climates and human-related water uses. Using these methods, we effectively diagnose years with unusual thermal variability and patterns in variability through time, as well as spatial variability linked to regional and local factors that influence stream temperature. Our findings highlight the complexity of responses of thermal regimes of streams and reveal their differential vulnerability to climate warming and human-related water uses. The two approaches presented here can be applied with a variety of other continuous phenomena to address historical changes, extreme events, and their associated ecological responses.

  9. Technical Note: Higher-order statistical moments and a procedure that detects potentially anomalous years as two alternative methods describing alterations in continuous environmental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arismendi, I.; Johnson, S. L.; Dunham, J. B.

    2015-03-01

    Statistics of central tendency and dispersion may not capture relevant or desired characteristics of the distribution of continuous phenomena and, thus, they may not adequately describe temporal patterns of change. Here, we present two methodological approaches that can help to identify temporal changes in environmental regimes. First, we use higher-order statistical moments (skewness and kurtosis) to examine potential changes of empirical distributions at decadal extents. Second, we adapt a statistical procedure combining a non-metric multidimensional scaling technique and higher density region plots to detect potentially anomalous years. We illustrate the use of these approaches by examining long-term stream temperature data from minimally and highly human-influenced streams. In particular, we contrast predictions about thermal regime responses to changing climates and human-related water uses. Using these methods, we effectively diagnose years with unusual thermal variability and patterns in variability through time, as well as spatial variability linked to regional and local factors that influence stream temperature. Our findings highlight the complexity of responses of thermal regimes of streams and reveal their differential vulnerability to climate warming and human-related water uses. The two approaches presented here can be applied with a variety of other continuous phenomena to address historical changes, extreme events, and their associated ecological responses.

  10. Predicting clutter during anomalous propagation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Susan C.; Maurer, Donald E.; Musser, Keith L.

    1988-06-01

    Excessive clutter caused by anomalous propagation conditions severely degrades radar performance in many regions of the world. This article describes methods that can be used to predict anomalous clutter amplitude for site-specific radar parameters, terrain features, and atmospheric conditions and to predict the effects of radar Doppler processing on evaporation-ducted sea clutter.

  11. OGLE-III DETECTION OF THE ANOMALOUS GALACTIC BULGE RED GIANT BRANCH BUMP: EVIDENCE OF ENHANCED HELIUM ENRICHMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nataf, D. M.; Gould, A.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Udalski, A.

    2011-04-01

    We measure the red giant branch bump (RGBB) of the Galactic bulge, the most metal-rich RGBB ever detected. The RGBB luminosity function peaks at the expected brightness, but its number density is very low relative to Galactic globular cluster calibrations, implying the Galactic bulge has a higher helium enrichment parameter {Delta}Y/{Delta}Z {>=} 4.0 for Y {approx} 0.35 rather than the standard 2.0 with Y = 0.27, which we suggest may be a common feature of galactic spheroids. The RGBB is (0.71 {+-} 0.02) mag fainter than the red clump (RC) in I toward the densest stellar regions imaged by the OGLE-III Galactic bulge photometric survey, (|l| {<=} 4, 2 {approx}< |b| {<=} 4). The number density of RGBB stars is (12.7 {+-} 2.0)% that of RC stars. The brightness dispersion of the RGBB is significantly lower than that of the RC, a result that is difficult to explain as the RGBB luminosity is known to vary significantly with metallicity. Sight lines that have two RCs have two RGBBs with similar properties to one another, an expected outcome if the Milky Way's bulge is X-shaped. We also find preliminary evidence of the Galactic bulge asymptotic giant branch bump, at a brightness of {approx}1.06 mag brighter than the RC in I and with a number density {approx}1.5% that of the RC. Accounting for the RGBB has a small effect on the best-fit parameters of the RC, shifting its best-fit peak brightness and reducing its brightness dispersion by {approx}0.015 mag each.

  12. Detection of anomalous crop condition and soil variability mapping using a 26 year Landsat record and the Palmer crop moisture index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venteris, E. R.; Tagestad, J. D.; Downs, J. L.; Murray, C. J.

    2015-07-01

    Cost-effective and reliable vegetation monitoring methods are needed for applications ranging from traditional agronomic mapping, to verifying the safety of geologic injection activities. A particular challenge is defining baseline crop conditions and subsequent anomalies from long term imagery records (Landsat) in the face of large spatiotemporal variability. We develop a new method for defining baseline crop response (near peak growth) using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from 26 years (1986-2011) of Landsat data for 400 km2 surrounding a planned geologic carbon sequestration site near Jacksonville, Illinois. The normal score transform (yNDVI) was applied on a field by field basis to accentuate spatial patterns and level differences due to planting times. We tested crop type and soil moisture (Palmer crop moisture index (CMI)) as predictors of expected crop condition. Spatial patterns in yNDVI were similar between corn and soybeans - the two major crops. Linear regressions between yNDVI and the cumulative CMI (CCMI) exposed complex interactions between crop condition, field location (topography and soils), and annual moisture. Wet toposequence positions (depressions) were negatively correlated to CCMI and dry positions (crests) positively correlated. However, only 21% of the landscape showed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) linear relationship. To map anomalous crop conditions, we defined a tolerance interval based on yNDVI statistics. Tested on an independent image (2013), 63 of 1483 possible fields showed unusual crop condition. While the method is not directly suitable for crop health assessment, the spatial patterns in correlation between yNDVI and CCMI have potential applications for pest damage detection and edaphological soil mapping, especially in the developing world.

  13. Assessing bimodality to detect the presence of a dual cognitive process.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jonathan B; Dale, Rick

    2013-03-01

    Researchers have long sought to distinguish between single-process and dual-process cognitive phenomena, using responses such as reaction times and, more recently, hand movements. Analysis of a response distribution's modality has been crucial in detecting the presence of dual processes, because they tend to introduce bimodal features. Rarely, however, have bimodality measures been systematically evaluated. We carried out tests of readily available bimodality measures that any researcher may easily employ: the bimodality coefficient (BC), Hartigan's dip statistic (HDS), and the difference in Akaike's information criterion between one-component and two-component distribution models (AIC(diff)). We simulated distributions containing two response populations and examined the influences of (1) the distances between populations, (2) proportions of responses, (3) the amount of positive skew present, and (4) sample size. Distance always had a stronger effect than did proportion, and the effects of proportion greatly differed across the measures. Skew biased the measures by increasing bimodality detection, in some cases leading to anomalous interactive effects. BC and HDS were generally convergent, but a number of important discrepancies were found. AIC(diff) was extremely sensitive to bimodality and identified nearly all distributions as bimodal. However, all measures served to detect the presence of bimodality in comparison to unimodal simulations. We provide a validation with experimental data, discuss methodological and theoretical implications, and make recommendations regarding the choice of analysis. PMID:22806703

  14. Life Detection System DTIVA for Monitoring Parameter in Fossilization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, F.; Garcia-Descalzo, L.; Cockell, C. S.; Schwendner, P.; Rettberg, P.; Beblo-Vranesevic, K.; Bohmeier, M.; Rabbow, E.; Westall, F.; Gaboyer, F.; Walter, N.; Moissl-Eichinger, M.; Perras, A.; Amils, R.; Malki, M.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Monaghan, E.; Marteinsson, V.; Vannier, P.

    2016-05-01

    Using Life Detection System LDS we followed the physicochemical parameter in a growth culture under fossilization/mineralization-induced process with the objectives of biomarkers detection. Biomarkers study is crucial for the search for life on Mars.

  15. Olfactory processing: detection of rapid changes.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Krone, Franziska; Walker, Susannah; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Changes in the olfactory environment have a rather poor chance of being detected. Aim of the present study was to determine, whether the same (cued) or different (uncued) odors can generally be detected at short inter stimulus intervals (ISI) below 2.5 s. Furthermore we investigated, whether inhibition of return, an attentional phenomenon facilitating the detection of new stimuli at longer ISI, is present in the domain of olfaction. Thirteen normosmic people (3 men, 10 women; age range 19-27 years; mean age 23 years) participated. Stimulation was performed using air-dilution olfactometry with 2 odors: phenylethylalcohol and hydrogen disulfide. Reaction time to target stimuli was assessed in cued and uncued conditions at ISIs of 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 s. There was a significant main effect of ISI, indicating that odors presented only 1 s apart are missed frequently. Uncued presentation facilitated detection at short ISIs, implying that changes of the olfactory environment are detected better than presentation of the same odor again. Effects in relation to "olfactory inhibition of return," on the other hand, are not supported by our results. This suggests that attention works different for the olfactory system compared with the visual and auditory systems. PMID:25911421

  16. Error Detection Processes during Observational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badets, Arnaud; Blandin, Yannick; Wright, David L.; Shea, Charles H.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether a faded knowledge of results (KR) frequency during observation of a model's performance enhanced error detection capabilities. During the observation phase, participants observed a model performing a timing task and received KR about the model's performance on each trial or on one of two…

  17. Windshear detection radar signal processing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    This final report briefly summarizes research work at Clemson in the Radar Systems Laboratory under the NASA Langley Research Grant NAG-1-928 in support of the Antenna and Microwave Branch, Guidance and Control Division, program to develop airborne sensor technology for the detection of low altitude windshear. A bibliography of all publications generated by Clemson personnel is included. An appendix provides abstracts of all publications.

  18. Detection of Thermometer Clustering in the Calibration of Large Batches of Industrial Thermometers for the LHC by Automated Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavese, F.; Ichim, D.; Ciarlini, P.; Balle, C.; Casas-Cubillos, J.

    2003-09-01

    The complete procedure to calibrate thermometers is a complex process, especially when several thousand semiconductor-type thermometers are used and must be individually calibrated, as in the case of the instrumentation of the new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN. Indeed, the similarity of the characteristics of semiconducting thermometers is more limited than that of wire-wound thermometers. The span of the characteristics spread can appear as a homogeneous set, or can show clusters (groups) of characteristics. In the latter case, one of the reasons for clustering may be the fabrication process by batches of numerous devices on the same wafer. Consequently, the detection of the groups can be useful, from the supplier point of view, to give information relevant to improving the fabrication uniformity. From the user point of view, it is useful for making a guess of the possible thermometer stability with time, when this is a must, as in the LHC case. In fact, thermometers showing characteristics outlying or in small clusters should be considered to be potentially anomalous. In addition, the identification of anomalous groups allows the detection of artifacts due to the experimental process. For a large number of thermometers, this analysis requires the use of automated procedures and, consequently, automated decisions that avoid false effects. The paper describes the mathematical methodology adopted for the identification of the clusters, based on the mixed-effect modeling of the thermometer characteristics.

  19. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-01

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, …) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1—contraband material in the sea containers, case 2—-explosives in soil (landmines), case 3—explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  20. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-10

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, ...) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1--contraband material in the sea containers, case 2 - explosives in soil (landmines), case 3 - explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  1. Detecting jaundice by using digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Ramos, J.; Toxqui-Quitl, C.; Villa Manriquez, F.; Orozco-Guillen, E.; Padilla-Vivanco, A.; Sánchez-Escobar, JJ.

    2014-03-01

    When strong Jaundice is presented, babies or adults should be subject to clinical exam like "serum bilirubin" which can cause traumas in patients. Often jaundice is presented in liver disease such as hepatitis or liver cancer. In order to avoid additional traumas we propose to detect jaundice (icterus) in newborns or adults by using a not pain method. By acquiring digital images in color, in palm, soles and forehead, we analyze RGB attributes and diffuse reflectance spectra as the parameter to characterize patients with either jaundice or not, and we correlate that parameters with the level of bilirubin. By applying support vector machine we distinguish between healthy and sick patients.

  2. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain.

  3. Anomalous neuronal responses to fluctuated inputs.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Ryosuke; Sakai, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    The irregular firing of a cortical neuron is thought to result from a highly fluctuating drive that is generated by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. A previous study reported anomalous responses of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to the fluctuated inputs where an irregularity of spike trains is inversely proportional to an input irregularity. In the current study, we investigated the origin of these anomalous responses with the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron model, map-based models, and a simple mixture of interspike interval distributions. First, we specified the parameter regions for the bifurcations in the Hindmarsh-Rose model, and we confirmed that the model reproduced the anomalous responses in the dynamics of the saddle-node and subcritical Hopf bifurcations. For both bifurcations, the Hindmarsh-Rose model shows bistability in the resting state and the repetitive firing state, which indicated that the bistability was the origin of the anomalous input-output relationship. Similarly, the map-based model that contained bistability reproduced the anomalous responses, while the model without bistability did not. These results were supported by additional findings that the anomalous responses were reproduced by mimicking the bistable firing with a mixture of two different interspike interval distributions. Decorrelation of spike trains is important for neural information processing. For such spike train decorrelation, irregular firing is key. Our results indicated that irregular firing can emerge from fluctuating drives, even weak ones, under conditions involving bistability. The anomalous responses, therefore, contribute to efficient processing in the brain. PMID:26565270

  4. Contamination detection NDE for cleaning process inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinelli, W. J.; Dicristina, V.; Sonnenfroh, D.; Blair, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the joining of multilayer materials, and in welding, the cleanliness of the joining surface may play a large role in the quality of the resulting bond. No non-intrusive techniques are currently available for the rapid measurement of contamination on large or irregularly shaped structures prior to the joining process. An innovative technique for the measurement of contaminant levels in these structures using laser based imaging is presented. The approach uses an ultraviolet excimer laser to illuminate large and/or irregular surface areas. The UV light induces fluorescence and is scattered from the contaminants. The illuminated area is viewed by an image-intensified CCD (charge coupled device) camera interfaced to a PC-based computer. The camera measures the fluorescence and/or scattering from the contaminants for comparison with established standards. Single shot measurements of contamination levels are possible. Hence, the technique may be used for on-line NDE testing during manufacturing processes.

  5. Signal processing in cryogenic particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryev, Y. N.; Jang, Y. S.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. J.; Yoon, W. S.; Kim, Y. H.

    2011-04-01

    We describe a signal-processing program for a data acquisition system for cryogenic particle detectors. The program is based on an optimal-filtering method for high-resolution measurement of calorimetric signals with a significant amount of noise of unknown origin and non-stationary behavior. The program was applied to improve the energy resolution of the alpha particle spectrum of an 241Am source.

  6. Processing of GPR data from NIITEK landmine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarsky, Justin J.; Broach, J. T.; Bishop, Steven S.

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, a signal processing approach for wide-bandwidth ground-penetrating-radar imagery from Non-Intrusive Inspection Technology, Incorporated (NIITEK) vehicle-mounted landmine detection sensor is investigated. The approach consists of a sequence of processing steps, which include signal filtering, image enhancement and detection. Filtering strategies before detection aid in image visualization by reducing ground bounce, systematic effects and redundant signals. Post-filter image processing helps by enhancing landmine signatures in the NIITEK radar imagery. Study results from applying this signal processing approach are presented for test minefield lane data, which were collected during 2002 from an Army test site.

  7. Detecting causality in policy diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Grabow, Carsten; Macinko, James; Silver, Diana; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    A universal question in network science entails learning about the topology of interaction from collective dynamics. Here, we address this question by examining diffusion of laws across US states. We propose two complementary techniques to unravel determinants of this diffusion process: information-theoretic union transfer entropy and event synchronization. In order to systematically investigate their performance on law activity data, we establish a new stochastic model to generate synthetic law activity data based on plausible networks of interactions. Through extensive parametric studies, we demonstrate the ability of these methods to reconstruct networks, varying in size, link density, and degree heterogeneity. Our results suggest that union transfer entropy should be preferred for slowly varying processes, which may be associated with policies attending to specific local problems that occur only rarely or with policies facing high levels of opposition. In contrast, event synchronization is effective for faster enactment rates, which may be related to policies involving Federal mandates or incentives. This study puts forward a data-driven toolbox to explain the determinants of legal activity applicable to political science, across dynamical systems, information theory, and complex networks. PMID:27586609

  8. An anomalous extinction law in the Cep OB3b young cluster: Evidence for dust processing during gas dispersal

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Thomas S.; Prchlik, Jakub J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Pipher, Judith L.; Naylor, Tim; Jeffries, R. D.

    2014-05-10

    We determine the extinction law through Cep OB3b, a young cluster of 3000 stars undergoing gas dispersal. The extinction is measured toward 76 background K giants identified with MMT/Hectospec spectra. Color excess ratios were determined toward each of the giants using V and R photometry from the literature, g, r, i, and z photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and J, H, and K{sub s} photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. These color excess ratios were then used to construct the extinction law through the dusty material associated with Cep OB3b. The extinction law through Cep OB3b is intermediate between the R{sub V} = 3.1 and R{sub V} = 5 laws commonly used for the diffuse atomic interstellar medium and dense molecular clouds, respectively. The dependence of the extinction law on line-of-sight A{sub V} is investigated and we find the extinction law becomes shallower for regions with A{sub V} > 2.5 mag. We speculate that the intermediate dust law results from dust processing during the dispersal of the molecular cloud by the cluster.

  9. Communication: Probing anomalous diffusion in frequency space

    SciTech Connect

    Stachura, Sławomir; Kneller, Gerald R.

    2015-11-21

    Anomalous diffusion processes are usually detected by analyzing the time-dependent mean square displacement of the diffusing particles. The latter evolves asymptotically as W(t) ∼ 2D{sub α}t{sup α}, where D{sub α} is the fractional diffusion constant and 0 < α < 2. In this article we show that both D{sub α} and α can also be extracted from the low-frequency Fourier spectrum of the corresponding velocity autocorrelation function. This offers a simple method for the interpretation of quasielastic neutron scattering spectra from complex (bio)molecular systems, in which subdiffusive transport is frequently encountered. The approach is illustrated and validated by analyzing molecular dynamics simulations of molecular diffusion in a lipid POPC bilayer.

  10. Global positioning system interference and satellite anomalous event monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Lukas M.

    Global Positioning System satellite Signal Quality Monitoring (SQM) is required to ensure the integrity of the received signal for aviation safety-critical systems. Failure mitigation is not addressed since failure detection ensures system integrity. The GPS Anomalous Event Monitor (GAEM) is introduced, consisting of a GPS receiver serving as an anomaly sensor, and the Software Defined Radio, allowing for a thorough analysis of signal malfunction modes through advanced signal processing techniques. Algorithms to monitor the GPS signal by the anomaly sensor are developed and in case of possible signal inconsistencies the signal is analyzed by the Software Defined Radio. For the purpose of quality monitoring it is essential to understand the impact of the radio frequency front-end on the received signal, and implicitly onto the signal parameter estimation process; otherwise a signal inconsistency may be flagged which is induced by the monitoring system. Thus, radio frequency front-end induced errors are examined and the statistics for signal parameter estimators are derived. As the statistics of an anomalous signal are unknown, a non-parametric, non-homoscedastic (uncommon variance of sample space) statistical test is developed. Berry-Esseen bounds are introduced to quantify convergence and to establish confidence levels. The algorithm is applied to the detection of signal anomalies, with emphasis on interference detection. The algorithms to detect GPS signal anomalies are verified with experimental data. The performance of the interference detection algorithms is demonstrated through data collection in a shielded measurement chamber. Actual GPS signals in combination with interference sources such as narrowband, wideband and pulsed interference were broadcast in the chamber. Subsequently, case studies from continuous GPS monitoring are included and observed anomalies are discussed. The performance demonstration of the GPS anomalous event monitor is concluded with a

  11. HIGH RESOLUTION RESISTIVITY LEAK DETECTION DATA PROCESSING & EVALUATION MEHTODS & REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD JS

    2007-10-04

    This document has two purposes: {sm_bullet} Describe how data generated by High Resolution REsistivity (HRR) leak detection (LD) systems deployed during single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval operations are processed and evaluated. {sm_bullet} Provide the basic review requirements for HRR data when Hrr is deployed as a leak detection method during SST waste retrievals.

  12. On Anomalous Quark Triangles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Arkady

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous quark triangles with one axial and two vector currents are studied in special kinematics when one of the vector currents carries a soft momentum. According to the Adler-Bardeen theorem the anomalous longitudinal part of the triangle is not renormalized in the chiral limit. We show that perturbative corrections the transversal part of the triangle is also absent. This nonrenormalization, in difference with the longitudinal part, holds on only perturbatively.

  13. Post-processing for improving hyperspectral anomaly detection accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jee-Cheng; Jiang, Chi-Ming; Huang, Chen-Liang

    2015-10-01

    Anomaly detection is an important topic in the exploitation of hyperspectral data. Based on the Reed-Xiaoli (RX) detector and a morphology operator, this research proposes a novel technique for improving the accuracy of hyperspectral anomaly detection. Firstly, the RX-based detector is used to process a given input scene. Then, a post-processing scheme using morphology operator is employed to detect those pixels around high-scoring anomaly pixels. Tests were conducted using two real hyperspectral images with ground truth information and the results based on receiver operating characteristic curves, illustrated that the proposed method reduced the false alarm rates of the RXbased detector.

  14. Sequential Detection of Fission Processes for Harbor Defense

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Walston, S E; Chambers, D H

    2015-02-12

    With the large increase in terrorist activities throughout the world, the timely and accurate detection of special nuclear material (SNM) has become an extremely high priority for many countries concerned with national security. The detection of radionuclide contraband based on their γ-ray emissions has been attacked vigorously with some interesting and feasible results; however, the fission process of SNM has not received as much attention due to its inherent complexity and required predictive nature. In this paper, on-line, sequential Bayesian detection and estimation (parameter) techniques to rapidly and reliably detect unknown fissioning sources with high statistical confidence are developed.

  15. Dual left anterior descending artery with anomalous origin of long LAD from pulmonary artery - rare coronary anomaly detected on computed tomography coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Aditi; Narula, Harneet

    2016-01-01

    Dual left anterior descending artery is a rare coronary artery anomaly showing two left anterior descending arteries. Short anterior descending artery usually arises from the left coronary artery, while long anterior descending artery has anomalous origin and course. Dual left anterior descending artery with origin of long anterior descending artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a very rare coronary artery anomaly which has not been reported previously in the literature. We present the computed tomography coronary angiographic findings of this rare case in a young female patient who presented with atypical chest pain. PMID:27413266

  16. Detecting link failures in complex network processes using remote monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhal, R.; Abad Torres, J.; Roy, S.

    2015-11-01

    We study whether local structural changes in a complex network can be distinguished from passive remote time-course measurements of the network's dynamics. Specifically the detection of link failures in a network synchronization process from noisy measurements at a single network component is considered. By phrasing the detection task as a Maximum A Posteriori Probability hypothesis testing problem, we are able to obtain conditions under which the detection is (1) improved over the a priori and (2) asymptotically perfect, in terms of the network spectrum and graph. We find that, in the case where the detector has knowledge of the network's state, perfect detection is possible under general connectivity conditions regardless of the measurement location. When the detector does not have state knowledge, a remote signature permits improved but not perfect detection, under the same connectivity conditions. At its essence, detectability is achieved because of the close connection between a network's topology, its eigenvalues and local response characteristics.

  17. Multiple populations in the Sagittarius nuclear cluster M 54 and in other anomalous globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    M 54 is the central cluster of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy. This stellar system is now in process of being disrupted by the tidal interaction with the Milky Way and represents one of the building blocks of the Galactic Halo. Recent discoveries, based on the synergy of photometry and spectroscopy have revealed that the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of some massive, anomalous, Globular Clusters (GCs) host stellar populations with different content of heavy elements. In this paper, I use multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry to detect and characterize multiple stellar populations in M 54. I provide empirical evidence that this GC shares photometric and spectroscopic similarities with the class of anomalous GCs. These findings make it tempting to speculate that, similarly to Sagittarius nuclear cluster M 54, other anomalous GCs were born in an extra-Galactic environment.

  18. Nonlocal anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shulei; Vignale, Giovanni

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a distinctive transport property of ferromagnetic metals arising from spin orbit coupling (SOC) in concert with spontaneous spin polarization. Nonetheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also appears in a nonmagnetic metal in contact with a magnetic insulator. The main puzzle lies in the apparent absence of spin polarized electrons in the non-magnetic metal. Here, we theoretically demonstrate that the scattering of electrons from a rough metal-insulator interface is generally spin-dependent, which results in mutual conversion between spin and charge currents flowing in the plane of the layer. It is the current-carrying spin polarized electrons and the spin Hall effect in the bulk of the metal layer that conspire to generate the AH current. This novel AHE differs from the conventional one only in the spatial separation of the SOC and the magnetization, so we name it as nonlocal AHE. In contrast to other previously proposed mechanisms (e.g., spin Hall AHE and magnetic proximity effect (MPE)), the nonlocal AHE appears on the first order of spin Hall angle and does not rely on the induced moments in the metal layer, which make it experimentally detectable by contrasting the AH current directions of two layered structures such as Pt/Cu/YIG and β -Ta/Cu/YIG (with a thin inserted Cu layer to eliminate the MPE). We predict that the directions of the AH currents in these two trilayers would be opposite since the spin Hall angles of Pt and β -Ta are of opposite signs. Work supported by NSF Grants DMR-1406568.

  19. Analysis of quantitative phase detection based on optical information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wang; Tu, Jiang-Chen; Chun, Kuang-Tao; Yu, Han-Wang; Xin, Du

    2009-07-01

    Phase object exists widely in nature, such as biological cells, optical components, atmospheric flow field and so on. The phase detection of objects has great significance in the basic research, nondestructive testing, aerospace, military weapons and other areas. The usual methods of phase object detection include interference method, grating method, schlieren method, and phase-contrast method etc. These methods have their own advantages, but they also have some disadvantages on detecting precision, environmental requirements, cost, detection rate, detection range, detection linearity in various applications, even the most sophisticated method-phase contrast method mainly used in microscopic structure, lacks quantitative analysis of the size of the phase of the object and the relationship between the image contrast and the optical system. In this paper, various phase detection means and the characteristics of different applications are analyzed based on the optical information processing, and a phase detection system based on optical filtering is formed. Firstly the frequency spectrum of the phase object is achieved by Fourier transform lens in the system, then the frequency spectrum is changed reasonably by the filter, at last the image which can represent the phase distribution through light intensity is achieved by the inverse Fourier transform. The advantages and disadvantages of the common used filters such as 1/4 wavelength phase filter, high-pass filter and edge filter are analyzed, and their phase resolution is analyzed in the same optical information processing system, and the factors impacting phase resolution are pointed out. The paper draws a conclusion that there exists an optimal filter which makes the detect accuracy best for any application. At last, we discussed how to design an optimal filter through which the ability of the phase testing of optical information processing system can be improved most.

  20. Anomalous spectral dependence of optical polarization and its impact on spin detection in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Puttisong, Y.; Huang, Y. Q.; Buyanova, I. A.; Chen, W. M.; Yang, X. J.; Subagyo, A.; Sueoka, K.; Murayama, A.

    2014-09-29

    We show that circularly polarized emission light from InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) ensembles under optical spin injection from an adjacent GaAs layer can switch its helicity depending on emission wavelengths and optical excitation density. We attribute this anomalous behavior to simultaneous contributions from both positive and negative trions and a lower number of photo-excited holes than electrons being injected into the QDs due to trapping of holes at ionized acceptors and a lower hole mobility. Our results call for caution in reading out electron spin polarization by optical polarization of the QD ensembles and also provide a guideline in improving efficiency of spin light emitting devices that utilize QDs.

  1. Landscape Measures of Rangeland Condition in the BLM Owyhee Pilot Project: Shrub Canopy Mapping, Vegetation Classification, and Detection of Anomalous Land Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Tagestad, Jerry D.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2007-12-28

    In 2006, the BLM tasked PNNL to collaborate in research being conducted under the Owyhee Uplands Pilot Project to assess rangeland condition. The objective of this effort was to provide Owyhee Uplands Pilot Project with a sophisticated suite of data and tools to assist in evaluating the health and condition of the Owyhee Uplands study area. We focused on three technical areas. The first involved enhancing existing algorithms to estimate shrub canopy cover in the Lower Reynolds Creek Watershed. The second task involved developing and applying a strategy to assess and compare three vegetation map products for the Idaho portion of the Owyhee study area. The third task developed techniques and data that can be used to identify areas exhibiting anomalous rangeland conditions (for example exotic plants or excessive bare soil exposure). This report documents the methods used, results obtained, and conclusions drawn.

  2. Using support vector machines for anomalous change detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, James P; Steinwart, Ingo; Llamocca, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We cast anomalous change detection as a binary classification problem, and use a support vector machine (SVM) to build a detector that does not depend on assumptions about the underlying data distribution. To speed up the computation, our SVM is implemented, in part, on a graphical processing unit. Results on real and simulated anomalous changes are used to compare performance to algorithms which effectively assume a Gaussian distribution. In this paper, we investigate the use of support vector machines (SVMs) with radial basis kernels for finding anomalous changes. Compared to typical applications of SVMs, we are operating in a regime of very low false alarm rate. This means that even for relatively large training sets, the data are quite meager in the regime of operational interest. This drives us to use larger training sets, which in turn places more of a computational burden on the SVM. We initially considered three different approaches to to address the need to work in the very low false alarm rate regime. The first is a standard SVM which is trained at one threshold (where more reliable estimates of false alarm rates are possible) and then re-thresholded for the low false alarm rate regime. The second uses the same thresholding approach, but employs a so-called least squares SVM; here a quadratic (instead of a hinge-based) loss function is employed, and for this model, there are good theoretical arguments in favor of adjusting the threshold in a straightforward manner. The third approach employs a weighted support vector machine, where the weights for the two types of errors (false alarm and missed detection) are automatically adjusted to achieve the desired false alarm rate. We have found in previous experiments (not shown here) that the first two types can in some cases work well, while in other cases they do not. This renders both approaches unreliable for automated change detection. By contrast, the third approach reliably produces good results, but at

  3. Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaerna, T; Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2007-02-09

    The principal objective of this two-year study is to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection/location using array processing. We address a strategy to obtain significantly improved precision in the location of low-magnitude events compared with current fully-automatic approaches, combined with a low false alarm rate. We have developed and evaluated a prototype automatic system which uses as a basis regional array processing with fixed, carefully calibrated, site-specific parameters in conjuction with improved automatic phase onset time estimation. We have in parallel developed tools for Matched Field Processing for optimized detection and source-region identification of seismic signals. This narrow-band procedure aims to mitigate some of the causes of difficulty encountered using the standard array processing system, specifically complicated source-time histories of seismic events and shortcomings in the plane-wave approximation for seismic phase arrivals at regional arrays.

  4. Advanced Information Processing System - Fault detection and error handling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is designed to provide a fault tolerant and damage tolerant data processing architecture for a broad range of aerospace vehicles, including tactical and transport aircraft, and manned and autonomous spacecraft. A proof-of-concept (POC) system is now in the detailed design and fabrication phase. This paper gives an overview of a preliminary fault detection and error handling philosophy in AIPS.

  5. Detection of hazelnut in foods using ELISA: challenges related to the detectability in processed foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Cucu, Tatiana; Devreese, Bart; Trashin, Stanislav; Kerkaert, Barbara; Rogge, Maarten; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Hazelnuts are widely used nowadays, and can pose a serious threat to allergic consumers due to cross-contamination that may occur during processing. This might lead to the presence of hidden hazelnut in foods. Therefore, reliable tests are needed to detect hazelnut, especially in processed foods. A hazelnut-specific indirect competitive ELISA based on polyclonal chicken antibodies was developed. The polyclonal antibodies were raised against modified hazelnut proteins in order to improve the detectability of hazelnut proteins in processed foods. The assay showed a detection limit of 1.36 microg hazelnut protein/mL of 5 mM urea in phosphate-buffered saline buffer (pH 7.4). Limited cross-reactivity with walnut and pecan nut was observed; no cross-reactivity was observed with other food ingredients. Blank cookies spiked before analysis showed recoveries of 73-107%. However, cookies spiked before baking showed that the detectability was severely decreased. Addition of lactose to the cookies, which led to more severe modification through the Maillard reaction, led to an increase in the detectability. These results indicate that using antibodies developed toward allergens modified through food processing-simulating reactions is a better approach for detection. PMID:22468353

  6. Comparison of formant detection methods used in speech processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belean, Bogdan

    2013-11-01

    The paper describes time frequency representations of speech signal together with the formant significance in speech processing applications. Speech formants can be used in emotion recognition, sex discrimination or diagnosing different neurological diseases. Taking into account the various applications of formant detection in speech signal, two methods for detecting formants are presented. First, the poles resulted after a complex analysis of LPC coefficients are used for formants detection. The second approach uses the Kalman filter for formant prediction along the speech signal. Results are presented for both approaches on real life speech spectrograms. A comparison regarding the features of the proposed methods is also performed, in order to establish which method is more suitable in case of different speech processing applications.

  7. Asynchronous Processing of a Constellation of Geostationary and Polar-Orbiting Satellites for Fire Detection and Smoke Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyer, E. J.; Peterson, D. A.; Curtis, C. A.; Schmidt, C. C.; Hoffman, J.; Prins, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Fire Locating and Monitoring of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) system converts satellite observations of thermally anomalous pixels into spatially and temporally continuous estimates of smoke release from open biomass burning. This system currently processes data from a constellation of 5 geostationary and 2 polar-orbiting sensors. Additional sensors, including NPP VIIRS and the imager on the Korea COMS-1 geostationary satellite, will soon be added. This constellation experiences schedule changes and outages of various durations, making the set of available scenes for fire detection highly variable on an hourly and daily basis. Adding to the complexity, the latency of the satellite data is variable between and within sensors. FLAMBE shares with many fire detection systems the goal of detecting as many fires as possible as early as possible, but the FLAMBE system must also produce a consistent estimate of smoke production with minimal artifacts from the changing constellation. To achieve this, NRL has developed a system of asynchronous processing and cross-calibration that permits satellite data to be used as it arrives, while preserving the consistency of the smoke emission estimates. This talk describes the asynchronous data ingest methodology, including latency statistics for the constellation. We also provide an overview and show results from the system we have developed to normalize multi-sensor fire detection for consistency.

  8. Processing bronchial sonograms to detect respiratory cycle fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh; Zhdanov, D. S.; Zemlyakov, I. Yu; Svetlik, M. V.

    2014-10-01

    This article describes the authors' results of work on the development of a method for the automated assessment of the state of the human bronchopulmonary system based on acoustic data. In particular, the article covers the method of detecting breath sounds on bronchial sonograms obtained during the auscultation process.

  9. Signal processing techniques for clutter filtering and wind shear detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxa, Ernest G., Jr.; Deshpande, Manohar D

    1991-01-01

    An extended Prony algorithm applicable to signal processing techniques for clutter filtering and windshear detection is discussed. The algorithm is based upon modelling the radar return as a time series, and appears to offer potential for improving hazard factor estimates in the presence of strong clutter returns.

  10. Analytical solutions for anomalous dispersion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, D.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2014-06-01

    Groundwater flow and transport often occur in a highly heterogeneous environment (potentially heterogeneous at multiple spatial scales) and is impacted by geochemical reactions, advection, diffusion, and other pore scale processes. All these factors can give rise to large-scale anomalous dispersive behavior that can make complex model representation and prediction of plume concentrations challenging due to difficulties unraveling all the complexities associated with the governing processes, flow medium, and their parameters. An alternative is to use upscaled stochastic models of anomalous dispersion, and this is the approach used here. Within a probabilistic framework, we derive a number of analytical solutions for several anomalous dispersion models. The anomalous dispersion models are allowed to be either non-Gaussian (α-stable Lévy), correlated, or nonstationary from the Lagrangian perspective. A global sensitivity analysis is performed to gain a greater understanding of the extent to which uncertainty in the parameters associated with the anomalous behavior can be narrowed by examining concentration measurements from a network of monitoring wells and to demonstrate the computational speed of the solutions. The developed analytical solutions are encoded and available for use in the open source computational framework MADS (http://mads.lanl.gov).

  11. Colored models for anomalous nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.J.S.; Saly, R.; Romo, W.J.; Sundaresan, M.K.; Campbell, B.; Elias, V.

    1983-04-01

    There seems to be good experimental evidence that anomalous nuclei are produced in heavy-ion collisions; they are anomalous in that they have an abnormally short mean free path, for example, in nuclear emulsions. Here we consider the possibility that anomalous nuclei are combinations of a colored anomalous particle fragment (based on theories with spontaneous breakdown of color symmetry) with ordinary nucleons. Phenomenological implications of various possible models in which the anomalous particle fragment is considered to be a colored particle with the color symmetry SU(3)/sub c/ explicitly broken are given.

  12. Image processing and fusion to detect navigation obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yamada, Kimio

    1998-07-01

    Helicopters flying at low altitude in the visual flight rules often crash against obstacles such as a power transmission line. This paper describes the image sensors to detect obstacles and the several image processing techniques to derive and enhance the targets in the images. The images including obstacles were collected both on the ground and by air using an infrared (IR) camera and a color video camera in different backgrounds, distances, and weather conditions. Collected results revealed that IR images have an advantage over color images to detect obstacles in many environments. Several image processing techniques have been evaluated to improve the qualities of collected images. For example, fusion of IR and color images, several filters, such as the Median filter or the adaptive filter have been tested. Information that the target is thin and long, which characterizes the shape of power lines, has been introduced to derive power lines. It has been shown that these processes can greatly reduce the noise and enhance the contrast, no matter how the background is. It has also been demonstrated that there is a good prospect that these processes will help develop the algorithm for automatic obstacle detection and warning.

  13. Detection, information fusion, and temporal processing for intelligence in recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.

    1996-12-31

    The use of intelligence in vision recognition uses many different techniques or tools. This presentation discusses several of these techniques for recognition. The recognition process is generally separated into several steps or stages when implemented in hardware, e.g. detection, segmentation and enhancement, and recognition. Several new distortion-invariant filters, biologically-inspired Gabor wavelet filter techniques, and morphological operations that have been found very useful for detection and clutter rejection are discussed. These are all shift-invariant operations that allow multiple object regions of interest in a scene to be located in parallel. We also discuss new algorithm fusion concepts by which the results from different detection algorithms are combined to reduce detection false alarms; these fusion methods utilize hierarchical processing and fuzzy logic concepts. We have found this to be most necessary, since no single detection algorithm is best for all cases. For the final recognition stage, we describe a new method of representing all distorted versions of different classes of objects and determining the object class and pose that most closely matches that of a given input. Besides being efficient in terms of storage and on-line computations required, it overcomes many of the problems that other classifiers have in terms of the required training set size, poor generalization with many hidden layer neurons, etc. It is also attractive in its ability to reject input regions as clutter (non-objects) and to learn new object descriptions. We also discuss its use in processing a temporal sequence of input images of the contents of each local region of interest. We note how this leads to robust results in which estimation efforts in individual frames can be overcome. This seems very practical, since in many scenarios a decision need not be made after only one frame of data, since subsequent frames of data enter immediately in sequence.

  14. Process for the detection of micro-cracks

    DOEpatents

    Lapinski, Norman; Sather, Allen

    1979-01-01

    A process for the nondestructive testing of ceramic objects to detect the presence of defects and micro-cracks in the surface in which a solution of silver nitrate is applied to the surface of the object which penetrates into the surface defects, drying the object so that the silver nitrate remains in the defects, and preparing an X-ray radiograph whereby any defects and micro-cracks will appear in the radiograph.

  15. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  16. Process and apparatus for detecting presence of plant substances

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J.A.

    1990-12-31

    Disclosed is a process for detecting the presence of plant substances in a particular environment which comprises the steps of: (1) Measuring the background K40 gamma ray radiation level in a particular environment with a 1.46 MeV gamma ray counter system; (2) measuring the amount of K40 gamma ray radiation emanating from a package containing said plant substance being passed through said environment with said counter; and (3) generating an alarm signal when the total K40 gamma ray radiation reaches a predetermined level over and above the background level. Also disclosed is the apparatus and system used to conduct the process.

  17. Process and apparatus for detecting presence of plant substances

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for detecting the presence of plant substances in a particular environment which comprises the steps of: (1) Measuring the background K40 gamma ray radiation level in a particular environment with a 1.46 MeV gamma ray counter system; (2) measuring the amount of K40 gamma ray radiation emanating from a package containing said plant substance being passed through said environment with said counter; and (3) generating an alarm signal when the total K40 gamma ray radiation reaches a predetermined level over and above the background level. Also disclosed is the apparatus and system used to conduct the process.

  18. Interstellar Processes Leading to Molecular Deuterium Enrichment and Their Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large deuterium (D) enrichments in meteoritic materials indicate that interstellar organic materials survived incorporation into parent bodies within the forming Solar System. These enrichments are likelier due to one or more of four distinct astrochemical processes. These are (1) low temperature gas phase ion-molecule reactions; (2) low temperature gas-grain reactions; (3) gas phase unimolecular photodissociation, and (4) ultraviolet photolysis in D-enriched ice mantles. Each of these processes should be associated with molecular carriers having, distinct regiochemical signatures (D placement on the product molecules, correlation with specific chemical functionalities, etc.). These processes are reviewed and specific spectroscopic signatures for the detection of these processes in space are identified and described.

  19. Lunar Crescent Detection Based on Image Processing Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar, Mostafa; Moalem, Peyman; Badri, Mohamad Ali

    2014-11-01

    For many years lunar crescent visibility has been studied by many astronomers. Different criteria have been used to predict and evaluate the visibility status of new Moon crescents. Powerful equipment such as telescopes and binoculars have changed capability of observations. Most of conventional statistical criteria made wrong predictions when new observations (based on modern equipment) were reported. In order to verify such reports and modify criteria, not only previous statistical parameters should be considered but also some new and effective parameters like high magnification, contour effect, low signal to noise, eyestrain and weather conditions should be viewed. In this paper a new method is presented for lunar crescent detection based on processing of lunar crescent images. The method includes two main steps, first, an image processing algorithm that improves signal to noise ratio and detects lunar crescents based on circular Hough transform (CHT). Second using an algorithm based on image histogram processing to detect the crescent visually. Final decision is made by comparing the results of visual and CHT algorithms. In order to evaluate the proposed method, a database, including 31 images are tested. The illustrated method can distinguish and extract the crescent that even the eye can't recognize. Proposed method significantly reduces artifacts, increases SNR and can be used easily by both groups astronomers and who want to develop a new criterion as a reliable method to verify empirical observation.

  20. RSRM Nozzle Anomalous Throat Erosion Investigation Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Wendel, Gary M.

    1998-01-01

    In September, 1996, anomalous pocketing erosion was observed in the aft end of the throat ring of the nozzle of one of the reusable solid rocket motors (RSRM 56B) used on NASA's space transportation system (STS) mission 79. The RSRM throat ring is constructed of bias tape-wrapped carbon cloth/ phenolic (CCP) ablative material. A comprehensive investigation revealed necessary and sufficient conditions for occurrence of the pocketing event and provided rationale that the solid rocket motors for the subsequent mission, STS-80, were safe to fly. The nozzles of both of these motors also exhibited anomalous erosion similar to, but less extensive than that observed on STS-79. Subsequent to this flight, the investigation to identify both the specific causes and the corrective actions for elimination of the necessary and sufficient conditions for the pocketing erosion was intensified. A detailed fault tree approach was utilized to examine potential material and process contributors to the anomalous performance. The investigation involved extensive constituent and component material property testing, pedigree assessments, supplier audits, process audits, full scale processing test article fabrication and evaluation, thermal and thermostructural analyses, nondestructive evaluation, and material performance tests conducted using hot fire simulation in laboratory test beds and subscale and full scale solid rocket motor static test firings. This presentation will provide an over-view of the observed anomalous nozzle erosion and the comprehensive, fault-tree based investigation conducted to resolve this issue.

  1. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    SciTech Connect

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-21

    Capacitance-voltage (C–V) and capacitance-frequency (C–f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C–V anomalous) is observed in the C–V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C–V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO{sub 2} interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60–0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti{sup 3+} ions. Both the C–V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  2. Ability of NCAR RegCM2 in reproducing the dominant physical processes during the anomalous rainfall episodes in the summer of 1991 over the Yangtze-Huaihe valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zhao, Y. C.; Ding, Y. H.

    2002-03-01

    The excessively torrential rainfall over the Yangtze-Huaihe valley during the summer of 1991 is simulated with an updated version of the second generation NCAR regional climate model (RegCM2) as a case study to evaluate the model's performance in reproducing the daily precipitation and the associated physical factors contributing to the generation of the anomalous rainfall. This simulation is driven by large-scale atmospheric lateral boundary conditions derived from the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) analysis. The simulation period is May to August 1991. The model domain covers East Asia and its adjacent oceanic regions, The model resolution is 60 km x 60 km in the horizontal and 23 layers in the vertical. The model can reasonably reproduce the daily precipitation events over East Asia for the summer of 1991, especially in the Yangtze-Huaihe valley where the anomalous rainfall occurred. The spatial and temporal structure of some important physical variables and processes related to the generation of the anomalous rainfall are analyzed, The time evolution of simulated upward vertical motion and horizontal convergence agrees with the five rainfall episodes over this subregion. The water vapor feeding the rainfall is mostly transported by the horizontal atmospheric motions from outside of the region rather than from local sources. The subtropical high over the western Pacific Ocean controls the progress and retreat of the summer monsoon over East Asia, and the RegCM2 can simulate the northward migration and southward retreat of subtropical high over the western Pacific Ocean. Furthermore, the model can represent the daily variation of the low level jet, which is crucial in the water vapor transport to the Yangtze-Huaihe valley.

  3. System and process for detecting and monitoring surface defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Mark K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A system and process for detecting and monitoring defects in large surfaces such as the field joints of the container segments of a space shuttle booster motor. Beams of semi-collimated light from three non-parallel fiber optic light panels are directed at a region of the surface at non-normal angles of expected incidence. A video camera gathers some portion of the light that is reflected at an angle other than the angle of expected reflectance, and generates signals which are analyzed to discern defects in the surface. The analysis may be performed by visual inspection of an image on a video monitor, or by inspection of filtered or otherwise processed images. In one alternative embodiment, successive predetermined regions of the surface are aligned with the light source before illumination, thereby permitting efficient detection of defects in a large surface. Such alignment is performed by using a line scan gauge to sense the light which passes through an aperture in the surface. In another embodiment a digital map of the surface is created, thereby permitting the maintenance of records detailing changes in the location or size of defects as the container segment is refurbished and re-used. The defect detection apparatus may also be advantageously mounted on a fixture which engages the edge of a container segment.

  4. Processing Ocean Images to Detect Large Drift Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veenstra, Tim

    2009-01-01

    A computer program processes the digitized outputs of a set of downward-looking video cameras aboard an aircraft flying over the ocean. The purpose served by this software is to facilitate the detection of large drift nets that have been lost, abandoned, or jettisoned. The development of this software and of the associated imaging hardware is part of a larger effort to develop means of detecting and removing large drift nets before they cause further environmental damage to the ocean and to shores on which they sometimes impinge. The software is capable of near-realtime processing of as many as three video feeds at a rate of 30 frames per second. After a user sets the parameters of an adjustable algorithm, the software analyzes each video stream, detects any anomaly, issues a command to point a high-resolution camera toward the location of the anomaly, and, once the camera has been so aimed, issues a command to trigger the camera shutter. The resulting high-resolution image is digitized, and the resulting data are automatically uploaded to the operator s computer for analysis.

  5. Network Detection in Raster Data Using Marked Point Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Kruse, C.; Rottensteiner, F.; Soergel, U.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    We propose a new approach for the automatic detection of network structures in raster data. The model for the network structure is represented by a graph whose nodes and edges correspond to junction-points and to connecting line segments, respectively; nodes and edges are further described by certain parameters. We embed this model in the probabilistic framework of marked point processes and determine the most probable configuration of objects by stochastic sampling. That is, different graph configurations are constructed randomly by modifying the graph entity parameters, by adding and removing nodes and edges to/ from the current graph configuration. Each configuration is then evaluated based on the probabilities of the changes and an energy function describing the conformity with a predefined model. By using the Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampler, a global optimum of the energy function is determined. We apply our method to the detection of river and tidal channel networks in digital terrain models. In comparison to our previous work, we introduce constraints concerning the flow direction of water into the energy function. Our goal is to analyse the influence of different parameter settings on the results of network detection in both, synthetic and real data. Our results show the general potential of our method for the detection of river networks in different types of terrain.

  6. Remote sensing and characterization of anomalous debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Beavers, W.; Lambour, R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.; Kansky, J.; Stansbery, E.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of orbital debris data shows a band of anomalously high debris concentration in the altitude range between 800 and 1000 km. Analysis indicates that the origin is the leaking coolant fluid from nuclear power sources that powered a now defunct Soviet space-based series of ocean surveillance satellites. A project carried out to detect, track and characterize a sample of the anomalous debris is reported. The nature of the size and shape of the sample set, and the possibility of inferring the composition of the droplets were assessed. The technique used to detect, track and characterize the sample set is described and the results of the characterization analysis are presented. It is concluded that the nature of the debris is consistent with leaked Na-K fluid, although this cannot be proved with the remote sensing techniques used.

  7. Apparatus and process for microbial detection and enumeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Grana, D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus and process for detecting and enumerating specific microorganisms from large volume samples containing small numbers of the microorganisms is presented. The large volume samples are filtered through a membrane filter to concentrate the microorganisms. The filter is positioned between two absorbent pads and previously moistened with a growth medium for the microorganisms. A pair of electrodes are disposed against the filter and the pad electrode filter assembly is retained within a petri dish by retainer ring. The cover is positioned on base of petri dish and sealed at the edges by a parafilm seal prior to being electrically connected via connectors to a strip chart recorder for detecting and enumerating the microorganisms collected on filter.

  8. Respiratory rate detection algorithms by photoplethysmography signal processing.

    PubMed

    Lee, E M; Kim, N H; Trang, N T; Hong, J H; Cha, E J; Lee, T S

    2008-01-01

    Photoplethysmography (PPG) offers the clinically meaningful parameters, such as, heart rate, and respiratory rate. In this study, we presented three respiratory signal detection algorithms using photoplethysmography raw data generated from commercial PPG sensor: (1)Min-Max (2)Peak-to-Peak (3)Pulse Shape. As reference signal, nasal sensor signal was acquired simultaneously and compared and analyzed. We used two types of moving average filtering technique to process three PPG parameters. In laboratory experiment, 6 subjects' PPG signals were measured when they respire ten and fifteen, and arbitrary times per minute. From the results, following conclusions were drawn. Min-Max and Peak-to-Peak algorithms perform better than Pulse shape algorithm. They can be used to detect respiratory rate. But, Pulse Shape algorithm was accurate for subject 4 only. More experimental data is necessary to improve the accuracy and reliability. PMID:19162865

  9. Beta function and anomalous dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-orders beta-function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the 2-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows us to determine the anomalous dimension of the fermion masses at the infrared fixed point, and the resulting values compare well with the lattice determinations.

  10. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  11. Process and apparatus for detecting presence of plant substances

    DOEpatents

    Kirby, John A.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and process for detecting the presence of plant substances in a particular environment which comprises the steps of: measuring the background K40 gamma ray radiation level in a particular environment with a 1.46 MeV gamma ray counter system; measuring the amount of K40 gamma ray radiation emanating from a package containing a plant substance being passed through an environment with a counter; and generating an alarm signal when the total K40 gamma ray radiation reaches a predetermined level over and above the background level.

  12. Process and apparatus for detecting presence of plant substances

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J.A.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes an apparatus and process for detecting the presence of plant substances in a particular environment. It comprises: measuring the background K40 gamma ray radiation level in a particular environment with a 1.46 MeV gamma ray counter system; measuring the amount of K40 gamma ray radiation emanating from a package containing a plant substance being passed through an environment with a counter; and generating an alarm signal when the total K40 gamma ray radiation reaches a predetermined level over and above the background level.

  13. Atomic force microscopy to detect internal live processes in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukin, M. E.; Guz, N. V.; Vasilyev, S.; Sokolov, I.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study surface oscillations coming from internal live processes of insects. With a specially designed AFM stage to keep an insect motion partially restricted, the AFM can record internal oscillations on different parts of the insect. We demonstrate the method for a fly, mosquito, and lady beetle. We show that AFM can provide information about the spectral behavior that has not been studied so far, 10-600 Hz range, detecting amplitudes down to subnanometer level.

  14. Signal processing techniques for atrial fibrillation source detection.

    PubMed

    Ambadkar, Minal; Leonelli, Fabio M; Sankar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    In clinical practice, Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most common and critical cardiac arrhythmia encountered. The treatment that can ensure permanent AF removal is catheter ablation, where cardiologists destroy the affected cardiac muscle cells with RF or Laser. In this procedure it is necessary to know exactly from which part of the heart AF triggers are originated. Various signal processing algorithms provide a strong tool to track AF sources. This study proposes, signal processing techniques that can be exploited for characterization, analysis and source detection of AF signals. These algorithms are implemented on Electrocardiogram (ECG) and intracardiac signals which contain important information that allows the analysis of anatomic and physiologic aspects of the whole cardiac muscle. PMID:25570578

  15. Gaussian Process for Activity Modeling and Anomaly Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.; Rosenhahn, B.; Yang, M. Ying

    2015-08-01

    Complex activity modeling and identification of anomaly is one of the most interesting and desired capabilities for automated video behavior analysis. A number of different approaches have been proposed in the past to tackle this problem. There are two main challenges for activity modeling and anomaly detection: 1) most existing approaches require sufficient data and supervision for learning; 2) the most interesting abnormal activities arise rarely and are ambiguous among typical activities, i.e. hard to be precisely defined. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to model complex activities and detect anomalies by using non-parametric Gaussian Process (GP) models in a crowded and complicated traffic scene. In comparison with parametric models such as HMM, GP models are nonparametric and have their advantages. Our GP models exploit implicit spatial-temporal dependence among local activity patterns. The learned GP regression models give a probabilistic prediction of regional activities at next time interval based on observations at present. An anomaly will be detected by comparing the actual observations with the prediction at real time. We verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed model on the QMUL Junction Dataset. Furthermore, we provide a publicly available manually labeled ground truth of this data set.

  16. Bisous model-Detecting filamentary patterns in point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, E.; Stoica, R. S.; Kipper, R.; Saar, E.

    2016-07-01

    The cosmic web is a highly complex geometrical pattern, with galaxy clusters at the intersection of filaments and filaments at the intersection of walls. Identifying and describing the filamentary network is not a trivial task due to the overwhelming complexity of the structure, its connectivity and the intrinsic hierarchical nature. To detect and quantify galactic filaments we use the Bisous model, which is a marked point process built to model multi-dimensional patterns. The Bisous filament finder works directly with the galaxy distribution data and the model intrinsically takes into account the connectivity of the filamentary network. The Bisous model generates the visit map (the probability to find a filament at a given point) together with the filament orientation field. Using these two fields, we can extract filament spines from the data. Together with this paper we publish the computer code for the Bisous model that is made available in GitHub. The Bisous filament finder has been successfully used in several cosmological applications and further development of the model will allow to detect the filamentary network also in photometric redshift surveys, using the full redshift posterior. We also want to encourage the astro-statistical community to use the model and to connect it with all other existing methods for filamentary pattern detection and characterisation.

  17. Flashing anomalous color contrast.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Spillmann, Lothar; Werner, John S

    2004-01-01

    A new visual phenomenon that we call flashing anomalous color contrast is described. This phenomenon arises from the interaction between a gray central disk and a chromatic annulus surrounded by black radial lines. In an array of such figures, the central gray disk no longer appears gray, but assumes a color complementary to that of the surrounding annulus. The induced color appears: (1) vivid and saturated; (2) self-luminous, not a surface property; (3) flashing with eye or stimulus movement; (4) floating out of its confines; and (5) stronger in extrafoveal than in foveal vision. The strength of the effect depends on the number, length, width, and luminance contrast of the radial lines. The results suggest that the chromatic ring bounding the inner tips of the black radial lines induces simultaneous color contrast, whereas the radial lines elicit, in conjunction with the gray disk and the ring, the flashing, vividness, and high saturation of the effect. The stimulus properties inducing the illusion suggest that flashing anomalous color contrast may be based on asynchronous interactions among multiple visual pathways. PMID:15518215

  18. Coherent detection and digital signal processing for fiber optic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Ezra

    The drive towards higher spectral efficiency in optical fiber systems has generated renewed interest in coherent detection. We review different detection methods, including noncoherent, differentially coherent, and coherent detection, as well as hybrid detection methods. We compare the modulation methods that are enabled and their respective performances in a linear regime. An important system parameter is the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) utilized in transmission. Polarization-multiplexed quadrature-amplitude modulation maximizes spectral efficiency and power efficiency as it uses all four available DOF contained in the two field quadratures in the two polarizations. Dual-polarization homodyne or heterodyne downconversion are linear processes that can fully recover the received signal field in these four DOF. When downconverted signals are sampled at the Nyquist rate, compensation of transmission impairments can be performed using digital signal processing (DSP). Software based receivers benefit from the robustness of DSP, flexibility in design, and ease of adaptation to time-varying channels. Linear impairments, including chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization-mode dispersion (PMD), can be compensated quasi-exactly using finite impulse response filters. In practical systems, sampling the received signal at 3/2 times the symbol rate is sufficient to enable an arbitrary amount of CD and PMD to be compensated for a sufficiently long equalizer whose tap length scales linearly with transmission distance. Depending on the transmitted constellation and the target bit error rate, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) should have around 5 to 6 bits of resolution. Digital coherent receivers are naturally suited for the implementation of feedforward carrier recovery, which has superior linewidth tolerance than phase-locked loops, and does not suffer from feedback delay constraints. Differential bit encoding can be used to prevent catastrophic receiver failure due

  19. Statistical method for detecting structural change in the growth process.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimoto, Atsushi

    2008-03-01

    Due to competition among individual trees and other exogenous factors that change the growth environment, each tree grows following its own growth trend with some structural changes in growth over time. In the present article, a new method is proposed to detect a structural change in the growth process. We formulate the method as a simple statistical test for signal detection without constructing any specific model for the structural change. To evaluate the p-value of the test, the tube method is developed because the regular distribution theory is insufficient. Using two sets of tree diameter growth data sampled from planted forest stands of Cryptomeria japonica in Japan, we conduct an analysis of identifying the effect of thinning on the growth process as a structural change. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method is useful to identify the structural change caused by thinning. We also provide the properties of the method in terms of the size and power of the test. PMID:17608782

  20. Signal detection in FDA AERS database using Dirichlet process.

    PubMed

    Hu, Na; Huang, Lan; Tiwari, Ram C

    2015-08-30

    In the recent two decades, data mining methods for signal detection have been developed for drug safety surveillance, using large post-market safety data. Several of these methods assume that the number of reports for each drug-adverse event combination is a Poisson random variable with mean proportional to the unknown reporting rate of the drug-adverse event pair. Here, a Bayesian method based on the Poisson-Dirichlet process (DP) model is proposed for signal detection from large databases, such as the Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) database. Instead of using a parametric distribution as a common prior for the reporting rates, as is the case with existing Bayesian or empirical Bayesian methods, a nonparametric prior, namely, the DP, is used. The precision parameter and the baseline distribution of the DP, which characterize the process, are modeled hierarchically. The performance of the Poisson-DP model is compared with some other models, through an intensive simulation study using a Bayesian model selection and frequentist performance characteristics such as type-I error, false discovery rate, sensitivity, and power. For illustration, the proposed model and its extension to address a large amount of zero counts are used to analyze statin drugs for signals using the 2006-2011 AERS data. PMID:25924820

  1. Diffraction tomographic signal processing algorithms for tunnel detection

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.

    1993-08-01

    Signal processing algorithms have been developed for wave based imaging using diffraction tomography. The basis for this image reconstruction procedure is the generalized projection slice theorem (GPST) which, for homogeneous waves, is an analytic relationship between the spatial Fourier transform of the acquired data and the spatial Fourier transform of the spatial profile (object function) of the object being imaged. Imaging within geophysical diffraction tomography when only homogeneous waves are considered can then be accomplished by inversion of the GPST using standard numerical techniques. In an attenuating background medium or when eddy currents or static fields are considered, a generalized GPST can be derived that involves both real and complex spatial frequencies. In this case, direct Fourier inversion is not possible because of the presence of the complex frequencies. Although direct inversion and, hence, complete imaging is not possible for such cases, the generalized CPST`S can be used to analytically shift the location of data templates matched to specified targets and these templates can, in turn, be correlated with acquired data to detect and estimate the location of the specified targets. Since GPST`s are used directly in the detection problem, there is no need to numerically invert the intergal transform of the object function. For this reason, target detection can be accomplished in a computationally efficient manner independent of the type of measurement or background geologic conditions. A number of GPST`s are derived and the use of GPST`s for both imaging and detection of subsurface voids is demonstrated in several recent applications.

  2. Effects of image processing on the detective quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Chang-Lae; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na

    2010-04-01

    Digital radiography has gained popularity in many areas of clinical practice. This transition brings interest in advancing the methodologies for image quality characterization. However, as the methodologies for such characterizations have not been standardized, the results of these studies cannot be directly compared. The primary objective of this study was to standardize methodologies for image quality characterization. The secondary objective was to evaluate affected factors to Modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) according to image processing algorithm. Image performance parameters such as MTF, NPS, and DQE were evaluated using the international electro-technical commission (IEC 62220-1)-defined RQA5 radiographic techniques. Computed radiography (CR) images of hand posterior-anterior (PA) for measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR), slit image for measuring MTF, white image for measuring NPS were obtained and various Multi-Scale Image Contrast Amplification (MUSICA) parameters were applied to each of acquired images. In results, all of modified images were considerably influence on evaluating SNR, MTF, NPS, and DQE. Modified images by the post-processing had higher DQE than the MUSICA=0 image. This suggests that MUSICA values, as a post-processing, have an affect on the image when it is evaluating for image quality. In conclusion, the control parameters of image processing could be accounted for evaluating characterization of image quality in same way. The results of this study could be guided as a baseline to evaluate imaging systems and their imaging characteristics by measuring MTF, NPS, and DQE.

  3. Single- and Dual-Process Models of Biased Contingency Detection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Decades of research in causal and contingency learning show that people’s estimations of the degree of contingency between two events are easily biased by the relative probabilities of those two events. If two events co-occur frequently, then people tend to overestimate the strength of the contingency between them. Traditionally, these biases have been explained in terms of relatively simple single-process models of learning and reasoning. However, more recently some authors have found that these biases do not appear in all dependent variables and have proposed dual-process models to explain these dissociations between variables. In the present paper we review the evidence for dissociations supporting dual-process models and we point out important shortcomings of this literature. Some dissociations seem to be difficult to replicate or poorly generalizable and others can be attributed to methodological artifacts. Overall, we conclude that support for dual-process models of biased contingency detection is scarce and inconclusive. PMID:27025532

  4. STIS MAMA Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the STIS FUV MAMA or NUV MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flags are used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of three separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high voltage ramp-up, and 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage followed by a fold analysis test {See STIS ISR 98-02R}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13150.

  5. COS NUV Detector Recovery after Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the NUV-MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high-voltage ramp-up, 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage, and 4} fold analysis test {See COS TIR 2010-01}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 20 proposal 13129. Adjustments were made the the Software Global Monitor {SGM} to account for an increase in the dark counts due to window glow and to align the SGM to previously obtained Fold Analysis event data.

  6. COS NUV Detector Recovery After Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the NUV-MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMAâ??s health after an anomalous shutdown: signal processing electronics check, slow, intermediate voltage high-voltage ramp-up, ramp-up to full operating voltage, and fold analysis test {See COS TIR 2010-01}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 18 proposal 12430.

  7. COS NUV Detector Recovery After Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the NUV-MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMAâ_Ts health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high-voltage ramp-up, 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage, and 4} fold analysis test {See COS TIR 2010-01}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes almost the same steps as Cycle 19 proposal 12723. Adjustments were made the the Software Global Monitor {SGM} to account for an increase in the dark counts due to window glow and to align the SGM to previously obtained Fold Analysis event data.

  8. ACS SBC Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the SBC {FUV MAMA} detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flag 2 is used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage. The recovery procedure consists of four separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMA's health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, high-voltage ramp-up to an intermediate voltage, 3} a slow high-voltage ramp-up to the nominal operating HV, and 4} fold analysis test. Each must be completed successfully before proceeding onto the next. During the two high-voltage ramp-ups, dark ACCUM exposures are taken. At high voltage, dark ACCUM exposures and diagnostics are taken. This proposal is based on Proposal 13163 from Cycle 20. For additional MAMA recovery information, see STIS ISR 98-02R.

  9. STIS MAMA Recovery from Anomalous Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This proposal is designed to permit a safe and orderly recovery of the STIS FUV MAMA or NUV MAMA detector after an anomalous shutdown. This is accomplished by using slower-than-normal MCP high-voltage ramp-ups and diagnostics. Anomalous shutdowns can occur because of bright object violations, which trigger the Global Hardware Monitor or the Global Software Monitor. Anomalous shutdowns can also occur because of MAMA hardware anomalies or failures. The cause of the shutdown should be thoroughly investigated and understood prior to recovery. Twenty-four hour wait intervals are required after each test for MCP gas desorption and data analysis. Event flags are used to prevent inadvertent MAMA usage.The recovery procedure consists of three separate tests {i.e. visits} to check the MAMAâ_Ts health after an anomalous shutdown: 1} signal processing electronics check, 2} slow, intermediate voltage high voltage ramp-up, and 3} ramp-up to full operating voltage followed by a fold analysis test {See STIS ISR 98-02R}. Each must be successfully completed before proceeding onto the next. This proposal executes the same steps as Cycle 19 proposal 12779.

  10. Real-Time Plasma Process Condition Sensing and Abnormal Process Detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2010-01-01

    The plasma process is often used in the fabrication of semiconductor wafers. However, due to the lack of real-time etching control, this may result in some unacceptable process performances and thus leads to significant waste and lower wafer yield. In order to maximize the product wafer yield, a timely and accurately process fault or abnormal detection in a plasma reactor is needed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is one of the most frequently used metrologies in in-situ process monitoring. Even though OES has the advantage of non-invasiveness, it is required to provide a huge amount of information. As a result, the data analysis of OES becomes a big challenge. To accomplish real-time detection, this work employed the sigma matching method technique, which is the time series of OES full spectrum intensity. First, the response model of a healthy plasma spectrum was developed. Then, we defined a matching rate as an indictor for comparing the difference between the tested wafers response and the health sigma model. The experimental results showed that this proposal method can detect process faults in real-time, even in plasma etching tools. PMID:22219683

  11. Process fault detection and nonlinear time series analysis for anomaly detection in safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.L.; Mullen, M.F.; Wangen, L.E.

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we discuss two advanced techniques, process fault detection and nonlinear time series analysis, and apply them to the analysis of vector-valued and single-valued time-series data. We investigate model-based process fault detection methods for analyzing simulated, multivariate, time-series data from a three-tank system. The model-predictions are compared with simulated measurements of the same variables to form residual vectors that are tested for the presence of faults (possible diversions in safeguards terminology). We evaluate two methods, testing all individual residuals with a univariate z-score and testing all variables simultaneously with the Mahalanobis distance, for their ability to detect loss of material from two different leak scenarios from the three-tank system: a leak without and with replacement of the lost volume. Nonlinear time-series analysis tools were compared with the linear methods popularized by Box and Jenkins. We compare prediction results using three nonlinear and two linear modeling methods on each of six simulated time series: two nonlinear and four linear. The nonlinear methods performed better at predicting the nonlinear time series and did as well as the linear methods at predicting the linear values.

  12. Anomalous reflections from the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givishvili, G. V.; Leshchenko, L. N.

    2013-09-01

    The existence of anomalous ionospheric reflections was shown on the basis of vertical soundings at the Moskow station. They are observed at heights of 100-200 km. These anomalous reflections are not related to the main Ne( h) ionospheric profile. Morphological characteristics of such reflections are presented: the daily, seasonal, and cyclic dependences of their appearance.

  13. Anomalous electrodynamic explosions in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, H.

    1986-06-01

    The recently reported Graneau experiments on electrodynamic explosions in liquids, which reveal anomalous longitudinal electrodynamic forces of the order of 10/sup 4/ times greater than expected, verify the need for a term in the law of electrodynamics that corresponds to the ion/electron mass ratio. This confirms an earlier theoretical interpretation of the anomalous cathode reaction forces found in the vacuum arc.

  14. Particle contamination formation and detection in magnetron sputtering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.; Weiss, C.A.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C.

    1996-10-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination can cause electrical shorting, pin holes, problems with photolithography, adhesion failure, as well as visual and cosmetic defects. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique that provides real-time, {ital in-situ} imaging of particles > 0.3 {mu}m in diameter. Using this technique, the causes, sources and influences on particles in plasma and non-plasma and non-plasma processes may be independently evaluated and corrected. Several studies employing laser light scattering have demonstrated both homogeneous and heterogeneous causes of particle contamination. In this paper, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. In this region, film redeposition is followed by filament or nodule growth and enhanced trapping which increases filament growth. Eventually the filaments effectively ``short circuit`` the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes heating failure of the filament fracturing and ejecting the filaments into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor (IC) fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests that this mechanism may be universal to many sputtering processes.

  15. Space–time-bounded quantum fields for detection processes

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo, Fernando J.; Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a quantum field detection model comprising two types of detection procedures: maximal detection, where the initial state of the system and detectors undergoes an irreversible evolution, and minimal detection, where the system–detector interaction consists of a small, reversible coupling and posterior maximal detection performed over the detector system. Combined, these detection procedures allow for a time-dependent description of signalling experiments involving yes/no type of questions. A particular minimal detection model, stable in the presence of the vacuum, is presented and studied, successfully reproducing the localization of the state after a detection. PMID:24711717

  16. Spectrum of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    The equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics describe an Abelian plasma where conduction and chiral currents are simultaneously present and constrained by the second law of thermodynamics. At high frequencies the magnetic currents play the leading role, and the spectrum is dominated by two-fluid effects. The system behaves instead as a single fluid in the low-frequency regime where the vortical currents induce potentially large hypermagnetic fields. After deriving the physical solutions of the generalized Appleton-Hartree equation, the corresponding dispersion relations are scrutinized and compared with the results valid for cold plasmas. Hypermagnetic knots and fluid vortices can be concurrently present at very low frequencies and suggest a qualitatively different dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities.

  17. Anomalous gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Barklow, T.; Rizzo, T.; Baur, U.

    1997-01-13

    The measurement of anomalous gauge boson self couplings is reviewed for a variety of present and planned accelerators. Sensitivities are compared for these accelerators using models based on the effective Lagrangian approach. The sensitivities described here are for measurement of {open_quotes}generic{close_quotes} parameters {kappa}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub V}, etc., defined in the text. Pre-LHC measurements will not probe these coupling parameters to precision better than O(10{sup -1}). The LHC should be sensitive to better than O(10{sup -2}), while a future NLC should achieve sensitivity of O(10{sup -3}) to O(10{sup -4}) for center of mass energies ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 TeV.

  18. Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2011-02-15

    The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

  19. Lightning Detection Efficiency Analysis Process: Modeling Based on Empirical Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    2005-01-01

    A ground based lightning detection system employs a grid of sensors, which record and evaluate the electromagnetic signal produced by a lightning strike. Several detectors gather information on that signal s strength, time of arrival, and behavior over time. By coordinating the information from several detectors, an event solution can be generated. That solution includes the signal s point of origin, strength and polarity. Determination of the location of the lightning strike uses algorithms based on long used techniques of triangulation. Determination of the event s original signal strength relies on the behavior of the generated magnetic field over distance and time. In general the signal from the event undergoes geometric dispersion and environmental attenuation as it progresses. Our knowledge of that radial behavior together with the strength of the signal received by detecting sites permits an extrapolation and evaluation of the original strength of the lightning strike. It also limits the detection efficiency (DE) of the network. For expansive grids and with a sparse density of detectors, the DE varies widely over the area served. This limits the utility of the network in gathering information on regional lightning strike density and applying it to meteorological studies. A network of this type is a grid of four detectors in the Rondonian region of Brazil. The service area extends over a million square kilometers. Much of that area is covered by rain forests. Thus knowledge of lightning strike characteristics over the expanse is of particular value. I have been developing a process that determines the DE over the region [3]. In turn, this provides a way to produce lightning strike density maps, corrected for DE, over the entire region of interest. This report offers a survey of that development to date and a record of present activity.

  20. Direct detection of DNA conformation in hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, George; Tsortos, Achilleas; Bender, Florian; Ferapontova, Elena E; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-02-21

    DNA hybridization studies at surfaces normally rely on the detection of mass changes as a result of the addition of the complementary strand. In this work we propose a mass-independent sensing principle based on the quantitative monitoring of the conformation of the immobilized single-strand probe and of the final hybridized product. This is demonstrated by using a label-free acoustic technique, the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D), and oligonucleotides of specific sequences which, upon hybridization, result in DNAs of various shapes and sizes. Measurements of the acoustic ratio ΔD/ΔF in combination with a "discrete molecule binding" approach are used to confirm the formation of straight hybridized DNA molecules of specific lengths (21, 75, and 110 base pairs); acoustic results are also used to distinguish between single- and double-stranded molecules as well as between same-mass hybridized products with different shapes, i.e., straight or "Y-shaped". Issues such as the effect of mono- and divalent cations to hybridization and the mechanism of the process (nucleation, kinetics) when it happens on a surface are carefully considered. Finally, this new sensing principle is applied to single-nucleotide polymorphism detection: a DNA hairpin probe hybridized to the p53 target gene gave products of distinct geometrical features depending on the presence or absence of the SNP, both readily distinguishable. Our results suggest that DNA conformation probing with acoustic wave sensors is a much more improved detection method over the popular mass-related, on/off techniques offering higher flexibility in the design of solid-phase hybridization assays. PMID:22248021

  1. A preamplification approach to GMO detection in processed foods.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, S; Cirillo, A; Di Bernardo, G; Galderisi, U; Cipollaro, M

    2010-03-01

    DNA is widely used as a target for GMO analysis because of its stability and high detectability. Real-time PCR is the method routinely used in most analytical laboratories due to its quantitative performance and great sensitivity. Accurate DNA detection and quantification is dependent on the specificity and sensitivity of the amplification protocol as well as on the quality and quantity of the DNA used in the PCR reaction. In order to enhance the sensitivity of real-time PCR and consequently expand the number of analyzable target genes, we applied a preamplification technique to processed foods where DNA can be present in low amounts and/or in degraded forms thereby affecting the reliability of qualitative and quantitative results. The preamplification procedure utilizes a pool of primers targeting genes of interest and is followed by real-time PCR reactions specific for each gene. An improvement of Ct values was found comparing preamplified vs. non-preamplified DNA. The strategy reported in the present study will be also applicable to other fields requiring quantitative DNA testing by real-time PCR. PMID:19823811

  2. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  3. Detecting geomorphic processes and change with high resolution topographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, Simon; Hurst, Martin; Grieve, Stuart; Clubb, Fiona; Milodowski, David; Attal, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    The first global topographic dataset was released in 1996, with 1 km grid spacing. It is astonishing that in only 20 years we now have access to tens of thousands of square kilometres of LiDAR data at point densities greater than 5 points per square meter. This data represents a treasure trove of information that our geomorphic predecessors could only dream of. But what are we to do with this data? Here we explore the potential of high resolution topographic data to dig deeper into geomorphic processes across a wider range of landscapes and using much larger spatial coverage than previously possible. We show how this data can be used to constrain sediment flux relationships using relief and hillslope length, and how this data can be used to detect landscape transience. We show how the nonlinear sediment flux law, proposed for upland, soil mantled landscapes by Roering et al. (1999) is consistent with a number of topographic tests. This flux law allows us to predict how landscapes will respond to tectonic forcing, and we show how these predictions can be used to detect erosion rate perturbations across a range of tectonic settings.

  4. Techniques of EMG signal analysis: detection, processing, classification and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M.S.; Mohd-Yasin, F.

    2006-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) signals can be used for clinical/biomedical applications, Evolvable Hardware Chip (EHW) development, and modern human computer interaction. EMG signals acquired from muscles require advanced methods for detection, decomposition, processing, and classification. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the various methodologies and algorithms for EMG signal analysis to provide efficient and effective ways of understanding the signal and its nature. We further point up some of the hardware implementations using EMG focusing on applications related to prosthetic hand control, grasp recognition, and human computer interaction. A comparison study is also given to show performance of various EMG signal analysis methods. This paper provides researchers a good understanding of EMG signal and its analysis procedures. This knowledge will help them develop more powerful, flexible, and efficient applications. PMID:16799694

  5. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  6. Tests of anomalous quartic couplings at the Next Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Éboli, O. J. P.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M. C.; Mizukoshi, J. K.

    1998-08-01

    We analyze the potential of the Next Linear e+e- Collider to study anomalous quartic vector-boson interactions through the processes e+e--->W+W-Z and ZZZ. In the framework of SU(2)L⊗U(1)Y chiral Lagrangians, we examine all effective operators of order p4 that lead to four-gauge-boson interactions but do not induce anomalous trilinear vertices. In our analysis, we take into account the decay of the vector bosons to fermions and evaluate the efficiency in their reconstruction. We obtain the bounds that can be placed on the anomalous quartic interactions and we study the strategies to distinguish the possible couplings.

  7. Optimizing Urine Processing Protocols for Protein and Metabolite Detection

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Nazema Y; DuBois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Will, Thompson J; Grenier, Carole; Burke, Emily; Fraser, Matthew O; Amundsen, Cindy L; Murphy, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Background In urine, factors such as timing of voids, and duration at room temperature (RT) may affect the quality of recovered protein and metabolite data. Additives may aid with detection, but can add more complexity in sample collection or analysis. We aimed to identify the optimal urine processing protocol for clinically-obtained urine samples that allows for the highest protein and metabolite yields with minimal degradation. Methods Healthy women provided multiple urine samples during the same day. Women collected their first morning (1st AM) void and another “random void”. Random voids were aliquotted with: 1) no additive; 2) boric acid (BA); 3) protease inhibitor (PI); or 4) both BA + PI. Of these aliquots, some were immediately stored at 4°C, and some were left at RT for 4 hours. Proteins and individual metabolites were quantified, normalized to creatinine concentrations, and compared across processing conditions. Sample pools corresponding to each processing condition were analyzed using mass spectrometry to assess protein degradation. Results Ten Caucasian women between 35-65 years of age provided paired 1st morning and random voided urine samples. Normalized protein concentrations were slightly higher in 1st AM compared to random “spot” voids. The addition of BA did not significantly change proteins, while PI significantly improved normalized protein concentrations, regardless of whether samples were immediately cooled or left at RT for 4 hours. In pooled samples, there were minimal differences in protein degradation under the various conditions we tested. In metabolite analyses, there were significant differences in individual amino acids based on the timing of the void. Conclusions For comparative translational research using urine, information about void timing should be collected and standardized. For urine samples processed in the same day, BA does not appear to be necessary while the addition of PI enhances protein yields, regardless of 4

  8. Detection of Space-debris Using Space-Based Integrated Detection and Image Processing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzazy, M.; Justice, J.

    2014-09-01

    Detection and cataloguing of space-debris is paramount to satellite operations. Space debris vary in size from very small objects 10-4 m2 to large objects approximately > 1 m2. The detection of small debris using earth-based telescopes and detection systems present a great challenge; long integration time, and large blur due to atmospheric turbulence. Space-based detection systems are usually expensive and have limited image processing capabilities to detect and track space debris. In this paper we describe the development of a relatively inexpensive space-based integrated sensor/processor that allows the detection of objects as small as 10-4 m2 at 50 km range (equivalent to star magnitude 10). The sensor noise floor is equivalent to star magnitude 12. The sensor field of regard is 60°x120°. The elevation field of regard is covered by two 25 mega-pixel focal plane arrays, each with 4 cm aperture covering 30 degrees field of view. A gimbal is then used to scan the sensor in the azimuthal direction. The sensor frame rate to cover the full field of regard is 10 frames/sec. The FPA outputs are processed onboard to register the images, remove background stars, identify the debris, and determine their coordinate and sidereal motion relative to the camera frame of reference. Image registration: rotation and translation to sub-pixel level was achieved using Radon transformation and fast Fourier transform techniques. The image registration algorithm was optimized to run on an FPGA. Star background is then removed from the registered images and the location and sidereal motion of the debris are then determined. The image processing system uses stars with magnitudes between 5 and 7 along with a look-up table map of the sky to convert the debris coordinate system to an inertial coordinate system which is then transmitted to the ground. A high fidelity simulation model has been developed and used to guide and test the image processing algorithms. The high fidelity simulation

  9. Effects of crystal orientation on electronic band structure and anomalous shift of higher critical point in VO2 thin films during the phase transition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Huang, Ting; You, Qinghu; Zhang, Jinzhong; Li, Wenwu; Wu, Jiada; Hu, Zhigao; Chu, Junhao

    2015-12-01

    The phase transition behaviour of vanadium dioxide (VO2) with different thicknesses has been investigated by temperature-dependent optical transmittance and Raman spectra. It is found that the crystal orientation has a great effect on the metal-insulator transition (MIT) of VO2 films. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the films are polycrystalline and exhibit the characteristics of the monoclinic phase. The preferential growth crystal orientation (0 2 0) is converted to the (\\bar{1} 1 1) plane with the film thickness increasing. It is believed that the (\\bar{1} 1 1) plane is the reflection of a twinned structure with (0 1 1) crystal orientation, which will lead to the arrangements of oxygen atoms and vanadium atoms deviating from the pure monoclinic structure. It is found that the highest order transition (E 3) is highly susceptible to the crystal orientation, whereas the lowest order transition (E 1) is nearly unaffected by it. The E 3 exhibits an anomalous temperature dependence with an abrupt blue-shift (˜0.5 eV) in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition (MIT) for VO2 film with a thickness of 84 nm. The findings show that the empty {σ*} band can be driven close to the Fermi level when the (0 2 0) orientation is converted to the (\\bar{1} 1 1) orientation. Compared to the VO2 films with thicknesses of 39 and 57 nm, the E 3 decreases by 0.8 eV and the E 2 increases by about 0.1 eV at the insulator state for the VO2 film with a thickness of 84 nm. The abnormal electronic transition and the variation of energy band is likely caused by the lattice distortion and V-V dimerisation deviation from the monoclinic {{a}\\text{m}} axis.

  10. Over-the-Horizon Anomalous VHF Propagation and Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, M.; Barbara, A. K.; Ruzhin, Ya. Yu.; Hayakawa, M.

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review current activities for the identification of earthquake (EQ) precursors and their epicentres. Starting with a brief description on the background to approaches using ultra-low (ULF), extremely low (ELF), very low/low (VLF/LF), medium (MF), high (HF), very high frequency (VHF) etc. radio waves for short-term EQ prediction, the paper concentrates on those characteristics of anomalous VHF reception from frequency-modulation (FM) radio transmissions and broadcast television (TV) signals in relation to EQ precursors. The possible ways to identify an impending EQ and its epicentre position as defined and observed by workers from a variety of studies fall within the purview of the paper. In attempts to find pre-EQ energy exchange and coupling processes between the lithosphere and atmosphere, the paper highlights some relevant observations of surface latent heat flux, sonic detection and ranging (SODAR) echograms and LF propagation. Explanations on possible causes leading to such anomalous reception are reviewed with reported results in association with pre-seismic induced modifications to tropospheric and ionospheric parameters.

  11. High-Speed Observer: Automated Streak Detection for the Aerospike Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieckhoff, T. J.; Covan, M. A.; OFarrell, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    A high-frame-rate digital video camera, installed on test stands at Stennis Space Center (SSC), has been used to capture images of the aerospike engine plume during test. These plume images are processed in real time to detect and differentiate anomalous plume events. Results indicate that the High-Speed Observer (HSO) system can detect anomalous plume streaking events that are indicative of aerospike engine malfunction.

  12. Does facial processing prioritize change detection?: change blindness illustrates costs and benefits of holistic processing.

    PubMed

    Wilford, Miko M; Wells, Gary L

    2010-11-01

    There is broad consensus among researchers both that faces are processed more holistically than other objects and that this type of processing is beneficial. We predicted that holistic processing of faces also involves a cost, namely, a diminished ability to localize change. This study (N = 150) utilized a modified change-blindness paradigm in which some trials involved a change in one feature of an image (nose, chin, mouth, hair, or eyes for faces; chimney, porch, window, roof, or door for houses), whereas other trials involved no change. People were better able to detect the occurrence of a change for faces than for houses, but were better able to localize which feature had changed for houses than for faces. Half the trials used inverted images, a manipulation that disrupts holistic processing. With inverted images, the critical interaction between image type (faces vs. houses) and task (change detection vs. change localization) disappeared. The results suggest that holistic processing reduces change-localization abilities. PMID:20935169

  13. Photogrammetric processing of hexagon stereo data for change detection studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabha, E. Anantha; Shashivardhan Reddy, P.; Narender, B.; Muralikrishnan, S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Hexagon satellite data acquired as a part of USA Corona program has been declassified and is accessible to general public. This image data was acquired in high resolution much before the launch of civilian satellites. However the non availability of interior and exterior orientation parameters is the main bottle neck in photogrammetric processing of this data. In the present study, an attempt was made to orient and adjust Hexagon stereo pair through Rigorous Sensor Model (RSM) and Rational Function Models (RFM). The study area is part of Western Ghats in India. For rigorous sensor modelling an arbitrary camera file is generated based on the information available in the literature and few assumptions. A terrain dependent RFM was generated for the stereo data using Cartosat-1 reference data. The model accuracy achieved for both RSM and RFM was better than one pixel. DEM and orthoimage were generated with a spacing of 50 m and Ground Sampling Distance (GSD) of 6 m to carry out the change detection with a special emphasis on water bodies with reference to recent Cartosat-1 data. About 72 new water bodies covering an area of 2300 hectares (23 sq. km) were identified in Cartosat-1 orthoimage that were not present in Hexagon data. The image data from various Corona programs like Hexagon provide a rich source of information for temporal studies. However photogrammetric processing of the data is a bit tedious due to lack of information about internal sensor geometry.

  14. Multispectral (IR and MMW) processing for automatic target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Francis J.; Swistak, Joseph E.

    1990-10-01

    Automatic Target Recognition algorithms have been developed with limited success over the last few years. The processing to extract military targets from background clutter has difficulty under noisy, real-world conditions. Fusion of data from different wavelength sensors has been one approach to improve performance. The underlying theory is that signature data from different areas of the electro-magnetic spectrum will be complementary and clutter is frequency dependent. Recent work based on both statistical classification, and feature analysis in the thermal infrared and millimeter wave spectra, has shown interesting trends. We will provide a description of the IR/MMW target classification algorithms, the fusion architecture we employed, and processes used to search for the optimum features. Two distinct search and detect schemes were tested with different results. Data acquisition and reduction issues which affect algorithm experiments will also be discussed. A software based algorithm development test-bed was built at Textron to implement the multispectral targeting experiments. The effect of a modular, programmable test-bed on such experiments is to increase productivity and allow multivariate evaluatio ns.

  15. Algorithms for lineaments detection in processing of multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, D.; Jelev, G.; Atanassov, V.; Koprinkova-Hristova, Petia; Alexiev, K.

    2014-10-01

    Satellite remote sensing is a universal tool to investigate the different areas of Earth and environmental sciences. The advancement of the implementation capabilities of the optoelectronic devices which are long-term-tested in the laboratory and the field and are mounted on-board of the remote sensing platforms further improves the capability of instruments to acquire information about the Earth and its resources in global, regional and local scales. With the start of new high-spatial and spectral resolution satellite and aircraft imagery new applications for large-scale mapping and monitoring becomes possible. The integration with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) allows a synergistic processing of the multi-source spatial and spectral data. Here we present the results of a joint project DFNI I01/8 funded by the Bulgarian Science Fund focused on the algorithms of the preprocessing and the processing spectral data by using the methods of the corrections and of the visual and automatic interpretation. The objects of this study are lineaments. The lineaments are basically the line features on the earth's surface which are a sign of the geological structures. The geological lineaments usually appear on the multispectral images like lines or edges or linear shapes which is the result of the color variations of the surface structures. The basic geometry of a line is orientation, length and curve. The detection of the geological lineaments is an important operation in the exploration for mineral deposits, in the investigation of active fault patterns, in the prospecting of water resources, in the protecting people, etc. In this study the integrated approach for the detecting of the lineaments is applied. It combines together the methods of the visual interpretation of various geological and geographical indications in the multispectral satellite images, the application of the spatial analysis in GIS and the automatic processing of the multispectral images by Canny

  16. Protein immobilization and detection on laser processed polystyrene surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Kollia, Zoe; Palles, Dimitrios; Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, Nikolaos; Cefalas, Alkiviadis-Constantinos; Petrou, Panagiota S.; Kakabakos, Sotirios

    2011-09-15

    The bovine serum albumin (BSA)-polystyrene (PS) interface layer is laser photo activated at 157 nm for site selective multiple target-protein immobilization. The 5-15 nm photon induced interface layer has different chemical, wetting, and stiffness properties than the PS photon processed surface. The irradiated areas exhibit target-protein binding, followed by localized probe-target protein detection. The photon induced chemical modification of the BSA-PS interface layer is identified by: (1) Morphological, imaging, and analysis of surface parameters with atomic force microscopy, (2) spectroscopic shift (4 cm{sup -1}), of the amide I group and formation of new C=N, NH{sub 2}, C-O, C=O, and O-C=O groups following irradiation, identified with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and (3) the different hydrophilic/hydrophobic and force-distance response of the bare PS and BSA-PS surfaces. Near field edge diffraction (Fresnel) fluorescence imaging specifies the threshold photon energy and the fluence required to optically detect the protein binding on the photon induced BSA-PS interface layer. By approximating the Fresnel integrals with analytical functions, the threshold photon energy and the fluence are expressed as the sum of zero, first, and second order harmonic terms of two characteristic diffracted modes and they are specified to be 8.73x10{sup -9} Jand623 J m{sup -2}, respectively. Furthermore, a bioarray of three probe-target proteins is fabricated with 1.5 {mu}m spatial resolution using a 157 nm laser microstepper. The methodology eliminates the use of intermediate polymer layers between the blocking BSA protein and the PS substrate in bioarray fabrication.

  17. Local Seismic Event Detection Using Image Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, J. D.; Fouch, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The large footprint of regularly-spaced broadband seismometers afforded by EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) [www.usarray.org] presents an unprecedented opportunity to develop novel seismic array processing methods. Here we report preliminary results from a new automated method for detecting small local seismic events within the footprint of the TA using image processing techniques. The overarching goal is to develop a new methodology for automated searches of large seismic datasets for signals that are difficult to detect by traditional means, such as STA/LTA triggering algorithms. We first process the raw broadband data for each station by bandpass filtering at 7-19 Hz and integrating the absolute value of the velocity waveform over a sequence of 5-second intervals. We further combine the integrated values of all three orthogonal channels into a single new time series with a 5-second sampling rate. This new time series is analogous to a measurement of the total seismic energy recorded at the station in each 5-second interval; we call this time series Integrated Ground Motion (IGM). Each sample is compared to a sliding longer-term average to remove diurnal and long-term noise effects. We create an image file by mapping each station location to an equivalent position in a blank image array, and use a modified Voronoi tessellation algorithm to assign each pixel in the image to the IGM value of the nearest station. We assign a value of zero if the pixel is more than a maximum distance from the nearest station. We apply 2-dimensional spatial image filtering techniques to remove large-scale features affecting much of the image, as we assume these likely result from teleseismic events. We also filter the time series to remove very small-scale features from noise spikes affecting a single seismic station. The resulting image contains only features of regional scale affecting 2 or more stations. For each of the remaining image features, we find the center

  18. Detection of Satellite Attitude Jitter Based on Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Tong, X.; Ye, Z.; Tang, X.; Xu, Y.; Li, L.; Wang, F.; Xie, H.; Xie, J.; Li, T.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution satellite imageries (HRSIs) always suffer from mechanical vibration during scan, resulting in attitude jitter and non-ignorable errors in geo-positioning and mapping. Therefore, it is critical to detect and estimate the attitude jitter for further possible compensation to explore the full geometric potential of HRSI. We bring up with a solution to detect the attitude jitter effect based on image processing using images recorded by a sensor system with parallax observation. Three methods of attitude jitter detection are investigated. The first one is based on analysis of the co-registration errors between images with very small parallax observation (e.g. different bands of multispectral image). The second one is based on stereo images using sensor imaging models to investigate the geometric inconsistance in image space. The third one is based on analysis of the co-registration errors of two DOM products from the images. Phase correlation, geometric constraint cross correlation and least squares matching are used in our methods correspondingly for high accuracy image matching, and the RANSAC algorithm is adopted to remove mismatched points and outliers. Finally, the image disparities from each method are used to investigate the effect and characteristic of satellite attitude jitter. We applied our methods on different satellites to investigate their attitude jitter characteristics. Results of experiment with multispectral images obtained by the ASTER camera equipped on Terra satellite showed that there exist more than one frequency with amplitude up to 0.3 pixel. Experimental results with panchromatic image strips captured by LROC revealed that there exist at least two attitude jitter frequencies with amplitude up to 0.6 pixel. Three methods were all used to investigate the attitude jitter of Chinese ZY-3 satellite and the results from different methods showed good consistency, and a distinct periodic attitude fluctuation with frequency around 0.65Hz

  19. Anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  20. Anomalous Earthquakes Associated With Nyiragongo Volcano (D.R. Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuler, A.; Ekström, G.

    2007-12-01

    The Virunga Volcanic Complex, located in the Western Rift Valley of the East African Rift, is the site of a series of unusual earthquakes. Five anomalous events, each of moderate size (4.6detection in an area in which many smaller events are routinely detected and located. The frequency content of these anomalous earthquakes was compared with those from local events found in global catalogs, and it was shown that these five events are greatly depleted in frequencies above 0.1 Hz. At 1 Hz, the difference in spectral amplitude between detected and undetected earthquakes of similar size and location is between two and three orders of magnitude. Centroid-moment-tensor solutions were computed for each event. The earthquakes are highly non-double-couple in nature, each having a large CLVD component of the moment tensor. Their focal mechanisms are stable and robust, and are highly irregular in character. Surface waves are also well fit by a source model composed of a series of vertical forces. The first three earthquakes occurred within days of the eruption of Nyiragongo in January 2002, while the last two events are not linked to major eruptive activity at either Nyiragongo or its neighbor, Nyamuragira. Systematic differences in frequency spectra were seen between these two groups although all five have similar focal mechanisms. These variations are potentially due to a difference in physical mechanism of the source. A variety of potential source processes are explored, including slip on a conical ring-fault, massive stoping within a buried magma chamber, and degassing/phreatomagmatic explosions.

  1. CB detection and early warning--fusing disparate sensors into the detection process: program overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birenzvige, Amnon; Sickenberger, David W.; Reyes, Felix; Underwood, William J.; Reiff, Christian G.; Gonski, David; Fargues, Monique P.; Nelson, Bruce N.

    2003-04-01

    the signatures generated by the conventional and the (simulated) chemical rounds. This paper will be followed by other papers that will provide more details information gained by the various sensors and describe how fusing the data enhance the reliability of the CB detection process.

  2. Risk assessment as an evolved threat detection and analysis process.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, D Caroline; Griebel, Guy; Pobbe, Roger; Blanchard, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    Risk assessment is a pattern of activities involved in detection and analysis of threat stimuli and the situations in which the threat is encountered. It is a core process in the choice of specific defenses, such as flight, freezing, defensive threat and defensive attack, that counter the threat and minimize the danger it poses. This highly adaptive process takes into account important characteristics, such as type and location (including distance from the subject) of the threat, as well as those (e.g. presence of an escape route or hiding place) of the situation, combining them to predict which specific defense is optimal with that particular combination of threat and situation. Risk assessment is particularly associated with ambiguity either of the threat stimulus or of the outcome of available defensive behaviors. It is also crucial in determining that threat is no longer present, permitting a return to normal, nondefensive behavior. Although risk assessment has been described in detail in rodents, it is also a feature of human defensive behavior, particularly in association with ambiguity. Rumination may be a specifically human form of risk assessment, more often expressed by women, and highly associated with anxiety. Risk assessment behaviors respond to drugs effective against generalized anxiety disorder; however, flight, a dominant specific defense in many common situations, shows a pharmacological response profile closer to that of panic disorder. Risk assessment and flight also appear to show some consistent differences in terms of brain regional activation patterns, suggesting a potential biological differentiation of anxiety and fear/panic systems. An especially intriguing possibility is that mirror neurons may respond to some of the same types of situational differences that are analyzed during risk assessment, suggesting an additional functional role for these neurons. PMID:21056591

  3. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  4. Anomalous discrete symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z. )

    1992-12-01

    We examine an interesting scenario to solve the domain-wall problem recently suggested by Preskill, Trivedi, Wilczek, and Wise. The effective potential is calculated in the presence of the QCD axial anomaly. It is shown that some discrete symmetries such as {ital CP} and {ital Z}{sub 2} can be anomalous due to a so-called {ital K} term induced by instantons. We point out that the {ital Z}{sub 2} domain-wall problem in the two-doublet standard model can be resolved by two types of solutions: the {ital CP}-conserving one and the {ital CP}-breaking one. In the first case, there exist two {ital Z}{sub 2}-related local minima whose energy splitting is provided by the instanton effect. In the second case, there is only one unique vacuum so that the domain walls do not form at all. The consequences of this new source of {ital CP} violation are discussed and shown to be well within the experimental limits in weak interactions.

  5. Impact of thermal processing on ELISA detection of peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tong-Jen; Maks, Nicole

    2013-06-19

    This study examined the effect of heat treatment on the solubility of peanut proteins and compared the performances of two commercial ELISA kits (Veratox Quantitative Peanut Allergen Test and BioKits Peanut Assay Kit) for quantitation of peanut residues as affected by different heat treatments (moist and dry heat) and detection targets (mixture of proteins vs specific protein). Both laboratory-prepared and commercial peanut flour preparations were used for the evaluation. The two ELISA kits tended to underestimate the levels of protein in samples that were subjected to elevated heat, respectively, by more than 60- or 400-fold lower for the autoclaved samples and by as much as 70- or 2000-fold lower for the dark-roast commercial flour samples. The BioKits test, which employs antibodies specific to a heat labile protein (Ara h 1), in general exhibited a greater degree of underestimation. These results suggest that commercial ELISA kits may not be able to accurately determine the amount of proteins present in thermally processed foods due to changes in the solubility and immunoreactivity of the target proteins. Users need to be aware of such limitations before applying ELISA kits for evaluation of food allergen control programs. PMID:23473340

  6. Digital Image Processing Technique for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Cabrera, R.; Guzmán-Sepúlveda, J. R.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; May-Arrioja, D. A.; Ruiz-Pinales, J.; Ibarra-Manzano, O. G.; Aviña-Cervantes, G.; Parada, A. González

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of death in women and the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Primary prevention in the early stages of the disease becomes complex as the causes remain almost unknown. However, some typical signatures of this disease, such as masses and microcalcifications appearing on mammograms, can be used to improve early diagnostic techniques, which is critical for women’s quality of life. X-ray mammography is the main test used for screening and early diagnosis, and its analysis and processing are the keys to improving breast cancer prognosis. As masses and benign glandular tissue typically appear with low contrast and often very blurred, several computer-aided diagnosis schemes have been developed to support radiologists and internists in their diagnosis. In this article, an approach is proposed to effectively analyze digital mammograms based on texture segmentation for the detection of early stage tumors. The proposed algorithm was tested over several images taken from the digital database for screening mammography for cancer research and diagnosis, and it was found to be absolutely suitable to distinguish masses and microcalcifications from the background tissue using morphological operators and then extract them through machine learning techniques and a clustering algorithm for intensity-based segmentation.

  7. Probing Interfacial Processes on Graphene Surface by Mass Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2013-03-01

    In this work we studied the mass density of graphene, probed interfacial processes on graphene surface and examined the formation of graphene oxide by mass detection. The graphene layers were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition method on copper foils and transfer-printed on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The mass density of single layer graphene was measured by investigating the mechanical resonance of the QCM. Moreover, we extended the developed technique to probe the binding dynamics of proteins on the surface of graphene, were able to obtain nonspecific binding constant of BSA protein of graphene surface in aqueous solution. The time trace of resonance signal showed that the BSA molecules rapidly saturated by filling the available binding sites on graphene surface. Furthermore, we monitored oxidation of graphene surface under oxygen plasma by tracing the changes of interfacial mass of the graphene controlled by the shifts in Raman spectra. Three regimes were observed the formation of graphene oxide which increases the interfacial mass, the release of carbon dioxide and the removal of small graphene/graphene oxide flakes. Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) grant no. 110T304, 109T209, Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant (IRG) grant no 256458, Turkish Academy of Science (TUBA-Gebip).

  8. Temporal variations of the anomalous oxygen component, 1977 - 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Klecker, B.; Galvin, A. B.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is of the long term temporal variations of 6.6 to 12 MeV/nucleon anomalous oxygen at 1 AU covering the period 1977 to 1984. This time interval included the recent solar maximum, with the recovery at neutron monitor energies beginning in 1982. During this time interval, 6.6 to 12 MeV/nucleon 0 fluxes decreased by at least a factor of 50, and indeed remained below the instrumental detection threshold after 1979. By late 1984, neutron monitors had recovered to roughly 1979 levels from the 1982 solar maximum, and anomalous O still remained below the detection threshold.

  9. Model-Based Signal Processing: Correlation Detection With Synthetic Seismograms

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Harris, D; Pasyanos, M; Blair, S; Matt, R

    2006-08-30

    Recent applications of correlation methods to seismological problems illustrate the power of coherent signal processing applied to seismic waveforms. Examples of these applications include detection of low amplitude signals buried in ambient noise and cross-correlation of sets of waveforms to form event clusters and accurately measure delay times for event relocation and/or earth structure. These methods rely on the exploitation of the similarity of individual waveforms and have been successfully applied to large sets of empirical observations. However, in cases with little or no empirical event data, such as aseismic regions or exotic event types, correlation methods with observed seismograms will not be possible due to the lack of previously observed similar waveforms. This study uses model-based signals computed for three-dimensional (3D) Earth models to form the basis for correlation detection. Synthetic seismograms are computed for fully 3D models estimated from the Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) method. MCMC uses stochastic sampling to fit multiple seismological data sets. Rather than estimate a single ''optimal'' model, MCMC results in a suite of models that sample the model space and incorporates uncertainty through variability of the models. The variability reflects our ignorance of Earth structure, due to limited resolution, data and modeling errors, and produces variability in the seismic waveform response. Model-based signals are combined using a subspace method where the synthetic signals are decomposed into an orthogonal basis by singular-value decomposition (SVD) and the observed waveforms are represented with a linear combination of a sub-set of eigenvectors (signals) associated with the most significant eigenvalues. We have demonstrated the method by modeling long-period (80-10 seconds) regional seismograms for a moderate (M{approx}5) earthquake near the China-North Korea border. Synthetic seismograms are computed with the Spectral Element Method

  10. Anomalous zones in Gulf Coast Salt domes with special reference to Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Thoms, R.L.; Autin, W.J.; McCulloh, R.P.; Denzler, S.; Byrne, K.O.

    1993-07-01

    Anomalous features in Gulf Coast Salt domes exhibit deviations from normally pure salt and vary widely in form from one dome to the next, ranging considerably in length and width. They have affected both conventional and solution mining in several ways. Gas outbursts, insolubles, and potash (especially carnallite) have led to the breakage of tubing in a number of caverns, and caused irregular shapes of many caverns through preferential leaching. Such anomalous features essentially have limited the lateral extent of conventional mining at several salt mines, and led to accidents and even the closing of several other mines. Such anomalous features, are often aligned in anomalous zones, and appear to be related to diapiric processes of salt dome development. Evidence indicates that anomalous zones are found between salt spines, where the differential salt intrusion accumulates other materials: Anhydrite bands which are relatively strong, and other, weaker impurities. Shear zones and fault displacement detected at Big Hill and Weeks Island domes have not yet had any known adverse impacts on SPR oil storage, but new caverns at these sites conceivably may encounter some potentially adverse conditions. Seismic reflection profiles at Big Hill dome have shown numerous fractures and faults in the caprock, and verified the earlier recognition of a major shear zone transecting the entire salt stock and forming a graben in the overlying caprock. Casing that is placed in such zones can be at risk. Knowledge of these zones should create awareness of possible effects rather than preclude the future emplacement of caverns. To the extent possible, major anomalous zones and salt stock boundaries should be avoided. Shear zones along overhangs may be particularly hazardous, and otherwise unknown valleys in the top of salt may occur along shear zones. These zones often can be mapped geophysically, especially with high-resolution seismic techniques.

  11. Nonlinear processing of radar data for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosz, Elizabeth E.; DeJong, Keith; Duvoisin, Herbert A.; Solomon, Geoff Z.; Steinway, William J.; Warren, Albert

    2004-09-01

    Outstanding landmine detection has been achieved by the Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS system) in government-run field tests. The use of anomaly detection using principal component analysis (PCA) on the return of ground penetrating radar (GPR) coupled with metal detection is the key to the success of the HSTAMIDS-like system algorithms. Indications of nonlinearities and asymmetries in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data point to modifications to the current PCA algorithm that might prove beneficial. Asymmetries in the distribution of PCA projections of field data have been quantified in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data. An initial correction for the observed asymmetries has improved the False Alarm Rate (FAR) on this data.

  12. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  13. Cloud detection using SEVIRI IR channels for the GERB processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipe, Alessandro; Gonzalez Sotelino, Luis; Baeck, Pieter-Jan; Clerbaux, Nicolas; Dewitte, Steven

    2010-05-01

    The first Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument was launched during the summer 2002 together with the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on board of the Meteosat-8 satellite. This broadband radiometer aims to deliver near real-time estimates of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) solar and thermal radiative fluxes at high temporal resolution thanks to the geostationary orbit. Such goal is performed at the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium by running the L20 GERB processing which generates these fluxes at several spatial resolutions from the directional filtered radiance measurements of the instrument. This processing consists of successive components, one of them being a radiance-to-flux conversion. Such conversion is carried out in the solar region by using information from a scene identification of SEVIRI data. This scheme estimates the cloud mask over the whole SEVIRI/GERB field-of-view with solely visible SEVIRI channels. While this method gives good results during daytime, it cannot be applied during nighttime. Nevertheless, cloud mask information is valuable to study clouds and aerosols thermal radiative forcing. Thus, a nighttime cloud mask would benefit the GERB flux products in the thermal region. A majority of cloud detection schemes found in the literature relies on multispectral threshold tests applied to equivalent brightness temperatures (BTs) or brightness temperature differences (BTDs) associated to the 3.9, 8.7, 10.8 and 12 µm bands. These thresholds are commonly estimated using skin surface temperatures as well as water vapor and temperature profiles from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. However, such dependency on external NWP models cannot guarantee the required stability and accuracy of these cloud masks for climate datasets. Therefore, in this contribution we present a cloud detection method mainly based for every pixel and SEVIRI IR channels on its 60 days time--series of BTs acquired at the

  14. HR 4453 - An anomalously bright UV source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polidan, R. S.; Oegerle, W. R.; Margon, B.

    1980-01-01

    Crawford et al. (1979) reported that HR 4453 has an anomalously large UV flux in the 1350-1600 A band. This paper reports results of the UV spectrophotometry of HR 4453 obtained with the Copernicus satellite. Portions of the spectrum from 1120 to 2660 A were scanned, but no stellar signal was detected in any wavelength interval. This result is consistent with both components of the binary being normal A2A stars. UV variability or a source other than HR 4453 must be invoked to explain the observations of Crawford et al.

  15. Processing Satellite Imagery To Detect Waste Tire Piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skiles, Joseph; Schmidt, Cynthia; Wuinlan, Becky; Huybrechts, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    A methodology for processing commercially available satellite spectral imagery has been developed to enable identification and mapping of waste tire piles in California. The California Integrated Waste Management Board initiated the project and provided funding for the method s development. The methodology includes the use of a combination of previously commercially available image-processing and georeferencing software used to develop a model that specifically distinguishes between tire piles and other objects. The methodology reduces the time that must be spent to initially survey a region for tire sites, thereby increasing inspectors and managers time available for remediation of the sites. Remediation is needed because millions of used tires are discarded every year, waste tire piles pose fire hazards, and mosquitoes often breed in water trapped in tires. It should be possible to adapt the methodology to regions outside California by modifying some of the algorithms implemented in the software to account for geographic differences in spectral characteristics associated with terrain and climate. The task of identifying tire piles in satellite imagery is uniquely challenging because of their low reflectance levels: Tires tend to be spectrally confused with shadows and deep water, both of which reflect little light to satellite-borne imaging systems. In this methodology, the challenge is met, in part, by use of software that implements the Tire Identification from Reflectance (TIRe) model. The development of the TIRe model included incorporation of lessons learned in previous research on the detection and mapping of tire piles by use of manual/ visual and/or computational analysis of aerial and satellite imagery. The TIRe model is a computational model for identifying tire piles and discriminating between tire piles and other objects. The input to the TIRe model is the georeferenced but otherwise raw satellite spectral images of a geographic region to be surveyed

  16. Asymptotic Behavior of Anomalous Diffusions Driven by alpha -Stable Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michna, Z.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we discuss decomposition principle for alpha -stable Lévy processes. We investigate asymptotic properties of components and stochastic integrals driven by such processes providing an important class of anomalous diffusions. We consider two case studies with integrands being fractional Brownian motion and gamma process.

  17. Detecting Buried Archaeological Remains by the Use of Geophysical Data Processing with 'Diffusion Maps' Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical methods are prompt, non-invasive and low-cost tool for quantitative delineation of buried archaeological targets. However, taking into account the complexity of geological-archaeological media, some unfavourable environments and known ambiguity of geophysical data analysis, a single geophysical method examination might be insufficient (Khesin and Eppelbaum, 1997). Besides this, it is well-known that the majority of inverse-problem solutions in geophysics are ill-posed (e.g., Zhdanov, 2002), which means, according to Hadamard (1902), that the solution does not exist, or is not unique, or is not a continuous function of observed geophysical data (when small perturbations in the observations will cause arbitrary mistakes in the solution). This fact has a wide application for informational, probabilistic and wavelet methodologies in archaeological geophysics (Eppelbaum, 2014a). The goal of the modern geophysical data examination is to detect the geophysical signatures of buried targets at noisy areas via the analysis of some physical parameters with a minimal number of false alarms and miss-detections (Eppelbaum et al., 2011; Eppelbaum, 2014b). The proposed wavelet approach to recognition of archaeological targets (AT) by the examination of geophysical method integration consists of advanced processing of each geophysical method and nonconventional integration of different geophysical methods between themselves. The recently developed technique of diffusion clustering combined with the abovementioned wavelet methods was utilized to integrate the geophysical data and detect existing irregularities. The approach is based on the wavelet packet techniques applied as to the geophysical images (or graphs) versus coordinates. For such an analysis may be utilized practically all geophysical methods (magnetic, gravity, seismic, GPR, ERT, self-potential, etc.). On the first stage of the proposed investigation a few tens of typical physical-archaeological models (PAM

  18. Research on intelligent detection and processing technology of laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haili; Jiang, Huilin

    2005-01-01

    Aimed at the influence of turbulent atmosphere effect on laser pulse detection, it discusses the key factors that affect the signal test in this paper. Based on it, the article also discusses two key techniques, namely, floating threshold value and AGC (Automatic Gain Control) technology in detail, especially about the technique of floating threshold value. According to discussion about intelligent detection technology of laser pulse, the system designs a low noise detecting unit of laser pulse, tests its performance by the experiment, and validates correctness of the results.

  19. Size-varying small target detection for infrared image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miao; Zhu, Ran; Long, Yunli; An, Wei; Zhou, Yiyu

    2015-10-01

    IRST (Infrared Search and Track) has been applied to many military or civil fields such as precise guidance, aerospace, early warning. As a key technique, small target detection based on infrared image plays an important role. However, infrared targets have their own characteristics, such as target size variation, which make the detection work quite difficult. In practical application, the target size may vary due to many reasons, such as optic angle of sensors, imaging distance, environment and so on. For conventional detection methods, it is difficult to detect such size-varying targets, especially when the backgrounds have strong clutters. This paper presents a novel method to detect size-varying infrared targets in a cluttered background. It is easy to find that the target region is salient in infrared images. It means that target region have a signature of discontinuity with its neighboring regions and concentrates in a relatively small region, which can be considered as a homogeneous compact region, and the background is consistent with its neighboring regions. Motivated by the saliency feature and gradient feature, we introduce minimum target intensity (MTI) to measure the dissimilarity between different scales, and use mean gradient to restrict the target scale in a reasonable range. They are integrated to be multiscale MTI filter. The proposed detection method is designed based on multiscale MTI filter. Firstly, salient region is got by morphological low-pass filtering, where the potential target exists in. Secondly, the candidate target regions are extracted by multiscale minimum target intensity filter, which can effectively give the optimal target size. At last, signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) is used to segment targets, which is computed based on optimal scale of candidate targets. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method can achieve both higher detection precision and robustness in complex background.

  20. Anomalous azygos vein: a potential danger during endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Sieunarine, K; May, J; White, G H; Harris, J P

    1997-08-01

    A report of a patient with an azygos lobe and an associated anomalous azygos vein covering the upper thoracic sympathetic chain. This anomaly poses a significant risk during the procedure of endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy. A chest X-ray is useful in detecting this anomaly and alerting the surgeon to potential problems. PMID:9287933

  1. Relative Saliency in Change Signals Affects Perceptual Comparison and Decision Processes in Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2011-01-01

    Change detection requires perceptual comparison and decision processes on different features of multiattribute objects. How relative salience between two feature-changes influences the processes has not been addressed. This study used the systems factorial technology to investigate the processes when detecting changes in a Gabor patch with visual…

  2. Processing of radar data for landmine detection: nonlinear transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosz, E. E.; Duvoisin, H.; Konduri, R.; Solomon, G. Z.

    2005-06-01

    The Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS system) has achieved outstanding performance in government-run field tests due to its use of anomaly detection using principal component analysis (PCA) on the return of ground penetrating radar (GPR) coupled with metal detection. Indications of nonlinearities and asymmetries in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data point to modifications to the current PCA algorithm that might prove beneficial. Asymmetries in the distribution of PCA projections of field data have been quantified in Humanitarian Demining (HD) data. The data suggest a logarithmic correction to the data. Such a correction has been applied and has improved the FAR on this data set. The increase in performance is comparable to the increase shown using the simpler asymmetric rescaling method.

  3. Falling Person Detection Using Multi-Sensor Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toreyin, B. Ugur; Soyer, A. Birey; Onaran, Ibrahim; Cetin, E. Enis

    2007-12-01

    Falls are one of the most important problems for frail and elderly people living independently. Early detection of falls is vital to provide a safe and active lifestyle for elderly. Sound, passive infrared (PIR) and vibration sensors can be placed in a supportive home environment to provide information about daily activities of an elderly person. In this paper, signals produced by sound, PIR and vibration sensors are simultaneously analyzed to detect falls. Hidden Markov Models are trained for regular and unusual activities of an elderly person and a pet for each sensor signal. Decisions of HMMs are fused together to reach a final decision.

  4. Physical Meaning of the Optimum Measurement Process in Quantum Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaki, Masao; Kozuka, Haruhisa; Hirota, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    The optimum measurement processes are represented as the optimum detection operators in the quantum detection theory. The error probability by the optimum detection operators goes beyond the standard quantum limit automatically. However the optimum detection operators are given by pure mathematical descriptions. In order to realize a communication system overcoming the standard quantum limit, we try to give the physical meaning of the optimum detection operators.

  5. Protecting Student Intellectual Property in Plagiarism Detection Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butakov, Sergey; Barber, Craig

    2012-01-01

    The rapid development of the Internet along with increasing computer literacy has made it easy and tempting for digital natives to copy-paste someone's work. Plagiarism is now a burning issue in education, industry and even in the research community. In this study, the authors concentrate on plagiarism detection with particular focus on the…

  6. Protecting Students' Intellectual Property in the Web Plagiarism Detection Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butakov, Sergey; Dyagilev, Vadim; Tskhay, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Learning management systems (LMS) play a central role in communications in online and distance education. In the digital era, with all the information now accessible at students' fingertips, plagiarism detection services (PDS) have become a must-have part of LMS. Such integration provides a seamless experience for users, allowing PDS to check…

  7. Anomalous temperature dependence of the IR spectrum of polyalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helenius, V.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Kotila, S.; Nieminen, J.; Lohikoski, R.; Timonen, J.

    1997-12-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the infrared spectra of acetanilide (ACN), tryptophan-(alanine) 15, and tyrosine-(alanine) 15. No sidebands of the amide-I vibration were observed in the polypeptides, but two anomalous sidebands of the NH stretch with a similar temperature dependence as that of the anomalous amide-I vibrational mode at 1650 cm -1 of crystalline ACN were detected. Fermi resonance combined with the appearance of a red-shifted sideband of NH stretch through coupling to lattice modes seems to explain this band structure. Observations are indicative of excitons that may occur in polypeptides as well as in single crystals of ACN.

  8. Hic Sunt Leones: Anomalous Scaling In Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, L.; Gabellani, S.; Provenzale, A.; Rebora, N.

    In recent years the spatio-temporal intermittency of precipitation fields has often been quantified in terms of scaling and/or multifractal behaviour. In this work we anal- yse the spatial scaling properties of precipitation intensity fields measured during the GATE radar experiment, and compare the results with those obtained from surrogate data generated by nonlinearly filtered, linear stochastic processes and from random shuffling of the original data. The results of the study suggest a spurious nature of the spatial multifractal behaviour of the GATE fields and indicate that claims of multifrac- tality and anomalous scaling in rainfall may have to be reconsidered.

  9. Timely online chatter detection in end milling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yang; Zhang, Yun; Zhou, Huamin; Li, Dequn; Liu, Hongqi; Qiao, Haiyu; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Chatter is one of the most unexpected and uncontrollable phenomenon during the milling operation. It is very important to develop an effective monitoring method to identify the chatter as soon as possible, while existing methods still cannot detect it before the workpiece has been damaged. This paper proposes an energy aggregation characteristic-based Hilbert-Huang transform method for online chatter detection. The measured vibration signal is firstly decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) using ensemble empirical mode decomposition. Feature IMFs are then selected according to the majority energy rule. Subsequently Hilbert spectral analysis is applied on these feature IMFs to calculate the Hilbert time/frequency spectrum. Two indicators are proposed to quantify the spectrum and thresholds are automatically calculated using Gaussian mixed model. Milling experiments prove the proposed method to be effective in protecting the workpiece from severe chatter damage within acceptable time complexity.

  10. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-09-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neural networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  11. Signal processing of Shiley heart valve data for fracture detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mullenhoff, C.

    1993-04-01

    Given digital acoustic data emanating from the heart sounds of the beating heart measured from laboratory sheep with implanted Bjoerk-Shiley Convexo-Concave heart valves, it is possible to detect and extract the opening and closing heart beats from the data. Once extracted, spectral or other information can then obtained from the heartbeats and passed on to feature extraction algorithms, neutral networks, or pattern recognizers so that the valve condition, either fractured or intact, may be determined.

  12. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  13. Advanced signal processing technique for damage detection in steel tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel Kumar; Dao, Cac Minh; Dao, Kiet; Kundu, Tribikram

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, ultrasonic guided waves gained attention for reliable testing and characterization of metals and composites. Guided wave modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers either in transmission or reflection mode. In this study guided waves are excited and detected in the transmission mode and the phase change of the propagating wave modes are recorded. In most of the other studies reported in the literature, the change in the received signal strength (amplitude) is investigated with varying degrees of damage while in this study the change in phase is correlated with the extent of damage. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that the bonding condition between the transducer and the specimen does not affect the phase while it can affect the strength of recorded signal. Therefore, if the specimen is not damaged but the transducer-specimen bonding is deteriorated then the received signal strength is altered but the phase remains same and thus false positive predictions for damage can be avoided.

  14. Detecting phonemes and letters in text: interactions between different types and levels of processes.

    PubMed

    Schneider, V I; Healy, A F

    1993-11-01

    In six experiments, subjects detected phonemes or letters in text presented auditorily or visually. Experiments 1 and 2 provided support for the hypothesis that a mismatch between the phoneme and letter representations of a target leads to detection errors. In addition, visual word unitization processes were implicated. Experiments 3 and 4 provided support for the hypothesis that the Gestalt goodness of pattern affected detection errors when subjects searched for letters. Experiments 5 and 6 demonstrated that the effects of unitization on the detection of letters in common words were decreased by altering the familiar configuration of the test words. The combined results of all six experiments lead to the conclusion that both visual and phonetic processes influence letter detection, that these processes communicate through a type of cross-checking, and that there are at least two levels of visual (and perhaps of phonetic) processing involved in the letter detection task. PMID:8289652

  15. Anomalous Microwave Emission in HII regions: is it really anomalous ? The case of RCW 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Roberta; Ingallinera, Adriano; Agliozzo, Claudia; Tibbs, Christopher; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Umana, Grazia; Dickinson, Clive; Trigiglio, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The detection of an excess of emission at microwave frequencies with respect to the predicted free-free emission has been reportedfor several Galactic HII regions. Here, we investigate the case of RCW 49, for which the Cosmic Background Imager tentatively (~ 3 sigma) detected Anomalous Microwave Emission at 31 GHz on angular scales of 7'. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we carried out a multi-frequency (5 GHz, 19 GHz and 34 GHz) continuum study of the region, complemented by observations of the H109 alpha radio recombination line. The analysis shows that: 1) the spatial correlation between the microwave and IR emission persists on angular scales from 3.4' to 0.4'', although the degree of the correlation slightly decreases at higher frequencies and on smaller angular scales; 2) the spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz are globally in agreement with optically thin free-free emission, however, ~ 30 % of these are positive and much greater than -0.1, consistently with a stellar wind scenario; 3) no major evidence for inverted free-free radiation is found, indicating that this is likely not the cause of the Anomalous Emission in RCW 49. Although our results cannot rule out the spinning dust hypothesis to explain the tentative detection of Anomalous Microwave emission in RCW 49, they emphasize the complexity of astronomical sources very well known and studied such as HII regions, and suggest that, at least in these objects, the reported excess of emissionmight be ascribed to alternative mechanisms such as stellar winds and shocks.

  16. Evaluation of pre-processing, thresholding and post-processing steps for very small target detection in infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardımcı, Ozan; Ulusoy, Ä.°lkay

    2016-05-01

    Pre-processing, thresholding and post-processing stages are very important especially for very small target detection from infrared images. The effects of these stages to the final detection performance are measured in this study. Various methods for each stage are compared based on the final detection performance, which is defined by precision and recall values. Among various methods, the best method for each stage is selected and proved. For the pre-processing stage, local block based methods perform the best, nearly for all thresholding methods. The best thresholding method is chosen as the one, which does not need any user defined parameter. Finally, the post processing method, which is suitable for the best performing pre-processing and thesholding methods is selected.

  17. Weld line detection and process control for welding automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sang-Min; Cho, Man-Ho; Lee, Ho-Young; Cho, Taik-Dong

    2007-03-01

    Welding has been widely used as a process to join metallic parts. But because of hazardous working conditions, workers tend to avoid this task. Techniques to achieve the automation are the recognition of joint line and process control. A CCD (charge coupled device) camera with a laser stripe was applied to enhance the automatic weld seam tracking in GMAW (gas metal arc welding). The adaptive Hough transformation having an on-line processing ability was used to extract laser stripes and to obtain specific weld points. The three-dimensional information obtained from the vision system made it possible to generate the weld torch path and to obtain information such as the width and depth of the weld line. In this study, a neural network based on the generalized delta rule algorithm was adapted to control the process of GMAW, such as welding speed, arc voltage and wire feeding speed. The width and depth of the weld joint have been selected as neurons in the input layer of the neural-network algorithm. The input variables, the width and depth of the weld joint, are determined by image information. The voltage, weld speed and wire feed rate are represented as the neurons in the output layer. The results of the neural-network learning applied to the welding are as follows: learning ratio 0.5, momentum ratio 0.7, the number of hidden layers 2 and the number of hidden units 8. They have significant influence on the weld quality.

  18. Auditory Processing Speed and Signal Detection in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korboot, P. J.; Damiani, N.

    1976-01-01

    Two differing explanations of schizophrenic processing deficit were examined: Chapman and McGhie's and Yates'. Thirty-two schizophrenics, classified on the acute-chronic and paranoid-nonparanoid dimensions, and eight neurotics were tested on two dichotic listening tasks. (Editor)

  19. Decision Processes in Discrimination: Fundamental Misrepresentations of Signal Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    In the first part of this article, I describe a new approach to studying decision making in discrimination tasks that does not depend on the technical assumptions of signal detection theory (e.g., normality of the encoding distributions). Applying these new distribution-free tests to data from three experiments, I show that base rate and payoff manipulations had substantial effects on the participants' encoding distributions but no effect on their decision rules, which were uniformly unbiased in equal and unequal base rate conditions and in symmetric and asymmetric payoff conditions. In the second part of the article, I show that this seemingly paradoxical result is readily explained by the sequential sampling models of discrimination. I then propose a new, "model-free" test for response bias that seems to more properly identify both the nature and direction of the biases induced by the classical bias manipulations.

  20. Children's Responses to Anomalous Scientific Data: How Is Conceptual Change Impeded?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Clark A.; Malhotra, Betina A.

    2002-01-01

    Four experiments with 4th, 5th, and 6th graders addressed conceptual change in response to anomalous data about empirical regularities in science. Impedance to conceptual change in response to anomalous data could potentially occur at any of four cognitive processes: observation, interpretation, generalization, or retention. In the four…

  1. Anomalous Micellization of Pluronic Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonardi, Amanda; Ryu, Chang Y.

    2014-03-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) - poly(propylene oxide) - poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymers, commercially known as Pluronics, are a unique family of amphiphilic triblock polymers, which self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution. These copolymers have shown promise in therapeutic, biomedical, cosmetic, and nanotech applications. As-received samples of Pluronics contain low molecular weight impurities (introduced during the manufacturing and processing), that are ignored in most applications. It has been observed, however, that in semi-dilute aqueous solutions, at concentrations above 1 wt%, the temperature dependent micellization behavior of the Pluronics is altered. Anomalous behavior includes a shift of the critical micellization temperature and formation of large aggregates at intermediate temperatures before stable sized micelles form. We attribute this behavior to the low molecular weight impurities that are inherent to the Pluronics which interfere with the micellization process. Through the use of Dynamic Light Scattering and HPLC, we compared the anomalous behavior of different Pluronics of different impurity levels to their purified counterparts.

  2. ANOMALOUSLY PRESSURED GAS DISTRIBUTION IN THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-03-31

    Anomalously pressured gas (APG) assets, typically called ''basin-center'' gas accumulations, represent either an underdeveloped or undeveloped energy resource in the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB). Historically, the exploitation of these gas resources has proven to be very difficult and costly. In this topical report, an improved exploration strategy is outlined in conjunction with a more detailed description of new diagnostic techniques that more efficiently detect anomalously pressured, gas-charged domains. The ability to delineate gas-charged domains occurring below a regional velocity inversion surface allows operators to significantly reduce risk in the search for APG resources. The Wind River Basin was chosen for this demonstration because of the convergence of public data availability (i.e., thousands of mud logs and DSTs and 2400 mi of 2-D seismic lines); the evolution of new diagnostic techniques; a 175 digital sonic log suite; a regional stratigraphic framework; and corporate interest. In the exploration scheme discussed in this topical report, the basinwide gas distribution is determined in the following steps: (1) A detailed velocity model is established from sonic logs, 2-D seismic lines, and, if available, 3-D seismic data. In constructing the seismic interval velocity field, automatic picking technology using continuous, statistically-derived interval velocity selection, as well as conventional graphical interactive methodologies are utilized. (2) Next, the ideal regional velocity/depth function is removed from the observed sonic or seismic velocity/depth profile. The constructed ideal regional velocity/depth function is the velocity/depth trend resulting from the progressive burial of a rock/fluid system of constant rock/fluid composition, with all other factors remaining constant. (3) The removal of the ideal regional velocity/depth function isolates the anomalously slow velocities and allows the evaluation of (a) the regional velocity

  3. Ultrasonic imaging system for in-process fabric defect detection

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Lawrence, William P.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    An ultrasonic method and system are provided for monitoring a fabric to identify a defect. A plurality of ultrasonic transmitters generate ultrasonic waves relative to the fabric. An ultrasonic receiver means responsive to the generated ultrasonic waves from the transmitters receives ultrasonic waves coupled through the fabric and generates a signal. An integrated peak value of the generated signal is applied to a digital signal processor and is digitized. The digitized signal is processed to identify a defect in the fabric. The digitized signal processing includes a median value filtering step to filter out high frequency noise. Then a mean value and standard deviation of the median value filtered signal is calculated. The calculated mean value and standard deviation are compared with predetermined threshold values to identify a defect in the fabric.

  4. Neoclassical and anomalous transport in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas with electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1995-08-01

    Neoclassical and anomalous transport fluxes are determined for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas with weak electrostatic fluctuations. The neoclassical and anomalous fluxes are defined based on the ensemble-averaged kinetic equation with the statistically averaged nonlinear term. The anomalous forces derived from that quasilinear term induce the anomalous particle and heat fluxes. The neoclassical banana-plateau particle and heat fluxes and the bootstrap current are also affected by the fluctuations through the parallel anomalous forces and the modified parallel viscosities. The quasilinear term, the anomalous forces, and the anomalous particle and heat fluxes are evaluated from the fluctuating part of the drift kinetic equation. The averaged drift kinetic equation with the quasilinear term is solved for the plateau regime to derive the parallel viscosities modified by the fluctuations. The entropy production rate due to the anomalous transport processes is formulated and used to identify conjugate pairs of the anomalous fluxes and forces, which are connected by the matrix with the Onsager symmetry. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. OPAD data analysis. [Optical Plumes Anomaly Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Kraft, Richard; Whitaker, Kevin; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.; Wallace, Tim L.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained in the framework of an Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program intended to create a rocket engine health monitor based on spectrometric detections of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the exhaust plume are analyzed. The major results include techniques for handling data noise, methods for registration of spectra to wavelength, and a simple automatic process for estimating the metallic component of a spectrum.

  6. Multisensor Network System for Wildfire Detection Using Infrared Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, I.; Serrano, A.; Vergara, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the next step in the evolution of multi-sensor wireless network systems in the early automatic detection of forest fires. This network allows remote monitoring of each of the locations as well as communication between each of the sensors and with the control stations. The result is an increased coverage area, with quicker and safer responses. To determine the presence of a forest wildfire, the system employs decision fusion in thermal imaging, which can exploit various expected characteristics of a real fire, including short-term persistence and long-term increases over time. Results from testing in the laboratory and in a real environment are presented to authenticate and verify the accuracy of the operation of the proposed system. The system performance is gauged by the number of alarms and the time to the first alarm (corresponding to a real fire), for different probability of false alarm (PFA). The necessity of including decision fusion is thereby demonstrated. PMID:23843734

  7. Low-power signal processing devices for portable ECG detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shuenn-Yuh; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Pin; Kao, Wei-Chun

    2008-01-01

    An analog front end for diagnosing and monitoring the behavior of the heart is presented. This sensing front end has two low-power processing devices, including a 5(th)-order Butterworth operational transconductance-C (OTA-C) filter and an 8-bit successive approximation analog-to-digital converter (SAADC). The components fabricated in a 0.18-microm CMOS technology feature with power consumptions of 453 nW (filter) and 940 nW (ADC) at a supply voltage of 1 V, respectively. The system specifications in terms of output noise and linearity associated with the two integrated circuits are described in this paper. PMID:19163002

  8. Detecting fast, online reasoning processes in clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Flores, Amanda; Cobos, Pedro L; López, Francisco J; Godoy, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    In an experiment that used the inconsistency paradigm, experienced clinical psychologists and psychology students performed a reading task using clinical reports and a diagnostic judgment task. The clinical reports provided information about the symptoms of hypothetical clients who had been previously diagnosed with a specific mental disorder. Reading times of inconsistent target sentences were slower than those of control sentences, demonstrating an inconsistency effect. The results also showed that experienced clinicians gave different weights to different symptoms according to their relevance when fluently reading the clinical reports provided, despite the fact that all the symptoms were of equal diagnostic value according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The diagnostic judgment task yielded a similar pattern of results. In contrast to previous findings, the results of the reading task may be taken as direct evidence of the intervention of reasoning processes that occur very early, rapidly, and online. We suggest that these processes are based on the representation of mental disorders and that these representations are particularly suited to fast retrieval from memory and to making inferences. They may also be related to the clinicians' causal reasoning. The implications of these results for clinician training are also discussed. PMID:24274045

  9. Magnetic effects in anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, M.

    1992-12-31

    Spectacular enhancements of magnetic x-ray scattering have been predicted and observed experimentally. These effects are the result of resonant phenomena closely related to anomalous dispersion, and they are strongest at near-edge resonances. The theory of these resonances will be developed with particular attention to the symmetry properties of the scatterer. While the phenomena to be discussed concern magnetic properties the transitions are electric dipole or electric quadrupole in character and represent a subset of the usual anomalous dispersion phenomena. The polarization dependence of the scattering is also considered, and the polarization dependence for magnetic effects is related to that for charge scattering and to Templeton type anisotropic polarization phenomena. It has been found that the strongest effects occur in rare-earths and in actinides for M shell edges. In addition to the scattering properties the theory is applicable to ``forward scattering`` properties such as the Faraday effect and circular dichroism.

  10. Automatic endpoint detection to support the systematic review process.

    PubMed

    Blake, Catherine; Lucic, Ana

    2015-08-01

    Preparing a systematic review can take hundreds of hours to complete, but the process of reconciling different results from multiple studies is the bedrock of evidence-based medicine. We introduce a two-step approach to automatically extract three facets - two entities (the agent and object) and the way in which the entities are compared (the endpoint) - from direct comparative sentences in full-text articles. The system does not require a user to predefine entities in advance and thus can be used in domains where entity recognition is difficult or unavailable. As with a systematic review, the tabular summary produced using the automatically extracted facets shows how experimental results differ between studies. Experiments were conducted using a collection of more than 2million sentences from three journals Diabetes, Carcinogenesis and Endocrinology and two machine learning algorithms, support vector machines (SVM) and a general linear model (GLM). F1 and accuracy measures for the SVM and GLM differed by only 0.01 across all three comparison facets in a randomly selected set of test sentences. The system achieved the best performance of 92% for objects, whereas the accuracy for both agent and endpoints was 73%. F1 scores were higher for objects (0.77) than for endpoints (0.51) or agents (0.47). A situated evaluation of Metformin, a drug to treat diabetes, showed system accuracy of 95%, 83% and 79% for the object, endpoint and agent respectively. The situated evaluation had higher F1 scores of 0.88, 0.64 and 0.62 for object, endpoint, and agent respectively. On average, only 5.31% of the sentences in a full-text article are direct comparisons, but the tabular summaries suggest that these sentences provide a rich source of currently underutilized information that can be used to accelerate the systematic review process and identify gaps where future research should be focused. PMID:26003938

  11. Can Anomalous Amplification be Attained without Postselection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Rincón, Julián; Liu, Wei-Tao; Viza, Gerardo I.; Howell, John C.

    2016-03-01

    We present a parameter estimation technique based on performing joint measurements of a weak interaction away from the weak-value-amplification approximation. Two detectors are used to collect full statistics of the correlations between two weakly entangled degrees of freedom. Without discarding of data, the protocol resembles the anomalous amplification of an imaginary-weak-value-like response. The amplification is induced in the difference signal of both detectors allowing robustness to different sources of technical noise, and offering in addition the advantages of balanced signals for precision metrology. All of the Fisher information about the parameter of interest is collected. A tunable phase controls the strength of the amplification response. We experimentally demonstrate the proposed technique by measuring polarization rotations in a linearly polarized laser pulse. We show that in the presence of technical noise the effective sensitivity and precision of a split detector is increased when compared to a conventional continuous-wave balanced detection technique.

  12. Can Anomalous Amplification be Attained without Postselection?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rincón, Julián; Liu, Wei-Tao; Viza, Gerardo I; Howell, John C

    2016-03-11

    We present a parameter estimation technique based on performing joint measurements of a weak interaction away from the weak-value-amplification approximation. Two detectors are used to collect full statistics of the correlations between two weakly entangled degrees of freedom. Without discarding of data, the protocol resembles the anomalous amplification of an imaginary-weak-value-like response. The amplification is induced in the difference signal of both detectors allowing robustness to different sources of technical noise, and offering in addition the advantages of balanced signals for precision metrology. All of the Fisher information about the parameter of interest is collected. A tunable phase controls the strength of the amplification response. We experimentally demonstrate the proposed technique by measuring polarization rotations in a linearly polarized laser pulse. We show that in the presence of technical noise the effective sensitivity and precision of a split detector is increased when compared to a conventional continuous-wave balanced detection technique. PMID:27015468

  13. Detecting Anthropogenic Disturbance on Weathering and Erosion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanacker, V.; Schoonejans, J.; Bellin, N.; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Y.; Opfergelt, S.; Christl, M.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance of natural vegetation can profoundly alter the physical, chemical and biological processes within soils. Rapid removal of topsoil during intense farming can result in an imbalance between soil production through chemical weathering and physical erosion, with direct implications on local biogeochemical cycling. However, the feedback mechanisms between soil erosion, chemical weathering and biogeochemical cycling in response to anthropogenic forcing are not yet fully understood. In this paper, we analyze dynamic soil properties for a rapidly changing anthropogenic landscape in the Spanish Betic Cordillera; and focus on the coupling between physical erosion, soil production and soil chemical weathering. Modern erosion rates were quantified through analysis of sediment deposition volumes behind check dams, and represent catchment-average erosion rates over the last 10 to 50 years. Soil production rates are derived from in-situ produced 10Be nuclide concentrations, and represent long-term flux rates. In each catchment, soil chemical weathering intensities were calculated for two soil-regolith profiles. Although Southeast Spain is commonly reported as the European region that is most affected by land degradation, modern erosion rates are low (140 t ha-1 yr-1). About 50 % of the catchments are losing soils at a rate of less than 60 t km-2 yr-1. Our data show that modern erosion rates are roughly of the same magnitude as the long-term or cosmogenically-derived erosion rates in the Betic Cordillera. Soils developed on weathered metamorphic rocks have no well-developed profile characteristics, and are generally thin and stony. Nevertheless, soil chemical weathering intensities are high; and question the occurrence of past soil truncation.

  14. Two stages of parafoveal processing during reading: Evidence from a display change detection task.

    PubMed

    Angele, Bernhard; Slattery, Timothy J; Rayner, Keith

    2016-08-01

    We used a display change detection paradigm (Slattery, Angele, & Rayner Human Perception and Performance, 37, 1924-1938 2011) to investigate whether display change detection uses orthographic regularity and whether detection is affected by the processing difficulty of the word preceding the boundary that triggers the display change. Subjects were significantly more sensitive to display changes when the change was from a nonwordlike preview than when the change was from a wordlike preview, but the preview benefit effect on the target word was not affected by whether the preview was wordlike or nonwordlike. Additionally, we did not find any influence of preboundary word frequency on display change detection performance. Our results suggest that display change detection and lexical processing do not use the same cognitive mechanisms. We propose that parafoveal processing takes place in two stages: an early, orthography-based, preattentional stage, and a late, attention-dependent lexical access stage. PMID:26769246

  15. Impact of two types of image processing on cancer detection in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Lucy M.; Halling-Brown, Mark D.; Looney, Padraig T.; Dance, David R.; Wilkinson, Louise; Wallis, Matthew G.; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Cooke, Julie; McAvinchey, Rita; Young, Kenneth C.

    2016-03-01

    The impact of image processing on cancer detection is still a concern to radiologists and physicists. This work aims to evaluate the effect of two types of image processing on cancer detection in mammography. An observer study was performed in which six radiologists inspected 349 cases (a mixture of normal cases, benign lesions and cancers) processed with two types of image processing. The observers marked areas they were suspicious were cancers. JAFROC analysis was performed to determine if there was a significant difference in cancer detection between the two types of image processing. Cancer detection was significantly better with the standard setting image processing (flavor A) compared with one that provides enhanced image contrast (flavor B), p = 0.036. The image processing was applied to images of the CDMAM test object, which were then analysed using CDCOM. The threshold gold thickness measured with the CDMAM test object was thinner using flavor A than flavor B image processing. Since Flavor A was found to be superior in both the observer study and the measurements using the CDMAM phantom, this may indicate that measurements using the CDMAM correlate with change in cancer detection with different types of image processing.

  16. Dual-Process Theory and Signal-Detection Theory of Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixted, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Two influential models of recognition memory, the unequal-variance signal-detection model and a dual-process threshold/detection model, accurately describe the receiver operating characteristic, but only the latter model can provide estimates of recollection and familiarity. Such estimates often accord with those provided by the remember-know…

  17. Can Mismatch Negativity Be Linked to Synaptic Processes? A Glutamatergic Approach to Deviance Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strelnikov, Kuzma

    2007-01-01

    This article aims to provide a theoretical framework to elucidate the neurophysiological underpinnings of deviance detection as reflected by mismatch negativity. A six-step model of the information processing necessary for deviance detection is proposed. In this model, predictive coding of learned regularities is realized by means of long-term…

  18. Marine Magnetic Data Processing and Interpretation: Detection and Positioning of the Power Cables on Seabed Offshore of Kaohsiung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.; Song, G.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the mapping of marine magnetic data offshore of Kaohsiung, and locate the traces of two power cables by interpreting the processed data. The survey area is roughly rectangle-shaped waters between the coast of Linbian township and Liuqiu island, located at the offshore area of Kaohsiung County in southwestern Taiwan. It is about 1 km wide and 18 km long at a water depth ranging from 10 to 70 meters. The survey system comprises the G880 cesium marine magnetometer, which was towed approximately 25 meters behind the boat. A depressor wing was used for keeping the sensor below the sea surface around 10 meters deep. The reference station of DGPS configuration was located at Taipei about 340 kilometers away from the survey area. To compensate for the natural temporal variations of the Earth's magnetic field during the survey, we had the magnetic data go through diurnal correction. Then the corrected magnetic data were gridded to generate the total field magnetic map. To enhance anomalous features with a certain wavelength, we applied filtering to the signals. A rule of thumb is that the wavelength of an anomaly divided by three or four is approximately equal to the depth at which the body producing the anomaly is buried. [1] After the processing of high pass filtering, long-wavelength anomalies were removed and enhance the contrast of anomalies produced by ferro-metallic source near the seabed, such as pipeline. In conclusion, we can tell the position of magnetic anomalies and the power cables is highly related. The marine magnetic survey can successfully detect and locate power cables on seabed. In order to achieve accuracy of locating cables, we use the USBL to position deep-towed sensor. Furthermore, total horizontal derivative of data can be applied. This enhancement sharpens up anomalies over bodies and tends to reduce anomaly complexity. [1] References 1. Advanced processing and interpretation of gravity and magnetic Data

  19. Effect of Using Automated Auditing Tools on Detecting Compliance Failures in Unmanaged Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doganata, Yurdaer; Curbera, Francisco

    The effect of using automated auditing tools to detect compliance failures in unmanaged business processes is investigated. In the absence of a process execution engine, compliance of an unmanaged business process is tracked by using an auditing tool developed based on business provenance technology or employing auditors. Since budget constraints limit employing auditors to evaluate all process instances, a methodology is devised to use both expert opinion on a limited set of process instances and the results produced by fallible automated audit machines on all process instances. An improvement factor is defined based on the average number of non-compliant process instances detected and it is shown that the improvement depends on the prevalence of non-compliance in the process as well as the sensitivity and the specificity of the audit machine.

  20. Discontinuity interaction and anomalous source models in through transmission eddy current testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mergelas, B.J.; Atherton, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Growing interest in the detection of external, axially aligned stress corrosion cracks in ferromagnetic oil and gas transmission pipelines, has prompted a detailed investigation of discontinuity interactions in remote field eddy current (RFEC) testing. Experimental measurements and numerical modeling were undertaken to study discontinuity interactions in a single through-wall transmission geometry for ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic pipes. Anomalous source models have been introduced in order to explain the responses of axial discontinuities to circumferential eddy currents or circumferential AC magnetic fields. In nonferromagnetic material, discontinuity responses may be modeled by two types of anomalous eddy current sources. In ferromagnetic materials, an anomalous magnetization source is useful for explaining discontinuity response.

  1. Anomalous phosphenes in ocular protontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, E.; Maréchal, F.; Dendale, R.; Mabit, C.; Calugaru, V.; Desjardin, L.; Narici, L.

    2010-04-01

    We have undertaken a clinical ground study of proton-induced light flashes (phosphenes). Patients treated at the Institut Curie - Centre de Protonthérapie in Orsay, France, received radiation therapy to cure ocular and skull-base cancers. Sixty percent of the patients treated for choroidal melanomas using 73 MeV protons report anomalous phosphenes. Delivering a radiation dose on the retina only is not sufficient to trigger the light flash. The present study may be the first indication of phosphenes triggered by protons of few tens of MeV.

  2. Khinchin Theorem and Anomalous Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Morgado, Rafael; Vainstein, Mendeli H.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2008-12-01

    A recent Letter [M. H. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 190601 (2007)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.190601] has called attention to the fact that irreversibility is a broader concept than ergodicity, and that therefore the Khinchin theorem [A. I. Khinchin, Mathematical Foundations of Statistical Mechanics (Dover, New York, 1949)] may fail in some systems. In this Letter we show that for all ranges of normal and anomalous diffusion described by a generalized Langevin equation the Khinchin theorem holds.

  3. Ultrasonic sensor system to detect solids in a milk pasteurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroeta Z., Carlos; Sanchez M., Fernando L.; Fernando R., G. Moreno; Montes P., Laura

    2002-11-01

    In the food industry, many products require a specific process. In the milk industry, the raw milk passes through several process stages before reaching the end user in a very qualitative and healthy way. One of the problems of the milk is that it can contain solids in suspension, result of contamination of the milk, or inherent to the pasteurization process itself. In order to control these solids, a solid detection system is being developed, which will detect the solids by the reflection and refraction of ultrasonic waves. The sensor must be set in the upper part of the milk containers, and with a grid array to allow the control system to prevent these solids from entering into the pipes of the processing plant. The sensing system may activate an acoustic alarm to indicate that a solid has been detected, and a visual one to indicate the affected part of the process. (To be presented in Spanish.)

  4. An underwater ship fault detection method based on Sonar image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Shi; Fang-jian, Shan; Bo, Cong; Wei, Qiu

    2016-02-01

    For the research of underwater ship fault detection method in conditions of sailing on the ocean especially in poor visibility muddy sea, a fault detection method under the assist of sonar image processing was proposed. Firstly, did sonar image denoising using the algorithm of pulse coupled neural network (PCNN); secondly, edge feature extraction for the image after denoising was carried out by morphological wavelet transform; Finally, interested regions Using relevant tracking method were taken, namely fault area mapping. The simulation results presented here proved the feasibility and effectiveness of the sonar image processing in underwater fault detection system.

  5. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Turcotte, Melissa

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the

  6. Anomalous Hall effect in localization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Zhu, Kai; Yue, Di; Tian, Yuan; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    The anomalous Hall effect in the ultrathin film regime is investigated in Fe(001)(1-3 nm) films epitaxial on MgO(001). The logarithmic localization correction to longitudinal resistivity and anomalous Hall resistivity are observed at low temperature. We identify that the coefficient of skew scattering has a reduction from metallic to localized regime, while the contribution of side jump has inconspicuous change except for a small drop below 10 K. Furthermore, we discover that the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity decreases with the reduction of thickness below 2 nm. Our results provide unambiguous experimental evidence to clarify the problem of localization correction to the anomalous Hall effect.

  7. Hyperspectral imaging technique for detection of poultry fecal residues on food processing equipments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byoung-Kwan; Kim, Moon S.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2005-11-01

    Emerging concerns about safety and security in current mass production of food products necessitate rapid and reliable inspection for contaminant-free products. Diluted fecal residues on poultry processing plant equipment surface, not easily discernable from water by human eye, are contamination sources for poultry carcasses. Development of sensitive detection methods for fecal residues is essential to ensure safe production of poultry carcasses. Hyperspectral imaging techniques have shown good potential for detecting of the presence of fecal and other biological substances on food and processing equipment surfaces. In this study, use of high spatial resolution hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging (with UV-A excitation) is presented as a tool for selecting a few multispectral bands to detect diluted fecal and ingesta residues on materials used for manufacturing processing equipment. Reflectance and fluorescence imaging methods were compared for potential detection of a range of diluted fecal residues on the surfaces of processing plant equipment. Results showed that low concentrations of poultry feces and ingesta, diluted up to 1:100 by weight with double distilled water, could be detected using hyperspectral fluorescence images with an accuracy of 97.2%. Spectral bands determined in this study could be used for developing a real-time multispectral inspection device for detection of harmful organic residues on processing plant equipment.

  8. Asymptotic behavior of the supremum tail probability for anomalous diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michna, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we investigate asymptotic behavior of the tail probability for subordinated self-similar processes with regularly varying tail probability. We show that the tail probability of the one-dimensional distributions and the supremum tail probability are regularly varying with the pre-factor depending on the moments of the subordinating process. We can apply our result to the so-called anomalous diffusion.

  9. Asymmetry in the winter-anomalous behaviour of absorption at midlatitudes in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwentek, H.; Elling, W.; Peres, M.

    1980-06-01

    Ionospheric absorption data at 1.73 and 2.28 MHz were obtained during a winter at Lindau (51.6 deg N) and Ushuaia (54.8 deg S). These data are compared in order to detect a possible asymmetry in the behavior of the ionospheric absorption in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. A real asymmetry was found, mainly in the features of excess winter-anomalous absorption. It is suggested that this asymmetry is due to different meteorological processes in the two hemispheres around the mesopause region in winter.

  10. ERTS-1 anomalous dark patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Through combined use of imagery from ERTS-1 and NOAA-2 satellites was found that when the sun elevation exceeds 55 degrees, the ERTS-1 imagery is subject to considerable contamination by sunlight even though the actual specular point is nearly 300 nautical miles from nadir. Based on sea surface wave slope information, a wind speed of 10 knots will theoretically provide approximately 0.5 percent incident solar reflectance under observed ERTS multispectral scanner detectors. This reflectance nearly doubles under the influence of a 20 knot wind. The most pronounced effect occurs in areas of calm water where anomalous dark patches are observed. Calm water at distances from the specular point found in ERTS scenes will reflect no solar energy to the multispectral scanner, making these regions stand out as dark areas in all bands in an ocean scene otherwise comprosed by a general diffuse sunlight from rougher ocean surfaces. Anomalous dark patches in the outer parts of the glitter zones may explain the unusual appearance of some scenes.

  11. NO.sub.x sensor and process for detecting NO.sub.x

    DOEpatents

    Dalla Betta, Ralph A.; Sheridan, David R.; Reed, Daniel L.

    1994-01-01

    This invention is a process for detecting low levels of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) in a flowing gas stream (typically an exhaust gas stream) and a catalytic NO.sub.x sensor which may be used in that process.

  12. Adaptive Image Processing Methods for Improving Contaminant Detection Accuracy on Poultry Carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract A real-time multispectral imaging system has demonstrated a science-based tool for fecal and ingesta contaminant detection during poultry processing. In order to implement this imaging system at commercial poultry processing industry, the false positives must be removed. For doi...

  13. Surface defect detection in tiling Industries using digital image processing methods: analysis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mohammad H; Asemani, Davud

    2014-05-01

    Ceramic and tile industries should indispensably include a grading stage to quantify the quality of products. Actually, human control systems are often used for grading purposes. An automatic grading system is essential to enhance the quality control and marketing of the products. Since there generally exist six different types of defects originating from various stages of tile manufacturing lines with distinct textures and morphologies, many image processing techniques have been proposed for defect detection. In this paper, a survey has been made on the pattern recognition and image processing algorithms which have been used to detect surface defects. Each method appears to be limited for detecting some subgroup of defects. The detection techniques may be divided into three main groups: statistical pattern recognition, feature vector extraction and texture/image classification. The methods such as wavelet transform, filtering, morphology and contourlet transform are more effective for pre-processing tasks. Others including statistical methods, neural networks and model-based algorithms can be applied to extract the surface defects. Although, statistical methods are often appropriate for identification of large defects such as Spots, but techniques such as wavelet processing provide an acceptable response for detection of small defects such as Pinhole. A thorough survey is made in this paper on the existing algorithms in each subgroup. Also, the evaluation parameters are discussed including supervised and unsupervised parameters. Using various performance parameters, different defect detection algorithms are compared and evaluated. PMID:24502941

  14. Anomalous Microwave Emission in HII Regions: Is it Really Anomalous? The Case of RCW 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladini, Roberta; Ingallinera, Adriano; Agliozzo, Claudia; Tibbs, Christopher T.; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Umana, Grazia; Dickinson, Clive; Trigilio, Corrado

    2015-11-01

    The detection of an excess of emission at microwave frequencies with respect to the predicted free-free emission has been reported for several Galactic H ii regions. Here, we investigate the case of RCW 49, for which the Cosmic Background Imager tentatively (˜3σ) detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) at 31 GHz on angular scales of 7‧. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we carried out a multi-frequency (5, 19, and 34 GHz) continuum study of the region, complemented by observations of the H109α radio recombination line. The analysis shows that: (1) the spatial correlation between the microwave and IR emission persists on angular scales from 3.‧4 to 0.″4, although the degree of the correlation slightly decreases at higher frequencies and on smaller angular scales; (2) the spectral indices between 1.4 and 5 GHz are globally in agreement with optically thin free-free emission, however, ˜30% of these are positive and much greater than -0.1, consistent with a stellar wind scenario; and (3) no major evidence for inverted free-free radiation is found, indicating that this is likely not the cause of the Anomalous Emission in RCW 49. Although our results cannot rule out the spinning dust hypothesis to explain the tentative detection of AME in RCW 49, they emphasize the complexity of astronomical sources that are very well known and studied, such as H ii regions, and suggest that, at least in these objects, the reported excess of emission might be ascribed to alternative mechanisms such as stellar winds and shocks.

  15. Chemical Sensing for Buried Landmines - Fundamental Processes Influencing Trace Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    PHELAN, JAMES M.

    2002-05-01

    Mine detection dogs have a demonstrated capability to locate hidden objects by trace chemical detection. Because of this capability, demining activities frequently employ mine detection dogs to locate individual buried landmines or for area reduction. The conditions appropriate for use of mine detection dogs are only beginning to emerge through diligent research that combines dog selection/training, the environmental conditions that impact landmine signature chemical vapors, and vapor sensing performance capability and reliability. This report seeks to address the fundamental soil-chemical interactions, driven by local weather history, that influence the availability of chemical for trace chemical detection. The processes evaluated include: landmine chemical emissions to the soil, chemical distribution in soils, chemical degradation in soils, and weather and chemical transport in soils. Simulation modeling is presented as a method to evaluate the complex interdependencies among these various processes and to establish conditions appropriate for trace chemical detection. Results from chemical analyses on soil samples obtained adjacent to landmines are presented and demonstrate the ultra-trace nature of these residues. Lastly, initial measurements of the vapor sensing performance of mine detection dogs demonstrates the extreme sensitivity of dogs in sensing landmine signature chemicals; however, reliability at these ultra-trace vapor concentrations still needs to be determined. Through this compilation, additional work is suggested that will fill in data gaps to improve the utility of trace chemical detection.

  16. A discrete time random walk model for anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angstmann, C. N.; Donnelly, I. C.; Henry, B. I.; Nichols, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    The continuous time random walk, introduced in the physics literature by Montroll and Weiss, has been widely used to model anomalous diffusion in external force fields. One of the features of this model is that the governing equations for the evolution of the probability density function, in the diffusion limit, can generally be simplified using fractional calculus. This has in turn led to intensive research efforts over the past decade to develop robust numerical methods for the governing equations, represented as fractional partial differential equations. Here we introduce a discrete time random walk that can also be used to model anomalous diffusion in an external force field. The governing evolution equations for the probability density function share the continuous time random walk diffusion limit. Thus the discrete time random walk provides a novel numerical method for solving anomalous diffusion equations in the diffusion limit, including the fractional Fokker-Planck equation. This method has the clear advantage that the discretisation of the diffusion limit equation, which is necessary for numerical analysis, is itself a well defined physical process. Some examples using the discrete time random walk to provide numerical solutions of the probability density function for anomalous subdiffusion, including forcing, are provided.

  17. Investigating perturbative unitarity in the presence of anomalous couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, Mamta; Dutta, Sukanta; Islam, Rashidul

    2016-03-01

    We perform a model independent analysis of the helicity amplitudes at high energy for all the 2 →2 scattering processes involving gauge and Higgs bosons in the presence of anomalous W W V , W W V V , V V H , V V H H (V ≡Z , γ and W±), H H H H and H H H interactions. We obtain the perturbative unitarity constraints on anomalous couplings by demanding the vanishing of terms proportional to s2 and s3 /2 in the helicity amplitudes. Using these constraints, we also compute the upper bound on all the anomalous couplings from terms linear in s . Further, assuming all anomalous couplings to have arisen only from dimension six operators, we show that the perturbative unitarity violation can be evaded up to ˜9 TeV corresponding to the best fit values of fW W/Λ2 and fB B/Λ2 from the combined analysis of Tevatron and LHC data.

  18. Stochastic Loewner evolution relates anomalous diffusion and anisotropic percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Credidio, Heitor F.; Moreira, André A.; Herrmann, Hans J.; Andrade, José S.

    2016-04-01

    We disclose the origin of anisotropic percolation perimeters in terms of the stochastic Loewner evolution (SLE) process. Precisely, our results from extensive numerical simulations indicate that the perimeters of multilayered and directed percolation clusters at criticality are the scaling limits of the Loewner evolution of an anomalous Brownian motion, being superdiffusive and subdiffusive, respectively. The connection between anomalous diffusion and fractal anisotropy is further tested by using long-range power-law correlated time series (fractional Brownian motion) as the driving functions in the evolution process. The fact that the resulting traces are distinctively anisotropic corroborates our hypothesis. Under the conceptual framework of SLE, our study therefore reveals different perspectives for mathematical and physical interpretations of non-Markovian processes in terms of anisotropic paths at criticality and vice versa.

  19. [Multi-DSP parallel processing technique of hyperspectral RX anomaly detection].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Ji; Zeng, Xiao-Ru; Zhao, Bao-Wei; Ming, Xing; Zhang, Gui-Feng; Lü, Qun-Bo

    2014-05-01

    To satisfy the requirement of high speed, real-time and mass data storage etc. for RX anomaly detection of hyperspectral image data, the present paper proposes a solution of multi-DSP parallel processing system for hyperspectral image based on CPCI Express standard bus architecture. Hardware topological architecture of the system combines the tight coupling of four DSPs sharing data bus and memory unit with the interconnection of Link ports. On this hardware platform, by assigning parallel processing task for each DSP in consideration of the spectrum RX anomaly detection algorithm and the feature of 3D data in the spectral image, a 4DSP parallel processing technique which computes and solves the mean matrix and covariance matrix of the whole image by spatially partitioning the image is proposed. The experiment result shows that, in the case of equivalent detective effect, it can reach the time efficiency 4 times higher than single DSP process with the 4-DSP parallel processing technique of RX anomaly detection algorithm proposed by this paper, which makes a breakthrough in the constraints to the huge data image processing of DSP's internal storage capacity, meanwhile well meeting the demands of the spectral data in real-time processing. PMID:25095443

  20. Stream computing for biomedical signal processing: A QRS complex detection case-study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B M; O'Driscoll, C; Boylan, G B; Lightbody, G; Marnane, W P

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in "Big Data" have brought significant gains in the ability to process large amounts of data on commodity server hardware. Stream computing is a relatively new paradigm in this area, addressing the need to process data in real time with very low latency. While this approach has been developed for dealing with large scale data from the world of business, security and finance, there is a natural overlap with clinical needs for physiological signal processing. In this work we present a case study of streams processing applied to a typical physiological signal processing problem: QRS detection from ECG data. PMID:26737641

  1. Wanted: A Positive Control for Anomalous Subdiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous subdiffusion in cells and model systems is an active area of research. The main questions are whether diffusion is anomalous or normal, and if it is anomalous, its mechanism. The subject is controversial, especially the hypothesis that crowding causes anomalous subdiffusion. Anomalous subdiffusion measurements would be strengthened by an experimental standard, particularly one able to cross-calibrate the different types of measurements. Criteria for a calibration standard are proposed. First, diffusion must be anomalous over the length and timescales of the different measurements. The length-scale is fundamental; the time scale can be adjusted through the viscosity of the medium. Second, the standard must be theoretically well understood, with a known anomalous subdiffusion exponent, ideally readily tunable. Third, the standard must be simple, reproducible, and independently characterizable (by, for example, electron microscopy for nanostructures). Candidate experimental standards are evaluated, including obstructed lipid bilayers; aqueous systems obstructed by nanopillars; a continuum percolation system in which a prescribed fraction of randomly chosen obstacles in a regular array is ablated; single-file diffusion in pores; transient anomalous subdiffusion due to binding of particles in arrays such as transcription factors in randomized DNA arrays; and computer-generated physical trajectories. PMID:23260043

  2. Automatic detection of health changes using statistical process control techniques on measured transfer times of elderly.

    PubMed

    Baldewijns, Greet; Luca, Stijn; Nagels, William; Vanrumste, Bart; Croonenborghs, Tom

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that gait speed and transfer times are good measures of functional ability in elderly. However, data currently acquired by systems that measure either gait speed or transfer times in the homes of elderly people require manual reviewing by healthcare workers. This reviewing process is time-consuming. To alleviate this burden, this paper proposes the use of statistical process control methods to automatically detect both positive and negative changes in transfer times. Three SPC techniques: tabular CUSUM, standardized CUSUM and EWMA, known for their ability to detect small shifts in the data, are evaluated on simulated transfer times. This analysis shows that EWMA is the best-suited method with a detection accuracy of 82% and an average detection time of 9.64 days. PMID:26737425

  3. Degree-Strength Correlation Reveals Anomalous Trading Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Qian; Shen, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Xue-Qi; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation is an important issue for both developed and emerging stock markets. Many efforts have been made to detect manipulation in stock markets. However, it is still an open problem to identify the fraudulent traders, especially when they collude with each other. In this paper, we focus on the problem of identifying the anomalous traders using the transaction data of eight manipulated stocks and forty-four non-manipulated stocks during a one-year period. By analyzing the trading networks of stocks, we find that the trading networks of manipulated stocks exhibit significantly higher degree-strength correlation than the trading networks of non-manipulated stocks and the randomized trading networks. We further propose a method to detect anomalous traders of manipulated stocks based on statistical significance analysis of degree-strength correlation. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is effective at distinguishing the manipulated stocks from non-manipulated ones. Our method outperforms the traditional weight-threshold method at identifying the anomalous traders in manipulated stocks. More importantly, our method is difficult to be fooled by colluded traders. PMID:23082114

  4. Degree-strength correlation reveals anomalous trading behavior.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Qian; Shen, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Xue-Qi; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation is an important issue for both developed and emerging stock markets. Many efforts have been made to detect manipulation in stock markets. However, it is still an open problem to identify the fraudulent traders, especially when they collude with each other. In this paper, we focus on the problem of identifying the anomalous traders using the transaction data of eight manipulated stocks and forty-four non-manipulated stocks during a one-year period. By analyzing the trading networks of stocks, we find that the trading networks of manipulated stocks exhibit significantly higher degree-strength correlation than the trading networks of non-manipulated stocks and the randomized trading networks. We further propose a method to detect anomalous traders of manipulated stocks based on statistical significance analysis of degree-strength correlation. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is effective at distinguishing the manipulated stocks from non-manipulated ones. Our method outperforms the traditional weight-threshold method at identifying the anomalous traders in manipulated stocks. More importantly, our method is difficult to be fooled by colluded traders. PMID:23082114

  5. Emergent primary PCI of anomalous LAD.

    PubMed

    Hershey, Jeffrey; Isada, Loretta; Fenster, Michael S

    2006-05-01

    Approximately 0.3% to 2% of patients may have anomalous origins of the coronary arteries. Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery (LCA) or left anterior descending (LAD) artery from the right sinus has been well described. In persons in whom the course involves an interarterial track between the aorta (Ao) and pulmonary artery (PA), an increased incidence of sudden death has been reported, particularly during or shortly after exercise. This has been felt to be due to transient occlusion of the anomalous LAD from increased blood flow through the Ao and PA as the anomalous LAD courses between them, possibly causing myocardial ischemia. In an elective setting, further anatomic delineation with other methodologies such as cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is recommended. In this case report we present an emergent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of an anomalous LAD arising from the right sinus of Valsalva and coursing between the Ao and PA in a nonsurgical candidate. PMID:16670456

  6. Improved electromagnetic induction processing with novel adaptive matched filter and matched subspace detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Charles E.; McClellan, James H.; Scott, Waymond R.; Kerr, Andrew J.

    2016-05-01

    This work introduces two advances in wide-band electromagnetic induction (EMI) processing: a novel adaptive matched filter (AMF) and matched subspace detection methods. Both advances make use of recent work with a subspace SVD approach to separating the signal, soil, and noise subspaces of the frequency measurements The proposed AMF provides a direct approach to removing the EMI self-response while improving the signal to noise ratio of the data. Unlike previous EMI adaptive downtrack filters, this new filter will not erroneously optimize the EMI soil response instead of the EMI target response because these two responses are projected into separate frequency subspaces. The EMI detection methods in this work elaborate on how the signal and noise subspaces in the frequency measurements are ideal for creating the matched subspace detection (MSD) and constant false alarm rate matched subspace detection (CFAR) metrics developed by Scharf The CFAR detection metric has been shown to be the uniformly most powerful invariant detector.

  7. DETECTION OF THE SECOND r-PROCESS PEAK ELEMENT TELLURIUM IN METAL-POOR STARS ,

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Lawler, James E.; Cowan, John J.; Beers, Timothy C.; Frebel, Anna; Ivans, Inese I.; Schatz, Hendrik; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sneden, Christopher

    2012-03-15

    Using near-ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we detect neutral tellurium in three metal-poor stars enriched by products of r-process nucleosynthesis, BD +17 3248, HD 108317, and HD 128279. Tellurium (Te, Z = 52) is found at the second r-process peak (A Almost-Equal-To 130) associated with the N = 82 neutron shell closure, and it has not been detected previously in Galactic halo stars. The derived tellurium abundances match the scaled solar system r-process distribution within the uncertainties, confirming the predicted second peak r-process residuals. These results suggest that tellurium is predominantly produced in the main component of the r-process, along with the rare earth elements.

  8. Anomalous Growth of Aging Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a discrete-time population dynamics with age-dependent structure. At every time step, one of the alive individuals from the population is chosen randomly and removed with probability q_k depending on its age, whereas a new individual of age 1 is born with probability r. The model can also describe a single queue in which the service order is random while the service efficiency depends on a customer's "age" in the queue. We propose a mean field approximation to investigate the long-time asymptotic behavior of the mean population size. The age dependence is shown to lead to anomalous power-law growth of the population at the critical regime. The scaling exponent is determined by the asymptotic behavior of the probabilities q_k at large k. The mean field approximation is validated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  9. Anomalous charge pumping in a one-dimensional optical superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ran; Mueller, Erich J.

    2015-07-01

    We model atomic motion in a sliding superlattice potential to explore "topological charge pumping" and to find optimal parameters for experimental observation of this phenomenon. We analytically study the band structure, finding how the Wannier states evolve as two sinusoidal lattices are moved relative to one another, and relate this evolution to the center-of-mass motion of an atomic cloud. We pay particular attention to counterintuitive or anomalous regimes, such as when the atomic motion is opposite to that of the lattice. We propose a practical cold-atom experiment to detect this anomalous behavior. Through numerical simulations, we find that a negative adiabatic current and a nontrivial Chern number C =-1 are readily measured.

  10. A novel framework for processing forward looking infrared imagery with application to buried threat detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malof, Jordan M.; Morton, Kenneth D.; Collins, Leslie M.; Torrione, Peter A.

    2013-06-01

    Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) cameras have recently been studied as a sensing modality for use in buried threat detection systems. FLIR-based detection systems benefit from larger standoff distances and faster rates of advance than other sensing modalities, but they also present significant signal processing challenges. FLIR imagery typically yields multiple looks at each surface area, each of which is obtained from a different relative camera pose and position. This multi-look imagery can be exploited for improved performance, however open questions remain as to the best ways to process and fuse such data. Further, the utility of each look in the multi-look imagery is also unclear: How many looks are needed, from what poses, etc? In this work we propose a general framework for processing FLIR imagery wherein FLIR imagery is partitioned according to the particular relative camera pose from which it was collected. Each partition is then projected into a common spatial coordinate system resulting in several distinct images of the surface area. Buried threat detection algorithms can then be applied to each of these resulting images independently, or in aggregate. The proposed framework is evaluated using several detection algorithms on an FLIR dataset collected at a Western US test site and the results indicate that the framework offers significant improvement over detection in the original FLIR imagery. Further experiments using this framework suggest that multiple looks by the FLIR camera can be used to improve detection performance.

  11. Error detection process - Model, design, and its impact on computer performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for computer error detection processes and applied to estimate their influence on system performance. Faults in the hardware, not in the design, are assumed to be the potential cause of transition to erroneous states during normal operations. The classification properties and associated recovery methods of error detection are discussed. The probability of obtaining an unreliable result is evaluated, along with the resulting computational loss. Error detection during design is considered and a feasible design space is outlined. Extension of the methods to account for the effects of extant multiple faults is indicated.

  12. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  13. [The process of detection and treatment of cases of tuberculosis in a prison].

    PubMed

    Valença, Mariana Soares; Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Brum, Clarice Brinck; Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida da

    2016-06-01

    This study seeks to analyze the process of detection and treatment of cases of tuberculosis (TB) in a prison in the south of Brazil. An active and passive search for TB was conducted to estimate the scale of TB in a prison with 764 inmates. In conjunction with the detection strategies and clinical follow-up of the 41 TB cases, participant observation and records in field diaries were performed, making it possible to analyze the scope and limitations of detection and treatment of cases of TB in prison. The development of search strategies is discussed along with the use of questionnaires to detect symptomatic cases, as well as the inadequacy of the clinical follow-up of TB cases, involvement of different workers and coordination between prison and health services. There is clear potential for the control of TB using an active search to induce the passive detection and screening for symptoms that - even skewed by the perceptions of inmates regarding symptoms of TB - enabled an increase in detection. The functional dynamics of prison life hamper the inclusion of health routines and can restrict actions to control TB and other diseases. In the process of control of TB in prisons, the feasibility of effective detection methods is as important as planning based on disease conditions, network services and workers involved. PMID:27383345

  14. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded

  15. Anomalous diffusion with transient subordinators: a link to compound relaxation laws.

    PubMed

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Weron, Karina; Weron, Aleksander

    2014-02-01

    This paper deals with a problem of transient anomalous diffusion which is currently found to emerge from a wide range of complex processes. The nonscaling behavior of such phenomena reflects changes in time-scaling exponents of the mean-squared displacement through time domain - a more general picture of the anomalous diffusion observed in nature. Our study is based on the identification of some transient subordinators responsible for transient anomalous diffusion. We derive the corresponding fractional diffusion equation and provide links to the corresponding compound relaxation laws supported by this case generalizing many empirical dependencies well-known in relaxation investigations. PMID:24511928

  16. Anomalous resistivity effect on multiple ion beam emission and hard x-ray generation in a Mather type plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect

    Behbahani, R. A.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2011-10-15

    Multi ion beam and hard x-ray emissions were detected in a high inductance (more than 100 nH) Mather type plasma focus (PF) device at different filling gas pressures and charging voltages. The signal analysis was performed through the current trace, as it is the fundamental signal from which all of the phenomena in a PF device can be extracted. Two different fitting processes were carried out according to Lee's computational (snow-plow) model. In the first process, only plasma dynamics and classical (Spitzer) resistances were considered as energy consumer parameters for plasma. This led to an unsuccessful fitting and did not answer the energy transfer mechanism into plasma. A second fitting process was considered through the addition of anomalous resistance, which provided the best fit. Anomalous resistance was the source of long decrease in current trace, and multi dips and multi peaks of high voltage probe. Multi-peak features were interpreted considering the second fitting process along with the mechanisms for ion beam production and hard x-ray emission. To show the important role of the anomalous resistance, the duration of the current drop was discussed.

  17. Detection of delamination defects in CFRP materials using ultrasonic signal processing.

    PubMed

    Benammar, Abdessalem; Drai, Redouane; Guessoum, Abderrezak

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, signal processing techniques are tested for their ability to resolve echoes associated with delaminations in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer multi-layered composite materials (CFRP) detected by ultrasonic methods. These methods include split spectrum processing (SSP) and the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. A simulation study on defect detection was performed, and results were validated experimentally on CFRP with and without delamination defects taken from aircraft. Comparison of the methods for their ability to resolve echoes are made. PMID:18501942

  18. Electrically tunable spin polarization of chiral edge modes in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui-Xing; Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2016-06-01

    In the quantum anomalous Hall effect, chiral edge modes are expected to conduct spin polarized current without dissipation and thus hold great promise for future electronics and spintronics with low energy consumption. However, spin polarization of chiral edge modes has never been established in experiments. In this work, we theoretically study spin polarization of chiral edge modes in the quantum anomalous Hall effect, based on both the effective model and more realistic tight-binding model constructed from first-principles calculations. We find that spin polarization can be manipulated by tuning either a local gate voltage or the Fermi energy. We also propose to extract spin information of chiral edge modes by contacting the quantum anomalous Hall insulator to a ferromagnetic lead. The establishment of spin polarization of chiral edge modes, as well as the manipulation and detection in a fully electrical manner, will pave the way to the applications of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in spintronics.

  19. Optical observation, image-processing, and detection of space debris in geosynchronous Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hiroshi; Kurosaki, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Toshifumi; Tagawa, Makoto

    We report on optical observations and an efficient detection method of space debris in the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). We operate our new Australia Remote Observatory (ARO) where an 18 cm optical telescope with a charged-coupled device (CCD) camera covering a 3.14-degree field of view is used for GEO debris survey, and analyse datasets of successive CCD images using the line detection method (Yanagisawa and Nakajima 2005). In our operation, the exposure time of each CCD image is set to be 3 seconds, and the time interval of each images is about 4.7 seconds. We can detect faint signals (down to about 1.8 sigma of background noise) by applying the line detection method to 18 CCD images. As a result, we detected about 300 GEO objects up to magnitude of 14 among 5 nights data, and found that a certain amount of our detections are new objects that are not contained in the two-line-element (TLE) data provided by the U.S. Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM). We conclude that our ARO posses a high efficiency detection of GEO objects despite the use of comparatively-inexpensive observation and analysis system. We also describe the image-processing method specialised for the detection of GEO objects (not for usual astronomical objects like stars) in this paper.

  20. Optical Observation, Image-processing, and Detection of Space Debris in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Tagawa, M.

    2014-09-01

    We report on optical observations and an efficient detection method of space debris in the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). We operate our new Australia Remote Observatory (ARO) where an 18 cm optical telescope with a charged-coupled device (CCD) camera covering a 3.14-degree field of view is used for GEO debris survey, and analyse datasets of successive CCD images using the line detection method (Yanagisawa and Nakajima 2005). In our operation, the exposure time of each CCD image is set to be 3 seconds (or 5 seconds), and the time interval of CCD shutter open is about 4.7 seconds (or 6.7 seconds). In the line detection method, a sufficient number of sample objects are taken from each image based on their shape and intensity, which includes not only faint signals but also background noise (we take 500 sample objects from each image in this paper). Then we search a sequence of sample objects aligning in a straight line in the successive images to exclude the noise sample. We succeed in detecting faint signals (down to about 1.8 sigma of background noise) by applying the line detection method to 18 CCD images. As a result, we detected about 300 GEO objects up to magnitude of 15.5 among 5 nights data. We also calculate orbits of objects detected using the Simplified General Perturbations Satellite Orbit Model 4(SGP4), and identify the objects listed in the two-line-element (TLE) data catalogue publicly provided by the U.S. Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM). We found that a certain amount of our detections are new objects that are not contained in the catalogue. We conclude that our ARO and detection method posse a high efficiency detection of GEO objects despite the use of comparatively-inexpensive observation and analysis system. We also describe the image-processing specialized for the detection of GEO objects (not for usual astronomical objects like stars) in this paper.

  1. [Fast Detection of Camellia Sinensis Growth Process and Tea Quality Informations with Spectral Technology: A Review].

    PubMed

    Peng, Ji-yu; Song, Xing-lin; Liu, Fei; Bao, Yi-dan; He, Yong

    2016-03-01

    The research achievements and trends of spectral technology in fast detection of Camellia sinensis growth process information and tea quality information were being reviewed. Spectral technology is a kind of fast, nondestructive, efficient detection technology, which mainly contains infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. The rapid detection of Camellia sinensis growth process information and tea quality is helpful to realize the informatization and automation of tea production and ensure the tea quality and safety. This paper provides a review on its applications containing the detection of tea (Camellia sinensis) growing status(nitrogen, chlorophyll, diseases and insect pest), the discrimination of tea varieties, the grade discrimination of tea, the detection of tea internal quality (catechins, total polyphenols, caffeine, amino acid, pesticide residual and so on), the quality evaluation of tea beverage and tea by-product, the machinery of tea quality determination and discrimination. This paper briefly introduces the trends of the technology of the determination of tea growth process information, sensor and industrial application. In conclusion, spectral technology showed high potential to detect Camellia sinensis growth process information, to predict tea internal quality and to classify tea varieties and grades. Suitable chemometrics and preprocessing methods is helpful to improve the performance of the model and get rid of redundancy, which provides the possibility to develop the portable machinery. Future work is to develop the portable machinery and on-line detection system is recommended to improve the further application. The application and research achievement of spectral technology concerning about tea were outlined in this paper for the first time, which contained Camellia sinensis growth, tea production, the quality and safety of tea and by-produce and so on, as well as some problems to be solved

  2. A new approach to plasmasphere refilling: Anomalous plasma effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1991-01-01

    During the last 10 months of the grant, both laminar and anomalous plasma processes occurring during the refilling of the outer plasmasphere after magnetic storms are investigated. Theoretical investigations were based on two types of models: (1) two-stream hydrodynamic model in which plasma flows from the conjugate ionospheres are treated as separate fluids and the ion temperature anisotropies are treated self-consistently; and (2) large-scale particle-in-cell code.

  3. Detection, manipulation and post processing of circulating tumor cells using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiaridoost, Somayyeh; Habibiyan, Hamidreza; Ghafoorifard, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are malignant cells that are derived from a solid tumor in the metastasis stage and are shed into the blood stream. These cells hold great promise to be used as liquid biopsy that is less aggressive than traditional biopsy. Recently, detection and enumeration of these cells has received ever-increasing attention from researchers as a way of early detection of cancer metastasis, determining the effectiveness of treatment and studying the mechanism of formation of secondary tumors. CTCs are found in blood at low concentration, which is a major limitation of isolation and detection of these cells. Over the last few years, multifarious research studies have been conducted on accurate isolation and detection and post processing of CTCs. Among all the proposed systems, microfluidic systems seem to be more attractive for researchers due to their numerous advantages. On the other hand, recent developments in optical methods have made the possibility of cellular studies at single-cell level. Thus, accuracy and efficiency of separation, detection and manipulation of CTCs can be improved using optical techniques. In this review, we describe optical methods that have been used for CTC detection, manipulation and post processing.

  4. Feature Transformation Detection Method with Best Spectral Band Selection Process for Hyper-spectral Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hai-Wen; McGurr, Mike; Brickhouse, Mark

    2015-11-01

    We present a newly developed feature transformation (FT) detection method for hyper-spectral imagery (HSI) sensors. In essence, the FT method, by transforming the original features (spectral bands) to a different feature domain, may considerably increase the statistical separation between the target and background probability density functions, and thus may significantly improve the target detection and identification performance, as evidenced by the test results in this paper. We show that by differentiating the original spectral, one can completely separate targets from the background using a single spectral band, leading to perfect detection results. In addition, we have proposed an automated best spectral band selection process with a double-threshold scheme that can rank the available spectral bands from the best to the worst for target detection. Finally, we have also proposed an automated cross-spectrum fusion process to further improve the detection performance in lower spectral range (<1000 nm) by selecting the best spectral band pair with multivariate analysis. Promising detection performance has been achieved using a small background material signature library for concept-proving, and has then been further evaluated and verified using a real background HSI scene collected by a HYDICE sensor.

  5. Automatic defect detection for TFT-LCD array process using quasiconformal kernel support vector data description.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Hung; Chen, Yan-Jen

    2011-01-01

    Defect detection has been considered an efficient way to increase the yield rate of panels in thin film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) manufacturing. In this study we focus on the array process since it is the first and key process in TFT-LCD manufacturing. Various defects occur in the array process, and some of them could cause great damage to the LCD panels. Thus, how to design a method that can robustly detect defects from the images captured from the surface of LCD panels has become crucial. Previously, support vector data description (SVDD) has been successfully applied to LCD defect detection. However, its generalization performance is limited. In this paper, we propose a novel one-class machine learning method, called quasiconformal kernel SVDD (QK-SVDD) to address this issue. The QK-SVDD can significantly improve generalization performance of the traditional SVDD by introducing the quasiconformal transformation into a predefined kernel. Experimental results, carried out on real LCD images provided by an LCD manufacturer in Taiwan, indicate that the proposed QK-SVDD not only obtains a high defect detection rate of 96%, but also greatly improves generalization performance of SVDD. The improvement has shown to be over 30%. In addition, results also show that the QK-SVDD defect detector is able to accomplish the task of defect detection on an LCD image within 60 ms. PMID:22016625

  6. Conscious and unconscious detection of semantic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    When asked What superhero is associated with bats, Robin, the Penguin, Metropolis, Catwoman, the Riddler, the Joker, and Mr. Freeze? people frequently fail to notice the anomalous word Metropolis. The goals of this study were to determine whether detection of semantic anomalies, like Metropolis, is conscious or unconscious and whether this detection is immediate or delayed. To achieve these goals, participants answered anomalous and nonanomalous questions as their reading times for words were recorded. Comparisons between detected versus undetected anomalies revealed slower reading times for detected anomalies-a finding that suggests that people immediately and consciously detected anomalies. Further, comparisons between first and second words following undetected anomalies versus nonanomalous controls revealed some slower reading times for first and second words-a finding that suggests that people may have unconsciously detected anomalies but this detection was delayed. Taken together, these findings support the idea that when we are immediately aware of a semantic anomaly (i.e., immediate conscious detection) our language processes make immediate adjustments in order to reconcile contradictory information of anomalies with surrounding text; however, even when we are not consciously aware of semantic anomalies, our language processes still make these adjustments, although these adjustments are delayed (i.e., delayed unconscious detection). PMID:25624136

  7. High efficiency processing for reduced amplitude zones detection in the HRECG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugarte, N.; Álvarez, A.; Balacco, J.; Mercado, G.; Gonzalez, A.; Dugarte, E.; Olivares, A.

    2016-04-01

    Summary – This article presents part of a more detailed research proposed in the medium to long term, with the intention of establishing a new philosophy of electrocardiogram surface analysis. This research aims to find indicators of cardiovascular disease in its early stage that may go unnoticed with conventional electrocardiography. This paper reports the development of a software processing which collect some existing techniques and incorporates novel methods for detection of reduced amplitude zones (RAZ) in high resolution electrocardiographic signal (HRECG).The algorithm consists of three stages, an efficient processing for QRS detection, averaging filter using correlation techniques and a step for RAZ detecting. Preliminary results show the efficiency of system and point to incorporation of techniques new using signal analysis with involving 12 leads.

  8. A stereo inspecting detection system based on electronic imaging and computer image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dong; Lu, Zhihong; Wang, Aiguo; Cao, Miao

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a internal flaws detected system. The internal flaws of metal tube or internal hole of mechanical device, such as crazing, rust-eaten and dropping of electroplated coating. By using xenon-light as a light source through the fiber bundle, the internal surface of tube is illuminated and imaged on the CCD optical receiver by endoscope, Then the direction and the size of the flaws are measured after processed by the imaging grab section and computer processing system. This system also can detect the pose water pipe of the aircrafts, the firebox of the aero engine, turbine and lamina which can not be viewed and detected nearly by human eye. It can measure their redundancy and size of internal flaws.

  9. Detection Method of Cord Plug Tracking based on Signal Processing of Circuit Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Masahiro; Yokotani, Akira; Mizuno, Yukio; Nakagawa, Toshiyuki

    Tracking of a cord plug caused by leakage current between its electrodes, which is occasionally observed under contaminated and wetted conditions, is attributed to one of the causes of fire accidents. It is generally difficult to detect the leakage current itself because its magnitude is much smaller than that of load current of a typical household appliance. Some detection methods have been proposed based on results of laboratory experiments. However, it seems that no reliable method, which detects tracking and shuts off circuit, has been realized at site due to technical and economical problems. In this paper, a novel method is proposed, where characteristics of leakage current is extracted from circuit current (i.e. sum of load and leakage currents) based on signal processing and by using a physical quantity introduced. It was confirmed by laboratory experiments that the method was satisfactory to detect tracking of a cord plug regardless of the extent of tracking and kind of loads connected.

  10. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patro, L. N.; Burghaus, O.; Roling, B.

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180 kV /cm . Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P6 ,6 ,6 ,14][Cl ] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models.

  11. An Anomalous Force on the Map Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Wollack, Edward J.; Bay, P. Michael; Fink, Dale R.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) orbits the second Earth-Sun libration point (L2)-about 1.5 million kilometers outside Earth's orbit-mapping cosmic microwave background radiation. To achieve orbit near L2 on a small fuel budget, the MAP spacecraft needed to swing past the Moon for a gravity assist. Timing the lunar swing-by required MAP to travel in three high-eccentricity phasing loops with critical maneuvers at a minimum of two, but nominally all three, of the perigee passes. On the approach to the first perigee maneuver, MAP telemetry showed a considerable change in system angular momentum that threatened to cause on-board Failure Detection and Correction (FDC) to abort the critical maneuver. Fortunately, the system momentum did not reach the FDC limit; however, the MAP team did develop a contingency strategy should a stronger anomaly occur before or during subsequent perigee maneuvers, Simultaneously, members of the MAP team developed and tested various hypotheses for the cause of the anomalous force. The final hypothesis was that water was outgassing from the thermal blanketing and freezing to the cold side of the solar shield. As radiation from Earth warmed the cold side of the spacecraft, the uneven sublimation of frozen water created a torque on the spacecraft.

  12. Anomalous Wien Effects in Supercooled Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Patro, L N; Burghaus, O; Roling, B

    2016-05-01

    We have measured conductivity spectra of several supercooled monocationic and dicationic ionic liquids in the nonlinear regime by applying ac electric fields with large amplitudes up to about 180  kV/cm. Thereby, higher harmonic ac currents up to the 7th order were detected. Our results point to the existence of anomalous Wien effects in supercooled ionic liquids. Most ionic liquids studied here exhibit a conductivity-viscosity relation, which is close to the predictions of the Nernst-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein equations, as observed for classical strong electrolytes like KCl. These "strong" ionic liquids show a much stronger nonlinearity of the conductivity than classical strong electrolytes. On the other hand, the conductivity-viscosity relation of the ionic liquid [P_{6,6,6,14}][Cl] points to ion association effects. This "weak" ionic liquid shows a strength of the nonlinear effect, which is comparable to classical weak electrolytes. However, the nonlinearity increases quadratically with the field. We suggest that a theory for explaining these anomalies will have to go beyond the level of Coulomb lattice gas models. PMID:27203333

  13. Anomalous frequency dependent diamagnetism in metal silicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Ashutosh; Gunasekera, Jagat; Harriger, Leland; Singh, David J.; Singh, Deepak K.; Leland Harriger Collaboration

    Discovery of superconductivity in PbO-type FeSe has generated a lot of interest. Among the samples we synthesize with similar structure, NiSi has showed anomalous but very interesting results. Nickel silicides are important electronic materials that have been used as contacts for field effect transistors, as interconnects and in nanoelectronic devices. The magnetic properties of NiSi are not well known, however. In this presentation, we report a highly unusual magnetic phenomenon in NiSi. The ac susceptibility measurements on NiSi reveal strong frequency dependence of static and dynamic susceptibilities that are primarily diamagnetic at room temperature. The static susceptibility is found to exhibit a strong frequency dependence of the diamagnetic response below 100K, while dynamic susceptibility showed peak type feature at 10KHz frequency around 50K. Detailed neutron scattering measurements on high quality powder sample of NiSi on SPINS cold spectrometer further revealed an inelastic peak around 1.5meV, even though no magnetic order is detected. The inelastic peak dissipates above 100K, which is where the static susceptibility starts to diverge with frequency. Research is supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Grant No. DE-SC0014461.

  14. Electronic post-compensation of WDM transmission impairments using coherent detection and digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxu; Chen, Xin; Goldfarb, Gilad; Mateo, Eduardo; Kim, Inwoong; Yaman, Fatih; Li, Guifang

    2008-01-21

    A universal post-compensation scheme for fiber impairments in wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) systems is proposed based on coherent detection and digital signal processing (DSP). Transmission of 10 x 10 Gbit/s binary-phase-shift-keying (BPSK) signals at a channel spacing of 20 GHz over 800 km dispersion shifted fiber (DSF) has been demonstrated numerically. PMID:18542162

  15. The Utility of Chinese Tone Processing Skill in Detecting Children with English Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Alida; Wang, Min

    2012-01-01

    The utility of Chinese tone processing skill in detecting children with English reading difficulties was examined through differences in a Chinese tone experimental task between a group of native English-speaking children with reading disabilities (RD) and a comparison group of children with normal reading development (NRD). General auditory…

  16. Motion compensated image processing and optimal parameters for egg crack detection using modified pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shell eggs with microcracks are often undetected during egg grading processes. In the past, a modified pressure imaging system was developed to detect eggs with microcracks without adversely affecting the quality of normal intact eggs. The basic idea of the modified pressure imaging system was to ap...

  17. The Influence of Affective States on the Process of Lie Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhard, Marc-Andre; Schwarz, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Lay theories about the tell tale signs of deception include numerous nonverbal cues; empirically, however, a focus on message content results in better lie detection than a focus on nonverbal elements. Feelings-as-information theory (Schwarz, 1990, 2012) predicts that systematic processing of message content is more likely under sad than happy…

  18. Real-time image processing for rapid contaminant detection on broiler carcasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Windham, William R.; Snead, M. Preston

    2004-11-01

    Recently, the imaging research group at Russell Research Center, ARS in Athens, Georgia has developed a real-time multispectral imaging system for fecal and ingesta contaminant detection on broiler carcasses. The prototype system includes a common aperture camera with three optical trim filters (515.4, 566.4 and 631-nm wavelength), which were selected by visible/NIR spectroscopy and validated by a hyperspectral imaging system. The preliminary results showed that the multispectral imaging technique can be used effectively for detecting feces (from duodenum, ceca, and colon) and ingesta on the surface of poultry carcasses with a processing speed of 140 birds per minute. The accuracy for the detection of fecal and ingesta contaminates was 96%. However, the system contains many false positives including scabs, feathers, and boundaries. This paper demonstrates calibration of common aperture multispectral imaging hardware and real-time multispectral image processing software. The software design, especially the Unified Modeling Language (UML) design approach was used to develop real-time image processing software for on-line application. The UML models including class, object, activity, sequence, and collaboration diagram were discussed. Both hardware and software for a real-time fecal and ingesta contaminant detection were tested at the pilot-scale poultry processing line.

  19. Detecting Answer Copying when the Regular Response Process Follows a Known Response Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Sotaridona, Leonardo

    2006-01-01

    A statistical test for detecting answer copying on multiple-choice items is presented. The test is based on the exact null distribution of the number of random matches between two test takers under the assumption that the response process follows a known response model. The null distribution can easily be generalized to the family of distributions…

  20. Interactive Change Detection Using High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on Active Learning with Gaussian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Hui; Yu, Huai; Huang, Pingping; Yang, Wen

    2016-06-01

    Although there have been many studies for change detection, the effective and efficient use of high resolution remote sensing images is still a problem. Conventional supervised methods need lots of annotations to classify the land cover categories and detect their changes. Besides, the training set in supervised methods often has lots of redundant samples without any essential information. In this study, we present a method for interactive change detection using high resolution remote sensing images with active learning to overcome the shortages of existing remote sensing image change detection techniques. In our method, there is no annotation of actual land cover category at the beginning. First, we find a certain number of the most representative objects in unsupervised way. Then, we can detect the change areas from multi-temporal high resolution remote sensing images by active learning with Gaussian processes in an interactive way gradually until the detection results do not change notably. The artificial labelling can be reduced substantially, and a desirable detection result can be obtained in a few iterations. The experiments on Geo-Eye1 and WorldView2 remote sensing images demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed method.

  1. Experimental phasing using zinc anomalous scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Sun-Shin; An, Young Jun; Jeong, Chang-Sook; Kim, Min-Kyu; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2012-09-01

    The surface of proteins can be charged with zinc ions and the anomalous signals from these zinc ions can be used for structure determination of proteins. Zinc is a suitable metal for anomalous dispersion phasing methods in protein crystallography. Structure determination using zinc anomalous scattering has been almost exclusively limited to proteins with intrinsically bound zinc(s). Here, it is reported that multiple zinc ions can easily be charged onto the surface of proteins with no intrinsic zinc-binding site by using zinc-containing solutions. Zn derivatization of protein surfaces appears to be a largely unnoticed but promising method of protein structure determination.

  2. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.; Shively, John E.; Li, Lin

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  3. a New Online Distributed Process Fault Detection and Isolation Approach Using Potential Clustering Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrampour, Soheil; Moshiri, Behzad; Salahshoor, Karim

    2009-08-01

    Most of process fault monitoring systems suffer from offline computations and confronting with novel faults that limit their applicabilities. This paper presents a new online fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithm based on distributed online clustering approach. In the proposed approach, clustering algorithm is used for online detection of a new trend of time series data which indicates faulty condition. On the other hand, distributed technique is used to decompose the overall monitoring task into a series of local monitoring sub-tasks so as to locally track and capture the process faults. This algorithm not only solves the problem of online FDI, but also can handle novel faults. The diagnostic performances of the proposed FDI approach is evaluated on the Tennessee Eastman process plant as a large-scale benchmark problem.

  4. A novel time-domain signal processing algorithm for real time ventricular fibrillation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, G. E.; Scarone, N. C.; Liscovsky, P. O.; Rotter S/N, P.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents an application of a novel algorithm for real time detection of ECG pathologies, especially ventricular fibrillation. It is based on segmentation and labeling process of an oversampled signal. After this treatment, analyzing sequence of segments, global signal behaviours are obtained in the same way like a human being does. The entire process can be seen as a morphological filtering after a smart data sampling. The algorithm does not require any ECG digital signal pre-processing, and the computational cost is low, so it can be embedded into the sensors for wearable and permanent applications. The proposed algorithms could be the input signal description to expert systems or to artificial intelligence software in order to detect other pathologies.

  5. Modelling anomalous extinction using nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rakesh K.; Rastogi, Shantanu

    2012-07-01

    The modelling of extinction along anomalous/non-Cardelli, Clayton & Mathis sightlines, which are characterized by a broad 217.5-nm bump and steep far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise, is reported. The extinction along these sightlines, namely HD 210121, HD 204827, HD 29647 and HD 62542, is difficult to reproduce using standard silicate and graphite grains. A very good match with the observed extinction is obtained by considering a nanodiamond component as part of the carbonaceous matter. Most of these sightlines are rich in carbon and are invariably backed by a young hot stellar object. Nanodiamond is taken as a core within amorphous carbon and graphite. These core-mantle particles, taken as additional components along with graphite and silicates, lead to a reduction in the silicate requirement. The abundance of carbonaceous matter is not affected, as a very small fraction of nanodiamond is required. Extinction along sightlines that show steep FUV is also reported, demonstrating the importance of the nanodiamond component in all such regions.

  6. Specific detection of banana residue in processed foods using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yumiko; Ishihata, Kimie; Nakano, Shigeru; Yamada, Toshihiro; Yano, Takeo; Uchida, Kouji; Nakao, Yoshiki; Urisu, Atsuo; Adachi, Reiko; Teshima, Reiko; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2010-07-28

    Specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods were developed for the detection of banana residue in processed foods. For high banana specificity, the primer set BAN-F/BAN-R was designed on the basis of the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcL) genes of chloroplasts and used to obtain amplified products specific to banana by both conventional and real-time PCR. To confirm the specificity of these methods, genomic DNA samples from 31 other species were examined; no amplification products were detected. Subsequently, eight kinds of processed foods containing banana were investigated using these methods to confirm the presence of banana DNA. Conventional PCR had a detection limit of 1 ppm (w/w) banana DNA spiked in 50 ng of salmon testis DNA, whereas SYBR Green I real-time semiquantitative PCR had a detection limit as low as 10 ppm banana DNA. Thus, both methods show high sensitivity and may be applicable as specific tools for the detection of trace amounts of banana in commercial food products. PMID:20604506

  7. Anomalous Hall effect on the surface of topological Kondo insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, E. J.; Ostrovsky, P. M.; Dzero, M.; Levchenko, A.

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the anomalous Hall conductivity σx y of the surface states in cubic topological Kondo insulators. We consider a generic model for the surface states with three Dirac cones on the (001) surface. The Fermi velocity, the Fermi momentum, and the Zeeman energy in different Dirac pockets may be unequal. The microscopic impurity potential mediates mixed intra- and interband extrinsic scattering processes. Our calculation of σx y is based on the Kubo-Streda diagrammatic approach. It includes diffractive skew scattering contributions originating from the rare two-impurity complexes. Remarkably, these contributions yield anomalous Hall conductivity that is independent of impurity concentration, and thus is of the same order as other known extrinsic side jump and skew scattering terms. We discuss various special cases of our results and the experimental relevance of our study in the context of the recent hysteretic magnetotransport data in SmB6 samples.

  8. Anomalous transport in weakly heterogeneous geological porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan

    2013-03-01

    Anomalous transport is found to be ubiquitous in complex geological formations and it has a paramount impact on petroleum engineering and groundwater sciences. This process can be well described by the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, in which the probability density function w(t) of a particle's transition time t follows a power law for large t: w(t)˜t-1-α (0<α<2). In this work, based on the CTRW theory, a semifractional advection-diffusion equation is proposed to model the anomalous transport for 1<α<2, which is, as evidenced by field and numerical experiments, possibly the typical situation for many complex geological porous media with weakly heterogeneous microstructures.

  9. Anomalous plasma diffusion and the magnetopause boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Labelle, James; Haerendel, Gerhard; Pottelette, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the current state of anomalous diffusion research at the magnetopause and its role in the formation of the magnetopause boundary layer is presented. Plasma wave measurements in the boundary layer indicate that most of the relevant unstable wave modes contribute negligibly to the diffusion process at the magnetopause under magnetically undisturbed northward IMF conditions. The most promising instability is the lower hybrid drift instability, which may yield diffusion coefficients of the right order if the highest measured wave intensities are assumed. It is concluded that global stationary diffusion due to wave-particle interactions does not take place at the magnetopause. Microscopic wave-particle interaction and anomalous diffusion may contribute to locally break the MD frozen-in conditions and help in transporting large amounts of magnetosheath plasma across the magnetospheric boundary.

  10. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Degrande, Céline; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve ; Greiner, Nicolas; Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München ; Kilian, Wolfgang; University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen ; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott; Zhang, Cen; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: •We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. •We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. •We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  11. Driven anomalous diffusion: An example from polymer stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takuya; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2015-07-01

    The way tension propagates along a chain is a key to govern many anomalous dynamics in macromolecular systems. After introducing the weak and the strong force regimes of the tension propagation, we focus on the latter, in which the dynamical fluctuations of a segment in a long polymer during its stretching process is investigated. We show that the response, i.e., average drift, is anomalous, which is characterized by the nonlinear memory kernel, and its relation to the fluctuation is nontrivial. These features are discussed on the basis of the generalized Langevin equation, in which the role of the temporal change in spring constant due to the stress hardening is pinpointed. We carried out the molecular dynamics simulation, which supports our theory.

  12. Driven anomalous diffusion: An example from polymer stretching.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takuya; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2015-07-01

    The way tension propagates along a chain is a key to govern many anomalous dynamics in macromolecular systems. After introducing the weak and the strong force regimes of the tension propagation, we focus on the latter, in which the dynamical fluctuations of a segment in a long polymer during its stretching process is investigated. We show that the response, i.e., average drift, is anomalous, which is characterized by the nonlinear memory kernel, and its relation to the fluctuation is nontrivial. These features are discussed on the basis of the generalized Langevin equation, in which the role of the temporal change in spring constant due to the stress hardening is pinpointed. We carried out the molecular dynamics simulation, which supports our theory. PMID:26274194

  13. Anomalous right upper lobe venous drainage.

    PubMed

    Tarazi, M; Mayooran, N; Philip, B; Anjum, M N; O'Regan, K; Doddakula, K

    2016-01-01

    Lung resections are usually not associated with significant bleeding, but can be fatal, especially in cases of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Anomalous vascular structures could be a major reason for unexpected bleeding in such surgeries. We present a case of an aberrant upper lobe pulmonary vein that was encountered posterior to the right upper lobe bronchus during a right upper lobectomy via thoracotomy. The anomalous pulmonary vein was identified preoperatively on a computed tomography (CT) scan and hence was looked for before dividing the bronchus. Many centres are adopting the VATS approach for performing lung resections. If an anomalous vein is present posterior to the bronchus, it might be in a blind spot and could be damaged inadvertently, leading to profuse and potentially fatal bleeding. We conclude that the identification of anomalous vascular structures prior to surgery with the help of CT helps in avoiding adverse outcomes. PMID:27016516

  14. Anomalous right upper lobe venous drainage

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, M.; Mayooran, N.; Philip, B.; Anjum, M.N.; O'Regan, K.; Doddakula, K.

    2016-01-01

    Lung resections are usually not associated with significant bleeding, but can be fatal, especially in cases of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Anomalous vascular structures could be a major reason for unexpected bleeding in such surgeries. We present a case of an aberrant upper lobe pulmonary vein that was encountered posterior to the right upper lobe bronchus during a right upper lobectomy via thoracotomy. The anomalous pulmonary vein was identified preoperatively on a computed tomography (CT) scan and hence was looked for before dividing the bronchus. Many centres are adopting the VATS approach for performing lung resections. If an anomalous vein is present posterior to the bronchus, it might be in a blind spot and could be damaged inadvertently, leading to profuse and potentially fatal bleeding. We conclude that the identification of anomalous vascular structures prior to surgery with the help of CT helps in avoiding adverse outcomes. PMID:27016516

  15. Anomalous Diffraction in Crystallographic Phase Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from crystals of biological macromolecules contain sufficient information to define atomic structures, but atomic positions are inextricable without having electron-density images. Diffraction measurements provide amplitudes, but the computation of electron density also requires phases for the diffracted waves. The resonance phenomenon known as anomalous scattering offers a powerful solution to this phase problem. Exploiting scattering resonances from diverse elements, the methods of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) now predominate for de novo determinations of atomic-level biological structures. This review describes the physical underpinnings of anomalous diffraction methods, the evolution of these methods to their current maturity, the elements, procedures and instrumentation used for effective implementation, and the realm of applications. PMID:24726017

  16. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  17. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    PubMed

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems. PMID:26274432

  18. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  19. Responsiveness of electrical nociceptive detection thresholds to capsaicin (8 %)-induced changes in nociceptive processing.

    PubMed

    Doll, Robert J; van Amerongen, Guido; Hay, Justin L; Groeneveld, Geert J; Veltink, Peter H; Buitenweg, Jan R

    2016-09-01

    Pain disorders can be initiated and maintained by malfunctioning of one or several mechanisms underlying the nociceptive function. Psychophysical procedures allow the estimation of nociceptive detection thresholds using intra-epidermal electrical stimuli. By varying the temporal properties of electrical stimuli, various contributions of nociceptive processes to stimulus processing can be observed. To observe the responsiveness of nociceptive thresholds to changes in nociceptive function, a model of capsaicin-induced nerve defunctionalization was used. Its effect on nociceptive detections thresholds was investigated over a period of 84 days. A cutaneous capsaicin (8 %) patch was applied for 60 min to the upper leg of eight healthy human participants. Single- and double-pulse electrical stimuli were presented in a pseudo-random order using an intra-epidermal electrode. Stimuli and corresponding responses were recorded on both treated and untreated skin areas prior to capsaicin application and on days 2, 7, 28, and 84. Increases in electrical detection thresholds at the capsaicin area were observed on days 2 and 7 for single-pulse stimuli. Detection thresholds corresponding to double-pulse stimuli were increased on days 7 and 28, suggesting a delayed and longer lasting effect on double-pulse stimuli. In the present study, it was demonstrated that the responsiveness of detection thresholds to capsaicin application depends on the temporal properties of electrical stimuli. The observation of capsaicin-induced changes by estimation of detection thresholds revealed different time patterns of contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to stimulus processing. PMID:27142052

  20. Geospatial Image Stream Processing: Models, techniques, and applications in remote sensing change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda-Velasquez, Carlos Alberto

    Detection of changes in environmental phenomena using remotely sensed data is a major requirement in the Earth sciences, especially in natural disaster related scenarios where real-time detection plays a crucial role in the saving of human lives and the preservation of natural resources. Although various approaches formulated to model multidimensional data can in principle be applied to the inherent complexity of remotely sensed geospatial data, there are still challenging peculiarities that demand a precise characterization in the context of change detection, particularly in scenarios of fast changes. In the same vein, geospatial image streams do not fit appropriately in the standard Data Stream Management System (DSMS) approach because these systems mainly deal with tuple-based streams. Recognizing the necessity for a systematic effort to address the above issues, the work presented in this thesis is a concrete step toward the foundation and construction of an integrated Geospatial Image Stream Processing framework, GISP. First, we present a data and metadata model for remotely sensed image streams. We introduce a precise characterization of images and image streams in the context of remotely sensed geospatial data. On this foundation, we define spatially-aware temporal operators with a consistent semantics for change analysis tasks. We address the change detection problem in settings where multiple image stream sources are available, and thus we introduce an architectural design for the processing of geospatial image streams from multiple sources. With the aim of targeting collaborative scientific environments, we construct a realization of our architecture based on Kepler, a robust and widely used scientific workflow management system, as the underlying computational support; and open data and Web interface standards, as a means to facilitate the interoperability of GISP instances with other processing infrastructures and client applications. We demonstrate our

  1. Detectability of hepatic tumors during 3D post-processed ultrafast cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jijo; Vogl, Thomas J.; Chacko, Annamma

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate hepatic tumor detection using ultrafast cone-beam computed tomography (UCBCT) cross-sectional and 3D post-processed image datasets. 657 patients were examined using UCBCT during hepatic transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and data were collected retrospectively from January 2012 to September 2014. Tumor detectability, diagnostic ability, detection accuracy and sensitivity were examined for different hepatic tumors using UCBCT cross-sectional, perfusion blood volume (PBV) and UCBCT-MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) fused image datasets. Appropriate statistical tests were used to compare collected sample data. Fused image data showed the significantly higher (all P  <  0.05) diagnostic ability for hepatic tumors compared to UCBCT or PBV image data. The detectability of small hepatic tumors (<5 mm) was significantly reduced (all P  <  0.05) using UCBCT cross-sectional images compared to MRI or fused image data; however, PBV improved tumor detectability using a color display. Fused image data produced 100% tumor sensitivity due to the simultaneous availability of MRI and UCBCT information during tumor diagnosis. Fused image data produced excellent hepatic tumor sensitivity, detectability and diagnostic ability compared to other datasets assessed. Fused image data is extremely reliable and useful compared to UCBCT cross-sectional or PBV image datasets to depict hepatic tumors during TACE. Partial anatomical visualization on cross-sectional images was compensated by fused image data during tumor diagnosis.

  2. Estimating the anomalous diffusion exponent for single particle tracking data with measurement errors - An alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnecki, Krzysztof; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Sikora, Grzegorz; Weron, Aleksander

    2015-06-01

    Accurately characterizing the anomalous diffusion of a tracer particle has become a central issue in biophysics. However, measurement errors raise difficulty in the characterization of single trajectories, which is usually performed through the time-averaged mean square displacement (TAMSD). In this paper, we study a fractionally integrated moving average (FIMA) process as an appropriate model for anomalous diffusion data with measurement errors. We compare FIMA and traditional TAMSD estimators for the anomalous diffusion exponent. The ability of the FIMA framework to characterize dynamics in a wide range of anomalous exponents and noise levels through the simulation of a toy model (fractional Brownian motion disturbed by Gaussian white noise) is discussed. Comparison to the TAMSD technique, shows that FIMA estimation is superior in many scenarios. This is expected to enable new measurement regimes for single particle tracking (SPT) experiments even in the presence of high measurement errors.

  3. Estimating the anomalous diffusion exponent for single particle tracking data with measurement errors - An alternative approach

    PubMed Central

    Burnecki, Krzysztof; Kepten, Eldad; Garini, Yuval; Sikora, Grzegorz; Weron, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    Accurately characterizing the anomalous diffusion of a tracer particle has become a central issue in biophysics. However, measurement errors raise difficulty in the characterization of single trajectories, which is usually performed through the time-averaged mean square displacement (TAMSD). In this paper, we study a fractionally integrated moving average (FIMA) process as an appropriate model for anomalous diffusion data with measurement errors. We compare FIMA and traditional TAMSD estimators for the anomalous diffusion exponent. The ability of the FIMA framework to characterize dynamics in a wide range of anomalous exponents and noise levels through the simulation of a toy model (fractional Brownian motion disturbed by Gaussian white noise) is discussed. Comparison to the TAMSD technique, shows that FIMA estimation is superior in many scenarios. This is expected to enable new measurement regimes for single particle tracking (SPT) experiments even in the presence of high measurement errors. PMID:26065707

  4. Sampling plan optimization for detection of lithography and etch CD process excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Richard C.; Nurani, Raman K.; Lee, Sung Jin; Ortiz, Luis G.; Preil, Moshe E.; Shanthikumar, J. G.; Riley, Trina; Goodwin, Greg A.

    2000-06-01

    Effective sample planning requires a careful combination of statistical analysis and lithography engineering. In this paper, we present a complete sample planning methodology including baseline process characterization, determination of the dominant excursion mechanisms, and selection of sampling plans and control procedures to effectively detect the yield- limiting excursions with a minimum of added cost. We discuss the results of our novel method in identifying critical dimension (CD) process excursions and present several examples of poly gate Photo and Etch CD excursion signatures. Using these results in a Sample Planning model, we determine the optimal sample plan and statistical process control (SPC) chart metrics and limits for detecting these excursions. The key observations are that there are many different yield- limiting excursion signatures in photo and etch, and that a given photo excursion signature turns into a different excursion signature at etch with different yield and performance impact. In particular, field-to-field variance excursions are shown to have a significant impact on yield. We show how current sampling plan and monitoring schemes miss these excursions and suggest an improved procedure for effective detection of CD process excursions.

  5. Computer-assisted image processing to detect spores from the fungus Pandora neoaphidis

    PubMed Central

    Korsnes, Reinert; Westrum, Karin; Fløistad, Erling; Klingen, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    This contribution demonstrates an example of experimental automatic image analysis to detect spores prepared on microscope slides derived from trapping. The application is to monitor aerial spore counts of the entomopathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis which may serve as a biological control agent for aphids. Automatic detection of such spores can therefore play a role in plant protection. The present approach for such detection is a modification of traditional manual microscopy of prepared slides, where autonomous image recording precedes computerised image analysis. The purpose of the present image analysis is to support human visual inspection of imagery data – not to replace it. The workflow has three components:•Preparation of slides for microscopy.•Image recording.•Computerised image processing where the initial part is, as usual, segmentation depending on the actual data product. Then comes identification of blobs, calculation of principal axes of blobs, symmetry operations and projection on a three parameter egg shape space. PMID:27073786

  6. Fault detection in the distillation column process using Kullback Leibler divergence.

    PubMed

    Aggoune, Lakhdar; Chetouani, Yahya; Raïssi, Tarek

    2016-07-01

    Chemical plants are complex large-scale systems which need designing robust fault detection schemes to ensure high product quality, reliability and safety under different operating conditions. The present paper is concerned with a feasibility study of the application of the black-box modeling method and Kullback Leibler divergence (KLD) to the fault detection in a distillation column process. A Nonlinear Auto-Regressive Moving Average with eXogenous input (NARMAX) polynomial model is firstly developed to estimate the nonlinear behavior of the plant. Furthermore, the KLD is applied to detect abnormal modes. The proposed FD method is implemented and validated experimentally using realistic faults of a distillation plant of laboratory scale. The experimental results clearly demonstrate the fact that proposed method is effective and gives early alarm to operators. PMID:27020311

  7. Detection of almond allergen coding sequences in processed foods by real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Nuria; Iniesto, Elisa; Burbano, Carmen; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Rovira, Mercè; Rodríguez, Julia; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Crespo, Jesus F; Cuadrado, Carmen; Linacero, Rosario

    2014-06-18

    The aim of this work was to develop and analytically validate a quantitative RT-PCR method, using novel primer sets designed on Pru du 1, Pru du 3, Pru du 4, and Pru du 6 allergen-coding sequences, and contrast the sensitivity and specificity of these probes. The temperature and/or pressure processing influence on the ability to detect these almond allergen targets was also analyzed. All primers allowed a specific and accurate amplification of these sequences. The specificity was assessed by amplifying DNA from almond, different Prunus species and other common plant food ingredients. The detection limit was 1 ppm in unprocessed almond kernels. The method's robustness and sensitivity were confirmed using spiked samples. Thermal treatment under pressure (autoclave) reduced yield and amplificability of almond DNA; however, high-hydrostatic pressure treatments did not produced such effects. Compared with ELISA assay outcomes, this RT-PCR showed higher sensitivity to detect almond traces in commercial foodstuffs. PMID:24857239

  8. Effective confidence interval estimation of fault-detection process of software reliability growth models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chih-Chiang; Yeh, Chun-Wu

    2016-09-01

    The quantitative evaluation of software reliability growth model is frequently accompanied by its confidence interval of fault detection. It provides helpful information to software developers and testers when undertaking software development and software quality control. However, the explanation of the variance estimation of software fault detection is not transparent in previous studies, and it influences the deduction of confidence interval about the mean value function that the current study addresses. Software engineers in such a case cannot evaluate the potential hazard based on the stochasticity of mean value function, and this might reduce the practicability of the estimation. Hence, stochastic differential equations are utilised for confidence interval estimation of the software fault-detection process. The proposed model is estimated and validated using real data-sets to show its flexibility.

  9. Computer-assisted image processing to detect spores from the fungus Pandora neoaphidis.

    PubMed

    Korsnes, Reinert; Westrum, Karin; Fløistad, Erling; Klingen, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    This contribution demonstrates an example of experimental automatic image analysis to detect spores prepared on microscope slides derived from trapping. The application is to monitor aerial spore counts of the entomopathogenic fungus Pandora neoaphidis which may serve as a biological control agent for aphids. Automatic detection of such spores can therefore play a role in plant protection. The present approach for such detection is a modification of traditional manual microscopy of prepared slides, where autonomous image recording precedes computerised image analysis. The purpose of the present image analysis is to support human visual inspection of imagery data - not to replace it. The workflow has three components:•Preparation of slides for microscopy.•Image recording.•Computerised image processing where the initial part is, as usual, segmentation depending on the actual data product. Then comes identification of blobs, calculation of principal axes of blobs, symmetry operations and projection on a three parameter egg shape space. PMID:27073786

  10. Real-time computational processing and implementation for concealed object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Su; Yeom, Seokwon; Chang, YuShin; Lee, Mun-Kyo; Jung, Sang-Won

    2012-07-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) readily penetrates fabrics, thus it can be used to detect objects concealed under clothing. A passive MMW imaging system can operate as a stand-off type sensor that scans people both indoors and outdoors. However, because of the diffraction limit and low signal level, the imaging system often suffers from low image quality. Therefore, suitable computational processing would be required for automatic analysis of the images. The authors present statistical and computational algorithms and their implementations for real-time concealed object detection. The histogram of the image is modeled as a Gaussian mixture distribution, and hidden object areas are segmented by a multilevel scheme involving the expectation-maximization algorithm. The complete algorithm has been implemented in both MATLAB and C++. Experimental and simulation results confirm that the implemented system can achieve real-time detection of concealed objects.

  11. Colorimetric detection of hazardous gases using a remotely operated capturing and processing system.

    PubMed

    Montes-Robles, Roberto; Moragues, María Esperanza; Vivancos, José-Luis; Ibáñez, Javier; Fraile, Rubén; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; García-Breijo, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an electronic system for the automatic detection of hazardous gases. The proposed system implements colorimetric sensing algorithms, thus providing a low-cost solution to the problem of gas sensing. It is remotely operated and it performs the tasks of image capturing and processing, hence obtaining colour measurements in RGB (Red-Green-Blue) space that are subsequently sent to a remote operator via the internet. A prototype of the system has been built to test its performance. Specifically, experiments have been carried out aimed at the detection of CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2 and formaldehyde at diverse concentrations by using a chromogenic array composed by 13 active and 2 inert compounds. Statistical analyses of the results reveal a good performance of the electronic system and the feasibility of remote hazardous gas detection using colorimetric sensor arrays. PMID:26434416

  12. Anomalous transfer of syntax between languages.

    PubMed

    Vaughan-Evans, Awel; Kuipers, Jan Rouke; Thierry, Guillaume; Jones, Manon W

    2014-06-11

    Each human language possesses a set of distinctive syntactic rules. Here, we show that balanced Welsh-English bilinguals reading in English unconsciously apply a morphosyntactic rule that only exists in Welsh. The Welsh soft mutation rule determines whether the initial consonant of a noun changes based on the grammatical context (e.g., the feminine noun cath--"cat" mutates into gath in the phrase y gath--"the cat"). Using event-related brain potentials, we establish that English nouns artificially mutated according to the Welsh mutation rule (e.g., "goncert" instead of "concert") require significantly less processing effort than the same nouns implicitly violating Welsh syntax. Crucially, this effect is found whether or not the mutation affects the same initial consonant in English and Welsh, showing that Welsh syntax is applied to English regardless of phonological overlap between the two languages. Overall, these results demonstrate for the first time that abstract syntactic rules transfer anomalously from one language to the other, even when such rules exist only in one language. PMID:24920636

  13. Technology Gap Analysis for the Detection of Process Signatures Using Less Than Remote Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, John S.; Atkinson, David A.; Lind, Michael A.; Maughan, A. D.; Kelly, James F.

    2005-01-01

    Although remote sensing methods offer advantages for monitoring important illicit process activities, remote and stand-off technologies cannot successfully detect all important processes with the sensitivity and certainty that is desired. The main scope of the program is observables, with a primary focus on chemical signatures. A number of key process signatures elude remote or stand-off detection for a variety of reasons (e.g., heavy particulate emissions that do not propagate far enough for detection at stand-off distances, semi-volatile chemicals that do not tend to vaporize and remain in the environment near the source, etc.). Some of these compounds can provide persistent, process-specific information that is not available through remote techniques; however, the associated measurement technologies have their own set of advantages, disadvantages and technical challenges that may need to be overcome before additional signature data can be effectively and reliably exploited. The main objective of this report is to describe a process to identify high impact technology gaps for important less-than-remote detection applications. The subsequent analysis focuses on the technology development needed to enable exploitation of important process signatures. The evaluation process that was developed involves three interrelated and often conflicting requirements generation activities: • Identification of target signature chemicals with unique intelligence value and their associated attributes as mitigated by environmentally influenced fate and transport effects (i.e., what can you expect to actually find that has intelligence value, where do you need to look for it and what sensitivity and selectivity do you need to see it) • Identification of end-user deployment scenario possibilities and constraints with a focus on alternative detection requirements, timing issues, logistical consideration, and training requirements for a successful measurement • Identification of

  14. Methods, media, and systems for detecting attack on a digital processing device

    DOEpatents

    Stolfo, Salvatore J.; Li, Wei-Jen; Keromylis, Angelos D.; Androulaki, Elli

    2014-07-22

    Methods, media, and systems for detecting attack are provided. In some embodiments, the methods include: comparing at least part of a document to a static detection model; determining whether attacking code is included in the document based on the comparison of the document to the static detection model; executing at least part of the document; determining whether attacking code is included in the document based on the execution of the at least part of the document; and if attacking code is determined to be included in the document based on at least one of the comparison of the document to the static detection model and the execution of the at least part of the document, reporting the presence of an attack. In some embodiments, the methods include: selecting a data segment in at least one portion of an electronic document; determining whether the arbitrarily selected data segment can be altered without causing the electronic document to result in an error when processed by a corresponding program; in response to determining that the arbitrarily selected data segment can be altered, arbitrarily altering the data segment in the at least one portion of the electronic document to produce an altered electronic document; and determining whether the corresponding program produces an error state when the altered electronic document is processed by the corresponding program.

  15. [Detection of genetically modified soy (Roundup-Ready) in processed food products].

    PubMed

    Hagen, M; Beneke, B

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the application of a qualitative and a quantitative method of analysis to detect genetically modified RR-Soy (Roundup-Ready Soy) in processed foods is described. A total of 179 various products containing soy such as baby food and diet products, soy drinks and desserts, tofu and tofu products, soy based meat substitutes, soy protein, breads, flour, granules, cereals, noodles, soy bean sprouts, fats and oils as well as condiments were investigated following the pattern of the section 35 LMBG-method L 23.01.22-1. The DNA was extracted from the samples and analysed using a soybean specific lectin gene PCR as well as a PCR, specific for the genetic modification. Additional, by means of PCR in combination with fluorescence-detection (TaqMan 5'-Nuclease Assay), suspicious samples were subjected to a real-time quantification of the percentage of genetically modified RR-Soy. The methods of analysis proved to be extremely sensitive and specific in regard to the food groups checked. The fats and oils, as well as the condiments were the exceptions in which amplifiable soy DNA could not be detected. The genetic modification of RR-Soy was detected in 34 samples. Eight of these samples contained more than 1% of RR-Soy. It is necessary to determine the percentage of transgenic soy in order to assess whether genetically modified ingredients were deliberately added, or whether they were caused by technically unavoidable contamination (for example during transportation and processing). PMID:11153227

  16. Immunoassay for the Detection of Animal Central Nervous Tissue in Processed Meat and Feed Products.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qinchun; Richt, Juergen A; Hsieh, Yun-Hwa Peggy

    2016-05-11

    An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) based on the detection of the thermal-stable central nervous tissue (CNT) marker protein, myelin basic protein (MBP), was developed to detect animal CNT in processed meat and feedstuffs. Two meat samples (cooked at 100 °C for 30 min and autoclaved at 133 °C for 20 min) of bovine brain in beef and two feed samples (bovine brain meal in beef meal and in soybean meal) were prepared at levels of 0.0008, 0.0031, 0.0063, 0.0125, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1.6%. An anti-MBP monoclonal antibody (mAb3E3) was produced using the hybridoma technique and characterized using Western blot. The optimized icELISA was CNT-specific without cross-reactivity with either meat (beef and pork) or soybean meal samples and had low intra-assay (%CV ≤ 3.5) and interassay variability (%CV ≤ 3.3), with low detection limits for bovine MBP (6.4 ppb) and bovine CNT spiked in both meat (0.05%) and feed (0.0125%) samples. This assay is therefore suitable for the quantitative detection of trace amounts of contaminated animal CNT in processed food and feed products. PMID:27109117

  17. Improvement of the detection rate in digital watermarked images against image degradation caused by image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Masato; Ando, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Kawashima, Hironao; Nakamura, Shinya

    2004-04-01

    In the current environment of medical information disclosure, the general-purpose image format such as JPEG/BMP which does not require special software for viewing, is suitable for carrying and managing medical image information individually. These formats have no way to know patient and study information. We have therefore developed two kinds of ID embedding methods: one is Bit-swapping method for embedding Alteration detection ID and the other is data-imposing method in Fourier domain using Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) for embedding Original image source ID. We then applied these two digital watermark methods to four modality images (Chest X-ray, Head CT, Abdomen CT, Bone scintigraphy). However, there were some cases where the digital watermarked ID could not be detected correctly due to image degradation caused by image processing. In this study, we improved the detection rate in digital watermarked image using several techniques, which are Error correction method, Majority correction method, and Scramble location method. We applied these techniques to digital watermarked images against image processing (Smoothing) and evaluated the effectiveness. As a result, Majority correction method is effective to improve the detection rate in digital watermarked image against image degradation.

  18. Quantitative Performance Assessment of Computed Radiography for Corrosion Detection in Process Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, Rajashekar; Raghu, C.; Pandey, Pramod; Vedula, Venumadhav; Thapa, Prasad; Venugopal, Manoharan

    2007-03-01

    Evaluation of integrity of process pipes in service is an important preventive maintenance issue for power generation and petrochemical industries. Ultrasonic wall thickness is traditionally used to measure wall thickness loss due to corrosion. This technique has various limitations such as need for removal of insulation, point based measurements and unsuitability for high temperature applications. Many have attempted computed radiography to quantify corrosion in pipelines as an alternative technique. Computed Radiography can be carried out without removing insulation and also at higher temperatures. However, the minimum detectability limit of wall thickness loss is limited by various physics complications in radiographic imaging process i.e. scattering, modulation due to detector response, focal spot blurring, the effective thickness of insulation and fluid inside pipe. An attempt has been made to study the effect of insulation and fluid inside pipe on detectability of wall loss due to corrosion using physics simulations and experiments.

  19. [Medical image processing based on wavelet characteristics and edge blur detection].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Baihui; Wan, Zhiping

    2014-06-01

    To solve the problems of noise interference and edge signal weakness for the existing medical image, we used two-dimensional wavelet transform to process medical images. Combined the directivity of the image edges and the correlation of the wavelet coefficients, we proposed a medical image processing algorithm based on wavelet characteristics and edge blur detection. This algorithm improved noise reduction capabilities and the edge effect due to wavelet transformation and edge blur detection. The experimental results showed that directional correlation improved edge based on wavelet transform fuzzy algorithm could effectively reduce the noise signal in the medical image and save the image edge signal. It has the advantage of the high-definition and de-noising ability. PMID:25219221

  20. Processing properties of ON and OFF pathways for Drosophila motion detection

    PubMed Central

    Behnia, Rudy; Clark, Damon A.; Carter, Adam G.; Clandinin, Thomas R.; Desplan, Claude

    2014-01-01

    The algorithms and neural circuits that process spatiotemporal changes in luminance to extract visual motion cues have been the focus of intense research. An influential model, the Hassenstein-Reichardt correlator1 (HRC), relies on differential temporal filtering of two spatially separated input channels, delaying one input signal with respect to the other. Motion in a particular direction causes these delayed and non-delayed luminance signals to arrive simultaneously at a subsequent processing step in the brain; these signals are then nonlinearly amplified to produce a direction-selective response (Figure 1A). Recent work in Drosophila has identified two parallel pathways that selectively respond to either moving light or dark edges2,3. Each of these pathways requires two critical processing steps to be applied to incoming signals: differential delay between the spatial input channels, and distinct processing of brightness increment and decrement signals. Using in vivo patch-clamp recordings, we demonstrate that four medulla neurons implement these two processing steps. The neurons Mi1 and Tm3 respond selectively to brightness increments, with the response of Mi1 delayed relative to Tm3. Conversely, Tm1 and Tm2 respond selectively to brightness decrements, with the response of Tm1 delayed compared to Tm2. Remarkably, constraining HRC models using these measurements produces outputs consistent with previously measured properties of motion detectors, including temporal frequency tuning and specificity for light vs. dark edges. We propose that Mi1 and Tm3 perform critical processing of the delayed and non-delayed input channels of the correlator responsible for the detection of light edges, while Tm1 and Tm2 play analogous roles in the detection of moving dark edges. Our data shows that specific medulla neurons possess response properties that allow them to implement the algorithmic steps that precede the correlative operation in the HRC, revealing elements of the

  1. Detecting nonuniformity in small welds and solder seams using optical correlation and electronic processing.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J W

    1981-10-15

    Using holographic matched filtering and electronic processing, small variations in surface displacement along the seam of a hermetic microcircuit package can be detected when the seam is stressed. Destructive analysis of a solder-sealed package reveals a strong correlation between optical signal variations and nonuniformity of solder adhesion and wetting along the seam. The technique promises potential application as a means of nondestructively inspecting for flaws in small welded or soldered seams. PMID:20372226

  2. Detection processing of complex beam-former output data: a new dispersion-based reconditioning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Robert J.; Wilbur, JoEllen

    1996-05-01

    Detection processing of the Toroidal Volume Search Sonar beamformer output prior to image formation is used to increase the signal-to-reverberation. The energy detector and sliding matched filter perform adequately at close range but degrade considerably when the reverberation begins to dominate. The skewness matched filter offers some improvement. A dispersion based reconditioning algorithm, introduced in this paper, is shown to provide considerably improvement in the signal-to-reverberation at far range.

  3. An electronic circuit that detects left ventricular ejection events by processing the arterial pressure waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebben, V. D.; Webb, J. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    An electronic circuit for processing arterial blood pressure waveform signals is described. The circuit detects blood pressure as the heart pumps blood through the aortic valve and the pressure distribution caused by aortic valve closure. From these measurements, timing signals for use in measuring the left ventricular ejection time is determined, and signals are provided for computer monitoring of the cardiovascular system. Illustrations are given of the circuit and pressure waveforms.

  4. Detection of genetically modified maize in processed foods sold commercially in iran by qualitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Maryam; Mehdizadeh, Mehrangiz; Rastegar, Hossein; Vahidi, Hossein; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food is an important issue for all the subjects involved in food control and customer's right. Due to the increasing number of GMOs imported to Iran during the past few years, it has become necessary to screen the products in order to determine the identity of the consumed daily foodstuffs. In this study, following the extraction of genomic DNA from processed foods sold commercially in Iran, qualitative PCR was performed to detect genetically modified maize. The recombinant DNA target sequences were detected with primers highly specific for each investigated transgene such as CaMV35s gene, Bt-11, MON810 and Bt-176 separately. Based on the gel electrophoresis results, Bt- 11 and MON810 events were detected in some maize samples, while, in none of them Bt- 176 modified gene was detected. For the first time, the results demonstrate the presence of genetically modified maize in Iranian food products, reinforcing the need for the development of labeling system and valid quantitative methods in routine analyses. PMID:24250568

  5. Gaussian Process Regression-Based Video Anomaly Detection and Localization With Hierarchical Feature Representation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kai-Wen; Chen, Yie-Tarng; Fang, Wen-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical framework for detecting local and global anomalies via hierarchical feature representation and Gaussian process regression (GPR) which is fully non-parametric and robust to the noisy training data, and supports sparse features. While most research on anomaly detection has focused more on detecting local anomalies, we are more interested in global anomalies that involve multiple normal events interacting in an unusual manner, such as car accidents. To simultaneously detect local and global anomalies, we cast the extraction of normal interactions from the training videos as a problem of finding the frequent geometric relations of the nearby sparse spatio-temporal interest points (STIPs). A codebook of interaction templates is then constructed and modeled using the GPR, based on which a novel inference method for computing the likelihood of an observed interaction is also developed. Thereafter, these local likelihood scores are integrated into globally consistent anomaly masks, from which anomalies can be succinctly identified. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time GPR is employed to model the relationship of the nearby STIPs for anomaly detection. Simulations based on four widespread datasets show that the new method outperforms the main state-of-the-art methods with lower computational burden. PMID:26394423

  6. Detection of ancient Egyptian archaeological sites using satellite remote sensing and digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrie, Robert K.

    2011-11-01

    Satellite remote sensing is playing an increasingly important role in the detection and documentation of archaeological sites. Surveying an area from the ground using traditional methods often presents challenges due to the time and costs involved. In contrast, the multispectral synoptic approach afforded by the satellite sensor makes it possible to cover much larger areas in greater spectral detail and more cost effectively. This is especially the case for larger scale regional surveys, which are helping to contribute to a better understanding of ancient Egyptian settlement patterns. This study presents an overview of satellite remote sensing data products, methodologies, and image processing techniques for detecting lost or undiscovered archaeological sites with reference to Egypt and the Near East. Key regions of the electromagnetic spectrum useful for site detection are discussed, including the visible near-infrared (VNIR), shortwave infrared (SWIR), thermal infrared (TIR), and microwave (radar). The potential of using Google Earth as both a data provider and a visualization tool is also examined. Finally, a case study is presented for detecting tell sites in Egypt using Landsat ETM+, ASTER, and Google Earth imagery. The results indicated that principal components analysis (PCA) was successfully able to detect and differentiate tell sites from modern settlements in Egypt's northwestern Nile Delta region.

  7. Detection of Genetically Modified Maize in Processed Foods Sold Commercially in Iran by Qualitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Rabiei, Maryam; Mehdizadeh, Mehrangiz; Rastegar, Hossein; Vahidi, Hossein; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food is an important issue for all the subjects involved in food control and customer’s right. Due to the increasing number of GMOs imported to Iran during the past few years, it has become necessary to screen the products in order to determine the identity of the consumed daily foodstuffs. In this study, following the extraction of genomic DNA from processed foods sold commercially in Iran, qualitative PCR was performed to detect genetically modified maize. The recombinant DNA target sequences were detected with primers highly specific for each investigated transgene such as CaMV35s gene, Bt-11, MON810 and Bt-176 separately. Based on the gel electrophoresis results, Bt- 11 and MON810 events were detected in some maize samples, while, in none of them Bt- 176 modified gene was detected. For the first time, the results demonstrate the presence of genetically modified maize in Iranian food products, reinforcing the need for the development of labeling system and valid quantitative methods in routine analyses. PMID:24250568

  8. Real-time reprogrammable low-level image processing: edge detection and edge tracking accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meribout, M.; Hou, Kun M.

    1993-10-01

    Currently, in image processing, segmentation algorithms comprise between real time video rate processing and accurate results. In this paper, we present an efficient and not recursive algorithm filter originated from Deriche filter. This algorithm is implemented in hardware by using FPGA technology. Thus, it permits video rate edge detection. In addition, the FPGA board is used as an edge tracking accelerator, it allows us to greatly reduce execution time by avoiding scanning the whole image. We also present the architecture of our vision system dedicated to build 3D scene every 200 ms.

  9. An automated and integrated framework for dust storm detection based on ogc web processing services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, F.; Shea, G. Y. K.; Wong, M. S.; Campbell, J.

    2014-11-01

    Dust storms are known to have adverse effects on public health. Atmospheric dust loading is also one of the major uncertainties in global climatic modelling as it is known to have a significant impact on the radiation budget and atmospheric stability. The complexity of building scientific dust storm models is coupled with the scientific computation advancement, ongoing computing platform development, and the development of heterogeneous Earth Observation (EO) networks. It is a challenging task to develop an integrated and automated scheme for dust storm detection that combines Geo-Processing frameworks, scientific models and EO data together to enable the dust storm detection and tracking processes in a dynamic and timely manner. This study develops an automated and integrated framework for dust storm detection and tracking based on the Web Processing Services (WPS) initiated by Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The presented WPS framework consists of EO data retrieval components, dust storm detecting and tracking component, and service chain orchestration engine. The EO data processing component is implemented based on OPeNDAP standard. The dust storm detecting and tracking component combines three earth scientific models, which are SBDART model (for computing aerosol optical depth (AOT) of dust particles), WRF model (for simulating meteorological parameters) and HYSPLIT model (for simulating the dust storm transport processes). The service chain orchestration engine is implemented based on Business Process Execution Language for Web Service (BPEL4WS) using open-source software. The output results, including horizontal and vertical AOT distribution of dust particles as well as their transport paths, were represented using KML/XML and displayed in Google Earth. A serious dust storm, which occurred over East Asia from 26 to 28 Apr 2012, is used to test the applicability of the proposed WPS framework. Our aim here is to solve a specific instance of a complex EO data

  10. IR-based system for short-circuit detection during copper electrorefining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makipaa, Esa; Tanttu, Juha T.; Virtanen, Henri

    1999-03-01

    In this paper an infrared system for short-circuit detection in the copper electrorefining process is presented. The system consists of an IR-camera, a computer, radiomodems and software including the developed algorithm to process a thermal image. The basic component of the proposed system is an infrared camera mounted in an air-conditioned protection unit on a moving crane. The video output of the infrared camera is connected to the input of a framegrabber card in a computer. The framegrabber card with software captures a thermal image of the electrolytic cell, then processes it to locate the hot spots (short-circuits in a cell). The inspection results are transferred directly by radio link to the control room to be printed and further processed. The system presented in this paper is a prototype that has been tested for several months. The test results indicate that strong short-circuits can be detected with the proposed system as reliably as with a currently used manual method (gaussmeter). The advantages of the proposed system are easier and faster measurements (all cathodes in a cell can be measured remotely at the same time) and possibility to gather new process information.

  11. Detection of a novel, integrative aging process suggests complex physiological integration.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alan A; Milot, Emmanuel; Li, Qing; Bergeron, Patrick; Poirier, Roxane; Dusseault-Bélanger, Francis; Fülöp, Tamàs; Leroux, Maxime; Legault, Véronique; Metter, E Jeffrey; Fried, Linda P; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Many studies of aging examine biomarkers one at a time, but complex systems theory and network theory suggest that interpretations of individual markers may be context-dependent. Here, we attempted to detect underlying processes governing the levels of many biomarkers simultaneously by applying principal components analysis to 43 common clinical biomarkers measured longitudinally in 3694 humans from three longitudinal cohort studies on two continents (Women's Health and Aging I & II, InCHIANTI, and the Baltimore Longitudinal Study on Aging). The first axis was associated with anemia, inflammation, and low levels of calcium and albumin. The axis structure was precisely reproduced in all three populations and in all demographic sub-populations (by sex, race, etc.); we call the process represented by the axis "integrated albunemia." Integrated albunemia increases and accelerates with age in all populations, and predicts mortality and frailty--but not chronic disease--even after controlling for age. This suggests a role in the aging process, though causality is not yet clear. Integrated albunemia behaves more stably across populations than its component biomarkers, and thus appears to represent a higher-order physiological process emerging from the structure of underlying regulatory networks. If this is correct, detection of this process has substantial implications for physiological organization more generally. PMID:25761112

  12. Continuous time anomalous diffusion in a composite medium.

    PubMed

    Stickler, B A; Schachinger, E

    2011-08-01

    The one-dimensional continuous time anomalous diffusion in composite media consisting of a finite number of layers in immediate contact is investigated. The diffusion process itself is described with the help of two probability density functions (PDFs), one of which is an arbitrary jump-length PDF, and the other is a long-tailed waiting-time PDF characterized by the waiting-time index β∈(0,1). The former is assumed to be a function of the space coordinate x and the time coordinate t while the latter is a function of x and the time interval. For such an environment a very general form of the diffusion equation is derived which describes the continuous time anomalous diffusion in a composite medium. This result is then specialized to two particular forms of the jump-length PDF, namely the continuous time Lévy flight PDF and the continuous time truncated Lévy flight PDF. In both cases the PDFs are characterized by the Lévy index α∈(0,2) which is regarded to be a function of x and t. It is possible to demonstrate that for particular choices of the indices α and β other equations for anomalous diffusion, well known from the literature, follow immediately. This demonstrates the very general applicability of the derivation and of the resulting fractional differential equation discussed here. PMID:21928958

  13. Image Corruption Detection in Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Post-Processing and Real-Time Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Shea, Steven M.; Lorenz, Christine H.; Jiang, Hangyi; Chou, Ming-Chung; Mori, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high sensitivity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to physiological motion, clinical DTI scans often suffer a significant amount of artifacts. Tensor-fitting-based, post-processing outlier rejection is often used to reduce the influence of motion artifacts. Although it is an effective approach, when there are multiple corrupted data, this method may no longer correctly identify and reject the corrupted data. In this paper, we introduce a new criterion called “corrected Inter-Slice Intensity Discontinuity” (cISID) to detect motion-induced artifacts. We compared the performance of algorithms using cISID and other existing methods with regard to artifact detection. The experimental results show that the integration of cISID into fitting-based methods significantly improves the retrospective detection performance at post-processing analysis. The performance of the cISID criterion, if used alone, was inferior to the fitting-based methods, but cISID could effectively identify severely corrupted images with a rapid calculation time. In the second part of this paper, an outlier rejection scheme was implemented on a scanner for real-time monitoring of image quality and reacquisition of the corrupted data. The real-time monitoring, based on cISID and followed by post-processing, fitting-based outlier rejection, could provide a robust environment for routine DTI studies. PMID:24204551

  14. Compensation for red-green contrast loss in anomalous trichromats

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, A. E.; MacLeod, D. I. A.; Bosten, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    For anomalous trichromats, threshold contrasts for color differences captured by the L and M cones and their anomalous analogs are much higher than for normal trichromats. The greater spectral overlap of the cone sensitivities reduces chromatic contrast both at and above threshold. But above threshold, adaptively nonlinear processing might compensate for the chromatically impoverished photoreceptor inputs. Ratios of sensitivity for threshold variations and for color appearance along the two cardinal axes of MacLeod-Boynton chromaticity space were calculated for three groups: normals (N = 15), deuteranomals (N = 9), and protanomals (N = 5). Using a four-alternative forced choice (4AFC) task, threshold sensitivity was measured in four color-directions along the two cardinal axes. For the same participants, we reconstructed perceptual color spaces for the positions of 25 hues using multidimensional scaling (MDS). From the reconstructed color spaces we extracted “color difference ratios,” defined as ratios for the size of perceived color differences along the L/(L + M) axis relative to those along the S/(L + M) axis, analogous to “sensitivity ratios” extracted from the 4AFC task. In the 4AFC task, sensitivity ratios were 38% of normal for deuteranomals and 19% of normal for protanomals. Yet, in the MDS results, color difference ratios were 86% of normal for deuteranomals and 67% of normal for protanomals. Thus, the contraction along the L/(L + M) axis shown in the perceptual color spaces of anomalous trichromats is far smaller than predicted by their reduced sensitivity, suggesting that an adaptive adjustment of postreceptoral gain may magnify the cone signals of anomalous trichromats to exploit the range of available postreceptoral neural signals. PMID:25413625

  15. Identification of anomalous motion of thunderstorms using daily rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Moral, Anna; Llasat, Maria Carmen; Rigo, Tomeu

    2016-04-01

    Adverse weather phenomena in Catalonia (NE of the Iberian Peninsula) is commonly associated to heavy rains, large hail, strong winds, and/or tornados, all of them caused by thunderstorms. In most of the cases with adverse weather, thunderstorms vary sharply their trajectories in a concrete moment, changing completely the motion directions that have previously followed. Furthermore, it is possible that a breaking into several cells may be produced, or, in the opposite, it can be observed a joining of different thunderstorms into a bigger system. In order to identify the main features of the developing process of thunderstorms and the anomalous motions that these may follow in some cases, this contribution presents a classification of the events using daily rainfall fields, with the purpose of distinguishing quickly anomalous motion of thunderstorms. The methodology implemented allows classifying the daily rainfall fields in three categories by applying some thresholds related with the daily precipitation accumulated values and their extension: days with "no rain", days with "potentially convective" rain and days with "non-potentially convective" rain. Finally, for those "potentially convective" daily rainfall charts, it also allows a geometrical identification and classification of all the convective structures into "ellipse" and "non-ellipse", obtaining then the structures with "normal" or "anomalous" motion pattern, respectively. The work is focused on the period 2008-2015, and presents some characteristics of the rainfall behaviour in terms of the seasonal distribution of convective rainfall or the geographic variability. It shows that convective structures are mainly found during late spring and summer, even though they can be recorded in any time of the year. Consequently, the maximum number of convective structures with anomalous motion is recorded between July and November. Furthermore, the contribution shows the role of the orography of Catalonia in the

  16. Automatically Detecting Failures in Natural Language Processing Tools for Online Community Text

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Andrea L; Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W; Pratt, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence and value of patient-generated health text are increasing, but processing such text remains problematic. Although existing biomedical natural language processing (NLP) tools are appealing, most were developed to process clinician- or researcher-generated text, such as clinical notes or journal articles. In addition to being constructed for different types of text, other challenges of using existing NLP include constantly changing technologies, source vocabularies, and characteristics of text. These continuously evolving challenges warrant the need for applying low-cost systematic assessment. However, the primarily accepted evaluation method in NLP, manual annotation, requires tremendous effort and time. Objective The primary objective of this study is to explore an alternative approach—using low-cost, automated methods to detect failures (eg, incorrect boundaries, missed terms, mismapped concepts) when processing patient-generated text with existing biomedical NLP tools. We first characterize common failures that NLP tools can make in processing online community text. We then demonstrate the feasibility of our automated approach in detecting these common failures using one of the most popular biomedical NLP tools, MetaMap. Methods Using 9657 posts from an online cancer community, we explored our automated failure detection approach in two steps: (1) to characterize the failure types, we first manually reviewed MetaMap’s commonly occurring failures, grouped the inaccurate mappings into failure types, and then identified causes of the failures through iterative rounds of manual review using open coding, and (2) to automatically detect these failure types, we then explored combinations of existing NLP techniques and dictionary-based matching for each failure cause. Finally, we manually evaluated the automatically detected failures. Results From our manual review, we characterized three types of failure: (1) boundary failures, (2) missed

  17. Anomalous thermalization of fast ions in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.R.

    1993-11-01

    A novel anomalous process causing the perpendicular energy of fast ions to be thermalized and lost on average to bulk ion heating, instead of classical slowing down and bulk electron heating, is investigated with PIC simulations. More than half of the fast ions are slowed down to the thermal ion level, although some are heated to twice their birth energy. The fast ion density perturbation is large. This process is excited by a new two-gyro-stream instability and may continually occur in a burning plasma. The implications for fusion ignition and fast ion confinement are assessed.

  18. Echocardiographic Findings of an Anomalous Origin of the Left Coronary Artery in Children and Adolescents: Real or Fake?

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Shui; Chen, Xin-Xin; Chen, Ji-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Ma, Ying; Huang, Mei-Ping; Zhuang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    An anomalous origin of the left coronary artery (LCA) is a relatively uncommon congenital heart defect that can lead to myocardial ischemia and sudden cardiac death. An LCA arising from the pulmonary artery and an LCA arising from the opposite sinus of Valsalva are the common types of anomalous origins of the LCA. Echocardiographic assessment of the coronary arteries is an important component of the routine cardiovascular evaluation, but echocardiographic "pseudo images" of LCA origination can be present in some patients. Detection of an anomalous origin of the LCA remains a challenge to sonographers. PMID:27353070

  19. Improved change detection with local co-registration adjustments

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlberg, Brendt E; Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a simple approach for compensating for residual misregistration error on the performance of anomalous change detection algorithms. Using real data with a simulation framework for anomalous change and with a real anomalous change, we illustrate the approach and investigate its effectiveness.

  20. Scalable time series change detection for biomass monitoring using gaussian process

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Vatsavai, Raju

    2010-01-01

    Biomass monitoring, specifically detecting changes in the biomass or vegetation of a geographical region, is vital for studying the carbon cycle of the system and has significant implications in the context of understanding climate change and its impacts. Recently, several time series change detection methods have been proposed to identify land cover changes in temporal profiles (time series) of vegetation collected using remote sensing instruments. In this paper, we adapt Gaussian process regression to detect changes in such time series in an online fashion. While Gaussian process (GP) has been widely used as a kernel based learning method for regression and classification, their applicability to massive spatio-temporal data sets, such as remote sensing data, has been limited owing to the high computational costs involved. In this paper we address the scalability aspect of GP based time series change detection. Specifically, we exploit the special structure of the covariance matrix generated for GP analysis to come up with methods that can efficiently estimate the hyper-parameters associated with GP as well as identify changes in the time series while requiring a memory footprint which is linear in the size of input data, as compared to traditional method which involves solving a linear system of equations for the Choleksy decomposition of the quadratic sized covariance matrix. Experimental results show that our proposed method achieves significant speedups, as high as 1000, when processing long time series, while maintaining a small memory footprint. To further improve the computational complexity of the proposed method, we provide a parallel version which can concurrently process multiple input time series using the same set of hyper-parameters. The parallel version exploits the natural parallelization potential of the serial algorithm and is shown to perform significantly better than the serial version, with speedups as high as 10. Finally, we demonstrate the

  1. A Gaussian Process Based Online Change Detection Algorithm for Monitoring Periodic Time Series

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Vatsavai, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Online time series change detection is a critical component of many monitoring systems, such as space and air-borne remote sensing instruments, cardiac monitors, and network traffic profilers, which continuously analyze observations recorded by sensors. Data collected by such sensors typically has a periodic (seasonal) component. Most existing time series change detection methods are not directly applicable to handle such data, either because they are not designed to handle periodic time series or because they cannot operate in an online mode. We propose an online change detection algorithm which can handle periodic time series. The algorithm uses a Gaussian process based non-parametric time series prediction model and monitors the difference between the predictions and actual observations within a statistically principled control chart framework to identify changes. A key challenge in using Gaussian process in an online mode is the need to solve a large system of equations involving the associated covariance matrix which grows with every time step. The proposed algorithm exploits the special structure of the covariance matrix and can analyze a time series of length T in O(T^2) time while maintaining a O(T) memory footprint, compared to O(T^4) time and O(T^2) memory requirement of standard matrix manipulation methods. We experimentally demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithm over several existing time series change detection algorithms on a set of synthetic and real time series. Finally, we illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm for identifying land use land cover changes using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data collected for an agricultural region in Iowa state, USA. Our algorithm is able to detect different types of changes in a NDVI validation data set (with ~80% accuracy) which occur due to crop type changes as well as disruptive changes (e.g., natural disasters).

  2. Signal processing techniques for damage detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors and embedded ultrasonic structural radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Bao, Jingjing; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2004-07-01

    Embedded ultrasonic structural radar (EUSR) algorithm is developed for using piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) array to detect defects within a large area of a thin-plate specimen. Signal processing techniques are used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages, and thereby to determine the location of the defects with the EUSR algorithm. In our research, the transient tone-burst wave propagation signals are generated and collected by the embedded PWAS. Then, with signal processing, the frequency contents of the signals and the time of flight of individual frequencies are determined. This paper starts with an introduction of embedded ultrasonic structural radar algorithm. Then we will describe the signal processing methods used to extract the time of flight of the wave packages. The signal processing methods being used include the wavelet denoising, the cross correlation, and Hilbert transform. Though hardware device can provide averaging function to eliminate the noise coming from the signal collection process, wavelet denoising is included to ensure better signal quality for the application in real severe environment. For better recognition of time of flight, cross correlation method is used. Hilbert transform is applied to the signals after cross correlation in order to extract the envelope of the signals. Signal processing and EUSR are both implemented by developing a graphical user-friendly interface program in LabView. We conclude with a description of our vision for applying EUSR signal analysis to structural health monitoring and embedded nondestructive evaluation. To this end, we envisage an automatic damage detection application utilizing embedded PWAS, EUSR, and advanced signal processing.

  3. Sequential Filtering Processes Shape Feature Detection in Crickets: A Framework for Song Pattern Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hedwig, Berthold G.

    2016-01-01

    Intraspecific acoustic communication requires filtering processes and feature detectors in the auditory pathway of the receiver for the recognition of species-specific signals. Insects like acoustically communicating crickets allow describing and analysing the mechanisms underlying auditory processing at the behavioral and neural level. Female crickets approach male calling song, their phonotactic behavior is tuned to the characteristic features of the song, such as the carrier frequency and the temporal pattern of sound pulses. Data from behavioral experiments and from neural recordings at different stages of processing in the auditory pathway lead to a concept of serially arranged filtering mechanisms. These encompass a filter for the carrier frequency at the level of the hearing organ, and the pulse duration through phasic onset responses of afferents and reciprocal inhibition of thoracic interneurons. Further, processing by a delay line and coincidence detector circuit in the brain leads to feature detecting neurons that specifically respond to the species-specific pulse rate, and match the characteristics of the phonotactic response. This same circuit may also control the response to the species-specific chirp pattern. Based on these serial filters and the feature detecting mechanism, female phonotactic behavior is shaped and tuned to the characteristic properties of male calling song. PMID:26941647

  4. Sequential Filtering Processes Shape Feature Detection in Crickets: A Framework for Song Pattern Recognition.

    PubMed

    Hedwig, Berthold G

    2016-01-01

    Intraspecific acoustic communication requires filtering processes and feature detectors in the auditory pathway of the receiver for the recognition of species-specific signals. Insects like acoustically communicating crickets allow describing and analysing the mechanisms underlying auditory processing at the behavioral and neural level. Female crickets approach male calling song, their phonotactic behavior is tuned to the characteristic features of the song, such as the carrier frequency and the temporal pattern of sound pulses. Data from behavioral experiments and from neural recordings at different stages of processing in the auditory pathway lead to a concept of serially arranged filtering mechanisms. These encompass a filter for the carrier frequency at the level of the hearing organ, and the pulse duration through phasic onset responses of afferents and reciprocal inhibition of thoracic interneurons. Further, processing by a delay line and coincidence detector circuit in the brain leads to feature detecting neurons that specifically respond to the species-specific pulse rate, and match the characteristics of the phonotactic response. This same circuit may also control the response to the species-specific chirp pattern. Based on these serial filters and the feature detecting mechanism, female phonotactic behavior is shaped and tuned to the characteristic properties of male calling song. PMID:26941647

  5. Face recognition in simulated prosthetic vision: face detection-based image processing strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Wu, Xiaobei; Lu, Yanyu; Wu, Hao; Kan, Han; Chai, Xinyu

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Given the limited visual percepts elicited by current prosthetic devices, it is essential to optimize image content in order to assist implant wearers to achieve better performance of visual tasks. This study focuses on recognition of familiar faces using simulated prosthetic vision. Approach. Combined with region-of-interest (ROI) magnification, three face extraction strategies based on a face detection technique were used: the Viola-Jones face region, the statistical face region (SFR) and the matting face region. Main results. These strategies significantly enhanced recognition performance compared to directly lowering resolution (DLR) with Gaussian dots. The inclusion of certain external features, such as hairstyle, was beneficial for face recognition. Given the high recognition accuracy achieved and applicable processing speed, SFR-ROI was the preferred strategy. DLR processing resulted in significant face gender recognition differences (i.e. females were more easily recognized than males), but these differences were not apparent with other strategies. Significance. Face detection-based image processing strategies improved visual perception by highlighting useful information. Their use is advisable for face recognition when using low-resolution prosthetic vision. These results provide information for the continued design of image processing modules for use in visual prosthetics, thus maximizing the benefits for future prosthesis wearers.

  6. Interlaboratory Study of ELISA Kits for the Detection of Egg and Milk Protein in Processed Foods.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shigeki; Yagi, Takahiro; Kato, Ayako; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Akimoto, Masanobu; Arihara, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    The labeling of seven specific allergenic ingredients (egg, milk, wheat, buckwheat, peanut, shrimp, and crab) is mandatory in Japan. To ensure proper labeling, two kinds of ELISA kits using polyclonal antibodies have been developed. However, we developed two novel ELISA kits using monoclonal antibodies with improved specificity, the Allergeneye ELISA Egg (AE-Egg) and Allergeneye ELISA Milk (AE-Milk) Kits, to detect egg and milk proteins in processed foods, respectively. Five types of processed food containing 10 mg/kg of egg or milk soluble protein were prepared for an interlaboratory study of the performance of these kits. The kits showed a relatively high reproducibility level of interlaboratory precision (AE-Egg RSDR, 3.7-5.7%; AE-Milk RSDR, 6.8-10.5%) and satisfied the recovery rate stipulated by Japanese guidelines (AE-Egg, 61.6-89.3%; AE-Milk, 52.1-67%) for all processed foods. Our results suggest that the AE-Egg and AE-Milk Kits are precise and reliable tools for detecting egg or milk proteins in processed foods. PMID:26086260

  7. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  8. On the sources of astrometric anomalous refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne

    2009-06-01

    Over a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, now known as "anomalous refraction," is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low frequency, large angular scale motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by previous astrometric catalogs. These motions of typically several tenths of an arcsecond with timescales on the order often minutes are ubiquitous to drift-scan ground-based astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but never confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter scale slowly evolving coherent dynamical structures in the boundary-layer below 60 meters.

  9. Fault detection in heavy duty wheels by advanced vibration processing techniques and lumped parameter modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malago`, M.; Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2016-03-01

    Heavy duty wheels are used in applications such as automatic vehicles and are mainly composed of a polyurethane tread glued to a cast iron hub. In the manufacturing process, the adhesive application between tread and hub is a critical assembly phase, since it is completely made by an operator and a contamination of the bond area may happen. Furthermore, the presence of rust on the hub surface can contribute to worsen the adherence interface, reducing the operating life. In this scenario, a quality control procedure for fault detection to be used at the end of the manufacturing process has been developed. This procedure is based on vibration processing techniques and takes advantages of the results of a lumped parameter model. Indicators based on cyclostationarity can be considered as key parameters to be adopted in a monitoring test station at the end of the production line due to their not deterministic characteristics.

  10. Absolute diode laser-based in situ detection of HCl in gasification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortwein, P.; Woiwode, W.; Fleck, S.; Eberhard, M.; Kolb, T.; Wagner, S.; Gisi, M.; Ebert, V.

    2010-10-01

    The release of HCl is an important parameter for industrial combustion and gasification processes, which must be determined in the ppm range for active process control and optimization. Based on a low power vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) at 1.74 μm, we developed a new tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometer for calibration-free, absolute in situ HCl detection using the H35Cl (2 ← 0) R(3) absorption line with minimized cross-sensitivity to CO2 and H2O. The spectrometer was applied to in situ measurements in a gasification process ( T = 1,130°C, P = 1 atm, L = 28 cm) and yielded an optical resolution of 2.3·10-4, i.e. a HCl sensitivity of 45 ppm (13 ppm·m).

  11. Rapid detection of Listeria monocytogenes by real-time PCR in processed meat and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Heo, Eun Jeong; Song, Bo Ra; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Young Jo; Moon, Jin San; Wee, Sung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Seok; Yoon, Yohan

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in different ready-to-eat foods using real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Various concentrations (10(0) to 10(5) CFU/ml) of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 were inoculated into ham, sausage, ground meat, processed milk, cheese, and infant formula. L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 in the samples was then enumerated on Oxford agar, and DNA was extracted from the samples before and after incubation at 36°C for 4 h. A set of primers and hybridization probe designed in this study was then used to detect the pathogen. The standard curve was then prepared by plotting cycle threshold values for each dilution versus L. monocytogenes cell counts (log CFU). The specificity of the set of primers and hybridization probe was appropriate. A 4-h incubation at 36°C before DNA extraction produced optimum standard curves in comparison to the results for a 0-h incubation. Thus, a 4-h incubation at 36°C was applied for monitoring L. monocytogenes in collected food samples. To monitor L. monocytogenes in foods, 533 samples (ham, 129; sausage, 226; ground meat, 72; processed cheese, 54; processed milk, 42; and infant formula, 10) were collected from retail markets and from the step before pasteurization in plants. Of all 533 samples, 4 samples (0.8%) showed positive signals in RT-PCR. Two samples from hams (1.6%) and two samples from sausages (0.9%) were determined to be positive for L. monocytogenes at < 100 CFU/g. The results indicate that the RT-PCR detection method with the set of primers and hybridization probe designed in this study should be useful in monitoring for L. monocytogenes in processed meat and milk products. PMID:24674437

  12. Automated processing integrated with a microflow cytometer for pathogen detection in clinical matrices

    PubMed Central

    Golden, J.P.; Verbarg, J.; Howell, P.B.; Shriver-Lake, L.C.; Ligler, F.S.

    2012-01-01

    A spinning magnetic trap (MagTrap) for automated sample processing was integrated with a microflow cytometer capable of simultaneously detecting multiple targets to provide an automated sample-to-answer diagnosis in 40 min. After target capture on fluorescently coded magnetic microspheres, the magnetic trap automatically concentrated the fluorescently coded microspheres, separated the captured target from the sample matrix, and exposed the bound target sequentially to biotinylated tracer molecules and streptavidin-labeled phycoerythrin. The concentrated microspheres were then hydrodynamically focused in a microflow cytometer capable of 4-color analysis (two wavelengths for microsphere identification, one for light scatter to discriminate single microspheres and one for phycoerythrin bound to the target). A three-fold decrease in sample preparation time and an improved detection limit, independent of target preconcentration, was demonstrated for detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 using the MagTrap as compared to manual processing. Simultaneous analysis of positive and negative controls, along with the assay reagents specific for the target, was used to obtain dose–response curves, demonstrating the potential for quantification of pathogen load in buffer and serum. PMID:22960010

  13. Digital image processing in the SECURE concealed-object detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven W.

    1993-04-01

    A new technology has been developed for detecting explosives and other dangerous objects concealed under persons' clothing. The 'Subambient Exposure, Computer Utilized Reflected Energy' (SECURE) method uses a very low level of back-scattered x-rays in conjunction with digital image processing to produce an image of the person and any concealed objects. Image processing algorithms, used in the system are directed at presenting information to a human operator in the best possible manner for foreign object detection. These algorithms are viewed as being near optimum, and additional development is probably not justified. Algorithm development is needed in the area of automatic threat detection. This has the potential of reducing the invasion of privacy associated with having a security operator view each image. It also has the potential of reducing the serious problem of operator complacency. In one approach, the new algorithm must (1) recognize and isolate objects in the image, (2) discriminate between concealed objects and human anatomy, and (3) discriminate between dangerous and benign concealed objects. The images produced with the SECURE technology are extremely noisy due to the low levels of radiation used. Any algorithm developed must perform well in this noisy environment. Execution of the algorithm must be accomplished in less than a few seconds. Hardware to implement the algorithm must be of a complexity and cost compatible with the commercial SECURE system.

  14. Evaluation of a Change Detection Methodology by Means of Binary Thresholding Algorithms and Informational Fusion Processes

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Iñigo; Martinez, Estibaliz; Arquero, Agueda; Pajares, Gonzalo; Sanchez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Landcover is subject to continuous changes on a wide variety of temporal and spatial scales. Those changes produce significant effects in human and natural activities. Maintaining an updated spatial database with the occurred changes allows a better monitoring of the Earth’s resources and management of the environment. Change detection (CD) techniques using images from different sensors, such as satellite imagery, aerial photographs, etc., have proven to be suitable and secure data sources from which updated information can be extracted efficiently, so that changes can also be inventoried and monitored. In this paper, a multisource CD methodology for multiresolution datasets is applied. First, different change indices are processed, then different thresholding algorithms for change/no_change are applied to these indices in order to better estimate the statistical parameters of these categories, finally the indices are integrated into a change detection multisource fusion process, which allows generating a single CD result from several combination of indices. This methodology has been applied to datasets with different spectral and spatial resolution properties. Then, the obtained results are evaluated by means of a quality control analysis, as well as with complementary graphical representations. The suggested methodology has also been proved efficiently for identifying the change detection index with the higher contribution. PMID:22737023

  15. Incipient fault detection and identification in process systems using accelerating neural network learning

    SciTech Connect

    Parlos, A.G.; Muthusami, J.; Atiya, A.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the development and numerical testing of a robust fault detection and identification (FDI) system using artificial neural networks (ANNs), for incipient (slowly developing) faults occurring in process systems. The challenge in using ANNs in FDI systems arises because of one's desire to detect faults of varying severity, faults from noisy sensors, and multiple simultaneous faults. To address these issues, it becomes essential to have a learning algorithm that ensures quick convergence to a high level of accuracy. A recently developed accelerated learning algorithm, namely a form of an adaptive back propagation (ABP) algorithm, is used for this purpose. The ABP algorithm is used for the development of an FDI system for a process composed of a direct current motor, a centrifugal pump, and the associated piping system. Simulation studies indicate that the FDI system has significantly high sensitivity to incipient fault severity, while exhibiting insensitivity to sensor noise. For multiple simultaneous faults, the FDI system detects the fault with the predominant signature. The major limitation of the developed FDI system is encountered when it is subjected to simultaneous faults with similar signatures. During such faults, the inherent limitation of pattern-recognition-based FDI methods becomes apparent. Thus, alternate, more sophisticated FDI methods become necessary to address such problems. Even though the effectiveness of pattern-recognition-based FDI methods using ANNs has been demonstrated, further testing using real-world data is necessary.

  16. Automated processing integrated with a microflow cytometer for pathogen detection in clinical matrices.

    PubMed

    Golden, J P; Verbarg, J; Howell, P B; Shriver-Lake, L C; Ligler, F S

    2013-02-15

    A spinning magnetic trap (MagTrap) for automated sample processing was integrated with a microflow cytometer capable of simultaneously detecting multiple targets to provide an automated sample-to-answer diagnosis in 40 min. After target capture on fluorescently coded magnetic microspheres, the magnetic trap automatically concentrated the fluorescently coded microspheres, separated the captured target from the sample matrix, and exposed the bound target sequentially to biotinylated tracer molecules and streptavidin-labeled phycoerythrin. The concentrated microspheres were then hydrodynamically focused in a microflow cytometer capable of 4-color analysis (two wavelengths for microsphere identification, one for light scatter to discriminate single microspheres and one for phycoerythrin bound to the target). A three-fold decrease in sample preparation time and an improved detection limit, independent of target preconcentration, was demonstrated for detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 using the MagTrap as compared to manual processing. Simultaneous analysis of positive and negative controls, along with the assay reagents specific for the target, was used to obtain dose-response curves, demonstrating the potential for quantification of pathogen load in buffer and serum. PMID:22960010

  17. Space Shuttle Main Engine Propellant Path Leak Detection Using Sequential Image Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. Montgomery; Malone, Jo Anne; Crawford, Roger A.

    1995-01-01

    Initial research in this study using theoretical radiation transport models established that the occurrence of a leak is accompanies by a sudden but sustained change in intensity in a given region of an image. In this phase, temporal processing of video images on a frame-by-frame basis was used to detect leaks within a given field of view. The leak detection algorithm developed in this study consists of a digital highpass filter cascaded with a moving average filter. The absolute value of the resulting discrete sequence is then taken and compared to a threshold value to produce the binary leak/no leak decision at each point in the image. Alternatively, averaging over the full frame of the output image produces a single time-varying mean value estimate that is indicative of the intensity and extent of a leak. Laboratory experiments were conducted in which artificially created leaks on a simulated SSME background were produced and recorded from a visible wavelength video camera. This data was processed frame-by-frame over the time interval of interest using an image processor implementation of the leak detection algorithm. In addition, a 20 second video sequence of an actual SSME failure was analyzed using this technique. The resulting output image sequences and plots of the full frame mean value versus time verify the effectiveness of the system.

  18. Detectivity of plasmonic enhanced photodetectors based on nondegenerate two-photon absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Kohoutek, John; Mohseni, Hooman

    2012-10-01

    Mid-infrared photodetectors are the subject of many research efforts within the last two decades for enhancing their operating parameters such as temperature stability, detectivity and quantum efficiency. This is due to their wide range of applications like biosensing, night vision, and short range communication. However, mid-infrared photons have much smaller energy compared with the band gap energy of well known semiconductors including III-V and II-VI families. One way to overcome this problem is to utilizing quantum confinement effects by absorbing a photon through the intersubband transition of a conduction electron or valance hole. Fabricating devices at the nanoscale size to achieve quantum confinement is costly and imposes limitations for further device preparation. In addition, the optical properties of quantum confined devices are sensitive to nanoscale geometrical parameters which make them vulnerable to fabrication imperfections. The other approach of detecting mid-infrared light is by exploiting the non-degenerate two photon absorption process (TPA). Two photons with different energies can be absorbed simultaneously by a semiconductor with the band gap energy less than the overall energy of two photons. Thus, a mid-infrared photon as the signal can be detected by a bulk semiconductor with much larger band gap energy when a near-infrared photon as the gate assists the absorption process through TPA.

  19. Gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles based disposable magnetic genosensors for the detection of DNA hybridization processes.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Óscar A; Jubete, Elena; Ochoteco, Estibalitz; Cabañero, German; Grande, Hans; Rodríguez, Javier

    2011-01-15

    In this article, a disposable magnetic DNA sensor using an enzymatic amplification strategy for the detection of specific hybridization processes, based on the coupling of streptavidin-peroxidase to biotinylated target sequences, has been developed. A thiolated 19-mer capture probe was attached to gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles and hybridization with the biotinylated target was allowed to proceed. Then, a streptavidin-peroxide was attached to the biotinylated target and the resulting modified gold coated ferric oxide nanoparticles were captured by a magnetic field on the surface of a home-made carbon screen printed electrode (SPE). Using hydroquinone as a mediator, a square wave voltammetric procedure was chosen to detect the hybridization process after the addition of hydrogen peroxide. Different aspects concerning the assay protocol and nanoparticles fabrication were optimized in order to improve the sensitivity of the developed methodology. A low detection limit (31 pM) with good stability (RSD=7.04%, n=10) was obtained without the need of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. PMID:20951565

  20. Specific capture of the hydrolysate on magnetic beads for sensitive detecting plant vacuolar processing enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Meng; Zeng, Lizhang; Liu, Weipeng; Zhang, Tao; Xing, Da

    2016-05-15

    Conventional plant protease detection always suffers from high background interference caused by the complex coloring metabolites in plant cells. In this study, a bio-modified magnetic beads-based strategy was developed for sensitive and quantitative detection of plant vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) activity. Cleavage of the peptide substrate (ESENCRK-FITC) after asparagine residue by VPE resulted in the 2-cyano-6-amino-benzothiazole (CABT)-functionalized magnetic beads capture of the severed substrate CRK-FITC via a condensation reaction between CABT and cysteine (Cys). The catalytic activity was subsequently obtained by the confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry quantitative analysis. The sensor system integrated advantages of (i) the high efficient enrichment and separation capabilities of magnetic beads and (ii) the catalyst-free properties of the CABT-Cys condensation reaction. It exhibited a linear relationship between the fluorescence signal and the concentration of severed substrate in the range of 10-600 pM. The practical results showed that, compared with normal growth conditions, VPE activity was increased by 2.7-fold (307.2 ± 25.3 μM min(-1)g(-1)) upon cadmium toxicity stress. This platform effectively overcame the coloring metabolites-caused background interference, showing fine applicability for the detection of VPE activity in real samples. The strategy offers great sensitivity and may be further extended to other protease activity detection. PMID:26797250

  1. Analysis of SAR moving grid processing for focusing and detection of ground moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, Daniel E.; Saville, Michael A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper investigates the performance of single-channel SAR-GMTI systems in the focusing and detection of translating ground targets moving in the presence of a clutter background. Specifically, focusing and detection performance is investigated by applying the Moving Grid Processing (MGP) focusing technique to a scene containing an accelerating target moving in the presence of both uniform and correlated K-distributed clutter backgrounds. The increase in detection sensitivity resulting from the focusing operation is found to result from two separable effects, target focusing and clutter defocusing. While the detection sensitivity gain due to target focusing is common for both clutter types, the gain due to clutter defocusing is found to be significantly greater for textured clutter than for uniform clutter, by approximately 5 to 6 dB in the simulated scenario under consideration. This paper concludes with a discussion of the phenomenological causes for this difference and implications of this finding for single channel SAR-GMTI systems operating in heterogeneous clutter environments.

  2. Joint digital signal processing of Nyquist-wavelength division multiplexing superchannel with group detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianyun; Yao, Shuchang; Fu, Songnian; Tang, Ming; Liu, Deming

    2014-12-01

    To relax the limited sampling rate of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and to reduce the complexity of conventional fiber-optical superchannel coherent detection, we propose and demonstrate a joint digital signal processing (DSP) technique of Nyquist-wavelength division multiplexing superchannel with group detection. At the receiver side, three Nyquist-spaced channels with 12.5 Gbaud polarization multiplexing-quadrature phase shift keying signals are group detected with a sampling rate per channel of 1.33 times over the normal sampling rate. A modified carrier separation technique is then put forward to retrieve the high-frequency interference component of both the designated channel and its adjacent channels, which can subsequently be used to recover the designated channel with new constant modulus algorithm-based joint multiinput-multioutput equalizers. The results show that the proposed group detection and joint DSP algorithm can simultaneously improve the transmission performance and reduce the complexity of both the transmitter and receiver, regardless of bandwidth restrictions from the waveshaper, ADC module, and coherent receiver.

  3. Bifunctional electro-optical nanoprobe to real-time detect local biochemical processes in single cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin Ting; Hu, Weihua; Wang, Houxiao; Yang, Hongbin; Zhou, Wei; Li, Chang Ming

    2011-07-15

    A bifunctional electro-optical nanoprobe with integrated nanoring electrode and optical nanotip was fabricated and investigated to simultaneously detect both electrical and optical signals in real-time with high spatial resolution. Concurrent measurements of the oxidant generation and the intracellular antioxidant levels in single cells correlate the stronger oxidant generation with an altered initial antioxidant response in the breast cancer cells in comparison to the normal ones suggesting that the cell malignancy is associated with the strength of oxidative stress, and the higher antioxidant level may be the cause of the drug resistance. While the optical detection indicates the fluctuation of the intracellular redox homeostasis, the chronoamperometric signals allow quantitative real-time detection of the H₂O₂ release and decay. Furthermore, the nanoscale probe enables localized simultaneous detections thus discovering that activated enzymes responsible for the oxidative stress target at specific membrane regions. This method promises applications in study of the dynamics of important physiological processes, and provides the opportunity to unravel the interplay of various signaling pathways. PMID:21632233

  4. Collaborative multicue fusion using the cross-diffusion process for salient object detection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Gang; Gao, Changxin; Tian, Jinwen

    2016-03-01

    Salient object detection is very useful in a large variety of image and vision-related applications. A recent trend in salient object detection is to explore novel top-down visual cues and combine them with bottom-up saliency to improve the performance. However, a basic and important problem, i.e., how to effectively fuse multiple visual cues, has rarely been addressed in previous works. To this end, the paper presents a multicue fusion method using the cross-diffusion process (CDP) for salient object detection. The CDP algorithm is deployed to combine the affinity matrices constructed over individual visual cue channels, which is then embedded into a saliency propagation framework to accomplish salient object detection. Different from other multicue fusion strategies, our proposed approach allows for collaborative fusion, that is, the individual visual cues to be fused are able to interact and exchange information with each other during the fusion procedure, which can possibly correct the noise or corruption included in the individual visual cue channels, leading to more robust and effective fusion results. Intensive experiments on publicly available datasets demonstrate the effectiveness and superior performance of our proposed method. PMID:26974910

  5. Signal processing for passive detection and classification of underwater acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kil Woo

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation examines signal processing for passive detection, classification and tracking of underwater acoustic signals for improving port security and the security of coastal and offshore operations. First, we consider the problem of passive acoustic detection of a diver in a shallow water environment. A frequency-domain multi-band matched-filter approach to swimmer detection is presented. The idea is to break the frequency contents of the hydrophone signals into multiple narrow frequency bands, followed by time averaged (about half of a second) energy calculation over each band. Then, spectra composed of such energy samples over the chosen frequency bands are correlated to form a decision variable. The frequency bands with highest Signal/Noise ratio are used for detection. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated for experimental data collected for a diver in the Hudson River. We also propose a new referenceless frequency-domain multi-band detector which, unlike other reference-based detectors, does not require a diver specific signature. Instead, our detector matches to a general feature of the diver spectrum in the high frequency range: the spectrum is roughly periodic in time and approximately flat when the diver exhales. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated by using experimental data collected from the Hudson River. Moreover, we present detection, classification and tracking of small vessel signals. Hydroacoustic sensors can be applied for the detection of noise generated by vessels, and this noise can be used for vessel detection, classification and tracking. This dissertation presents recent improvements aimed at the measurement and separation of ship DEMON (Detection of Envelope Modulation on Noise) acoustic signatures in busy harbor conditions. Ship signature measurements were conducted in the Hudson River and NY Harbor. The DEMON spectra demonstrated much better temporal stability compared with the full ship

  6. Semi-Automated Neuron Boundary Detection and Nonbranching Process Segmentation in Electron Microscopy Images

    SciTech Connect

    Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Watanabe, Shigeki; Giuly, Richard J.; Paiva, Antonio R.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists are developing new imaging techniques and generating large volumes of data in an effort to understand the complex structure of the nervous system. The complexity and size of this data makes human interpretation a labor-intensive task. To aid in the analysis, new segmentation techniques for identifying neurons in these feature rich datasets are required. This paper presents a method for neuron boundary detection and nonbranching process segmentation in electron microscopy images and visualizing them in three dimensions. It combines both automated segmentation techniques with a graphical user interface for correction of mistakes in the automated process. The automated process first uses machine learning and image processing techniques to identify neuron membranes that deliniate the cells in each two-dimensional section. To segment nonbranching processes, the cell regions in each two-dimensional section are connected in 3D using correlation of regions between sections. The combination of this method with a graphical user interface specially designed for this purpose, enables users to quickly segment cellular processes in large volumes.

  7. Semi-automated Neuron Boundary Detection and Nonbranching Process Segmentation in Electron Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Jurrus, Elizabeth; Watanabe, Shigeki; Giuly, Richard J.; Paiva, Antonio R. C.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscientists are developing new imaging techniques and generating large volumes of data in an effort to understand the complex structure of the nervous system. The complexity and size of this data makes human interpretation a labor-intensive task. To aid in the analysis, new segmentation techniques for identifying neurons in these feature rich datasets are required. This paper presents a method for neuron boundary detection and nonbranching process segmentation in electron microscopy images and visualizing them in three dimensions. It combines both automated segmentation techniques with a graphical user interface for correction of mistakes in the automated process. The automated process first uses machine learning and image processing techniques to identify neuron membranes that deliniate the cells in each two-dimensional section. To segment nonbranching processes, the cell regions in each two-dimensional section are connected in 3D using correlation of regions between sections. The combination of this method with a graphical user interface specially designed for this purpose, enables users to quickly segment cellular processes in large volumes. PMID:22644867

  8. Drag suppression in anomalous chiral media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-06-01

    We study a heavy impurity moving longitudinal with the direction of an external magnetic field in an anomalous chiral medium. Such system would carry a nondissipative current of chiral magnetic effect associated with the anomaly. We show, by generalizing Landau's criterion for superfluidity, that the "anomalous component" which gives rise to the anomalous transport will not contribute to the drag experienced by an impurity. We argue on a very general basis that those systems with a strong magnetic field would exhibit an interesting transport phenomenon—the motion of the heavy impurity is frictionless, in analogy to the case of a superfluid. We demonstrate and confirm our general results with two complementary examples: weakly coupled chiral fermion gases and strongly interacting chiral liquids.

  9. Experimental realization of quantized anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qi-Kun

    2014-03-01

    Anomalous Hall effect was discovered by Edwin Hall in 1880. In this talk, we report the experimental observation of the quantized version of AHE, the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 magnetic topological insulator. At zero magnetic field, the gate-tuned anomalous Hall resistance exhibits a quantized value of h /e2 accompanied by a significant drop of the longitudinal resistance. The longitudinal resistance vanishes under a strong magnetic field whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value. The realization of QAHE paves a way for developing low-power-consumption electronics. Implications on observing Majorana fermions and other exotic phenomena in magnetic topological insulators will also be discussed. The work was collaborated with Ke He, Yayu Wang, Xucun Ma, Xi Chen, Li Lv, Dai Xi, Zhong Fang and Shoucheng Zhang.

  10. Anomalous fluorescence line intensity in megavoltage bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Nino; Litz, Marc; Merkel, George; Schumer, Joseph; Seely, John; Carroll, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission crystal spectrometer intended for laser plasma diagnostics has measured an anomalous ratio between the fluorescence lines in megavoltage bremsstrahlung. When observed in reflection, Kα1 fluorescence is twice as strong as the Kβ line, as is usual. However, in forward-directed bremsstrahlung from a 2 MV end point linear accelerator with a tungsten converter, the Kα1 and Kβ fluorescence are approximately equal. The anomalous fluorescence line ratio, unity, reflects the large amount of fluorescence generated on the side of the converter where the electrons enter, and the differential attenuation of the fluorescence photons as they pass through the converter to opposite side. Understanding of fluorescence in megavoltage bremsstrahlung is relevant to the explanation of anomalous line ratios in spectra produced by high-energy electrons generated by intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

  11. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Samik; Patel, Vipul R

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint. PMID:25593361

  12. Bacteriophages for detection and control of bacterial pathogens in food and food-processing environment.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents recent advances in bacteriophage research and their application in the area of food safety. Section 1 describes general facts on phage biology that are relevant to their application for control and detection of bacterial pathogens in food and environmental samples. Section 2 summarizes the recently acquired data on application of bacteriophages to control growth of bacterial pathogens and spoilage organisms in food and food-processing environment. Section 3 deals with application of bacteriophages for detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. Advantages of bacteriophage-based methods are presented and their shortcomings are discussed. The chapter is intended for food scientist and food product developers, and people in food inspection and health agencies with the ultimate goal to attract their attention to the new developing technology that has a tremendous potential in providing means for producing wholesome and safe food. PMID:23034118

  13. Fault Detection of Gearbox from Inverter Signals Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pislaru, C.; Lane, M.; Ball, A. D.; Gu, F.

    2012-05-01

    The gear faults are time-localized transient events so time-frequency analysis techniques (such as the Short-Time Fourier Transform, Wavelet Transform, motor current signature analysis) are widely used to deal with non-stationary and nonlinear signals. Newly developed signal processing techniques (such as empirical mode decomposition and Teager Kaiser Energy Operator) enabled the recognition of the vibration modes that coexist in the system, and to have a better understanding of the nature of the fault information contained in the vibration signal. However these methods require a lot of computational power so this paper presents a novel approach of gearbox fault detection using the inverter signals to monitor the load, rather than the motor current. The proposed technique could be used for continuous monitoring as well as on-line damage detection systems for gearbox maintenance.

  14. Signal processing for the detection of multiple imperfection echoes drowned in the structural noise.

    PubMed

    Drai, R; Benammar, A; Benchaala, A

    2004-04-01

    In this work, we propose to develop algorithms based on the split spectrum processing method associated with the multi-steps method based on "Group delay moving entropy" (GDME) allowing detecting and locating multiple imperfection echoes drowned in the structural noise of materials. In fact, GDME is based on the fact that defect echoes have a constant group delay while the noise has a random group delay. The investigation is performed with 4 known defect echoes with different characteristics (position, center frequency and bandwidth). The defect echo frequency is varied around the frequency of the input signal in order to evaluate, by signal to noise ratio calculation, the robustness of the detection method. The grain noise signal is generated first, by a simple clutter model which consider the noise, in the time domain, as the superimposed of signal coming from backscaterers in the medium and second, experimentally by a material with coarse grains. PMID:15047392

  15. Efficient signal processing for time-resolved fluorescence detection of nitrogen-vacancy spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Hacquebard, L.; Childress, L.

    2016-03-01

    Room-temperature fluorescence detection of the nitrogen-vacancy center electronic spin typically has low signal to noise, requiring long experiments to reveal an averaged signal. Here, we present a simple approach to analysis of time-resolved fluorescence data that permits an improvement in measurement precision through signal processing alone. Applying our technique to experimental data reveals an improvement in signal to noise equivalent to a 14% increase in photon collection efficiency. We further explore the dependence of the signal to noise ratio on excitation power, and analyze our results using a rate equation model. Our results provide a rubric for optimizing fluorescence spin detection, which has direct implications for improving precision of nitrogen-vacancy-based sensors.

  16. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor. PMID:26720879

  17. Framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guolan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qin, Xulei; Halig, Luma; Muller, Susan; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Amy; Pogue, Brian W.; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Fei, Baowei

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an imaging modality that holds strong potential for rapid cancer detection during image-guided surgery. But the data from HSI often needs to be processed appropriately in order to extract the maximum useful information that differentiates cancer from normal tissue. We proposed a framework for hyperspectral image processing and quantification, which includes a set of steps including image preprocessing, glare removal, feature extraction, and ultimately image classification. The framework has been tested on images from mice with head and neck cancer, using spectra from 450- to 900-nm wavelength. The image analysis computed Fourier coefficients, normalized reflectance, mean, and spectral derivatives for improved accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of the hyperspectral image processing and quantification framework for cancer detection during animal tumor surgery, in a challenging setting where sensitivity can be low due to a modest number of features present, but potential for fast image classification can be high. This HSI approach may have potential application in tumor margin assessment during image-guided surgery, where speed of assessment may be the dominant factor.

  18. On-road anomaly detection by multimodal sensor analysis and multimedia processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orhan, Fatih; Eren, P. E.

    2014-03-01

    The use of smartphones in Intelligent Transportation Systems is gaining popularity, yet many challenges exist in developing functional applications. Due to the dynamic nature of transportation, vehicular social applications face complexities such as developing robust sensor management, performing signal and image processing tasks, and sharing information among users. This study utilizes a multimodal sensor analysis framework which enables the analysis of sensors in multimodal aspect. It also provides plugin-based analyzing interfaces to develop sensor and image processing based applications, and connects its users via a centralized application as well as to social networks to facilitate communication and socialization. With the usage of this framework, an on-road anomaly detector is being developed and tested. The detector utilizes the sensors of a mobile device and is able to identify anomalies such as hard brake, pothole crossing, and speed bump crossing. Upon such detection, the video portion containing the anomaly is automatically extracted in order to enable further image processing analysis. The detection results are shared on a central portal application for online traffic condition monitoring.

  19. Al-26 from red giants. [connections with anomalous Mg-26 content in meteorites and solar system formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgaard, H.

    1980-01-01

    Simplified models of thermally pulsing red giants are investigated, with particular emphasis on predicting the extent to which nuclear processing at the base of the convective envelope in conjunction with processing in the thermally unstable He shell can synthesize Al-26 (tau/1/2/ = 7.2 x 10 to the 5th yr). Values of Al-26/Al-27 of about 0.5-1, with Al-27/Al-27(solar) of about 1-2, are predicted in some cases. It is pointed out that such results can lead to isotope shifts in the absorption lines of AlH and AlO, which should be observationally identifiable in some late-type supergiants. The possible connection with the anomalous Mg-26 content (assigned to the decay of Al-26) detected in some meteorites and the connection with formation of the solar system are also touched on.

  20. Experimental system for detecting lung nodules by chest x-ray image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Inaoka, Noriko; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1991-07-01

    This paper describes a system for automatic detection of lung nodules by means of digital image-processing techniques. The objective of the system is to help chest physicians to improve their accuracy of detection. For detecting lung nodules in chest x-ray images, the authors developed the directional contrast filter for nodules (DCF-N), which consists of three concentric circles. The DCF-N is effective for detecting patterns with obscure peripheries, such as lung cancer. The filter was evaluated using 192 lung cancer cases, and a detection ratio of 88.5% with false-positive foci was obtained. The authors also developed a rule-based system for eliminating these false-positive foci. The rule-base contains six rules that were heuristically developed according to a common method of diagnosis used by chest physicians. By using the rule-base, the authors succeeded in eliminating 63.3% of false-positive foci without increasing the number of false-negatives significantly (5.0%). In addition to the rule- base, a logic was developed for discriminating between lung nodules and false-positive foci by using the nine measured values on each shadow. The discrimination was tested by using 192 lung cancer cases and 74 normal control cases. As a result, figures of 92.2% and 71.6% were obtained for the sensitivity and specificity of the system, respectively. To evaluate the logic by using external data, 30 cases of lung cancer and 78 control cases were collected. As a result of the evaluation, the authors obtained figures of 71.3%, 76.7%, and 69.2% for the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the system, respectively.

  1. Anomalous Diffraction in Cold Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Z.; Gad, R.; Bar-Ad, S.; Fisher, A.

    2015-10-01

    Cold magnetized plasma possesses an anisotropic permittivity tensor with a unique dispersion relation that for adequate electron density and magnetic field results in anomalous diffraction of a right-hand circularly polarized beam. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally anomalous diffraction of a microwave beam in plasma. Additionally, decreasing the electron density enables observation of the transition of the material from a hyperbolic to a standard material. Manipulation of the control parameters will enable plasma to serve as a reconfigurable metamaterial-like medium.

  2. Anomalous Diffraction in Cold Magnetized Plasma.

    PubMed

    Abelson, Z; Gad, R; Bar-Ad, S; Fisher, A

    2015-10-01

    Cold magnetized plasma possesses an anisotropic permittivity tensor with a unique dispersion relation that for adequate electron density and magnetic field results in anomalous diffraction of a right-hand circularly polarized beam. In this work, we demonstrate experimentally anomalous diffraction of a microwave beam in plasma. Additionally, decreasing the electron density enables observation of the transition of the material from a hyperbolic to a standard material. Manipulation of the control parameters will enable plasma to serve as a reconfigurable metamaterial-like medium. PMID:26551813

  3. A potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of a potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter operating on the blue and near infrared transitions are calculated. The results show that the filter can be designed to provide high transmission, very narrow pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth. The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) provides a narrow pass bandwidth (about GHz) optical filter for laser communications, remote sensing, and lidar. The general theoretical model for the FADOF has been established in our previous paper. In this paper, we have identified the optimum operational conditions for a potassium FADOF operating on the blue and infrared transitions. The signal transmission, bandwidth, and equivalent noise bandwidth (ENBW) are also calculated.

  4. Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed during Spacecraft Flybys of Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, John D.; Campbell, James K.; Ekelund, John E.; Ellis, Jordan; Jordan, James F.

    2008-03-01

    We report and characterize anomalous orbital-energy changes observed during six Earth flybys by the Galileo, NEAR, Cassini, Rosetta, and MESSENGER spacecraft. These anomalous energy changes are consistent with an empirical prediction formula which is proportional to the total orbital energy per unit mass and which involves the incoming and outgoing geocentric latitudes of the asymptotic spacecraft velocity vectors. We use this formula to predict a potentially detectable flyby velocity increase of less than 1mm/s for a second Rosetta flyby on November 13, 2007.

  5. Anomalous orbital-energy changes observed during spacecraft flybys of earth.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John D; Campbell, James K; Ekelund, John E; Ellis, Jordan; Jordan, James F

    2008-03-01

    We report and characterize anomalous orbital-energy changes observed during six Earth flybys by the Galileo, NEAR, Cassini, Rosetta, and MESSENGER spacecraft. These anomalous energy changes are consistent with an empirical prediction formula which is proportional to the total orbital energy per unit mass and which involves the incoming and outgoing geocentric latitudes of the asymptotic spacecraft velocity vectors. We use this formula to predict a potentially detectable flyby velocity increase of less than 1 mm/s for a second Rosetta flyby on November 13, 2007. PMID:18352689

  6. Sound vibration signal processing for detection and identification detonation (knock) to optimize performance Otto engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujono, A.; Santoso, B.; Juwana, W. E.

    2016-03-01

    Problems of detonation (knock) on Otto engine (petrol engine) is completely unresolved problem until now, especially if want to improve the performance. This research did sound vibration signal processing engine with a microphone sensor, for the detection and identification of detonation. A microphone that can be mounted is not attached to the cylinder block, that's high temperature, so that its performance will be more stable, durable and inexpensive. However, the method of analysis is not very easy, because a lot of noise (interference). Therefore the use of new methods of pattern recognition, through filtration, and the regression function normalized envelope. The result is quite good, can achieve a success rate of about 95%.

  7. High-Speed Digital Signal Processing Method for Detection of Repeating Earthquakes Using GPGPU-Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Taiki; Okubo, Kan; Uchida, Naoki; Takeuchi, Nobunao; Matsuzawa, Toru

    2013-04-01

    Repeating earthquakes are occurring on the similar asperity at the plate boundary. These earthquakes have an important property; the seismic waveforms observed at the identical observation site are very similar regardless of their occurrence time. The slip histories of repeating earthquakes could reveal the existence of asperities: The Analysis of repeating earthquakes can detect the characteristics of the asperities and realize the temporal and spatial monitoring of the slip in the plate boundary. Moreover, we are expecting the medium-term predictions of earthquake at the plate boundary by means of analysis of repeating earthquakes. Although the previous works mostly clarified the existence of asperity and repeating earthquake, and relationship between asperity and quasi-static slip area, the stable and robust method for automatic detection of repeating earthquakes has not been established yet. Furthermore, in order to process the enormous data (so-called big data) the speedup of the signal processing is an important issue. Recently, GPU (Graphic Processing Unit) is used as an acceleration tool for the signal processing in various study fields. This movement is called GPGPU (General Purpose computing on GPUs). In the last few years the performance of GPU keeps on improving rapidly. That is, a PC (personal computer) with GPUs might be a personal supercomputer. GPU computing gives us the high-performance computing environment at a lower cost than before. Therefore, the use of GPUs contributes to a significant reduction of the execution time in signal processing of the huge seismic data. In this study, first, we applied the band-limited Fourier phase correlation as a fast method of detecting repeating earthquake. This method utilizes only band-limited phase information and yields the correlation values between two seismic signals. Secondly, we employ coherence function using three orthogonal components (East-West, North-South, and Up-Down) of seismic data as a

  8. Nonparametric signal processing validation in T-wave alternans detection and estimation.

    PubMed

    Goya-Esteban, R; Barquero-Pérez, O; Blanco-Velasco, M; Caamaño-Fernández, A J; García-Alberola, A; Rojo-Álvarez, J L

    2014-04-01

    Although a number of methods have been proposed for T-Wave Alternans (TWA) detection and estimation, their performance strongly depends on their signal processing stages and on their free parameters tuning. The dependence of the system quality with respect to the main signal processing stages in TWA algorithms has not yet been studied. This study seeks to optimize the final performance of the system by successive comparisons of pairs of TWA analysis systems, with one single processing difference between them. For this purpose, a set of decision statistics are proposed to evaluate the performance, and a nonparametric hypothesis test (from Bootstrap resampling) is used to make systematic decisions. Both the temporal method (TM) and the spectral method (SM) are analyzed in this study. The experiments were carried out in two datasets: first, in semisynthetic signals with artificial alternant waves and added noise; second, in two public Holter databases with different documented risk of sudden cardiac death. For semisynthetic signals (SNR = 15 dB), after the optimization procedure, a reduction of 34.0% (TM) and 5.2% (SM) of the power of TWA amplitude estimation errors was achieved, and the power of error probability was reduced by 74.7% (SM). For Holter databases, appropriate tuning of several processing blocks, led to a larger intergroup separation between the two populations for TWA amplitude estimation. Our proposal can be used as a systematic procedure for signal processing block optimization in TWA algorithmic implementations. PMID:24658256

  9. [Anomalous systemic arterial supply to left basal lung with anomalous return of V6].

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Hiroshi; Shibuya, Jotaro; Handa, Masashi; Yamada, Takehiro

    2014-11-01

    The patient was 52-year-old woman. Her chief compliant was bloody sputum. The computed tomography revealed an anomalous artery from descending aorta running into left lung basal segment and anomalous left V6 return to superior pulmonary vein. The bronchoscopic examination showed normal bronchial branches. Under the diagnosis of anomalous systemic arterial supply to left basal lung without sequestration, left lower lobectomy was performed. Microscopically, the pulmonary artery showed intimal thickening and alveolar collapse with interstitial fibrosis were seen. The postoperative course was uneventful and she discharged at 6th postoperative day. PMID:25391467

  10. Generalized spectral representations of chaotic maps displaying intermittency and anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, H.H.; Luschei, E.; Prigogine, I.

    1994-12-31

    Transport processes can be understood in terms of the spectral properties of the Frobenius-Perron operator. For the multi-Bernoulli map we have obtained generalized spectral representations describing diffusion processes. In this paper we consider a chaotic map which leads to intermittency and anomalous diffusion. We calculate the spatio-temporal power spectrum and compare it to numerical simulation.

  11. Interstellar formaldehyde. I - The collisional pumping mechanism for anomalous 6-centimeter absorption.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of the quantum mechanics of the collisional pumping process which Townes and Cheung (1969) propose as the cause of 'anomalous' formaldehyde absorption in diffuse dark nebulae discussed by Palmer et al. (1969). Quantum effects are taken into account in an attempt to determine whether such nebulae are likely to provide the physical conditions required for the collisional pumping process.

  12. Simulation of Anomalous Oil Filtration in a Porous Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelbaliev, G. I.; Rzaev, Ab. G.; Rasulov, S. R.; Guseinova, L. V.

    2015-03-01

    The problems of modeling the processes of filtration of anomalous structurized oils with coagulation structures present in a porous bed are considered. An equation for the filtration of Bingham fluids in a carrier bed that accounts for the dependence of the filtration rate on the pressure gradient and shear stress has been derived. Models for calculating the effective viscosity and mobility of oil depending on the change of the pressure gradient in the bed and of the concentration of particles in it have been developed. A comparison of these models with the experimental data available in the literature for various wells yielded satisfactory results.

  13. Constraints on anomalous top quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of distributions associated with the pair production of top quarks at the LHC can be used to constrain (or observe) the anomalous chromomagnetic dipole moment(k) of the top. For example, using either the tt(bar) invariant mass or the Pt distribution of top we find that sensitivities to ; k; of order 0.05 are obtainable with 100 /fb of integrated luminosity. This is similar in magnitude to what can be obtained at a 500 GeV NLC with an integrated luminosity of 50 /fb through an examination of the e(+)e(-) right arrow tt(bar)g process.

  14. A Real-Time Processing System for Pulsation Detection in Neonatal Cranial Ultrasonogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki; Yamada, Masayoshi

    1998-05-01

    In order to observe artery pulsation in the neonatal cranium at the site of pediatric diagnosis, a real-time processing system was developed for continuous detection and display of artery pulsation, from the moving images of the neonatal cranial ultrasonogram.The pulsation images were continuously generated by calculating the absolute difference between each pixel value at the two images corresponding to about half a heartbeat interval.The system was confirmed to process and continuously display at intervals of about 150 ms while capturing the echo images at the video rate of 30 ms, showing that the system performance was good enough to observe the artery pulsation in real-time.By monitoring the pulsation images continuously redisplayed, the critical conditions of the echo image such as the sway of the ultrasound probe could be easily avoided at the site of diagnosis.

  15. A signal processing framework for simultaneous detection of multiple environmental contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Subhadeep; Manahan, Michael P.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of large-scale attacks using chemical warfare agents (CWAs) has exposed the critical need for fundamental research enabling the reliable, unambiguous and early detection of trace CWAs and toxic industrial chemicals. This paper presents a unique approach for the identification and classification of simultaneously present multiple environmental contaminants by perturbing an electrochemical (EC) sensor with an oscillating potential for the extraction of statistically rich information from the current response. The dynamic response, being a function of the degree and mechanism of contamination, is then processed with a symbolic dynamic filter for the extraction of representative patterns, which are then classified using a trained neural network. The approach presented in this paper promises to extend the sensing power and sensitivity of these EC sensors by augmenting and complementing sensor technology with state-of-the-art embedded real-time signal processing capabilities.

  16. Analysis of Space Shuttle Ground Support System Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery Processes and Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Gerald-Yamasaki, Michael; Trent, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the FDIR (Fault Detection, Isolation, and Recovery) Project for the Constellation Program, a task was designed within the context of the Constellation Program FDIR project called the Legacy Benchmarking Task to document as accurately as possible the FDIR processes and resources that were used by the Space Shuttle ground support equipment (GSE) during the Shuttle flight program. These results served as a comparison with results obtained from the new FDIR capability. The task team assessed Shuttle and EELV (Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle) historical data for GSE-related launch delays to identify expected benefits and impact. This analysis included a study of complex fault isolation situations that required a lengthy troubleshooting process. Specifically, four elements of that system were considered: LH2 (liquid hydrogen), LO2 (liquid oxygen), hydraulic test, and ground special power.

  17. Using the sequential regression (SER) algorithm for long-term signal processing. [Intrusion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Soldan, D. L.; Ahmed, N.; Stearns, S. D.

    1980-01-01

    The use of the sequential regression (SER) algorithm (Electron. Lett., 14, 118(1978); 13, 446(1977)) for long-term processing applications is limited by two problems that can occur when an SER predictor has more weights than required to predict the input signal. First, computational difficulties related to updating the autocorrelation matrix inverse could arise, since no unique least-squares solution exists. Second, the predictor strives to remove very low-level components in the input, and hence could implement a gain function that is essentially zero over the entire passband. The predictor would then tend to become a no-pass filter which is undesirable in certain applications, e.g., intrusion detection (SAND--78-1032). Modifications to the SER algorithm that overcome the above problems are presented, which enable its use for long-term signal processing applications. 3 figures.

  18. Stereo system based on a graphics processing unit for pedestrian detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Bodam; Kang, Sungil; Hong, Hyunki; Eem, Changkyoung

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a novel stereo system, based on a graphics processing unit (GPU), for pedestrian detection in real images. The process of obtaining a dense disparity map and the edge properties of the scene to extract a region of interest (ROI) is designed on a GPU for real-time applications. After extracting the histograms of the oriented gradients on the ROIs, a support vector machine classifies them as pedestrian and nonpedestrian types. The system employs the recognition-by-components method, which compensates for the pose and articulation changes of pedestrians. In order to effectively track spatial pedestrian estimates over sequences, subwindows at distinctive parts of human beings are used as measurements for the Kalman filter.

  19. Respiration detection chip with integrated temperature-insensitive MEMS sensors and CMOS signal processing circuits.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yu-Chen; Chen, Tse-An; Lin, Ren-Yi; Liu, Tin-Hao

    2015-02-01

    An airflow sensing chip, which integrates MEMS sensors with their CMOS signal processing circuits into a single chip, is proposed for respiration detection. Three micro-cantilever-based airflow sensors were designed and fabricated using a 0.35 μm CMOS/MEMS 2P4M mixed-signal polycide process. Two main differences were present among these three designs: they were either metal-covered or metal-free structures, and had either bridge-type or fixed-type reference resistors. The performances of these sensors were measured and compared, including temperature sensitivity and airflow sensitivity. Based on the measured results, the metal-free structure with fixed-type reference resistors is recommended for use, because it has the highest airflow sensitivity and also can effectively reduce the output voltage drift caused by temperature change. PMID:24956395

  20. Studies of Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) with the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, C.; Ali-Hamoud, Y.; Beswick, R. J.; Casassus, S.; Cleary, K.; Draine, B.; Genova-Santos, R.; Grainge, K.; Hoang, T. C.; Lazarian, A.; Murphy, E.; Paladini, R.; Peel, M. W.; Perrott, Y.; Rubino-Martin, J. A.; Scaife, A.; Tibbs, C.; Verstraete, L.; Vidal, M.; Watson, R. A.; Ysard, N.

    2015-04-01

    In this chapter, we will outline the scientific motivation for studying Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME) with the SKA. AME is thought to be due to electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains, although thermal fluctuations of magnetic dust grains may also contribute. Studies of this mysterious component would shed light on the emission mechanism, which then opens up a new window onto the interstellar medium (ISM). AME is emitted mostly in the frequency range $\\sim 10$--100\\,GHz, and thus the SKA has the potential of measuring the low frequency side of the AME spectrum, particularly in band 5. Science targets include dense molecular clouds in the Milky Way, as well as extragalactic sources. We also discuss the possibility of detecting rotational line emission from Poly-cyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), which could be the main carriers of AME. Detecting PAH lines of a given spacing would allow for a definitive identification of specific PAH species.

  1. Ontology-Driven Hypothesis Generation to Explain Anomalous Patient Responses to Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Laura; Sleeman, Derek; Sim, Malcolm; Booth, Malcolm; Daniel, Malcolm; Donaldson, Lyndsay; Gilhooly, Charlotte; Hughes, Martin; Kinsella, John

    Within the medical domain there are clear expectations as to how a patient should respond to treatments administered. When these responses are not observed it can be challenging for clinicians to understand the anomalous responses. The work reported here describes a tool which can detect anomalous patient responses to treatment and further suggest hypotheses to explain the anomaly. In order to develop this tool, we have undertaken a study to determine how Intensive Care Unit (ICU) clinicians identify anomalous patient responses; we then asked further clinicians to provide potential explanations for such anomalies. The high level reasoning deployed by the clinicians has been captured and generalised to form the procedural component of the ontology-driven tool. An evaluation has shown that the tool successfully reproduced the clinician’s hypotheses in the majority of cases. Finally, the paper concludes by describing planned extensions to this work.

  2. Anomalous coronary artery causing transmural ischaemia and ventricular tachycardia in a high school athlete.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Caio Brito; Gonzalez, Maria Margarita; Dallan, Luis Alberto; Shiozaki, Afonso Akio; Medeiros, Fabio Morais; Britto, Pedro Carrusca; Cesar, Luiz Antonio

    2007-07-01

    A previously asymptomatic 15-year-old boy was treated at our institution after an episode of chest pain, palpitation, and syncope while playing in a high school soccer game. The patient's resting electrocardiogram was normal. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed an anomalous left main coronary artery originating from the right sinus of Valsalva. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography demonstrated clearly that the anomalous vessel coursed between the aorta and the pulmonary trunk (interarterial subtype). Treadmill testing registered several nonsustained polymorphic ventricular tachycardias and transmural myocardial ischaemia in the early recovery phase (ST-elevation up to 5mm in CM5 and V2 leads). The patient underwent bypass grafting. One year later, he remains asymptomatic, and new treadmill tests have been normal. In this patient, severe transmural myocardial ischaemia was detected, possibly due to collapse or vasospasm of the anomalous vessel, triggering life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:17353080

  3. Orthogonal sensor suite and the signal-processing algorithm for human detection and discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekimov, Alexander; Sabatier, James M.

    2009-05-01

    The focus of this paper is a review of methods and algorithms for human motion detection in the presence of nonstationary environmental background noise. Human footstep forces on the ground/floor generate periodic broadband seismic and sound signals envelopes with two characteristic times, T1 (the footstep repetition time, which is equal to the time of the whole body periodic vibrations) and T2 (the footstep duration time, which is equal to the time interval for a single footstep from "heel strike" to "toe slap and weight transfer"). Human body motions due to walking are periodic movements of a multiple-degrees-of-freedom mechanical system with a specific cadence frequency equal to 1/T1. For a walking human, the cadence frequencies for the appendages are the same and lie below 3 Hz. Simultaneously collecting footstep seismic, ultrasonic, and Doppler signals of human motion enhance the capability to detect humans in quiet and noisy environments. The common denominator of in the use of these orthogonal sensors (seismic, ultrasonic, Doppler) is a signal-processing algorithm package that allows detection of human-specific time-frequency signatures and discriminates them using a distinct cadence frequency from signals produced by other moving and stationary objects (e.g. vehicular and animal signatures). It has been experimentally shown that human cadence frequencies for seismic, passive ultrasonic, and Doppler motion signatures are equivalent and temporally stable.

  4. Mass Detection in Mammographic Images Using Wavelet Processing and Adaptive Threshold Technique.

    PubMed

    Vikhe, P S; Thool, V R

    2016-04-01

    Detection of mass in mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is a significant assignment in the reduction of the mortality rate. However, in some cases, screening of mass is difficult task for radiologist, due to variation in contrast, fuzzy edges and noisy mammograms. Masses and micro-calcifications are the distinctive signs for diagnosis of breast cancer. This paper presents, a method for mass enhancement using piecewise linear operator in combination with wavelet processing from mammographic images. The method includes, artifact suppression and pectoral muscle removal based on morphological operations. Finally, mass segmentation for detection using adaptive threshold technique is carried out to separate the mass from background. The proposed method has been tested on 130 (45 + 85) images with 90.9 and 91 % True Positive Fraction (TPF) at 2.35 and 2.1 average False Positive Per Image(FP/I) from two different databases, namely Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS) and Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM). The obtained results show that, the proposed technique gives improved diagnosis in the early breast cancer detection. PMID:26811073

  5. Flare imaging with multibeam systems: Data processing for bubble detection at seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider von Deimling, J.; Brockhoff, J.; Greinert, J.

    2007-06-01

    Multibeam sonar surveys have been conducted since their invention in the 1970s; however, mainly reflections from the seafloor were considered so far. More recently, water column imaging with multibeam is becoming of increasing interest for fisheries, buoy, mooring, or gas detection in the water column. Using ELAC SEABEAM 1000 data, we propose a technique to detect gas bubbles (flares) although this system is originally not designed to record water column data. The described data processing represents a case study and can be easily adapted to other multibeam systems. Multibeam data sets from the Black Sea and the North Sea show reflections of gas bubbles that form flares in the water column. At least for reasonably intense gas escape the detection of bubbles is feasible. The multibeam technique yields exact determination of the source position and information about the dimension of the gas cloud in the water. Compared to conventional flare imaging by single-beam echo sounders, the wide swath angle of multibeam systems allows the mapping of large areas in much shorter time.

  6. Space-time signal processing for distributed pattern detection in sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paffenroth, Randy C.; Du Toit, Philip C.; Scharf, Louis L.; Jayasumana, Anura P.; Banadara, Vidarshana; Nong, Ryan

    2012-05-01

    We present a theory and algorithm for detecting and classifying weak, distributed patterns in network data that provide actionable information with quantiable measures of uncertainty. Our work demonstrates the eectiveness of space-time inference on graphs, robust matrix completion, and second order analysis for the detection of distributed patterns that are not discernible at the level of individual nodes. Motivated by the importance of the problem, we are specically interested in detecting weak patterns in computer networks related to Cyber Situational Awareness. Our focus is on scenarios where the nodes (terminals, routers, servers, etc.) are sensors that provide measurements (of packet rates, user activity, central processing unit usage, etc.) that, when viewed independently, cannot provide a denitive determination of the underlying pattern, but when fused with data from across the network both spatially and temporally, the relevant patterns emerge. The approach is applicable to many types of sensor networks including computer networks, wireless networks, mobile sensor networks, and social networks, as well as in contexts such as databases and disease outbreaks.

  7. Wearable technology and ECG processing for fall risk assessment, prevention and detection.

    PubMed

    Melillo, Paolo; Castaldo, Rossana; Sannino, Giovanna; Orrico, Ada; de Pietro, Giuseppe; Pecchia, Leandro

    2015-08-01

    Falls represent one of the most common causes of injury-related morbidity and mortality in later life. Subjects with cardiovascular disorders (e.g., related to autonomic dysfunctions and postural hypotension) are at higher risk of falling. Autonomic dysfunctions increasing the risk of falling in the short and mid-term could be assessed by Heart Rate Variability (HRV) extracted by electrocardiograph (ECG). We developed three trials for assessing the usefulness of ECG monitoring using wearable devices for: risk assessment of falling in the next few weeks; prevention of imminent falls due to standing hypotension; and fall detection. Statistical and data-mining methods are adopted to develop classification and regression models, validated with the cross-validation approach. The first classifier based on HRV features enabled to identify future fallers among hypertensive patients with an accuracy of 72% (sensitivity: 51.1%, specificity: 80.2%). The regression model to predict falls due to orthostatic dropdown from HRV recorded before standing achieved an overall accuracy of 80% (sensitivity: 92%, specificity: 90%). Finally, the classifier to detect simulated falls using ECG achieved an accuracy of 77.3% (sensitivity: 81.8%, specificity: 72.7%). The evidence from these three studies showed that ECG monitoring and processing could achieve satisfactory performances compared to other system for risk assessment, fall prevention and detection. This is interesting as differently from other technologies actually employed to prevent falls, ECG is recommended for many other pathologies of later life and is more accepted by senior citizens. PMID:26738086

  8. Detection of dominant modelled nitrate processes with a high temporally resolved parameter sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Marcelo; Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Fohrer, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    The river systems in the catchment are impacted by nutrient inputs from different sources of the landscape. The input of nitrate from agricultural areas into the river systems is related to numerous processes which occur simultaneously and influence each other permanently. These complex nitrate processes are represented in eco-hydrological models. To obtain reliable future predictions of nitrate concentrations in rivers, the nitrogen cycle needs to be reproduced accurately in these models. For complex research questions dealing with nitrate impacts, it is thus essential to better understand the nitrate process dynamics in models and to reduce the uncertainties in water quality predictions. This study aims to improve the understanding of nitrate process dynamics by using a temporal parameter sensitivity analysis, which is applied on an eco-hydrological model. With this method, the dominant model parameters are detected for each day. Thus, by deriving temporal variations in dominant model parameters, the nitrate process dynamic is investigated for phases with different conditions for nitrate transport and transformations. The results show that the sensitivity of different nitrate parameters varies temporally. These temporal dynamics in dominant parameters are explained by temporal variations in nitrate transport and plant uptake processes. An extended view on the dynamics of the temporal parameter sensitivity is obtained by analysing different modelled runoff components and nitrate pathways. Thereby, the interpretation of seasonal variations in dominant nitrate pathways is assisted and a better understanding of the role of nitrate in the environment is achieved. We conclude that this method improves the reliability of modelled nitrate processes. In this way, a better basis for recent and future scenarios of nitrate loads management is provided.

  9. Detection and Genotyping of Leuconostoc spp. in a Sausage Processing Plant.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Frausto, J J; Cepeda-Marquez, L G; Salgado, L M; Iturriaga, M H; Arvizu-Medrano, S M

    2015-12-01

    Some Leuconostoc spp. have the ability to produce slime and undesirable compounds in cooked sausage. The objectives of this research were to identify Leuconostoc sources in a Vienna-type sausage processing plant and to evaluate the genetic diversity of the isolated strains. Three hundred and two samples of sausage batter, sausages during processing, spoiled sausage, equipment surfaces, chilling brine, workers' gloves and aprons, and used casings were collected (March to November 2008 and February to April 2010) from a sausage processing plant. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were quantified, and Leuconostoc were detected using PCR. Strains were isolated and identified in Leuconostoc-positive samples. Leuconostoc strains were genotyped using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. LAB content of nonspoiled and spoiled sausage ranged from <0.8 to 4.4 log CFU/g and from 4.9 to 8.3 log CFU/g, respectively. LAB levels on equipment surfaces ranged from <1.3 to 4.8 log CFU/100 cm(2). Leuconostoc was detected in 35% of the samples, and 88 Leuconostoc spp. strains were isolated and genotyped. The main Leuconostoc spp. isolated were L. mesenteroides (37 genotypes), L. fallax (29 genotypes), and L. lactis (6 genotypes). Some strains of Leuconostoc isolated from equipment surfaces and sausages showed the same genotype. One L. lactis genotype included strains isolated from spoiled sausages analyzed in April 2008 and March to April 2010. Equipment and conveyor belts constitute Leuconostoc contamination sources. Leuconostoc persistence in the sausage processing environment and in the final product suggests the existence of microbial reservoirs, possibly on equipment surfaces. PMID:26613911

  10. Anomalous absorption in a-type asymmetric top molecules in cosmic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    Since the detection of the first molecule OH in cosmic objects in 1963, scientists got interested in identification of molecules in the cosmic objects. By now more than 170 molecules have been identified. In order to know about the physical conditions prevailing in the cool cosmic objects and about the chemical reactions going on there, scientists are interested in identification of as many molecules as possible. In some molecular clouds, the kinetic temperature is very low, 10 - 20 K. For such objects, anomalous absorption, i.e., the absorption against the cosmic microwave background, may play an important role for identification of molecules. The transition 111 - 110 at 4.829 GHz of H_2CO was the first one showing the anomalous absorption in the cosmic objects. The molecule H_2CS also has been identified in the cosmic objects. We have discussed about the anomalous absorption of 111 - 110 transition in a-type asymmetric top molecules. For the investigation, the required parameters are the radiative and collisional transition probabilities. We can calculate radiative transition probabilities between the rotational levels. Calculation of collisional rates is a tedious job. In absence of accurate collisional rates, we can investigated the anomalous absorption in a qualitative manner by using the scaled values for collisional rates. We find that anomalous absorption of 111 - 110 transition is possible, provided collisional rates satisfy the required condition.

  11. Inter-laboratory validation study of two immunochemical methods for detection of processed ruminant proteins.

    PubMed

    van Raamsdonk, L W D; Margry, R J C F; van Kaathoven, R G C; Bremer, M G E G

    2015-10-15

    In order to facilitate safe re-introduction of non-ruminant processed animal proteins (PAPs) in aqua feed, two immunoassays have been tested in an interlaboratory study for their capability to detect ruminant PAPs processed under European conditions. The sensitivity of the MELISA-TEK assay was improved by applying a specific extraction kit. Six approved blank pork and poultry samples were adulterated to produce 15 samples spiked at 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% with ruminant material, sterilised at either 133 °C or 137 °C. Fourteen participants investigated the 6 blanks and 15 spiked samples, making 21 samples for the final test. For both assays specificity and sensitivity were at 97% or higher. Concordance and accordance were higher than 95% with one exception. The results indicate that both assays provided correct results at 0.5% and higher for the detecting ruminant PAPs (sterilised at 133 °C) in non-ruminant PAPs. Given the 2% upper limit of ruminant PAPs in non-ruminant PAPs for avoiding an increase in BSE incidents, these methods are fit for monitoring non-ruminant PAPs intended for aqua feed. PMID:25952876

  12. Fast Enzymatic Processing of Proteins for MS Detection with a Flow-through Microreactor.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Iulia M; Deng, Jingren; Smith, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of mass spectrometry (MS)-based protein analysis methods involve an enzymatic digestion step prior to detection, typically with trypsin. This step is necessary for the generation of small molecular weight peptides, generally with MW < 3,000-4,000 Da, that fall within the effective scan range of mass spectrometry instrumentation. Conventional protocols involve O/N enzymatic digestion at 37 ºC. Recent advances have led to the development of a variety of strategies, typically involving the use of a microreactor with immobilized enzymes or of a range of complementary physical processes that reduce the time necessary for proteolytic digestion to a few minutes (e.g., microwave or high-pressure). In this work, we describe a simple and cost-effective approach that can be implemented in any laboratory for achieving fast enzymatic digestion of a protein. The protein (or protein mixture) is adsorbed on C18-bonded reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) silica particles preloaded in a capillary column, and trypsin in aqueous buffer is infused over the particles for a short period of time. To enable on-line MS detection, the tryptic peptides are eluted with a solvent system with increased organic content directly in the MS ion source. This approach avoids the use of high-priced immobilized enzyme particles and does not necessitate any aid for completing the process. Protein digestion and complete sample analysis can be accomplished in less than ~3 min and ~30 min, respectively. PMID:27078683

  13. Manipulation of small Rho GTPases is a pathogen-induced process detected by Nod1

    PubMed Central

    Keestra, A. Marijke; Winter, Maria G.; Auburger, Josef J.; Fräßle, Simon P.; Xavier, Mariana N.; Winter, Sebastian E.; Kim, Anita; Poon, Victor; Ravesloot, Mariëtta M.; Waldenmaier, Julian; Tsolis, Renée M.; Eigenheer, Richard A.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    Our innate immune system distinguishes microbes from self by detecting conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) 1. However, all microbes produce PAMPs, regardless of their pathogenic potential. To distinguish virulent microbes from ones with lower disease-causing potential the innate immune system detects conserved pathogen-induced processes 2, such as the presence of microbial products in the host cytosol, by mechanisms that are not fully resolved. Here we show that Nod1 senses cytosolic microbial products by monitoring the activation state of small Rho GTPases. Activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 by bacterial delivery or ectopic expression of a Salmonella virulence factor, SopE, triggered the Nod1 signaling pathway with consequent Rip2-mediated induction of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses. Similarly, activation of the Nod1 signaling pathway by peptidoglycan required Rac1 activity. Furthermore, constitutively active forms of Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA activated the Nod1 signaling pathway. Our data identify activation of small Rho GTPases as a pathogen-induced process sensed through the Nod1 signaling pathway (Fig. S1). PMID:23542589

  14. Manipulation of small Rho GTPases is a pathogen-induced process detected by NOD1.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Winter, Maria G; Auburger, Josef J; Frässle, Simon P; Xavier, Mariana N; Winter, Sebastian E; Kim, Anita; Poon, Victor; Ravesloot, Mariëtta M; Waldenmaier, Julian F T; Tsolis, Renée M; Eigenheer, Richard A; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2013-04-11

    Our innate immune system distinguishes microbes from self by detecting conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns. However, these are produced by all microbes, regardless of their pathogenic potential. To distinguish virulent microbes from those with lower disease-causing potential the innate immune system detects conserved pathogen-induced processes, such as the presence of microbial products in the host cytosol, by mechanisms that are not fully resolved. Here we show that NOD1 senses cytosolic microbial products by monitoring the activation state of small Rho GTPases. Activation of RAC1 and CDC42 by bacterial delivery or ectopic expression of SopE, a virulence factor of the enteric pathogen Salmonella, triggered the NOD1 signalling pathway, with consequent RIP2 (also known as RIPK2)-mediated induction of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses. Similarly, activation of the NOD1 signalling pathway by peptidoglycan required RAC1 activity. Furthermore, constitutively active forms of RAC1, CDC42 and RHOA activated the NOD1 signalling pathway. Our data identify the activation of small Rho GTPases as a pathogen-induced process sensed through the NOD1 signalling pathway. PMID:23542589

  15. Fault Detection of Roller-Bearings Using Signal Processing and Optimization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dae-Ho; Lee, Dong-Han; Ahn, Jong-Hyo; Koh, Bong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a fault detection of roller bearings through signal processing and optimization techniques. After the occurrence of scratch-type defects on the inner race of bearings, variations of kurtosis values are investigated in terms of two different data processing techniques: minimum entropy deconvolution (MED), and the Teager-Kaiser Energy Operator (TKEO). MED and the TKEO are employed to qualitatively enhance the discrimination of defect-induced repeating peaks on bearing vibration data with measurement noise. Given the perspective of the execution sequence of MED and the TKEO, the study found that the kurtosis sensitivity towards a defect on bearings could be highly improved. Also, the vibration signal from both healthy and damaged bearings is decomposed into multiple intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), through empirical mode decomposition (EMD). The weight vectors of IMFs become design variables for a genetic algorithm (GA). The weights of each IMF can be optimized through the genetic algorithm, to enhance the sensitivity of kurtosis on damaged bearing signals. Experimental results show that the EMD-GA approach successfully improved the resolution of detectability between a roller bearing with defect, and an intact system. PMID:24368701

  16. Fault detection of roller-bearings using signal processing and optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dae-Ho; Lee, Dong-Han; Ahn, Jong-Hyo; Koh, Bong-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a fault detection of roller bearings through signal processing and optimization techniques. After the occurrence of scratch-type defects on the inner race of bearings, variations of kurtosis values are investigated in terms of two different data processing techniques: minimum entropy deconvolution (MED), and the Teager-Kaiser Energy Operator (TKEO). MED and the TKEO are employed to qualitatively enhance the discrimination of defect-induced repeating peaks on bearing vibration data with measurement noise. Given the perspective of the execution sequence of MED and the TKEO, the study found that the kurtosis sensitivity towards a defect on bearings could be highly improved. Also, the vibration signal from both healthy and damaged bearings is decomposed into multiple intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), through empirical mode decomposition (EMD). The weight vectors of IMFs become design variables for a genetic algorithm (GA). The weights of each IMF can be optimized through the genetic algorithm, to enhance the sensitivity of kurtosis on damaged bearing signals. Experimental results show that the EMD-GA approach successfully improved the resolution of detectability between a roller bearing with defect, and an intact system. PMID:24368701

  17. On-chip skin color detection using a triple-well CMOS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussaid, Farid; Chai, Douglas; Bouzerdoum, Abdesselam

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, a current-mode VLSI architecture enabling on read-out skin detection without the need for any on-chip memory elements is proposed. An important feature of the proposed architecture is that it removes the need for demosaicing. Color separation is achieved using the strong wavelength dependence of the absorption coefficient in silicon. This wavelength dependence causes a very shallow absorption of blue light and enables red light to penetrate deeply in silicon. A triple-well process, allowing a P-well to be placed inside an N-well, is chosen to fabricate three vertically integrated photodiodes acting as the RGB color detector for each pixel. Pixels of an input RGB image are classified as skin or non-skin pixels using a statistical skin color model, chosen to offer an acceptable trade-off between skin detection performance and implementation complexity. A single processing unit is used to classify all pixels of the input RGB image. This results in reduced mismatch and also in an increased pixel fill-factor. Furthermore, the proposed current-mode architecture is programmable, allowing external control of all classifier parameters to compensate for mismatch and changing lighting conditions.

  18. Distribution and speciation of gold in biogenic and abiogenic calcium carbonates - Implications for the formation of gold anomalous calcrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, Frank; Etschmann, Barbara; Dart, Robert C.; Brewe, Dale L.; Vogt, Stefan; Schmidt Mumm, Andreas; Brugger, Joël

    2011-04-01

    Calcrete (pedogenic Ca carbonate) is an important sampling medium for geochemical gold (Au) exploration in semi-arid and arid regions of Australia, because it is widespread, easy to sample and calcium (Ca) shows a strong positive correlation with Au, but not with base metals, in calcrete overlying buried Au mineralization. In this study we show that the formation of Au-anomalous calcrete can be biomediated through the activity of resident microorganisms, and may not simply be the result of passive nucleation on inactive cells or evapotransporative processes. Calcified microfossils are highly abundant in calcrete from the Barns Au-prospect in South Australia. These microfossils are morphological analogues of calcified cells and biofilms formed in laboratory experiments conducted with active bacterial cultures enriched from Au-anomalous calcareous sand from the Barns prospect. Calcium carbonates precipitated by these cultures consisted mostly of calcite, which is the main carbonate mineral in calcrete. Synchrotron micro-X-ray fluorescence (S-μXRF) mapping was used to assess the distribution of Au, Zn, Ca and other metals in Ca carbonates precipitated by active bacterial cultures. On a μm-scale the distribution of Au was heterogeneous in these Ca carbonates and differed from base metal distribution, thus mimicking the spatial separation of these metals observed in calcrete. The speciation of Au in Ca carbonates precipitated by active bacteria was measured using micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (μ-XANES) and resembled that observed in Au-anomalous calcrete closely. While metallic Au was observed in Au 'hotpots', ionic Au was detected in the halo surrounding the 'hotspot'. In contrast, the precipitates produced in the presence of dead bacterial cells or by raising solution pH or pCO 2, i.e., hydroxylapatite, portlandite and vaterite, respectively, did not reflect the mineralogy of calcrete. Gold distribution and speciation in vaterite, formed

  19. Structural damage detection using extended Kalman filter combined with statistical process control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong

    2015-04-01

    Traditional modal-based methods, which identify damage based upon changes in vibration characteristics of the structure on a global basis, have received considerable attention in the past decades. However, the effectiveness of the modalbased methods is dependent on the type of damage and the accuracy of the structural model, and these methods may also have difficulties when applied to complex structures. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm which has the capability to estimate parameters and catch abrupt changes, is currently used in continuous and automatic structural damage detection to overcome disadvantages of traditional methods. Structural parameters are typically slow-changing variables under effects of operational and environmental conditions, thus it would be difficult to observe the structural damage and quantify the damage in real-time with EKF only. In this paper, a Statistical Process Control (SPC) is combined with EFK method in order to overcome this difficulty. Based on historical measurements of damage-sensitive feathers involved in the state-space dynamic models, extended Kalman filter (EKF) algorithm is used to produce real-time estimations of these features as well as standard derivations, which can then be used to form control ranges for SPC to detect any abnormality of the selected features. Moreover, confidence levels of the detection can be adjusted by choosing different times of sigma and number of adjacent out-of-range points. The proposed method is tested using simulated data of a three floors linear building in different damage scenarios, and numerical results demonstrate high damage detection accuracy and light computation of this presented method.

  20. An internal model architecture for novelty detection: implications for cerebellar and collicular roles in sensory processing.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sean R; Porrill, John; Pearson, Martin J; Pipe, Anthony G; Prescott, Tony J; Dean, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is thought to implement internal models for sensory prediction, but details of the underlying circuitry are currently obscure. We therefore investigated a specific example of internal-model based sensory prediction, namely detection of whisker contacts during whisking. Inputs from the vibrissae in rats can be affected by signals generated by whisker movement, a phenomenon also observable in whisking robots. Robot novelty-detection can be improved by adaptive noise-cancellation, in which an adaptive filter learns a forward model of the whisker plant that allows the sensory effects of whisking to be predicted and thus subtracted from the noisy sensory input. However, the forward model only uses information from an efference copy of the whisking commands. Here we show that the addition of sensory information from the whiskers allows the adaptive filter to learn a more complex internal model that performs more robustly than the forward model, particularly when the whisking-induced interference has a periodic structure. We then propose a neural equivalent of the circuitry required for adaptive novelty-detection in the robot, in which the role of the adaptive filter is carried out by the cerebellum, with the comparison of its output (an estimate of the self-induced interference) and the original vibrissal signal occurring in the superior colliculus, a structure noted for its central role in novelty detection. This proposal makes a specific prediction concerning the whisker-related functions of a region in cerebellar cortical zone A(2) that in rats receives climbing fibre input from the superior colliculus (via the inferior olive). This region has not been observed in non-whisking animals such as cats and primates, and its functional role in vibrissal processing has hitherto remained mysterious. Further investigation of this system may throw light on how cerebellar-based internal models could be used in broader sensory, motor and cognitive contexts. PMID

  1. Tensor charge and anomalous magnetic moment correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhfi, Mustapha

    2005-12-01

    We propose a generalization of the upgraded Karl-Sehgal formula which relates baryon magnetic moments to the spin structure of constituent quarks, by adding anomalous magnetic moments of quarks. We first argue that the relativistic nature of quarks inside baryons requires the introduction of two kinds of magnetisms, one axial and the other tensorial. The first one is associated with integrated quark helicity distributions {delta}{sub i}-{delta}{sub i} (standard) and the second with integrated transversity distributions {delta}{sub i}-{delta}{sub i}. The weight of each contribution is controlled by the combination of two parameters, x{sub i} the ratio of the quark mass to the average kinetic energy and a{sub i} the quark anomalous magnetic moment. The quark anomalous magnetic moment is correlated to transversity, and both are necessary ingredients in describing relativistic quarks. The proposed formula, when confronted with baryon magnetic moments data with reasonable inputs, yields, besides quark magnetic densities, anomalous magnetic moments large enough not to be ignored.

  2. Anomalous adaptive conditions associated with strabismus.

    PubMed

    Verma, Arun

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous adaptive conditions (AAC) associated with strabismus include: suppression, amblyopia, abnormal retinal correspondence, eccentric fixation, retinal rivalry, horror fusionis, and suspension. This article poses the hypothesis that AAC, in certain cases, may be the cause of strabismus rather than the result of strabismus. PMID:17984497

  3. Electroweak baryogenesis with anomalous Higgs couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Wu, Lei; Yue, Jason

    2016-04-01

    We investigate feasibility of efficient baryogenesis at the electroweak scale within the effective field theory framework based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge symmetry. In this framework the LHC Higgs boson is described by a singlet scalar field, which, therefore, admits new interactions. Assuming that Higgs couplings with the eletroweak gauge bosons are as in the Standard Model, we demonstrate that the Higgs cubic coupling and the CP-violating Higgs-top quark anomalous couplings alone may drive the a strongly first-order phase transition. The distinguished feature of this transition is that the anomalous Higgs vacuum expectation value is generally non-zero in both phases. We identify a range of anomalous couplings, consistent with current experimental data, where sphaleron rates are sufficiently fast in the `symmetric' phase and are suppressed in the `broken' phase and demonstrate that the desired baryon asymmetry can indeed be generated in this framework. This range of the Higgs anomalous couplings can be further constrained from the LHC Run 2 data and be probed at high luminosity LHC and beyond.

  4. Anomalous solutions to the strong CP problem.

    PubMed

    Hook, Anson

    2015-04-10

    We present a new mechanism for solving the strong CP problem using a Z_{2} discrete symmetry and an anomalous U(1) symmetry. A Z_{2} symmetry is used so that two gauge groups have the same theta angle. An anomalous U(1) symmetry makes the difference between the two theta angles physical and the sum unphysical. Two models are presented where the anomalous symmetry manifests itself in the IR in different ways. In the first model, there are massless bifundamental quarks, a solution reminiscent of the massless up quark solution. In the IR of this model, the η^{'} boson relaxes the QCD theta angle to the difference between the two theta angles-in this case zero. In the second model, the anomalous U(1) symmetry is realized in the IR as a dynamically generated mass term that has exactly the phase needed to cancel the theta angle. Both of these models make the extremely concrete prediction that there exist new colored particles at the TeV scale. PMID:25910109

  5. Anomalous WWγ couplings with beam polarization at the Compact Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arı, V.; Billur, A. A.; İnan, S. C.; Köksal, M.

    2016-05-01

    We study the anomalous WWγ couplings at the Compact Linear Collider through the processes e+e- →W+W-, e-e+ →e-γ*e+ →e+νeW- and e-e+ →e-γ*γ*e+ →e-W+W-e+ (γ* is the Weizsacker-Williams photon). We give the 95% confidence level limits for unpolarized and polarized electron (positron) beam on the anomalous couplings for various values of the integrated luminosities and center-of-mass energies. We show that the obtained limits on the anomalous couplings through these processes can highly improve the current experimental limits. In addition, our limits with beam polarization are approximately two times better than the unpolarized case.

  6. Anomalous transport phenomena in px+i py superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songci; Andreev, A. V.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry in superconductors with the px+i py symmetry of the order parameter allows for a class of effects which are analogous to the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets. These effects exist below the critical temperature, T anomalous Hall thermal conductivity, the polar Kerr effect, the anomalous Hall effect, and the anomalous photo- and acousto-galvanic effects.

  7. Anomalous Symmetry Fractionalization and Surface Topological Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xie; Burnell, F. J.; Vishwanath, Ashvin; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2015-10-01

    In addition to possessing fractional statistics, anyon excitations of a 2D topologically ordered state can realize symmetry in distinct ways, leading to a variety of symmetry-enriched topological (SET) phases. While the symmetry fractionalization must be consistent with the fusion and braiding rules of the anyons, not all ostensibly consistent symmetry fractionalizations can be realized in 2D systems. Instead, certain "anomalous" SETs can only occur on the surface of a 3D symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phase. In this paper, we describe a procedure for determining whether a SET of a discrete, on-site, unitary symmetry group G is anomalous or not. The basic idea is to gauge the symmetry and expose the anomaly as an obstruction to a consistent topological theory combining both the original anyons and the gauge fluxes. Utilizing a result of Etingof, Nikshych, and Ostrik, we point out that a class of obstructions is captured by the fourth cohomology group H4(G ,U (1 )) , which also precisely labels the set of 3D SPT phases, with symmetry group G . An explicit procedure for calculating the cohomology data from a SET is given, with the corresponding physical intuition explained. We thus establish a general bulk-boundary correspondence between the anomalous SET and the 3D bulk SPT whose surface termination realizes it. We illustrate this idea using the chiral spin liquid [U (1 )2 ] topological order with a reduced symmetry Z2×Z2⊂SO (3 ) , which can act on the semion quasiparticle in an anomalous way. We construct exactly solved 3D SPT models realizing the anomalous surface terminations and demonstrate that they are nontrivial by computing three-loop braiding statistics. Possible extensions to antiunitary symmetries are also discussed.

  8. Geomorphological change detection of fluvial processes of lower Siret channel using LIDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niculita, Mihai; Obreja, Florin; Boca, Bogdan

    2015-04-01

    Geomorphological change detection is a relatively new method risen from the availability of high resolution multitemporal DEMs (James et. al., 2011; Brodu & Lague, 2012; Barnhart & Crosby, 2013). The main issue in regard with this method is the identification of real change, given by geomorphologic processes, and not by the noise, method artefacts, vegetation or various other errors (Wheaton et. al., 2009). We present the results of geomorphological change detection applied to a part of the lower Siret river channel (from 60 to 140 km above the Siret-Dunăre confluence, between Adjud and Namoloasa). The data sources used were LIDAR DEMs provided by the Siret and Prut-Barlad Water Administrations, one version for 2008, at 2 m resolution, and the other at 0.5 m resolution for 2012. The geomorphological change detection was performed at a resolution of 2 m using the methodology of Wheaton et. al., 2009, on 4 sites with a cumulated length of 47 km, with 41.6 km covering meandering channels and 5.4 km Movileni anthropic lake shore. In the studied period (2008-2012), two major flood events were registered, one in 2008 and the other in 2010 (Olariu et. al., 2009, Serbu et. al., 2009, Nedelcu et. al., 2011). The geomorphological change detection approach managed to outline the presence and the rate of process (expressed as volumetric change) for: channel erosion, channel aggradation, lateral migration of river bank, meander migration, lake bank erosion, alluvial fan deposition and anthropic excavation of channel and river bank. Barnhart T.B., Crosby B.T., 2013. Comparing Two Methods of Surface Change Detection on an Evolving Thermokarst Using High-Temporal-Frequency Terrestrial Laser Scanning, Selawik River, Alaska. Remote Sensing, 5:2813-23937. Brodu N, Lague D. 2012. 3D Terrestrial LiDAR data classification of complex natural scenes using a multi-scale dimensionality criterion: applications in geomorphology, ISPRS journal of Photogrammmetry and Remote Sensing, 68

  9. Detection of organic residues on food processing equipment surfaces by spectral imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jianwei; Jun, Won; Kim, Moon S.; Chao, Kaunglin

    2010-04-01

    Organic residues on equipment surfaces in poultry processing plants can generate cross contamination and increase the risk of unsafe food for consumers. This research was aimed to investigate the potential of LED-induced fluorescence imaging technique for rapid inspection of organic residues on poultry processing equipment surfaces. High-power blue LEDs with a spectral output at 410 nm were used as the excitation source for a line-scanning hyperspectral imaging system. Common chicken residue samples including fat, blood, and feces from ceca, colon, duodenum, and small intestine were prepared on stainless steel sheets. Fluorescence emission images were acquired from 120 samples (20 for each type of residue) in the wavelength range of 500-700 nm. LED-induced fluorescence characteristics of the tested samples were determined. PCA (principal component analysis) was performed to analyze fluorescence spectral data. Two SIMCA (soft independent modeling of class analogy) models were developed to differentiate organic residues and stainless steel samples. Classification accuracies using 2-class ('stainless steel' and 'organic residue') and 4-class ('stainless steel', 'fat', 'blood', and 'feces') SIMCA models were 100% and 97.5%, respectively. An optimal single-band and a band-pair that are promising for rapid residue detection were identified by correlation analysis. The single-band approach using the selected wavelength of 666 nm could generate false negative errors for chicken blood inspection. Two-band ratio images using 503 and 666 nm (F503/F666) have great potential for detecting various chicken residues on stainless steel surfaces. This wavelength pair can be adopted for developing a LED-based hand-held fluorescence imaging device for inspecting poultry processing equipment surfaces.

  10. NLO BFKL and Anomalous Dimensions of Light-Ray Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Balitsky, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The anomalous dimensions of light-ray operators of twist two are obtained by analytical continuation of the anomalous dimensions of corresponding local operators. I demonstrate that the asymptotics of these anomalous dimensions at the "BFKL point" j → 1 can be obtained by comparing the light-cone operator expansion with the high-energy expansion in Wilson lines.

  11. Data processing of ground-penetrating radar signals for the detection of discontinuities using polarization diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebchrany, Elias; Sagnard, Florence; Baltazart, Vincent; Tarel, Jean-Phillippe

    2014-05-01

    In civil engineering, ground penetrating radar (GPR) is used to survey pavement thickness at traffic speed, detect and localize buried objects (pipes, cables, voids, cavities), zones of cracks and discontinuities in concrete or soils. In this work, a ground-coupled radar made of a pair of transmitting and receiving bowtie-slot antennas is moved linearly on the soil surface to detect the reflected waves induced by discontinuities in the subsurface. The GPR system operates in the frequency domain using a step-frequency continuous wave (SFCW) using a Vector Network Analyzer (VNA) in an ultra-wide band [0.3 ; 4] GHz. The detection of targets is usually focused on time imaging. Thus, the targets (limited in size) are usually shown by diffraction hyperbolas on a Bscan image that is an unfocused depiction of the scatterers. The contrast in permittivity and the ratio between the size of the object and the wavelength are important parameters in the detection process. Thus, we have made a first study on the use of polarization diversity to obtain additional information relative to the contrast between the soil and the target and the dielectric characteristics of a target. The two main polarizations configurations of the radar have been considered in the presence of objects having a pipe geometry: the TM (Transverse Magnetic) and TE (Transverse Electric. To interpret the diffraction hyperbolas on a Bscan image, we have used pre-processing techniques are necessary to reduce the clutter signal which can overlap and obscure the target responses, particularly shallow objects. The clutter, which can be composed of the direct coupling between the antennas and the reflected wave from the soil surface, the scattering on the heterogeneities due to the granular nature of the subsurface material, and some additive noise, varies with soil dielectric characteristics and/or surface roughness and leads to uncertainty in the measurements (additive noise). Because of the statistical nature of

  12. Anomalous Rayleigh Scattering and Nanoscale Inhomogeneities in Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, John; Lee, Mierie; Moynihan, Cornelius T.

    2000-03-01

    Light scattering from oxide and halide glasses in the glass transition region exhibits anomalous Rayleigh scattering.We observe a local maximum in the scattered intensity during the heating phase of heating and cooling experiments.It is shown that this behavior is consistent with the presence of nanoscale inhomogeneities,which relax at different rates.Observations of anomalous light scattering were detected from strong and fragile glass formers.In all glasses a hysteresis effect is seen in the Rayleigh scattering behavior when heating and cooling experiments are compared.In the cooling phase measurements,the Rayleigh intensity behavior is normal.This hysteresis effect in the Rayleigh scattering is an indication that an intermediate range order exists in these glasses.The extent of the intermediate range order as determined from Rayleigh data compares well with values obtained obtained from Boson peak data.A model based on the modified Tool-Narayanaswamy concept is found to be in agreement with the calculations based on experimental results.

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Brian C; Brindley, Stephen M; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Newman, Lee S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ. PMID:24932923

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  15. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Detection of Beryllium Ions in the Antigen Processing and Presentation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ. PMID:24932923

  16. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstratemore » that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.« less

  17. Novel applications for biogeophysics: Prospects for detecting key subseafloor geomicrobiological processes or habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, F. S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.

    2007-05-01

    The new subdiscipline of biogeophysics has focused mostly on the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in contaminated subsurface environments usually undergoing remediation. However, the use of biogeophysics to examine the biogeochemistry of marine sediments has not yet been well-integrated into conceptual models that describe subseafloor processes. Current examples of geophysical measurements that have been used to detect geomicrobiological processes or infer their location in the seafloor include sound surveillance system (SOSUS)-derived data that detect seafloor eruptive events, deep and shallow cross-sectional seismic surveys that determine the presence of hydraulically conductive zones or gas-bearing sediments (e.g., bottom-simulating reflectors or bubble-rich strata), and thermal profiles. One possible area for innovative biogeophysical characterization of the seafloor involves determining the depth of the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) in locations where sulfate diffuses from the seawater and methane emanates from subsurface strata. The SMI demarcates a stratum where microbially-driven anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is dependent upon methane as an electron donor and sulfate as an electron acceptor. AMO is carried out by a recently defined, unique consortium of microbes that metabolically temper the flux of methane into the overlying seawater. The depth of the SMI is, respectively, shallow or deep according to whether a high or low rate of methane flux occurs from the deep sediments. Presently, the SMI can only be determined by direct measurements of methane and sulfate concentrations in the interstitial waters or by molecular biological techniques that target the microbes responsible for creating the SMI. Both methods require collection and considerable analysis of sediment samples. Therefore, detection of the SMI by non-destructive methods would be advantageous. As a key biogeochemical threshold in marine sediments, the depth of the SMI defines

  18. Image processing of head CT images using neuro best contrast (NBC) and lesion detection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipnis, Sameer; Vincent, Diana; Rumboldt, Zoran; Huda, Walter

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to objectively compare lesion detection performance of head CT images reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) algorithms with those reconstructed using NBC. Method: The observer study was conducted using the 2-AFC methodology. An AFC experiment consists of 128 observer choices and permits the computation of the intensity needed to achieve 92% correct (I92%). High values of I92% corresponds to a poor level of detection performance, and vice versa. Head CT images were acquired at an x-ray tube voltage of 120 kVp with a CTDIvol value of 75 mGy in a helical scan. Nine randomly selected normal images from three patients and at three anatomical head locations were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and neuro-best-contrast (NBC) processing. Circular lesions were generated by projecting spheres onto the image plane, followed by blurring function, with lesion sizes of 2.8 mm, 6.5 mm and 9.8 mm used in these experiments. Four readers were used, with 18 experiments performed by each observer (2 processing techniques × 3 lesion sizes × 3 repeats). The experimental order of the 18 experiments was randomized to eliminate learning curve and/or observer fatigue. The ratio R of the I92% value for NBC to the corresponding I92% value for FBP was calculated for each observer and each lesion size. Values of R greater than unity indicate that NBC is inferior to FBP, and vice versa. Results: Analysis of data from each observer showed that a total of four data points had R less than unity, and eight data points were greater than unity. Eleven of the twelve individual observer R values with one standard deviation of unity. When data for the four observers were pooled, the resultant average R values were 0.98 +/- 0.38, 0.96 +/- 0.33 and 1.15 +/- 0.45, for the 2.8 mm, 6.5 mm and 9.8 mm lesions respectively. The overall average R for all three lesions sizes was 1.03 +/- 0.67. Conclusion: Our AFC investigation has shown no

  19. Real-Time Detection Methods to Monitor TRU Compositions in UREX+Process Streams

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Charlton, William; Indacochea, J Ernesto; taleyarkhan, Rusi; Pereira, Candido

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has developed advanced methods for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel. The majority of this development was accomplished under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), building on the strong legacy of process development R&D over the past 50 years. The most prominent processing method under development is named UREX+. The name refers to a family of processing methods that begin with the Uranium Extraction (UREX) process and incorporate a variety of other methods to separate uranium, selected fission products, and the transuranic (TRU) isotopes from dissolved spent nuclear fuel. It is important to consider issues such as safeguards strategies and materials control and accountability methods. Monitoring of higher actinides during aqueous separations is a critical research area. By providing on-line materials accountability for the processes, covert diversion of the materials streams becomes much more difficult. The importance of the nuclear fuel cycle continues to rise on national and international agendas. The U.S. Department of Energy is evaluating and developing advanced methods for safeguarding nuclear materials along with instrumentation in various stages of the fuel cycle, especially in material balance areas (MBAs) and during reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. One of the challenges related to the implementation of any type of MBA and/or reprocessing technology (e.g., PUREX or UREX) is the real-time quantification and control of the transuranic (TRU) isotopes as they move through the process. Monitoring of higher actinides from their neutron emission (including multiplicity) and alpha signatures during transit in MBAs and in aqueous separations is a critical research area. By providing on-line real-time materials accountability, diversion of the materials becomes much more difficult. The objective of this consortium was to develop real time detection methods to monitor the efficacy of the UREX+ process and to safeguard the separated

  20. Time-dependent Neural Processing of Auditory Feedback during Voice Pitch Error Detection

    PubMed Central

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Liu, Hanjun; Larson, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    The neural responses to sensory consequences of a self-produced motor act are suppressed compared with those in response to a similar but externally generated stimulus. Previous studies in the somatosensory and auditory systems have shown that the motor-induced suppression of the sensory mechanisms is sensitive to delays between the motor act and the onset of the stimulus. The present study investigated time-dependent neural processing of auditory feedback in response to self-produced vocalizations. ERPs were recorded in response to normal and pitch-shifted voice auditory feedback during active vocalization and passive listening to the playback of the same vocalizations. The pitch-shifted stimulus was delivered to the subjects’ auditory feedback after a randomly chosen time delay between the vocal onset and the stimulus presentation. Results showed that the neural responses to delayed feedback perturbations were significantly larger than those in response to the pitch-shifted stimulus occurring at vocal onset. Active vocalization was shown to enhance neural responsiveness to feedback alterations only for nonzero delays compared with passive listening to the playback. These findings indicated that the neural mechanisms of auditory feedback processing are sensitive to timing between the vocal motor commands and the incoming auditory feedback. Time-dependent neural processing of auditory feedback may be an important feature of the audio-vocal integration system that helps to improve the feedback-based monitoring and control of voice structure through vocal error detection and correction. PMID:20146608

  1. The early component of middle latency auditory-evoked potentials in the process of deviance detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Linfeng; Gong, Qin

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate both the encoding mechanism and the process of deviance detection when deviant stimuli were presented in various patterns in an environment featuring repetitive sounds. In adults with normal hearing, middle latency responses were recorded within an oddball paradigm containing complex tones or speech sounds, wherein deviant stimuli featured different change patterns. For both complex tones and speech sounds, the Na and Pa components of middle latency responses showed an increase in the mean amplitude and a reduction in latency when comparing rare deviant stimuli with repetitive standard stimuli in a stimulation block. However, deviant stimuli with a rising frequency induced signals with smaller amplitudes than other deviant stimuli. The present findings indicate that deviant stimuli with different change patterns induce differing responses in the primary auditory cortex. In addition, the Pa components of speech sounds typically feature a longer latency and similar mean amplitude compared with complex tones, which suggests that the auditory system requires more complex processing for the analysis of speech sounds before processing in the auditory cortex. PMID:27203294

  2. Lyapunov-Based Sensor Failure Detection And Recovery For The Reverse Water Gas Shift Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralambous, Michael G.

    2001-01-01

    Livingstone, a model-based AI software system, is planned for use in the autonomous fault diagnosis, reconfiguration, and control of the oxygen-producing reverse water gas shift (RWGS) process test-bed located in the Applied Chemistry Laboratory at KSC. In this report the RWGS process is first briefly described and an overview of Livingstone is given. Next, a Lyapunov-based approach for detecting and recovering from sensor failures, differing significantly from that used by Livingstone, is presented. In this new method, models used are in terms of the defining differential equations of system components, thus differing from the qualitative, static models used by Livingstone. An easily computed scalar inequality constraint, expressed in terms of sensed system variables, is used to determine the existence of sensor failures. In the event of sensor failure, an observer/estimator is used for determining which sensors have failed. The theory underlying the new approach is developed. Finally, a recommendation is made to use the Lyapunov-based approach to complement the capability of Livingstone and to use this combination in the RWGS process.

  3. LYAPUNOV-Based Sensor Failure Detection and Recovery for the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralambous, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    Livingstone, a model-based AI software system, is planned for use in the autonomous fault diagnosis, reconfiguration, and control of the oxygen-producing reverse water gas shift (RWGS) process test-bed located in the Applied Chemistry Laboratory at KSC. In this report the RWGS process is first briefly described and an overview of Livingstone is given. Next, a Lyapunov-based approach for detecting and recovering from sensor failures, differing significantly from that used by Livingstone, is presented. In this new method, models used are in t e m of the defining differential equations of system components, thus differing from the qualitative, static models used by Livingstone. An easily computed scalar inequality constraint, expressed in terms of sensed system variables, is used to determine the existence of sensor failures. In the event of sensor failure, an observer/estimator is used for determining which sensors have failed. The theory underlying the new approach is developed. Finally, a recommendation is made to use the Lyapunov-based approach to complement the capability of Livingstone and to use this combination in the RWGS process.

  4. Gross error detection and stage efficiency estimation in a separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Serth, R.W.; Srikanth, B. . Dept. of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering); Maronga, S.J. . Dept. of Chemical and Process Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    Accurate process models are required for optimization and control in chemical plants and petroleum refineries. These models involve various equipment parameters, such as stage efficiencies in distillation columns, the values of which must be determined by fitting the models to process data. Since the data contain random and systematic measurement errors, some of which may be large (gross errors), they must be reconciled to obtain reliable estimates of equipment parameters. The problem thus involves parameter estimation coupled with gross error detection and data reconciliation. MacDonald and Howat (1988) studied the above problem for a single-stage flash distillation process. Their analysis was based on the definition of stage efficiency due to Hausen, which has some significant disadvantages in this context, as discussed below. In addition, they considered only data sets which contained no gross errors. The purpose of this article is to extend the above work by considering alternative definitions of state efficiency and efficiency estimation in the presence of gross errors.

  5. Advanced signal processing method for ground penetrating radar feature detection and enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Venkatachalam, Anbu Selvam; Huston, Dryver; Xia, Tian

    2014-03-01

    This paper focuses on new signal processing algorithms customized for an air coupled Ultra-Wideband (UWB) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) system targeting highway pavements and bridge deck inspections. The GPR hardware consists of a high-voltage pulse generator, a high speed 8 GSps real time data acquisition unit, and a customized field-programmable gate array (FPGA) control element. In comparison to most existing GPR system with low survey speeds, this system can survey at normal highway speed (60 mph) with a high horizontal resolution of up to 10 scans per centimeter. Due to the complexity and uncertainty of subsurface media, the GPR signal processing is important but challenging. In this GPR system, an adaptive GPR signal processing algorithm using Curvelet Transform, 2D high pass filtering and exponential scaling is proposed to alleviate noise and clutter while the subsurface features are preserved and enhanced. First, Curvelet Transform is used to remove the environmental and systematic noises while maintain the range resolution of the B-Scan image. Then, mathematical models for cylinder-shaped object and clutter are built. A two-dimension (2D) filter based on these models removes clutter and enhances the hyperbola feature in a B-Scan image. Finally, an exponential scaling method is applied to compensate the signal attenuation in subsurface materials and to improve the desired signal feature. For performance test and validation, rebar detection experiments and subsurface feature inspection in laboratory and field configurations are performed.

  6. Color is processed less efficiently than orientation in change detection but more efficiently in visual search.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liqiang

    2015-05-01

    Basic visual features (e.g., color, orientation) are assumed to be processed in the same general way across different visual tasks. Here, a significant deviation from this assumption was predicted on the basis of the analysis of stimulus spatial structure, as characterized by the Boolean-map notion. If a task requires memorizing the orientations of a set of bars, then the map consisting of those bars can be readily used to hold the overall structure in memory and will thus be especially useful. If the task requires visual search for a target, then the map, which contains only an overall structure, will be of little use. Supporting these predictions, the present study demonstrated that in comparison to stimulus colors, bar orientations were processed more efficiently in change-detection tasks but less efficiently in visual search tasks (Cohen's d = 4.24). In addition to offering support for the role of the Boolean map in conscious access, the present work also throws doubts on the generality of processing visual features. PMID:25834029

  7. Observation of polymer degradation processes in photovoltaic modules via luminescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röder, B.; Ermilov, E. A.; Philipp, D.; Köhl, M.

    2008-08-01

    The estimation of PV-modules lifetime facilitates the further development and helps to lower risks for producers and investors. One base for this extensive testing work is the knowledge of the degradation kinetics of encapsulating polymer materials. Besides ethylen-vinylacetate copolymer (EVA), which is the prevalent material for encapsulation, new materials like Poly-Vinyl-Butyral (PVB), and thermoplastic Poly-Urethan (TPU) become available and need the assessment of their properties and the durability impact. In this context is it very important to identify the extent of degradation caused by different parameters in order to identify the determining factor of polymer degradation as well as potential interactions between different degradation processes. To simulate long time degeneration processes accelerated aging under damp-heat and high-UV conditions was performed on different EVA, TPU, and PVB samples. In this paper we report first results on measuring fluorescence spectra from different encapsulation materials after accelerated ageing in dependence on time and aging procedure. Our investigations clearly demonstrate that it is possible to follow damp-heat and UV induced aging processes of different polymers used in PV-modules as encapsulation materials by luminescence detection.

  8. A signal processing approach to exploit chirp excitation in Lamb wave defect detection and localization procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Luca; Perelli, Alessandro; Marzani, Alessandro

    2013-08-01

    A non-linear Lamb wave signal processing strategy aimed at extending the capability of active-passive networks of PZT transducers for defect detection is proposed. In particular, the proposed signal processing allows to use chirp shaped pulses in actuation, instead of classically applied spiky pulses, requiring thus lower input voltages. To such aim, the acquired Lamb waves are processed by means of a two-step procedure: a warped frequency transform (WFT) to compensate for the dispersion due to the traveled distance, followed by a compression procedure to remove from the signals the induced chirp frequency modulation. Next, the resulting signals are exploited to feed an imaging algorithm aimed at providing the position of the defect on the plate. The potential of the procedure is demonstrated and validated by analyzing experimental Lamb waves propagating in an aluminum plate where defects were emulated by posing an added mass on the plate. The proposed automatic procedure is suitable to locate defect-induced reflections and can be easily implemented in real applications for structural health monitoring.

  9. Signal Processing and Its Effect on Scanning Efficiencies for a Field Instrument for Detecting Low-energy Radiation.

    PubMed

    Marianno, Craig M

    2015-07-01

    Signal processing within a radiation detector affects detection efficiency. Currently, organizations such as private industry, the U.S. Navy, Army, and Air Force are coupling some detector systems with data collection devices to survey large land areas for radioactive contamination. As detector technology has advanced and analog data collection has turned to digital, signal processing is becoming prevalent in some instruments. Using a NIST traceable (241)Am source, detection efficiency for a field instrument for detecting low-energy radiation (FIDLER) was examined for both a static and scanning mode. Experimental results were compared to Monte Carlo-generated efficiencies. Stationary data compared nicely to the theoretical results. Conversely, scanning detection efficiencies were considerably different from their theoretical counterparts. As speed increased, differences in detection efficiency approached two orders of magnitude. To account for these differences, a quasi time-dependent Monte Carlo simulation was created mimicking the signal processing undertaken by the FIDLER detection system. By including signal processing, experimental results fell within the bounds of the Monte Carlo-generated efficiencies, thus demonstrating the negative effects of such processing on detection efficiencies. PMID:26011500

  10. Osmotic generation of 'anomalous' fluid pressures in geological environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzii, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    Osmotic pressures are generated by differences in chemical potential of a solution across a membrane. But whether osmosis can have a significant effect on the pressure of fluids in geological environments has been controversial, because the membrane properties of geological media are poorly understood. 'Anomalous' pressures - large departures from hydrostatic pressure that are not explicable in terms of topographic or fluid-density effects are widely found in geological settings, and are commonly considered to result from processes that alter the pore or fluid volume, which in turn implies crustal changes happening at a rate too slow to observe directly. Yet if osmosis can explain some anomalies, there is no need to invoke such dynamic geological processes in those cases. Here I report results of a nine- year in situ measurement of fluid pressures and solute concentrations in shale that are consistent with the generation of large (up to 20 MPa) osmotic-pressure anomalies which could persist for tens of millions of years. Osmotic pressures of this magnitude and duration can explain many of the pressure anomalies observed in geological settings. The require, however, small shale porosity and large contrasts in the amount of dissolved solids in the pore waters - criteria that may help to distinguish between osmotic and crystal-dynamic origins of anomalous pressures.

  11. Anomalous reactive transport in porous media: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edery, Yaniv; Dror, Ishai; Scher, Harvey; Berkowitz, Brian

    2015-05-01

    We analyze dynamic behavior of chemically reactive species in a porous medium, subject to anomalous transport. In this context, we present transport experiments in a refraction-index-matched, three-dimensional, water-saturated porous medium. A pH indicator (Congo red) was used as either a conservative or a reactive tracer, depending on the tracer solution pH relative to that of the background solution. The porous medium consisted of an acrylic polymer material formed as spherical beads that have pH-buffering capacity. The magnitude of reaction during transport through the porous medium was related to the color change of the Congo red, via image analysis. Here, we focused on point injection of the tracer into a macroscopically uniform flow field containing water at a pH different from that of the injected tracer. The setup yielded measurements of the temporally evolving spatial (local-in-space) concentration field. Parallel experiments with the same tracer, but without reactions (no changes in pH), enabled identification of the transport itself to be anomalous (non-Fickian); this was quantified by a continuous time random walk (CTRW) formulation. A CTRW particle tracking model was then used to quantify the spatial and temporal migration of both the conservative and reactive tracer plumes. Model parameters related to the anomalous transport were determined from the conservative tracer experiments. An additional term accounting for chemical reaction was established solely from analysis of the reactant concentrations, and significantly, no other fitting parameters were required. The measurements and analysis emphasized the localized nature of reaction, caused by small-scale concentration fluctuations and preferential pathways. In addition, a threshold radius for pH-controlled reactive transport processes was defined under buffering conditions, which delineated the region in which reactions occurred rapidly.

  12. Leak detection in gas pipeline by acoustic and signal processing - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, N. F.; Ghazali, M. F.; Amin, M. M.; Hamat, A. M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The pipeline system is the most important part in media transport in order to deliver fluid to another station. The weak maintenance and poor safety will contribute to financial losses in term of fluid waste and environmental impacts. There are many classifications of techniques to make it easier to show their specific method and application. This paper's discussion about gas leak detection in pipeline system using acoustic method will be presented in this paper. The wave propagation in the pipeline is a key parameter in acoustic method when the leak occurs and the pressure balance of the pipe will generated by the friction between wall in the pipe. The signal processing is used to decompose the raw signal and show in time- frequency. Findings based on the acoustic method can be used for comparative study in the future. Acoustic signal and HHT is the best method to detect leak in gas pipelines. More experiments and simulation need to be carried out to get the fast result of leaking and estimation of their location.

  13. A wearable smartphone-based platform for real-time cardiovascular disease detection via electrocardiogram processing.

    PubMed

    Oresko, Joseph J; Duschl, Heather; Cheng, Allen C

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the single leading cause of global mortality and is projected to remain so. Cardiac arrhythmia is a very common type of CVD and may indicate an increased risk of stroke or sudden cardiac death. The ECG is the most widely adopted clinical tool to diagnose and assess the risk of arrhythmia. ECGs measure and display the electrical activity of the heart from the body surface. During patients' hospital visits, however, arrhythmias may not be detected on standard resting ECG machines, since the condition may not be present at that moment in time. While Holter-based portable monitoring solutions offer 24-48 h ECG recording, they lack the capability of providing any real-time feedback for the thousands of heart beats they record, which must be tediously analyzed offline. In this paper, we seek to unite the portability of Holter monitors and the real-time processing capability of state-of-the-art resting ECG machines to provide an assistive diagnosis solution using smartphones. Specifically, we developed two smartphone-based wearable CVD-detection platforms capable of performing real-time ECG acquisition and display, feature extraction, and beat classification. Furthermore, the same statistical summaries available on resting ECG machines are provided. PMID:20388600

  14. Image-processing algorithms for detecting and counting vehicles waiting at a traffic light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rocha, Ernesto; Palacios, Rafael

    2010-10-01

    Traffic lights at most road intersections operate on a fixed timing schedule that leads to suboptimal traffic management, with unnecessary delays, higher fuel consumption, and higher emissions. Traffic management can be improved by installing inductive loops; however, installation involves temporary road closures and high maintenance costs, especially if there is normally a lot of heavy traffic on the road. We present a vehicle detection and counting system based on digital image-processing techniques. These images can be taken by digital cameras installed at the top of existing traffic lights. By using the proposed approach, it is possible to detect the number of vehicles waiting on each side of the intersection, hence, providing the necessary information for optimal traffic management. Results achieved after testing this methodology on three real intersections are promising, attaining high accuracy during the day (98.8%) and the night (91.3%) while counting several vehicles at the same time. Hence, the system is equivalent to installing multiple inductive loops in all the streets of the intersection, but with lower installation and maintenance costs. After integrating the proposed algorithms into a traffic-management system, it was possible to reduce fuel and CO2 emissions by half compared to the standard fixed-time scheduler.

  15. Use of adaptive hybrid filtering process in Crohn's disease lesion detection from real capsule endoscopy videos.

    PubMed

    Charisis, Vasileios S; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this Letter is to present a new capsule endoscopy (CE) image analysis scheme for the detection of small bowel ulcers that relate to Crohn's disease. More specifically, this scheme is based on: (i) a hybrid adaptive filtering (HAF) process, that utilises genetic algorithms to the curvelet-based representation of images for efficient extraction of the lesion-related morphological characteristics, (ii) differential lacunarity (DL) analysis for texture feature extraction from the HAF-filtered images and (iii) support vector machines for robust classification performance. For the training of the proposed scheme, namely HAF-DL, an 800-image database was used and the evaluation was based on ten 30-second long endoscopic videos. Experimental results, along with comparison with other related efforts, have shown that the HAF-DL approach evidently outperforms the latter in the field of CE image analysis for automated lesion detection, providing higher classification results. The promising performance of HAF-DL paves the way for a complete computer-aided diagnosis system that could support the physicians' clinical practice. PMID:27222730

  16. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2016-07-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  17. Image processing techniques for detection of buried objects with infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón-Correa, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the principles of infrared thermography and its application to humanitarian demining in the world as well as the factors influencing its application in a country like Colombia which suffers badly the problem posed by antipersonnel mines. The main factors that affect the images taken by different sensors are: day time, mine size and material, installation angle, object's burial depth, moisture, emissivity, wind, rain, as well as other objects in the proximity shadowing the images. Infrared image processing methods and results of tests done in different sites of the country such as Cartagena, Bogota, and Tolemaida are also shown. Finally, a method for the detection of the presence of a buried object is presented with its successful results.

  18. Gaussian process surrogates for failure detection: A Bayesian experimental design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongqiao; Lin, Guang; Li, Jinglai

    2016-05-01

    An important task of uncertainty quantification is to identify the probability of undesired events, in particular, system failures, caused by various sources of uncertainties. In this work we consider the construction of Gaussian process surrogates for failure detection and failure probability estimation. In particular, we consider the situation that the underlying computer models are extremely expensive, and in this setting, determining the sampling points in the state space is of essential importance. We formulate the problem as an optimal experimental design for Bayesian inferences of the limit state (i.e., the failure boundary) and propose an efficient numerical scheme to solve the resulting optimization problem. In particular, the proposed limit-state inference method is capable of determining multiple sampling points at a time, and thus it is well suited for problems where multiple computer simulations can be performed in parallel. The accuracy and performance of the proposed method is demonstrated by both academic and practical examples.

  19. Image dewarping and region of interest detection for processing of Moiré images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Debasish; Blotter, Jonathan

    2002-11-01

    Projected grid interferometry is a low cost displacement measurement technique that can be applied to a wide range of applications. There has been a revived interest in this technique in recent years due to developments in computer hardware and image processing algorithms which are providing faster and more accurate measurement methods. In this paper, an image dewarping technique based on a fast centroid search algorithm, and a unique region of interest (ROI) detection algorithm which uses features inherent to projected grid images, are presented. These two algorithms are shown to provide good results with computation times less than 1 s each. These algorithms are demonstrated by using data acquired from a cantilever plate and from an airfoil in a large wind tunnel.

  20. Analog CMOS design for optical coherence tomography signal detection and processing.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Mathine, David L; Barton, Jennifer K

    2008-02-01

    A CMOS circuit was designed and fabricated for optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detection and processing. The circuit includes a photoreceiver, differential gain stage and lock-in amplifier based demodulator. The photoreceiver consists of a CMOS photodetector and low noise differential transimpedance amplifier which converts the optical interference signal into a voltage. The differential gain stage further amplifies the signal. The in-phase and quadrature channels of the lock-in amplifier each include an analog mixer and switched-capacitor low-pass filter with an external mixer reference signal. The interferogram envelope and phase can be extracted with this configuration, enabling Doppler OCT measurements. A sensitivity of -80 dB is achieved with faithful reproduction of the interferometric signal envelope. A sample image of finger tip is presented. PMID:18269983