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Sample records for detecting chromosomal alterations

  1. Detection of Chromosomal Structural Alterations in Single Cells by SNP Arrays: A Systematic Survey of Amplification Bias and Optimized Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Kazuya; Bundo, Miki; Ueda, Junko; Nakano, Yoko; Ukai, Wataru; Hashimoto, Eri; Saito, Toshikazu; Kato, Tadafumi

    2007-01-01

    Background In single-cell human genome analysis using whole-genome amplified product, a strong amplification bias involving allele dropout and preferential amplification hampers the quality of results. Using an oligonucleotide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, we systematically examined the nature of this amplification bias, including frequency, degree, and preference for genomic location, and we assessed the effects of this amplification bias on subsequent genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. Methodology/Principal Findings We found a large variability in amplification bias among the amplified products obtained by multiple displacement amplification (MDA), and this bias had a severe effect on the genotype and chromosomal copy number analyses. We established optimal experimental conditions for pre-screening for high-quality amplified products, processing array data, and analyzing chromosomal structural alterations. Using this optimized protocol, we successfully detected previously unidentified chromosomal structural alterations in single cells from a lymphoblastoid cell line. These alterations were subsequently confirmed by karyotype analysis. In addition, we successfully obtained reproducible chromosomal copy number profiles of single cells from the cell line with a complex karyotype, indicating the applicability and potential of our optimized workflow. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that the quality of amplification products should be critically assessed before using them for genomic analyses. The method of MDA-based whole-genome amplification followed by SNP array analysis described here will be useful for exploring chromosomal alterations in single cells. PMID:18074030

  2. Comparative genomic hybridization detects losses of chromosomes 22 and 16 as the most common recurrent genetic alterations in primary ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Zheng, P P; Pang, J C; Hui, A B; Ng, H K

    2000-10-01

    In this study, we used comparative genomic hybridization to provide an overview of chromosomal imbalances in a series of 20 adult and 8 childhood ependymomas. All tumors displayed multiple genomic imbalances. Loss of genetic material was observed in chromosomes 22q (71%), 16 (57%), 17 (46%), 6 (39%), 19q (32%), 20q (32%), and 1p (29%), with the overlapped deletion regions determined at 16p13.1-13.3, 16q22-q24, 19q13.1-13.4, 20q13.1-13.2 and 1p36.1-36.3. Gain of DNA was commonly detected on chromosomes 5q (46%), 12q (39%), 7q (36%), 9q (36%), and 4q (32%), with overlapped regions of gain mapped to 5q21-22, 12q15-24.1, 7q11.2-31.2, 9q12-32, and 4q23-28, respectively. These findings suggest a greater degree of genomic imbalance in ependymomas than has been recognized previously and highlight chromosomal loci likely to contain oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes that may contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of this tumor. Our study also confirmed previous findings on frequent losses of 17 and 22q in ependymomas and further identified chromosome 16 loss as a common recurrent genetic aberration in ependymomas. PMID:11104027

  3. Chromosome alterations associated with in vitro exposure of human fibroblasts to chemical or physical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, N.C.; Amsbaugh, S.C.; Milo, G.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1986-09-01

    Normal human foreskin fibroblasts treated in vitro with a chemical carcinogen or irradiated with ultraviolet light subsequently acquired anchorage independent growth and an extended but finite capacity for exponential growth. All cell lines were derived from cells recovered from colonies that had grown in semisolid medium; cell lines originally treated with a chemical carcinogen produced nodules after s.c. inoculation into nude mice. G-banding analysis of 10 cell lines (including one ultraviolet light line) revealed that seven were chromosomally abnormal with structural and numerical chromosome alterations, one was characterized by a consistent trisomy, and the other two were normal diploid. Structural alterations consisted of chromosome deletions, translocations, and partial chromosome duplications. Although no common structural or numerical abnormality was detected, several structural alterations were observed involving chromosomes 1, 7, 11, and 22, where fgr, erb-B, H-ras-1, and sis protooncogenes, respectively, are located. In one cell line trisomy 17 was a unique chromosome alteration. The induction of chromosome changes may have influenced the proliferative capacity of the treated cells relative to nontreated cells. However, the two cell lines without detectable chromosome changes also had an increased proliferative life span, suggesting that other submicroscopic genetic alterations may have affected cell multiplication. Although carcinogen induced chromosome abnormalities may represent a step in the process of neoplastic development, additional genetic and/or epigenetic changes, are required for indefinite growth and the expression of malignancy.

  4. Chromosome 3p alterations in pancreatic endocrine neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Eliana; Barbi, Stefano; Malpeli, Giorgio; Bersani, Samantha; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Capelli, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) are rare neoplasms classified as functioning (F-PET) or non-functioning (NF-PET) according to the presence of a clinical syndrome due to hormonal hypersecretion. PETs show variable degrees of clinical aggressiveness and loss of chromosome 3p has been suggested to be associated with an advanced stage of disease. We assessed chromosome 3p copy number in 113 primary PETs and 32 metastases by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using tissue microarrays. The series included 56 well-differentiated endocrine tumors (WDET), 62 well-differentiated endocrine carcinomas (WDEC), and 6 poorly differentiated endocrine carcinomas (PDEC). Chromosome 3p alterations were found in 23/113 (20%) primary tumors, with losses being predominant over gains (14% vs. 6%). Loss of 3p was found in 5/55 (9%) WDET, 11/52 (21%) WDEC, and never in PDEC. Gains of 3p were detected in 4/55 (7%) WDET, no WDEC, but notably in 3/6 (50%) PDEC (OR 23.6; P = 0.003). Metastases were more frequently monosomic for 3p compared to primary tumors (OR 3.6; P = 0.005). Monosomy was significantly associated with larger tumor size, more advanced tumor stage, and metastasis. No association was found with survival. Chromosome 3p copy number alterations are frequent events in advanced stage PET, with gains prevailing in PDEC while losses are more frequent in WDEC, supporting the view that a specific pattern of alterations are involved in these diverse disease subtypes. PMID:20981439

  5. Alterations and Abnormal Mitosis of Wheat Chromosomes Induced by Wheat-Rye Monosomic Addition Lines

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shulan; Yang, Manyu; Fei, Yunyan; Tan, Feiquan; Ren, Zhenglong; Yan, Benju; Zhang, Huaiyu; Tang, Zongxiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat-rye addition lines are an old topic. However, the alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes caused by wheat-rye monosomic addition lines are seldom reported. Methodology/Principal Findings Octoploid triticale was derived from common wheat T. aestivum L. ‘Mianyang11’×rye S. cereale L. ‘Kustro’ and some progeny were obtained by the controlled backcrossing of triticale with ‘Mianyang11’ followed by self-fertilization. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using rye genomic DNA and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes were used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Strong pSc119.2 FISH signals could be observed at the telomeric regions of 3DS arms in ‘Mianyang11’. However, the pSc119.2 FISH signals were disappeared from the selfed progeny of 4R monosomic addition line and the changed 3D chromosomes could be transmitted to next generation stably. In one of the selfed progeny of 7R monosomic addition line, one 2D chromosome was broken and three 4A chromosomes were observed. In the selfed progeny of 6R monosomic addition line, structural variation and abnormal mitotic behaviour of 3D chromosome were detected. Additionally, 1A and 4B chromosomes were eliminated from some of the progeny of 6R monosomic addition line. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that single rye chromosome added to wheat might cause alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes and it is possible that the stress caused by single alien chromosome might be one of the factors that induced karyotype alteration of wheat. PMID:23936213

  6. Altered fingerprints: analysis and detection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soweon; Feng, Jianjiang; Jain, Anil K

    2012-03-01

    The widespread deployment of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) in law enforcement and border control applications has heightened the need for ensuring that these systems are not compromised. While several issues related to fingerprint system security have been investigated, including the use of fake fingerprints for masquerading identity, the problem of fingerprint alteration or obfuscation has received very little attention. Fingerprint obfuscation refers to the deliberate alteration of the fingerprint pattern by an individual for the purpose of masking his identity. Several cases of fingerprint obfuscation have been reported in the press. Fingerprint image quality assessment software (e.g., NFIQ) cannot always detect altered fingerprints since the implicit image quality due to alteration may not change significantly. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) compiling case studies of incidents where individuals were found to have altered their fingerprints for circumventing AFIS, 2) investigating the impact of fingerprint alteration on the accuracy of a commercial fingerprint matcher, 3) classifying the alterations into three major categories and suggesting possible countermeasures, 4) developing a technique to automatically detect altered fingerprints based on analyzing orientation field and minutiae distribution, and 5) evaluating the proposed technique and the NFIQ algorithm on a large database of altered fingerprints provided by a law enforcement agency. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed approach in detecting altered fingerprints and highlight the need to further pursue this problem. PMID:21808092

  7. Alterations in Chromosomal Synapses and DNA Repair in Apoptotic Spermatocytes of Mus m. Domesticus

    PubMed Central

    Ayarza, E.; González, M.; López, F.; Fernández-Donoso, R.; Page, J.; Berrios, S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether apoptotic spermatocytes from the mouse Mus m. domesticus presented alterations in chromosomal synapses and DNA repair. To enrich for apoptotic spermatocytes, the scrotum’s temperature was raised by partially exposing animals for 15 min to a 42ºC water bath. Spermatocytes in initial apoptosis were identified in situ by detecting activated caspase-9. SYCP1 and SYCP3 were markers for evaluating synapses or the structure of synaptonemal complexes and Rad51 and γH2AX for detecting DNA repair and chromatin remodeling. Apoptotic spermatocytes were concentrated in spermatogenic cycle stages III-IV (50.3%), XI-XII (44.1%) and IX-X (4.2%). Among apoptotic spermatocytes, 48% were in middle pachytene, 44% in metaphase and 6% in diplotene. Moreover, apoptotic spermatocytes showed several structural anomalies in autosomal bivalents, including splitting of chromosomal axes and partial asynapses between homologous chromosomes. γH2AX and Rad51 were atypically distributed during pachytene and as late as diplotene and associated with asynaptic chromatin, single chromosome axes or discontinuous chromosome axes. Among apoptotic spermatocytes at pachytene, 70% showed changes in the structure of synapses, 67% showed changes in γH2AX and Rad51 distribution and 50% shared alterations in both synapses and DNA repair. Our results showed that apoptotic spermatocytes from Mus m. domesticus contain a high frequency of alterations in chromosomal synapses and in the recruitment and distribution of DNA repair proteins. Together, these observations suggest that these alterations may have been detected by meiotic checkpoints triggering apoptosis. PMID:27349323

  8. Alterations in chromosomal synapses and DNA repair in apoptotic spermatocytes of Mus m. domesticus.

    PubMed

    Ayarza, E; González, M; López, F; Fernández-Donoso, R; Page, J; Berrios, S

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether apoptotic spermatocytes from the mouse Mus m. domesticus presented alterations in chromosomal synapses and DNA repair. To enrich for apoptotic spermatocytes, the scrotum's temperature was raised by partially exposing animals for 15 min to a 42ºC water bath. Spermatocytes in initial apoptosis were identified in situ by detecting activated Caspase-9.  SYCP1 and SYCP3 were markers for evaluating synapses or the structure of synaptonemal complexes and Rad51 and γH2AX for detecting DNA repair and chromatin remodeling. Apoptotic spermatocytes were concentrated in spermatogenic cycle stages III-IV (50.3%), XI-XII (44.1%) and IX-X (4.2%). Among apoptotic spermatocytes, 48% were in middle pachytene, 44% in metaphase and 6% in diplotene. Moreover, apoptotic spermatocytes showed several structural anomalies in autosomal bivalents, including splitting of chromosomal axes and partial asynapses between homologous chromosomes. gH2AX and Rad51 were atypically distributed during pachytene and as late as diplotene and associated with asynaptic chromatin, single chromosome axes or discontinuous chromosome axes. Among apoptotic spermatocytes at pachytene, 70% showed changes in the structure of synapses, 67% showed changes in gH2AX and Rad51 distribution and 50% shared alterations in both synapses and DNA repair. Our results showed that apoptotic spermatocytes from Mus m. domesticus contain a high frequency of alterations in chromosomal synapses and in the recruitment and distribution of DNA repair proteins. Together, these observations suggest that these alterations may have been detected by meiotic checkpoints triggering apoptosis. PMID:27349323

  9. Alterations and Chromosomal Variants in the Ecuadorian Population

    PubMed Central

    Paz-y-Miño, César; Cumbal, Nadia; Araujo, Santiago; Sánchez, Ma. Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Medical genetics is a field marked by fast progress. Even though it was at one point confined to a group of relatively rare diseases, today it has become a central component in the understanding of disorders and it is the subject of interest for all medical specialties. This paper, shares data on the chromosomal alterations and variations that have been diagnosed in Ecuadorian patients since 1998. A total of 2,636 individual cases have been analyzed by G-banding technique until February 2012. The present work shows this collection of data and the important findings that have appeared throughout these years in hopes that it can contribute to have a deeper understanding of the incidence of chromosomal aberrations and alterations in the Ecuadorian population. PMID:23091347

  10. Chromosomal and genetic alterations in human hepatocellular adenomas associated with type Ia glycogen storage disease.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Chuang, Tzu-Po; Bali, Deeksha; Koeberl, Dwight; Austin, Stephanie; Weinstein, David A; Murphy, Elaine; Chen, Ying-Ting; Boyette, Keri; Liu, Chu-Hao; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Li, Ling-Hui

    2009-12-15

    Hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) is a frequent long-term complication of glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I) and malignant transformation to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is known to occur in some cases. However, the molecular pathogenesis of tumor development in GSD I is unclear. This study was conducted to systematically investigate chromosomal and genetic alterations in HCA associated with GSD I. Genome-wide SNP analysis and mutation detection of target genes was performed in ten GSD Ia-associated HCA and seven general population HCA cases for comparison. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 60% of the GSD Ia HCA and 57% of general population HCA. Intriguingly, simultaneous gain of chromosome 6p and loss of 6q were only seen in GSD Ia HCA (three cases) with one additional GSD I patient showing submicroscopic 6q14.1 deletion. The sizes of GSD Ia adenomas with chromosome 6 aberrations were larger than the sizes of adenomas without the changes (P = 0.012). Expression of IGF2R and LATS1 candidate tumor suppressor genes at 6q was reduced in more than 50% of GSD Ia HCA that were examined (n = 7). None of the GSD Ia HCA had biallelic mutations in the HNF1A gene. These findings give the first insight into the distinct genomic and genetic characteristics of HCA associated with GSD Ia. These results strongly suggest that chromosome 6 alterations could be an early event in the liver tumorigenesis in GSD I, and may be in general population. These results also suggest an interesting relationship between GSD Ia HCA and steps to HCC transformation. PMID:19762333

  11. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOEpatents

    Stokke, T.; Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-12-05

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20. 3 figs.

  12. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOEpatents

    Stokke, Trond; Pinkel, Daniel; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  13. Detection Of Amplified Or Deleted Chromosomal Regions

    DOEpatents

    Stokke, Trond , Pinkel, Daniel , Gray, Joe W.

    1997-05-27

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  14. Association of specific chromosome alterations with tumour phenotype in posterior uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sisley, K; Parsons, M A; Garnham, J; Potter, A M; Curtis, D; Rees, R C; Rennie, I G

    2000-01-01

    Posterior uveal melanomas have recurrent alterations of chromosomes 1, 3, 6 and 8. In particular, changes of chromosomes 3 and 8 occur in association, appear to characterize those tumours with a ciliary body component, and have been shown to be of prognostic significance. The relevance of other chromosome alterations is less certain. We have performed cytogenetic analysis on 42 previously untreated primary posterior uveal melanomas. Of interest was the observation that as tumour size increased the involvement of specific chromosome changes, and the amount of chromosome abnormalities likewise increased. Loss, or partial deletions, of the short arm of chromosome 1 were found to associate with larger ciliary body melanomas; typically, loss of the short arm resulted from unbalanced translocations, the partners of which varied. Trisomy of chromosome 21 occurred more often in ciliary body melanomas, whilst rearrangements of chromosomes 6 and 11 were primarily related to choroidal melanomas. Our results imply that alterations of chromosome 1 are important in the progression of some uveal melanomas, and that other chromosome abnormalities, besides those of chromosomes 3 and 8, are associated with ocular tumours of particular locations. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646885

  15. Integrated Genomic and Transcriptional Profiling Identifies Chromosomal Loci with Altered Gene Expression in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilting, Saskia M.; de Wilde, Jillian; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Berkhof, Johannes; Yi, Yajun; van Wieringen, Wessel N.; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J. M.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Steenbergen, Renske D. M.

    2009-01-01

    For a better understanding of the consequences of recurrent chromosomal alterations in cervical carcinomas, we integrated genome-wide chromosomal and transcriptional profiles of 10 squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), 5 adenocarcinomas (AdCAs) and 6 normal controls. Previous genomic profiling showed that gains at chromosome arms 1q, 3q, and 20q as well as losses at 8q, 10q, 11q, and 13q were common in cervical carcinomas. Altered regions spanned multiple megabases, and the extent to which expression of genes located there is affected remains unclear. Expression analysis of these previously chromosomally profiled carcinomas yielded 83 genes with significantly differential expression between carcinomas and normal epithelium. Application of differential gene locus mapping (DIGMAP) analysis and the array CGH expression integration tool (ACE-it) identified hotspots within large chromosomal alterations in which gene expression was altered as well. Chromosomal gains of the long arms of chromosome 1, 3, and 20 resulted in increased expression of genes located at 1q32.1-32.2, 3q13.32-23, 3q26.32-27.3, and 20q11.21-13.33, whereas a chromosomal loss of 11q22.3-25 was related to decreased expression of genes located in this region. Overexpression of DTX3L, PIK3R4, ATP2C1, and SLC25A36, all located at 3q21.1-23 and identified by DIGMAP, ACE-it or both, was confirmed in an independent validation sample set consisting of 12 SCCs and 13 normal ectocervical samples. In conclusion, integrated chromosomal and transcriptional profiling identified chromosomal hotspots at 1q, 3q, 11q, and 20q with altered gene expression within large commonly altered chromosomal regions in cervical cancer. PMID:18618715

  16. Partial trisomy 11q involving chromosome 1 detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, M.; Bereziouk, O.; McCorquodale, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    Partial trisomy 11q was detected in an infant delivered 3-4 weeks prematurely. The phenotype included slanted palpebral fissures, high arched palate, developmental delay, microcephaly, and cardiac defects, all of which occur in the majority of cases with this syndrome. Other features included a column-shaped skull, preauricular pit, single palmar crease, short, broad great toes, flat occiput, unilateral kidney agenesis, and strabismus. Chromosomes obtained from peripheral blood cells revealed the presence of extra material on the long arm of chromosome 1. The G-banding pattern of this extra material indicated that it might be derived from chromosome 1 or 11. Chromosomal {open_quotes}paints{close_quotes} showed that it was not chromosome 1 material, but was chromosome 11 material extending from band q21 to qter. Partial trisomy 11q arising from translocation of the 11q material to chromosome 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 13, 17, 21, 22, and X has been reported previously, whereas translocation to chromosome 1 has not. The chromosome to which the 11q material is translocated does not alter the most frequent features of the partial trisomy 11q syndrome, but may influence other less common features.

  17. Isolation of yeast artificial chromosomes free of endogenous yeast chromosomes: construction of alternate hosts with defined karyotypic alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, L; Johnston, M; Green, E D

    1995-01-01

    An intrinsic feature of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) is that the cloned DNA is generally in the same size range (i.e., approximately 200-2000 kb) as the endogenous yeast chromosomes. As a result, the isolation of YAC DNA, which typically involves separation by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, is frequently confounded by the presence of a comigrating or closely migrating endogenous yeast chromosome(s). We have developed a strategy that reliably allows the isolation of any YAC free of endogenous yeast chromosomes. Using recombination-mediated chromosome fragmentation, a set of Saccharomyces cerevisiae host strains was systematically constructed. Each strain contains defined alterations in its electrophoretic karyotype, which provide a large-size interval devoid of endogenous chromosomes (i.e., a karyotypic "window"). All of the constructed strains contain the kar1-delta 15 mutation, thereby allowing the efficient transfer of a YAC from its original host into an appropriately selected window strain using the kar1-transfer procedure. This approach provides a robust and efficient means to obtain relatively pure YAC DNA regardless of YAC size. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8524833

  18. An Assay to Detect In Vivo Y Chromosome Loss in Drosophila Wing Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szabad, Janos; Bellen, Hugo J.; Venken, Koen J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of the Y chromosome in Drosophila has no impact on cell viability and therefore allows us to assay the impact of environmental agents and genetic alterations on chromosomal loss. To detect in vivo chromosome loss in cells of the developing Drosophila wing primordia, we first engineered a Y chromosome with an attP docking site. By making use of the ΦC31 integrase system, we site-specifically integrated a genomic transgene encompassing the multiple wing hair (mwh) locus into this attP site, leading to a mwh+Y chromosome. This chromosome fully rescues the mwh mutant phenotype, an excellent recessive wing cell marker mutation. Loss of this mwh+Y chromosome in wing primordial cells then leads to manifestation of the mwh mutant phenotype in mwh-homozygous cells. The forming mwh clones permit us to quantify the effect of agents and genetic alterations by assaying frequency and size of the mwh mosaic spots. To illustrate the use of the mwh+Y loss system, the effects of four known mutagens (X-rays, colchicine, ethyl methanesulfonate, and formaldehyde) and two genetic conditions (loss- and gain-of-function lodestar mutant alleles) are documented. The procedure is simple, sensitive, and inexpensive. PMID:22973547

  19. Effect of chromosome size on aberration levels caused by gamma radiation as detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Pandita, T K; Gregoire, V; Dhingra, K; Hittelman, W N

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful technique for detecting genomic alterations at the chromosome level. To study the effect of chromosome size on aberration formation, we used FISH to detect initial damage in individual prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) of gamma-irradiated G0 human cells. A linear dose response for breaks and a nonlinear dose response for exchanges was obtained using a chromosome 1-specific probe. FISH detected more chromosome 1 breaks than expected from DNA based extrapolation of Giemsa stained PCC preparations. The discrepancy in the number of breaks detected by the two techniques raised questions as to whether Giemsa staining and FISH differ in their sensitivities for detecting breaks, or is chromosome 1 uniquely sensitive to gamma-radiation. To address the question of technique sensitivity, we determined total chromosome damage by FISH using a total genomic painting probe; the results obtained from Giemsa-staining and FISH were nearly identical. To determine if chromosome 1 was uniquely sensitive, we selected four different sized chromosomes for paint probes and scored them for gamma-ray induced aberrations. In these studies the number of chromosome breaks per unit DNA increased linearly with an increase in the DNA content of the chromosomes. However, the number of exchanges per unit of DNA did not increase with an increase in chromosome size. This suggests that chromosome size may influence the levels of aberrations observed. Extrapolation from measurements of a single chromosome's damage to the whole genome requires that the relative DNA content of the measured chromosome be considered. PMID:8039428

  20. Detection of sex chromosomal aneuploidies X-X, Y-Y, and X-Y in human sperm using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Robbins, W.A. |; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H.U.; Mehraein, Y. |

    1994-10-15

    Sex chromosome aneuploidy is the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality in humans at birth and a substantial portion of these abnormalities involve paternal chromosomes. An efficient method is presented for using air-dried smears of human semen to detect the number of X and Y chromosomes in sperm chromatin using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization. Air-dried semen smears were pre-treated with dithiothreitol and 3,4-diiodosalicylate salt to decondense the sperm chromatin and then were hybridized with repetitive sequence DNA probes that had been generated by PCR and differentially labeled. Hybridizations with X and Y specific probes showed the expected ratio of 50%X:50%Y bearing sperm. Sperm carrying extra fluorescence domains representing disomy for the X or Y chromosomes occurred at frequencies of {approximately} 4 per 10,000 sperm each. Cells carrying both X and Y fluorescence domains occurred at a frequency of {approximately} 6/10,000. Thus, the overall frequency of sperm that carried an extra sex chromosome was 1.4/1,000. The frequencies of sperm carrying sex chromosome aneuploidies determined by hybridization did not differ statistically from those reported from the same laboratory using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique. Multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm is a promising method for assessing sex-ratio alterations in human semen and for determining the fraction of sperm carrying sex or other chromosome aneuploidies which may be transmissible to offspring. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. 5-fluoro-orotic acid induces chromosome alterations in genetically manipulated strains of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wellington, Melanie; Kabir, M Anaul; Rustchenko, Elena

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the occurrence of chromosome alterations in a Candida albicans prototrophic strain 3153A treated with 5-fluoro-orotic acid (5-FOA). In this study we investigated the mutagenic properties of 5-FOA with two derivatives of C. albicans strain CAF4-2 (ura3/ura3), each containing an ectopic copy of URA3 gene (ura3/ ura3 URA3) on a different chromosome. As expected, after the ura3/ura3 URA3 constructs were applied to 5-FOA containing solid medium, the "pop-outs" that lost URA3 appeared. However most of the "pop-outs" acquired various chromosome alterations. Thus constructs exposed to 5-FOA should be examined for chromosome alterations or the use of 5-FOA should be avoided. PMID:17040068

  2. Temporal and spatial evolution of somatic chromosomal alterations: a case-cohort study of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohong; Galipeau, Patricia C; Paulson, Thomas G; Sanchez, Carissa A; Arnaudo, Jessica; Liu, Karen; Sather, Cassandra L; Kostadinov, Rumen L; Odze, Robert D; Kuhner, Mary K; Maley, Carlo C; Self, Steven G; Vaughan, Thomas L; Blount, Patricia L; Reid, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    All cancers are believed to arise by dynamic, stochastic somatic genomic evolution with genome instability, generation of diversity, and selection of genomic alterations that underlie multistage progression to cancer. Advanced esophageal adenocarcinomas have high levels of somatic copy number alterations. Barrett's esophagus is a risk factor for developing esophageal adenocarcinoma, and somatic chromosomal alterations (SCA) are known to occur in Barrett's esophagus. The vast majority (∼95%) of individuals with Barrett's esophagus do not progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma during their lifetimes, but a small subset develop esophageal adenocarcinoma, many of which arise rapidly even in carefully monitored patients without visible endoscopic abnormalities at the index endoscopy. Using a well-designed, longitudinal case-cohort study, we characterized SCA as assessed by single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays over space and time in 79 "progressors" with Barrett's esophagus as they approach the diagnosis of cancer and 169 "nonprogressors" with Barrett's esophagus who did not progress to esophageal adenocarcinoma over more than 20,425 person-months of follow-up. The genomes of nonprogressors typically had small localized deletions involving fragile sites and 9p loss/copy neutral LOH that generate little genetic diversity and remained relatively stable over prolonged follow-up. As progressors approach the diagnosis of cancer, their genomes developed chromosome instability with initial gains and losses, genomic diversity, and selection of SCAs followed by catastrophic genome doublings. Our results support a model of differential disease dynamics in which nonprogressor genomes largely remain stable over prolonged periods, whereas progressor genomes evolve significantly increased SCA and diversity within four years of esophageal adenocarcinoma diagnosis, suggesting a window of opportunity for early detection. PMID:24253313

  3. Chromosome damage and aneuploidy detected by interphase multicolour FISH in benzene-exposed shale oil workers.

    PubMed

    Marcon, F; Zijno, A; Crebelli, R; Carere, A; Veidebaum, T; Peltonen, K; Parks, R; Schuler, M; Eastmond, D

    1999-09-30

    A multicolour tandem-labelling fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure was used to detect chromosome alterations in peripheral blood cells of a group of Estonian petrochemistry workers. Twelve workers employed in benzene production and five cokery workers, together with eight unexposed rural controls, were enrolled in the study. The methodology employed, based on the in situ hybridization of adjacent centromeric and pericentromeric regions, allowed the simultaneous detection of both chromosome breakage, involving damage-prone pericentromeric regions, and hyperploidy in interphase cells. Blood smears from all subjects were hybridized with chromosome 1 specific probes, in order to detect genotoxic damage in circulating lymphocytes and granulocytes. Moreover, lymphocyte cultures were established, harvested 48 h following mitogen stimulation and hybridized with the tandem chromosomes 1 and 9 probes. No significant difference in the incidence of breakage was detected in the nucleated cells of blood smears of exposed vs. control subjects. In contrast, modest but significantly increased frequencies of breakage affecting both chromosomes 1 and 9 were observed in the cultured lymphocytes of the benzene-exposed workers compared to the unexposed controls, suggesting an expression of premutagenic lesions during the S-phase in vitro. Across the entire study group, the frequencies of breakage affecting chromosomes 1 and 9 in the stimulated lymphocytes were highly intercorrelated (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found in the incidence of hyperploidy among the study groups, although a tendency to higher values was observed in benzene-exposed workers. Although the relatively small size of the study groups does not allow firm conclusions on the role of occupational exposure, the observed patterns are suggestive of effects in the benzene-exposed workers. This work also shows that tandem labelling FISH can be usefully applied in human biomonitoring, allowing the

  4. Functional profiling and gene expression analysis of chromosomal copy number alterations

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Lucía; Montaner, David; Burguet-Castell, Jordi; Tárraga, Joaquín; Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2007-01-01

    Contrarily to the traditional view in which only one or a few key genes were supposed to be the causative factors of diseases, we discuss the importance of considering groups of functionally related genes in the study of pathologies characterised by chromosomal copy number alterations. Recent observations have reported the existence of regions in higher eukaryotic chromosomes (including humans) containing genes of related function that show a high degree of coregulation. Copy number alterations will consequently affect to clusters of functionally related genes, which will be the final causative agents of the diseased phenotype, in many cases. Therefore, we propose that the functional profiling of the regions affected by copy number alterations must be an important aspect to take into account in the understanding of this type of pathologies. To illustrate this, we present an integrated study of DNA copy number variations, gene expression along with the functional profiling of chromosomal regions in a case of multiple myeloma. PMID:17597935

  5. High-order chromatin architecture shapes the landscape of chromosomal alterations in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew; Mirny, Leonid

    2012-02-01

    The rapid growth of cancer genome structural information provides an opportunity for a better understanding of the mutational mechanisms of genomic alterations in cancer and the forces of selection that act upon them. Here we test the evidence for two major forces, spatial chromosome structure and purifying (or negative) selection, that shape the landscape of somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) in cancer (Beroukhim et al, 2010). Using a maximum likelihood framework we compare SCNA maps and three-dimensional genome architecture as determined by genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (HiC) and described by the proposed fractal-globule (FG) model (Lieberman-Aiden and Van Berkum et al, 2009). This analysis provides evidence that the distribution of chromosomal alterations in cancer is spatially related to three-dimensional genomic architecture and additionally suggests that purifying selection as well as positive selection shapes the landscape of SCNAs during somatic evolution of cancer cells.

  6. Chromosomal and Nuclear Alterations in Root Tip Cells of Allium Cepa L. Induced by Alprazolam

    PubMed Central

    Nefic, Hilada; Musanovic, Jasmin; Metovic, Azra; Kurteshi, Kemajl

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Alprazolam is a triazolobenzodiazepine used in panic disorders and other anxiety states. Target organ of Alprazolam is CNS, causing depression of respiration and consciousness. Aim: This study aimed to estimate the genotoxic potential of Alprazolam using Allium cepa test. Methods: Allium cepa is one of the most suitable plants for detecting different types of xenobiotics. The test enables the assessment of different genetic endpoints making possible damage to the DNA of humans to be predicted. Results: Alprazolam induced chromosomal (anaphase bridges, breaks, lagging and stickiness, abnormal spiralisation, multipolarity and polyploidy) and cytological aberrations, especially nuclear alterations (nuclear buds, fragmented nucleus and apoptotic bodies, cells without nucleus, binucleated and micronucleated cells), morphological alterations in shape and size of cells, spindle disturbance and polar deviation in root tip meristem cells of Allium cepa at all tested concentrations. Alprazolam also caused significant inhibition of mitotic index in these cells. Conclusion: These changes in cells are indicators of genotoxic potential of Alprazolam suggesting a need for further in vitro studies on animal and human lymphocytes as well as in vivo studies. PMID:25568504

  7. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are born a boy or a girl (your gender). They are called sex chromosomes: Females have 2 X chromosomes. Males have 1 X and 1 Y chromosome. The mother gives an X chromosome to the ... baby is a girl or a boy. The remaining chromosomes are called ...

  8. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes . It is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist ... come in pairs. Normally, each cell in the human body has 23 pairs of chromosomes (46 total chromosomes). ...

  9. Complex CGH alterations on chromosome arm 8p at candidate tumor suppressor gene loci in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Venter, Deon J; Ramus, Susan J; Hammet, Fleur M A; de Silva, Melanie; Hutchins, Anne-Marie; Petrovic, Vida; Price, Gareth; Armes, Jane E

    2005-07-15

    Loss of genetic material from chromosome arm 8p occurs frequently in human breast carcinomas, consistent with this region of the genome harboring one or more tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). We used the complementary techniques of microsatellite-based LOH, high-density FISH, and conventional CGH on 6 breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, SKBR3, T47D, MDA MB453, BT549, and BT474) to investigate the molecular cytogenetic changes occurring on chromosome 8 during tumorigenesis, with particular emphasis on 6 potential TSGs on 8p. We identified multiple alterations of chromosome 8, including partial or complete deletion of 8p or 8q, duplication of 8q, and isochromosome 8q. The detailed FISH analysis showed several complex rearrangements of 8p with differing breakpoints of varying proximity to the genes of interest. High rates of LOH were observed at markers adjacent to or within PCM1, DUSP4/MKP2, NKX3A, and DLC1, supporting their status as candidate TSGs. Due to the complex ploidy status of these cell lines, relative loss of 8p material detected by CGH did not always correlate with microsatellite-based LOH results. These results extend our understanding of the mechanisms accompanying the dysregulation of candidate tumor suppressor loci on chromosome arm 8p, and identify appropriate cellular systems for further investigation of their biological properties. PMID:15993269

  10. The clinical application of array CGH for the detection of chromosomal defects in 20,126 unselected newborns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a powerful tool for detecting unbalanced chromosomal alterations. To validate the usefulness of array CGH in newborn screening, we examined 20,126 unselected infants. In addition, the number of newborns analyzed with array CGH is the largest one ever reported. Findings A total of 20,126 unselected newborns were investigated with array CGH and cytogenetic analyses. The analyses revealed 87 cases with chromosome abnormalities. Of these, 53 cases had significant chromosome aneuploidies, including trisomy 13, trisomy 21, 47,XXY or 45,X, and the other 34 cases presented partial chromosomal deletions or duplications. Conclusions In this study, we show that array CGH is an appropriate tool for the screening of chromosomal abnormalities in newborns, especially for the infants without distinct clinical features. PMID:23725218

  11. Chromosomal mosaicism of extraembryonic cells detected by prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotukhina, T.V.; Shilova, N.V.

    1995-09-01

    Data on detection of chromosomal mosaicism in amniotic cells and chorionic villi obtained by prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis are presented. The frequency of chromosomal mosaicism in preparations of amniotic fluid cell culture was 2.6% (6 out of 226), and that in {open_quotes}direct{close_quotes} villus preparations was 1.6% (13 out of 774). The necessity to perform an additional analysis of other fetal cells or neonatal lymphocytes to specify the diagnosis was shown. The analysis of the outcome of pregnancies during which chromosomal mosaicism in the extraembryonic cells was detected indicates that these women form a high-risk group, both genetically and obstetrically; in only 8 out of 19 cases did pregnancies end in normal deliveries at term; in three cases, spontaneous abortions occurred at 16-31 weeks of gestation; in three cases, the pregnancies were terminated due to fetal chromosomal aberrations in nonmosaic form; the outcome of pregnancy in five cases was preterm delivery of an underweight newborn. 26 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Chromosomal Rainbows’ Detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2011-01-01

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as ‘TRKA’), RET (‘Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene’, OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3′- end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabasepair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC’s). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine

  13. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine mapping of

  14. 'Chromosomal Rainbows' Detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M; Weier, Jingly F; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G

    2010-01-01

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'- end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners.We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabasepair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding techniques for fine mapping of

  15. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2002-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  16. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2008-09-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  17. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ .[.nudeic.]. .Iadd.nucleic .Iaddend.acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  18. Chromosomal Microarrays for the Prenatal Detection of Microdeletions and Microduplications.

    PubMed

    Wou, Karen; Levy, Brynn; Wapner, Ronald J

    2016-06-01

    Chromosomal microarray analysis has replaced conventional G-banded karyotype in prenatal diagnosis as the first-tier test for the cytogenetic detection of copy number imbalances in fetuses with/without major structural abnormalities. This article reviews the basic technology of microarray; the value and clinical significance of the detection of microdeletions, microduplications, and other copy number variants; as well as the importance of genetic counseling for prenatal diagnosis. It also discusses the current status of noninvasive screening for some of these microdeletion and microduplication syndromes. PMID:27235911

  19. Gyramides Prevent Bacterial Growth by Inhibiting DNA Gyrase and Altering Chromosome Topology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics targeting DNA gyrase have been a clinical success story for the past half-century, and the emergence of bacterial resistance has fueled the search for new gyrase inhibitors. In this paper we demonstrate that a new class of gyrase inhibitors, the gyramides, are bacteriostatic agents that competitively inhibit the ATPase activity of Escherichia coli gyrase and produce supercoiled DNA in vivo. E. coli cells treated with gyramide A have abnormally localized, condensed chromosomes that blocks DNA replication and interrupts chromosome segregation. The resulting alterations in DNA topology inhibit cell division through a mechanism that involves the SOS pathway. Importantly, gyramide A is a specific inhibitor of gyrase and does not inhibit the closely related E. coli enzyme topoisomerase IV. E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to gyramide A do not display cross-resistance to ciprofloxacin and novobiocin. The results demonstrate that the gyramides prevent bacterial growth by a mechanism in which the topological state of chromosomes is altered and halts DNA replication and segregation. The specificity and activity of the gyramides for inhibiting gyrase makes these compounds important chemical tools for studying the mechanism of gyrase and the connection between DNA topology and bacterial cell division. PMID:24712739

  20. Detection of chromosomal imbalances in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Voorter, C.; Joos, S.; Bringuier, P. P.; Vallinga, M.; Poddighe, P.; Schalken, J.; du Manoir, S.; Ramaekers, F.; Lichter, P.; Hopman, A.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was applied for a comprehensive screening of chromosomal aberrations in 14 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder of different grade and stage. The results were compared in a number of selected cases with those obtained by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization. Distinct amplifications, found with CGH, were located on 3p22-24, 10p13-14, 12q13-15, 17q22-23, 18p11, and 22q11-13. These high copy number amplifications and the frequency of imbalances involving chromosome 5, occurring in 4 of 14 cases, have not yet been identified in transitional cell carcinomas. Apart from these new aberrations, imbalances were detected in 3 or more cases for chromosomes 9 and 11, as already described previously in the literature. In four tumors, the copy number of specific chromosomal regions was also analyzed by interphase cytogenetics. Although in most instances the CGH data were confirmed, in one tumor, distinct differences were observed, possibly a result of heterogeneity of the tumor cell population. Furthermore, the CGH data were compared with loss of heterozygosity as revealed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in the same tumors. In 80% of informative cases, no loss was detected by restriction fragment length polymorphism or by CGH. Of the 15 cases of loss of heterozygosity, 7 showed a loss also with CGH, whereas in 8 cases no loss was observed. In summary, CGH is a fast method to obtain a comprehensive picture of chromosomal imbalances in transitional cell carcinomas, including a number of previously unknown genomic alterations such as high level amplifications. Images Figure 2 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7778674

  1. Automating dicentric chromosome detection from cytogenetic biodosimetry data.

    PubMed

    Rogan, Peter K; Li, Yanxin; Wickramasinghe, Asanka; Subasinghe, Akila; Caminsky, Natasha; Khan, Wahab; Samarabandu, Jagath; Wilkins, Ruth; Flegal, Farrah; Knoll, Joan H

    2014-06-01

    We present a prototype software system with sufficient capacity and speed to estimate radiation exposures in a mass casualty event by counting dicentric chromosomes (DCs) in metaphase cells from many individuals. Top-ranked metaphase cell images are segmented by classifying and defining chromosomes with an active contour gradient vector field (GVF) and by determining centromere locations along the centreline. The centreline is extracted by discrete curve evolution (DCE) skeleton branch pruning and curve interpolation. Centromere detection minimises the global width and DAPI-staining intensity profiles along the centreline. A second centromere is identified by reapplying this procedure after masking the first. Dicentrics can be identified from features that capture width and intensity profile characteristics as well as local shape features of the object contour at candidate pixel locations. The correct location of the centromere is also refined in chromosomes with sister chromatid separation. The overall algorithm has both high sensitivity (85 %) and specificity (94 %). Results are independent of the shape and structure of chromosomes in different cells, or the laboratory preparation protocol followed. The prototype software was recoded in C++/OpenCV; image processing was accelerated by data and task parallelisation with Message Passaging Interface and Intel Threading Building Blocks and an asynchronous non-blocking I/O strategy. Relative to a serial process, metaphase ranking, GVF and DCE are, respectively, 100 and 300-fold faster on an 8-core desktop and 64-core cluster computers. The software was then ported to a 1024-core supercomputer, which processed 200 metaphase images each from 1025 specimens in 1.4 h. PMID:24757176

  2. Automating dicentric chromosome detection from cytogenetic biodosimetry data

    PubMed Central

    Rogan, Peter K.; Li, Yanxin; Wickramasinghe, Asanka; Subasinghe, Akila; Caminsky, Natasha; Khan, Wahab; Samarabandu, Jagath; Wilkins, Ruth; Flegal, Farrah; Knoll, Joan H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a prototype software system with sufficient capacity and speed to estimate radiation exposures in a mass casualty event by counting dicentric chromosomes (DCs) in metaphase cells from many individuals. Top-ranked metaphase cell images are segmented by classifying and defining chromosomes with an active contour gradient vector field (GVF) and by determining centromere locations along the centreline. The centreline is extracted by discrete curve evolution (DCE) skeleton branch pruning and curve interpolation. Centromere detection minimises the global width and DAPI-staining intensity profiles along the centreline. A second centromere is identified by reapplying this procedure after masking the first. Dicentrics can be identified from features that capture width and intensity profile characteristics as well as local shape features of the object contour at candidate pixel locations. The correct location of the centromere is also refined in chromosomes with sister chromatid separation. The overall algorithm has both high sensitivity (85 %) and specificity (94 %). Results are independent of the shape and structure of chromosomes in different cells, or the laboratory preparation protocol followed. The prototype software was recoded in C++/OpenCV; image processing was accelerated by data and task parallelisation with Message Passaging Interface and Intel Threading Building Blocks and an asynchronous non-blocking I/O strategy. Relative to a serial process, metaphase ranking, GVF and DCE are, respectively, 100 and 300-fold faster on an 8-core desktop and 64-core cluster computers. The software was then ported to a 1024-core supercomputer, which processed 200 metaphase images each from 1025 specimens in 1.4 h. PMID:24757176

  3. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  4. Method of detecting genetic translocations identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  5. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  6. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  7. Sensitive and specific detection of mosaic chromosomal abnormalities using the Parent-of-Origin-based Detection (POD) method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mosaic somatic alterations are present in all multi-cellular organisms, but the physiological effects of low-level mosaicism are largely unknown. Most mosaic alterations remain undetectable with current analytical approaches, although the presence of such alterations is increasingly implicated as causative for disease. Results Here, we present the Parent-of-Origin-based Detection (POD) method for chromosomal abnormality detection in trio-based SNP microarray data. Our software implementation, triPOD, was benchmarked using a simulated dataset, outperformed comparable software for sensitivity of abnormality detection, and displayed substantial improvement in the detection of low-level mosaicism while maintaining comparable specificity. Examples of low-level mosaic abnormalities from a large autism dataset demonstrate the benefits of the increased sensitivity provided by triPOD. The triPOD analyses showed robustness across multiple types of Illumina microarray chips. Two large, clinically-relevant datasets were characterized and compared. Conclusions Our method and software provide a significant advancement in the ability to detect low-level mosaic abnormalities, thereby opening new avenues for research into the implications of mosaicism in pathogenic and non-pathogenic processes. PMID:23724825

  8. Molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome 15 deletions in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, D.E.; Weksberg, R.; Shuman, C.

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct genetic disorders involving alterations of chromosome 15q11-q13. Approximately 75% of individuals with PWS and AS have deletions within 15q11-q13 by molecular analysis. We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the clinical laboratory detection of del(15)(q11q13) using the cosmid probes D15S11 and GABRB3 (ONCOR, Gaithersburg, NY). 4/4 PWS and 1/1 AS patients previously identified as having cytogenetic deletions were deleted for both probes. In a prospectively ascertained series of 54 patient samples referred to rule out either PWS or AS, 8 were deleted for D15S11 and GABRB3. In addition, an atypical deletion patient with PWS was also identified who was found to be deleted for GABRB3 but not D15S11. The SNRPN locus was also deleted in this patient. Only 4 of the 9 patient samples having molecular cytogenetic deletions were clearly deleted by high resolution banding (HRB) analysis. The microscopic and submicroscopic deletions have been confirmed by dinucleotide (CA) repeat analysis. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis was also used to demonstrate that five non-deletion patients in this series had biparental inheritance of chromosome 15, including region q11-q13. Deletions were not detected by either HRB, FISH or microsatellite polymorphism analysis in samples obtained from parents of the deletion patients. Methylation studies of chromosome 15q11-q13 are in progress for this series of PWS and AS families. FISH analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 in patients with PWS and AS is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for deletion detection.

  9. Temporal and spatial evolution of somatic chromosomal alterations: A case-cohort study of Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohong; Galipeau, Patricia C.; Paulson, Thomas G.; Sanchez, Carissa A.; Arnaudo, Jessica; Liu, Karen; Sather, Cassandra L.; Kostadinov, Rumen L.; Odze, Robert D.; Kuhner, Mary K.; Maley, Carlo C.; Self, Steven G.; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Blount, Patricia L.; Reid, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    All cancers are believed to arise by dynamic, stochastic somatic genomic evolution with genome instability, generation of diversity and selection of genomic alterations that underlie multi-stage progression to cancer. Advanced esophageal adenocarcinomas (EAs) have high levels of somatic copy number alterations. Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a risk factor for developing EA, and somatic chromosomal alterations (SCAs) are known to occur in BE. The vast majority (~95%) of individuals with BE do not progress to EA during their lifetimes, but a small subset develop EA, many of which arise rapidly even in carefully monitored patients without visible endoscopic abnormalities at the index endoscopy. Using a well-designed, longitudinal case-cohort study, we characterized SCA as assessed by SNP arrays over space and time in 79 “progressors” with BE as they approach the diagnosis of cancer and 169 “nonprogressors” with BE who did not progress to EA over 20,425 person-months of follow-up. The genomes of nonprogressors typically had small localized deletions involving fragile sites and 9p loss/copy neutral LOH that generate little genetic diversity and remained relatively stable over prolonged follow-up. As progressors approach the diagnosis of cancer, their genomes developed chromosome instability with initial gains and losses, genomic diversity, and selection of SCAs followed by catastrophic genome doublings. Our results support a model of differential disease dynamics in which nonprogressor genomes largely remain stable over prolonged periods whereas progressor genomes evolve significantly increased SCA and diversity within four years of EA diagnosis, suggesting a window of opportunity for early detection. PMID:24253313

  10. Chromosomal position shift of a regulatory gene alters the bacterial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Michael; Zaldastanishvili, Elisabed; Sobetzko, Patrick; Lafon, Corinne; Mourez, Michael; Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-09-30

    Recent studies strongly suggest that in bacterial cells the order of genes along the chromosomal origin-to-terminus axis is determinative for regulation of the growth phase-dependent gene expression. The prediction from this observation is that positional displacement of pleiotropic genes will affect the genetic regulation and hence, the cellular phenotype. To test this prediction we inserted the origin-proximal dusB-fis operon encoding the global regulator FIS in the vicinity of replication terminus on both arms of the Escherichia coli chromosome. We found that the lower fis gene dosage in the strains with terminus-proximal dusB-fis operons was compensated by increased fis expression such that the intracellular concentration of FIS was homeostatically adjusted. Nevertheless, despite unchanged FIS levels the positional displacement of dusB-fis impaired the competitive growth fitness of cells and altered the state of the overarching network regulating DNA topology, as well as the cellular response to environmental stress, hazardous substances and antibiotics. Our finding that the chromosomal repositioning of a regulatory gene can determine the cellular phenotype unveils an important yet unexplored facet of the genetic control mechanisms and paves the way for novel approaches to manipulate bacterial physiology. PMID:26170236

  11. Methods for Detecting Chromosome Rearrangements in Gibberella Zeae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chromosome rearrangements between fungal strains may reduce fertility in sexual crosses through the production of genetically inviable recombinant progeny. As such, rearrangements can be important postzygotic reproductive barriers that contribute to the speciation process. The presence of chromosom...

  12. Analysis of protein gene products in cells with altered chromosome sets for the purpose of genetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkin, S.S.; Zakharov, S.F.; Gromov, P.S.; Shcheglova, M.V.; Kukharenko, V.I.; Shilov, A.G.; Matveeva, N.M.; Zhdanova, N.S.; Efimochkin, A.S.; Krokhina, T.B. |

    1994-12-01

    Two-dimensional electrophoresis was used for analyzing proteins in hybrid cells that contained single human chromosomes (chromosome 5, chromosome 21, or chromosomes 5 and 21) against the background of the mouse genome. By comparing the protein patterns of hybrid and parent cells (about 1000 protein fractions for each kind of cell), five fractions among proteins of hybrid cells were supposedly identified as human proteins. The genes of two of them are probably located on chromosome 5, and those of the other three on chromosome 21. Moreover, analysis of proteins in fibroblasts of patients with the cri-du-chat syndrome (5p-) revealed a decrease in the content of two proteins as compared with those in preparations of diploid fibroblasts. This fact was regarded as evidence that two corresponding genes are located on the short arm of chromosome 5. Methodological problems associated with the use of protein pattern analysis in cells with altered chromosome sets for the purposes of genetic mapping are discussed.

  13. Genomic alterations in cervical carcinoma: Losses of chromosome heterozygosity (LOH) correlated with cytogenetic, HPV, and p53 evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, H.P.; Mullokandov, M.; Khollodilov, N.G.

    1994-09-01

    This study was undertaken to obtain indications of chromosomes likely to carry tumorigenicity suppressor genes the loss of function of which play a role in the origin or progression of cervical carcinomas. PCR and electrophoresis with primers for 73 highly polymorphic microsatellite chromosome markers were used to determine the incidence of LOH of all of the autosomes in 38 cervical carcinomas. According to these criteria 14 of the autosomes are involved in LOH in 24% to 42% of the tumors. This involves chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 16, 18 and 19. Most frequently involved are chromosomes 3 and 6 with LOH in 42% of the tumors. The chromosomes next most frequently involved are 4, 7, 11 and 18, with LOH in 31-32% of cases. Chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 8 and 16 each had LOH in 29% of the tumors; 9 and 13 each in 26%; and 19 in 24% of the tumors. All other autosomes had LOH in 18% or fewer of the tumors. Cytogenetic analyses performed on direct preparations from many of the same tumors agreed well with the molecular LOH assays. Correlation of the information obtained with both of these methods provides considerable insight into the mechanisms involved in the occurrence of these chromosome alterations. Chromosome 3 is the third most frequent chromosome involved in LOH in all types of cancer. In cervical carcinomas the region most frequently involved is 3p13-p25, which is a segment within which suppressors have been implicated in several other types of malignancies. Chromosome 6 on the other hand is rarely involved in other neoplasias and this appears to be unique to cervical carcinomas. Of interest was the finding that many of the HPV-negative tumors had LOH of chromosome 17 and many of these expressed mutant p53. The latter tumors occur in older women and are on the average much more aggressive than the HPV-positive tumors.

  14. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    SciTech Connect

    M'kacher, Radhia; El Maalouf, Elie; Terzoudi, Georgia; Ricoul, Michelle; Heidingsfelder, Leonhard; Karachristou, Ionna; Laplagne, Eric; Hempel, William M.; Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain; Pantelias, Gabriel; Sabatier, Laure

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to {sup 60}Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw.

  15. Reciprocal white matter alterations due to 16p11.2 chromosomal deletions versus duplications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi Shin; Owen, Julia P; Pojman, Nicholas J; Thieu, Tony; Bukshpun, Polina; Wakahiro, Mari L J; Marco, Elysa J; Berman, Jeffrey I; Spiro, John E; Chung, Wendy K; Buckner, Randy L; Roberts, Timothy P L; Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Sherr, Elliott H; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2016-08-01

    Copy number variants at the 16p11.2 chromosomal locus are associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and speech and language disorders. A gene dosage dependence has been suggested, with 16p11.2 deletion carriers demonstrating higher body mass index and head circumference, and 16p11.2 duplication carriers demonstrating lower body mass index and head circumference. Here, we use diffusion tensor imaging to elucidate this reciprocal relationship in white matter organization, showing widespread increases of fractional anisotropy throughout the supratentorial white matter in pediatric deletion carriers and, in contrast, extensive decreases of white matter fractional anisotropy in pediatric and adult duplication carriers. We find associations of these white matter alterations with cognitive and behavioral impairments. We further demonstrate the value of imaging metrics for characterizing the copy number variant phenotype by employing linear discriminant analysis to predict the gene dosage status of the study subjects. These results show an effect of 16p11.2 gene dosage on white matter microstructure, and further suggest that opposite changes in diffusion tensor imaging metrics can lead to similar cognitive and behavioral deficits. Given the large effect sizes found in this study, our results support the view that specific genetic variations are more strongly associated with specific brain alterations than are shared neuropsychiatric diagnoses. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2833-2848, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27219475

  16. X-chromosome tiling path array detection of copy number variants in patients with chromosome X-linked mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal, I; Rodríguez-Revenga, L; Armengol, L; González, E; Rodriguez, B; Badenas, C; Sánchez, A; Martínez, F; Guitart, M; Fernández, I; Arranz, JA; Tejada, MI; Pérez-Jurado, LA; Estivill, X; Milà, M

    2007-01-01

    Background Aproximately 5–10% of cases of mental retardation in males are due to copy number variations (CNV) on the X chromosome. Novel technologies, such as array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), may help to uncover cryptic rearrangements in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) patients. We have constructed an X-chromosome tiling path array using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and validated it using samples with cytogenetically defined copy number changes. We have studied 54 patients with idiopathic mental retardation and 20 controls subjects. Results Known genomic aberrations were reliably detected on the array and eight novel submicroscopic imbalances, likely causative for the mental retardation (MR) phenotype, were detected. Putatively pathogenic rearrangements included three deletions and five duplications (ranging between 82 kb to one Mb), all but two affecting genes previously known to be responsible for XLMR. Additionally, we describe different CNV regions with significant different frequencies in XLMR and control subjects (44% vs. 20%). Conclusion This tiling path array of the human X chromosome has proven successful for the detection and characterization of known rearrangements and novel CNVs in XLMR patients. PMID:18047645

  17. Chromosome alterations in breast carcinomas: frequent involvement of DNA losses including chromosomes 4q and 21q.

    PubMed Central

    Schwendel, A.; Richard, F.; Langreck, H.; Kaufmann, O.; Lage, H.; Winzer, K. J.; Petersen, I.; Dietel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization was applied to map DNA gains and losses in 39 invasive ductal breast carcinomas. Frequent abnormalities included gains on chromosomal regions 1q, 8q, 11q12-13, 16p, 19, 20q and X as well as frequent losses on 1p, 5q, 6q, 9p, 11q, 13q and 16q. Furthermore, frequent losses on 4q (20 cases) and 21q (14 cases) were found for the first time in this tumour type. High copy number amplifications were observed at 8q12-24, 11q11-13 and 20q13-ter. Highly differentiated tumours were associated with gains on 1q and 11q12-13 along with losses on 1p21-22, 4q, 13q, 11q21-ter. Undifferentiated breast carcinomas were characterized by additional DNA imbalances, i.e. deletions of 5q13-23, all of chromosome 9, the centromeric part of chromosome 13 including band 13q14 and the overrepresentation of chromosome X. We speculate that these changes are associated with tumour progression of invasive ductal breast cancer. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9743305

  18. High-Throughput Detection of Actionable Genomic Alterations in Clinical Tumor Samples by Targeted, Massively Parallel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wagle, Nikhil; Berger, Michael F.; Davis, Matthew J.; Blumenstiel, Brendan; DeFelice, Matthew; Pochanard, Panisa; Ducar, Matthew; Van Hummelen, Paul; MacConaill, Laura E.; Hahn, William C.; Meyerson, Matthew; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of “actionable” somatic genomic alterations present in each tumor (e.g., point mutations, small insertions/deletions, and copy number alterations that direct therapeutic options) should facilitate individualized approaches to cancer treatment. However, clinical implementation of systematic genomic profiling has rarely been achieved beyond limited numbers of oncogene point mutations. To address this challenge, we utilized a targeted, massively parallel sequencing approach to detect tumor genomic alterations in formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor samples. Nearly 400-fold mean sequence coverage was achieved, and single nucleotide sequence variants, small insertions/deletions, and chromosomal copy number alterations were detected simultaneously with high accuracy compared to other methods in clinical use. Putatively actionable genomic alterations, including those that predict sensitivity or resistance to established and experimental therapies, were detected in each tumor sample tested. Thus, targeted deep sequencing of clinical tumor material may enable mutation-driven clinical trials and, ultimately, ”personalized” cancer treatment. PMID:22585170

  19. FISH detection of chromosome 15 deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Teshima, I.; Chadwick, D.; Chitayat, D.

    1996-03-29

    We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis for the clinical laboratory detection of the 15q11-q13 deletion seen in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) using probes for loci D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10, and GABRB3. In a series of 118 samples from patients referred for PWS or AS, 29 had deletions by FISH analysis. These included two brothers with a paternally transmitted deletion detectable with the probe for SNRPN only. G-banding analysis was less sensitive for deletion detection but useful in demonstrating other cytogenetic alterations in four cases. Methylation and CA-repeat analyses of 15q11-q13 were used to validate the FISH results. Clinical findings of patients with deletions were variable, ranging from newborns with hypotonia as the only presenting feature to children who were classically affected. We conclude that FISH analysis is a rapid and reliable method for detection of deletions within 15q11-q13 and whenever a deletion is found, FISH analysis of parental chromosomes should also be considered. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Detection of Y Chromosome DNA as Evidence of Semen in Cervicovaginal Secretions of Sexually Active Women

    PubMed Central

    Chomont, Nicolas; Grésenguet, Gérard; Lévy, Michel; Hocini, Hakim; Becquart, Pierre; Matta, Mathieu; Tranchot-Diallo, Juliette; Andreoletti, Laurent; Carreno, Marie-Paule; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Bélec, Laurent

    2001-01-01

    The detection of traces of semen in cervicovaginal secretions (CVS) from sexually active women practicing unprotected sex is a prerequisite for the accurate study of cervicovaginal immunity. Two semen markers, the prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) and the Y chromosome, were detected in parallel in CVS obtained by a standardized vaginal washing of consecutive women attending the principal medical center for sexually transmitted diseases of Bangui, Central African Republic. PSA was detected by immunoenzymatic capture assay in the cell-free fraction of CVS, and the Y chromosome was detected by a single PCR assay of DNA extracted by silica from the cell fraction (Y PCR). Fifty (19%) cell-free fractions of the 264 β-globin-positive CVS samples were positive for PSA, and 100 (38%) cell fractions of the CVS samples were positive for the Y chromosome. All the 50 (19%) PSA-containing CVS samples were also positive for the Y chromosome. Fifty (19%) CVS samples were positive only for the Y chromosome, with no detectable PSA. The remaining 164 (62%) CVS samples were both PSA and Y chromosome negative. These findings demonstrate that CVS from sexually active women may contain cell-associated semen residues unrecognized by conventional immunoenzymatic assays used to detect semen components. The detection of cell-associated male DNA with a highly sensitive and specific procedure such as Y PCR constitutes a method of choice to detect semen traces in female genital secretions. PMID:11527810

  1. Chromosome 10 and RET gene copy number alterations in hereditary and sporadic Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Raffaele; Romei, Cristina; Cosci, Barbara; Vivaldi, Agnese; Bottici, Valeria; Renzini, Giulia; Ugolini, Clara; Tacito, Alessia; Basolo, Fulvio; Pinchera, Aldo; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    About 30% of hereditary Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma (MTC) have been demonstrated to harbour imbalance between mutant and wild-type RET alleles. We studied the RET copy number alterations (RET CNA) in 65 MTC and their correlation with RET mutation and patients' outcome. Fluorescence in situ Hybridization and Real-time PCR revealed RET CNA in 27.7% MTC but only in a variable percentage of cells. In sporadic MTC, RET CNA were represented by chromosome 10 aneuploidy while in hereditary MTC by RET amplification. A significant higher prevalence of RET CNA was observed in RET mutated MTC (P=0.003). RET CNA was also associated to a poorer outcome (P=0.005). However, the multivariate analysis revealed that only RET mutation and advanced clinical stage correlated with the worst outcome. In conclusion, 30% MTC harbour RET CNA in variable percentage of cells suggesting cell heterogeneity. RET CNA can be considered a poor prognostic factor potentiating the poor prognostic role of RET mutation. PMID:21867742

  2. Identification of a chromosome 18q gene that is altered in colorectal cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Fearon, E.R.; Nigro, J.M.; Simons, J.W.; Ruppert, J.M.; Preisinger, A.C.; Vogelstein, B.; Cho, K.R.; Kern, S.E.; Hamilton, S.R. ); Thomas, G. )

    1990-01-05

    A contiguous stretch of DNA comprising 370 kilobase pairs (kb) has now been cloned from a region of chromosome 18q suspected to reside near this gene. Potential exons in the 370-kb region were defined by human-rodent sequence identities, and the expression of potential exons was assessed by an exon-connection strategy based on the polymerase chain reaction. Expressed exons were used as probes for cDNA screening to obtain clones that encoded a portion of a gene termed DCC; this cDNA was encoded by at least eight exons within the 370-kb genomic region. The predicted amino acid sequence of the cDNA specified a protein with sequence similarity to neural cell adhesion molecules and other related cell surface glycoproteins. While the DCC gene was expressed in most normal tissues, including colonic mucosa, its expression was greatly reduced or absent in most colorectal carcinomas tested. Somatic mutations within the DCC gene observed in colorectal cancers included a homozygous deletion of the 5{prime} end of the gene, a point mutation within one of the introns, and ten examples of DNA insertions within a 0.17-kb fragment immediately downstream of one of the exons. The DCC gene may play a role in the pathogenesis of human colorectal neoplasia, perhaps through alteration of the normal cell-cell interactions controlling growth.

  3. Association of Chromosomal Alterations with Arsenite-Induced Tumorigenicity of Human HaCaT Keratinocytes in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Ho, I-Ching; Lee, Te-Chang

    2004-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen. Chronic low-dose exposure to inorganic arsenic is associated with an increased incidence of a variety of cancers, including skin, lung, bladder, and liver cancer. Because genetic alterations often occur during cancer development, the objective of this study was to explore what types of genetic alterations were induced by chronic exposure of human HaCaT cells to arsenic. After 20 passages in the presence of inorganic trivalent arsenite at concentrations of 0.5 or 1 μM, HaCaT cells had higher intracellular levels of glutathione, became more resistance to arsenite, and showed an increased frequency of micronuclei. Furthermore, the previously nontumorigenic HaCaT cells became tumorigenic, as shown by subcutaneous injection into Balb/c nude mice. Cell lines derived from the tumors formed by injection of arsenite-exposed HaCaT cells into nude mice expressed higher levels of keratin 6, a proliferation marker of keratinocytes, than did parental HaCaT cells, whereas the expression of keratins 5, 8, and 10 was significantly decreased. Comparative genomic hybridization demonstrated chromosomal alterations in the 11 cell lines derived from these tumors; all 11 showed significant loss of chromosome 9q, and seven showed significant gain of chromosome 4q. The present results show that long-term exposure to low doses of arsenite transformed nontumorigenic human keratinocytes to cells that were tumorigenic in nude mice and that chromosomal alterations were observed in all cell lines established from the tumors. PMID:15579417

  4. Genomic Characterization of Prenatally Detected Chromosomal Structural Abnormalities Using Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peining; Pomianowski, Pawel; DiMaio, Miriam S.; Florio, Joanne R.; Rossi, Michael R.; Xiang, Bixia; Xu, Fang; Yang, Hui; Geng, Qian; Xie, Jiansheng; Mahoney, Maurice J.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of chromosomal structural abnormalities using conventional cytogenetic methods poses a challenge for prenatal genetic counseling due to unpredictable clinical outcomes and risk of recurrence. Of the 1,726 prenatal cases in a 3-year period, we performed oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis on 11 cases detected with various structural chromosomal abnormalities. In nine cases, genomic aberrations and gene contents involving a 3p distal deletion, a marker chromosome from chromosome 4, a derivative chromosome 5 from a 5p/7q translocation, a de novo distal 6q deletion, a recombinant chromosome 8 comprised of an 8p duplication and an 8q deletion, an extra derivative chromosome 9 from an 8p/9q translocation, mosaicism for chromosome 12q with added material of initially unknown origin, an unbalanced 13q/15q rearrangement, and a distal 18q duplication and deletion were delineated. An absence of pathogenic copy number changes was noted in one case with a de novo 11q/14q translocation and in another with a familial insertion of 21q into a 19q. Genomic characterization of the structural abnormalities aided in the prediction of clinical outcomes. These results demonstrated the value of aCGH analysis in prenatal cases with subtle or complex chromosomal rearrangements. Furthermore, a retrospective analysis of clinical indications of our prenatal cases showed that approximately 20% of them had abnormal ultrasound findings and should be considered as high risk pregnancies for a combined chromosome and aCGH analysis. PMID:21671377

  5. Chromosome-Specific Staining To Detect Genetic Rearrangements Associated With Chromosome 3 And/Or Chromosone 17

    DOEpatents

    Gray; Joe W.; Pinkel; Daniel; Kallioniemi; Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi; Anne; Sakamoto; Masaru

    2002-02-05

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  6. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Darrow, Emily M.; Huntley, Miriam H.; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K.; Durand, Neva C.; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P.; Lander, Eric S.; Chadwick, Brian P.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-01-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the “Barr body.” Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called “superdomains,” such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called “superloops.” DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4. We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  7. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture.

    PubMed

    Darrow, Emily M; Huntley, Miriam H; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K; Durand, Neva C; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P; Lander, Eric S; Chadwick, Brian P; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-08-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the "Barr body." Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called "superdomains," such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called "superloops." DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4 We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  8. Detection of dinoflagellates by the light scattering properties of the chiral structure of their chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianping; Kattawar, George W.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most prominent properties of dinoflagellates is their large sized and highly chromosome-laden nucleus, which contains dozens of cylindrically shaped chromosomes. With such high chromatic concentration, these chromosomes condense into ordered helical structures and were claimed to be responsible for the large circular polarization effects observed in the light scattering from dinoflagellates. In previous research, a thin helix model of a chromosome was used to compare the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) and the analytical Born approximation calculations. However, for such a simplified model only modest qualitative agreements with experimental measurements were achieved. Moreover, only one chromosome in one nucleus was simulated, overlooking the effects of interactions between chromosomes. In this work, we adopt the helical plywood liquid crystal model with a capsule shape, in which parallel fibrils lie in plains perpendicular to the helix axis and the orientations of these fibrils twist at a constant angle between two neighboring layers. The ADDA code is applied to calculate the 16 Mueller matrix elements of light scattering from a single chromosome and from the nucleus, which is composed of a collection of randomly positioned and randomly orientated chromosomes. Special attention is paid to the S14 Mueller matrix element, which describes the ability of differentiating left and right circularly polarized light. Our results show that large S14 back scattering signals from the dinoflagellate nucleus results from the underlying helical structures of its chromosomes. These signals are sensitive to the light wavelength and pitch of the chromatic helix, the latter of which is species specific. Therefore, detecting back scattering S14 signal could be a promising method to monitor dinoflagellates such as Karenia brevis, the causal agent of the Florida red tide.

  9. High Resolution Genome-Wide Analysis of Chromosomal Alterations in Burkitt's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Toujani, Saloua; Dessen, Philippe; Ithzar, Nathalie; Danglot, Gisèle; Richon, Catherine; Vassetzky, Yegor; Robert, Thomas; Lazar, Vladimir; Bosq, Jacques; Da Costa, Lydie; Pérot, Christine; Ribrag, Vincent; Patte, Catherine; Wiels, Jöelle; Bernheim, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Additional chromosomal abnormalities are currently detected in Burkitt's lymphoma. They play major roles in the progression of BL and in prognosis. The genes involved remain elusive. A whole-genome oligonucleotide array CGH analysis correlated with karyotype and FISH was performed in a set of 27 Burkitt's lymphoma-derived cell lines and primary tumors. More than half of the 145 CNAs<2 Mb were mapped to Mendelian CNVs, including GSTT1, glutathione s-transferase and BIRC6, an anti-apoptotic protein, possibly predisposing to some cancers. Somatic cell line-specific CNVs localized to the IG locus were consistently observed with the 244 K aCGH platform. Among 136 CNAs >2 Mb, gains were found in 1q (12/27), 13q (7/27), 7q (6/27), 8q(4/27), 2p (3/27), 11q (2/27) and 15q (2/27). Losses were found in 3p (5/27), 4p (4/27), 4q (4/27), 9p (4/27), 13q (4/27), 6p (3/27), 17p (3/27), 6q (2/27),11pterp13 (2/27) and 14q12q21.3 (2/27). Twenty one minimal critical regions (MCR), (range 0.04–71.36 Mb), were delineated in tumors and cell lines. Three MCRs were localized to 1q. The proximal one was mapped to 1q21.1q25.2 with a 6.3 Mb amplicon (1q21.1q21.3) harboring BCA2 and PIAS3. In the other 2 MCRs, 1q32.1 and 1q44, MDM4 and AKT3 appeared as possible drivers of these gains respectively. The 13q31.3q32.1 <89.58–96.81> MCR contained an amplicon and ABCC4 might be the driver of this amplicon. The 40 Kb 2p16.1 <60.96–61> MCR was the smallest gained MCR and specifically encompassed the REL oncogene which is already implicated in B cell lymphomas. The most frequently deleted MCR was 3p14.1 <60.43–60.53> that removed the fifth exon of FHIT. Further investigations which combined gene expression and functional studies are essential to understand the lymphomagenesis mechanism and for the development of more effective, targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:19759907

  10. Array-based detection of genetic alterations associated with disease

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel; Albertson, Donna G.; Gray, Joe W.

    2007-09-11

    The present invention relates to DNA sequences from regions of copy number change on chromosome 20. The sequences can be used in hybridization methods for the identification of chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases.

  11. Prenatal detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured chorionic villus samples by FISH.

    PubMed Central

    Bryndorf, T.; Christensen, B.; Vad, M.; Parner, J.; Carelli, M. P.; Ward, B. E.; Klinger, K. W.; Bang, J.; Philip, J.

    1996-01-01

    We developed a 1-d FISH assay for detection of numerical chromosome abnormalities in uncultured chorionic villus samples (CVS). Probes specific for chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y were used to determine ploidy by analysis of signal number in hybridized nuclei. Aneuploidy detection using this assay was directly compared with the results obtained by conventional cytogenetic analysis in a consecutive, clinical study of 2,709 CVS and placental samples. The FISH assay yielded discrete differences in the signal profiles between cytogenetically normal and abnormal samples. On the basis of these results, we generated FISH-assay cutoff values that discriminated between karyotypically normal and aneuploid samples. Samples with mosaicism and a single sample with possible heritable small chromosome X probe target were exceptions and showed poor agreement between FISH results and conventional cytogenetics. We conclude that the FISH assay may act as a more accurate and less labor-demanding alternative to "direct" CVS analysis. PMID:8808609

  12. Genomic Profiling of Advanced-Stage Oral Cancers Reveals Chromosome 11q Alterations as Markers of Poor Clinical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ambatipudi, Srikant; Gerstung, Moritz; Gowda, Ravindra; Pai, Prathamesh; Borges, Anita M.; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Mahimkar, Manoj B.

    2011-01-01

    Identifying oral cancer lesions associated with high risk of relapse and predicting clinical outcome remain challenging questions in clinical practice. Genomic alterations may add prognostic information and indicate biological aggressiveness thereby emphasizing the need for genome-wide profiling of oral cancers. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization was performed to delineate the genomic alterations in clinically annotated primary gingivo-buccal complex and tongue cancers (n = 60). The specific genomic alterations so identified were evaluated for their potential clinical relevance. Copy-number changes were observed on chromosomal arms with most frequent gains on 3q (60%), 5p (50%), 7p (50%), 8q (73%), 11q13 (47%), 14q11.2 (47%), and 19p13.3 (58%) and losses on 3p14.2 (55%) and 8p (83%). Univariate statistical analysis with correction for multiple testing revealed chromosomal gain of region 11q22.1–q22.2 and losses of 17p13.3 and 11q23–q25 to be associated with loco-regional recurrence (P = 0.004, P = 0.003, and P = 0.0003) and shorter survival (P = 0.009, P = 0.003, and P 0.0001) respectively. The gain of 11q22 and loss of 11q23-q25 were validated by interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization (I-FISH). This study identifies a tractable number of genomic alterations with few underlying genes that may potentially be utilized as biological markers for prognosis and treatment decisions in oral cancers. PMID:21386901

  13. Genetic effects of individual chromosomes in cotton cultivars detected by using chromosome substitution lines as genetic probes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of chromosomes or chromosome arms with desirable genes in different inbred lines and/or crosses should provide useful genetic information for crop improvement. In this study, we applied a modified additive-dominance model to analyze a data set of 13 cotton chromosome substitution lines...

  14. Rapid detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured amniocytes by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Katherine; Landes, Greg; Shook, Donna; Harvey, Robert; Lopez, Linda; Locke, Pat; Lerner, Terry; Osathanondh, Rapin; Leverone, Benjamin; Houseal, Timothy; Pavelka, Karen; Dackowski, William

    1992-01-01

    Herein we report the results of the first major prospective study directly comparing aneuploidy detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization of interphase nuclei with the results obtained by cytogenetic analysis. We constructed probes derived from specific subregions of human chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X, and Y that give a single copy–like signal when used in conjunction with suppression hybridization. A total of 526 independent amniotic fluid samples were analyzed in a blind fashion. All five probes were analyzed on 117 samples, while subsets of these five probes were used on the remaining samples (because of insufficient sample size), for a total of over 900 autosomal hybridization reactions and over 400 sex chromosome hybridization reactions. In this blind series, 21 of 21 abnormal samples were correctly identified. The remaining samples were correctly classified as disomic for these five chromosomes. The combination of chromosome-specific probe sets composed primarily of cosmid contigs and optimized hybridization/detection allowed accurate chromosome enumeration in uncultured human amniotic fluid cells, consistent with the results obtained by traditional cytogenetic analysis. Imagesp[60]-aFigure 1 PMID:1609805

  15. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers. PMID:15176974

  16. Presence of an extra chromosome alters meiotic double-stranded break repair dynamics and MLH1 foci distribution in human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Robles, P; Roig, I; Garcia, R; Brieño-Enríquez, M; Martin, M; Cabero, Ll; Toran, N; Garcia Caldés, M

    2013-03-01

    Studies performed on human trisomic 21 oocytes have revealed that during meiosis, the three homologues 21 synapse and, in some cases, achieve what looks like a trivalent. This implies that meiotic recombination takes place among the three homologous chromosomes 21, and to some extent, crossovers form between them. To see how meiotic recombination is in the presence of an extra chromosome 21, we analyzed the distribution of three recombination markers (γH2AX, RPA, and MLH1) on trisomic 21 oocytes at pachynema and, in particular, on chromosomes 21. Results clearly show how the presence of an extra chromosome 21 alters meiotic recombination progression, leading to the presence of a higher number of early recombination markers at pachynema. Moreover, the distribution on these chromosomes 21 of some of these markers is different in aneuploid oocytes. Finally, there is a substantial increase in the number of MLH1 foci, a marker of most crossovers in mammals, which is related to the number of synapsed chromosomes in pachynema. Thus, bivalents 21 had fewer MLH1 foci than partial or total trivalents, suggesting a close relationship between synapsis and crossover designation. All of the data presented suggest that the presence of an extra chromosome alters meiotic recombination globally in aneuploid human oocytes. PMID:23283390

  17. Alteration of wheat vernalization requirement by alien chromosome-mediated transposition of MITE.

    PubMed

    Gorafi, Yasir Serag Alnor; Eltayeb, Amin Elsadig; Tsujimoto, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    Under the changing climate, early flowering is advantageous to escape terminal heat and drought. Previously during evaluation of 14 chromosome introgression lines (ILs), we found three ILs that flowered a month earlier than their wheat background Chinese Spring (CS). This paper describes the cause of the early flowering in the ILs and provides insight into the evolution of spring wheat from the winter wheat. We used specific molecular markers for Vrn genes to determine its allelic composition. Phenotypic evaluations carried out under field conditions and in a growth chamber. Unlike the winter vrn-A1 allele of CS, the spring Vrn-A1 allele of the ILs had insertions of 222 and 131-bp miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) in the promoter region. Sequence analysis indicated that the 222-bp insertion is similar to an insertion in the spring genotype, Triple Dirk D. Our results ruled out any possibility of outcrossing or contamination. Without vernalization, Vrn-A1 is highly expressed in the ILs compared to CS. We attribute the early flowering of the ILs to the insertion of the MITE in the promoter of Vrn-A1. The alien chromosome might mediate this insertion. PMID:27162490

  18. Alteration of wheat vernalization requirement by alien chromosome-mediated transposition of MITE

    PubMed Central

    Gorafi, Yasir Serag Alnor; Eltayeb, Amin Elsadig; Tsujimoto, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Under the changing climate, early flowering is advantageous to escape terminal heat and drought. Previously during evaluation of 14 chromosome introgression lines (ILs), we found three ILs that flowered a month earlier than their wheat background Chinese Spring (CS). This paper describes the cause of the early flowering in the ILs and provides insight into the evolution of spring wheat from the winter wheat. We used specific molecular markers for Vrn genes to determine its allelic composition. Phenotypic evaluations carried out under field conditions and in a growth chamber. Unlike the winter vrn-A1 allele of CS, the spring Vrn-A1 allele of the ILs had insertions of 222 and 131-bp miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) in the promoter region. Sequence analysis indicated that the 222-bp insertion is similar to an insertion in the spring genotype, Triple Dirk D. Our results ruled out any possibility of outcrossing or contamination. Without vernalization, Vrn-A1 is highly expressed in the ILs compared to CS. We attribute the early flowering of the ILs to the insertion of the MITE in the promoter of Vrn-A1. The alien chromosome might mediate this insertion. PMID:27162490

  19. Experimental approaches for the detection of chromosomal malsegregation occurring in the germline of mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.

    1985-01-01

    Existing and newly proposed methods to detect the induction of heritable aneuploidy are summarized, and their favorable and unfavorable features discussed. Among the tests involving direct chromosomal examination, that involving study of pronuclear chromosome at first cleavage is judged to be the most universally informative and reliable, provided tertiary trisomy can be ruled out. Measurement of post-midterm (fetal) death is proposed as a trisomy prescreen that can be readily combined with a dominant-lethal test. Among the genetic procedures for identifying the results of malsegregation events, direct detection of aneuploids has a number of advantages over complementation methods, in which only a fraction of the products of aneuploid gametes is detectable. Direct detection of aneuploids must, however, be restricted to sex-chromosomes, if postnatal animals are examined. A genetic marker system to detect autosomal trisomies in fetuses is proposed. An examination of experimental parameters that might maximize induction of malsegregation leads to the recommendation to include preleptotene among exposed germ-cell stages. 64 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Flow cytometry may allow microscope-independent detection of holocentric chromosomes in plants.

    PubMed

    Zedek, František; Veselý, Pavel; Horová, Lucie; Bureš, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Two chromosomal structures, known as monocentric and holocentric chromosomes, have evolved in eukaryotes. Acentric fragments of monocentric chromosomes are unequally distributed to daughter cells and/or lost, while holocentric fragments are inherited normally. In monocentric species, unequal distribution should generate chimeras of cells with different nuclear DNA content. We investigated whether such differences in monocentric species are detectable by flow cytometry (FCM) as (i) a decreased nuclear DNA content and (ii) an increased coefficient of variance (CV) of the G1 peak after gamma radiation-induced fragmentation. We compared 13 monocentric and 9 holocentric plant species. Unexpectedly, monocentrics and holocentrics did not differ with respect to parameters (i) and (ii) in their response to gamma irradiation. However, we found that the proportion of G2 nuclei was highly elevated in monocentrics after irradiation, while holocentrics were negligibly affected. Therefore, we hypothesize that DNA-damaging agents induce cell cycle arrest leading to endopolyploidy only in monocentric and not (or to much lesser extent) in holocentric plants. While current microscope-dependent methods for holocentrism detection are unreliable for small and numerous chromosomes, which are common in holocentrics, FCM can use somatic nuclei. Thus, FCM may be a rapid and reliable method of high-throughput screening for holocentric candidates across plant phylogeny. PMID:27255216

  1. A simple cytogenetic method to detect chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6.

    PubMed

    Ohye, Tamae; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Inagaki, Hidehito; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Ihira, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2016-02-01

    Some healthy individuals carry human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) within a host chromosome, which is called inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (iciHHV-6). Because iciHHV-6 is generally considered a non-pathogenic condition, it is important to distinguish iciHHV-6 from HHV-6 reactivation in immunocompromised hosts because both conditions manifest high copy numbers of the HHV-6 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a reliable method for the diagnosis of iciHHV-6, HHV-6-specific FISH probes are not commercially available. In our present study, we established a simple PCR-based method for producing FISH probes that can detect the chromosomal integration site of iciHHV-6 at high sensitivity. Using these probes, we confirmed that HHV-6 signals were consistently located at the telomeric region in all of the 13 iciHHV-6 individuals examined. Interestingly, in all seven Japanese iciHHV-6A patients, signals were detected exclusively on chromosome 22q. This method provides a simple and fast approach for iciHHV-6 diagnosis in the clinical laboratory. PMID:26549829

  2. Flow cytometry may allow microscope-independent detection of holocentric chromosomes in plants

    PubMed Central

    Zedek, František; Veselý, Pavel; Horová, Lucie; Bureš, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Two chromosomal structures, known as monocentric and holocentric chromosomes, have evolved in eukaryotes. Acentric fragments of monocentric chromosomes are unequally distributed to daughter cells and/or lost, while holocentric fragments are inherited normally. In monocentric species, unequal distribution should generate chimeras of cells with different nuclear DNA content. We investigated whether such differences in monocentric species are detectable by flow cytometry (FCM) as (i) a decreased nuclear DNA content and (ii) an increased coefficient of variance (CV) of the G1 peak after gamma radiation-induced fragmentation. We compared 13 monocentric and 9 holocentric plant species. Unexpectedly, monocentrics and holocentrics did not differ with respect to parameters (i) and (ii) in their response to gamma irradiation. However, we found that the proportion of G2 nuclei was highly elevated in monocentrics after irradiation, while holocentrics were negligibly affected. Therefore, we hypothesize that DNA-damaging agents induce cell cycle arrest leading to endopolyploidy only in monocentric and not (or to much lesser extent) in holocentric plants. While current microscope-dependent methods for holocentrism detection are unreliable for small and numerous chromosomes, which are common in holocentrics, FCM can use somatic nuclei. Thus, FCM may be a rapid and reliable method of high-throughput screening for holocentric candidates across plant phylogeny. PMID:27255216

  3. Multicolor FISHs for simultaneous detection of genes and DNA segments on human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Maekawa, Masahiko; Asai, Satoko; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a convenient multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) (five-, four-, three-, and two-color FISHs) for detecting specific genes/DNA segments on the human chromosomes. As a foundation of multicolor FISH, we first isolated 80 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes that specifically detect the peri-centromeres (peri-CEN) and subtelomeres (subTEL) of 24 different human chromosomes (nos. 1~22, X, and Y) by screening our homemade BAC library (Keio BAC library) consisting of 200,000 clones. Five-color FISH was performed using human DNA segments specific for peri-CEN or subTEL, which were labeled with five different fluorescent dyes [7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC): blue, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC): green, rhodamine 6G (R6G): yellow, TexRed: red, and cyanine5 (Cy5): purple]. To observe FISH signals under a fluorescence microscope, five optic filters were carefully chosen to avoid overlapping fluorescence emission. Five-color FISH and four-color FISH enabled us to accurately examine the numerical anomaly of human chromosomes. Three-color FISH using two specific BAC clones, that distinguish 5' half of oncogene epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from its 3' half, revealed the amplification and truncation of EGFR in EGFR-overproducing cancer cells. Moreover, two-color FISH readily detected a fusion gene in leukemia cells such as breakpoint cluster region (BCR)/Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue (ABL) on the Philadelphia (Ph') chromosome with interchromosomal translocation. Some other successful cases such as trisomy 21 of Down syndrome are presented. Potential applications of multicolor FISH will be discussed. PMID:25947045

  4. Influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase on DNA repair, chromosomal alterations, and mutations.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A T; van Zeeland, A A; Zwanenburg, T S

    1983-01-01

    The influence of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase such as 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) and benzamide (B) on the spontaneously occurring as well as mutagen induced chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and point mutations has been studied. In addition, we have measured the influence of 3AB on DNA repair following treatment with physical and chemical mutagens. Post treatment of X-irradiated mammalian cells with 3AB increases the frequencies of induced chromosomal aberrations by a factor of 2 to 3. Both acentric fragments and exchanges increase indicating that the presence of 3AB slows down the repair of DNA strand breaks (probably DNA double strand breaks), thus making breaks available for interaction with each other to give rise to exchanges. 3AB, when present in the medium containing bromodeoxyuridine(BrdUrd) during two cell cycles, increases the frequencies of SCEs in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) in a concentration dependent manner leading to about a 10-fold increase at 10 mM concentration. Most 3AB induced SCEs occur during the second cell cycle, in which DNA containing bromouridine (BU) is used as template for replication. BU containing DNA appears to be prone to errors during replication. The extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs by 3AB is correlated with the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of the cells. The frequencies of spontaneously occurring DNA single strand breaks in cells grown in BrdUrd containing medium are higher than in the cells grown in normal medium and this increase depends on the amount of BU incorporated in the DNA of these cells. We have studied the extent of increase in the frequencies of SCEs due to 1 mM 3AB in several human cell lines, including those derived from patients suffering from genetic diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), Fanconi's anemia (FA), and Huntington's chorea. None of these syndromes showed any increased response when compared to normal cells. 3AB, however, increased the

  5. Low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) polymorphism, alcohol-drinking behavior, and chromosome alterations in peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, K; Takeshita, T

    1996-01-01

    Excessive drinking of alcohol is now widely known to be one of the major lifestyle choices that ca effect health. Among the various effects of alcohol drinking, cytogenetic and other genotoxic effects are of major concern from the viewpoint of prevention of alcohol-related diseases. Alcohol is first metabolized to acetaldehyde, which directly causes various types of chromosomal DNA lesions and alcohol-related diseases, and is then further detoxified to the much less toxic metabolite acetate. About 50% of Oriental people are deficient in the aldehyde-dehydrogenase 2 isozyme (ALDH2) that can most efficiently detoxify acetaldehyde. We have performed a series of experiments to investigate how the genetic deficiency in ALDH2 affects the behavioral pattern for alcohol drinking and the sensitivity of peripheral lymphocytes to the induction of chromosome alterations by exposure to alcohol and alcohol-related chemicals. We found great effects of the ALDH2 genotypes on alcohol sensitivity and alcohol-drinking behavior. We also show that lymphocytes from habitual drinkers with the deficient ALDH2 enzyme had significantly higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges than those from ALDH2-proficient individuals. PMID:8781384

  6. High Resolution X Chromosome-Specific Array-CGH Detects New CNVs in Infertile Males

    PubMed Central

    Krausz, Csilla; Giachini, Claudia; Lo Giacco, Deborah; Daguin, Fabrice; Chianese, Chiara; Ars, Elisabet; Ruiz-Castane, Eduard; Forti, Gianni; Rossi, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Context The role of CNVs in male infertility is poorly defined, and only those linked to the Y chromosome have been the object of extensive research. Although it has been predicted that the X chromosome is also enriched in spermatogenesis genes, no clinically relevant gene mutations have been identified so far. Objectives In order to advance our understanding of the role of X-linked genetic factors in male infertility, we applied high resolution X chromosome specific array-CGH in 199 men with different sperm count followed by the analysis of selected, patient-specific deletions in large groups of cases and normozoospermic controls. Results We identified 73 CNVs, among which 55 are novel, providing the largest collection of X-linked CNVs in relation to spermatogenesis. We found 12 patient-specific deletions with potential clinical implication. Cancer Testis Antigen gene family members were the most frequently affected genes, and represent new genetic targets in relationship with altered spermatogenesis. One of the most relevant findings of our study is the significantly higher global burden of deletions in patients compared to controls due to an excessive rate of deletions/person (0.57 versus 0.21, respectively; p = 8.785×10−6) and to a higher mean sequence loss/person (11.79 Kb and 8.13 Kb, respectively; p = 3.435×10−4). Conclusions By the analysis of the X chromosome at the highest resolution available to date, in a large group of subjects with known sperm count we observed a deletion burden in relation to spermatogenic impairment and the lack of highly recurrent deletions on the X chromosome. We identified a number of potentially important patient-specific CNVs and candidate spermatogenesis genes, which represent novel targets for future investigations. PMID:23056185

  7. The NACP/synuclein gene: Chromosomal assignment and screening for alterations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, D.; Martin, C.; Charbonnier, F.

    1995-03-20

    The major component of the vascular and plaque amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease is the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}). A second intrinsic component of amyloid, the NAC (non-A{beta} component of amyloid) peptide, has recently been identified, and its precursor protein was named NACP. A computer homology search allowed us to establish that the human NACP gene was homologous to the rat synuclein gene. We mapped the NACP/synuclein gene to chromosome 4 and cloned three alternatively spliced transcripts in lymphocytes derived from a normal subject. We analyzed by RT-PCR and direct sequencing the entire coding region of the NACP/synuclein gene in a group of patients with familial early onset Alzheimer disease. No mutation was found in 26 unrelated patients. Further studies are required to investigate the implication of the NACP/synuclein gene in Alzheimer disease. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Chromosomal imbalances in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor detected by metaphase and microarray comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yasuko; Yoshida, Aki; Numoto, Kunihiko; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Wai, Daniel; Ohata, Norihide; Takeda, Ken; Kawai, Akira; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2006-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are highly malignant tumors affecting adolescents and adults. There have been a few reports on chromosomal aberrations of MPNSTs; however, the tumor-specific alteration remains unknown. We characterized the genomic alterations in 8 MPNSTs and 8 schwannomas by metaphase comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In 5 of 8 MPNSTs, microarray CGH was added for more detailed analyses. Frequent gains were identified on 3q13-26, 5p13-14, and 12q11-23 and frequent losses were at 1p31, 10p, 11q24-qter, 16, and 17. Microarray CGH revealed frequent gains of EGFR, DAB2, MSH2, KCNK12, DDX15, CDK6, and LAMA3, and losses of CDH1, GLTSCR2, EGR1, CTSB, GATA3, and SULT2A1. These genes seem to be responsible for developing MPNSTs. The concordance rate between metaphase CGH and microarray CGH was 66%. Metaphase CGH was useful for identifying chromosomal alterations before applying microarray CGH. PMID:16391845

  9. Genetic alterations of chromosomes, p53 and p16 genes in low- and high-grade bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Abat, Deniz; Demirhan, Osman; Inandiklioglu, Nihal; Tunc, Erdal; Erdogan, Seyda; Tastemir, Deniz; Uslu, Inayet Nur; Tansug, Zuhtu

    2014-07-01

    A majority of patients with bladder cancer present with superficial disease and subsequently, some patients show progression to muscle invasive or metastatic disease. Bladder cancer has a complex genetic process and identification of the genetic alterations which occur during progression may lead to the understanding of the nature of the disease and provide the possibility of early treatment. The aim of the present study was to compare the structural and numerical chromosomal differences and changes in the p16 and p53 genes between low-grade (LG) and high-grade (HG) bladder cancer (BC) using cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic methods. Between March 2009 and March 2010, cytogenetic analyses were carried out on tumor and blood samples in 34 patients with transitional cell type BC, and on blood samples of 34 healthy patients as a control group. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes for the p16 and p53 genes were also used to screen the alterations in these genes in 32 patients with BC. The patients were divided into two groups (LG and HG) and the findings were compared. A total of 11 (32.3%) patients exhibited LGBC, 22 (64.7%) exhibited HGBC and one (3%) patient exhibited carcinoma in situ. There were no differences between the LGBC and HGBC groups according to the number of chromosomal aberrations (P=0.714); however, differences between alterations of the p16 and p53 genes were significant (P=0.002 and P=0.039). Almost all structural abnormalities were found to be located to the 1q21, 1q32, 3p21 and 5q31 regions in patients with HG tumors. In conclusion, the p16 and p53 genes were altered more prominently in patients with HG tumors compared with LG tumors. The structural abnormalities in the 1q21, 1q32, 3p21 and 5q31 regions were observed more frequently in patients with HG tumors. These regions may play significant roles in the progression of BC, but further studies are required to find candidate genes for a panel of BC. PMID:24959214

  10. A new direction for prenatal chromosome microarray testing: software-targeting for detection of clinically significant chromosome imbalance without equivocal findings

    PubMed Central

    Bint, Susan; Irving, Melita D.; Kyle, Phillipa M.; Akolekar, Ranjit; Mohammed, Shehla N.; Mackie Ogilvie, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To design and validate a prenatal chromosomal microarray testing strategy that moves away from size-based detection thresholds, towards a more clinically relevant analysis, providing higher resolution than G-banded chromosomes but avoiding the detection of copy number variants (CNVs) of unclear prognosis that cause parental anxiety. Methods. All prenatal samples fulfilling our criteria for karyotype analysis (n = 342) were tested by chromosomal microarray and only CNVs of established deletion/duplication syndrome regions and any other CNV >3 Mb were detected and reported. A retrospective full-resolution analysis of 249 of these samples was carried out to ascertain the performance of this testing strategy. Results. Using our prenatal analysis, 23/342 (6.7%) samples were found to be abnormal. Of the remaining samples, 249 were anonymized and reanalyzed at full-resolution; a further 46 CNVs were detected in 44 of these cases (17.7%). None of these additional CNVs were of clear clinical significance. Conclusion. This prenatal chromosomal microarray strategy detected all CNVs of clear prognostic value and did not miss any CNVs of clear clinical significance. This strategy avoided both the problems associated with interpreting CNVs of uncertain prognosis and the parental anxiety that are a result of such findings. PMID:24795849

  11. Unexpected rates of chromosomal instabilities and alterations of hormone levels in Namibian uranium miners.

    PubMed

    Zaire, R; Notter, M; Riedel, W; Thiel, E

    1997-05-01

    A common problem in determining the health consequences of radiation exposure is factoring out other carcinogenic influences. The conditions in Namibia provide a test case for distinguishing the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to uranium from the other environmental factors because of good air quality and the lack of other industries with negative health effects. Present records indicate a much higher prevalence of cancer among male workers in the open-pit uranium mine in Namibia compared with the general population. The objective of the present study was to determine whether long-term exposure to low doses of uranium increases the risk of a biological radiation damage which would lead to malignant diseases and to derive a dose-response model for these miners. To investigate this risk, we measured uranium excretion in urine, neutrophil counts and the serum level of FSH, LH and testosterone and analyzed chromosome aberrations in whole blood cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A representative cohort of 75 non-smoking, HIV-negative miners was compared to a control group of 31 individuals with no occupational history in mining. A sixfold increase in uranium excretion among the miners compared to the controls was recorded (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we determined a significant reduction in testosterone levels (P < 0.008) and neutrophil count (P < 0.004) in miners compared to the unexposed controls. A threefold increase in chromosome aberrations in the miners compared to the nonexposed controls was recorded (P < 0.0001). Most remarkably, cells with multiple aberrations such as "rogue" cells were observed for the first time in miners; these cells had previously been found only after short-term high-dose radiation exposure, e.g. from the Hiroshima atomic bomb or the Chernobyl accident. We conclude that the miners exposed to uranium are at an increased risk to acquire various degrees of genetic damage, and that the damage may be associated with an

  12. Multicolor detection of every chromosome as a means of detecting mosaicism and nuclear organization in human embryonic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kara; Fowler, Katie; Fonseka, Gothami; Griffin, Darren; Ioannou, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revolutionized cytogenetics using fluorescently labelled probes with high affinity with target (nuclear) DNA. By the early 1990s FISH was adopted as a means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) sexing for couples at risk of transmitting X-linked disorders and later for detection of unbalanced translocations. Following a rise in popularity of PGD by FISH for sexing and the availability of multicolor probes (5-8 colors), the use of FISH was expanded to the detection of aneuploidy and selective implantation of embryos more likely to be euploid, the rationale being to increase pregnancy rates (referral categories were typically advanced maternal age, repeated IVF failure, repeated miscarriage or severe male factor infertility). Despite initial reports of an increase in implantation rates, reduction in trisomic offspring and spontaneous abortions criticism centered around experimental design (including lack of randomization), inadequate control groups and lack of report on live births. Eleven randomized control trials (RCTs) (2004-2010) showed that preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with FISH did not increase delivery rates with some demonstrating adverse outcomes. These RCTs, parallel improvements in culturing and cryopreservation and a shift to blastocyst biopsy essentially outdated FISH as a tool for PGS and it has now been replaced by newer technologies (array CGH, SNP arrays, qRT-PCR and NGS). Cell-by-cell follow up analysis of individual blastomeres in non-transferred embryos is however usually prohibitively expensive by these new approaches and thus FISH remains an invaluable resource for the study of mosaicism and nuclear organization. We thus developed the approach described herein for the FISH detection of chromosome copy number of all 24 human chromosomes. This approach involves 4 sequential layers of hybridization, each with 6 spectrally distinct fluorochromes and a bespoke capturing system. Here we report

  13. Unexpected rates of chromosomal instabilities and alterations of hormone levels in Namibian uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Zaire, R.; Notter, M.; Thiel, E.

    1997-05-01

    A common problem in determining the health consequences of radiation exposure is factoring out other carcinogenic influences. The conditions in Namibia provide a test case for distinguishing the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to uranium from the other environmental factors because of good air quality and the lack of other industries with negative health effects. Present records indicate a much higher prevalence of cancer among male workers in the open-pit uranium mine in Namibia compared with the general population. The objective of the present study was to determine whether long-term exposure to low doses of uranium increases the risk of a biological radiation damage which would lead to malignant diseases and to derive a dose-response model for these miners. To investigate this risk, we measured uranium excretion in urine, neutrophil counts and the serum level of FSH, LH and testosterone and analyzed chromosome aberrations in whole blood cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A representative cohort of 75 non-smoking, HIV-negative miners was compared to a control group of 31 individuals with no occupational history in mining. A sixfold increase in uranium excretion among the miners compared to the controls was recorded (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we determined a significant reduction in testosterone levels (P < 0.008) and neutrophil count (P < 0.0001). Most remarkably, cells with multiple aberrations such as {open_quotes}rogue{close_quotes} cells were observed for the first time in miners; these cells had previously been found only after short-term high-dose radiation exposure, e.g. from the Hiroshima atomic bomb or the Chernobyl accident. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Validation of copy number variation sequencing for detecting chromosome imbalances in human preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Cram, David S; Shen, Jiandong; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jianguang; Song, Zhuo; Xu, Genming; Li, Na; Fan, Junmei; Wang, Shufang; Luo, Yaning; Wang, Jun; Yu, Li; Liu, Jiayin; Yao, Yuanqing

    2014-08-01

    Chromosome aneuploidies commonly arise in embryos produced by assisted reproductive technologies and represent a major cause of implantation failure and miscarriage. Currently, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is performed by array-based methods to identify euploid embryos for transfer to the patient. We speculated that a combination of next-generation sequencing technologies and sophisticated bioinformatics would deliver a more comprehensive and accurate methodology to improve the overall efficacy of embryo testing. To meet this challenge, we developed a high-resolution copy number variation (CNV) sequencing pipeline suitable for single-cell analysis. In validation studies, we showed that CNV-Seq was highly sensitive and specific for detection of euploidy, aneuploidy, and segmental imbalances in 24 whole genome amplification samples from PGD embryos that were originally diagnosed by gold standard array comparative genomic hybridization. In addition, CNV-Seq was capable of detecting, mapping, and accurately quantifying terminal chromosome imbalances down to 1 Mb in size originating from abnormal segregation of translocation chromosomes. These validation studies indicate that CNV-Seq displays the hallmarks of an accurate and reliable embryo test with the potential to further improve the overall efficacy of PGD. PMID:24966395

  15. Prenatal detection of chromosome aneuploidies in uncultured chorionic villus samples by FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Bryndorf, T.; Christensen, B.; Vad, M.; Philip, J.

    1996-10-01

    We developed a 1-d FISH assay for detection of numerical chromosome abnormalities in uncultured chorionic villus samples (CVS). Probes specific for chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y were used to determine ploidy by analysis of signal number in hybridized nuclei. Aneuploidy detection using this assay was directly compared with the results obtained by conventional cytogenetic analysis in a consecutive, clinical study of 2,709 CVS and placental samples. The FISH assay yielded discrete differences in the signal profiles between cytogenetically normal and abnormal samples. On the basis of these results, we generated FISH-assay cutoff values that discriminated between karyotypically normal and aneuploid samples. Samples with mosaicism and a single sample with possible heritable small chromosome X probe target were exceptions and showed poor agreement between FISH results and conventional cytogenetics. We conclude that the FISH assay may act as a more accurate and less labor-demanding alternative to {open_quotes}direct{close_quotes} CVS analysis. 22 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Change detection in remote sensing images using modified polynomial regression and spatial multivariate alteration detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianat, Rouhollah; Kasaei, Shohreh

    2009-11-01

    A new and efficient method for incorporating the spatiality into difference-based change detection (CD) algorithms is introduced in this paper. It uses the spatial derivatives of image pixels to extract spatial relations among them. Based on this methodology, the performances of two famous difference-based CD methods, conventional polynomial regression (CPR) and multivariate alteration detection (MAD), are improved and called modified polynomial regression (MPR) and spatial multivariate alteration detection (SMAD), respectively. Various quantitative and qualitative evaluations have shown the superiority of MPR over CPR and SMAD over MAD. Also, the superiority of SMAD over all mentioned CD algorithms is shown. Moreover, it has been proved that both proposed methods enjoy the affine invariance property.

  17. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detection of transcribed sequences on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.F.; Zhu, Y. )

    1994-03-15

    Seventy-four pairs of oligonucleotides derived from sequence-tagged sites (STSs) on the long arm of human chromosome 21, specifically from bands 21q22.1 to 21q22.3, were used in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) to detect the presence of expressed sequences in a fetal brain. These STSs included 69 that had not been related to transcribed sequences and 5 that had detected two known genes and three previously isolated cDNA clones. Of the 69 STSs analyzed in RT-PCR, 25 allowed amplification of specific cDNA fragments. The sizes of amplified cDNA fragments match those amplified from either human genomic DNA or somatic hybrid cells containing human chromosome 21. Of the 11 cDNA analyzed in Northern blot hybridizations, 6 hybridized to specific RNA species. The rapid screening for cDNA using previously mapped STSs has provided insight into the distribution of expressed sequences in this region of chromosome 21. Northern blot analysis of the amplified cDNA fragments has revealed interesting candidate genes in two disease loci. The marker D21S267 was previously mapped in the Down syndrome region of chromosome 21, and the marker D21S113 is closely linked to progressive myoclonus epilepsy. The cDNA fragments amplified using the primer sequences derived from D21S267 and D21S113 hybridized to 7- and 6.5-kb transcripts, respectively, which seems to express predominantly in brain. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Multiscale image enhancement of chromosome banding patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Castleman, Kenneth R.

    1996-10-01

    Visual examination of chromosome banding patterns is an important means of chromosome analysis. Cytogeneticists compare their patient's chromosome image against the prototype normal/abnormal human chromosome banding patterns. Automated chromosome analysis instruments facilitate this by digitally enhancing the chromosome images. Currently available systems employing traditional highpass/bandpass filtering and/or histogram equalization are approximately equivalent to photomicroscopy in their ability to support the detection of band pattern alterations. Improvements in chromosome image display quality, particularly in the detail of the banding pattern, would significantly increase the cost-effectiveness of these systems. In this paper we present our work on the use of multiscale transform and derivative filtering for image enhancement of chromosome banding patterns. A steerable pyramid representation of the chromosome image is generated by a multiscale transform. The derivative filters are designed to detect the bands of a chromosome, and the steerable pyramid transform is chosen based on its desirable properties of shift and rotation invariance. By processing the transform coefficients that correspond to the bands of the chromosome in the pyramid representation, contrast enhancement of the chromosome bands can be achieved with designed flexibility in scale, orientation and location. Compared with existing chromosome image enhancement techniques, this new approach offers the advantage of selective chromosome banding pattern enhancement that allows designated detail analysis. Experimental results indicate improved enhancement capabilities and promise more effective visual aid to comparison of chromosomes to the prototypes and to each other. This will increase the ability of automated chromosome analysis instruments to assist the evaluation of chromosome abnormalities in clinical samples.

  19. Overview of recurrent chromosomal losses in retinoblastoma detected by low coverage next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    García-Chequer, A J; Méndez-Tenorio, A; Olguín-Ruiz, G; Sánchez-Vallejo, C; Isa, P; Arias, C F; Torres, J; Hernández-Angeles, A; Ramírez-Ortiz, M A; Lara, C; Cabrera-Muñoz, M L; Sadowinski-Pine, S; Bravo-Ortiz, J C; Ramón-García, G; Diegopérez-Ramírez, J; Ramírez-Reyes, G; Casarrubias-Islas, R; Ramírez, J; Orjuela, M A; Ponce-Castañeda, M V

    2016-03-01

    Genes are frequently lost or gained in malignant tumors and the analysis of these changes can be informative about the underlying tumor biology. Retinoblastoma is a pediatric intraocular malignancy, and since deletions in chromosome 13 have been described in this tumor, we performed genome wide sequencing with the Illumina platform to test whether recurrent losses could be detected in low coverage data from DNA pools of Rb cases. An in silico reference profile for each pool was created from the human genome sequence GRCh37p5; a chromosome integrity score and a graphics 40 Kb window analysis approach, allowed us to identify with high resolution previously reported non random recurrent losses in all chromosomes of these tumors. We also found a pattern of gains and losses associated to clear and dark cytogenetic bands respectively. We further analyze a pool of medulloblastoma and found a more stable genomic profile and previously reported losses in this tumor. This approach facilitates identification of recurrent deletions from many patients that may be biological relevant for tumor development. PMID:26883451

  20. Overview of recurrent chromosomal losses in retinoblastoma detected by low coverage next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    García-Chequer, A.J.; Méndez-Tenorio, A.; Olguín-Ruiz, G.; Sánchez-Vallejo, C.; Isa, P.; Arias, C.F.; Torres, J.; Hernández-Angeles, A.; Ramírez-Ortiz, M.A.; Lara, C.; Cabrera-Muñoz, M.L.; Sadowinski-Pine, S.; Bravo-Ortiz, J.C.; Ramón-García, G.; Diegopérez-Ramírez, J.; Ramírez-Reyes, G.; Casarrubias-Islas, R.; Ramírez, J.; Orjuela, M.A.; Ponce-Castañeda, M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Genes are frequently lost or gained in malignant tumors and the analysis of these changes can be informative about the underlying tumor biology. Retinoblastoma is a pediatric intraocular malignancy, and since deletions in chromosome 13 have been described in this tumor, we performed genome wide sequencing with the Illumina platform to test whether recurrent losses could be detected in low coverage data from DNA pools of Rb cases. An in silico reference profile for each pool was created from the human genome sequence GRCh37p5; a chromosome integrity score and a graphics 40 Kb window analysis approach, allowed us to identify with high resolution previously reported non random recurrent losses in all chromosomes of these tumors. We also found a pattern of gains and losses associated to clear and dark cytogenetic bands respectively. We further analyze a pool of medulloblastoma and found a more stable genomic profile and previously reported losses in this tumor. This approach facilitates identification of recurrent deletions from many patients that may be biological relevant for tumor development. PMID:26883451

  1. Bioinformatics Tools Allow Targeted Selection of Chromosome Enumeration Probes and Aneuploidy Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Polyzos, Aris A.; Lemke, Kalistyn H.; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate determination of cellular chromosome complements is a highly relevant issue beyond prenatal/pre-implantation genetic analyses or stem cell research, because aneusomy may be an important mechanism by which organisms control the rate of fetal cellular proliferation and the fate of regenerating tissues. Typically, small amounts of individual cells or nuclei are assayed by in situ hybridization using chromosome-specific DNA probes. Careful probe selection is fundamental to successful hybridization experiments. Numerous DNA probes for chromosome enumeration studies are commercially available, but their use in multiplexed hybridization assays is hampered due to differing probe-specific hybridization conditions or a lack of a sufficiently large number of different reporter molecules. Progress in the International Human Genome Project has equipped the scientific community with a wealth of unique resources, among them recombinant DNA libraries, physical maps, and data-mining tools. Here, we demonstrate how bioinformatics tools can become an integral part of simple, yet powerful approaches to devise diagnostic strategies for detection of aneuploidy in interphase cells. Our strategy involving initial in silico optimization steps offers remarkable savings in time and costs during probe generation, while at the same time significantly increasing the assay’s specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility. PMID:23204113

  2. Chromosome specific DNA hybridization in suspension for flow cytometric detection of chimerism in bone marrow transplantation and leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Arkesteijn, G.J.A.; Erpelinck, S.L.A.; Martens, A.C.M.; Hagenbeek, A.

    1995-04-01

    Flow cytometry was used to measure the fluorescence intensity of nuclei that were subjected to fluorescent in situ hybridization in suspension with chromosome specific DNA probes. Paraformaldehyde-fixed nuclei were protein digested with trypsin and hybridized simultaneously with a biotin- and DIG labeled probe specific for chromosome 8 and the biotin labeled Y chromosome probe. Y chromosome positive or negative nuclei were sorted onto microscope slides and subsequently classified as being leukemic or not by fluorescence microscopy, on the basis of the presence of a trisomy for chromosome 8. A 120-fold enrichment could be achieved when 300 Y positive nuclei were sorted from a mixture originally containing 0.5% leukemia cells. Given the specificity of the flow cytometry and FISH procedure, the combination of the two methods can reach a lower detection level of 1 per 250,000. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Detection of Chromosomal Inversions Using Non-Repetitive Nucleic Acid Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method and a kit for the identification of chromosomal inversions are described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  4. Detection of chromosomal inversions using non-repetitive nucleic acid probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Susan M. (Inventor); Ray, F. Andrew (Inventor); Goodwin, Edwin H. (Inventor); Bedford, Joel S. (Inventor); Cornforth, Michael N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for the identification of chromosomal inversions is described. Single-stranded sister chromatids are generated, for example by CO-FISH. A plurality of non-repetitive, labeled probes of relatively small size are hybridized to portions of only one of a pair of single-stranded sister chromatids. If no inversion exists, all of the probes will hybridize to a first chromatid. If an inversion has occurred, these marker probes will be detected on the sister chromatid at the same location as the inversion on the first chromatid.

  5. Y chromosome in Turner syndrome: detection of hidden mosaicism and the report of a rare X;Y translocation case.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Adriana Valéria Sales; Burégio-Frota, Pollyanna; Oliveira dos Santos, Luana; Leal, Gabriela Ferraz; Duarte, Andrea Rezende; Araújo, Jacqueline; Cavalcante da Silva, Vanessa; Muniz, Maria Tereza Cartaxo; Liehr, Thomas; Santos, Neide

    2014-10-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder in females associated with the absence of complete or parts of a second sex chromosome. In 5-12% of patients, mosaicism for a cell line with a normal or structurally abnormal Y chromosome is identified. The presence of Y-chromosome material is of medical importance because it results in an increased risk of developing gonadal tumours and virilisation. Molecular study and fluorescence in situ hybridisation approaches were used to study 74 Brazilian TS patients in order to determine the frequency of hidden Y-chromosome mosaicism, and to infer the potential risk of developing malignancies. Additionally, we describe one TS girl with a very uncommon karyotype 46,X,der(X)t(X;Y)(p22.3?2;q11.23) comprising a partial monosomy of Xp22.3?2 together with a partial monosomy of Yq11.23. The presence of cryptic Y-chromosome-specific sequences was detected in 2.7% of the cases. All patients with Y-chromosome-positive sequences showed normal female genitalia with no signs of virilisation. Indeed, the clinical data from Y-chromosome-positive patients was very similar to those with Y-negative results. Therefore, we recommend that the search for hidden Y-chromosome mosaicism should be carried out in all TS cases and not be limited to virilised patients or carriers of a specific karyotype. PMID:25294360

  6. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization for the Genomewide Detection of Submicroscopic Chromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M. ; de Vries, Bert B. A. ; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo ; Janssen, Irene M. ; Feuth, Ton ; Choy, Chik On ; Straatman, Huub ; van der Vliet, Walter ; Huys, Erik H. L. P. G. ; van Rijk, Anke ; Smeets, Dominique ; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A. ; Knoers, Nine V. ; van der Burgt, Ineke ; de Jong, Pieter J. ; Brunner, Han G. ; van Kessel, Ad Geurts ; Schoenmakers, Eric F. P. M. ; Veltman, Joris A. 

    2003-01-01

    Microdeletions and microduplications, not visible by routine chromosome analysis, are a major cause of human malformation and mental retardation. Novel high-resolution, whole-genome technologies can improve the diagnostic detection rate of these small chromosomal abnormalities. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization allows such a high-resolution screening by hybridizing differentially labeled test and reference DNAs to arrays consisting of thousands of genomic clones. In this study, we tested the diagnostic capacity of this technology using ∼3,500 flourescent in situ hybridization–verified clones selected to cover the genome with an average of 1 clone per megabase (Mb). The sensitivity and specificity of the technology were tested in normal-versus-normal control experiments and through the screening of patients with known microdeletion syndromes. Subsequently, a series of 20 cytogenetically normal patients with mental retardation and dysmorphisms suggestive of a chromosomal abnormality were analyzed. In this series, three microdeletions and two microduplications were identified and validated. Two of these genomic changes were identified also in one of the parents, indicating that these are large-scale genomic polymorphisms. Deletions and duplications as small as 1 Mb could be reliably detected by our approach. The percentage of false-positive results was reduced to a minimum by use of a dye-swap-replicate analysis, all but eliminating the need for laborious validation experiments and facilitating implementation in a routine diagnostic setting. This high-resolution assay will facilitate the identification of novel genes involved in human mental retardation and/or malformation syndromes and will provide insight into the flexibility and plasticity of the human genome. PMID:14628292

  7. A simplified method to detect epididymal sperm aneuploidy (ESA) in mice using three-chromosome fish

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, X.; O`Hogan, S.; Wyrobek, A.

    1995-11-01

    We developed a new method (ESA) to detect aneuploidy and polyploidy in epididymal sperm of mice using three-chromosome FISH. In comparison to a previous method (TSA-testicular spermatid aneuploidy), which required late-step spermatids, the ESA method utilizes epididymal sperm, which are easier to collect than testicular cells. The ESA method also provides a homogenous population of cells, which significantly speeds up the scoring procedure. A total of 6 mice were investigated by the ESA method and results compared with those obtained by the TSA method: 2 mice each of Robertsonian (8.14) heterozygotes, Rb(8.14) homozygotes and B6C3F1. About 10,000 sperm were scored per mouse. For the ESA method, epididimides were cut into small pieces and filtered. Sperm were prepared for hybridization by sonication and a modification of the DTT/LIS method previously described. Sperm aneuploidy was detected by multi-color FISH using three DNA probes specific for mouse chromosomes X, Y and 8. The sex ratio of X8(49.7%) and Y8(49.6%) did not differ from the expected 1:1. The efficiency of ESA was very high; -0.3% of the cells showed no hybridization domain. Hyperhaploidy frequencies for chromosomes X, Y and 8 compared well between the ESA and TSA methods for Rb(8.14) heterozygous (p=0.79) and B6C3F1 mice (p>0.05). The data obtained from Rb(8.14) homozygotes were similar to those from B6C3F1, as predicted (p=0.3). This highly efficient ESA assay is therefore, recommended for future studies of the mechanism of induction of aneuploidy in male germ cells. It also lays a solid foundation for automated scoring.

  8. Angelman syndrome: Validation of molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 for deletion detection

    SciTech Connect

    White, L.; Knoll, J.H.M.

    1995-03-13

    In a series of 18 individuals comprising parents of Angelman syndrome (AS) patients and AS patients with large deletions, microdeletions, and no deletions, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with genomic phage clones for loci D15S63 and GABRB3 for deletion detection of chromosome 15q11-q13. Utilization of probes at these loci allows detection of common large deletions and permits discrimination of less common small deletions. In all individuals the molecular cytogenetic data were concordant with the DNA deletion analyses. FISH provides an accurate method of deletion detection for chromosome 15q11-q13. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Comparison of chromosomal aberrations detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with clinical parameters, DNA ploidy and Ki 67 expression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Y.; Igawa, M.; Shiina, H.; Shigeno, K.; Yokogi, H.; Urakami, S.; Yoneda, T.; Maruyama, R.

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of chromosomal aberrations in renal cell carcinoma, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine its prevalence and correlation with clinical parameters of malignancy. In addition, correlation of chromosomal aberration with Ki 67 expression was analysed. We performed FISH with chromosome-specific DNA probes, and the signal number of pericentromeric sequences on chromosomes 3, 7, 9 and 17 was detected within interphase nuclei in touch preparations from tumour specimen. The incidence of loss of chromosome 3 was significantly higher than those of chromosomes 7, 9 and 17 (P < 0.001, P = 0.03 and P < 0.001 respectively). Hyperdiploid aberration of chromosomes 3 and 17 was significantly correlated with tumour stage (P = 0.03, P = 0.02 respectively), whereas hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 9 was associated with nuclear grade (P = 0.04). Disomy of chromosome 7 was correlated with venous involvement (P = 0.04). Ki 67 expression was significantly associated with hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 17 (P = 0.01), but not with aberration of chromosome 3. There was a significant relationship between hyperdiploid aberration of chromosome 7 and Ki 67 expression (P = 0.01). In conclusions, gain of chromosome 17 may reflect tumour development, and aberration of chromosome 7 may affect metastatic potential of malignancy, whereas loss of chromosome 3 may be associated with early stage of tumour development in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:9667682

  10. [THE INFLUENCE OF THE PREPARATION PRETREATMENT ON IN SITU DETECTION OF 5-METHYLCYTOSINE IN METAPHASE CHROMOSOMES AND IN INTERPHASE NUCLEI].

    PubMed

    Grudinina, N A; Sasina, L K; Noniashvili, E M; Neronova, E G; Pavlinova, L I; Suchkova, I O; Sofronov, G A; Patkin, E L

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitate analysis of DNA methylation in situ at the level of cells, chromosomes and chromosomal domains is extremely important for the diagnosis and treatment of various diseases, the study of ageing and the consequences of environmental impacts. An important question arises, whether the revealed in situ methylation pattern reflects DNA methylation per se and (or) availability of the DNA for antibodies, which in turn depends on the peculiarities of chromatin structure and chromosome condensation. These events can lead to an incorrect evaluation of the actual pattern of DNA methylation. To avoid this shortcoming as far as possible, we have modified the most widely used method of revealing 5-methylcytosine in situ with monoclonal antibodies. Here we have shown that the detection of DNA methylation staining of chromosomes including C-heterochromatin, chromosomal arms and sister chromatids is drastically dependent on pretreatment of chromosomal preparations for immunocytochemical study using fluorescent antibodies. Using undifferentiated stem cells of mouse embryonal carcinoma line F9, it has been found that change in preparations storage results in a sharp fluorescence decrease up to complete disappearance of the signal in centromeric heterochromatin. With the help of the method described in the work, we have first revealed the asymmetry of sister chromatids methylation in metaphase chromosomes of F9 cell and lymphocytes of human periphery blood. This may lead to asymmetry of transcriptional signature of daughter cells after division. The proposed here modification of 5-methylcytosine detection in situ provides a more complete characterization of methylation of chromosomes and chromosomal domains, compared to previously published methods. PMID:26591571

  11. Automated identification of abnormal metaphase chromosome cells for the detection of chronic myeloid leukemia using microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Hong

    2010-07-01

    Karyotyping is an important process to classify chromosomes into standard classes and the results are routinely used by the clinicians to diagnose cancers and genetic diseases. However, visual karyotyping using microscopic images is time-consuming and tedious, which reduces the diagnostic efficiency and accuracy. Although many efforts have been made to develop computerized schemes for automated karyotyping, no schemes can get be performed without substantial human intervention. Instead of developing a method to classify all chromosome classes, we develop an automatic scheme to detect abnormal metaphase cells by identifying a specific class of chromosomes (class 22) and prescreen for suspicious chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The scheme includes three steps: (1) iteratively segment randomly distributed individual chromosomes, (2) process segmented chromosomes and compute image features to identify the candidates, and (3) apply an adaptive matching template to identify chromosomes of class 22. An image data set of 451 metaphase cells extracted from bone marrow specimens of 30 positive and 30 negative cases for CML is selected to test the scheme's performance. The overall case-based classification accuracy is 93.3% (100% sensitivity and 86.7% specificity). The results demonstrate the feasibility of applying an automated scheme to detect or prescreen the suspicious cancer cases.

  12. Detection of chromosomal aneuploidy in human preimplantation embryos by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jianguang; Song, Zhuo; Wang, Shufang; Gao, Yang; Wang, Jun; Luo, Yaning; Niu, Ziru; Yue, Xiaojing; Xu, Genming; Cram, David S; Yao, Yuanqing

    2014-05-01

    Embryos produced by assisted reproductive technologies are commonly associated with a high level of aneuploidy. Currently, 24-chromosome profiling of embryo biopsy samples by array-based methods is available to identify euploid embryos for transfer that have a higher potential for implantation and development to term. From a laboratory and patient perspective, there is a need to explore the feasibility of developing an alternative method for routine aneuploidy assessment of embryos that would be more comprehensive, cost-effective, and efficient. We speculated that aneuploidy could be readily assessed in test single-cell biopsy samples by first performing whole genome amplification followed by library generation, massively parallel shot-gun sequencing, and finally bioinformatics analysis to quantitatively compare the ratio of uniquely mapped reads to reference cells. Using Down syndrome as an example, the copy number change for chromosome 21 was consistently 1.5-fold higher in multiple cell and single-cell samples with a 47,XX,+21 karyotype. Applying the validated sequencing strategy to 10 sister blastomeres from a single human embryo, we showed that the aneuploidy status called by sequencing was consistent with short tandem repeat allelic profiling. These validation studies indicate that aneuploidy detection using sequencing-based methodology is feasible for further improving the practice of preimplantation genetic diagnosis. PMID:24648399

  13. Detection of cryptic chromosomal abnormalities in unexplained mental retardation: a general strategy using hypervariable subtelomeric DNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, A O

    1993-01-01

    Given the availability of DNA from both parents, unusual segregation of hypervariable DNA polymorphisms (HVPs) in the offspring may be attributable to deletion, unbalanced chromosomal translocation, or uniparental disomy. The telomeric regions of chromosomes are rich in both genes and hypervariable minisatellite sequences and may also be particularly prone to cryptic breakage events. Here I describe and analyze a general approach to the detection of subtelomeric abnormalities and uniparental disomy in patients with unexplained mental retardation. With 29 available polymorphic systems, approximately 50%-70% of these abnormalities could currently be detected. Development of subtelomeric HVPs physically localized with respect to their telomeres should provide a valuable resource in routine diagnostics. PMID:8352277

  14. Genome Wide Analysis of Chromosomal Alterations in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas Revealed over Expression of MGAM and ADAM9

    PubMed Central

    Vincent-Chong, Vui King; Anwar, Arif; Karen-Ng, Lee Peng; Cheong, Sok Ching; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Pradeep, Padmaja Jayaprasad; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Ismail, Siti Mazlipah; Zaini, Zuraiza Mohamad; Prepageran, Narayanan; Kallarakkal, Thomas George; Ramanathan, Anand; Mohayadi, Nur Aaina Binti Mohd; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Binti Mohamed; Mustafa, Wan Mahadzir Wan; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Tay, Keng Kiong; Zain, Rosnah Binti

    2013-01-01

    Despite the advances in diagnosis and treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mortality and morbidity rates have not improved over the past decade. A major drawback in diagnosis and treatment of OSCC is the lack of knowledge relating to how genetic instability in oral cancer genomes affects oral carcinogenesis. Hence, the key aim of this study was to identify copy number alterations (CNAs) that may be cancer associated in OSCC using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). To our knowledge this is the first study to use ultra-high density aCGH microarrays to profile a large number of OSCC genomes (n = 46). The most frequently amplified CNAs were located on chromosome 11q11(52%), 2p22.3(52%), 1q21.3–q22(54%), 6p21.32(59%), 20p13(61%), 7q34(52% and 72%),8p11.23–p11.22(80%), 8q11.1–q24.4(54%), 9q13–q34.3(54%), 11q23.3–q25(57%); 14q21.3–q31.1(54%); 14q31.3–q32.33(57%), 20p13–p12.3(54%) and 20q11.21–q13.33(52%). The most frequently deleted chromosome region was located on 3q26.1 (54%). In order to verify the CNAs from aCGH using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the three top most amplified regions and their associated genes, namely ADAM5P (8p11.23–p11.22), MGAM (7q34) and SIRPB1 (20p13.1), were selected in this study. The ADAM5P locus was found to be amplified in 39 samples and deleted in one; MGAM (24 amplifications and 3 deletions); and SIRPB1 (12 amplifications, others undetermined). On the basis of putative cancer-related annotations, two genes, namely ADAM metallopeptidase domain 9 (ADAM9) and maltase-glucoamylase alpha-glucosidase (MGAM), that mapped to CNA regions were selected for further evaluation of their mRNA expression using reverse transcriptase qPCR. The over-expression of MGAM was confirmed with a 6.6 fold increase in expression at the mRNA level whereas the fold change in ADAM9 demonstrated a 1.6 fold increase. This study has identified significant regions in the OSCC genome that

  15. Methylation Alterations at Imprinted Genes Detected Among Long Term Shiftworkers

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Daniel I.; Hansen, Johnni; Fu, Alan; Stevens, Richard G.; Tjonneland, Anne; Vogel, Ulla B.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to light at night through shiftwork has been linked to alterations in DNA methylation and increased risk of cancer development. Using an Illumina Infinium Methylation Assay, we analyzed methylation levels of 397 CpG sites in the promoter regions of 56 normally imprinted genes to investigate whether shiftwork is associated with alteration of methylation patterns. Methylation was significantly higher at 20 CpG sites and significantly lower at 30 CpG sites (P < 0.05) in 10 female long-term shiftworkers as compared to 10 female age- and folate intake-matched day workers. The strongest evidence for altered methylation patterns in shiftworkers was observed for DLX5, IGF2AS, and TP73 based on the magnitude of methylation change and consistency in the direction of change across multiple CpG sites, and consistent results were observed using quantitative DNA methylation analysis. We conclude that long-term shiftwork may alter methylation patterns at imprinted genes, which may be an important mechanism by which shiftwork has carcinogenic potential and warrants further investigation. PMID:23193016

  16. Rapid detection of chromosome 18 copy number in buccal smears using DNA probes and FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.; Nunez, M.; Giraldez, R.

    1994-09-01

    Rapid diagnosis of trisomy 18 in newborns is often critical to clinical management decisions that must be made in a minimum of time. DNA probes combined with FISH can be used to accurately to determine the copy number of chromosome 18 in interphase cells. We have used the D18Z1 alpha satellite DNA probe to determine signal frequency in normal, previously karyotyped subjects, 12 females and 6 males. We also present one clinical case of trisomy 18, confirmed by karyotype, for comparison to the results obtained from normal subjects. Buccal smears, unlike cytogenetic preparations from peripheral blood, are quite resistant to penetration of probes and detection reagents resulting in higher levels of false monosomy. We have studied 19 individuals and have obtained consistent FISH results, ranging from 64 to 90% disomy. False monosomy rates ranged from 10 to 36%, while false trisomy or tetrasomy was less than 1% in all samples. High rates of false monosomy make this test questionable for detection of low order mosaicism for monosomy, but the extremely low false hyperploidy rate suggests that this is a dependable procedure for detection of trisomy 18, enabling the use of buccal epithelium which can be collected easily from even premature and tiny infants.

  17. Loss of chromosome 9 in tissue sections of transitional cell carcinomas as detected by interphase cytogenetics. A comparison with RFLP analysis.

    PubMed

    Poddighe, P J; Bringuier, P P; Vallinga, M; Schalken, J A; Ramaekers, F C; Hopman, A H

    1996-06-01

    Interphase cytogenetics by in situ hybridization (ISH) using a panel of centromere-associated DNA probes for chromosomes 1, 7, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, and 18 was performed on 5 microns thick frozen tissue sections of transitional cell carcinomas (TCCs) of the urinary bladder. By this approach, chromosome ploidy, numerical chromosome aberrations, imbalance between chromosomes, and heterogeneity of aberrations within individual tumours were determined. In 15 of 24 TCCs, loss or underrepresentation of chromosome 9, compared with the ISH copy numbers of at least five other chromosomes, was demonstrated. Independently, RFLP analysis were performed on the same cases to detect loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome loci 9q34, 11p15, 16q22-24, 17p13, and 18q21. LOH was found in 9 of 19 informative cases for chromosome locus 9q34. Comparison of the ISH and RFLP results showed no correlation between numerical aberration and LOH for the loci on chromosomes 11, 16, 17, and 18. However, numerical loss of chromosome 9 was found in 89 per cent (eight of nine cases) with LOH for 9q34. Conversely, LOH at 9q34 was observed in only 67 per cent (eight of 12 cases) with underrepresentation of chromosome 9. Moreover, in 60 per cent of the non-informative cases (three of five cases), underrepresentation for chromosome 9 was observed. These results indicate that the heterochromatin probe for chromosome 9 can be reliably used in TCC tissue sections for the detection of chromosomal loss. In aneuploid TCCs, this DNA probe can be used for the detection of chromosomal underrepresentation only in combination with other centromere-associated DNA probes. PMID:8758209

  18. Clinical Utility of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization for Detection of Chromosomal Abnormalities in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, Karen R.; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Yu, Alexander; Folsom, Matthew R.; Zhao, Yi-Jue; Rao, Pulivarthi H.; Plon, Sharon E.; Naeem, Rizwan C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate detection of recurrent chromosomal abnormalities is critical to assign patients to risk-based therapeutic regimens for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Procedure We investigated the utility of array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) for detection of chromosomal abnormalities compared to standard clinical evaluation with karyotype and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH). Fifty pediatric ALL diagnostic bone marrows were analyzed by bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array, and findings compared to standard clinical evaluation. Results Sensitivity of aCGH was 79% to detect karyotypic findings other than balanced translocations, which cannot be detected by aCGH because they involve no copy number change. aCGH also missed abnormalities occurring in subclones constituting less than 25% of cells. aCGH detected 44 additional abnormalities undetected or misidentified by karyotype, 21 subsequently validated by FISH, including abnormalities in 4 of 10 cases with uninformative cytogenetics. aCGH detected concurrent terminal deletions of both 9p and 20q in three cases, in two of which the 20q deletion was undetected by karyotype. A narrow region of loss at 7p21 was detected in two cases. Conclusions An array with increased BAC density over regions important in ALL, combined with PCR for fusion products of balanced translocations, could minimize labor- and time-intensive cytogenetic assays and provide key prognostic information in the approximately 35% of cases with uninformative cytogenetics. PMID:18253961

  19. Detection of Selection Signatures on the X Chromosome in Three Sheep Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Caiye; Fan, Hongying; Yuan, Zehu; Hu, Shijin; Zhang, Li; Wei, Caihong; Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Fuping; Du, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Artificial selection has played a critical role in animal breeding. Detection of artificial selection footprints in genomic regions can provide insights for understanding the function of specific phenotypic traits and better guide animal breeding. To more fully understand the relationship between genomic composition and phenotypic diversity arising from breed development, a genome-wide scan was conducted using an OvineSNP50 BeadChip and integrated haplotype score and fixation index analyses to detect selection signatures on the X chromosome in three sheep breeds. We identified 49, 34, and 55 candidate selection regions with lengths of 27.49, 16.47, and 25.42 Mb in German Mutton, Dorper, and Sunit sheep, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis showed that some of the genes in these regions with selection signatures, such as BMP15, were relevant to reproduction. We also identified some selection regions harboring genes that had human orthologs, including BKT, CENPI, GUCY2F, MSN, PCDH11X, PLP1, VSIG4, PAK3, WAS, PCDH19, PDHA1, and SRPX2. The VSIG4 and PCDH11X genes are associated with the immune system and disease, PDHA1 is associated with biosynthetic related pathways, and PCDH19 is expressed in the nervous system and skin. These genes may be useful as candidate genes for molecular breeding. PMID:26343642

  20. Leukemia-related chromosomal loss detected in hematopoietic progenitor cells of benzene-exposed workers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Ji, Zhiying; Li, Guilan; Shen, Min; Vermeulen, Roel; Guo, Weihong; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Linet, Martha S.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Benzene exposure causes acute myeloid leukemia, and hematotoxicity, shown as suppression of mature blood and myeloid progenitor cell numbers. As the leukemia-related aneuploidies monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 previously had been detected in the mature peripheral blood cells of exposed workers, we hypothesized that benzene could cause leukemia through the induction of these aneuploidies in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We measured loss and gain of chromosomes 7 and 8 by fluorescence in situ hybridization in interphase colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) cells cultured from otherwise healthy benzene-exposed (n=28) and unexposed (n=14) workers. CFU-GM monosomy 7 and 8 levels (but not trisomy) were significantly increased in subjects exposed to benzene overall, compared to levels in the control subjects (p=0.0055 and p=0.0034, respectively). Levels of monosomy 7 and 8 were significantly increased in subjects exposed to <10 ppm (20%, p=0.0419 and 28%, p=0.0056, respectively) and ≥10 ppm (48%, p=0.0045 and 32%, p=0.0354) benzene, compared with controls, and significant exposure-response trends were detected (ptrend=0.0033 and 0.0057). These data show that monosomies 7 and 8 are produced in a dose-dependent fashion in the blood progenitor cells of workers exposed to benzene and may be mechanistically relevant biomarkers of early effect for benzene and other leukemogens. PMID:22643707

  1. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH)

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L.; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1. PMID:23429197

  2. Live birth after PGD with confirmation by a comprehensive approach (karyomapping) for simultaneous detection of monogenic and chromosomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A; Handyside, Alan H; Thornhill, Alan R; Ottolini, Christian S; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Wells, Dagan; Griffin, Darren K

    2014-11-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorders has the drawback of time and cost associated with tailoring a specific test for each couple, disorder, or both. The inability of any single assay to detect the monogenic disorder in question and simultaneously the chromosomal complement of the embryo also limits its application as separate tests may need to be carried out on the amplified material. The first clinical use of a novel approach ('karyomapping') was designed to circumvent this problem. In this example, karyomapping was used to confirm the results of an existing PGD case detecting both chromosomal abnormalities and a monogenic disorder (Smith-Lemli-Opitz [SLO] syndrome) simultaneously. The family underwent IVF, ICSI and PGD, and both polar body and cleavage stage biopsy were carried out. Following whole genome amplification, array comparative genomic hybridisation of the polar bodies and minisequencing and STR analysis of single blastomeres were used to diagnose maternal aneuploidies and SLO status, respectively. This was confirmed, by karyomapping. Unlike standard PGD, karyomapping required no a-priori test development. A singleton pregnancy and live birth, unaffected with SLO syndrome and with no chromosome abnormality, ensued. Karyomapping is potentially capable of detecting a wide spectrum of monogenic and chromosome disorders and, in this context, can be considered a comprehensive approach to PGD. PMID:25154779

  3. 46 CFR 109.425 - Repairs and alterations: Fire detecting and extinguishing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Repairs and alterations: Fire detecting and extinguishing equipment. 109.425 Section 109.425 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Reports, Notifications, and Records Reports and Notifications § 109.425 Repairs and alterations:...

  4. Association between occupational exposure to benzene and chromosomal alterations in lymphocytes of Brazilian petrochemical workers removed from exposure.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rozana Oliveira; de Almeida Melo, Neli; Rêgo, Marco Antônio Vasconcelos

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between chronic exposure to benzene and genotoxicity in the lymphocytes of workers removed from exposure. The study included 20 workers with hematological disorders who had previously worked in the petrochemical industry of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil; 16 workers without occupational exposure to benzene served as the control group. Chromosomal analysis was performed on lymphocytes from peripheral blood, to assess chromosomal breaks and gaps and to identify aneuploidy. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the mean values between two groups, and Student's t test for comparison of two independent means. The frequency of gaps was statistically higher in and the exposed group than in the controls (2.13 ± 2.86 vs. 0.97 ± 1.27, p = 0.001). The frequency of chromosomal breaks was significantly higher among cases (0.21 ± 0.58) than among controls (0.12 ± 0.4) (p = 0.0002). An association was observed between chromosomal gaps and breaks and occupational exposure to benzene. Our study showed that even when removed from exposure for several years, workers still demonstrated genotoxic damage. Studies are still needed to clarify the long-term genotoxic potential of benzene after removal from exposure. PMID:27155858

  5. Chromosomal gains and genomic loss of p53 and p16 genes in Barrett's esophagus detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization of cytology specimens.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Mona; Skacel, Marek; Gramlich, Terry L; Brainard, Jennifer A; Rice, Thomas W; Goldblum, John R; Connor, Jason T; Casey, Graham; Legator, Mona S; Tubbs, Raymond R; Falk, Gary W

    2004-05-01

    Endoscopic brush cytology is a promising surveillance technique for Barrett's esophagus. Ancillary markers are sought to increase the sensitivity of cytology and allow identification of patients at increased risk for disease progression. To determine if there are specific genetic changes in Barrett's esophagus with associated high-grade dysplasia/intramucosal adenocarcinoma compared to those without dysplasia, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on cytologic specimens using probes to chromosomes and genomic regions previously described as altered in this disease. We studied archival brush cytology slides from 40 Barrett's esophagus patients: 21 with biopsy-proven high-grade dysplasia/carcinoma and 19 with no dysplasia and a minimum 5 years of negative follow-up. Centromeric enumeration probes (CEP) for chromosomes 6, 7, 11, and 12, and locus-specific probes (LSI) for 9p21 (p16 gene), and 17p13.1 (p53 gene) loci along with their corresponding CEP (9 and 17, respectively) were used in this study. A positive FISH result was defined as the presence of cells with >2 CEP signals or with a loss of the LSI signals relative to their corresponding CEP. p53 locus loss and/or aneusomy of chromosomes 6, 7, 11, and 12 abnormalities could be detected by FISH in routinely processed endoscopic brush cytology specimens from 95% of biopsy-positive cases with a specificity of 100%. Interestingly, all five cases with cytologic changes classified as indefinite for dysplasia from patients with a positive biopsy showed changes by FISH. Loss of the p16 locus was seen commonly in patients both with and without dysplasia/carcinoma. Selected biomarkers from this study merit further investigation to determine their potential to detect genetic changes in patients with Barrett's esophagus prior to the development of high-grade dysplasia. PMID:15017433

  6. DETECTION OF MUTAGENIC/CARCINOGENIC ALTERATION IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of using fish as bioassay organisms to detect mutagenic/carcinogenic substances in the aquatic environment was tested. The data in fish were compared to those in higher vertebrates including humans. Microsomal fractions from livers of channel catfish, fathead minn...

  7. Identification of Stmm3 locus Conferring Resistance to Late-stage Chemically Induced Skin Papillomas on Mouse Chromosome 4 by Congenic Mappingand Allele-specific Alteration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Megumi; Okumura, Kazuhiro; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kominami, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed that many low-penetrance cancer susceptibility loci are located throughout the genome; however, a very limited number of genes have been identified so far. Using a forward genetics approach to map such loci in a mouse skin cancer model, we previously identified strong genetic loci conferring resistance to chemically induced skin papillomas on chromosome 4 and 7 with a large number of [(FVB/N × MSM/Ms) F1 × FVB/N] backcross mice. In this report, we describe a combination of congenic mapping and allele-specific alteration analysis of the loci on chromosome 4. We used linkage analysis and a congenic mouse strain, FVB.MSM-Stmm3 to refine the location of Stmm3 (Skin tumor modifier of MSM 3) locus within a physical interval of about 34 Mb on distal chromosome 4. In addition, we used patterns of allele-specific imbalances in tumors from N2 and N10 congenic mice to narrow down further the region of Stmm3 locus to a physical distance of about 25 Mb. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis showed papillomas from congenic mice had less proliferative activity. These results suggest that Stmm3 responsible genes may have an influence on papilloma formation in the two-stage skin carcinogenesis by regulating papilloma growth rather than development. PMID:25077764

  8. Prenatal detection and characterization of supernumerary marker chromosomes by array-CGH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) occur in about 0.043% of newborns and in 0.076% of prenatal diagnoses. The phenotypes associated with sSMC vary substantially depending on size, gene content, and chromosome origin, which cannot easily be determined by karyotype or FISH analysis. There...

  9. Result and pedigree analysis of spontaneously abortion villus chromosome detecting by FISH.

    PubMed

    An, N; Li, L-L; Zhang, X-Y; Sun, W-T; Liu, M-H; Liu, R-Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between fetal karyotype and parental chromosomal abnormalities, and to provide a basis for clinical diagnosis and therapy in Northeast China. A total of 144 spontaneously aborted fetuses were analyzed by FISH to test for chromosome number and to recall couples for peripheral blood karyotype analysis. The rate of abnormal chorionic villus chromosomes was 35.42%. Villus chromosome abnormality rate of the first spontaneous abortion and repeated abortions were 40.54 and 33.64%, respectively (P < 0.05). The rate of chromosome abnormality in women with advanced maternal age and women younger than 35 years old were 46.43 and 32.76%, respectively (P < 0.05). In a recall of 112 couples for peripheral blood karyotype analysis, just 3 cases of 7 patients with peripheral blood chromosome abnormality showed abnormal FISH results in their abortion villi. Fetal chromosome number abnormality is a major cause of early abortion, and parental chromosomal abnormality is not the main factor in abnormal fetal karyotype. A complete evaluation and special treatment should be provided to couples with a history of recurrent miscarriage. PMID:26681012

  10. Detecting a hierarchical genetic population structure via Multi-InDel markers on the X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guang Yao; Ye, Yi; Hou, Yi Ping

    2016-01-01

    Detecting population structure and estimating individual biogeographical ancestry are very important in population genetics studies, biomedical research and forensics. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has long been considered to be a primary ancestry-informative marker (AIM), but it is constrained by complex and time-consuming genotyping protocols. Following up on our previous study, we propose that a multi-insertion-deletion polymorphism (Multi-InDel) with multiple haplotypes can be useful in ancestry inference and hierarchical genetic population structures. A validation study for the X chromosome Multi-InDel marker (X-Multi-InDel) as a novel AIM was conducted. Genetic polymorphisms and genetic distances among three Chinese populations and 14 worldwide populations obtained from the 1000 Genomes database were analyzed. A Bayesian clustering method (STRUCTURE) was used to discern the continental origins of Europe, East Asia, and Africa. A minimal panel of ten X-Multi-InDels was verified to be sufficient to distinguish human ancestries from three major continental regions with nearly the same efficiency of the earlier panel with 21 insertion-deletion AIMs. Along with the development of more X-Multi-InDels, an approach using this novel marker has the potential for broad applicability as a cost-effective tool toward more accurate determinations of individual biogeographical ancestry and population stratification. PMID:27535707

  11. Detecting a hierarchical genetic population structure via Multi-InDel markers on the X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guang Yao; Ye, Yi; Hou, Yi Ping

    2016-01-01

    Detecting population structure and estimating individual biogeographical ancestry are very important in population genetics studies, biomedical research and forensics. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has long been considered to be a primary ancestry-informative marker (AIM), but it is constrained by complex and time-consuming genotyping protocols. Following up on our previous study, we propose that a multi-insertion-deletion polymorphism (Multi-InDel) with multiple haplotypes can be useful in ancestry inference and hierarchical genetic population structures. A validation study for the X chromosome Multi-InDel marker (X-Multi-InDel) as a novel AIM was conducted. Genetic polymorphisms and genetic distances among three Chinese populations and 14 worldwide populations obtained from the 1000 Genomes database were analyzed. A Bayesian clustering method (STRUCTURE) was used to discern the continental origins of Europe, East Asia, and Africa. A minimal panel of ten X-Multi-InDels was verified to be sufficient to distinguish human ancestries from three major continental regions with nearly the same efficiency of the earlier panel with 21 insertion-deletion AIMs. Along with the development of more X-Multi-InDels, an approach using this novel marker has the potential for broad applicability as a cost-effective tool toward more accurate determinations of individual biogeographical ancestry and population stratification. PMID:27535707

  12. Microsatellite DNA markers detects 95% of chromosome 22q11 deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, D.; Cormier-Daire, V.; Munnich, A.; Lyonnet, S.

    1997-01-20

    Cono-truncal cardiac malformations account for some 50% of congenital heart defects in newborn infants. Recently, hemizygosity for chromosome 22q11.2 was reported in patients with the DiGeorge/Velo-cardio-facial syndromes (DGS/VCFS) and causally related disorders. We have explored the potential use of microsatellite DNA markers for rapid detection of 22q11 deletions in 19 newborn infants referred for cono-truncal heart malformations with associated DGS/VCFS anomalies. A failure of parental inheritance was documented in 84.2% of cases (16/19). PCR-based genotyping using microsatellite DNA markers located within the commonly deleted region allowed us either to confirm or reject a 22q11 microdeletion in 94.3% of cases (18/19) within 24 hours. This test is now currently performed in the infants referred to us for a cono-truncal heart malformation as a first intention screening for 22q11 microdeletion. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Simultaneous detection of multiple STR loci on sex chromosomes for forensic testing of sex and identity.

    PubMed

    Tun, Z; Honda, K; Nakatome, M; Nakamura, M; Shimada, S; Ogura, Y; Kuroki, H; Yamazaki, M; Terada, M; Matoba, R

    1999-07-01

    The forensic usefulness of X and Y chromosomal STR loci has recently been demonstrated. One quadruplex-PCR, using 2 X- and 2 Y-STRs (STRX1/HPRTB and DYS390/ DYS393), and 2 duplex-PCRs, each using an X- and a Y-STR (ARA/DYS390 and ARA/DYS393), and detection of PCR products by using an automated DNA sequencer are reported herein. This approach allows us to determine not only the sex of the donor of a sample, but also the X- and/or Y-STR genotypes of the sample. A male biological specimen yields 4 amplified products in quadruplex-PCR and 2 amplified fragments in duplex-PCRs, whereas a female biological specimen yields only 2 amplified fragments of X-STR in quadruplex-PCR and one fragment, also of X-STR, in duplex-PCRs. Our study thus provides useful information for many activities in forensic practice, such as identity testing, paternity testing, especially of deficiency cases, compilation of population data, and sex determination of a biological sample from a single PCR. PMID:10432611

  14. An Optimized Method for Accurate Fetal Sex Prediction and Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Detection in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibo; Ding, Jie; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Xiang, Jingjing; Li, Qiong; Xuan, Liming; Kong, Lingyin; Mao, Yan; Zhu, Yijun; Shen, Jingjing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) combined with bioinformatic analysis has been widely applied to detect fetal chromosomal aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, 18, 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) by sequencing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) from maternal plasma, so-called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, many technical challenges, such as dependency on correct fetal sex prediction, large variations of chromosome Y measurement and high sensitivity to random reads mapping, may result in higher false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate (FPR) in fetal sex prediction as well as in SCAs detection. Here, we developed an optimized method to improve the accuracy of the current method by filtering out randomly mapped reads in six specific regions of the Y chromosome. The method reduces the FNR and FPR of fetal sex prediction from nearly 1% to 0.01% and 0.06%, respectively and works robustly under conditions of low fetal DNA concentration (1%) in testing and simulation of 92 samples. The optimized method was further confirmed by large scale testing (1590 samples), suggesting that it is reliable and robust enough for clinical testing. PMID:27441628

  15. An Optimized Method for Accurate Fetal Sex Prediction and Sex Chromosome Aneuploidy Detection in Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; He, Quanze; Li, Haibo; Ding, Jie; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qin; Xiang, Jingjing; Li, Qiong; Xuan, Liming; Kong, Lingyin; Mao, Yan; Zhu, Yijun; Shen, Jingjing; Liang, Bo; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) combined with bioinformatic analysis has been widely applied to detect fetal chromosomal aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, 18, 13 and sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) by sequencing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) from maternal plasma, so-called non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). However, many technical challenges, such as dependency on correct fetal sex prediction, large variations of chromosome Y measurement and high sensitivity to random reads mapping, may result in higher false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate (FPR) in fetal sex prediction as well as in SCAs detection. Here, we developed an optimized method to improve the accuracy of the current method by filtering out randomly mapped reads in six specific regions of the Y chromosome. The method reduces the FNR and FPR of fetal sex prediction from nearly 1% to 0.01% and 0.06%, respectively and works robustly under conditions of low fetal DNA concentration (1%) in testing and simulation of 92 samples. The optimized method was further confirmed by large scale testing (1590 samples), suggesting that it is reliable and robust enough for clinical testing. PMID:27441628

  16. In silico and in vitro evaluation of PCR-based assays for the detection of Bacillus anthracis chromosomal signature sequences.

    PubMed

    Ågren, Joakim; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Hansen, Trine; Ruuls, Robin; Thierry, Simon; Vigre, Håkan; Janse, Ingmar; Sundström, Anders; Segerman, Bo; Koene, Miriam; Löfström, Charlotta; Van Rotterdam, Bart; Derzelle, Sylviane

    2013-11-15

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a zoonotic pathogen that is relatively common throughout the world and may cause life threatening diseases in animals and humans. There are many PCR-based assays in use for the detection of B. anthracis. While most of the developed assays rely on unique markers present on virulence plasmids pXO1 and pXO2, relatively few assays incorporate chromosomal DNA markers due to the close relatedness of B. anthracis to the B. cereus group strains. For the detection of chromosomal DNA, different genes have been used, such as BA813, rpoB, gyrA, plcR, S-layer, and prophage-lambda. Following a review of the literature, an in silico analysis of all signature sequences reported for identification of B. anthracis was conducted. Published primer and probe sequences were compared for specificity against 134 available Bacillus spp. genomes. Although many of the chromosomal targets evaluated are claimed to be specific to B. anthracis, cross-reactions with closely related B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains were often observed. Of the 35 investigated PCR assays, only 4 were 100% specific for the B. anthracis chromosome. An interlaboratory ring trial among five European laboratories was then performed to evaluate six assays, including the WHO recommended procedures, using a collection of 90 Bacillus strains. Three assays performed adequately, yielding no false positive or negative results. All three assays target chromosomal markers located within the lambdaBa03 prophage region (PL3, BA5345, and BA5357). Detection limit was further assessed for one of these highly specific assays. PMID:24005110

  17. Patterns of Chromosomal Aberrations in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a defining feature of solid tumors. Such cytogenetic alterations are mainly classified into structural chromosomal aberrations and copy number alterations, giving rise to aneuploid karyotypes. The increasing detection of these genetic changes allowed the description of specific tumor entities and the associated patterns of gene expression. In fact, tumor-specific landscapes of gross genomic copy number changes, including aneuploidies of entire chromosome arms and chromosomes result in a global deregulation of the transcriptome of cancer cells. Furthermore, the molecular characterization of cytogenetic abnormalities has provided insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has, in a few instances, led to the clinical implementation of effective diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as treatment strategies that target a specific genetic abnormality. PMID:26376875

  18. Patterns of Chromosomal Aberrations in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Camps, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a defining feature of solid tumors. Such cytogenetic alterations are mainly classified into structural chromosomal aberrations and copy number alterations, giving rise to aneuploid karyotypes. The increasing detection of these genetic changes allowed the description of specific tumor entities and the associated patterns of gene expression. In fact, tumor-specific landscapes of gross genomic copy number changes, including aneuploidies of entire chromosome arms and chromosomes result in a global deregulation of the transcriptome of cancer cells. Furthermore, the molecular characterization of cytogenetic abnormalities has provided insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has, in a few instances, led to the clinical implementation of effective diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as treatment strategies that target a specific genetic abnormality. PMID:26376875

  19. Female Sterile Mutations on the Second Chromosome of Drosophila Melanogaster. II. Mutations Blocking Oogenesis or Altering Egg Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Schupbach, T.; Wieschaus, E.

    1991-01-01

    In mutagenesis screens for recessive female sterile mutations on the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster 528 lines were isolated which allow the homozygous females to survive but cause sterility. In 62 of these lines early stages of oogenesis are affected, and these females usually do not lay any eggs. In 333 lines oogenesis proceeds apparently normally to stage 8 of oogenesis, but morphological defects become often apparent during later stages of oogenesis, and are visible in the defective eggs produced by these females whereas 133 lay eggs that appear morphologically normal, but do not support normal embryonic development. Of the lines 341 have been genetically characterized and define a total of 140 loci on the second chromosome. Not all the loci are specific for oogenesis. From the numbers obtained we estimate that the second chromosome of Drosophila contains about 13 loci that are relatively specific for early oogenesis, 70 loci that are specifically required in mid to late oogenesis, and around 30 maternal-effect lethals. PMID:1783295

  20. Induction of chromosome instability and stomach cancer by altering the expression pattern of mitotic checkpoint genes in mice exposed to areca-nut

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There are strong indications for a causal association between areca-nut consumption and cancers. In Meghalaya, India, the variety of areca-nut is used as raw and unprocessed form whose chemical composition and pharmacological actions have been reported. Yet we know little on the initial pathway involved in areca-nut associated carcinogenesis since it is difficult to assess its effects on genetic alterations without interference of other compounding factors. Therefore, present study was undertaken in mice to verify the ability of raw areca-nut (RAN) to induce cancer and to monitor the expression of certain genes involved in carcinogenesis. This study was not intended to isolate any active ingredients from the RAN and to look its action. Methods Three groups of mice (n = 25 in each) were taken and used at different time-points for different experimental analysis. The other three groups of mice (n = 15 in each) were considered for tumor induction studies. In each set, two groups were administered RAN-extract ad libitum in drinking water with or without lime. The expression of certain genes was assessed by conventional RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The mice were given the whole RAN-extract with and without lime in order to mimic the human consumption style of RAN. Results Histological preparation of stomach tissue revealed that RAN induced stomach cancer. A gradual increase in the frequency of precocious anaphase and aneuploid cells was observed in the bone marrow cells with a greater increment following RAN + lime administeration. Levels of p53, Bax, Securin and p65 in esophageal and stomach cells were elevated during early days of RAN exposure while those of different mitotic checkpoint proteins were downregulated. Apoptotic cell death was detected in non-cancerous stomach cells but not in tumor cells which showed overexpression of Bax and absence of PARP. Conclusion Present study suggested (a) RAN induces stomach cancer, however, presence of lime

  1. Genome-wide profiling of chromosomal alterations in renal cell carcinoma using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng; Ye, Yuanqing; Yang, Hushan; Tamboli, Pheroze; Matin, Surena; Tannir, Nizar M; Wood, Christopher G; Gu, Jian; Wu, Xifeng

    2009-11-15

    The identification of genetic aberrations may help understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has important implications in diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. We applied Illumina's 317K high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays to profile chromosomal aberrations in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) from 80 patients and analyzed the association of LOH/amplification events with clinicopathological characteristics and telomere length. The most common loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were 3p (69 cases) including 38 whole 3p arm losses, 30 large fragment LOH (spanning 3p21-36), and 1 interstitial LOH (spanning 3p12-14, 3p21-22, 3p24.1-24.2 and 3p24.3), followed by chromosome losses at 8p12-pter, 6q23.3-27, 14q24.1-qter, 9q32-qter, 10q22.3-qter, 9p13.3-pter, 4q28.3-qter and 13q12.1-21.1. We also found several smallest overlapping regions of LOH that contained tumor suppressor genes. One smallest LOH in 8p12 had a size of 0.29 Mb and only contained one gene (NRG1). The most frequent chromosome gains were at 5q (32 cases), including 10 whole 5q amplification, 21 large amplifications encompassing 5q32-ter and 1 focal amplification in 5q35.3 (0.42 Mb). The other common chromosome gains were 1q25.1-qter, 7q21.13-qter, 8q24.12-qter and whole 7p arm. Significant associations of LOH at 9p, 9q, 14q and 18q were observed with higher nuclear grade. Significant associations with tumor stage were observed for LOH at 14q, 18p and 21q. Finally, we found that tumors with LOH at 2q, 6p, 6q, 9p, 9q and 17p had significantly shorter telomere length than those without LOH. This is the first study to use Illumina's SNP-CGH array that provides a close estimate of the size and frequency of chromosome LOH and amplifications of ccRCC. The identified regions and genes may become diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers as well as potential targets of therapy. PMID:19521957

  2. Detection of a large RIII-derived chromosomal segment on chromosome 10 in the H-2 congenic strain B10.RIII(71NS)/Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P.; Hood, L.; McIndoe, R.A.

    1996-01-15

    This report describes the results of a study of the chromosomal localization of certain loci related to the susceptibility of specific mouse strains to collagen-induced arthritis, the biological model for rheumatoid arthritis. There were surprising results concerning the chromosomal mapping of mouse chromosome 10 and 17 and the backcrosses of mice involved. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Detection of cryptic chromosomal abnormalities in unexplained mental retardation: A general strategy using hypervariable subtelomeric DNA polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkie, A.O.M.

    1993-09-01

    Given the availability of DNA from both parents, unusual segregation of hypervariable DNA polymorphisms (HVPs) in the offspring may be attributable to deletion, unbalanced chromosomal translocation, or uniparental disomy. The telomeric regions of chromosomes are rich in both genes and hypervariable minisatellite sequences and may also be particularly prone to cryptic breakage events. Here the author describes and analyzes a general approach to the detection of subtelomeric abnormalities and uniparental disomy in patients with unexplained mental retardation. With 29 available polymorphic systems, [approximately]50%-70% of these abnormalities could currently be detected. Development of subtelomeric HVPs physically localized with respect to their telomers should provide a valuable resource in routine diagnostics. 73 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Chromosomal and multifactorial genetic disorders with oral manifestations.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali

    2014-09-01

    The chromosomal disorders are individually rare, but collectively they are common whereas the multifactorial disorders are the most common form of genetic disorders. The chromosomal anomalies typically arise from alterations in the DNA containing chromosomal regions and can be reliably detected by karyotype analysis, whereas the multifactorial disorders demonstrate multi-gene as well as environmental interactions. Both the chromosomal and multifactorial disorders may manifest signs and symptoms such as a combination of birth defects, physical disabilities, challenging behavior and certain craniofacial defects as well, the knowledge of which can aid in a better patient management in everyday practice of dentistry. PMID:25395808

  5. Chromosomal and Multifactorial Genetic Disorders with Oral Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shankargouda; Rao, Roopa S; Majumdar, Barnali

    2014-01-01

    The chromosomal disorders are individually rare, but collectively they are common whereas the multifactorial disorders are the most common form of genetic disorders. The chromosomal anomalies typically arise from alterations in the DNA containing chromosomal regions and can be reliably detected by karyotype analysis, whereas the multifactorial disorders demonstrate multi-gene as well as environmental interactions. Both the chromosomal and multifactorial disorders may manifest signs and symptoms such as a combination of birth defects, physical disabilities, challenging behavior and certain craniofacial defects as well, the knowledge of which can aid in a better patient management in everyday practice of dentistry. PMID:25395808

  6. Bioinformatic Tools Identify Chromosome-Specific DNA Probes and Facilitate Risk Assessment by Detecting Aneusomies in Extra-embryonic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Jingly F; Wang, Mei; Kassabian, Haig J; Polyzos, Aris A; Baumgartner, Adolf; O’Brien, Benjamin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G

    2012-01-01

    Despite their non-diseased nature, healthy human tissues may show a surprisingly large fraction of aneusomic or aneuploid cells. We have shown previously that hybridization of three to six non-isotopically labeled, chromosome-specific DNA probes reveals different proportions of aneuploid cells in individual compartments of the human placenta and the uterine wall. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we found that human invasive cytotrophoblasts isolated from anchoring villi or the uterine wall had gained individual chromosomes. Chromosome losses in placental or uterine tissues, on the other hand, were detected infrequently. A more thorough numerical analysis of all possible aneusomies occurring in these tissues and the investigation of their spatial as well as temporal distribution would further our understanding of the underlying biology, but it is hampered by the high cost of and limited access to DNA probes. Furthermore, multiplexing assays are difficult to set up with commercially available probes due to limited choices of probe labels. Many laboratories therefore attempt to develop their own DNA probe sets, often duplicating cloning and screening efforts underway elsewhere. In this review, we discuss the conventional approaches to the preparation of chromosome-specific DNA probes followed by a description of our approach using state-of-the-art bioinformatics and molecular biology tools for probe identification and manufacture. Novel probes that target gonosomes as well as two autosomes are presented as examples of rapid and inexpensive preparation of highly specific DNA probes for applications in placenta research and perinatal diagnostics. PMID:23450259

  7. A case report of a patient with microcephaly, facial dysmorphism, chromosomal radiosensitivity and telomere length alterations closely resembling "Nijmegen breakage syndrome" phenotype.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, F; di Masi, A; Salvatore, M; Banerjee, S; Myung, K; De Villartay, J P; Revy, P; Plebani, A; Soresina, A; Taruscio, D; Tanzarella, C; Antoccia, A

    2007-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity in Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is highlighted by patients showing clinical and cellular features of NBS but with no mutations in NBS1 and normal levels of nibrin. NBS is an autosomal recessive disorder, whose clinical cellular signs include growth and developmental defects, dysmorphic facies, immunodeficiency, cancer predisposition, chromosomal instability and radiosensitivity. NBS is caused by mutations in the NBS1 gene, whose product is part of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex involved in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response pathway. Since the identification of the NBS1 gene, patients with NBS clinical signs, particularly severe congenital microcephaly, are screened for mutations in the NBS1 gene. Further analyses include X-ray-induced chromosome aberrations, telomere analysis, kinetics of DSBs repair, levels of a panel of proteins involved in the maintenance of genetic stability, radiation-induced phosphorylation of various substrates and cell cycle analysis. We describe a patient with a NBS clinical phenotype, chromosomal sensitivity to X-rays but without mutations in the whole NBS1 or in the Cernunnos gene. Enhanced response to irradiation was mediated neither by DSBs rejoining defects nor by the NBS/AT-dependent DNA-damage response pathway. Notably, we found that primary fibroblasts from this patient displayed telomere length alterations. Cross-talk between pathways controlling response to DSBs and those involved in maintaining telomeres has been shown in the present patient. Dissecting the cellular phenotype of radiosensitive NBS-like patients represents a useful tool for the research of new genes involved in the cellular response to DSBs. PMID:17395558

  8. Evaluation of chromosomal alteration in electrical workers occupationally exposed to low frequency of electro magnetic field (EMFs) in Coimbatore population, India.

    PubMed

    Balamuralikrishnan, Balasubramanian; Balachandar, Vellingiri; Kumar, Shanmugam Suresh; Stalin, Nattan; Varsha, Prakash; Devi, Subramaniam Mohana; Arun, Meyyazhagan; Manikantan, Pappuswamy; Venkatesan, Chinnakulandhai; Sasikala, Keshavarao; Dharwadkar, Shahnaz N

    2012-01-01

    Extremely low frequency electro magnetic fields (EMFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. An increased number of chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes are correlated with elevated incidence of cancer. The aim of the present study was to assess occupationally induced chromosomal damage in EMF workers exposed to low levels of radiation. We used conventional metaphase chromosome aberration (CA) analysis and the micronucleus (MN) assay as biological indicators of non ionizing radiation exposure. In the present study totally 70 subjects were selected including 50 exposed and 20 controls. Informed written consent was obtained from all participants and the study was performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and the approval of the local ethical committee. A higher degree of CA and MN was observed in exposed subjects compared to controls, the frequency of CA being significantly enhanced with long years of exposure (P<0.05). Moreover increase in CA and MN with age was noted in both exposed subjects and controls, but was significantly greater in the former. The results of this study demonstrated that a significant induction of cytogenetic damage in peripheral lymphocytes of workers occupationally exposed to EMFs in electric transformer and distribution stations. In conclusion, our findings suggest that EMFs possess genotoxic capability, as measured by CA and MN assays; CA analysis appeared more sensitive than other cytogenetic end-points. It can be concluded that chronic occupational exposure to EMFs may lead to an increased risk of genetic damage among electrical workers. PMID:22938490

  9. Detection and possible role of two large nondivisible zones on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, J E; François, V; Louarn, J M

    1988-01-01

    Inversion of many predetermined segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome was attempted by using a system for in vivo selection of genomic rearrangements. Two types of constraints on these inversions were observed: (i) a sensitivity to rich medium when the distance between oriC and the 86- to 91-min region (which carries loci essential for transcription and translation) is increased; (ii) a poor viability or inviability of inversions having at least one endpoint in the one-third of the chromosome around replication terminators (with an exception for some inversions ending between these terminators). Although the first constraint is simply explained by a decreased dosage of the region involved, the second one may result from disruption of two long-range chromosomal organizations. The nondivisible zones thus disclosed coincide remarkably well with the two zones that we have previously described, which are polarized with respect to their replication. It is proposed that the two phenomena result from a sequence-dependent and polarized organization of the terminal region of the chromosome, which defines chromosome replication arms and may participate in nucleoid organization. Images PMID:3059345

  10. Aneuploidy in spermatozoa detected by FISH. Comparison with sperm chromosome data obtained via hamster system

    SciTech Connect

    Estop, A.M.; Van Kirk, V.; Cieply, K.

    1994-09-01

    Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) with two-color and cocktail DNA probes was used to assess the rates of aneuploidy for the X,Y and 18 chromosomes in 3 male donors. (Experiment 1). These individuals had previously been studied with the hamster system and published. Experiment 2 was designed in order to compare aneuploidy rates for chromosome 18 in donor 2 in conjunction with chromosome 6 and 12 as an internal control. (1) Aneuploidy for the sex chromosomes in the hamster system was 0.5 for Donor 1 and 0.7 (3) which was very similar to 0.49 (1) and 0.41 (3) found in this experiment. However, Donor 2 showed a lower rate of sex non-disjunction with this system: 0.18 vs. 0.7 with the hamster system. (2) Diploidy rates are in the same ranges in experiments 1 and 2. (3) If autosome aneuploidy rates are extrapolated to 22 chromosomes, the following values are found: Donor 1:2.42 (vs. 2.0 in the hamster system); donor 3:2.2 (vs. 1.34 with the hamster system) and donor 2:1.32 which is lower than 4.32 found with the hamster system. More data needs to be collected on the use of FISH for this study of aneuploides in sperm cells and attention needs to be paid to the different types of probes used for validation of results.

  11. High Performance DNA Probes for Perinatal Detection of Numerical Chromosome Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Kalistyn H; Weier, Jingly F; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Human reproduction is a tightly controlled process of stepwise evolution with multiple, mostly yet unknown milestones and checkpoints. Healthy halpoid gametes have to be produced by the parents, which will fuse to form the diploid zygote that implants in the female uterus and grows to become first an embryo, then a fetus and finally matures into a newborn. There are several known risk factors that interfere with normal production of gametes, spermatocytes or oocytes, and often cause embryonic mortality and fetal demise at an early stage. Yet some embryos with chomosomal abnormalities can develop beyond the critical first trimester of pregnancy and, while those with supernumary chromosomes in their hyperdiploid cells will be spontaneously aborted, a small fraction of fetuses with an extra chromosome continues to grow to term and will be delivered as a liveborn baby. While minor clinical symptoms displayed by children with trisomies are manageable for many parents, the burden of caring for a child with numerical chromosome abnormalities can be overwhelming to partners or individual families. It also poses a significant financial burden to the society and poses ethical dilemma. In this communication, we will review the progress that has been made in the development of molecular techniques to test individual fetal cells for chromosomal imbalances. We will focus our discussion on the direct visualization of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in live or fixed specimens using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and, more specifically, talk about the groundbreaking progress that in recent years has been achieved towards an improved diagnosis with novel, chromosome-specific DNA probes. PMID:26855976

  12. Polymorphisms detected by random PCR distinguish between different chromosomal forms of Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed Central

    Favia, G; Dimopoulos, G; della Torre, A; Touré, Y T; Coluzzi, M; Louis, C

    1994-01-01

    We have applied PCR amplification using random primers to distinguish between incipient species of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Individuals belonging to three chromosomally characterized West African forms of this mosquito, which are important epidemiologically as they differ in vectorial capacity, were sampled both from laboratory stocks and from wild populations collected in three localities. The techniques used allowed for the unambiguous classification of the mosquitoes, providing a tool for rapid and efficient diagnosis, which previously relied on cytological examination of polytene chromosomes. Images PMID:7937947

  13. Single chromosome transcriptional profiling reveals chromosome-level regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, Marshall J.; Raj, Arjun

    2013-01-01

    Here we report iceFISH, a multiplex imaging method for measuring gene expression and chromosome structure simultaneously on single chromosomes. We demonstrate that chromosomal translocations can alter transcription chromosome-wide, finding substantial differences in transcriptional frequency between genes located on a translocated chromosome in comparison to the normal chromosome in the same cell. Examination of correlations between genes on a single chromosome revealed a cis chromosome-level transcriptional interaction spanning 14.3 megabases. PMID:23416756

  14. Recurrent Chromosomal Imbalances Detected in Biopsy Material from Oral Premalignant and Malignant Lesions by Combined Tissue Microdissection, Universal DNA Amplification, and Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ruthild G.; Scheer, Martin; Born, I. Antonio; Joos, Stefan; Cobbers, J. M. J. Ludwig; Hofele, Christof; Reifenberger, Guido; Zöller, Joachim E.; Lichter, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Biopsies routinely performed for the histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial lesions before treatment were screened for chromosomal imbalances by comparative genomic hybridization. Comparative genomic hybridization was performed on 12 oral premalignant lesions (OPLs; dysplasias and carcinomas in situ) and 14 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). Eight biopsies displayed areas of different histopathological appearance, so that OPLs and OSCCs from the same patient were analyzed. To avoid contamination with nonneoplastic cells, defined cell populations were isolated by micromanipulation with a glass needle. Before comparative genomic hybridization analysis, universal DNA amplification was performed using the DOP-polymerase chain reaction protocol. In the 14 OSCCs examined, the average number of chromosomal imbalances was significantly higher than in the 12 OPLs (mean ± SEM: 11.9 ± 1.9 versus 3.2 ± 1.2; P = 0.003). The DNA copy number changes identified in more than one OPL were gains on 8q (3 of 12) and 16p (2 of 12), as well as losses on 3p (5 of 12); 5q (4 of 12); 13q (3 of 12); and 4q, 8p, and 9p (2 of 12 each). In more than 30% of OSCCs, gains of chromosomal material were identified on 20q (8 of 14); 8q, 11q, 22q (7 of 14 each); 3q, 15q, and 17p (6 of 14 each); and 14q, 17q, and 20p (5 of 14 each), and losses were identified on 3p and 4q (9 of 14 each), 5q (7 of 14), 13q (6 of 14), and 2q and 9p (5 of 14 each). These results were validated by positive and negative control comparative genomic hybridization experiments and microsatellite analysis for the detection of allelic loss. The vast majority of genomic alterations found in OPLs were again identified in OSCCs from the same biopsy, supporting the hypothesis that multiple lesions in the same patient are clonally related. In summary, we show that comprehensive information on the genomic alterations in oral epithelial lesions can be obtained from small biopsies. Such data may identify prognostic

  15. Y chromosome and HIV DNA Detection in Vaginal Swabs as Biomarkers of Semen and HIV Exposure in Women

    PubMed Central

    Penrose, Kerri J.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Besson, Guillaume; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Herold, Betsy C.; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Mellors, John; Parikh, Urvi M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The inability to quantify sexual exposure to HIV limits the power of HIV prevention trials of vaccines, microbicides and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in women. We investigated detection of HIV-1 and Y chromosomal (Yc) DNA in vaginal swabs from 83 participants in the HPTN 035 microbicide trial as biomarkers of HIV exposure and unprotected sexual activity. Methods 143 vaginal swabs from 85 women were evaluated for the presence of Y chromosomal DNA (Quantifiler Duo DNA quantification kit, Applied Biosystems) and total HIV-1 DNA (single copy in-house qPCR assay). Y DNA detection was paired with self-reported behavioral data with regard to recent coitus (≤ 1 week prior to collection) and condom usage (100% vs. <100% compliance). Results Yc DNA was detected in 62/143 (43%) swabs. For the 126 visits at which both behavioral data and swabs were collected, Yc DNA was significantly more frequent in women reporting <100% condom usage (OR 10.69; 95% confidence interval: 2.27 – 50.32; p=0.003). Notably, 27 of 83 (33%) swabs from women reporting 100% condom usage were positive for Yc DNA. HIV DNA was only detected in swabs collected post-seroconversion. Conclusions The use of Yc DNA in HIV prevention trials could reliably identify sub-groups of women who have unprotected sexual activity and could provide valuable exposure-based estimates of efficacy. PMID:25299415

  16. Chromosomal copy number changes in patients with non‐syndromic X linked mental retardation detected by array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Lugtenberg, D; de Brouwer, A P M; Kleefstra, T; Oudakker, A R; Frints, S G M; Schrander‐Stumpel, C T R M; Fryns, J P; Jensen, L R; Chelly, J; Moraine, C; Turner, G; Veltman, J A; Hamel, B C J; de Vries, B B A; van Bokhoven, H; Yntema, H G

    2006-01-01

    Several studies have shown that array based comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) is a powerful tool for the detection of copy number changes in the genome of individuals with a congenital disorder. In this study, 40 patients with non‐specific X linked mental retardation were analysed with full coverage, X chromosomal, bacterial artificial chromosome arrays. Copy number changes were validated by multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification as a fast method to detect duplications and deletions in patient and control DNA. This approach has the capacity to detect copy number changes as small as 100 kb. We identified three causative duplications: one family with a 7 Mb duplication in Xp22.2 and two families with a 500 kb duplication in Xq28 encompassing the MECP2 gene. In addition, we detected four regions with copy number changes that were frequently identified in our group of patients and therefore most likely represent genomic polymorphisms. These results confirm the power of array CGH as a diagnostic tool, but also emphasise the necessity to perform proper validation experiments by an independent technique. PMID:16169931

  17. Using a combination of MLPA kits to detect chromosomal imbalances in patients with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation is a valuable choice for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Jehee, Fernanda Sarquis; Takamori, Jean Tetsuo; Medeiros, Paula F Vasconcelos; Pordeus, Ana Carolina B; Latini, Flavia Roche M; Bertola, Débora Romeo; Kim, Chong Ae; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2011-01-01

    Conventional karyotyping detects anomalies in 3-15% of patients with multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation (MCA/MR). Whole-genome array screening (WGAS) has been consistently suggested as the first choice diagnostic test for this group of patients, but it is very costly for large-scale use in developing countries. We evaluated the use of a combination of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) kits to increase the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities in MCA/MR patients. We screened 261 MCA/MR patients with two subtelomeric and one microdeletion kits. This would theoretically detect up to 70% of all submicroscopic abnormalities. Additionally we scored the de Vries score for 209 patients in an effort to find a suitable cut-off for MLPA screening. Our results reveal that chromosomal abnormalities were present in 87 (33.3%) patients, but only 57 (21.8%) were considered causative. Karyotyping detected 15 abnormalities (6.9%), while MLPA identified 54 (20.7%). Our combined MLPA screening raised the total detection number of pathogenic imbalances more than three times when compared to conventional karyotyping. We also show that using the de Vries score as a cut-off for this screening would only be suitable under financial restrictions. A decision analytic model was constructed with three possible strategies: karyotype, karyotype + MLPA and karyotype + WGAS. Karyotype + MLPA strategy detected anomalies in 19.8% of cases which account for 76.45% of the expected yield for karyotype + WGAS. Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio (ICER) of MLPA is three times lower than that of WGAS, which means that, for the same costs, we have three additional diagnoses with MLPA but only one with WGAS. We list all causative alterations found, including rare findings, such as reciprocal duplications of regions deleted in Sotos and Williams-Beuren syndromes. We also describe imbalances that were considered polymorphisms or rare variants, such as the new SNP

  18. ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCTED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ORIENTATION REQUIREMENT TO DETECT MAGNETIC FIELD-INDUCED ALTERATION OF GAP JUNCTION COMMUNICATION IN EPITHELIAL CELLS.
    OBJECTIVE: We have shown that functional gap junction communication as measured by Lucifer yellow dye transfer (DT) in Clone-9 rat liver epithelial cells, c...

  19. ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABILITY OF THE MALE RAT PUBERTAL ASSAY TO DETECT ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS THAT ALTER THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    Stoker, Tammy E.1; Laws, Susan C.1; Ferrell, Janet M.1; Cooper, Ralph L.1.

    Endocrinology Branch, RTD, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, 27711.

    The...

  20. 46 CFR 109.425 - Repairs and alterations: Fire detecting and extinguishing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS OPERATIONS Reports, Notifications, and Records Reports and... to fire detecting and extinguishing equipment, the master or person in charge must report the nature... person in charge must report the nature of the repairs or alterations to the OCMI. Records...

  1. Relationship of Chromosome Changes to Neoplastic Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    DiPaolo, Joseph A.; Popescu, Nicolae C.

    1976-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a frequent concomitant of neoplasia, and although it is tempting to relate these mutations and alterations in chromatin (DNA) function to cancer, their relationship to the initiation or progression of carcinogenesis is unknown. Mammalian cells in culture, after interacting with chemical carcinogens, often exhibit chromosome damage consisting of breaks and exchanges of chromatid material. The pattern of damage of banded metaphases indicates that negative bands are especially vulnerable to the action of chemical carcinogens, probably because of differential chromatin condensation. Damage to individual chromosomes may be random or nonrandom, depending on the species. Cell death can be correlated with chromatid alterations that occur shortly after treatment with chemical carcinogens. There is also a correlation between mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of some chemical carcinogens and the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges. The question of whether specific chromosome changes are absolutely required for neoplastic transformation cannot be answered because of conflicting data and diverse results from studies even with known carcinogens. Cell transformation may occur without any visible chromosome changes. A universal specific numerical or visible structural chromosomal alteration is not necessarily associated with chemical or viral transformation. Chromosome changes are independent of the etiologic agents: different carcinogens may produce transformation associated with the same abnormal chromosomes, but not all transformed lines invariably exhibit the same abnormality, even with the same chemical. In some species, chromosome having nucleolar organizer regions may be more frequently involved in numerical or structural deviations. Progressively growing tumors also may occur as a result of the proliferation of transformed cells without detectable chromosome changes, indicating that tumorigenicity need not be related to an imbalance of

  2. Detection of cryptic Y chromosome mosaicism by coamplification PCR with archived cytogenetic slides of suspected Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, J W; Cho, E H; Kim, Y M; Kim, J M; Han, J Y; Park, S Y

    2000-03-31

    Turner syndrome is one of the most common cytogenetic abnormalities. It is known that the Y chromosome or Y derived material is present in 6-9% of TS patient and it may develop a high risk of gonadoblastoma in 15-25%. So it is crucial to carry out cyto genetic analysis and Y-specific probe studies for all persons with gonadal dysgenesis to rule out mosaicism with Y-bearing cell line; eg 45,X/46,XY. In this study, 26 archival slides previously analyzed cytogenetically as 45,X, 45,X/46,X,i(X), 45,X/46,X,r(X), and 45,X/46,XX were examined. Coamplification PCR, having the advantage of providing rapid result and confirming PCR failure, was performed with the slide samples in the regions of dystrophin gene in Xp21and DYZ3 in the Y centromeric region. All of archived slides were positive for X-specific gene and one slide of 45,X was found to have the cryptic Y chromosome material. Our result suggests that the archived cytogenetic slides could be applied for the detection of Y chromosome rapidly and efficiently in TS patients. PMID:10762060

  3. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of cancer cell alterations.

    PubMed

    Popescu, N C; Zimonjic, D B

    1997-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are the hallmark of cancer cells. Recurring and highly consistent structural and numerical alterations have been identified in a large number of leukemias, lymphomas, and solid tumors. The identification of recurrent genetic alterations and the isolation of molecular markers have clinical applications in the diagnosis and prognosis of neoplasia and in the detection of minimal residual disease that are essential for designing the most effective therapeutic approach. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) are powerful techniques for detection of genomic alterations. The battery of FISH methods and DNA probes that are available can resolve virtually any chromosomal alterations regardless of their complexity. Combined chromosome banding, multifluor or spectral karyotype, and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) allow identification of structural and numerical alterations on a global basis, mapping of the DNA copy number on the entire tumor genome, complete derivation of complex rearrangements, and localization of the breakpoints of translocations and deletions. Regions of recurrent alterations can be microdisected, amplified, microclone libraries constructed and probes localized on extended chromosomes or chromatin fibers for construction of high resolution physical maps that are critical for positional cloning and gene identification. In this review we attempted to cover the current trends in cancer molecular cytogenetics, and to outline the importance of molecular chromosome analysis in the understanding of oncogenesis and its clinical applications. PMID:9062575

  4. Solar activity cycle and the incidence of foetal chromosome abnormalities detected at prenatal diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Gabrielle J.; Stoupel, Eliahu G.; Barkai, Gad; Chaki, Rina; Legum, Cyril; Fejgin, Moshe D.; Shohat, Mordechai

    1995-06-01

    We studied 2001 foetuses during the period of minimal solar activity of solar cycle 21 and 2265 foetuses during the period of maximal solar activity of solar cycle 22, in all women aged 37 years and over who underwent free prenatal diagnosis in four hospitals in the greater Tel Aviv area. There were no significant differences in the total incidence of chromosomal abnormalities or of trisomy between the two periods (2.15% and 1.8% versus 2.34% and 2.12%, respectively). However, the trend of excessive incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in the period of maximal solar activity suggests that a prospective study in a large population would be required to rule out any possible effect of extreme solar activity.

  5. Detection of chromosome imbalances in retinoblastoma by parallel karyotype and CGH analyses.

    PubMed

    Mairal, A; Pinglier, E; Gilbert, E; Peter, M; Validire, P; Desjardins, L; Doz, F; Aurias, A; Couturier, J

    2000-08-01

    We have studied a series of 20 primary retinoblastomas by karyotypic analysis and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), to perform an exhaustive evaluation of chromosome imbalances in this tumor. In addition, 4 tumors were studied by CGH only. On the whole, CGH results were largely in agreement with those of karyotypic analysis and with known cytogenetic data. The most frequent imbalances were +6p (13/24 cases), +1q (12/24), -16/-16q (11/24), and +2p (9/24). Recurrent high-level amplifications were observed in 2p23-25 and 1q21. Amplification of 2p23-25, present in 4 cases among which 3 showed double-minute chromosomes, was related to MYCN amplification, as demonstrated by FISH and PCR. No evident correlation was found in this small series between any of the imbalances identified and either the differentiation or the histoprognostic risk. PMID:10862045

  6. Association of a Chromosomal Rearrangement Event with Mouse Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy and Alterations in Csrp2bp, Dzank1, and Ovol2 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Anna L.; Moran, Susan A.; Glover, Edward A.; Drinkwater, Norman R.; Swearingen, Rebecca E.; Teixeira, Leandro B.; Bradfield, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously described a mouse model of human posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD) and localized the causative mutation to a 6.2 Mbp region of chromosome 2, termed Ppcd1. We now show that the gene rearrangement linked to mouse Ppcd1 is a 3.9 Mbp chromosomal inversion flanked by 81 Kbp and 542 bp deletions. This recombination event leads to deletion of Csrp2bp Exons 8 through 11, Dzank1 Exons 20 and 21, and the pseudogene Znf133. In addition, we identified translocation of novel downstream sequences to positions adjacent to Csrp2bp Exon 7 and Dzank1 Exon 20. Twelve novel fusion transcripts involving Csrp2bp or Dzank1 linked to downstream sequences have been identified. Eight are expressed at detectable levels in PPCD1 but not wildtype eyes. Upregulation of two Csrp2bp fusion transcripts, as well as upregulation of the adjacent gene, Ovol2, was observed. Absence of the PPCD1 phenotype in animals haploinsufficient for Csrp2bp or both Csrp2bp and Dzank1 rules out haploinsufficiency of these genes as a cause of mouse PPCD1. Complementation experiments confirm that PPCD1 embryonic lethality is due to disruption of Csrp2bp expression. The ocular expression pattern of Csrp2bp is consistent with a role for this protein in corneal development and pathogenesis of PPCD1. PMID:27310661

  7. Detection of Chromosomal Rearrangements Derived From Homeologous Recombination in Four Mapping Populations of Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Udall, Joshua A.; Quijada, Pablo A.; Osborn, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic maps of Brassica napus were constructed from four segregating populations of doubled haploid lines. Each mapping population had the same male parent and used the same set of RFLP probes, facilitating the construction of a consensus map. Chromosomal rearrangements were identified in each population by molecular marker analysis and were classified as de novo homeologous nonreciprocal transpositions (HNRTs), preexisting HNRTs, and homeologous reciprocal transpositions (HRTs). Ninety-nine de novo HNRTs were identified by the presence of a few lines having duplication of a chromosomal region and loss of the corresponding homeologous region. These de novo HNRTs were more prevalent in one population that had a resynthesized B. napus as a parent. Preexisting HNRTs were identified by fragment duplication or fragment loss in many DH lines due to the segregation of HNRTs preexisting in one of the parents. Nine preexisting HNRTs were identified in the three populations involving natural B. napus parents, which likely originated from previous homeologous exchanges. The male parent had a previously described HRT between N7 and N16, which segregated in each population. These data suggest that chromosomal rearrangements caused by homeologous recombination are widespread in B. napus. The effects of these rearrangements on allelic and phenotypic diversity are discussed. PMID:15520255

  8. Genome and gene alterations by insertions and deletions in the evolution of human and chimpanzee chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Volfovsky, Natalia; Oleksyk, Taras K; Cruz, Kristine C; Truelove, Ann L; Stephens, Robert M; Smith, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Background Understanding structure and function of human genome requires knowledge of genomes of our closest living relatives, the primates. Nucleotide insertions and deletions (indels) play a significant role in differentiation that underlies phenotypic differences between humans and chimpanzees. In this study, we evaluated distribution, evolutionary history, and function of indels found by comparing syntenic regions of the human and chimpanzee genomes. Results Specifically, we identified 6,279 indels of 10 bp or greater in a ~33 Mb alignment between human and chimpanzee chromosome 22. After the exclusion of those in repetitive DNA, 1,429 or 23% of indels still remained. This group was characterized according to the local or genome-wide repetitive nature, size, location relative to genes, and other genomic features. We defined three major classes of these indels, using local structure analysis: (i) those indels found uniquely without additional copies of indel sequence in the surrounding (10 Kb) region, (ii) those with at least one exact copy found nearby, and (iii) those with similar but not identical copies found locally. Among these classes, we encountered a high number of exactly repeated indel sequences, most likely due to recent duplications. Many of these indels (683 of 1,429) were in proximity of known human genes. Coding sequences and splice sites contained significantly fewer of these indels than expected from random expectations, suggesting that selection is a factor in limiting their persistence. A subset of indels from coding regions was experimentally validated and their impacts were predicted based on direct sequencing in several human populations as well as chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and two subspecies of orangutans. Conclusion Our analysis demonstrates that while indels are distributed essentially randomly in intergenic and intronic genomic regions, they are significantly under-represented in coding sequences. There are substantial

  9. Elimination of Chromosomal Island SpyCIM1 from Streptococcus pyogenes Strain SF370 Reverses the Mutator Phenotype and Alters Global Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Scott V.; Rahman, Maliha; McCullor, Kimberly A.; King, Catherine J.; Fischetti, Vincent A.; McShan, W. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes chromosomal island M1 (SpyCIM1) integrates by site-specific recombination into the 5’ end of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutL in strain SF370SmR, blocking transcription of it and the downstream operon genes. During exponential growth, SpyCIM1 excises from the chromosome and replicates as an episome, restoring mutL transcription. This process is reversed in stationary phase with SpyCIM1 re-integrating into mutL, returning the cells to a mutator phenotype. Here we show that elimination of SpyCIM1 relieves this mutator phenotype. The downstream MMR operon genes, multidrug efflux pump lmrP, Holliday junction resolution helicase ruvA, and DNA base excision repair glycosylase tag, are also restored to constitutive expression by elimination of SpyCIM1. The presence of SpyCIM1 alters global transcription patterns in SF370SmR. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) demonstrated that loss of SpyCIM1 in the SpyCIM1 deletion mutant, CEM1Δ4, impacted the expression of over 100 genes involved in virulence and metabolism both in early exponential phase, when the SpyCIM1 is episomal, as well as at the onset of stationary phase, when SpyCIM1 has reintegrated into mutL. Among these changes, the up-regulation of the genes for the antiphagocytic M protein (emm1), streptolysin O (slo), capsule operon (hasABC), and streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin (speB), are particularly notable. The expression pattern of the MMR operon confirmed our earlier observations that these genes are transcribed in early exponential phase but silenced as stationary phase is approached. Thus, the direct role of SpyCIM1 in causing the mutator phenotype is confirmed, and further, its influence upon the biology of S. pyogenes was found to impact multiple genes in addition to the MMR operon, which is a novel function for a mobile genetic element. We suggest that such chromosomal islands are a remarkable evolutionary adaptation to promote the survival of its S. pyogenes host cell in changing

  10. Aneuploidy detection for chromosomes 1, X and Y by fluorescence in situ hybridization in human sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, M.G.; Zackowski, J.L.; Acosta, A.A.

    1994-09-01

    Oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males (n=15) were investigated for infertility as compared with proven fertile donors. The oligoasthenoteratozoospermic population showed a mean sperm concentration of 9.7 x 10{sup 6}/ml (Range 4.2-19.7), mean motility of 38.5% (Range 10.6-76.8) and morphology (measured by the percentage of normal forms evaluated by strict criteria) with a mean of 3.49% (Range 1.5-5.0). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using satellite DNA probes specific for chromosomes 1 (puc 1.77), X (alpha satellite), and Y (satellite-III at Yqh) was performed on human interphase sperm nuclei. DNA probes were either directly labelled with rhodamine-dUTP, FITC-dUTP, or biotinylated by nick translation. Hybridization and signal detection were done by routine laboratory protocols. Microscopic analysis was performed using a cooled CCD camera attached to an epi-fluorescent microscope. After hybridization, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 0.96% (n=12) nullisomic, 98.5% (n=1231) monosomic and 0.96% (n=12) disomic for chromosome 1, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 16% (n=600) nullisomic, 74.5% (n=2792) monosomic and 9.9% (n=370) disomic. In addition, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 45.7% (n=633) monosomic and 0.7% (n=11) disomic for chromosome X, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 38.7% (n=760) monosomic and 0.8% (n=13) disomic. Chromosome Y frequencies for fertile donors showed 44.6% (n=614) monosomic and 0.6% (n=2) disomic, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 33.2% (n=701) monosomic and 0.8% (n=15) disomic. This suggests that the frequency of nullisomy for chromosome 1 is significantly higher (p<0.001) in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic makes versus sperm from our fertile donors. We conclude that FISH is a powerful tool to determine the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients.

  11. Development and evaluation of automated systems for detection and classification of banded chromosomes: current status and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Wood, Marc; Li, Shibo; Chen, Wei; Liu, Hong

    2005-08-01

    Automated detection and classification of banded chromosomes may help clinicians diagnose cancers and other genetic disorders at an early stage more efficiently and accurately. However, developing such an automated system (including both a high-speed microscopic image scanning device and related computer-assisted schemes) is quite a challenging and difficult task. Since the 1980s, great research efforts have been made to develop fast and more reliable methods to assist clinical technicians in performing this important and time-consuming task. A number of computer-assisted methods including classical statistical methods, artificial neural networks and knowledge-based fuzzy logic systems, have been applied and tested. Based on the initial test using limited datasets, encouraging results in algorithm and system development have been demonstrated. Despite the significant research effort and progress made over the last two decades, computer-assisted chromosome detection and classification systems have not been routinely accepted and used in clinical laboratories. Further research and development is needed.

  12. Comparative study of microsatellite and cytogenetic markers for detecting the origin of the nondisjoined chromosome 21 in down syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, M.B.; Frantzen, M.; Lund, C.; Olsen, B.; Poulsen, H.; Sand, A.; Tommerup, N.; Mikkelsen, M. ); Antonarakis, S.E.; Warren, A.C. ); Van Broeckhoven, C. ); Chakravarti, A.; Cox, T.K. )

    1992-09-01

    Nondisjunction in trisomy 21 has traditionally been studied by cytogenetic heteromorphisms. Those studies assumed no crossing-over on the short arm of chromosome 21. Recently, increased accuracy of detection of the origin of nondisjunction has been demonstrated by DNA polymorphism analysis. The authors describe a comparative study of cytogenetic heteromorphisms and seven PCR-based DNA polymorphism analysis. They describe a comparative study of cytogenetic heteromorphisms and seven PCR-based DNA polymorphisms for detecting the origin of the additional chromosome 21 in 68 cases of Down syndrome. The polymorphisms studied were the highly informative microsatellites at loci D21S120, D21S192, IFNAR, D21S156, HMG14, and D21S171. The meiotic stage of nondisjunction was assigned on the basis of the pericentromeric markers D21S215, D21S120, and D21S192. Only unequivocal cytogenetic results were compared with the results of the DNA analysis. The parental and meiotic division origin could be determined in 51% of the cases by using the cytogenetic markers and in 88% of the cases by using the DNA markers. Although there were no discrepancies between the two scoring systems regarding parental origin, there were eight discrepancies regarding meiotic stage of nondisjunction. The results raise the possibility of recombination between the two marker systems, particularly on the short arm. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Recombinations in staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec elements compromise the molecular detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A; Hudson, Lyndsey O; El Ghany, Moataz Fouad Abd; Piepenburg, Olaf; Nair, Mridul; Dodgson, Andrew; Forrest, Matthew S; Clark, Taane G; Pain, Arnab

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly using molecular tests for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening. However, primers have to be targeted to a variable chromosomal region, the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). We initially screened 726 MRSA isolates from a single UK hospital trust by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), a novel, isothermal alternative to PCR. Undetected isolates were further characterised using multilocus sequence, spa typing and whole genome sequencing. 96% of our tested phenotypically MRSA isolates contained one of the six orfX-SCCmec junctions our RPA test and commercially available molecular tests target. However 30 isolates could not be detected. Sequencing of 24 of these isolates demonstrated recombinations within the SCCmec element with novel insertions that interfered with the RPA, preventing identification as MRSA. This result suggests that clinical laboratories cannot rely solely upon molecular assays to reliably detect all methicillin-resistance. The presence of significant recombinations in the SCCmec element, where the majority of assays target their primers, suggests that there will continue to be isolates that escape identification. We caution that dependence on amplification-based molecular assays will continue to result in failure to diagnose a small proportion (∼4%) of MRSA isolates, unless the true level of SCCmec natural diversity is determined by whole genome sequencing of a large collection of MRSA isolates. PMID:24972080

  14. COPS: a sensitive and accurate tool for detecting somatic Copy Number Alterations using short-read sequence data from paired samples.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Neeraja M; Gaur, Prakhar; Chaudhary, Rakshit; Rao, Arjun A; Panda, Binay

    2012-01-01

    Copy Number Alterations (CNAs) such as deletions and duplications; compose a larger percentage of genetic variations than single nucleotide polymorphisms or other structural variations in cancer genomes that undergo major chromosomal re-arrangements. It is, therefore, imperative to identify cancer-specific somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs), with respect to matched normal tissue, in order to understand their association with the disease. We have devised an accurate, sensitive, and easy-to-use tool, COPS, COpy number using Paired Samples, for detecting SCNAs. We rigorously tested the performance of COPS using short sequence simulated reads at various sizes and coverage of SCNAs, read depths, read lengths and also with real tumor:normal paired samples. We found COPS to perform better in comparison to other known SCNA detection tools for all evaluated parameters, namely, sensitivity (detection of true positives), specificity (detection of false positives) and size accuracy. COPS performed well for sequencing reads of all lengths when used with most upstream read alignment tools. Additionally, by incorporating a downstream boundary segmentation detection tool, the accuracy of SCNA boundaries was further improved. Here, we report an accurate, sensitive and easy to use tool in detecting cancer-specific SCNAs using short-read sequence data. In addition to cancer, COPS can be used for any disease as long as sequence reads from both disease and normal samples from the same individual are available. An added boundary segmentation detection module makes COPS detected SCNA boundaries more specific for the samples studied. COPS is available at ftp://115.119.160.213 with username "cops" and password "cops". PMID:23110103

  15. The use of molecular and cytogenetic methods as a valuable tool in the detection of chromosomal abnormalities in horses: a case of sex chromosome chimerism in a Spanish purebred colt.

    PubMed

    Demyda-Peyrás, S; Membrillo, A; Bugno-Poniewierska, M; Pawlina, K; Anaya, G; Moreno-Millán, M

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities associated to sex chromosomes are reported as a problem more common than believed to be in horses. Most of them remain undiagnosed due to the complexity of the horse karyotype and the lack of interest of breeders and veterinarians in this type of diagnosis. Approximately 10 years ago, the Spanish Purebred Breeders Association implemented a DNA paternity test to evaluate the pedigree of every newborn foal. All candidates who showed abnormal or uncertain results are routinely submitted to cytogenetical analysis to evaluate the presence of chromosomal abnormalities. We studied the case of a foal showing 3 and even 4 different alleles in several loci in the short tandem repeat (STR) -based DNA parentage test. To confirm these results, a filiation test was repeated using follicular hair DNA showing normal results. A complete set of conventional and molecular cytogenetic analysis was performed to determine their chromosomal complements. C-banding and FISH had shown that the foal presents a sex chimerism 64,XX/64,XY with a cellular percentage of approximately 70/30, diagnosed in blood samples. The use of a diagnostic approach combining routine parentage QF-PCR-based STR screening tested with classical or molecular cytogenetic analysis could be a powerful tool that allows early detection of foals that will have a poor or even no reproductive performance due to chromosomal abnormalities, saving time, efforts and breeders' resources. PMID:23735586

  16. Clonal evolution in CLL patients as detected by FISH versus chromosome banding analysis, and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Ewa; Kotkowska, Aleksandra; Blonski, Jerzy Z; Siemieniuk-Rys, Monika; Ziolkowska, Ewelina; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof; Robak, Tadeusz; Korycka-Wolowiec, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of new aberrations during the course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) named clonal evolution (CE) is usually detected by one of the two methods: chromosome banding analysis (CBA) and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH). The purpose of this study was to compare the usefulness of FISH and CBA for detecting CE and to evaluate its influence on clinical outcome. FISH and CBA were performed at two time points: baseline and follow-up. Thirty-eight previously untreated patients with CLL were included in this study. CBA and I-FISH revealed CE in 15 (39.5%) and 10 (26.3%) patients, respectively. High-risk CE was detected in six cases by CBA and in five cases by I-FISH. In four cases with CE-dependent 17p abnormalities detected by CBA, metaphase FISH was needed for the confirmation of 17p13.1 deletion. Time from first-line to second-line treatment (TTST) and overall survival (OS) did not differ between patients with and without CE, irrespective of the CE-detecting method used. However, shorter OS (P = 0.043) and TTST (P = 0.006) were observed for the patients with potentially relevant CE (rCE) detected by CBA, in which acquired aberrations were present in at least 20% of undivided cells and/or changed baseline karyotype to abnormal or complex and were not resulting from 13q deletion. Our results suggest that some, but not all, CE-dependent aberrations detected by CBA influence clinical outcome. Moreover, I-FISH, which was aimed at detecting aberrations of prognostic significance, was found to be more precise than CBA in their detection, especially TP53 deletion. PMID:24138550

  17. Human and mouse chromosomal mapping of the myeloid cell leukemia-1 gene: MCL1 maps to human chromosome 1q21, a region that is frequently altered in preneoplastic and neoplastic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, R.W.; Zhou, P.; Kozopas, K.M.

    1994-09-15

    The MCL1 gene, recently identified in a myeloid leukemia cell line, has sequence similarity to BCL2, the gene at the t(14;18) translocation in follicular lymphoma. The chromosomal location of MCL1 has now been determined. The human locus (MCL1) was mapped to the long arm of human chromosome 1q21, using the methods of in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybrid analysis. In the mouse, MCL1-related sequences were mapped to positions on two mouse chromosomes (chromosomes 3 and 5), using haplotype analysis of an interspecific cross. The location of the locus on mouse chromosome 3 (Mcl1) was homologous to that of MCL1 on human chromosome 1; the second locus (Mcl-rs on mouse chromosome 5) may represent a pseudogene. The proximal long arm of human chromosome 1, where MCL1 is located, is duplicated and/or rearranged in a variety of preneoplastic and neoplastic diseases including hematologic diseases and solid tumors. MCL1 is thus a candidate gene for involvement in cancer. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Elevated tolerance to aneuploidy in cancer cells: estimating the fitness effects of chromosome number alterations by in silico modelling of somatic genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Gisselsson, David

    2013-01-01

    An unbalanced chromosome number (aneuploidy) is present in most malignant tumours and has been attributed to mitotic mis-segregation of chromosomes. However, recent studies have shown a relatively high rate of chromosomal mis-segregation also in non-neoplastic human cells, while the frequency of aneuploid cells remains low throughout life in most normal tissues. This implies that newly formed aneuploid cells are subject to negative selection in healthy tissues and that attenuation of this selection could contribute to aneuploidy in cancer. To test this, we modelled cellular growth as discrete time branching processes, during which chromosome gains and losses were generated and their host cells subjected to selection pressures of various magnitudes. We then assessed experimentally the frequency of chromosomal mis-segregation as well as the prevalence of aneuploid cells in human non-neoplastic cells and in cancer cells. Integrating these data into our models allowed estimation of the fitness reduction resulting from a single chromosome copy number change to an average of ≈30% in normal cells. In comparison, cancer cells showed an average fitness reduction of only 6% (p = 0.0008), indicative of aneuploidy tolerance. Simulations based on the combined presence of chromosomal mis-segregation and aneuploidy tolerance reproduced distributions of chromosome aberrations in >400 cancer cases with higher fidelity than models based on chromosomal mis-segregation alone. Reverse engineering of aneuploid cancer cell development in silico predicted that aneuploidy intolerance is a stronger limiting factor for clonal expansion of aneuploid cells than chromosomal mis-segregation rate. In conclusion, our findings indicate that not only an elevated chromosomal mis-segregation rate, but also a generalised tolerance to novel chromosomal imbalances contribute to the genomic landscape of human tumours. PMID:23894657

  19. Elevated Tolerance to Aneuploidy in Cancer Cells: Estimating the Fitness Effects of Chromosome Number Alterations by In Silico Modelling of Somatic Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Gisselsson, David

    2013-01-01

    An unbalanced chromosome number (aneuploidy) is present in most malignant tumours and has been attributed to mitotic mis-segregation of chromosomes. However, recent studies have shown a relatively high rate of chromosomal mis-segregation also in non-neoplastic human cells, while the frequency of aneuploid cells remains low throughout life in most normal tissues. This implies that newly formed aneuploid cells are subject to negative selection in healthy tissues and that attenuation of this selection could contribute to aneuploidy in cancer. To test this, we modelled cellular growth as discrete time branching processes, during which chromosome gains and losses were generated and their host cells subjected to selection pressures of various magnitudes. We then assessed experimentally the frequency of chromosomal mis-segregation as well as the prevalence of aneuploid cells in human non-neoplastic cells and in cancer cells. Integrating these data into our models allowed estimation of the fitness reduction resulting from a single chromosome copy number change to an average of ≈30% in normal cells. In comparison, cancer cells showed an average fitness reduction of only 6% (p = 0.0008), indicative of aneuploidy tolerance. Simulations based on the combined presence of chromosomal mis-segregation and aneuploidy tolerance reproduced distributions of chromosome aberrations in >400 cancer cases with higher fidelity than models based on chromosomal mis-segregation alone. Reverse engineering of aneuploid cancer cell development in silico predicted that aneuploidy intolerance is a stronger limiting factor for clonal expansion of aneuploid cells than chromosomal mis-segregation rate. In conclusion, our findings indicate that not only an elevated chromosomal mis-segregation rate, but also a generalised tolerance to novel chromosomal imbalances contribute to the genomic landscape of human tumours. PMID:23894657

  20. Hyperspectral hybrid method classification for detecting altered mucosa of the human larynx

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the field of earth observation, hyperspectral detector systems allow precise target detections of surface components from remote sensing platforms. This enables specific land covers to be identified without the need to physically travel to the areas examined. In the medical field, efforts are underway to develop optical technologies that detect altering tissue surfaces without the necessity to perform an excisional biopsy. With the establishment of expedient classification procedures, hyperspectral imaging may provide a non-invasive diagnostic method that allows determination of pathological tissue with high reliability. In this study, we examined the performance of a hyperspectral hybrid method classification for the automatic detection of altered mucosa of the human larynx. Materials and methods Hyperspectral Imaging was performed in vivo and 30 bands from 390 to 680 nm for 5 cases of laryngeal disorders (2x hemorrhagic polyp, 3x leukoplakia) were obtained. Image stacks were processed with unsupervised clustering (linear spectral unmixing), spectral signatures were extracted from unlabeled cluster maps and subsequently applied as end-members for supervised classification (spectral angle mapper) of further medical cases with identical diagnosis. Results Linear spectral unmixing clearly highlighted altered mucosa as single spectral clusters in all cases. Matching classes were identified, and extracted spectral signatures could readily be applied for supervised classifications. Automatic target detection performed well, as the considered classes showed notable correspondence with pathological tissue locations. Conclusions Using hyperspectral classification procedures derived from remote sensing applications for diagnostic purposes can create concrete benefits for the medical field. The approach shows that it would be rewarding to collect spectral signatures from histologically different lesions of laryngeal disorders in order to build up a spectral

  1. Detection of a novel X-chromosomal short tandem repeat marker in Xq28 in four ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Takeki; Nakamura, Takako; Honda, Katuya

    2016-03-01

    DNA testing of X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (X-STR) polymorphisms has been the focus of attention in several studies, mainly due to its applicability in the investigation of complex kinship cases. Studies of X-STR in analyses of DNA sequences, population studies and DNA testing applications have been reported. We performed detection and population genetic study of a novel tetranucleotide X-STR locus in the present study. We identified a unique X-STR locus consisting of two tetranucleotides in Xq28. Although the STR is a simple tetranucleotide, its polymorphism was comparatively high [polymorphism information content (PIC)=0.7140] in Japanese subjects. In addition, the STR varied in structure among ethnic groups. We conclude that this locus will be useful for forensic DNA testing and anthropological studies. PMID:26980253

  2. Intra-strain polymorphisms are detected but no genomic alteration is found in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Koshichi . E-mail: koshichi@kazusa.or.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogura, Atsuo; Oishi, Michio

    2006-09-15

    In-gel competitive reassociation (IGCR) is a method for differential subtraction of polymorphic (RFLP) DNA fragments between two DNA samples of interest without probes or specific sequence information. Here, we applied the IGCR procedure to two cloned mice derived from an F1 hybrid of the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 strains, in order to investigate the possibility of genomic alteration in the cloned mouse genomes. Each of the five of the genomic alterations we detected between the two cloned mice corresponded to the 'intra-strain' polymorphisms in the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 mouse strains. Our result suggests that no severe aberration of genome sequences occurs due to somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  3. Comparison of methods to detect copy number alterations in cancer using simulated and real genotyping data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of genomic copy number alterations (CNA) in cancer based on SNP arrays requires methods that take into account tumour specific factors such as normal cell contamination and tumour heterogeneity. A number of tools have been recently developed but their performance needs yet to be thoroughly assessed. To this aim, a comprehensive model that integrates the factors of normal cell contamination and intra-tumour heterogeneity and that can be translated to synthetic data on which to perform benchmarks is indispensable. Results We propose such model and implement it in an R package called CnaGen to synthetically generate a wide range of alterations under different normal cell contamination levels. Six recently published methods for CNA and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) detection on tumour samples were assessed on this synthetic data and on a dilution series of a breast cancer cell-line: ASCAT, GAP, GenoCNA, GPHMM, MixHMM and OncoSNP. We report the recall rates in terms of normal cell contamination levels and alteration characteristics: length, copy number and LOH state, as well as the false discovery rate distribution for each copy number under different normal cell contamination levels. Assessed methods are in general better at detecting alterations with low copy number and under a little normal cell contamination levels. All methods except GPHMM, which failed to recognize the alteration pattern in the cell-line samples, provided similar results for the synthetic and cell-line sample sets. MixHMM and GenoCNA are the poorliest performing methods, while GAP generally performed better. This supports the viability of approaches other than the common hidden Markov model (HMM)-based. Conclusions We devised and implemented a comprehensive model to generate data that simulate tumoural samples genotyped using SNP arrays. The validity of the model is supported by the similarity of the results obtained with synthetic and real data. Based on these results and

  4. Satellite detection of vegetative damage and alteration caused by pollutants emitted by a zinc smelter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Fritz, E. L.; Pennypacker, S. P.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Field observations and data collected by low flying aircraft were used to verify the accuracy of maps produced from the satellite data. Although areas of vegetation as small as six acres can accurately be detected, a white pine stand that was severely damaged by sulfur dioxide could not be differentiated from a healthy white pine stand because spectral differences were not large enough. When winter data were used to eliminate interference from herbaceous and deciduous vegetation, the damage was still undetectable. The analysis was able to produce a character map that accurately delineated areas of vegetative alteration due to high zinc levels accumulating in the soil. The map depicted a distinct gradient of less damage and alteration as the distance from the smelter increased. Although the satellite data will probably not be useful for detecting small acreages of damaged vegetation, it is concluded that the data may be very useful as an inventory tool to detect and delineate large vegetative areas possessing differing spectral signatures.

  5. Novel Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Variants Detected Through the Use of Massively Parallel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Warshauer, David H; Churchill, Jennifer D; Novroski, Nicole; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technology is capable of determining the sizes of short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as well as their individual nucleotide sequences. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the repeat regions of STRs and variations in the pattern of repeat units in a given repeat motif can be used to differentiate alleles of the same length. In this study, MPS was used to sequence 28 forensically-relevant Y-chromosome STRs in a set of 41 DNA samples from the 3 major U.S. population groups (African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics). The resulting sequence data, which were analyzed with STRait Razor v2.0, revealed 37 unique allele sequence variants that have not been previously reported. Of these, 19 sequences were variations of documented sequences resulting from the presence of intra-repeat SNPs or alternative repeat unit patterns. Despite a limited sampling, two of the most frequently-observed variants were found only in African American samples. The remaining 18 variants represented allele sequences for which there were no published data with which to compare. These findings illustrate the great potential of MPS with regard to increasing the resolving power of STR typing and emphasize the need for sample population characterization of STR alleles. PMID:26391384

  6. Chromosome Painting in Vanellus chilensis: Detection of a Fusion Common to Clade Charadrii (Charadriiformes).

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Rafael; Gunski, Ricardo J; del Valle Garnero, Analía; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Ochotorena de Freitas, Thales R; Correa de Oliveira, Edivaldo H

    2015-01-01

    The Southern lapwing (Vanellus chilensis) is endemic to America and is well-known because of the vast expansion of its geographical distribution and its involvement in air accidents. Despite its popularity, there is no information concerning the genomic organization and karyotype of this species. Hence, because other species of the genus Vanellus have variable diploid numbers from 2n = 58 to 76, the aim of this report was to analyze the karyotype of V. chilensis by means of classical and molecular cytogenetics. We found that 2n = 78 and chromosome painting using probes of Gallus gallus (GGA) and Leucopternis albicollis revealed an organization similar to the avian putative ancestral karyotype, except for the fusion of GGA7 and GGA8, also found in Burhinus oedicnemus, the only Charadriiforme species analyzed by FISH so far. This rearrangement may represent a cytogenetic signature for this group and, in addition, must be responsible for the difference between the diploid number found in the avian putative ancestral karyotype (2n = 80) and V. chilensis (2n = 78). PMID:26088018

  7. Novel Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Variants Detected Through the Use of Massively Parallel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Warshauer, David H.; Churchill, Jennifer D.; Novroski, Nicole; King, Jonathan L.; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technology is capable of determining the sizes of short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as well as their individual nucleotide sequences. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the repeat regions of STRs and variations in the pattern of repeat units in a given repeat motif can be used to differentiate alleles of the same length. In this study, MPS was used to sequence 28 forensically-relevant Y-chromosome STRs in a set of 41 DNA samples from the 3 major U.S. population groups (African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics). The resulting sequence data, which were analyzed with STRait Razor v2.0, revealed 37 unique allele sequence variants that have not been previously reported. Of these, 19 sequences were variations of documented sequences resulting from the presence of intra-repeat SNPs or alternative repeat unit patterns. Despite a limited sampling, two of the most frequently-observed variants were found only in African American samples. The remaining 18 variants represented allele sequences for which there were no published data with which to compare. These findings illustrate the great potential of MPS with regard to increasing the resolving power of STR typing and emphasize the need for sample population characterization of STR alleles. PMID:26391384

  8. Detection of obesity QTLs on mouse chromosomes 1 and 7 by selective DNA pooling

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B.A.; Phillips, S.J.

    1996-06-15

    The inheritance of obesity has been analyzed in an intercross between the lean 129/Sv mouse strain and the obesity-prone EL/Suz mouse strain. The weights of three major fat pads were determined on 4-month-old mice, and the sum of these weights, divided by body weight, was used as an adiposity index. The strategy of selective DNA pooling was used as a primary screen to identify putative quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting adiposity index. DNA pools representing the leanest 15% and fattest 15% of the F2 progeny were compared for differential allelic enrichment using widely dispersed microsatellite variants. To evaluate putative QTLs, individual genotyping and interval mapping were employed to estimate QTL effects and assess statistical significance. One QTL affecting adiposity index, which accounted for 12.3% of phenotypic variance in gender-merged data, was mapped to the central region of Chromosome (Chr) 7. The QTL allele inherited from EL conferred increased adiposity. A second QTL that accounts for 6.3% of phenotypic variance was identified on Chr 1 near D1Mitt211. At both QTLs, the data are consistent with dominant inheritance of the allele contributing to obesity. The possible relationships between these QTLs and previously described obesity QYLs, major obesity mutations, and candidate genes are discussed. 42 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. ‘Druggable’ alterations detected by Ion Torrent in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    FANG, WEIJIA; RADOVICH, MILAN; ZHENG, YULONG; FU, CAI-YUN; ZHAO, PENG; MAO, CHENGYU; ZHENG, YI; ZHENG, SHUSEN

    2014-01-01

    The frequency and poor prognosis of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) emphasizes the requirement for improved biomarkers for use in the treatment and prognosis of mCRC. In the present study, somatic variants in exonic regions of key cancer genes were identified in mCRC patients. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues obtained by biopsy of the metastases of mCRC patients were collected, and the DNA was extracted and sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. For the targeted amplification of known cancer genes, the Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Panel, which is designed to detect 739 Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) mutations in 604 loci from 46 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes using as little as 10 ng of input DNA, was used. The sequencing results were then analyzed using the Ampliseq™ Variant Caller plug-in within the Ion Torrent Suite software. In addition, Ingenuity Pathway software was used to perform a pathway analysis. The Cox regression analysis was also conducted to investigate the potential correlation between alteration numbers and clinical factors, including response rate, disease-free survival and overall survival. Among 10 specimens, 65 genetic alterations were identified in 24 genes following the exclusion of germline mutations using the SNP database, whereby 41% of the alterations were also present in the COSMIC database. No clinical factors were found to significantly correlate with the alteration numbers in the patients by statistical analysis. However, pathway analysis identified ‘colorectal cancer metastasis signaling’ as the most commonly mutated canonical pathway. This analysis further revealed mutated genes in the Wnt, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/SMAD signaling pathways. Notably, 11 genes, including the expected APC, BRAF, KRAS, PIK3CA and TP53 genes, were mutated in at least two samples. Notably, 90% (9/10) of mCRC patients harbored at least

  10. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  11. Flow cytometric detection of DNA cell cycle alterations in hemocytes of mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) off the Adriatic coast, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Nevenka; Micić, Milena; Batel, Renato; Zahn, Rudolf K

    2003-07-16

    Studies were carried out to determine the alteration in DNA cell cycle characteristics of hemocytes of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis collected at 17 different locations (146 individuals) along the Adriatic coast, Croatia. In order to connect possible genomic manifestation to urban and/or industrial waste flow cytometry was used. We studied incidence of altered DNA profile reflective of chromosomal fragmentation phenomena or aneuploid mosaicism, coefficient of variation (CV) in DNA fluorescence as a measure of intraindividual genome size variability and DNA index (DI) as a measure of ploidy. The different classes of DNA cell cycle alterations found in this study mirror either acute or cumulative genotoxic effects of the surrounding environment on mussel hemocyte DNA. These are intraindividual genome size variability (CV>8, seven individuals from four sites), aneuploidy (altered DNA profile and DI<0.9, 45 individuals from 14 sites) and accidental apoptotic processes (altered DNA profile and presence of apoptotic cells, two individuals from two sites). Normal cell cycle DNA profiles were obtained for 89 (60.9%) individuals from all 17 sites and for 146 examined samples polyploids were absent. Flow cytometry proved to be a powerful technique for the determination of alterations in cell cycle characteristics in mussel hemocyte DNA. Therefore, it may be used in pollution control measurements to distinguish affected or vulnerable populations from healthy populations living in the presence of a wide variety of marine environmental contaminants. PMID:12799105

  12. Isovolumetric elasticity alteration in the human heart detected by in vivo time-harmonic elastography.

    PubMed

    Tzschätzsch, Heiko; Hättasch, Robert; Knebel, Fabian; Klaua, Robert; Schultz, Michael; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2013-12-01

    Time harmonic elastography (THE) has recently been introduced for measurement of the periodic alteration in myocardial shear modulus based on externally induced low-frequency acoustic vibrations produced by a loudspeaker. In this study, we propose further developments of cardiac THE toward a clinical modality including integration of the vibration source into the patient bed and automated parameter extraction from harmonic shear wave amplitudes, wall motion profiles and synchronized electrocardiographic records. This method has enabled us to evaluate the delay between wall motion and wave amplitude alteration for the measurement of isovolumetric times of elasticity alteration during contraction (τ(C)) and relaxation (τ(R)) in a group of 32 healthy volunteers. On average, the wave amplitudes changed between systole and diastole by a factor of 1.7 ± 0.3, with a τ(C) of 137 ± 61 ms and a τ(R) of 68 ± 73 ms, which agrees with results obtained with the more time-consuming and expensive cardiac magnetic resonance elastography. Furthermore, because of the high sampling rate, elasto-morphometric parameters such as transition times and the area of wave amplitude-cardiac motion cycles can be processed in an automated way for the future clinical detection of myocardial relaxation abnormalities. PMID:24035628

  13. A Novel Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Type XI Primer for Detection of mecC-Harboring Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Screening Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Petersdorf, Sabine; Herma, Miriam; Rosenblatt, Meike; Layer, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening using real-time PCR has decreased in sensitivity due to the emergence of variant staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) types. We have designed and validated a novel SCCmec XI primer, which enables for the first time the rapid detection of mecC-harboring MRSA directly from nasopharyngeal swabs without prior cultivation. PMID:26468503

  14. Near universal detection of alterations in CTNNB1 and Wnt pathway regulators in desmoid-type fibromatosis by whole-exome sequencing and genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Crago, Aimee M; Chmielecki, Juliann; Rosenberg, Mara; O'Connor, Rachael; Byrne, Caitlin; Wilder, Fatima G; Thorn, Katherine; Agius, Phaedra; Kuk, Deborah; Socci, Nicholas D; Qin, Li-Xuan; Meyerson, Matthew; Hameed, Meera; Singer, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    CTNNB1 mutations or APC abnormalities have been observed in ∼85% of desmoids examined by Sanger sequencing and are associated with Wnt/β-catenin activation. We sought to identify molecular aberrations in "wild-type" tumors (those without CTNNB1 or APC alteration) and to determine their prognostic relevance. CTNNB1 was examined by Sanger sequencing in 117 desmoids; a mutation was observed in 101 (86%) and 16 were wild type. Wild-type status did not associate with tumor recurrence. Moreover, in unsupervised clustering based on U133A-derived gene expression profiles, wild-type and mutated tumors clustered together. Whole-exome sequencing of eight of the wild-type desmoids revealed that three had a CTNNB1 mutation that had been undetected by Sanger sequencing. The mutation was found in a mean 16% of reads (vs. 37% for mutations identified by Sanger). Of the other five wild-type tumors sequenced, two had APC loss, two had chromosome 6 loss, and one had mutation of BMI1. The finding of low-frequency CTNNB1 mutation or APC loss in wild-type desmoids was validated in the remaining eight wild-type desmoids; directed miSeq identified low-frequency CTNNB1 mutation in four and comparative genomic hybridization identified APC loss in one. These results demonstrate that mutations affecting CTNNB1 or APC occur more frequently in desmoids than previously recognized (111 of 117; 95%), and designation of wild-type genotype is largely determined by sensitivity of detection methods. Even true CTNNB1 wild-type tumors (determined by next-generation sequencing) may have genomic alterations associated with Wnt activation (chromosome 6 loss/BMI1 mutation), supporting Wnt/β-catenin activation as the common pathway governing desmoid initiation. PMID:26171757

  15. Detection of aneuploid human sperm by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Evidence for a donor difference in frequency of sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, W.A. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Segraves, R.; Pinkel, D. ); Wyrobek, A.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with repetitive-sequence DNA probes was used to detect human sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y in three healthy men. Data on these same men had been obtained previously, using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique, providing a cytogenetic reference for validating sperm hybridization measurements. Air-dried smears were prepared from semen samples and treated with DTT and lithium diiodosalicylate to expand sperm chromatin. Hybridization with fluorescently tagged DNA probes for chromosomes 1 (pUC177) or Y (pY3.4) yielded average frequencies of sperm with two fluorescent domains of 14.2[+-]2.4/10,000 and 5.6[+-]1.6/10,000 sperm, respectively. These frequencies did not differ statistically from frequencies of hyperploidy observed for these chromosomes with the hamster technique. In addition, frequencies of disomic sperm from one donor were elevated [approximately]2.5-fold above those of other donors, for both chromosomes 1 (P = .045) and Y (P = .01), consistent with a trend found with the hamster technique. The authors conclude that fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm chromosomes provides a valid and promising measure of the frequency of disomic human sperm. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Detection of cryptic subtelomeric chromosome abnormalities and identification of anonymous chromatin using a quantitative multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay.

    PubMed

    Northrop, Emma L; Ren, Hua; Bruno, Damien L; McGhie, James D R; Coffa, Jordi; Schouten, Jan; Choo, K H Andy; Slater, Howard R

    2005-11-01

    The need to detect clinically significant segmental aneuploidies beyond the range of light microscopy demands the development of new cost-efficient, sensitive, and robust analytical techniques. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) has already been shown to be particularly effective and flexible for measuring copy numbers in a multiplex format. Previous attempts to develop a reliable MLPA to assay all chromosome subtelomeric regions have been confounded by unforeseen copy number variation in some genes that are very close to the telomeres in healthy individuals. We addressed this shortcoming by substituting all known polymorphic probes and using two complementary multiplex assays to minimize the likelihood of false results. We developed this new quantitative MLPA strategy for two important diagnostic applications. First, in a group of cases with high clinical suspicion of a chromosome abnormality but normal, high-resolution karyotypes, MLPA detected subtelomeric abnormalities in three patients. Two were de novo terminal deletions (del(4p) and del(1p)), and one was a derivative chromosome 1 from a maternal t(1p;17p). The range of these segmental aneuploidies was 1.8-6.6 Mb, and none were visible on retrospective microscopy. Second, in a group of six patients with apparently de novo single-chromosome abnormalities containing anonymous chromatin, MLPA identified two cases with simple intrachromosomal duplications: dup(6p) and dup(8q). Three cases showed derivative chromosomes from translocations involving the distal regions of 9q and 4q, 5p and 11q, and 6q and 3p. One case showed a nonreciprocal, interchromosomal translocation of the distal region of 10p-7p. All abnormalities in both groups were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). This quantitative MLPA technique for subtelomeric assays is compared with previously described alternative techniques. PMID:16170807

  17. Breakage-fusion-bridge cycles and de novo telomere formation on broken chromosomes in maize callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Santos-Serejo, Janay A; Aguiar-Perecin, Margarida L R

    2016-06-01

    Breakpoints involved in chromosome alterations associated with heterochromatin have been detected in maize plants regenerated from callus culture. A cytogenetic analysis of plants regenerated from a maize callus was performed aiming to analyze the stability of a chromosome 7 bearing a deficiency-duplication (Df-Dp), which was interpreted as derived from a chromatid type breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle. The Df-Dp chromosome 7 was stable in mitotic and meiotic cells of the regenerated plants. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed signals of telomeric sequences on the broken chromosome arm and provided evidence of de novo telomere formation. The stability of two types of altered chromosome 7 was investigated in C-banded metaphases from samples of the original callus that were collected during a period of 30-42 months after culture initiation. New alterations involving heterochromatic knobs of chromosomes 7 and 9 were observed. The aberrant chromosomes were stable in the subcultures, thus providing evidence of broken chromosome healing. The examination of anaphases showed the presence of bridges, which was consistent with the occurrence of BFB cycles. De novo telomere formation occurred in euchromatic and heterochromatic chromosome termini. The results point to events of chromosomal evolution that might occur in plants. PMID:27203556

  18. Dramatyping: a generic algorithm for detecting reasonable temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, one of the criteria for the standardized assessment of case causality in adverse drug reactions is the temporal relationship between the intake of a drug and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. This article presents and describes an algorithm for the detection of a reasonable temporal correlation between the administration of a drug and the alteration of a laboratory value course. The algorithm is designed to process normalized lab values and is therefore universally applicable. It has a sensitivity of 0.932 for the detection of lab value courses that show changes in temporal correlation with the administration of a drug and it has a specificity of 0.967 for the detection of lab value courses that show no changes. Therefore, the algorithm is appropriate to screen the data of electronic health records and to support human experts in revealing adverse drug reactions. A reference implementation in Python programming language is available. PMID:27042396

  19. Dramatyping: a generic algorithm for detecting reasonable temporal correlations between drug administration and lab value alterations.

    PubMed

    Newe, Axel

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, one of the criteria for the standardized assessment of case causality in adverse drug reactions is the temporal relationship between the intake of a drug and the occurrence of a reaction or a laboratory test abnormality. This article presents and describes an algorithm for the detection of a reasonable temporal correlation between the administration of a drug and the alteration of a laboratory value course. The algorithm is designed to process normalized lab values and is therefore universally applicable. It has a sensitivity of 0.932 for the detection of lab value courses that show changes in temporal correlation with the administration of a drug and it has a specificity of 0.967 for the detection of lab value courses that show no changes. Therefore, the algorithm is appropriate to screen the data of electronic health records and to support human experts in revealing adverse drug reactions. A reference implementation in Python programming language is available. PMID:27042396

  20. 13C-phenylalanine breath test detects altered phenylalanine kinetics in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Teraishi, T; Ozeki, Y; Hori, H; Sasayama, D; Chiba, S; Yamamoto, N; Tanaka, H; Iijima, Y; Matsuo, J; Kawamoto, Y; Kinoshita, Y; Hattori, K; Ota, M; Kajiwara, M; Terada, S; Higuchi, T; Kunugi, H

    2012-01-01

    Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid required for the synthesis of catecholamines including dopamine. Altered levels of phenylalanine and its metabolites in blood and cerebrospinal fluid have been reported in schizophrenia patients. This study attempted to examine for the first time whether phenylalanine kinetics is altered in schizophrenia using L-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine breath test ((13)C-PBT). The subjects were 20 chronically medicated schizophrenia patients (DSM-IV) and the same number of age- and sex-matched controls. (13)C-phenylalanine (99 atom% (13)C; 100 mg) was administered orally and the breath (13)CO(2) /(12)CO(2) ratio was monitored for 120 min. The possible effect of antipsychotic medication (risperidone (RPD) or haloperidol (HPD) treatment for 21 days) on (13)C-PBT was examined in rats. Body weight (BW), age and diagnostic status were significant predictors of the area under the curve of the time course of Δ(13)CO(2) (‰) and the cumulative recovery rate (CRR) at 120 min. A repeated measures analysis of covariance controlled for age and BW revealed that the patterns of CRR change over time differed between the patients and controls and that Δ(13)CO(2) was lower in the patients than in the controls at all sampling time points during the 120 min test, with an overall significant difference between the two groups. Chronic administration of RPD or HPD had no significant effect on (13)C-PBT indices in rats. Our results suggest that (13)C-PBT is a novel laboratory test that can detect altered phenylalanine kinetics in chronic schizophrenia patients. Animal experiments suggest that the observed changes are unlikely to be attributable to antipsychotic medication. PMID:22832963

  1. Gold nanostar based biosensor detects epigenetic alterations on promoter of real cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Ma, Xingyi; Sim, Sang Jun

    2015-04-15

    Epigenetic changes, particularly in cancer suppressor genes, are novel biomarkers for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. However, epigenetic studies should not only provide an estimation of the amount of 5-methylcytosine, but also examine the presence of epigenetic proteins to reveal the complete epigenetic alterations for downstream molecular process. The challenge of natural epigenetics is to unveil key factors of epigenetics in one assay, containing low concentrations. This would be valuable for the monitoring of early-stage cancer. On the basic of the nanoplasmonic biosensor, here we report a sensitive sensor to study epigenetics of DNA promoter. The results show detection limit for dual epigenetic biomarkers methyl-CpG group and methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) are one 5-methylcytosine molecule and 125fM MBD2. Moreover, DNA structure bending, steric competition under interaction of epigenetic proteins and transcription factors; and epigenetics-mediated suppression of transcription are observed during epigenetic alterations. This study provides a platform for full story of epigenetics, as compared with that of methylcytosine-based techniques only. PMID:25500525

  2. Detection of microvasculature alterations by synchrotron radiation in murine with delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Zhang, Bo; Huo, Hua; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qianqian; Wu, Yuanlin; Xiao, Liang; Ren, Yuqi; Zhang, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Using the tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata, we have previously established a delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) model, which is meaningful for clinical interventions against jellyfish stings. However, the mechanism of DJES still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to explore its potential mechanism by detecting TE-induced microvasculature alterations in vivo and ex vivo. Using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, we, for the first time, directly observed the blood vessel alterations induced by jellyfish venom in vivo and ex vivo. Firstly, microvasculature imaging of whole-body mouse in vivo indicated that the small blood vessel branches in the liver and kidney in the TE-treated group, seemed much thinner than those in the control group. Secondly, 3D imaging of kidney ex vivo showed that the kidneys in the TE-treated group had incomplete vascular trees where distal vessel branches were partly missing and disorderly disturbed. Finally, histopathological analysis found that obvious morphological changes, especially hemorrhagic effects, were also present in the TE-treated kidney. Thus, TE-induced microvasculature changes might be one of the important mechanisms of multiple organ dysfunctions in DJES. In addition, the methods we employed here will probably facilitate further studies on developing effective intervention strategies against DJES. PMID:24508769

  3. Detection of time-varying harmonic amplitude alterations due to spectral interpolations between musical instrument tones.

    PubMed

    Horner, Andrew B; Beauchamp, James W; So, Richard H Y

    2009-01-01

    Gradated spectral interpolations between musical instrument tone pairs were used to investigate discrimination as a function of time-averaged spectral difference. All possible nonidentical pairs taken from a collection of eight musical instrument sounds consisting of bassoon, clarinet, flute, horn, oboe, saxophone, trumpet, and violin were tested. For each pair, several tones were generated with different balances between the primary and secondary instruments, where the balance was fixed across the duration of each tone. Among primary instruments it was found that changes to horn and bassoon [corrected] were most easily discriminable, while changes to saxophone and trumpet timbres were least discriminable. Among secondary instruments, the clarinet had the strongest effect on discrimination, whereas the bassoon had the least effect. For primary instruments, strong negative correlations were found between discrimination and their spectral incoherences, suggesting that the presence of dynamic spectral variations tends to increase the difficulty of detecting time-varying alterations such as spectral interpolation. PMID:19173434

  4. Multiplexed chromosome conformation capture sequencing for rapid genome-scale high-resolution detection of long-range chromatin interactions.

    PubMed

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Kolovos, Petros; Brouwer, Rutger; Zuin, Jessica; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kockx, Christel; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Wendt, Kerstin S; Grosveld, Frank; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Soler, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology is a powerful and increasingly popular tool for analyzing the spatial organization of genomes. Several 3C variants have been developed (e.g., 4C, 5C, ChIA-PET, Hi-C), allowing large-scale mapping of long-range genomic interactions. Here we describe multiplexed 3C sequencing (3C-seq), a 4C variant coupled to next-generation sequencing, allowing genome-scale detection of long-range interactions with candidate regions. Compared with several other available techniques, 3C-seq offers a superior resolution (typically single restriction fragment resolution; approximately 1-8 kb on average) and can be applied in a semi-high-throughput fashion. It allows the assessment of long-range interactions of up to 192 genes or regions of interest in parallel by multiplexing library sequencing. This renders multiplexed 3C-seq an inexpensive, quick (total hands-on time of 2 weeks) and efficient method that is ideal for the in-depth analysis of complex genetic loci. The preparation of multiplexed 3C-seq libraries can be performed by any investigator with basic skills in molecular biology techniques. Data analysis requires basic expertise in bioinformatics and in Linux and Python environments. The protocol describes all materials, critical steps and bioinformatics tools required for successful application of 3C-seq technology. PMID:23411633

  5. Detection of subtle neurological alterations by the Catwalk XT gait analysis system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A new version of the CatWalk XT system was evaluated as a tool for detecting very subtle alteration in gait based on higher speed sample rate; the system could also demonstrate minor changes in neurological function. In this study, we evaluated the neurological outcome of sciatic nerve injury intervened by local injection of hyaluronic acid. Using the CatWalk XT system, we looked for differences between treated and untreated groups and differences within the same group as a function of time so as to assess the power of the Catwalk XT system for detecting subtle neurological change. Methods Peripheral nerve injury was induced in 36 Sprague–Dawley rats by crushing the left sciatic nerve using a vessel clamp. The animals were randomized into one of two groups: Group I: crush injury as the control; Group II: crush injury and local application with hyaluronic acid. These animals were subjected to neurobehavior assessment, histomorphology evaluation, and electrophysiology study periodically. These data were retrieved for statistical analysis. Results The density of neurofilament and S-100 over the distal end of crushed nerve showed significant differences either in inter-group comparison at various time points or intra-group comparison from 7 to 28 days. Neuronal structure architecture, axon counts, intensity of myelination, electrophysiology, and collagen deposition demonstrate significant differences between the two groups. There was significant difference of SFI and angle of ankle in inter- group analysis from 7 to 28 days, but there were no significant differences in SFI and angle of ankle at time points of 7 and 14 days. In the Cat Walk XT analysis, the intensity, print area, stance duration, and swing duration all showed detectable differences at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days, whereas there were no significant difference at 7 and 14 days with CatWalk 7 testing. In addition, there were no significant differences of step sequence or regularity index

  6. Chromothripsis-like chromosomal rearrangements induced by ionizing radiation using proton microbeam irradiation system.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Maki; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Konishi, Teruaki; Hayashi, Shin; Shigemizu, Daichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Moriyama, Keiji; Inazawa, Johji

    2016-03-01

    Chromothripsis is the massive but highly localized chromosomal rearrangement in response to a one-step catastrophic event, rather than an accumulation of a series of subsequent and random alterations. Chromothripsis occurs commonly in various human cancers and is thought to be associated with increased malignancy and carcinogenesis. However, the causes and consequences of chromothripsis remain unclear. Therefore, to identify the mechanism underlying the generation of chromothripsis, we investigated whether chromothripsis could be artificially induced by ionizing radiation. We first elicited DNA double-strand breaks in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HOC313-P and its highly metastatic subline HOC313-LM, using Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE), a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate a spot within the nuclei of adhesive cells, and then established irradiated monoclonal sublines from them, respectively. SNP array analysis detected a number of chromosomal copy number alterations (CNAs) in these sublines, and one HOC313-LM-derived monoclonal subline irradiated with 200 protons by the microbeam displayed multiple CNAs involved locally in chromosome 7. Multi-color FISH showed a complex translocation of chromosome 7 involving chromosomes 11 and 12. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing analysis revealed multiple de novo complex chromosomal rearrangements localized in chromosomes 2, 5, 7, and 20, resembling chromothripsis. These findings suggested that localized ionizing irradiation within the nucleus may induce chromothripsis-like complex chromosomal alterations via local DNA damage in the nucleus. PMID:26862731

  7. Chromothripsis-like chromosomal rearrangements induced by ionizing radiation using proton microbeam irradiation system

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Maki; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Konishi, Teruaki; Hayashi, Shin; Shigemizu, Daichi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Moriyama, Keiji; Inazawa, Johji

    2016-01-01

    Chromothripsis is the massive but highly localized chromosomal rearrangement in response to a one-step catastrophic event, rather than an accumulation of a series of subsequent and random alterations. Chromothripsis occurs commonly in various human cancers and is thought to be associated with increased malignancy and carcinogenesis. However, the causes and consequences of chromothripsis remain unclear. Therefore, to identify the mechanism underlying the generation of chromothripsis, we investigated whether chromothripsis could be artificially induced by ionizing radiation. We first elicited DNA double-strand breaks in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line HOC313-P and its highly metastatic subline HOC313-LM, using Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE), a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate a spot within the nuclei of adhesive cells, and then established irradiated monoclonal sublines from them, respectively. SNP array analysis detected a number of chromosomal copy number alterations (CNAs) in these sublines, and one HOC313-LM-derived monoclonal subline irradiated with 200 protons by the microbeam displayed multiple CNAs involved locally in chromosome 7. Multi-color FISH showed a complex translocation of chromosome 7 involving chromosomes 11 and 12. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing analysis revealed multiple de novo complex chromosomal rearrangements localized in chromosomes 2, 5, 7, and 20, resembling chromothripsis. These findings suggested that localized ionizing irradiation within the nucleus may induce chromothripsis-like complex chromosomal alterations via local DNA damage in the nucleus. PMID:26862731

  8. Detection of Phenotypic Alterations Using High-Content Analysis of Whole-Slide Images.

    PubMed

    Shirinifard, Abbas; Thiagarajan, Suresh; Vogel, Peter; Sablauer, András

    2016-05-01

    Tumors exhibit spatial heterogeneity, as manifested in immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining patterns. Current IHC quantification methods lose information by reducing this heterogeneity in each whole-slide image (WSI) or in selective fields of view to a single staining index. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of an IHC quantification method that uses this heterogeneity to reliably compare IHC staining patterns. We virtually partitioned WSIs by a grid of square tiles, and computed the staining index distributions to quantify heterogeneities. We used samples from these distributions as inputs to non-parametric statistical comparisons. We applied our grid method to fixed tumor samples from 26 tumors obtained from a double-blind preclinical study of a patient-derived orthotopic xenograft model of pediatric neuroblastoma in CD1 nude mice. We compared the results of our grid method to the results based on whole-slide indices, the current practice. We show that our grid method reliably detects phenotypic alterations that other tests based on whole-slide indices fail to detect. Based on robustness and increased sensitivity of statistical inference, we conclude that our method of whole-slide grid quantification is superior to existing whole-slide quantification techniques. PMID:27026297

  9. "Deafness" effects in detecting alterations to auditory feedback during sequence production.

    PubMed

    Pfordresher, Peter Q

    2014-01-01

    Past research has shown that when discrete responses are associated with a perceptual goal, performers may have difficulty detecting stimuli that are commensurate with that goal. Three experiments are reported here that test whether such effects extend to sequence production. In Experiment 1, participants performed 8-note melodies repeatedly, and on each trial a single tone could be altered with respect to its pitch and/or synchrony with actions. Results suggested a selective deficit of detection when feedback pitch was unchanged and the event was slightly delayed. Experiment 2 showed that this "deafness" to feedback is limited to rhythmic motor tasks that require sequencing, in that similar effects did not emerge when participants produced pitch sequences by tapping a single key repeatedly. A third experiment demonstrated similar results to Experiment 1 when the mapping of keys to pitches on the keyboard was reversed. Taken together, results suggest a selective deafness to response-congruent delayed feedback, consistent with the idea that performers suppress previously planned events during production. PMID:23344903

  10. First-trimester combined screening is effective for the detection of unbalanced chromosomal translocations at 11 to 12 weeks of gestation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shangyu; Chang, Chialin; Cheng, Pojen; Hsiao, Chinghua; Soong, Yungkuei; Duan, Tao

    2014-05-01

    The first trimester combined screening, which analyzes fetal nuchal translucency and levels of free β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) in maternal serum, is routinely used to detect abnormal pregnancies associated with Down syndrome and other trisomy aneuploidies. Based on the hypothesis that major chromosomal translocations could lead to similar biochemical and developmental outcomes during early embryo development, we compared these markers among pregnancies with normal, balanced, or unbalanced fetal karyotypes. Among the parents, 71 (73%) carry balanced reciprocal translocation and 26 (27%) have Robertsonian translocation. Of the 97 pregnancies tested, 39 (40%), 37 (37%), and 22 (23%) fetuses had normal karyotype, balanced chromosomal translocations, and unbalanced chromosomal translocations, respectively. Importantly, we found that pregnancies with an unbalanced translocation had significantly higher free β-hCG multiple of the median (MoM) and larger nuchal translucency thickness than those with normal karyotype or balanced translocations. Analysis showed that the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) is 0.716, 0.820, and 0.936 for free β-hCG MoM, PAPP-A MoM, and fetal nuchal translucency, respectively. When these 3 independent factors were combined, the AUC reached 0.976. In addition, logistic regression showed that the most optimal model for predicting an unbalanced chromosomal translocation is a combination of PAPP-A and nuchal translucency with an AUC of 0.980. Therefore, the first trimester combined screening is not only effective in the screening of Down syndrome and other trisomy abnormalities but also has high sensitivity for the detection of unbalanced chromosomal translocations in fetuses. PMID:24177714

  11. Artifically inserting a reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat into a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Marek's disease virus (MDV) alters expression of nearby MDV genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) was inserted into the very virulent Marek’s disease virus (MDV) Md5 bacterial artificial chromosome clone. The insertion site was nearly identical to the REV LTR that was naturally inserted into the JM/102W strain of MDV fo...

  12. Capturing Chromosome Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Job; Rippe, Karsten; Dekker, Martijn; Kleckner, Nancy

    2002-02-01

    We describe an approach to detect the frequency of interaction between any two genomic loci. Generation of a matrix of interaction frequencies between sites on the same or different chromosomes reveals their relative spatial disposition and provides information about the physical properties of the chromatin fiber. This methodology can be applied to the spatial organization of entire genomes in organisms from bacteria to human. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we could confirm known qualitative features of chromosome organization within the nucleus and dynamic changes in that organization during meiosis. We also analyzed yeast chromosome III at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. We found that chromatin is highly flexible throughout. Furthermore, functionally distinct AT- and GC-rich domains were found to exhibit different conformations, and a population-average 3D model of chromosome III could be determined. Chromosome III emerges as a contorted ring.

  13. Detection of alterations in testicular and epididymal function in laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, R.P.

    1986-12-01

    The potential impact of an agent altering male reproductive function is greater for humans than for animals. Consequently, it is essential that sensitive criteria be used to look for effects on a multiplicity of target sites when an agent is evaluated using an animal model. No animal model has reproductive characteristics similar to those of humans, but this does not negate the validity of using animal models. Classic methodologies for reproductive toxicology are limited by the approaches used for subjective evaluation of testicular histology and use of natural mating for fertility tests. After dosing for an interval at least equal to six times the duration of one cycle of the seminiferous epithelium, sperm from ejaculated semen or the cauda epididymidis can be evaluated for normalacy of morphology or function and should be used for artificial insemination of females to critically evaluate fertility. Normal males of animals models ejaculate a great excess of sperm. Artificial insemination of a critical number of sperm, selected to result in slightly less than maximal fertility for control animals, will maximize the probability of detecting a decrease in fertility if the same critical number of sperm is inseminated for treated animals as for control animals. Testicular function should be evaluated by objective, rather than subjective, criteria. Among the more sensitive criteria of testicular function are the minor diameter of essentially round seminiferous tubules, the ratio of leptotene spermatocytes to Sertoli cells, the corrected numbers of germ cells per seminiferous tubule cross section, and the number of homogenization-resistant spermatids per testis.

  14. DNA Profiling of B Chromosomes from the Yellow-necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (Rodentia, Mammalia)

    PubMed Central

    Tanić, Nikola; Dedović, Nasta; Vujos̆ević, Mladen; Dimitrijević, Bogomir

    2000-01-01

    Using AP-PCR-based DNA profiling we examined some structural features of B chromosomes from yellow-necked mice Apodemus flavicollis. Mice harboring one, two, or three or lacking B chromosomes were examined. Chromosomal structure was scanned for variant bands by using a series of arbitrary primers and from these, informative bands were selected. The selection criteria used were the ability to differentiate between individuals of the species, to detect markers common for both A and B chromosomes, and, importantly, to differentiate between A- and B-chromosome sets. In addition to primers, profiling conditions were found to be critical for meeting the selection criteria. Primers and analysis conditions that demonstrated structural characteristics unique to the B-chromosome set are described. These characteristics included variant bands as qualitative parameters and altered electrophoretic band intensities as quantitative distinctions estimated by integration of densitometric profiles of electrophoretograms. B chromosome-specific molecular markers are easy to detect by AP-PCR-based DNA profiling in the presence of a full set of A chromosomes. Models for the origin of yellow-necked mouse B chromosomes are discussed in the context of presented data. PMID:10645950

  15. Microdissected double-minute DNA detects variable patterns of chromosomal localizations and multiple abundantly expressed transcripts in normal and leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, S.; Zhou, Hongyi; Stass, S.A.; Sen, P. ); Mulac-Jericevic, B.; Pirrotta, V. )

    1994-02-01

    Double-minute (dm) chromosomes are cytogenetically resolvable DNA amplification-mediating acentric extrachromosomal structures that are commonly seen in primary tumors, tumor cell lines, and drug-resistant cells grown in vitro. Selective isolation of dm DNAs with standard molecular biological techniques is difficult, and thus, detailed studies to elucidate their structure, site of chromosomal origin, and chromosomal reintegration patterns have been limited. In those instances in which a gene has been localized on dms, characterization of the remainder of the DNA, which far exceeds the size of the gene identified, has remained inconclusive. dms seen in the acute myeloid leukemia cell line HL-60 have been shown to harbor the c-myc protooncogene. In this paper, the authors report the successful isolation of the dm-specific DNAs from these cells by the microdissection/polymerase chain reaction technique and demonstrate that the dm DNAs derived from a single discrete normal chromosome segment 8q24.1-q24.2 reintegrate at various specific locations in the leukemic cells. The microdissected dm DNA detects multiple abundantly expressed transcripts distinct from c-myc mRNA on Northern blots. By devising a [open quotes]transcript selection[close quotes] strategy, they cloned the partial genomic sequence of a gene from the microdissected DNA that encodes two of these RNAs. This strategy will be generally applicable for rapid cloning of unknown amplified genes harbored on dms. With DNA from 20 microdissected dms, they constructed a genomic library of about 20,000 recombinant microclones with an average insert size of about 450 bp. The microclones should help in isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones for high-resolution physical mapping of dms in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, application of the microdissection technique appears to be an extremely feasible approach to characterization of dms in other cell types. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Detection of hydrothermal alteration at Virginia City, Nevada using Airborne Imaging Spectrometry (AIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsinpiller, A.; Taranik, J. V.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data were collected over Virginia City, Nevada; an area of gold and silver mineralization with extensive surface exposures of altered volcanic rocks. The data were corrected for atmospheric effects by a flat-field method, and compared to library spectra of various alteration minerals using a spectral analysis program SPAM. Areas of strong clay alteration were identified on the AIS images that were mapped as kaolinitic, illitic, and sericitic alterations zones. Kaolinitic alteration is distinguishable in the 2.1 to 2.4 and 1.2 to 1.5 micrometer wavelength regions. Montmorillonite, illite, and sericite have absorption features similar to each other at 2.2 micrometer wavelength. Montnorillonite and illite also may be present in varying proportions within one Ground Instantaneous Field of View (GIFOV). In general AIS data is useful in identifying alteration zones that are associated with or lie above precious metal mineralization at Virginia City.

  17. Alterations of ATM and CADM1 in chromosomal 11q22.3-23.2 region are associated with the development of invasive cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mazumder Indra, Dipanjana; Mitra, Sraboni; Roy, Anup; Mondal, Ranajit Kumar; Basu, Partha Sarathi; Roychoudhury, Susanta; Chakravarty, Runu; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2011-12-01

    To understand the importance of chr11q22.3-23.2 region in the development of cervical cancer, we have studied the genetic and epigenetic alterations of the candidate genes ATM, PPP2R1B, SDHD and CADM1 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical carcinoma (CACX) samples. Our study revealed low expression and high alterations (methylation/deletion) (55-59%) of ATM and CADM1 genes along with poor patient outcome. The alterations of ATM and CADM1 are associated with the progression of tumor from CIN to Stage I/II, thus implying their role in early invasiveness. The two genes, PPP2R1B and SDHD, lying in between ATM and CADM1, have low frequency of alterations, and majority of the alterations are in CACX samples, indicating that their alterations might be associated with disease progression. Expressions (mRNA/protein) of the genes showed concordance with their molecular alterations. Significant co-alteration of ATM and CADM1 points to their synergic action for the development of CACX. Mutation is, however, a rare phenomenon for inactivation of ATM. Association between the alteration of ATM and CHEK1 and poor survival of the patients having co-alterations of ATM and CHEK1 points to the DNA damage response pathway disruption in development of CACX. Thus, our data suggest that inactivation of ATM-CHEK1-associated DNA damage response pathway and CADM1-associated signaling network might have an important role in the development of CACX. PMID:21643982

  18. Automatic aberration scoring using whole chromosome F. I. S. H

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, J.; Bayley, R.; Boyle, S.; Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Gordon, J.; Hill, W.; Ji, L.; Malloy, P.; Perry, P.; Rutovitz, D.; Stark, M.; Whale, D. )

    1993-01-01

    A radiation-induced rearrangement involving a painted and a non-painted chromosome will usually result in two partly-painted chromosomes, typically either a dicentric chromosome and associated fragment, or a reciprocal translocation pair. A consequence of such a rearrangement is that the number of painted image regions in the metaphase is increased by one, and their size distribution is altered. More complex rearrangements are uncommon, particularly at low doses. A high proportion of damaged cells can therefore be registered simply by detecting when the distribution of painted components differs from the expected number and size. A system has been constructed to pre-screen for damaged cells. It comprises automatic fluorescence metaphase finding followed by relocation and digitization of probe and counterstain channels at high resolution. Fully automatic segmentation in counterstain discriminates chromosomes from interphase nuclei and determines whether a metaphase is approximately diploid. The painted regions are segmented and their relative sizes estimated. Rules are applied which reduce the false positives due to artifacts such as overlapped painted chromosomes. More than 70% of cells with radiation damage involving painted and unpainted chromosomes were detected in a preliminary experiment using a small data set, with a low false positive rate. Results from a larger experiment in progress are presented.

  19. Thermal nociceptive threshold testing detects altered sensory processing in broiler chickens with spontaneous lameness.

    PubMed

    Hothersall, Becky; Caplen, Gina; Parker, Richard M A; Nicol, Christine J; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E; Weeks, Claire A; Murrell, Joanna C

    2014-01-01

    Lameness is common in commercially reared broiler chickens but relationships between lameness and pain (and thus bird welfare) have proved complex, partly because lameness is often partially confounded with factors such as bodyweight, sex and pathology. Thermal nociceptive threshold (TNT) testing explores the neural processing of noxious stimuli, and so can contribute to our understanding of pain. Using an acute model of experimentally induced articular pain, we recently demonstrated that TNT was reduced in lame broiler chickens, and was subsequently attenuated by administration of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). This study extended these findings to a large sample of commercial broilers. It examined factors affecting thermal threshold (Part 1) and the effect of an NSAID drug (meloxicam, 5 mg/kg) and of an opioid (butorphanol; 4 mg/kg) (Part 2). Spontaneously lame and matched non-lame birds (n=167) from commercial farms were exposed to ramped thermal stimulations via a probe attached to the lateral aspect of the tarsometatarsus. Baseline skin temperature and temperature at which a behavioural avoidance response occurred (threshold) were recorded. In Part 1 bird characteristics influencing threshold were modelled; In Part 2 the effect of subcutaneous administration of meloxicam or butorphanol was investigated. Unexpectedly, after accounting for other influences, lameness increased threshold significantly (Part 1). In Part 2, meloxicam affected threshold differentially: it increased further in lame birds and decreased in non-lame birds. No effect of butorphanol was detected. Baseline skin temperature was also consistently a significant predictor of threshold. Overall, lameness significantly influenced threshold after other bird characteristics were taken into account. This, and a differential effect of meloxicam on lame birds, suggests that nociceptive processing may be altered in lame birds, though mechanisms for this require further investigation

  20. Detection of aneuploidy in sperm of an ataxia telangiectasia patient using three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, X.R.; Baulch, J.E.; Arnheim, N.

    1994-09-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is an inherited, recessive, cancer-prone disorder. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA probes specific for three chromosomes was applied to sperm of an A-T patient to determine if there may be an increased germinal risk for aneuploidy. Air-dried sperm smears were treated with proteinase K and were decondensed with DTT and LIS. The slides were then hybridized with fluorescently labeled repetitive DNA probes specific for chromosomes X, Y and 8, and a total of 11,825 sperm cells were scored. The ratio of sperm bearing X-8 and Y-8 was 1:1, as predicted. The frequencies of hyperhaploidy were 3.9, 1.0, 17.6 and 7.8 per 10,000 cells for categories X-X-8, Y-Y-8, X-Y-8 and 8-8-(X or Y), respectively, In addition, the frequency of diploidy (X-Y-8-8) was 18.6 and auto-diploidies (X-X-8-8 and Y-Y-8-8) were 1.0 and 2.0, respectively. These frequencies were not significantly different when compared with levels in healthy men (p > 0.1). Our finding suggests that chromosome X, Y and 8 aneuploidies are not elevated in the sperm of A-T patients, but studies with additional patients and chromosomes are needed.

  1. DETECTING STREAM INVERTEBRATE COMMUNITY ALTERATION DUE TO MID TO LOW LEVELS OF WATERSHED LANDSCAPE MODIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of an investigation into the effects of watershed landscape alteration on stream ecosystems, quantitative invertebrate samples were collected from riffles in 26 second and third order south shore Lake Superior streams. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination ...

  2. International, collaborative assessment of limitations of chromosome-specific probes (CSP) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH): Analysis of expected detections in 73,000 prenatal cases

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.I.; Henry, G.P.; Miller, W.A.

    1994-09-01

    FISH and CSP have been proposed to reduce karyotyping need. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential efficacy of CSP-FISH using currently available probes (13, 18, 21, X, & Y) in large, prenatal diagnostic centers. Results (1990-1993) from 7 centers in 4 countries were divided by those expected to be detectable by currently available probes, and those which would be missed assuming 10% probe efficacy. 72,994 karyotypes included 699 trisomy 21`s, 352 trisomy 18`s, 136 trisomy 13`s, 358 sex chromosome aneuploidies, 70 triploidies, and 855 others (translocations, inversions, deletions, markers). Of 2,613 abnormalities, 1,745 would be detectable (66.8%). [Detroit 55.7%, Stockholm 68.3%, Boston 52.6%, Denver 61.3%, Muenster 77.0%, London 84.5%, Philadelphia 69.4%]. Centers with high proportions of referrals for ultrasound anomalies had the highest CSP-FISH positives secondary to increased T 18 & 13. We conclude: (1) 73,000 karyotypes show relatively consistent incidences of the common trisomies, sex chromosome abnormalities, and other chromosome abnormalities among the centers. (2) The proportion expected detectable by FISH-CSP technology varies from 52.6% to 84.5%, averaging 66.8%. (3) 1/3 of the karyotypic abnormalities would be missed, and therefore, replacement of complete karyotyping with FISH would have unacceptably high false-negative rates for routine evaluation. (4) FISH-CSP, while useful when positive for anomalies, is not sufficient when negative to obviate the need for a complete karyotype.

  3. Detection of Hereditary 1,25-Hydroxyvitamin D-Resistant Rickets Caused by Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 12 Using Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Mayuko; Isojima, Tsuyoshi; Kawashima, Minae; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamamoto, Keiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Namba, Noriyuki; Oka, Akira; Ozono, Keiichi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kitanaka, Sachiko

    2015-01-01

    Context Hereditary 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by biallelic mutations in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene. No patients have been reported with uniparental disomy (UPD). Objective Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to confirm whether HVDRR was caused by UPD of chromosome 12. Materials and Methods A 2-year-old girl with alopecia and short stature and without any family history of consanguinity was diagnosed with HVDRR by typical laboratory data findings and clinical features of rickets. Sequence analysis of VDR was performed, and the origin of the homozygous mutation was investigated by target SNP sequencing, short tandem repeat analysis, and genome-wide SNP array. Results The patient had a homozygous p.Arg73Ter nonsense mutation. Her mother was heterozygous for the mutation, but her father was negative. We excluded gross deletion of the father’s allele or paternal discordance. Genome-wide SNP array of the family (the patient and her parents) showed complete maternal isodisomy of chromosome 12. She was successfully treated with high-dose oral calcium. Conclusions This is the first report of HVDRR caused by UPD, and the third case of complete UPD of chromosome 12, in the published literature. Genome-wide SNP array was useful for detecting isodisomy and the parental origin of the allele. Comprehensive examination of the homozygous state is essential for accurate genetic counseling of recurrence risk and appropriate monitoring for other chromosome 12 related disorders. Furthermore, oral calcium therapy was effective as an initial treatment for rickets in this instance. PMID:26153892

  4. Detecting Sex-Biased Gene Flow in African-Americans through the Analysis of Intra- and Inter-Population Variation at Mitochondrial DNA and Y- Chromosome Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Battaggia, C; Anagnostou, P; Bosch, I; Brisighelli, F; Destro-Bisol, G; Capocasa, M

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on variations at the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) and at seven Y-chromosome microsatellites in an African-American population sample from Chicago, IL, USA. Our results support the hypothesis that the population studied had undergone a European male-biased gene flow. We show that comparisons of intra-and inter-population diversity parameters between African-Americans, Europeans and Africans may help detect sex-biased gene flow, providing a complement to quantitative methods to estimate genetic admixture. PMID:24052726

  5. SNPs detection in DHPS-WDR83 overlapping genes mapping on porcine chromosome 2 in a QTL region for meat pH

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The pH is an important parameter influencing technological quality of pig meat, a trait affected by environmental and genetic factors. Several quantitative trait loci associated to meat pH are described on PigQTL database but only two genes influencing this parameter have been so far detected: Ryanodine receptor 1 and Protein kinase, AMP-activated, gamma 3 non-catalytic subunit. To search for genes influencing meat pH we analyzed genomic regions with quantitative effect on this trait in order to detect SNPs to use for an association study. Results The expressed sequences mapping on porcine chromosomes 1, 2, 3 in regions associated to pork pH were searched in silico to find SNPs. 356 out of 617 detected SNPs were used to genotype Italian Large White pigs and to perform an association analysis with meat pH values recorded in semimembranosus muscle at about 1 hour (pH1) and 24 hours (pHu) post mortem. The results of the analysis showed that 5 markers mapping on chromosomes 1 or 3 were associated with pH1 and 10 markers mapping on chromosomes 1 or 2 were associated with pHu. After False Discovery Rate correction only one SNP mapping on chromosome 2 was confirmed to be associated to pHu. This polymorphism was located in the 3’UTR of two partly overlapping genes, Deoxyhypusine synthase (DHPS) and WD repeat domain 83 (WDR83). The overlapping of the 3’UTRs allows the co-regulation of mRNAs stability by a cis-natural antisense transcript method of regulation. DHPS catalyzes the first step in hypusine formation, a unique amino acid formed by the posttranslational modification of the protein eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A in a specific lysine residue. WDR83 has an important role in the modulation of a cascade of genes involved in cellular hypoxia defense by intensifying the glycolytic pathway and, theoretically, the meat pH value. Conclusions The involvement of the SNP detected in the DHPS/WDR83 genes on meat pH phenotypic variability and their

  6. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  7. Persisting ring chromosomes detected by mFISH in lymphocytes of a cancer patient-a case report.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Sabine; Pinkawa, Michael; Eble, Michael J; Kriehuber, Ralf

    2013-08-30

    We report the case of an 84 years old prostate cancer patient with severe side effects after radiotherapy in 2006. He was cytogenetically analysed in 2009 and in 2012 in a comparative study for individual radiosensitivity of prostate cancer patients. No other patient had clonal aberrations, but this patient showed ring chromosomes in the range of 21-25% of lymphocytes. He received 5 cycles of 5-fluorouracil/folic acid for chemotherapy of sigmoid colon carcinoma in 2003, three years before radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Blood samples were irradiated ex vivo with Cs-137 γ-rays (0.7Gy/min) in the G0-phase of the cell cycle. 100 FISH painted metaphases were analysed for the control and the irradiated samples each. Multicolour in situ hybridisation techniques like mFISH and mBand as well as MYC locus, telomere and centromere painting probes were used to characterise ring metaphases. Metaphase search and autocapture was performed with a Zeiss Axioplan 2 imaging microscope followed by scoring and image analysis using Metafer 4/ISIS software (MetaSystems). In 2009 chromosome 8 rings were found in about 25% of lymphocytes. Rings were stable over time and increased to about 30% until 2012. The ring chromosome 8 always lacked telomere signals and a small amount of rings displayed up to four centromere signals. In aberrant metaphases 8pter and 8qter were either translocated or deleted. Further analyses revealed that the breakpoint at the p arm is localised at 8p21.2-22. The breakpoint at the q arm turned out to be distal from the MYC locus at 8q23-24. We hypothesise that the ring chromosome 8 has been developed during the 5 FU/folic acid treatments in 2003. The long term persistence might be due to clonal expansion of a damaged but viable hematopoietic stem cell giving rise to cycling progenitor cells that permit cell survival and proliferation. PMID:23792211

  8. The prognostic value of FISH as an adjunct to conventional cytogenetics for the detection of cryptic gene rearrangements on chromosome 16. A retrospective investigation of 13 patients from Northern Ireland diagnosed with M4Eo acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    McGrattan, P; Humphreys, M W

    2003-05-01

    M4Eo acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients with the typical chromosome 16 abnormalities have a favourable prognosis. These subtle 16q22 gene rearrangements can be difficult to detect by conventional cytogenetic methods and if missed could lead to the incorrect assignment of prognostic group and hence subsequent treatment strategies. We retrospectively studied 13 patients diagnosed with M4Eo AML for such chromosome 16 abnormalities comparing conventional cytogenetic (G-banding) and molecular (FISH) methods. G-banded analysis detected only 2 patients with definite chromosome 16 abnormalities whereas FISH detected 4 patients, one with the typical inversion and three with the typical chromosome 16 translocation. FISH analysis also confirmed a false +ve G-banded result in one patient and a false -ve G-banded result in another patient. Finally, FISH confirmed a deletion of one chromosome 16 homologue in another patient indicating a poor prognosis. The overall survival of patients with the typical 16q22 rearrangements (n=4) was also significantly better (P=0.007) than patients with normal chromosome 16 homologues or having other numerical and/or structural abnormalities (n=9). This set of data shows that FISH is a more accurate method for the detection of cryptic 16q22 gene rearrangements and because of the prognostic implications has become a mandatory test along with conventional cytogenetics for all newly diagnosed M4Eo AML patients in Northern Ireland. PMID:12868698

  9. Detection and molecular cytogenetic characterization of a novel ring chromosome in a histological variant of Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Szuhai, Károly; IJszenga, Marije; Tanke, Hans J; Taminiau, Antonie H M; de Schepper, Arthur; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Rosenberg, Carla; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2007-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET) is a round-cell sarcoma that may show varying degrees of neuro-ectodermal differentiation. These tumors are identified by a characteristic round-cell morphology and immunohistochemical profile, as well as by specific translocations involving the EWS gene on chromosome 22 and the 3' portion of the E26 transformation-specific family of transcription factors. These translocations result in fusion proteins that act as aberrant transcription factors. The majority of Ewing sarcoma cases are characterized by a balanced t(11;22). Specific chromosomal abnormalities often correlate with distinct morphologic or phenotypic subtypes of tumors and play an important role in prognosis. Here we describe the molecular cytogenetic investigation of a case of Ewing sarcoma in the proximal humerus of a 39-year-old male using COBRA (combined binary ratio labelling) fluorescent in situ hybridization karyotyping, array comparative genomic hybridization, and EWS-gene specific fluorescence in situ hybridization. Multiple chromosomal aberrations were identified, including a der(22)r(20;22), resulting in an amplification of the proximal region of the EWS gene. This is the first time that both translocation and amplification involving the EWS gene and an unidentified gene are described. This case adds to the spectrum of both morphology and genetic rearrangements in Ewing sarcoma, and shows the importance of combined molecular cytogenetic approaches in identifying uncommon rearrangements in sarcomas. PMID:17175374

  10. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system.

  11. Genome‐wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis‐regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Rodrigo R. R.; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P.; Murray, Robin M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32‐q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele‐specific expression to assess cis‐regulatory effects associated with the two best‐supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis‐effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004590

  12. Genome-wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis-regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rodrigo R R; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P; Murray, Robin M; Bray, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32-q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele-specific expression to assess cis-regulatory effects associated with the two best-supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis-effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004590

  13. Detection of alteration associated with a porphyry copper deposit in southern Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M. J.; Siegal, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing of Landsat MSS data was performed using contrast stretching and band-to-band ratioing. A false color ratio composite picture showed color anomalies which coincided with known areas of alteration on and about Red Mountain. A helicopter survey of the study area was undertaken using a portable field reflectance spectrometer. One hundred fifty-six spectra were obtained in the 0.4 to 2.5 micrometer wavelength region. The spectra were digitized, and contour maps for 24 wavelength intervals were produced; no spectral anomalies were evident for the known altered areas. A contour map produced from the 1.6 and 2.2 micrometer ratio generally delineated the alteration areas. The 1.3, 1.6, and 2.2 micrometer wavelength data were canonically transformed using a transformation empirically derived from discriminant function analysis of altered and unaltered materials for the Goldfield, Nevada region, and a contour map was produced for the first canonical variable. The known areas of alteration were clearly defined on the contour map.

  14. The hippocampi of children with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have localized anterior alterations that predict severity of anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Julia A.; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi; Kalish, Kristopher; Lee, Aaron; Hunsaker, Michael R.; Schumann, Cynthia M.; Carmichael, Owen T.; Simon, Tony J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have an elevated risk for schizophrenia, which increases with history of childhood anxiety. Altered hippocampal morphology is a common neuroanatomical feature of 22q11.2DS and idiopathic schizophrenia. Relating hippocampal structure in children with 22q11.2DS to anxiety and impaired cognitive ability could lead to hippocampus-based characterization of psychosis-proneness in this at-risk population. Methods We measured hippocampal volume using a semiautomated approach on MRIs collected from typically developing children and children with 22q11.2DS. We then analyzed hippocampal morphology with Localized Components Analysis. We tested the modulating roles of diagnostic group, hippocampal volume, sex and age on local hippocampal shape components. Lastly, volume and shape components were tested as covariates of IQ and anxiety. Results We included 48 typically developing children and 69 children with 22q11.2DS in our study. Hippocampal volume was reduced bilaterally in children with 22q11.2DS, and these children showed greater variation in the shape of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Children with 22q11.2DS had greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus than typically developing children. Greater inward deformation of the anterior hippocampus was associated with greater severity of anxiety, specifically fear of physical injury, within the 22q11.2DS group. Limitations Shape alterations are not specific to hippocampal subfields. Conclusion Alterations in the structure of the anterior hippocampus likely affect function and may impact limbic circuitry. We suggest these alterations potentially contribute to anxiety symptoms in individuals with 22q11.2DS through modulatory pathways. Altered hippocampal morphology may be uniquely linked to anxiety risk factors for schizophrenia, which could be a powerful neuroanatomical marker of schizophrenia risk and hence protection

  15. Live cell detection of chromosome 2 deletion and Sfpi1/PU1 loss in radiation-induced mouse acute myeloid leukaemia☆

    PubMed Central

    Olme, C.-H.; Finnon, R.; Brown, N.; Kabacik, S.; Bouffler, S.D.; Badie, C.

    2013-01-01

    The CBA/H mouse model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML) has been studied for decades to bring to light the molecular mechanisms associated with multistage carcinogenesis. A specific interstitial deletion of chromosome 2 found in a high proportion of rAML is recognised as the initiating event. The deletion leads to the loss of Sfpi, a gene essential for haematopoietic development. Its product, the transcription factor PU.1 acts as a tumour suppressor in this model. Although the deletion can be detected early following ionising radiation exposure by cytogenetic techniques, precise characterisation of the haematopoietic cells carrying the deletion and the study of their fate in vivo cannot be achieved. Here, using a genetically engineered C57BL/6 mouse model expressing the GFP fluorescent molecule under the control of the Sfpi1 promoter, which we have bred onto the rAML-susceptible CBA/H strain, we demonstrate that GFP expression did not interfere with X-ray induced leukaemia incidence and that GFP fluorescence in live leukaemic cells is a surrogate marker of radiation-induced chromosome 2 deletions with or without point mutations on the remaining allele of the Sfpi1 gene. This study presents the first experimental evidence for the detection of this leukaemia initiating event in live leukemic cells. PMID:23806234

  16. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  17. Genomic signatures of chromosomal instability and osteosarcoma progression detected by high resolution array CGH and interphase FISH.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, S; Yoshimoto, M; Ludkovski, O; Park, P C; Bayani, J; Thorner, P; Maire, G; Squire, J A; Zielenska, M

    2008-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is characterized by an unstable karyotype which typically has a heterogeneous pattern of complex chromosomal abnormalities. High-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in combination with interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses provides a complete description of genomic imbalances together with an evaluation of the contribution of cell-to-cell variation to copy number changes. There have been no analyses to date documenting genomic signatures consistent with chromosomal instability mechanisms in OS tumors using array CGH. In this study, we utilized high-resolution array CGH to identify and characterize recurrent signatures of genomic imbalances using ten OS tumors. Comparison between the genomic profiles identified tumor groups with low, intermediate and high levels of genomic imbalance. Bands 6p22-->p21, 8q24 and 17p12--> p11.2 were consistently involved in high copy gain or amplification events. Since these three locations have been consistently associated with OS oncogenesis, FISH probes from each cytoband were used to derive an index of cellular heterogeneity for copy number within each region. OS with the highest degree of genomic imbalance also exhibited the most extreme cell-to-cell copy number variation. Significantly, the three OS with the most imbalance and genomic copy number heterogeneity also had the poorest response to preoperative chemotherapy. This genome wide analysis is the first utilizing oligonucleotide array CGH in combination with FISH analysis to derive genomic signatures of chromosomal instability in OS tumors by studying genomic imbalance and intercellular heterogeneity. This comprehensive genomic screening approach provides important insights concerning the mechanisms responsible for generating complex genomes. The resulting phenotypic diversity can generate tumors with a propensity for an aggressive disease course. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms leading to OS

  18. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  19. Genomic in situ hybridization analysis of Thinopyrum chromatin in a wheat-Th. intermedium partial amphiploid and six derived chromosome addition lines

    PubMed

    Chen; Conner; Laroche; Ji; Armstrong; Fedak

    1999-12-01

    The genomic origin of alien chromosomes present in a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium partial amphiploid TAF46 (2n = 8x = 56) and six derived chromosome addition lines were analyzed by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using S genomic DNA from Pseudoroegneria strigosa (2n = 2x = 14, SS) as a probe. The GISH analysis clearly showed that the chromosome complement of the partial amphiploid TAF46 consists of an entire wheat genome plus one synthetic genome consisting of a mixture of six S genome chromosomes and eight J (=E) genome chromosomes derived from Th. intermedium (2n = 6x = 42, JJJ(s)J(s)SS). There were no Js genome chromosomes present in TAF46. The J genome chromosomes present in TAF46 displayed a unique GISH hybridization pattern with the S genomic DNA probe, in which S genome DNA strongly hybridized at the terminal regions and weakly hybridized over the remaining parts of the chromosomes. This provides a diagnostic marker for distinguishing J genome chromosomes from Js or S genome or wheat ABD genome chromosomes. The genomic origin of the alien chromosomes present in the six derived chromosome addition lines were identified by their characteristic GISH hybridization patterns with S genomic DNA probe. GISH analysis showed that addition lines L1, L2, L3, and L5 carried one pair of J genome chromosomes, while addition lines L4 and L7 each carried one pair of S genome chromosomes. GISH patterns detected by the S genome probe on addition line of L1 were identical to those of the J genome chromosomes present in the partial amphiploid TAF46, suggesting that these chromosomes were not structurally altered when they were transferred from TAF46 to addition lines. PMID:10659790

  20. Tumor-induced lymph node alterations detected by MRI lymphography using gadolinium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, S. C.; Kurland, B. F.; Liu, C.-L.; Ho, R. J. Y.; Ruddell, A.

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI lymphography shows potential to identify alterations in lymph drainage through lymph nodes (LNs) in cancer and other diseases. MRI studies have typically used low molecular weight gadolinium contrast agents, however larger gadolinium-loaded nanoparticles possess characteristics that could improve the specificity and sensitivity of lymphography. The performance of three gadolinium contrast agents with different sizes and properties was compared by 3T MRI after subcutaneous injection. Mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma footpad tumors were imaged to assess tumor-induced alterations in lymph drainage through tumor-draining popliteal and inguinal LNs versus contralateral uninvolved drainage. Gadolinium lipid nanoparticles were able to identify tumor-induced alterations in contrast agent drainage into the popliteal LN, while lower molecular weight or albumin-binding gadolinium agents were less effective. All of the contrast agents distributed in foci around the cortex and medulla of tumor-draining popliteal LNs, while they were restricted to the cortex of non-draining LNs. Surprisingly, second-tier tumor-draining inguinal LNs exhibited reduced uptake, indicating that tumors can also divert LN drainage. These characteristics of tumor-induced lymph drainage could be useful for diagnosis of LN pathology in cancer and other diseases. The preferential uptake of nanoparticle contrasts into tumor-draining LNs could also allow selective targeting of therapies to tumor-draining LNs. PMID:26497382

  1. PTEN loss and chromosome 8 alterations in Gleason grade 3 prostate cancer cores predicts the presence of un-sampled grade 4 tumor: implications for active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Trock, Bruce J; Fedor, Helen; Gurel, Bora; Jenkins, Robert B; Knudsen, B S; Fine, Samson W; Said, Jonathan W; Carter, H Ballentine; Lotan, Tamara L; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-07-01

    Men who enter active surveillance because their biopsy exhibits only Gleason grade 3 (G3) frequently have higher grade tumor missed by biopsy. Thus, biomarkers are needed that, when measured on G3 tissue, can predict the presence of higher grade tumor in the whole prostate. We evaluated whether PTEN loss, chromosome 8q gain (MYC) and/or 8p loss (LPL) measured only on G3 cores is associated with un-sampled G4 tumor. A tissue microarray was constructed of prostatectomy tissue from patients whose prostates exhibited only Gleason score 3+3, only 3+4 or only 4+3 tumor (n=50 per group). Cores sampled only from areas of G3 were evaluated for PTEN loss by immunohistochemistry, and PTEN deletion, LPL/8p loss and MYC/8q gain by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Biomarker results were compared between Gleason score 6 vs 7 tumors using conditional logistic regression. PTEN protein loss, odds ratio=4.99, P=0.033; MYC/8q gain, odds ratio=5.36, P=0.010; and LPL/8p loss, odds ratio=3.96, P=0.003 were significantly more common in G3 cores derived from Gleason 7 vs Gleason 6 tumors. PTEN gene deletion was not statistically significant. Associations were stronger comparing Gleason 4+3 vs 6 than for Gleason 3+4 vs 6. MYC/8q gain, LPL/8p loss and PTEN protein loss measured in G3 tissue microarray cores strongly differentiate whether the core comes from a Gleason 6 or Gleason 7 tumor. If validated to predict upgrading from G3 biopsy to prostatectomy these biomarkers could reduce the likelihood of enrolling high-risk men and facilitate safe patient selection for active surveillance. PMID:27080984

  2. Alteration mineralogy and geochemistry as an exploration tool for detecting basement heat sources in sedimentary basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Tonguc; Gasparon, Massimo; van Zyl, Jacobus; Wyborn, Doone

    2010-05-01

    The Cooper Basin located in South Australia and Queensland hosts some of the hottest granites in the world at economic drilling depths (240°C at 3.5 km). Investigating the mechanism of heat-producing element enrichment in the Cooper Basin granite is crucial for understanding hot-dry rock geothermal systems and developing exploration strategies. Trace element (by ICP-MS) and stable isotope geochemistry of whole rock granite samples and hydrothermal phyllosilicate alteration minerals separated from the granite and overlying sandstones and mudstones of the Cooper Basin were examined in detail. Granite core samples from relatively shallow depths in Moomba 1 and Big Lake 1 are strongly altered with pervasive sericite (illite) and quartz precipitation, probably associated with intense micro-fracturing and veining. The intensity of hydrothermal alteration is less in deeper samples from Mcleod 1, Jolokia and Habanero 1. Highly altered granites from former holes are substantially enriched in lithophile elements, particularly in Cs, Rb, Be, Th, U and rare earth elements (REE) relative to the upper continental crust (UCC). U and Th contents with concentrations of up to 30 and 144 ppm, respectively, are 10 and 13 times higher than those of the UCC. Comparison of the trace element composition of the same samples dissolved by open beaker acid digestion and high-pressure acid bomb digestion (to dissolve zircon) shows that zircon is not the main repository of U and Th in the Cooper Basin granite. Instead, we propose that the enrichment of heat-producing elements was promoted by a regional hydrothermal event leading to the precipitation of U and Th- bearing minerals such as illite, K-feldspar and thorite. Crystallinity index (illite crystallinity) of the sericite indicates hydrothermal temperatures ranging from 250°C (in Moomba 1 and Big Lake 1) to 350°C (in McLeod 1 and Jolokia 1). In the overlying sedimentary rocks, crystallinity of authigenic illites translates to lower

  3. A New Essential Hypertension Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 2p24-p25, Detected by Genomewide Search

    PubMed Central

    Angius, Andrea; Petretto, Enrico; Maestrale, Giovanni Battista; Forabosco, Paola; Casu, Giuseppina; Piras, Daniela; Fanciulli, Manuela; Falchi, Mario; Melis, Paola Maria; Palermo, Mario; Pirastu, Mario

    2002-01-01

    Essential hypertension (EH) is a complex disorder that results from the interaction of a number of susceptibility genes and environmental factors. We studied an isolated Sardinian village (Talana) in which the prevalence of hypertension is comparable to that in most Western populations. Talana exhibits features, such as slow demographic growth, high inbreeding, a low number of founders, stable lifestyle and culture, and accurate genealogical records, that make it suitable for the study of complex disorders. Clinical assessment of the entire adult population (N=∼1,000) identified ∼100 hypertensive subjects. For our study, we selected the individuals with the most-severe EH (i.e., diastolic blood pressure >100 mm Hg), belonging to a single deep-rooted pedigree (12 generations), whose common ancestors lived in the 17th century. We performed a three-stage genomewide search using 36 affected individuals, by means of parametric linkage and allele-sharing approaches. LOD scores >1 were observed on chromosomes 1, 2, 13, 15, 17, and 19 (stage I). The most striking result was found in a 7.57-cM region on chromosome 2p24-p25. All five nonparametric linkage statistics estimated by the SimWalk2 program lie above the significance threshold of P<.008 for the whole region. Similar significance was obtained for 2p24-25 when parametric linkage (LOD score 1.99) and linkage disequilibrium mapping (P=.00006) were used, suggesting that a hypertension-susceptibility locus is located between D2S2278 and D2S168. This finding is strengthened by a recent report of linkage with marker D2S168 in a hypertensive sib-pair sample from China. PMID:12228842

  4. Global warming alters sound transmission: differential impact on the prey detection ability of echolocating bats

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jinhong; Koselj, Klemen; Zsebők, Sándor; Siemers, Björn M.; Goerlitz, Holger R.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change impacts the biogeography and phenology of plants and animals, yet the underlying mechanisms are little known. Here, we present a functional link between rising temperature and the prey detection ability of echolocating bats. The maximum distance for echo-based prey detection is physically determined by sound attenuation. Attenuation is more pronounced for high-frequency sound, such as echolocation, and is a nonlinear function of both call frequency and ambient temperature. Hence, the prey detection ability, and thus possibly the foraging efficiency, of echolocating bats and susceptible to rising temperatures through climate change. Using present-day climate data and projected temperature rises, we modelled this effect for the entire range of bat call frequencies and climate zones around the globe. We show that depending on call frequency, the prey detection volume of bats will either decrease or increase: species calling above a crossover frequency will lose and species emitting lower frequencies will gain prey detection volume, with crossover frequency and magnitude depending on the local climatic conditions. Within local species assemblages, this may cause a change in community composition. Global warming can thus directly affect the prey detection ability of individual bats and indirectly their interspecific interactions with competitors and prey. PMID:24335559

  5. Global warming alters sound transmission: differential impact on the prey detection ability of echolocating bats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinhong; Koselj, Klemen; Zsebok, Sándor; Siemers, Björn M; Goerlitz, Holger R

    2014-02-01

    Climate change impacts the biogeography and phenology of plants and animals, yet the underlying mechanisms are little known. Here, we present a functional link between rising temperature and the prey detection ability of echolocating bats. The maximum distance for echo-based prey detection is physically determined by sound attenuation. Attenuation is more pronounced for high-frequency sound, such as echolocation, and is a nonlinear function of both call frequency and ambient temperature. Hence, the prey detection ability, and thus possibly the foraging efficiency, of echolocating bats and susceptible to rising temperatures through climate change. Using present-day climate data and projected temperature rises, we modelled this effect for the entire range of bat call frequencies and climate zones around the globe. We show that depending on call frequency, the prey detection volume of bats will either decrease or increase: species calling above a crossover frequency will lose and species emitting lower frequencies will gain prey detection volume, with crossover frequency and magnitude depending on the local climatic conditions. Within local species assemblages, this may cause a change in community composition. Global warming can thus directly affect the prey detection ability of individual bats and indirectly their interspecific interactions with competitors and prey. PMID:24335559

  6. Real-time, label-free isothermal solid-phase amplification/detection (ISAD) device for rapid detection of genetic alteration in cancers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong; Perera, Agampodi Promoda; Kim, Kyung Woo; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2013-06-01

    Here, we first present an isothermal solid-phase amplification/detection (ISAD) technique for the detection of single-point mutations that can be performed without labelling in real-time by utilizing both silicon microring-based solid-phase amplification and isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). The ISAD technique was performed on a silicon microring device with a plastic chamber containing 10 μL of the reaction mixture, and characterized with an assay for the detection of the HRAS (Harvey RAS) gene single-point mutation. For the solid-phase amplification, the primer of the gene was directly attached to the surface of the device via an amine modification reaction. The amplified DNA was detected, without a label, by measuring the optical wavelength shift of the silicon microring resonator during the reaction. We demonstrated that the sensitivity of the ISAD technique was 100-times higher than that of RPA and conventional PCR methods. Moreover, this technique can be used to distinguish a single-point mutation of the HRAS gene via target amplification. This novel DNA amplification/detection technique will be useful for the detection of sequence alterations such as mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms as DNA biomarkers in human diseases. PMID:23609609

  7. Congenital Hypothyroidism with Neurological and Respiratory Alterations: A Case Detected Using a Variable Diagnostic Threshold for TSH

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Jesús; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Colón, Cristóbal; Cabanas, Paloma; Heredia, Claudia; Castaño, Luis Antonio; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Couce, M.Luz; Pombo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) with neurological and respiratory alterations due to a heterozygotic c.374-1G > A mutation of TITF1/NKX2-1. The hypothyroidism was detected using a neonatal screening protocol in which the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) threshold is re-set each day on the basis of within-day variability and between-day variation. In this case, the threshold on the day of the initial analysis was 8.2 mIU/L, and the measured TSH level in heel-prick blood was 8.3 mIU/L. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22155464

  8. Congenital hypothyroidism with neurological and respiratory alterations: a case detected using a variable diagnostic threshold for TSH.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Jesús; Alonso-Fernández, Jóse Ramón; Castro-Feijoo, Lidia; Colón, Cristóbal; Cabanas, Paloma; Heredia, Claudia; Castaño, Luis Antonio; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Couce, M Luz; Pombo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) with neurological and respiratory alterations due to a heterozygotic c.374-1G > A mutation of TITF1/NKX2-1. The hypothyroidism was detected using a neonatal screening protocol in which the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) threshold is re-set each day on the basis of within-day variability and between-day variation. In this case, the threshold on the day of the initial analysis was 8.2 mIU/L, and the measured TSH level in heel-prick blood was 8.3 mIU/L. PMID:22155464

  9. Detection of TTV in peripheral blood cells from patients with altered ALT and AST levels.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Jaqueline Carvalho; Nasser, Thiago Franco; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Aoki, Mateus Nóbrega; Carneiro, Juliana Laino do Val; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2008-04-01

    This work analyzes the prevalence of TTV DNA in peripheral blood cells from patients with hepatic alterations and healthy blood donors and measures levels of sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine, phosphatase alkaline, total and direct bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in certain randomly selected patients. DNA samples from 111 individuals were evaluated. They were divided into two groups, "A" (study) and "B" (control), including 54 patients with liver enzyme alterations (ALT/AST) presenting non-B-non-C hepatitis and 57 blood donors, respectively. TTV DNA was determined by nested PCR. Certain products of the second-round PCR were sequenced. Serum biochemical assay was performed and disclosed TTV in 31.48% (17/54) of patients in group A and 5.26% (3/57) in the control group B. TTV prevalence was significantly higher in patients with liver disease than in healthy donors. In group A, sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine, phosphatase alkaline, total and direct bilirubin, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were analyzed in certain randomly selected patients and no significant difference in biochemical levels (p>0.05) was found when TTV infected and noninfected individuals were compared. Knowledge related to TTV has rapidly increased, but many fundamental aspects remain unclear. This led us to question the role of TTV and doubt remains as to whether or not it is just a commensal virus. Further studies are necessary to confirm and extend these findings. PMID:18623984

  10. What's in your buffer? Solute altered millisecond motions detected by solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Wong, Madeline; Khirich, Gennady; Loria, J Patrick

    2013-09-17

    To date, little work has been conducted on the relationship between solute and buffer molecules and conformational exchange motion in enzymes. This study uses solution NMR to examine the effects of phosphate, sulfate, and acetate in comparison to MES- and HEPES-buffered references on the chemical shift perturbation and millisecond, chemical, or conformational exchange motions in the enzyme ribonuclease A (RNase A), triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) and HisF. The results indicate that addition of these solutes has a small effect on (1)H and (15)N chemical shifts for RNase A and TIM but a significant effect for HisF. For RNase A and TIM, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments, however, show significant solute-dependent changes in conformational exchange motions. Some residues show loss of millisecond motions relative to the reference sample upon addition of solute, whereas others experience an enhancement. Comparison of exchange parameters obtained from fits of dispersion data indicates changes in either or both equilibrium populations and chemical shifts between conformations. Furthermore, the exchange kinetics are altered in many cases. The results demonstrate that common solute molecules can alter observed enzyme millisecond motions and play a more active role than what is routinely believed. PMID:23991940

  11. Plant Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2016-04-29

    Although individuals in most flowering plant species, and in many haploid plants, have both sex functions, dioecious species-in which individuals have either male or female functions only-are scattered across many taxonomic groups, and many species have genetic sex determination. Among these, some have visibly heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and molecular genetic studies are starting to uncover sex-linked markers in others, showing that they too have fully sex-linked regions that are either too small or are located in chromosomes that are too small to be cytologically detectable from lack of pairing, lack of visible crossovers, or accumulation of heterochromatin. Detailed study is revealing that, like animal sex chromosomes, plant sex-linked regions show evidence for accumulation of repetitive sequences and genetic degeneration. Estimating when recombination stopped confirms the view that many plants have young sex-linked regions, making plants of great interest for studying the timescale of these changes. PMID:26653795

  12. Sex chromosome drive.

    PubMed

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in two clades, Rodentia and Diptera. Although very little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of drive, epigenetic processes such as chromatin regulation could be involved in many instances. Yet, its evolutionary consequences are far-reaching, from the evolution of mating systems and sex determination to the emergence of new species. PMID:25524548

  13. Automated clinical system for chromosome analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Friedan, H. J.; Johnson, E. T.; Rennie, P. A.; Wall, R. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic chromosome analysis system is provided wherein a suitably prepared slide with chromosome spreads thereon is placed on the stage of an automated microscope. The automated microscope stage is computer operated to move the slide to enable detection of chromosome spreads on the slide. The X and Y location of each chromosome spread that is detected is stored. The computer measures the chromosomes in a spread, classifies them by group or by type and also prepares a digital karyotype image. The computer system can also prepare a patient report summarizing the result of the analysis and listing suspected abnormalities.

  14. CEST-MRI detects metabolite levels altered by breast cancer cell aggressiveness and chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kannie W Y; Jiang, Lu; Cheng, Menglin; Wijnen, Jannie P; Liu, Guanshu; Huang, Peng; van Zijl, Peter C M; McMahon, Michael T; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-06-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an MRI contrast mechanism that detects the exchange of protons from distinct hydroxyl, amine, and amide groups to tissue water through the transfer of signal loss, with repeated exchange enhancing their effective signal. We applied CEST to detect systematically 15 common cellular metabolites in a panel of differentially aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. The highest CEST contrast was generated by creatine, myo-inositol, glutamate, and glycerophosphocholine, whose cellular concentrations decreased with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness. These decreased metabolite concentrations resulted in turn in a decreased CEST profile with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. Treatment of both breast cancer cell lines with the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin resulted in increased metabolic CEST profiles, which correlated with significant increases in creatine, phosphocreatine, and glycerophosphocholine. CEST can detect breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. The presented results help shed light on possible contributions from CEST-active metabolites to the CEST contrast produced by breast cancers. The metabolic CEST profile may improve detection sensitivity over conventional MRS, and may have the potential to assess breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy non-invasively using MRI if specialized metabolic CEST profile detection can be realized in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27100284

  15. Integrated Copy Number and Expression Analysis Identifies Profiles of Whole-Arm Chromosomal Alterations and Subgroups with Favorable Outcome in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Yuriko; Oda, Katsutoshi; Ikeda, Yuji; Koso, Takahiro; Tsuji, Shingo; Yamamoto, Shogo; Asada, Kayo; Sone, Kenbun; Kurikawa, Reiko; Makii, Chinami; Hagiwara, Otoe; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Maeda, Daichi; Hasegawa, Kosei; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Kawana, Kei; Fukayama, Masashi; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Yano, Tetsu; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is generally associated with chemoresistance and poor clinical outcome, even with early diagnosis; whereas high-grade serous carcinomas (SCs) and endometrioid carcinomas (ECs) are commonly chemosensitive at advanced stages. Although an integrated genomic analysis of SC has been performed, conclusive views on copy number and expression profiles for CCC are still limited. In this study, we performed single nucleotide polymorphism analysis with 57 epithelial ovarian cancers (31 CCCs, 14 SCs, and 12 ECs) and microarray expression analysis with 55 cancers (25 CCCs, 16 SCs, and 14 ECs). We then evaluated PIK3CA mutations and ARID1A expression in CCCs. SNP array analysis classified 13% of CCCs into a cluster with high frequency and focal range of copy number alterations (CNAs), significantly lower than for SCs (93%, P < 0.01) and ECs (50%, P = 0.017). The ratio of whole-arm to all CNAs was higher in CCCs (46.9%) than SCs (21.7%; P < 0.0001). SCs with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of BRCA1 (85%) also had LOH of NF1 and TP53, and LOH of BRCA2 (62%) coexisted with LOH of RB1 and TP53. Microarray analysis classified CCCs into three clusters. One cluster (CCC-2, n = 10) showed more favorable prognosis than the CCC-1 and CCC-3 clusters (P = 0.041). Coexistent alterations of PIK3CA and ARID1A were more common in CCC-1 and CCC-3 (7/11, 64%) than in CCC-2 (0/10, 0%; P < 0.01). Being in cluster CCC-2 was an independent favorable prognostic factor in CCC. In conclusion, CCC was characterized by a high ratio of whole-arm CNAs; whereas CNAs in SC were mainly focal, but preferentially caused LOH of well-known tumor suppressor genes. As such, expression profiles might be useful for sub-classification of CCC, and might provide useful information on prognosis. PMID:26043110

  16. Synthetic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes. PMID:26111960

  17. Chromosome and cell genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A.K.; Sharma, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: Chromosomes in differentiation; Chromosome axis; Nuclear and organelle split genes; Chemical mutagenesis; and Chromosome architecture and additional elements.

  18. Neuropsychological evaluation for detecting alterations in the central nervous system after chemical exposure.

    PubMed

    Bolla, K I

    1996-08-01

    Individuals with multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) report decreased attention/concentration, memory loss, disorientation, confusion, fatigue, depression, irritability, decreased libido, sleep disturbances, headaches, and weakness. These neurobehavioral symptoms represent possible alterations in the central nervous system (CNS). The evaluation of neurobehavioral functioning using neuropsychological techniques provides an indirect method for determining the integrity of the CNS. However, caution must be used in interpreting neuropsychological test results, since this technique is extremely sensitive but is not specific. Clinically significant aberrant test performance may be noted after chemical exposure as well as with other diseases of the CNS. In addition, neuropsychiatric conditions such as anxiety and depression are often manifested as cognitive difficulties that are similar in pattern to the cognitive dysfunction caused by toxic chemicals. Herein, limitations and cautions in the interpretations of neuropsychological test results are discussed. PMID:8921555

  19. Chromosome Cohesion Established by Rec8-Cohesin in Fetal Oocytes Is Maintained without Detectable Turnover in Oocytes Arrested for Months in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Sabrina; Borsos, Máté; Szydlowska, Anna; Godwin, Jonathan; Williams, Suzannah A.; Cohen, Paula E.; Hirota, Takayuki; Saitou, Mitinori; Tachibana-Konwalski, Kikuë

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sister chromatid cohesion mediated by the cohesin complex is essential for chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis [1]. Rec8-containing cohesin, bound to Smc3/Smc1α or Smc3/Smc1β, maintains bivalent cohesion in mammalian meiosis [2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. In females, meiotic DNA replication and recombination occur in fetal oocytes. After birth, oocytes arrest at the prolonged dictyate stage until recruited to grow into mature oocytes that divide at ovulation. How cohesion is maintained in arrested oocytes remains a pivotal question relevant to maternal age-related aneuploidy. Hypothetically, cohesin turnover regenerates cohesion in oocytes. Evidence for post-replicative cohesion establishment mechanism exists, in yeast and invertebrates [7, 8]. In mouse fetal oocytes, cohesin loading factor Nipbl/Scc2 localizes to chromosome axes during recombination [9, 10]. Alternatively, cohesion is maintained without turnover. Consistent with this, cohesion maintenance does not require Smc1β transcription, but unlike Rec8, Smc1β is not required for establishing bivalent cohesion [11, 12]. Rec8 maintains cohesion without turnover during weeks of oocyte growth [3]. Whether the same applies to months or decades of arrest is unknown. Here, we test whether Rec8 activated in arrested mouse oocytes builds cohesion revealed by TEV cleavage and live-cell imaging. Rec8 establishes cohesion when activated during DNA replication in fetal oocytes using tamoxifen-inducible Cre. In contrast, no new cohesion is detected when Rec8 is activated in arrested oocytes by tamoxifen despite cohesin synthesis. We conclude that cohesion established in fetal oocytes is maintained for months without detectable turnover in dictyate-arrested oocytes. This implies that women’s fertility depends on the longevity of cohesin proteins that established cohesion in utero. PMID:26898469

  20. Automatic segmentation of overlapping and touching chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Renli; Yu, Chang

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes a technique to segment overlapping and touching chromosomes of human metaphase cells. Automated chromosome classification has been an important pattern recognition problem for decades, numerous attempts were made in the past to characterize chromosome band patterns. But successful separation between touching and overlapping chromosomes is vital for correct classification. Since chromosomes are non-rigid objects, common methods for separation between touching chromosomes are not usable. We proposed a method using shape concave and convex information, topology analysis information, and band pale paths for segmentation of touching and overlapping chromosomes. To detect shape concave and convex information, we should first pre-segment the chromosomes and get the edge of overlapping and touching chromosomes. After filtering the original image using edge-preserving filter, we adopt the Otsu's segmentation method and extract the boundary of chromosomes. Hence the boundary can be used for segment the overlapping and touching chromosomes by detecting the concave and convex information based on boundary information. Most of the traditional boundary-based algorithms detect corners based on two steps: the first step is to acquire the smoothed version of curvature at every point along the contour, and the second step is to detect the positions where curvature maximal occur and threshold the curvature as corner points. Recently wavelet transform has been adopted into corner detection algorithms. Since the metaphase overlapping chromosomes has multi-scale corners, we adopt a multi-scale corner detection method based on Hua's method for corner detection. For touching chromosomes, it is convenient to split them using pale paths. Starting from concave corner points, a search algorithm is represented. The searching algorithm traces three pixels into the object in the direction of the normal vector in order to avoid stopping at the initial boundary until it

  1. Sensitive detection of chromatin-altering polymorphisms reveals autoimmune disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, Ricardo Cruz-Herrera; Poschmann, Jeremie; Rouam, Sigrid Laure; Png, Eileen; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd; Prabhakar, Shyam

    2015-05-01

    Most disease associations detected by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) lie outside coding genes, but very few have been mapped to causal regulatory variants. Here, we present a method for detecting regulatory quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that does not require genotyping or whole-genome sequencing. The method combines deep, long-read chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) with a statistical test that simultaneously scores peak height correlation and allelic imbalance: the genotype-independent signal correlation and imbalance (G-SCI) test. We performed histone acetylation ChIP-seq on 57 human lymphoblastoid cell lines and used the resulting reads to call 500,066 single-nucleotide polymorphisms de novo within regulatory elements. The G-SCI test annotated 8,764 of these as histone acetylation QTLs (haQTLs)—an order of magnitude larger than the set of candidates detected by expression QTL analysis. Lymphoblastoid haQTLs were highly predictive of autoimmune disease mechanisms. Thus, our method facilitates large-scale regulatory variant detection in any moderately sized cohort for which functional profiling data can be generated, thereby simplifying identification of causal variants within GWAS loci. PMID:25799442

  2. A new light on DNA replication from the inactive X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Aladjem, Mirit I.; Fu, Haiqing

    2014-01-01

    While large portions of the mammalian genome are known to replicate sequentially in a distinct, tissue-specific order, recent studies suggest that the inactive X chromosome is duplicated rapidly via random, synchronous DNA synthesis at numerous adjacent regions. The rapid duplication of the inactive X chromosome was observed in high-resolution studies visualizing DNA replication patterns in the nucleus, and by allele-specific DNA sequencing studies measuring the extent of DNA synthesis. These studies conclude that inactive X chromosomes complete replication earlier than previously thought and suggest that the strict order of DNA replication detected in the majority of genomic regions is not preserved in non-transcribed, “silent” chromatin. These observations alter current concepts about the regulation of DNA replication in non-transcribed portions of the genome in general and in the inactive X-chromosome in particular. PMID:24706495

  3. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, Falko; Weir, Jerry P

    2007-01-01

    Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors. PMID:17501993

  4. Early detection of chemotherapy-refractory patients by monitoring textural alterations in diffuse optical spectroscopic images

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Vorauer, Eric; Chin, Lee; Tran, William T.; Wright, Frances C.; Gandhi, Sonal; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Changes in textural characteristics of diffuse optical spectroscopic (DOS) functional images, accompanied by alterations in their mean values, are demonstrated here for the first time as early surrogates of ultimate treatment response in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). NAC, as a standard component of treatment for LABC patient, induces measurable heterogeneous changes in tumor metabolism which were evaluated using DOS-based metabolic maps. This study characterizes such inhomogeneous nature of response development, by determining alterations in textural properties of DOS images apparent at early stages of therapy, followed later by gross changes in mean values of these functional metabolic maps. Methods: Twelve LABC patients undergoing NAC were scanned before and at four times after treatment initiation, and tomographic DOS images were reconstructed at each time. Ultimate responses of patients were determined clinically and pathologically, based on a reduction in tumor size and assessment of residual tumor cellularity. The mean-value parameters and textural features were extracted from volumetric DOS images for several functional and metabolic parameters prior to the treatment initiation. Changes in these DOS-based biomarkers were also monitored over the course of treatment. The measured biomarkers were applied to differentiate patient responses noninvasively and compared to clinical and pathologic responses. Results: Responding and nonresponding patients demonstrated different changes in DOS-based textural and mean-value parameters during chemotherapy. Whereas none of the biomarkers measured prior the start of therapy demonstrated a significant difference between the two patient populations, statistically significant differences were observed at week one after treatment initiation using the relative change in contrast/homogeneity of seven functional maps (0.001 < p < 0.049), and mean value of water

  5. Utilization of the rpoB gene as a specific chromosomal marker for real-time PCR detection of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Y; Patra, G; Liang, X; Williams, L E; Rose, S; Redkar, R J; DelVecchio, V G

    2001-08-01

    The potential use of Bacillus anthracis as a weapon of mass destruction poses a threat to humans, domesticated animals, and wildlife and necessitates the need for a rapid and highly specific detection assay. We have developed a real-time PCR-based assay for the specific detection of B. anthracis by taking advantage of the unique nucleotide sequence of the B. anthracis rpoB gene. Variable region 1 of the rpoB gene was sequenced from 36 Bacillus strains, including 16 B. anthracis strains and 20 other related bacilli, and four nucleotides specific for B. anthracis were identified. PCR primers were selected so that two B. anthracis-specific nucleotides were at their 3' ends, whereas the remaining bases were specific to the probe region. This format permitted the PCR reactions to be performed on a LightCycler via fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The assay was found to be specific for 144 B. anthracis strains from different geographical locations and did not cross-react with other related bacilli (175 strains), with the exception of one strain. The PCR assay can be performed on isolated DNA as well as crude vegetative cell lysates in less than 1 h. Therefore, the rpoB-FRET assay could be used as a new chromosomal marker for rapid detection of B. anthracis. PMID:11472954

  6. [Detection of bcr/abl fusion gene and its derivative chromosome 9 deletions in CML by using home-made bcr/abl extra-signal probe].

    PubMed

    Lai, Yue-Yun; Feng, Lin; Wang, Zheng; Lü, Shan; Dang, Hui; Shi, Yan; He, Qi; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2010-02-01

    This study was aimed to verify the efficacy of home-made LSI bcr/abl ES probe for detection of bcr/abl fusion gene and derivative chromosome 9 deletions in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was carried out with dual color bcr/abl extra signal (ES) probe in 97 cases of CML based on morphology and cytogenetic karyotype and 129 cases of non-hematological malignancies/non-myeloproliferative diseases with normal cytogenetic karyotype. For the patients with signals of 1R1G1F indicating der(9) deletions, FISH were done using ASS DNA probe. The results showed that 91 cases with standard t(9;22) and 6 cases with variant translocation of t(9;22) were detected by conventional G banding technique. All of the 97 patients displayed bcr/abl fusion gene by ES-FISH, including 16 cases with signal patterns of 1R1G1F showing der(9) deletions. Among the 16 cases with der(9) deletions, 13 cases were detected to have deletions of ASS gene. Meanwhile, none of the 129 cases of negative control showed bcr/abl fusion gene by ES-FISH. It is concluded that home-made LSI bcr/abl ES probe is effective to identify the bcr/abl fusion gene and der(9) deletions in CML, and the ES-FISH results are consistent with conventional cytogenetic karyotype. PMID:20137147

  7. Detecting altered connectivity patterns in HIV associated neurocognitive impairment using mutual connectivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Anas Zainul; D'Souza, Adora M.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The use of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has provided interesting insights into our understanding of the brain. In clinical setups these scans have been used to detect and study changes in the brain network properties in various neurological disorders. A large percentage of subjects infected with HIV present cognitive deficits, which are known as HIV associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). In this study we propose to use our novel technique named Mutual Connectivity Analysis (MCA) to detect differences in brain networks in subjects with and without HIV infection. Resting state functional MRI scans acquired from 10 subjects (5 HIV+ and 5 HIV-) were subject to standard preprocessing routines. Subsequently, the average time-series for each brain region of the Automated Anatomic Labeling (AAL) atlas are extracted and used with the MCA framework to obtain a graph characterizing the interactions between them. The network graphs obtained for different subjects are then compared using Network-Based Statistics (NBS), which is an approach to detect differences between graphs edges while controlling for the family-wise error rate when mass univariate testing is performed. Applying this approach on the graphs obtained yields a single network encompassing 42 nodes and 65 edges, which is significantly different between the two subject groups. Specifically connections to the regions in and around the basal ganglia are significantly decreased. Also some nodes corresponding to the posterior cingulate cortex are affected. These results are inline with our current understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of HIV associated neurocognitive disease (HAND) and other HIV based fMRI connectivity studies. Hence, we illustrate the applicability of our novel approach with network-based statistics in a clinical case-control study to detect differences connectivity patterns.

  8. Aptamer-Assisted Detection of the Altered Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahirwar, Rajesh; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Sett, Arghya; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod; Bora, Utpal; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the expression of estrogen receptors (ER) and the expanded population of ER-positive cells are two common phenotypes of breast cancer. Detection of the aberrantly expressed ERα in breast cancer is carried out using ERα-antibodies and radiolabelled ligands to make decisions about cancer treatment and targeted therapy. Capitalizing on the beneficial advantages of aptamer over the conventional antibody or radiolabelled ligand, we have identified a DNA aptamer that selectively binds and facilitates the detection of ERα in human breast cancer tissue sections. The aptamer is identified using the high throughput sequencing assisted SELEX screening. Biophysical characterization confirms the binding and formation of a thermodynamically stable complex between the identified DNA aptamer (ERaptD4) and ERα (Ka = 1.55±0.298×108 M-1; ΔH = 4.32×104±801.1 cal/mol; ΔS = -108 cal/mol/deg). Interestingly, the specificity measurements suggest that the ERaptD4 internalizes into ERα-positive breast cancer cells in a target-selective manner and localizes specifically in the nuclear region. To harness these characteristics of ERaptD4 for detection of ERα expression in breast cancer samples, we performed the aptamer-assisted histochemical analysis of ERα in tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The results were validated by performing the immunohistochemistry on same samples with an ERα-antibody. We found that the two methods agree strongly in assay output (kappa value = 0.930, p-value <0.05 for strong ERα positive and the ERα negative samples; kappa value = 0.823, p-value <0.05 for the weak/moderate ER+ve samples, n = 20). Further, the aptamer stain the ERα-positive cells in breast tissues without cross-reacting to ERα-deficient fibroblasts, adipocytes, or the inflammatory cells. Our results demonstrate a significant consistency in the aptamer-assisted detection of ERα in strong ERα positive, moderate ERα positive and ERα negative breast cancer

  9. [Neuroimaging technique: a diagnostic tool to detect altered states of consciousness].

    PubMed

    Thonnard, Marie; Boly, Mélanie; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Chatelle, Camille; Gosseries, Olivia; Laureys, Steven; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    Vegetative and minimally conscious states diagnosis remained a major clinical challenge. New paradigms such as measurement of the global cerebral metabolism, the structural and functional integrity of fronto-parietal network, or the spontaneous activity in resting state have been shown to be helpful to disentangle vegetative from minimally conscious patients. Active neuroimagery paradigms also allow detecting voluntary and conscious activity in non-communicative patients. The implementation of these methods in clinical routine could permit to reduce the current high rate of misdiagnosis (40%). PMID:21299966

  10. Detection of early diastolic alterations by tissue Doppler imaging in untreated childhood-onset essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Agu, Ngozi C; McNiece Redwine, Karen; Bell, Cynthia; Garcia, Kathleen Marie; Martin, David S; Poffenbarger, Tim S; Bricker, John T; Portman, Ronald J; Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the presence of preclinical diastolic dysfunction in hypertensive children relative to normotensive children by Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI). We prospectively enrolled children with untreated essential hypertension in absence of any other disease and a matched healthy control group with normal blood pressure (BP); both groups confirmed by clinic BP and a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Echocardiographic diastolic parameters were determined using spectral transmitral inflow Doppler, flow propagation velocity, TDI, and systolic parameters were determined via midwall shortening fraction and ejection fraction. A total of 80 multiethnic children were prospectively enrolled for the study: 46 hypertensive (median age, 13 years; 72% males) and 34 control (median age, 14 years; 65% males). The only echocardiography parameters that had a statistically significant change compared with the control children, were regional mitral Ea, Aa, and the E/Ea ratio by TDI. In comparison with controls, hypertensive children had lower Ea and Aa velocities of anterior and posterior walls and higher lateral wall E/Ea ratio. The decrease in posterior wall Ea and Aa remained significant after adjustment for gender, age, body mass index, ethnicity, and left ventricular hypertrophy on multivariate analysis. The lateral and septal wall E/Ea ratios correlated significantly with fasting serum insulin levels on similar multivariate analysis. Decreased regional TDI velocities were seen with preserved left ventricular systolic function even when other measures of diastolic dysfunction remained unchanged in untreated hypertensive children. Hypertension and serum insulin levels had strong associations with preclinical diastolic alterations in children. PMID:24685005

  11. Detection of the chimeric ABL/BCR gene located on chromosome 9 by the FISH technique in a Ph negative CML

    SciTech Connect

    Macera, M.J.; Frankel, E.; Szabo, P. ||

    1994-09-01

    Chronic myelogeous leukemia (CML) is characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, which arises from a reciprical translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22 and is found in over 90% of all reported cases. This translocation results in the fusion of the chromosome 9 ABL gene with the chromosome 22 BCR gene forming a chimeric gene that encodes a unique protein. The chimeric gene has been demonstrated in variant translocations. In cases without Ph chromosomes, the ABL/BCR rearrangement was located on chromosome 22 at band q11. We report a case that presented with typical symptoms of classical CML. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a normal 46,XX karyotype in all his mitotic bone marrow cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a two color ABL/BCR probe (Oncor, Gaithersburg, MD) showed the presence of two ABL genes located on both chromosome 9s, one BCR located on chromosome 22 and one located in tandem with one ABL gene on chromosome 9q34. Southern blotting using the transprobe (Oncogene Science, Uniondale, NY) confirmed that a break was located within the 5.8 Kb major BCR. This is one of the first cases where the chimeric ABL/BCR gene was demonstrated to be on chromosome 9q34. This variant stresses the importance of the ABL/BCR gene in the etiology of this disease as this patient was clinically indistinguishable from those CML patients with the standard Ph translocation.

  12. Detection of ultrastructural changes in genetically altered and exercised skeletal muscle using PS-OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquesi, James J.; Schlachter, Simon C.; Boppart, Marni D.; Chaney, Eric; Kaufman, Stephen J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2006-02-01

    Birefringence of skeletal muscle has been associated with the ultrastructure of individual sarcomeres, specifically the arrangement of A-bands corresponding to the thick myosin filaments. Murine skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius) was imaged with a fiber-based PS-OCT imaging system to determine the level of birefringence present in the tissue under various conditions. In addition to muscle controls from wild-type mice, muscle from abnormal mice included: genetically-modified (mdx) mice which model human muscular dystrophy, transgenic mice exhibiting an overexpression of integrin (α7β1), and transgenic integrin (α7β1)knockout mice. Comparisons were also made between rested and exercised muscles to determine the effects of exercise on muscle birefringence for each of these normal and abnormal conditions. The PS-OCT images revealed that the presence of birefringence was similar in the rested muscle with dystrophy-like features (i.e., lacking the structural protein dystrophin - mdx) and in the integrin (α7β1)knockout muscle when compared to the normal (wild-type) control. However, exercising these abnormal muscle tissues drastically reduced the presence of birefringence detected by the PS-OCT system. The muscle exhibiting an overexpression of integrin (α7β1) remained heavily birefringent before and after exercise, similar to the normal (wild-type) muscle. These results suggest that there is a distinct relationship between the degree of birefringence detected using PS-OCT and the sarcomeric ultrastructure present within skeletal muscle.

  13. On the Power and the Systematic Biases of the Detection of Chromosomal Inversions by Paired-End Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lucas Lledó, José Ignacio; Cáceres, Mario

    2013-01-01

    One of the most used techniques to study structural variation at a genome level is paired-end mapping (PEM). PEM has the advantage of being able to detect balanced events, such as inversions and translocations. However, inversions are still quite difficult to predict reliably, especially from high-throughput sequencing data. We simulated realistic PEM experiments with different combinations of read and library fragment lengths, including sequencing errors and meaningful base-qualities, to quantify and track down the origin of false positives and negatives along sequencing, mapping, and downstream analysis. We show that PEM is very appropriate to detect a wide range of inversions, even with low coverage data. However, % of inversions located between segmental duplications are expected to go undetected by the most common sequencing strategies. In general, longer DNA libraries improve the detectability of inversions far better than increments of the coverage depth or the read length. Finally, we review the performance of three algorithms to detect inversions —SVDetect, GRIAL, and VariationHunter—, identify common pitfalls, and reveal important differences in their breakpoint precisions. These results stress the importance of the sequencing strategy for the detection of structural variants, especially inversions, and offer guidelines for the design of future genome sequencing projects. PMID:23637806

  14. A Method to Quantify Cell-Free Fetal DNA Fraction in Maternal Plasma Using Next Generation Sequencing: Its Application in Non-Invasive Prenatal Chromosomal Aneuploidy Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xu-Ping; Gan, Hai-Yan; Li, Fen-Xia; Tian, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Liang, Rong-Liang; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective The fraction of circulating cell-free fetal (cff) DNA in maternal plasma is a critical parameter for aneuploidy screening with non-invasive prenatal testing, especially for those samples located in equivocal zones. We developed an approach to quantify cff DNA fractions directly with sequencing data, and increased cff DNAs by optimizing library construction procedure. Methods Artificial DNA mixture samples (360), with known cff DNA fractions, were used to develop a method to determine cff DNA fraction through calculating the proportion of Y chromosomal unique reads, with sequencing data generated by Ion Proton. To validate our method, we investigated cff DNA fractions of 2,063 pregnant women with fetuses who were diagnosed as high risk of fetal defects. The z-score was calculated to determine aneuploidies for chromosomes 21, 18 and 13. The relationships between z-score and parameters of pregnancies were also analyzed. To improve cff DNA fractions in our samples, two groups were established as follows: in group A, the large-size DNA fragments were removed, and in group B these were retained, during library construction. Results A method to determine cff DNA fractions was successfully developed using 360 artificial mixture samples in which cff DNA fractions were known. A strong positive correlation was found between z-score and fetal DNA fraction in the artificial mixture samples of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, as well as in clinical maternal plasma samples. There was a positive correlation between gestational age and the cff DNA fraction in the clinical samples, but no correlation for maternal age. Moreover, increased fetal DNA fractions were found in group A compared to group B. Conclusion A relatively accurate method was developed to determine the cff DNA fraction in maternal plasma. By optimizing, we can improve cff DNA fractions in sequencing samples, which may contribute to improvements in detection rate and reliability. PMID:26765738

  15. Altered expression of the cell cycle regulatory molecules pRb, p53 and MDM2 exert a synergetic effect on tumor growth and chromosomal instability in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs).

    PubMed Central

    Gorgoulis, V. G.; Zacharatos, P.; Kotsinas, A.; Mariatos, G.; Liloglou, T.; Vogiatzi, T.; Foukas, P.; Rassidakis, G.; Garinis, G.; Ioannides, T.; Zoumpourlis, V.; Bramis, J.; Michail, P. O.; Asimacopoulos, P. J.; Field, J. K.; Kittas, C.

    2000-01-01

    the expression of two components was altered (p = 0.055). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that simultaneous deregulation of all members of the pRb-p53-MDM2 network confers an additive effect on tumor growth. The apoptotic pathway seems to be more susceptible to its defects than the cell proliferation machinery. The findings of the ploidy analysis, which are in parallel with those regarding the proliferative activity and the apoptotic rate study, further support the concept that these molecules constitute a tightly regulated network participating in cell cycle control and chromosomal stability. PMID:10965496

  16. In vivo binding of trimethylpsoralen detects DNA structural alterations associated with transcribing regions in the human beta-globin cluster.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ruiz, A; Zhang, Q; Shen, C K

    1995-12-01

    In order to increase our knowledge about the mechanisms that regulate expression of human beta-like globin genes, we have used a novel technique to analyze the chromatin structure in living cells. This approach allowed us to detect specific DNA regions in vivo where nucleosome folding or unconstrained DNA supercoiling in erythroid cells differs from that in non-erythroid cells. In this method, we use 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (TMP) as a probe capable of detecting altered chromatin conformations. Our results show that TMP binds to DNA with a higher affinity over the regions in the locus that are actively expressed, including both the promoter and the transcribed region. This higher affinity detected when comparing erythroid cells with non-erythroid cells does not extend to other regions inside the beta-globin cluster. Our data suggest that the observed effect is likely due to nucleosome displacement. Alternatively, it could result from localized DNA supercoiling, but not from widespread torsional stress across the entire beta-like globin locus as hypothesized previously. PMID:7499429

  17. Remote detection of past habitability at Mars-analogue hydrothermal alteration terrains using an ExoMars Panoramic Camera emulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. K.; Cousins, C. R.; Gunn, M.; Grindrod, P. M.; Barnes, D.; Crawford, I. A.; Cross, R. E.; Coates, A. J.

    2015-05-01

    A major scientific goal of the European Space Agency's ExoMars 2018 rover is to identify evidence of life within the martian rock record. Key to this objective is the remote detection of geological substrates that are indicative of past habitable environments, which will rely on visual (stereo wide-angle, and high resolution images) and multispectral (440-1000 nm) data produced by the Panoramic Camera (PanCam) instrument. We deployed a PanCam emulator at four hydrothermal sites in the Námafjall volcanic region of Iceland, a Mars-analogue hydrothermal alteration terrain. At these sites, sustained acidic-neutral aqueous interaction with basaltic substrates (crystalline and sedimentary) has produced phyllosilicate, ferric oxide, and sulfate-rich alteration soils, and secondary mineral deposits including gypsum veins and zeolite amygdales. PanCam emulator datasets from these sites were complemented with (i) NERC Airborne Research and Survey Facility aerial hyperspectral images of the study area; (ii) in situ reflectance spectroscopy (400-1000 nm) of PanCam spectral targets; (iii) laboratory X-ray Diffraction, and (iv) laboratory VNIR (350-2500 nm) spectroscopy of target samples to identify their bulk mineralogy and spectral properties. The mineral assemblages and palaeoenvironments characterised here are analogous to neutral-acidic alteration terrains on Mars, such as at Mawrth Vallis and Gusev Crater. Combined multispectral and High Resolution Camera datasets were found to be effective at capturing features of astrobiological importance, such as secondary gypsum and zeolite mineral veins, and phyllosilicate-rich substrates. Our field observations with the PanCam emulator also uncovered stray light problems which are most significant in the NIR wavelengths and investigations are being undertaken to ensure that the flight model PanCam cameras are not similarly affected.

  18. Single-nucleotide polymorphism-array improves detection rate of genomic alterations in core-binding factor leukemia.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Rosa da Silveira; Vasudevan, Anupama; Krepischi, Ana; Rosenberg, Carla; Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes L F

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a group of clonal diseases, resulting from two classes of mutation. Investigation for additional abnormalities associated with a well-recognized subtype, core-binding factor AML (CBF-AML) can provide further understanding and discrimination to this special group of leukemia. In order to better define genetic alterations in CBF-AML and identify possible cooperating lesions, a single-nucleotide polymorphism-array (SNP-array) analysis was performed, combined to KIT mutation screening, in a set of cases. Validation of SNP-array results was done by array comparative genomic hybridization and FISH. Fifteen cases were analyzed. Three cases had microscopic lesions better delineated by arrays. One case had +22 not identified by arrays. Submicroscopic abnormalities were mostly non-recurrent between samples. Of relevance, four regions were more frequently affected: 4q28, 9p11, 16q22.1, and 16q23. One case had an uncovered unbalanced inv(16) due to submicroscopic deletion of 5´MYH11 and 3´CBFB. Telomeric and large copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity (CNN-LOH) regions (>25 Mb), likely representing uniparental disomy, were detected in four out of fifteen cases. Only three cases had mutation on KIT gene, enhancing the role of abnormalities by SNP-array as presumptive cooperating alterations. Molecular karyotyping can add valuable information to metaphase karyotype analysis, emerging as an important tool to uncover and characterize microscopic, submicroscopic genomic alterations, and CNN-LOH events in the search for cooperating lesions. PMID:23636907

  19. Tensor GSVD of Patient- and Platform-Matched Tumor and Normal DNA Copy-Number Profiles Uncovers Chromosome Arm-Wide Patterns of Tumor-Exclusive Platform-Consistent Alterations Encoding for Cell Transformation and Predicting Ovarian Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Preethi; Schomay, Theodore E.; Aiello, Katherine A.; Alter, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD), which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs). We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient’s prognosis, is independent of the tumor’s stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell’s immortality, and a patient’s shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival. In Xq

  20. Tensor GSVD of patient- and platform-matched tumor and normal DNA copy-number profiles uncovers chromosome arm-wide patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent alterations encoding for cell transformation and predicting ovarian cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Preethi; Schomay, Theodore E; Aiello, Katherine A; Alter, Orly

    2015-01-01

    The number of large-scale high-dimensional datasets recording different aspects of a single disease is growing, accompanied by a need for frameworks that can create one coherent model from multiple tensors of matched columns, e.g., patients and platforms, but independent rows, e.g., probes. We define and prove the mathematical properties of a novel tensor generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD), which can simultaneously find the similarities and dissimilarities, i.e., patterns of varying relative significance, between any two such tensors. We demonstrate the tensor GSVD in comparative modeling of patient- and platform-matched but probe-independent ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma (OV) tumor, mostly high-grade, and normal DNA copy-number profiles, across each chromosome arm, and combination of two arms, separately. The modeling uncovers previously unrecognized patterns of tumor-exclusive platform-consistent co-occurring copy-number alterations (CNAs). We find, first, and validate that each of the patterns across only 7p and Xq, and the combination of 6p+12p, is correlated with a patient's prognosis, is independent of the tumor's stage, the best predictor of OV survival to date, and together with stage makes a better predictor than stage alone. Second, these patterns include most known OV-associated CNAs that map to these chromosome arms, as well as several previously unreported, yet frequent focal CNAs. Third, differential mRNA, microRNA, and protein expression consistently map to the DNA CNAs. A coherent picture emerges for each pattern, suggesting roles for the CNAs in OV pathogenesis and personalized therapy. In 6p+12p, deletion of the p21-encoding CDKN1A and p38-encoding MAPK14 and amplification of RAD51AP1 and KRAS encode for human cell transformation, and are correlated with a cell's immortality, and a patient's shorter survival time. In 7p, RPA3 deletion and POLD2 amplification are correlated with DNA stability, and a longer survival. In Xq, PABPC5

  1. Southern analysis of genomic alterations in gamma-ray-induced aprt- hamster cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Grosovsky, A.J.; Drobetsky, E.A.; deJong, P.J.; Glickman, B.W.

    1986-06-01

    The role of genomic alterations in mutagenesis induced by ionizing radiation has been the subject of considerable speculation. By Southern blotting analysis we show here that 9 of 55 (approximately 1/6) gamma-ray-induced mutants at the adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (aprt) locus of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have a detectable genomic rearrangement. These fall into two classes: intragenic deletions and chromosomal rearrangements. In contrast, no major genomic alterations were detected among 67 spontaneous mutants, although two restriction site loss events were observed. Three gamma-ray-induced mutants were found to be intragenic deletions; all may have identical break-points. The remaining six gamma-ray-induced mutants demonstrating a genomic alteration appear to be the result of chromosomal rearrangements, possibly translocation or inversion events. None of the remaining gamma-ray-induced mutants showed any observable alteration in blotting pattern indicating a substantial role for point mutation in gamma-ray-induced mutagenesis at the aprt locus.

  2. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  3. Detection of early metabolic alterations in the ocular fundus of diabetic patients by time-resolved autofluorescence of endogenous fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, D.; Klemm, M.; Quick, S.; Deutsch, L.; Jentsch, S.; Hammer, M.; Dawczynski, J.; Kloos, C. H.; Mueller, U. A.

    2011-07-01

    Measurements of time-resolved autofluorescence (FLIM) at the human ocular fundus of diabetic patients permit the detection of early pathologic alterations before signs of diabetic retinopathy are visible. The measurements were performed by the Jena Fluorescence Lifetime Laser Scanner Ophthalmoscope applying time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) in two spectral channels (K1: 490-560 nm, K2:560-700ps). The fluorescence was excited by 70 ps pulses (FWHM) at 448 nm. The decay of fluorescence intensity was triple-exponentially approximated. The frequency of amplitudes, lifetimes, and relative contributions was compared in fields of the same size and position in healthy subjects and in diabetic patients. The most sensitive parameter was the lifetime T2 in the short-wavelength channel, which corresponds to the neuronal retina. The changes in lifetime point to a loss of free NADH and an increased contribution of protein-bound NADH in the pre-stage of diabetic retinopathy.

  4. Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  5. Detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities (chr. 1 and 18) before and after photodynamic therapy of human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachor, Ruediger; Reich, Ella D.; Kleinschmidt, Klaus; Hautmann, Richard E.

    1997-12-01

    The application of nonradioactive in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific probes for cytogenetic analysis has increased significantly in recent years. In the field of photodynamic therapy (PDT) the hypothesis is that after PDT the remaining viable malignant cells are potentially metastatic cells. Therefore, we performed in vitro experiments on human bladder carcinoma cells to evaluate numerical chromosomal abnormalities before and after PDT. The possible genotoxic effect of PDT with porphycene (AamTPPn) appears to be small based on criteria such as numerical chromosomal abnormalities for chromosome 1 and 18.

  6. Selection and explosive growth alter genetic architecture and hamper the detection of causal rare variants

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlen, Noah A.; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Witte, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of rare alleles in complex phenotypes has been hotly debated, but most rare variant association tests (RVATs) do not account for the evolutionary forces that affect genetic architecture. Here, we use simulation and numerical algorithms to show that explosive population growth, as experienced by human populations, can dramatically increase the impact of very rare alleles on trait variance. We then assess the ability of RVATs to detect causal loci using simulations and human RNA-seq data. Surprisingly, we find that statistical performance is worst for phenotypes in which genetic variance is due mainly to rare alleles, and explosive population growth decreases power. Although many studies have attempted to identify causal rare variants, few have reported novel associations. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean that rare variants make negligible contributions to complex trait heritability. Our work shows that RVATs are not robust to realistic human evolutionary forces, so general conclusions about the impact of rare variants on complex traits may be premature. PMID:27197206

  7. Selection and explosive growth alter genetic architecture and hamper the detection of causal rare variants.

    PubMed

    Uricchio, Lawrence H; Zaitlen, Noah A; Ye, Chun Jimmie; Witte, John S; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2016-07-01

    The role of rare alleles in complex phenotypes has been hotly debated, but most rare variant association tests (RVATs) do not account for the evolutionary forces that affect genetic architecture. Here, we use simulation and numerical algorithms to show that explosive population growth, as experienced by human populations, can dramatically increase the impact of very rare alleles on trait variance. We then assess the ability of RVATs to detect causal loci using simulations and human RNA-seq data. Surprisingly, we find that statistical performance is worst for phenotypes in which genetic variance is due mainly to rare alleles, and explosive population growth decreases power. Although many studies have attempted to identify causal rare variants, few have reported novel associations. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean that rare variants make negligible contributions to complex trait heritability. Our work shows that RVATs are not robust to realistic human evolutionary forces, so general conclusions about the impact of rare variants on complex traits may be premature. PMID:27197206

  8. A recurrent marker chromosome involving chromosome 1 in two mammary tumors of the dog.

    PubMed

    Bartnitzke, S; Motzko, H; Caselitz, J; Kornberg, M; Bullerdiek, J; Schloot, W

    1992-01-01

    An apparently identical marker chromosome resulting from a chromosome 1. translocation was found in the mammary carcinomas of two bitches. Although these karyotypic aberrations were the sole clonal aberrations detected, it was not possible to unambiguously identify the material translocated to the chromosome 1 in either animal. Our observations, however, represent the first report of a recurring marker chromosome in mammary tumors of the dog and suggest that these tumors may become an interesting model for human breast cancer. PMID:1319309

  9. Detection of DNA double-strand breaks and chromosome translocations using ligation-mediated PCR and inverse PCR.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Michael J; Betti, Christopher J; Vaughan, Andrew T M

    2005-01-01

    Current techniques for examining the global creation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks are restricted in their sensitivity, and such techniques mask any site-dependent variations in breakage and repair rate or fidelity. We present here a system for analyzing the fate of documented DNA breaks, using the MLL gene as an example, through application of ligation-mediated PCR. Here, a simple asymmetric double-stranded DNA adapter molecule is ligated to experimentally induced DNA breaks and subjected to seminested PCR using adapter and gene-specific primers. The rate of appearance and loss of specific PCR products allows detection of both the break and its repair. Using the additional technique of inverse PCR, the presence of misrepaired products (translocations) can be detected at the same site, providing information on the fidelity of the ligation reaction in intact cells. Such techniques may be adapted for the analysis of DNA breaks introduced into any identifiable genomic location. PMID:15502230

  10. Fast detection of MYCN copy number alterations in brain neuronal tumors by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Malakho, S G; Korshunov, A; Stroganova, A M; Poltaraus, A B

    2008-01-01

    Increased MYCN gene copy number is a characteristic property of neurogenic tumors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) are traditionally used to determine MYCN amplification for tumor stratification. A unique ability of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine gene copy number, even within a small percent of observed tumor cells, and can be more appropriate. MYCN genomic copy number from 44 human brain tumors (22 medulloblastomas and 22 neurocytomas) was determined by means of FISH, array-CGH, and qPCR. By qPCR, with the original set of oligonucleotides, 17 out of 44 (38.6%) tumors were found to contain a 1.3- to 2.9-fold increase of MYCN defined as low-level gain. An absolute qPCR method was used to get high accuracy of results. Strong correlation was observed between the three methods: for medulloblastomas, r=1 (P<0.01) between FISH and array-CGH and r=0.92 (P<0.01) between qPCR and FISH/array-CGH. For neurocytomas, r=0.9 (P<0.01) between FISH and array-CGH and r=0.34/0.43 (P<0.01) between qPCR and FISH/array-CGH. Absolute qPCR assays possess high precision compared to other conventional methods and can be used for accurate and quickness detection of MYCN status (low-level gene gain and amplification). PMID:18348317

  11. Detecting altered postural control after cerebral concussion in athletes with normal postural stability

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, J; Guskiewicz, K; Giuliani, C; Marshall, S; Mercer, V; Stergiou, N

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine if approximate entropy (ApEn), a regularity statistic from non-linear dynamics, could detect changes in postural control during quiet standing in athletes with normal postural stability after cerebral concussion. Methods: The study was a retrospective, case series analysis of centre of pressure (COP) data collected during the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) from NCAA Division I (USA) athletes prior to and within 48 h after injury. Subjects were 21 male and six female athletes from a variety of sports who sustained a cerebral concussion between 1997 and 2003. After injury, athletes displayed normal postural stability equivalent to preseason levels. For comparison, COP data also were collected from 15 male and 15 female healthy non-athletes on two occasions. ApEn values were calculated for COP anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) time series. Results: Compared to healthy subjects, COP oscillations among athletes generally became more regular (lower ApEn value) after injury despite the absence of postural instability. For AP time series, declines in ApEn values were much larger in SOT conditions 1 and 2 (approximately three times as large as the standard error of the mean) than for all other conditions. For ML time series, ApEn values declined after injury in all sensory conditions (F1,55 = 6.36, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Athletes who demonstrated normal postural stability after concussion nonetheless displayed subtle changes in postural control. Changes in ApEn may have represented a clinically abnormal finding. ApEn analysis of COP oscillations may be a valuable supplement to existing concussion assessment protocols for athletes. PMID:16244188

  12. Differential display detects host nucleic acid motifs altered in scrapie-infected brain.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Harris, Alyson

    2009-09-25

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) including scrapie have been attributed to an infectious protein or prion. Infectivity is allied to conversion of the endogenous nucleic-acid-binding protein PrP to an infectious modified form known as PrP(sc). The protein-only theory does not easily explain the enigmatic properties of the agent including strain variation. It was previously suggested that a short nucleic acid, perhaps host-encoded, might contribute to the pathoetiology of the TSEs. No candidate host molecules that might explain transmission of strain differences have yet been put forward. Differential display is a robust technique for detecting nucleic acid differences between two populations. We applied this technique to total nucleic acid preparations from scrapie-infected and control brain. Independent RNA preparations from eight normal and eight scrapie-infected (strain 263K) hamster brains were randomly amplified and visualized in parallel. Though the nucleic acid patterns were generally identical in scrapie-infected versus control brain, some rare bands were differentially displayed. Molecular species consistently overrepresented (or underrepresented) in all eight infected brain samples versus all eight controls were excised from the display, sequenced, and assembled into contigs. Only seven ros contigs (RNAs over- or underrepresented in scrapie) emerged, representing <4 kb from the transcriptome. All contained highly stable regions of secondary structure. The most abundant scrapie-only ros sequence was homologous to a repetitive transposable element (LINE; long interspersed nuclear element). Other ros sequences identified cellular RNA 7SL, clathrin heavy chain, visinin-like protein-1, and three highly specific subregions of ribosomal RNA (ros1-3). The ribosomal ros sequences accurately corresponded to LINE; retrotransposon insertion sites in ribosomal DNA (p<0.01). These differential motifs implicate specific host RNAs in the pathoetiology

  13. Alterations in global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation are not detected in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gami, Priya; Valizadeh, Navid; Li, Abi; Revesz, Tamas; Balazs, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Aims Genetic factors do not seem to account fully for Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. There is evidence for the contribution of environmental factors, whose effect may be mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetics involves the regulation of gene expression independently of DNA sequence and these epigenetic changes are influenced by age and environmental factors, with DNA methylation being one of the best characterized epigenetic mechanisms. The human genome is predominantly methylated on CpG motifs, which results in gene silencing; however methylation within the body of the gene may mark active transcription. There is evidence suggesting an involvement of environmental factors in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which prompted our study examining DNA methylation in this disorder. Methods Using immunohistochemistry with 5‐methylcytosine/5‐hydroxymethylcytosine antibodies we studied, in comparison with age matched controls, DNA methylation in sporadic and familial AD cases in the entorhinal cortex that exhibits substantial pathology and the cerebellum, which is relatively spared. Results Neuronal nuclear labelling with 5‐methylcytosine (5mC) and 5‐hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) was evident in all cases studied. We did not detect any significant change in the levels of nuclear staining in the AD samples compared to neurologically normal controls. In the entorhinal cortex we also examined global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation using an enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Conclusion No significant differences were found between AD and control cases in global levels of 5mC and 5hmC in the entorhinal cortex using immunohistochemistry and enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assays. PMID:25201696

  14. A marker chromosome in post-transplant bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Morsberger, Laura; Powell, Kerry; Ning, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Detection of small supernumerary marker chromosomes in karyotype analysis represents a diagnostic challenge. While such markers are usually detected during cytogenetic studies of constitutional chromosome abnormalities, they have also been found in specimens submitted from patients with acquired malignancies. We report here the detection of a marker chromosome in a bone marrow specimen from a patient who received a bone marrow transplantation. We discuss the importance of proper characterization and interpretation of marker chromosomes in clinical practice. PMID:27252781

  15. Chromosome engineering: power tools for plant genetics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Simon W L

    2010-12-01

    The term "chromosome engineering" describes technologies in which chromosomes are manipulated to change their mode of genetic inheritance. This review examines recent innovations in chromosome engineering that promise to greatly increase the efficiency of plant breeding. Haploid Arabidopsis thaliana have been produced by altering the kinetochore protein CENH3, yielding instant homozygous lines. Haploid production will facilitate reverse breeding, a method that downregulates recombination to ensure progeny contain intact parental chromosomes. Another chromosome engineering success is the conversion of meiosis into mitosis, which produces diploid gametes that are clones of the parent plant. This is a key step in apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) and could help to preserve hybrid vigor in the future. New homologous recombination methods in plants will potentiate many chromosome engineering applications. PMID:20933291

  16. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Wu; Bai, Lin; Dai, Lyu-Xia; He, Xu; Zhou, Xian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions. Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes. The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations. In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19. Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations. CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33 and 17p13.1-13.3. And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG). Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis. We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p13.31-13.33, and 17p13.1-13.3. Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM. PMID:26879013

  17. Size threshold for Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes: generation of telocentric chromosomes from an unstable minichromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Zakian, V A; Blanton, H M; Wetzel, L; Dani, G M

    1986-01-01

    A 9-kilobase pair CEN4 linear minichromosome constructed in vitro transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae with high frequency but duplicated or segregated inefficiently in most cells. Stable transformants were only produced by events which fundamentally altered the structure of the minichromosome: elimination of telomeres, alteration of the centromere, or an increase of fivefold or greater in its size. Half of the stable transformants arose via homologous recombination between an intact chromosome IV and the CEN4 minichromosome. This event generated a new chromosome from each arm of chromosome IV. The other "arm" of each new chromosome was identical to one "arm" of the unstable minichromosome. Unlike natural yeast chromosomes, these new chromosomes were telocentric: their centromeres were either 3.9 or 5.4 kilobases from one end of the chromosome. The mitotic stability of the telocentric chromosome derived from the right arm of chromosome IV was determined by a visual assay and found to be comparable to that of natural yeast chromosomes. Both new chromosomes duplicated, paired, and segregated properly in meiosis. Moreover, their structure, as deduced from mobilities in orthogonal field gels, did not change with continued mitotic growth or after passage through meiosis, indicating that they did not give rise to isochromosomes or suffer large deletions or additions. Thus, in S. cerevisiae the close spacing of centromeres and telomeres on a DNA molecule of chromosomal size does not markedly alter the efficiency with which it is maintained. Taken together these data suggest that there is a size threshold below which stable propagation of linear chromosomes is no longer possible. Images PMID:3022139

  18. Detection of integrons and Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome (SCCmec) types in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from burn and non-burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Namvar, Amirmorteza Ebrahimzadeh; Khodaei, Farzaneh; Bijari, Aslan; Lari, Abdolaziz Rastegar

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have been recognized as an important reason of infections in health care units. Integrons role in antibiotic resistance box gene transfer has been well recognized which are found in Gram positive bacteria. Objective The aim of this study was analyzed of SCCmec typing and determine of integron classes in burn and non-burn specimens. Methodology A total of 110 S. aureus strains were isolated from burn and non-burn patients. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of mecA gene, various SCCmec types and integrons classes were analyzed. Results In antimicrobial susceptibility test in burn patients, resistant to both gentamicin and oxacilin and in non-burn patients resistance to oxacilin and cefepime showed the highest ratio In PCR molecular test (80%) and (52.7%) of strains harbored the mecA gene. Therefore five different SCCmec types were recognized among our studied strains. Subsequently, integron class I was evaluated as (94.5%) in burn and (12.7%) in non-burn isolates by the multiplex PCR method. Conclusion Albeit MRSA strains have the hospital reservoir so may cause serious treats for hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients, hence clinical decision for prevention and treatment may develop due to, mecA gene, SCCmec elements and integrons detection in health care units. PMID:26715924

  19. Multimolecular salivary mucin complex is altered in saliva of cigarette smokers: detection of disulfide bridges by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Motoe; Iizuka, Junko; Murata, Yukari; Ito, Yumi; Iwamiya, Mariko; Mori, Hiroshi; Hirata, Yukio; Mukai, Yoshiharu; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    Saliva contains mucins, which protect epithelial cells. We showed a smaller amount of salivary mucin, both MG1 and MG2, in the premenopausal female smokers than in their nonsmoking counterparts. Smokers' MG1, which contains almost 2% cysteine/half cystine in its amino acid residues, turned out to be chemically altered in the nonsmoker's saliva. The smaller acidic glycoprotein bands were detectable only in smoker's saliva in the range of 20-25 kDa and at 45 kDa, suggesting that degradation, at least in part, caused the reduction of MG1 mucin. This is in agreement with the previous finding that free radicals in cigarette smoke modify mucins in both sugar and protein moieties. Moreover, proteins such as amylase and albumin are bound to other proteins through disulfide bonds and are identifiable only after reduction with DTT. Confocal laser Raman microspectroscopy identified a disulfide stretch band of significantly stronger intensity per protein in the stimulated saliva of smokers alone. We conclude that the saliva of smokers, especially stimulated saliva, contains significantly more oxidized form of proteins with increased disulfide bridges, that reduces protection for oral epithelium. Raman microspectroscopy can be used for an easy detection of the damaged salivary proteins. PMID:23509686

  20. Highly frequent allelic loss of chromosome 6q16-23 in osteosarcoma: involvement of cyclin C in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Norihide; Ito, Sachio; Yoshida, Aki; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Numoto, Kunihiko; Jitsumori, Yoshimi; Kanzaki, Hirotaka; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Shimizu, Kenji; Ouchida, Mamoru

    2006-12-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of osteosarcoma is very complicated and associated with chaotic abnormalities on many chromosomal arms. We analyzed 12 cases of osteosarcomas with comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to identify chromosomal imbalances, and detected highly frequent chromosomal alterations in chromosome 6q, 8p, 10p and 10q. To define the narrow rearranged region on chromosome 6 with higher resolution, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis was performed with 21 microsatellite markers. Out of 31 cases, 23 cases (74%) showed allelic loss at least with one marker on chromosome 6q. We identified two distinct commonly deleted regions on chromosome 6 using markers D6S1565 located at 6q16 and 6q23MS1 at 6q23. The expression analysis of genes located at the deleted region was performed, and the decreased mRNA expression of the CCNC gene, one of the regulators of cell cycle, was detected. Growth of osteosarcoma cell line was significantly suppressed after the CCNC cDNA transfection. Fine mapping of the deleted region containing a possible tumor suppressor gene and the transfection assay suggest that the CCNC is a candidate tumor suppressor gene. PMID:17089020

  1. A chromosome 11 YAC library

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.; Zhang, J.; Isaacs, C.M.; Nagafuchi, S.; Jani Sait, S.N.; Abel, K.J.; Higgins, M.J.; Nowak, N.J.; Shows, T.B. )

    1993-06-01

    A targeted yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library for chromosome 11 has been constructed from the J1 cell line that carries a single human chromosome 11 within a hamster DNA background. Interspecies chimeric clones generated during construction of the library were detected during the screening process and eliminated from the library. Contig assembly becomes much less difficult using such a library as the complexity is decreased and the ends of the clone inserts can be rescued for walking to neighboring clones. The library contains > 1824 clones with an average insert length of 337 kb. This represents a fourfold coverage of chromosome 11 or a >95% chance of recovering a unique single-copy sequence from the library. Two hundred YAC clones were localized by fluorescence in situ hybridization and found to be randomly distributed along the chromosome. The library has been screened with probes for the chromosome 11 markers HBB, GLUR4, H19, and D11S193. Corresponding YAC clones have been isolated for each locus. This analysis has indicated that the library is unbiased, that cognate YAC clones can be recovered with chromosome 11 markers, and that extensive contig assembly should be feasible. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Differentiation of UK endemic strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport from epidemic North American strains by PCR detection of a truncated bapA chromosomal gene.

    PubMed

    Horton, R A; Card, R; Randall, L P; Teale, C J

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a PCR test to detect chromosomal differences between epidemic multidrug resistant (epi-MDR) strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport (S. Newport) and non-epi-MDR strains of S. Newport that are endemic to the United Kingdom (UK). Sequence analysis of the biofilm-associated protein A gene (bapA) showed that epi-MDR strains of S. Newport from the United States of America (USA) had a deletion of 309 bp, which was not present in non-epi-MDR strains of S. Newport from the UK. A PCR test was developed using primers designed to target this difference and was applied to a panel of S. Newport isolates comprising of strains from the UK (n=20, non-epi-MDR), from the USA (n=10, epi-MDR) and from Canada (n=7). A second panel of isolates (n=73) was used to assess the test specificity, and these isolates consisted of non-Newport Salmonella serovars (n=25), and other epidemic serovars (n=48). Epi-MDR S. Newport isolates produced a characteristic 505 bp amplicon, whereas non-epi-MDR S. Newport isolates produced an 814 bp amplicon. The bapA PCR has potential to discriminate between these S. Newport strains irrespective of their carrying resistance genes. PMID:26850548

  3. Detection of chromosomal changes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia using classical cytogenetic methods and FISH: application of rich mitogen mixtures for lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Koczkodaj, Dorota; Popek, Sylwia; Zmorzyński, Szymon; Wąsik-Szczepanek, Ewa; Filip, Agata A

    2016-04-01

    One of the research methods of prognostic value in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is cytogenetic analysis. This method requires the presence of appropriate B-cell mitogens in cultures in order to obtain a high mitotic index. The aim of our research was to determine the most effective methods of in vitro B-cell stimulation to maximize the number of metaphases from peripheral blood cells of patients with CLL for classical cytogenetic examination, and then to correlate the results with those obtained using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The study group involved 50 consecutive patients with CLL. Cell cultures were maintained with the basic composition of culture medium and addition of respective stimulators. We used the following stimulators: Pokeweed Mitogen (PWM), 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), ionophore, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30. We received the highest mitotic index when using the mixture of PWM+TPA+I+DSP30. With classical cytogenetic tests using banding techniques, numerical and structural aberrations of chromosomes were detected in 46 patients, and no change was found in only four patients. Test results clearly confirmed the legitimacy of using cell cultures enriched with the mixture of cell stimulators and combining classical cytogenetic techniques with the FISH technique in later patient diagnosing. PMID:26956786

  4. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Niels B.; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O.; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment. PMID:25979887

  5. DNA-Damage Foci to Detect and Characterize DNA Repair Alterations in Children Treated for Pediatric Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Mareike; Betten, Dominik; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Rübe, Christian; Graf, Norbert; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA) suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. Methods and Materials In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting γH2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. Results Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. Conclusions Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies. PMID:24637877

  6. Vis-NIR Spectroscopy of Mineral Mixtures with Montmorillonite and Silica: Implications for Detecting Alteration Products on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.

    2009-12-01

    generally present in silica-mixture spectra that contain >10 wt% silica. Conclusions. Vis-NIR spectra of our mineral mixtures show that montmorillonite has a lower detection limit than amorphous silica, based on the presence of the ~2.2 μm absorption. This indicates that chemically weathered surfaces on Mars that contain silica must have much more alteration material to be detected than surfaces with clay. Furthermore, the shape and position of the 1.4 and 1.9 μm features changes with igneous mineral type and silica abundance, which adds to the difficulty in using vis-NIR to detect amorphous silica on Mars. Our study is consistent with a previous study that demonstrates the inability to detect thin silica coatings on basaltic particulates by vis-NIR spectroscopy [5], and suggests acidic chemical weathering and the precipitation of amorphous silica on Mars may be more pervasive and intense than vis-NIR spectroscopic data indicate. References. [1] J.-P. Bibring et al. (2006) Science, 312, 400-404. [2] F. Poulet et al. (2005) Nature, 438, 623-627. [3] J.F. Mustard et al. (2008) Nature, 454, 305-309. [4] R.E. Milliken et al. (2008) Geology, 36, 847-850. [5] M.D. Kraft et al. (2007) 7th Int. Conf. Mars, 3396.

  7. Characterization of chromosome 1 abnormalities in malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Smedley, D; Sidhar, S; Birdsall, S; Bennett, D; Herlyn, M; Cooper, C; Shipley, J

    2000-05-01

    Chromosome 1 abnormalities are the most commonly detected aberrations in many cancers including malignant melanomas. Specific breakpoints are reported for malignant melanomas throughout the chromosome but especially at 1p36 and at several sites throughout 1p22-q21. In addition, partial deletions and loss of heterozygosity have been found on 1p indicating the possible location of tumor suppressor genes. Here we have characterized the involvement of chromosome 1 in a series of seven malignant melanoma cell lines. Initial chromosome painting studies revealed that six of the cell lines had chromosome 1 rearrangements. Deletions involving 1p10-32, 1q11-44, and 1q25-44 were observed. The other rearrangement breakpoints included three in the 1q10-p11 region with the rest at 1p36, 1p34, 1p32, 1p31, 1p12-13, 1q21, and 1q23. The breaks at 1q10-p11 were investigated further using an alpha-satellite 1 centromere probe and yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) from the region. Two of the 1q10-p11 breaks mapped in the centromeric region, while the others mapped to variable sites. This suggests that the role of these rearrangements in the pathogenesis of melanomas does not involve the alteration of specific oncogenes in the breakpoint region. During the YAC mapping a previously undetected, small (<1 Mbp) del(1)(p10p11) was identified. This deletion lies within minimal overlapping deleted regions reported in head and neck as well as breast carcinomas and it could therefore facilitate the isolation of a carcinoma-associated tumor suppressor gene. PMID:10738310

  8. Chromosome heteromorphism quantified by high-resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    PubMed

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Mayall, B; Gray, J W

    1989-11-01

    Maternal and paternal homologues of many chromosome types can be differentiated on the basis of their peak position in Hoechst 33258 versus chromomycin A3 bivariate flow karyotypes. We demonstrate here the magnitude of DNA content differences among normal chromosomes of the same type. Significant peak-position differences between homologues were observed for an average of four chromosome types in each of the karyotypes of 98 different individuals. The frequency of individuals with differences in homologue peak positions varied among chromosome types: e.g., chromosome 15, 61%; chromosome 3, 4%. Flow karyotypes of 33 unrelated individuals were compared to determine the range of peak position among normal chromosomes. Chromosomes Y, 21, 22, 15, 16, 13, 14, and 19 were most heteromorphic, and chromosomes 2-8 and X were least heteromorphic. The largest chromosome 21 was 45% larger than the smallest 21 chromosome observed. The base composition of the variable regions differed among chromosome types. DNA contents of chromosome variants determined from flow karyotypes were closely correlated to measurements of DNA content made of gallocyanin chrome alum-stained metaphase chromosomes on slides. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific repetitive sequences indicated that variability in their copy number is partly responsible for peak-position variability in some chromosomes. Heteromorphic chromosomes are identified for which parental flow karyotype information will be essential if de novo rearrangements resulting in small DNA content changes are to be detected with flow karyotyping. PMID:2479266

  9. Chromosome heteromorphism quantified by high-resolution bivariate flow karyotyping.

    PubMed Central

    Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Mayall, B; Gray, J W

    1989-01-01

    Maternal and paternal homologues of many chromosome types can be differentiated on the basis of their peak position in Hoechst 33258 versus chromomycin A3 bivariate flow karyotypes. We demonstrate here the magnitude of DNA content differences among normal chromosomes of the same type. Significant peak-position differences between homologues were observed for an average of four chromosome types in each of the karyotypes of 98 different individuals. The frequency of individuals with differences in homologue peak positions varied among chromosome types: e.g., chromosome 15, 61%; chromosome 3, 4%. Flow karyotypes of 33 unrelated individuals were compared to determine the range of peak position among normal chromosomes. Chromosomes Y, 21, 22, 15, 16, 13, 14, and 19 were most heteromorphic, and chromosomes 2-8 and X were least heteromorphic. The largest chromosome 21 was 45% larger than the smallest 21 chromosome observed. The base composition of the variable regions differed among chromosome types. DNA contents of chromosome variants determined from flow karyotypes were closely correlated to measurements of DNA content made of gallocyanin chrome alum-stained metaphase chromosomes on slides. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific repetitive sequences indicated that variability in their copy number is partly responsible for peak-position variability in some chromosomes. Heteromorphic chromosomes are identified for which parental flow karyotype information will be essential if de novo rearrangements resulting in small DNA content changes are to be detected with flow karyotyping. Images Figure 5 PMID:2479266

  10. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  11. Meiotic cohesin-based chromosome structure is essential for homologous chromosome pairing in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Matsuda, Atsushi; Okamasa, Kasumi; Nagahama, Yuki; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Chromosome structure is dramatically altered upon entering meiosis to establish chromosomal architectures necessary for the successful progression of meiosis-specific events. An early meiotic event involves the replacement of the non-SMC mitotic cohesins with their meiotic equivalents in most part of the chromosome, forming an axis on meiotic chromosomes. We previously demonstrated that the meiotic cohesin complex is required for chromosome compaction during meiotic prophase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. These studies revealed that chromosomes are elongated in the absence of the meiotic cohesin subunit Rec8 and shortened in the absence of the cohesin-associated protein Pds5. In this study, using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we found that Rec8 forms a linear axis on chromosomes, which is required for the organized axial structure of chromatin during meiotic prophase. In the absence of Pds5, the Rec8 axis is shortened whereas chromosomes are widened. In rec8 or pds5 mutants, the frequency of homologous chromosome pairing is reduced. Thus, Rec8 and Pds5 play an essential role in building a platform to support the chromosome architecture necessary for the spatial alignment of homologous chromosomes. PMID:26511279

  12. Spontaneous and Divergent Hexaploid Triticales Derived from Common Wheat × Rye by Complete Elimination of D-Genome Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changyou; Ji, Wanquan

    2015-01-01

    Background Hexaploid triticale could be either synthesized by crossing tetraploid wheat with rye, or developed by crossing hexaploid wheat with a hexaploid triticale or an octoploid triticale. Methodology/Principal Findings Here two hexaploid triticales with great morphologic divergence derived from common wheat cultivar M8003 (Triticum aestivum L.) × Austrian rye (Secale cereale L.) were reported, exhibiting high resistance for powdery mildew and stripe rust and potential for wheat improvement. Sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) karyotyping revealed that D-genome chromosomes were completely eliminated and the whole A-genome, B-genome and R-genome chromosomes were retained in both lines. Furthermore, plentiful alterations of wheat chromosomes including 5A and 7B were detected in both triticales and additionally altered 5B, 7A chromosome and restructured chromosome 2A was assayed in N9116H and N9116M, respectively, even after selfing for several decades. Besides, meiotic asynchrony was displayed and a variety of storage protein variations were assayed, especially in the HMW/LMW-GS region and secalins region in both triticales. Conclusion This study confirms that whole D-genome chromosomes could be preferentially eliminated in the hybrid of common wheat × rye, “genome shock” was accompanying the allopolyploidization of nascent triticales, and great morphologic divergence might result from the genetic variations. Moreover, new hexaploid triticale lines contributing potential resistance resources for wheat improvement were produced. PMID:25781330

  13. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  14. Identifying targets of selection in mosaic genomes with machine learning: applications in Anopheles gambiae for detecting sites within locally adapted chromosomal inversions.

    PubMed

    He, Qixin; Knowles, L Lacey

    2016-05-01

    Chromosomal inversions are important structural changes that may facilitate divergent selection when they capture co-adaptive loci in the face of gene flow. However, identifying selection targets within inversions can be challenging. The high degrees of differentiation between heterokaryotypes, as well as the differences in demographic histories of collinear regions compared with inverted ones, reduce the power of traditional outlier analyses for detecting selected loci. Here, we develop a new approach that uses discriminant functions informed from inversion-specific expectations to classify loci that are under selection (or drift). Analysis of RAD sequencing data we collected in a classic dipteran species with polymorphic inversion clines-Anopheles gambiae, a malaria vector species from sub-Saharan Africa-demonstrates the benefits of the approach compared with traditional outlier analyses. We focus specifically on two polymorphic inversions, the 2La and 2Rb arrangements that predominate in dry habitats and the 2L+(a) and 2R+(b) arrangements in wet habitats, which contrast with the minimal geographic structure of SNPs from collinear regions. With our approach, we identify two strongly selected regions within 2La associated with dry habitat. Moreover, we also show that the prevalence of selection is greater in the arrangement 2L+(a) that is associated with wet habitat (unlike presumed importance of selective divergence associated with the shift of the mosquitoes into dry habitats). We discuss the implications of these results with respect to studies of rapid adaptation in these malaria vectors, and in particular, the insights our newly developed approach offers for identifying not only potential targets of selection, but also the population that has undergone adaptive change. PMID:26994406

  15. Functional genomic analysis of chromosomal aberrations in a compendium of 8000 cancer genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Min; Xi, Ruibin; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Park, Richard W.; Johnson, Mark D.; Park, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    A large database of copy number profiles from cancer genomes can facilitate the identification of recurrent chromosomal alterations that often contain key cancer-related genes. It can also be used to explore low-prevalence genomic events such as chromothripsis. In this study, we report an analysis of 8227 human cancer copy number profiles obtained from 107 array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) studies. Our analysis reveals similarity of chromosomal arm-level alterations among developmentally related tumor types as well as a number of co-occurring pairs of arm-level alterations. Recurrent (“pan-lineage”) focal alterations identified across diverse tumor types show an enrichment of known cancer-related genes and genes with relevant functions in cancer-associated phenotypes (e.g., kinase and cell cycle). Tumor type-specific (“lineage-restricted”) alterations and their enriched functional categories were also identified. Furthermore, we developed an algorithm for detecting regions in which the copy number oscillates rapidly between fixed levels, indicative of chromothripsis. We observed these massive genomic rearrangements in 1%–2% of the samples with variable tumor type-specific incidence rates. Taken together, our comprehensive view of copy number alterations provides a framework for understanding the functional significance of various genomic alterations in cancer genomes. PMID:23132910

  16. Comparative genomic hybridization: Detection of segmental aneusomies

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, J.E.; Magrane, G.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has been used successfully to detect whole chromosome and segmental aneusomies. However, its sensitivity for detection of segmental aneusomies is still not well known. We present here an analysis of CGH sensitivity with emphasis on detection of abnormalities commonly found during pre-and neo-natal diagnosis. CGH is performed by hybridizing green and red fluorescing test and normal DNA samples, respectively, to normal metaphase spreads and measuring green:red fluorescence ratios along all chromosomes. The ratios are normalized such that 2 copies of a normal chromosome region in the test sample gives a ratio of 1.0. Alterations in test vs. control gene copy number range from 1.5 [trisomy] to 0.5 [monosomy]. Clinical samples analyzed included Wolf Hirschhorn (4p-), Cri du Chat (5p-) and DiGeorge (22q-). In addition, 7 cell lines with chromosome 21 segmental aneusomies were analyzed. These included 3 with terminal duplications, 1 with a terminal deletion, 1 with an interstitial deletion and 2 with interstitial amplifications. The DiGeorge deletion was the only deletion not deleted by CGH. This is not surprising as standard G banding does not routinely detect this 1-2 megabase deletion. The 4p- and 5p- monosomies were detected and breakpoints correctly assigned prospectively. Proximal alterations involving 21q22.11 are unambiguously defined. Specifically, two interstitial aneusomies involving this region are detected. Studies involving late prophase chromosome normal spreads gave identical breakpoints. Thus, analysis of extended chromosomes did not improve the sensitivity of the technique. Taken together, these data suggest that CGH can detect segmental aneusomies greater than 8 megabases in extent. Smaller aneusomies can, at times, be detected. Work is now underway to modify the analysis software to increase sensitivity and to decrease the amount of material needed for analysis.

  17. FLP-mediated DNA mobilization to specific target sites in Drosophila chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Golic, M M; Rong, Y S; Petersen, R B; Lindquist, S L; Golic, K G

    1997-01-01

    The ability to place a series of gene constructs at a specific site in the genome opens new possibilities for the experimental examination of gene expression and chromosomal position effects. We report that the FLP- FRT site-specific recombination system of the yeast 2mu plasmid can be used to integrate DNA at a chromosomal FRT target site in Drosophila. The technique we used was to first integrate an FRT- flanked gene by standard P element-mediated transformation. FLP was then used to excise the FRT- flanked donor DNA and screen for FLP-mediated re-integration at an FRT target at a different chromosome location. Such events were recovered from up to 5% of the crosses used to screen for mobilization and are easily detectable by altered linkage of a white reporter gene or by the generation of a white + gene upon integration. PMID:9278488

  18. Genome-wide gene expression perturbation induced by loss of C2 chromosome in allotetraploid Brassica napus L.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Shao, Yujiao; Pan, Qi; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy with loss of entire chromosomes from normal complement disrupts the balanced genome and is tolerable only by polyploidy plants. In this study, the monosomic and nullisomic plants losing one or two copies of C2 chromosome from allotetraploid Brassica napus L. (2n = 38, AACC) were produced and compared for their phenotype and transcriptome. The monosomics gave a plant phenotype very similar to the original donor, but the nullisomics had much smaller stature and also shorter growth period. By the comparative analyses on the global transcript profiles with the euploid donor, genome-wide alterations in gene expression were revealed in two aneuploids, and their majority of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) resulted from the trans-acting effects of the zero and one copy of C2 chromosome. The higher number of up-regulated genes than down-regulated genes on other chromosomes suggested that the genome responded to the C2 loss via enhancing the expression of certain genes. Particularly, more DEGs were detected in the monosomics than nullisomics, contrasting with their phenotypes. The gene expression of the other chromosomes was differently affected, and several dysregulated domains in which up- or downregulated genes obviously clustered were identifiable. But the mean gene expression (MGE) for homoeologous chromosome A2 reduced with the C2 loss. Some genes and their expressions on C2 were correlated with the phenotype deviations in the aneuploids. These results provided new insights into the transcriptomic perturbation of the allopolyploid genome elicited by the loss of individual chromosome. PMID:26442076

  19. Potential of Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Relaxometry for the Detection of Specific Pathological Alterations in Parkinson's Disease (PD)

    PubMed Central

    Esterhammer, Regina; Seppi, Klaus; Reiter, Eva; Pinter, Bernadette; Mueller, Christoph; Kremser, Christian; Zitzelsberger, Tanja; Nocker, Michael; Scherfler, Christoph; Poewe, Werner; Schocke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of multimodal MR imaging including mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), relaxation rates R2 and R2* to detect disease specific alterations in Parkinson's Disease (PD). We enrolled 82 PD patients (PD-all) with varying disease durations (≤5 years: PD≤5, n = 43; >5 years: PD>5, n = 39) and 38 matched healthy controls (HC), receiving diffusion tensor imaging as well as R2 and R2* relaxometry calculated from multi-echo T2*-weighted and dual-echo TSE imaging, respectively. ROIs were drawn to delineate caudate nucleus (CN), putamen (PU), globus pallidus (GP) and substantia nigra (SN) on the co-registered maps. The SN was divided in 3 descending levels (SL 1–3). The most significant parameters were used for a flexible discrimination analysis (FDA) in a training collective consisting of 25 randomized subjects from each group in order to predict the classification of remaining subjects. PD-all showed significant increases in MD, R2 and R2* within SN and its subregions as well as in MD and R2* within different basal ganglia regions. Compared to the HC group, the PD≤5 and the PD>5 group showed significant MD increases within the SN and its lower two subregions, while the PD≤5 group exhibited significant increases in R2 and R2* within SN and its subregions, and tended to elevation within the basal ganglia. The PD>5 group had significantly increased MD in PU and GP, whereas the PD≤5 group presented normal MD within the basal ganglia. FDA achieved right classification in 84% of study participants. Micro-structural damage affects primarily the SN of PD patients and in later disease stages the basal ganglia. Iron contents of PU, GP and SN are increased at early disease stages of PD. PMID:26713760

  20. Potential of Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Relaxometry for the Detection of Specific Pathological Alterations in Parkinson's Disease (PD).

    PubMed

    Esterhammer, Regina; Seppi, Klaus; Reiter, Eva; Pinter, Bernadette; Mueller, Christoph; Kremser, Christian; Zitzelsberger, Tanja; Nocker, Michael; Scherfler, Christoph; Poewe, Werner; Schocke, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of multimodal MR imaging including mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), relaxation rates R2 and R2* to detect disease specific alterations in Parkinson's Disease (PD). We enrolled 82 PD patients (PD-all) with varying disease durations (≤5 years: PD≤5, n = 43; >5 years: PD>5, n = 39) and 38 matched healthy controls (HC), receiving diffusion tensor imaging as well as R2 and R2* relaxometry calculated from multi-echo T2*-weighted and dual-echo TSE imaging, respectively. ROIs were drawn to delineate caudate nucleus (CN), putamen (PU), globus pallidus (GP) and substantia nigra (SN) on the co-registered maps. The SN was divided in 3 descending levels (SL 1-3). The most significant parameters were used for a flexible discrimination analysis (FDA) in a training collective consisting of 25 randomized subjects from each group in order to predict the classification of remaining subjects. PD-all showed significant increases in MD, R2 and R2* within SN and its subregions as well as in MD and R2* within different basal ganglia regions. Compared to the HC group, the PD≤5 and the PD>5 group showed significant MD increases within the SN and its lower two subregions, while the PD≤5 group exhibited significant increases in R2 and R2* within SN and its subregions, and tended to elevation within the basal ganglia. The PD>5 group had significantly increased MD in PU and GP, whereas the PD≤5 group presented normal MD within the basal ganglia. FDA achieved right classification in 84% of study participants. Micro-structural damage affects primarily the SN of PD patients and in later disease stages the basal ganglia. Iron contents of PU, GP and SN are increased at early disease stages of PD. PMID:26713760

  1. Altered Diastolic Flow Patterns and Kinetic Energy in Subtle Left Ventricular Remodeling and Dysfunction Detected by 4D Flow MRI

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Alexandru; Eriksson, Jonatan; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Ebbers, Tino; Bolger, Ann F.; Engvall, Jan; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan

    2016-01-01

    Aims 4D flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows quantitative assessment of left ventricular (LV) function according to characteristics of the dynamic flow in the chamber. Marked abnormalities in flow components’ volume and kinetic energy (KE) have previously been demonstrated in moderately dilated and depressed LV’s compared to healthy subjects. We hypothesized that these 4D flow-based measures would detect even subtle LV dysfunction and remodeling. Methods and Results We acquired 4D flow and morphological MRI data from 26 patients with chronic ischemic heart disease with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I and II and with no to mild LV systolic dysfunction and remodeling, and from 10 healthy controls. A previously validated method was used to separate the LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) into functional components: direct flow, which passes directly to ejection, and non-ejecting flow, which remains in the LV for at least 1 cycle. The direct flow and non-ejecting flow proportions of end-diastolic volume and KE were assessed. The proportions of direct flow volume and KE fell with increasing LVEDV-index (LVEDVI) and LVESV-index (LVESVI) (direct flow volume r = -0.64 and r = -0.74, both P<0.001; direct flow KE r = -0.48, P = 0.013, and r = -0.56, P = 0.003). The proportions of non-ejecting flow volume and KE rose with increasing LVEDVI and LVESVI (non-ejecting flow volume: r = 0.67 and r = 0.76, both P<0.001; non-ejecting flow KE: r = 0.53, P = 0.005 and r = 0.52, P = 0.006). The proportion of direct flow volume correlated moderately to LVEF (r = 0.68, P < 0.001) and was higher in a sub-group of patients with LVEDVI >74 ml/m2 compared to patients with LVEDVI <74 ml/m2 and controls (both P<0.05). Conclusion Direct flow volume and KE proportions diminish with increased LV volumes, while non-ejecting flow proportions increase. A decrease in direct flow volume and KE at end-diastole proposes that alterations in these novel 4D flow-specific markers may detect

  2. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia-associated chromosomal abnormalities and miRNA deregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Yvonne; Schulte, Christoph; Tiemann, Markus; Bullerdiek, Joern

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is the most common leukemia in adults. By cytogenetic investigations major subgroups of the disease can be identified that reflect different routes of tumor development. Of these chromosomal deviations, trisomy 12 and deletions of parts of either the long arm of chromosome 13, the long arm of chromosome 11, or the short arm of chromosome 17 are most commonly detected. In some of these aberrations the molecular target has been identified as eg, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in case of deletions of chromosomal region 11q22~23 and the genes encoding microRNAs miR-15a/16-1 as likely targets of deletions of chromosomal band 13q14.3. Of note, these aberrations do not characterize independent subgroups but often coexist within the metaphases of one tumor. Generally, complex aberrations are associated with a worse prognosis than simple karyotypic alterations. Due to smaller sizes of the missing segment the detection of recurrent deletions is not always possible by means of classical cytogenetics but requires more advanced techniques as in particular fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Nevertheless, at this time it is not recommended to replace classical cytogenetics by FISH because this would miss additional information given by complex or secondary karyotypic alterations. However, the results of cytogenetic analyses allow the stratification of prognostic and predictive groups of the disease. Of these, the group characterized by deletions involving TP53 is clinically most relevant. In the future refined methods as eg, array-based comparative genomic hybridization will supplement the existing techniques to characterize CLL. PMID:23776377

  3. Chromosome landmarks and autosome-sex chromosome translocations in Rumex hastatulus, a plant with XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system.

    PubMed

    Grabowska-Joachimiak, Aleksandra; Kula, Adam; Książczyk, Tomasz; Chojnicka, Joanna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Joachimiak, Andrzej J

    2015-06-01

    Rumex hastatulus is the North American endemic dioecious plant with heteromorphic sex chromosomes. It is differentiated into two chromosomal races: Texas (T) race characterised by a simple XX/XY sex chromosome system and North Carolina (NC) race with a polymorphic XX/XY1Y2 sex chromosome system. The gross karyotype morphology in NC race resembles the derived type, but chromosomal changes that occurred during its evolution are poorly understood. Our C-banding/DAPI and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments demonstrated that Y chromosomes of both races are enriched in DAPI-positive sequences and that the emergence of polymorphic sex chromosome system was accompanied by the break of ancestral Y chromosome and switch in the localization of 5S rDNA, from autosomes to sex chromosomes (X and Y2). Two contrasting domains were detected within North Carolina Y chromosomes: the older, highly heterochromatinised, inherited from the original Y chromosome and the younger, euchromatic, representing translocated autosomal material. The flow-cytometric DNA estimation showed ∼3.5 % genome downsizing in the North Carolina race. Our results are in contradiction to earlier reports on the lack of heterochromatin within Y chromosomes of this species and enable unambiguous identification of autosomes involved in the autosome-heterosome translocation, providing useful chromosome landmarks for further studies on the karyotype and sex chromosome differentiation in this species. PMID:25394583

  4. Evolutionary trends in the family Curimatidae (Characiformes): inferences from chromosome banding

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Tatiane Ramos; Pires, Larissa Bettin; Venturelli, Natália Bortolazzi; Usso, Mariana Campaner; da Rosa, Renata; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The family Curimatidae is a fish group usually considered chromosomally conserved in their diploid number. However, some studies show small changes in the karyotype microstructure, and the presence of B chromosomes, indicating a chromosomal diversification within the group, even if structural changes in the karyotypes are not visible. Few studies associate this trait with an evolutionary pattern within the family. This study aimed to characterize the karyotype, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), and heterochromatin distribution of six species of Curimatidae of the genera Cyphocharax Fowler, 1906 and Steindachnerina Fowler, 1906: Cyphocharax voga (Hensel, 1870), Cyphocharax spilotus (Vari, 1987), Cyphocharax saladensis (Meinken, 1933), Cyphocharax modestus (Fernández-Yépez, 1948), Steindachnerina biornata (Braga et Azpelicueta, 1987) and Steindachnerina insculpta (Fernández-Yépez, 1948) and contribute data to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the chromosomal evolution of this group of fish. All specimens had 2n=54, m-sm, and B microchromosomes. Five species exhibited single NORs, except for Steindachnerina biornata, which showed a multiple pattern of ribosomal sites. NORs were chromomycin A3 positive (CMA3+) and 4’-6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI-) negative, exhibiting differences in the pair and chromosomal location of each individual of the species. FISH with 5S rDNA probe revealed sites in the pericentrometic position of a pair of chromosomes of five species. However, another site was detected on a metacentric chromosome of Cyphocharax spilotus. Heterochromatin distributed both in the pericentromeric and some terminal regions was revealed to be CMA3+/DAPI-. These data associated with the previously existing ones confirm that, although Curimatidae have a very conservative karyotype macrostructure, NORs and heterochromatin variability are caused by mechanisms of chromosome alterations, such as translocations and/or inversions

  5. Evolutionary trends in the family Curimatidae (Characiformes): inferences from chromosome banding.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Tatiane Ramos; Pires, Larissa Bettin; Venturelli, Natália Bortolazzi; Usso, Mariana Campaner; da Rosa, Renata; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    The family Curimatidae is a fish group usually considered chromosomally conserved in their diploid number. However, some studies show small changes in the karyotype microstructure, and the presence of B chromosomes, indicating a chromosomal diversification within the group, even if structural changes in the karyotypes are not visible. Few studies associate this trait with an evolutionary pattern within the family. This study aimed to characterize the karyotype, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), and heterochromatin distribution of six species of Curimatidae of the genera Cyphocharax Fowler, 1906 and Steindachnerina Fowler, 1906: Cyphocharax voga (Hensel, 1870), Cyphocharax spilotus (Vari, 1987), Cyphocharax saladensis (Meinken, 1933), Cyphocharax modestus (Fernández-Yépez, 1948), Steindachnerina biornata (Braga et Azpelicueta, 1987) and Steindachnerina insculpta (Fernández-Yépez, 1948) and contribute data to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the chromosomal evolution of this group of fish. All specimens had 2n=54, m-sm, and B microchromosomes. Five species exhibited single NORs, except for Steindachnerina biornata, which showed a multiple pattern of ribosomal sites. NORs were chromomycin A3 positive (CMA3 (+)) and 4'-6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI(-)) negative, exhibiting differences in the pair and chromosomal location of each individual of the species. FISH with 5S rDNA probe revealed sites in the pericentrometic position of a pair of chromosomes of five species. However, another site was detected on a metacentric chromosome of Cyphocharax spilotus. Heterochromatin distributed both in the pericentromeric and some terminal regions was revealed to be CMA3 (+)/DAPI(-). These data associated with the previously existing ones confirm that, although Curimatidae have a very conservative karyotype macrostructure, NORs and heterochromatin variability are caused by mechanisms of chromosome alterations, such as translocations and/or inversions

  6. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  7. Isolation and analysis of the 21q+ chromosome in the acute myelogenous leukemia 8; 21 translocation: evidence that c-mos is not translocated

    SciTech Connect

    Drabkin, H.A.; Diaz, M.; Bradley, C.M.; Le Beau, M.M.; Rowley, J.D.; Patterson, D.

    1985-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), subgroup M2, is associated with a nonrandom chromosomal translocation, t(8;21)(q22,q22). The oncogene c-mos also has been localized to the q22 band on chromosome 8. There is also evidence that genes on chromosome 21 may be important in the development of leukemia. To determine whether the c-mos oncogene has been translocated in AML-M2 with this translocation and to isolate DNA sequences and genes from these two chromosomes that may be important in malignancy, the authors constructed somatic cell hybrids between a Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) mutant defective in glycine metabolism and myeloblasts with an 8;21 translocation from a patient with AML. The authors isolated the 21q+ chromosome of this translocation in a somatic cell hybrid and showed that the c-mos oncogene had not been translocated to chromosome 21, ruling out the possibility that translocation of c-mos to chromosome 21 is necessary for development of AML-M2. In addition, there was no detectable rearrangement of the c-mos locus within a 12.4-kilobase region surrounding the gene, indicating that rearrangement of the coding region of the gene itself or alteration of proximal 5' or 3' flanking sequences is not involved. The authors used this hybrid to determine whether specific DNA sequences and biochemical markers from chromosomes 8 and 21 had been translocated in this case.

  8. Chromosomal imbalances in four new uterine cervix carcinoma derived cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Alfredo; Monroy, Alberto; Arana, Rosa Ma; Taja, Lucía; Vázquez, Guelaguetza; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2003-01-01

    Background Uterine cervix carcinoma is the second most common female malignancy worldwide and a major health problem in Mexico, representing the primary cause of death among the Mexican female population. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be the most important risk factor for the development of this tumor and cervical carcinoma derived cell lines are very useful models for the study of viral carcinogenesis. Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) experiments have detected a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances during cervical cancer progression, indicating chromosomal regions that might contain genes that are important for cervical transformation. Methods We performed HPV detection and CGH analysis in order to initiate the genomic characterization of four recently established cervical carcinoma derived cell lines from Mexican patients. Results All the cell lines were HPV18 positive. The most prevalent imbalances in the cell lines were gains in chromosomes 1q23-q32, 3q11.2-q13.1, 3q22-q26.1, 5p15.1-p11.2, this alteration present as a high copy number amplification in three of the cell lines, 7p15-p13, 7q21, 7q31, 11q21, and 12q12, and losses in 2q35-qter, 4p16, 6q26-qter, 9q34 and 19q13.2-qter. Conclusions Analysis of our present findings and previously reported data suggest that gains at 1q31-q32 and 7p13-p14, as well as losses at 6q26-q27 are alterations that might be unique for HPV18 positive cases. These chromosomal regions, as well as regions with high copy number amplifications, coincide with known fragile sites and known HPV integration sites. The general pattern of chromosomal imbalances detected in the cells resembled that found in invasive cervical tumors, suggesting that the cells represent good models for the study of cervical carcinoma. PMID:12659655

  9. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  10. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  11. The precarious prokaryotic chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other "precarious" features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  12. B-chromosome evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, J P; Sharbel, T F; Beukeboom, L W

    2000-01-01

    B chromosomes are extra chromosomes to the standard complement that occur in many organisms. They can originate in a number of ways including derivation from autosomes and sex chromosomes in intra- and interspecies crosses. Their subsequent molecular evolution resembles that of univalent sex chromosomes, which involves gene silencing, heterochromatinization and the accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons. B-chromosome frequencies in populations result from a balance between their transmission rates and their effects on host fitness. Their long-term evolution is considered to be the outcome of selection on the host genome to eliminate B chromosomes or suppress their effects and on the B chromosome's ability to escape through the generation of new variants. Because B chromosomes interact with the standard chromosomes, they can play an important role in genome evolution and may be useful for studying molecular evolutionary processes. PMID:10724453

  13. Chromosomal intrachanges induced by swift iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstmann, M.; Durante, M.; Johannes, C.; Obe, G.

    We measured the induction of aberrations in human chromosome 5 by iron ions using the novel technique of multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND). Human lymphocytes isolated from whole blood were exposed in vitro to 500 MeV/n (LET=200 keV/μ m, doses 1 or 4 Gy) 56Fe nuclei at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (Japan). Chromosomes were prematurely condensed by calyculin A after 48 h in culture, and slides were painted by mBAND (MetaSystems). We found a frequency of 0.11 and 0.57 residual breakpoints per chromosome 5 after 1 Gy and 4 Gy Fe-ions, respectively. The distribution per unit length were similar in the p- and q-arm of chromosome 5, and >50% of the observed fragments measured <30% of the whole chromosome length. Only small fragments (<40% of the chromosome size) were involved in intra-chromosomal exchanges (interstitial deletions or inversions), whereas fragments up to 75% of the whole chromosome 5 were found in inter-chromosomal exchanges. We measured more inter-changes than intra-changes, and more intra-arm than inter-arm exchanges at both doses. No significant differences in the ratios of these aberrations were detected with respect to X-rays. On the other hand, Fe-ions induced a significantly higher fraction of complex-type exchanges when compared to sparsely ionizing radiation. Work supported by DLR, BMBF, INTAS and NIRS-HIMAC.

  14. Compositions for chromosome-specific staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1998-05-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. The methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. The probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. The invention provides for automated means to detect and analyze chromosomal abnormalities. 17 figs.

  15. Compositions for chromosome-specific staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Further, methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. Still further, the invention provides for automated means to detect and analyse chromosomal abnormalities.

  16. Defining ploidy-specific thresholds in array comparative genomic hybridization to improve the sensitivity of detection of single copy alterations in cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ng, Grace; Huang, Jingxiang; Roberts, Ian; Coleman, Nicholas

    2006-09-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is being widely used to screen for recurrent genomic copy number alterations in neoplasms, with imbalances typically detected through the application of gain and loss thresholds. Review of array CGH publications for the year 2005 showed that a wide range of thresholds are used. However, the effect of sample ploidy on the sensitivity of these thresholds for single copy alterations (SCAs) has not been evaluated. Here, we describe a method to evaluate the detection accuracy of thresholds for detecting SCAs in cell line array CGH data. By applying a hidden Markov model-based method, we segmented array CGH data from well-karyotyped cell lines and generated ploidy-specific sensitivity-specificity plots, from which we identified optimum thresholds relevant to sample ploidy. We demonstrate that commonly used nonploidy-specific thresholds are suboptimal in their ability to call SCAs, particularly when applied to hypertriploid or tetraploid cell lines. We conclude that the use of ploidy-specific thresholds improves the sensitivity of thres-hold-based array CGH for detecting SCAs in cell lines. Because polyploidy is a common feature of cancer cells, the application of ploidy-specific thresholds to cell lines (and potentially to clinical samples) may improve the detection sensitivity of SCAs of biological significance. PMID:16931585

  17. Remote sensing detection of gold related alteration zones in Um Rus area, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Reda; Kusky, Timothy; El Mezayen, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) images covering the Um Rus area in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt were evaluated for mapping geologic structure, lithology, and gold-related alteration zones. The study area is covered by Pan-African basement rocks including gabbro and granodiorite intruded into a variable mixture of metavolcanics and metasediments. The first three principal component analyses (PCA1, PCA2, PCA3) in a Red-Green-Blue (RGB) of the visible through shortwave-infrared (VNIR + SWIR) ASTER bands enabled the discrimination between lithological units. The results show that ASTER band ratios ((2 + 4)/3, (5 + 7)/6, (7 + 9)/8) in RGB identifies the lithological units and discriminates the granodiorite very well from the adjacent rock units.The granodiorites are dissected by gold-bearing quartz veins surrounded by alteration zones. The microscopic examination of samples collected from the alteration zones shows sericitic and argillic alteration zones. The Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) and Spectral Information Divergence (SID) supervised classification methods were applied using the reference spectra of the USGS spectral library. The results show that these classification methods are capable of mapping the alteration zones as indicated by field verification work. The PALSAR image was enhanced for fracture mapping using the second moment co-occurrence filter. Overlying extracted faults and alteration zone classification images show that the N30E and N-S fractures represent potential zones for gold exploration. It is concluded that the proposed methods can be used as a powerful tool for ore deposit exploration.

  18. Genetic recombination variation in wild Robertsonian mice: on the role of chromosomal fusions and Prdm9 allelic background

    PubMed Central

    Capilla, Laia; Medarde, Nuria; Alemany-Schmidt, Alexandra; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Ventura, Jacint; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Despite the existence of formal models to explain how chromosomal rearrangements can be fixed in a population in the presence of gene flow, few empirical data are available regarding the mechanisms by which genome shuffling contributes to speciation, especially in mammals. In order to shed light on this intriguing evolutionary process, here we present a detailed empirical study that shows how Robertsonian (Rb) fusions alter the chromosomal distribution of recombination events during the formation of the germline in a Rb system of the western house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus). Our results indicate that both the total number of meiotic crossovers and the chromosomal distribution of recombination events are reduced in mice with Rb fusions and that this can be related to alterations in epigenetic signatures for heterochromatinization. Furthermore, we detected novel house mouse Prdm9 allelic variants in the Rb system. Remarkably, mean recombination rates were positively correlated with a decrease in the number of ZnF domains in the Prdm9 gene. The suggestion that recombination can be modulated by both chromosomal reorganizations and genetic determinants that control the formation of double-stranded breaks during meiosis opens new avenues for understanding the role of recombination in chromosomal speciation. PMID:24850922

  19. Mitotic Stress and Chromosomal Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malumbres, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common motif in human cancer, and multiple therapeutic strategies are aimed to prevent tumor cell proliferation. Whereas most current therapies are designed to arrest cell cycle progression either in G1/S or in mitosis, new proposals include targeting the intrinsic chromosomal instability (CIN, an increased rate of gain or losses of chromosomes during cell division) or aneuploidy (a genomic composition that differs from diploid) that many tumor cells display. Why tumors cells are chromosomally unstable or aneuploid and what are the consequences of these alterations are not completely clear at present. Several mitotic regulators are overexpressed as a consequence of oncogenic alterations, and they are likely to alter the proper regulation of chromosome segregation in cancer cells. In this review, we propose the relevance of TPX2, a mitotic regulator involved in the formation of the mitotic spindle, in oncogene-induced mitotic stress. This protein, as well as its partner Aurora-A, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer, and its deregulation may participate not only in chromosome numeric aberrations but also in other forms of genomic instability in cancer cells. PMID:23634259

  20. Ovarian cancer has frequent loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 12p12.3-13.1 (region of TEL and Kip1 loci) and chromosome 12q23-ter: evidence for two new tumour-suppressor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Yokota, J.; Koeffler, H. P.

    1997-01-01

    Identification of the key genetic alterations leading to ovarian cancer is in its infancy. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is a powerful method for detecting regions of altered tumour-suppressor genes. Focusing on chromosome 12, we examined 23 ovarian cancer samples for LOH using 31 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers and found the chromosomal localization of two putative tumour-suppressor genes. Two commonly deleted regions were 12p12.3-13.1 in 6/23 (26%) and 12q23-ter in 7/23 (30%) samples. LOH on chromosome 12 was more common in late-stage ovarian carcinomas. The region of LOH at 12p12.3-13.1 includes the genes that code for the ETS-family transcriptional factor, known as TEL, and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, known as p27Kip1. Mutational analysis of both TEL and p27Kip1 using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) showed no abnormalities, suggesting that the altered gene in this region is neither of these genes. Taken together, our data suggest that new tumour-suppressor genes in the region of chromosomes 12p12.3-13.1 and 12q23-ter may be involved in the development of ovarian cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:9155043

  1. Group 3 chromosome bin maps of wheat and their relationship to rice chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Munkvold, J D; Greene, R A; Bermudez-Kandianis, C E; La Rota, C M; Edwards, H; Sorrells, S F; Dake, T; Benscher, D; Kantety, R; Linkiewicz, A M; Dubcovsky, J; Akhunov, E D; Dvorák, J; Miftahudin; Gustafson, J P; Pathan, M S; Nguyen, H T; Matthews, D E; Chao, S; Lazo, G R; Hummel, D D; Anderson, O D; Anderson, J A; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J L; Peng, J H; Lapitan, N; Qi, L L; Echalier, B; Gill, B S; Hossain, K G; Kalavacharla, V; Kianian, S F; Sandhu, D; Erayman, M; Gill, K S; McGuire, P E; Qualset, C O; Sorrells, M E

    2004-10-01

    The focus of this study was to analyze the content, distribution, and comparative genome relationships of 996 chromosome bin-mapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs) accounting for 2266 restriction fragments (loci) on the homoeologous group 3 chromosomes of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Of these loci, 634, 884, and 748 were mapped on chromosomes 3A, 3B, and 3D, respectively. The individual chromosome bin maps revealed bins with a high density of mapped ESTs in the distal region and bins of low density in the proximal region of the chromosome arms, with the exception of 3DS and 3DL. These distributions were more localized on the higher-resolution group 3 consensus map with intermediate regions of high-mapped-EST density on both chromosome arms. Gene ontology (GO) classification of mapped ESTs was not significantly different for homoeologous group 3 chromosomes compared to the other groups. A combined analysis of the individual bin maps using 537 of the mapped ESTs revealed rearrangements between the group 3 chromosomes. Approximately 232 (44%) of the consensus mapped ESTs matched sequences on rice chromosome 1 and revealed large- and small-scale differences in gene order. Of the group 3 mapped EST unigenes approximately 21 and 32% matched the Arabidopsis coding regions and proteins, respectively, but no chromosome-level gene order conservation was detected. PMID:15514041

  2. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Association of allelic losses on human chromosomal arms 11Q and 16Q in sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmutzler, R K; Fimmers, R; Bierhoff, E; Lohmar, B; Homann, A; Speiser, P; Kubista, E; Jaeger, K; Krebs, D; Zeillinger, R; Wiestler, O D; Von Deimling, A

    1996-08-22

    Breast-carcinoma development presumably results from multiple mutational events in tumor-associated genes. Certain results indicate that some tumor-suppressor genes may combine their pathogenetic potential to synergistically promote tumor growth. In an effort to identify such mechanisms in breast tumors, a series of 77 (group I) paired blood tumor samples from patients with sporadic mammary carcinomas was analyzed for loss of heterozygosity with 15 polymorphic markers on the chromosomal arms 7q, 11q, 13q, 16q, 17p and 17q. A significant association was observed for the combination of allelic losses on chromosomes 11q and 16q. In order to confirm these findings, we studied a second independent series of 189 breast-tumor patients (group 2) with comparable histopathological tumor stages. Group 2 was examined for the same genetic alterations using the identical set of polymorphic markers. The data from this group confirmed the detected association of loss of heterozygosity on chromosomes 11q and 16q and indicate the cooperation of putative tumor-suppressor genes on the chromosomal arms 11q and 16q in a sub-set of breast carcinomas. The regions involved harbor the candidate genes ATM (mutated in ataxiatelangiectasia) on chromosome 11q23 and UVO (uvomorulin, cadherin E) and BBCI (breast basic conserved I) on chromosome 16q22-q24. PMID:8797873

  4. Chromosomal Disorders and Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on chromosomal aberrations in autism, especially possible gene markers. It notes that Chromosome 15 and numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes have been most frequently reported as related to the genesis of autism. (Author/DB)

  5. Chromosomal development of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 30, describes the chromosomal development of cancer. It has been established through cytological research that the number of chromosomes in cancer cells often deviates greatly from the usual number in healthy cells of the host organism. This chapter includes discussions on chromosome studies in ascites tumors, stemline and tumor development, mitotic aberrations in cancer, and selection and tumor progression. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Detection of chromosomal blaCTX-M-15 in Escherichia coli O25b-B2-ST131 isolates from the Kinki region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Itaru; Fukui, Naoki; Taguchi, Masumi; Yamauchi, Kou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Okano, Sho; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2013-12-01

    Escherichia coli O25b-B2-ST131 isolates harbouring bla(CTX-M-15) are distributed worldwide. The bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit has often been found on plasmids and the genetic contexts have been examined; however, less is known about the frequency and contexts of the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit on the chromosome. This study was performed to determine the chromosomal location of the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit and to analyse the molecular structure of the region surrounding the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit in E. coli O25b-B2-ST131 isolates. Twenty-two E. coli O25b-B2-ST131 strains harbouring bla(CTX-M-15) that had been isolated from university hospital patients and nursing home residents in the Kinki region of Japan were examined. Inverse PCR (iPCR) targeting bla(CTX-M-15) was performed to classify the molecular structure of the region surrounding the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit. The isolates were classified into nine types (types A-I) considering the iPCR results; type A was the most prevalent type (13/22 isolates). Sequences of the iPCR-amplified DNA fragments showed that the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit consisted of ISEcp1, bla(CTX-M-15) and orf477Δ. A homology search of the obtained sequences showed that the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit was inserted into different chromosomal regions in eight of the nine classified types. Although 21 of the 22 E. coli isolates possessed chromosomally located bla(CTX-M-15) transposition units, clonal spread was not evident on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Taken together, these data indicate that certain E. coli O25b-B2-ST131 strains harbouring chromosomal bla(CTX-M-15) have emerged and spread in the Kinki region of Japan. PMID:24091130

  7. Physical Alteration of Martian Dust Grains, Its Influence on Detection of Clays and Identification of Aqueous Processes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Drief, Ahmed; Dyar, Darby

    2003-01-01

    Clays, if present on Mars, have been illusive. Determining whether or not clay minerals and other aqueous alteration species are present on Mars provides key information about the extent and duration of aqueous processes on Mars. The purpose of this study is to characterize in detail changes in the mineral grains resulting from grinding and to assess the influence of physical processes on clay minerals on the surface of Mars. Physical alteration through grinding was shown to greatly affect the structure and a number of properties of antigorite and kaolinite. This project builds on an initial study and includes a combination of SEM, HRTEM, reflectance and M ssbauer spectroscopies. Grain size was found to decrease, as expected, with grinding. In addition, nanophase carbonate, Si-OH and iron oxide species were formed.

  8. Mineralogy and chemistry of altered Icelandic basalts: Application to clay mineral detection and understanding aqueous environments on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlmann, B. L.; Bish, D. L.; Ruff, S. W.; Mustard, J. F.

    2012-10-01

    We used a suite of techniques, including those emulating compositional data sets obtained from Mars orbit and obtainable at the Mars surface, to examine aqueous alteration of basaltic rocks from Iceland as a mineralogic and geochemical analog for Noachian environments on Mars. A sample suite was collected for laboratory measurement of (1) whole-rock visible/near-infrared (VNIR) reflectance and thermal infrared (TIR) emission spectra; (2) VNIR and TIR reflectance spectra of particle-size separates derived from the bulk rock and from materials extracted from fractures/vesicles; (3) X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns for determination of quantitative modal mineralogy; (4) major element chemistry using flux fusion of whole-rock powders; and (5) electron microprobe analyses of minerals in thin sections. Conclusions about aqueous alteration can be influenced by technique. For these basalts, whole-rock chemical data showed scant evidence for chemical fractionation, but TIR, VNIR, and XRD measurements identified distinctive assemblages of hydrous silicate minerals, differing by sample. XRD provided the most complete and accurate quantitative determination of sample mineralogy. However, VNIR spectroscopy was the technique most useful for determining composition of low-abundance smectite clays, and TIR spectroscopy was the most useful for recognizing hydrated silicates in thin surface coatings. High spatial resolution mineralogical and chemical data sets were useful for understanding the texture and distribution of alteration products and variations in fluid chemistry. No single approach provides a complete assessment of the environment of alteration, demonstrating the importance of employing multiple, synergistic mineralogical and geochemical techniques and instruments in exploration of rock strata from aqueous paleoenvironments on Mars.

  9. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  10. Immunological detection of left-handed Z DNA in isolated polytene chromosomes. Effects of ionic strength, pH, temperature and topological stress.

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Nicoud, M; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Zarling, D A; Jovin, T M

    1984-01-01

    We have searched for the presence of left-handed Z DNA in unfixed polytene chromosomes isolated from the salivary glands of Chironomus thummi larvae. Physiological as well as fixation conditions were explored to assess the effects of a variety of factors known to influence the B-Z equilibrium. At neutral pH and physiological ionic strength, a weak immunofluorescence staining confined to the periphery of chromosomal bands is elicited but only by using high concentrations of anti-Z DNA immunoglobulin (IgG). The accessibility of internal highly condensed structures, as monitored with antibodies against core histones, is very limited under these conditions. Increasing the ionic strength exposes core histone determinants but results in a decondensation of the bands. The staining for Z DNA is still weak and primarily restricted to regions resisting decondensation or undergoing collapse. Dramatic changes in anti-Z DNA immunofluorescence intensities occur upon short exposure to low pH. Adjustment of the pH between 2.5 and 2.0 leads to an abrupt large increase in antibody binding, at first confined to a few specific bands and then generalized to bands throughout the chromosomes in a pattern very similar to that elicited in classical acid-fixed squash preparations. The acid-mediated effects are influenced by ionic strength, temperature and prior removal of histones; they can be mimicked by exposure to high temperature at neutral pH. The 'transition pH' assessed with a monoclonal IgG specific for left-handed d(G-C)n sequences is slightly lower than in the case of polyclonal antibodies which also recognize d(A-C)n X d(G-T)n.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:6373247

  11. Simultaneous scoring of 10 chromosomes (9,13,14,15,16,18,21,22,X, and Y) in interphase nuclei by using spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jingly; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Goldberg, James D.; Pedersen, Roger A.

    1999-06-01

    Numerical aberrations involving parts of or entire chromosomes have detrimental effects on mammalian embryonic, and perinatal development. Only few fetuses with chromosomal imbalances survive to term, and their abnormalities lead to stillbirth or cause severely altered phenotypes in the offspring (such as trisomies involving chromosomes 13, 18, 21, and anomalies of X, and Y). Because aneuploidy of any of the 24 chromosomes will have significant consequences, an optimized preimplantation and prenatal genetic diagnosis (PGD) test will score all the chromosomes. Since most cells to be analyzed will be in interphase rather than metaphase, we developed a rapid procedure for the analysis of interphase cells such as lymphocytes, amniocytes, or early embryonic cells (blastomeres). Our approach was based on in situ hybridization of chromosome-specific non-isotopically labeled DNA probes and Spectral Imaging. The Spectral Imaging system uses an interferometer instead of standard emission filters in a fluorescence microscope to record high resolution spectra from fluorescently stained specimens. This bio-imaging system combines the techniques of fluorescence optical microscopy, charged coupled device imaging, Fourier spectroscopy, light microscopy, and powerful analysis software. The probe set used here allowed simultaneous detection of 10 chromosomes (9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 21, 22, X, Y) in interphase nuclei. Probes were obtained commercially or prepared in-house. Following 16 - 40 h hybridization to interphase cells and removal of unbound probes, image spectra (range 450 - 850 nm, resolution 10 nm) were recorded and analyzed using an SD200 Spectral Imaging system (ASI, Carlsbad, CA). Initially some amniocytes were unscoreable due to their thickness, and fixation protocols had to be modified to achieve satisfactory results. In summary, this study shows the simultaneous detection of at least 10 different chromosomes in interphase cells using a novel approach for multi-chromosome

  12. Detection of Short-Range DNA Interactions in Mammalian Cells Using High-Resolution Circular Chromosome Conformation Capture Coupled to Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Millau, Jean-François; Gaudreau, Luc

    2015-01-01

    DNA interactions shape the genome to physically and functionally connect regulatory elements to their target genes. Studying these interactions is crucial to understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate gene expression. In this chapter, we present a protocol for high-resolution circular chromosome conformation capture coupled to deep sequencing. This methodology allows to investigate short-range DNA interactions (<100 kbp) and to obtain high-resolution DNA interaction maps of loci. It is a powerful tool to explore how regulatory elements and genes are connected together. PMID:26404155

  13. Anomaly Detection and Comparative Analysis of Hydrothermal Alteration Materials Trough Hyperspectral Multisensor Data in the Turrialba Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejas, J. G.; Martínez-Frías, J.; Bonatti, J.; Martínez, R.; Marchamalo, M.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this work is the comparative study of the presence of hydrothermal alteration materials in the Turrialba volcano (Costa Rica) in relation with computed spectral anomalies from multitemporal and multisensor data adquired in spectral ranges of the visible (VIS), short wave infrared (SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR). We used for this purposes hyperspectral and multispectral images from the HyMAP and MASTER airborne sensors, and ASTER and Hyperion scenes in a period between 2002 and 2010. Field radiometry was applied in order to remove the atmospheric contribution in an empirical line method. HyMAP and MASTER images were georeferenced directly thanks to positioning and orientation data that were measured at the same time in the acquisition campaign from an inertial system based on GPS/IMU. These two important steps were allowed the identification of spectral diagnostic bands of hydrothermal alteration minerals and the accuracy spatial correlation. Enviromental impact of the volcano activity has been studied through different vegetation indexes and soil patterns. Have been mapped hydrothermal materials in the crater of the volcano, in fact currently active, and their surrounding carrying out a principal components analysis differentiated for a high and low absorption bands to characterize accumulations of kaolinite, illite, alunite and kaolinite+smectite, delimitating zones with the presence of these minerals. Spectral anomalies have been calculated on a comparative study of methods pixel and subpixel focused in thermal bands fused with high-resolution images. Results are presented as an approach based on expert whose main interest lies in the automated identification of patterns of hydrothermal altered materials without prior knowledge or poor information on the area.

  14. Cancer related gene alterations can be detected with next-generation sequencing analysis of bile in diffusely infiltrating type cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Hun; Wang, Hong En; Seo, Seung Young; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, In Hee; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae Ghon; Han, Myung Kwan; Lee, Seung Ok

    2016-08-01

    Genome-wide association study in diffusely infiltrating type cholangiocarcinoma (CC) can be limited due to the difficulty of obtaining tumor tissue. We aimed to evaluate the genomic alterations of diffusely infiltrating type CC using next-generation sequencing (NGS) of bile and to compare the variations with those of mass-forming type CC. A total of 24 bile samples obtained during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and 17 surgically obtained tumor tissue samples were evaluated. Buffy coat and normal tissue samples were used as controls for a somatic mutation analysis. After extraction of genomic DNA, NGS analysis was performed for 48 cancer related genes. There were 27 men and 14 women with a mean age of 65.0±11.8years. The amount of extracted genomic DNA from 3cm(3) of bile was 66.0±84.7μg and revealed a high depth of sequencing coverage. All of the patients had genomic variations, with an average number of 19.4±2.8 and 22.3±3.3 alterations per patient from the bile and tumor tissue, respectively. After filtering process, damaging SNPs (8 sites for each type of CC) were predicted by analyzing tools, and their target genes showed relevant differences between the diffusely infiltrating and mass-forming type CC. Finally, in somatic mutation analysis, tumor-normal paired 14 tissue and 6 bile samples were analyzed, genomic alterations of EGFR, FGFR1, ABL1, PIK3CA, and CDKN2A gene were seen in the diffusely infiltrating type CC, and TP53, KRAS, APC, GNA11, ERBB4, ATM, SMAD4, BRAF, and IDH1 were altered in the mass-forming type CC group. STK11, GNAQ, RB1, KDR, and SMO genes were revealed in both groups. The NGS analysis was feasible with bile sample and diffusely infiltrating type CC revealed genetic differences compared with mass-forming type CC. Genome-wide association study could be performed using bile sample in the patients with CC undergoing ERCP and a different genetic approach for accurate diagnosis, pathogenesis study, and targeted

  15. Loss of chromosome 16q in lobular carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Etzell, J E; Devries, S; Chew, K; Florendo, C; Molinaro, A; Ljung, B M; Waldman, F M

    2001-03-01

    Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) and infiltrating lobular carcinoma may represent different forms of the same disease based on their frequent clinical association and similar histologic features. Patients with LCIS are at increased risk of multicentric and bilateral disease. Thus, LCIS may represent both a precursor to infiltrating lobular carcinoma and a marker of risk for breast cancer. To identify genomic alterations in LCIS, comparative genomic hybridization was performed on 17 cases without concurrent invasive carcinoma. Loss involving chromosome 16q was present in 88% of cases and was the sole detected alteration in 29%. Gain involving 1q was second in frequency, occurring in 41% of tumors, and in all cases was associated with loss of 16q. Other recurrent changes were loss involving 17p (18%), 8p (12%), and 12q24 (12%). E-cadherin immunohistochemistry was performed on all LCIS cases to evaluate the correlation of loss involving 16q22, the site of the E-cadherin gene, and altered protein expression. Most cases with 16q22 loss showed altered E-cadherin expression (12 of 13). These results in LCIS are similar to changes reported in infiltrating lobular cancer, confirming a genetic relationship between them. HUM PATHOL 32:292-296. PMID:11274638

  16. Chromosomes, conflict, and epigenetics: chromosomal speciation revisited.

    PubMed

    Brown, Judith D; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2010-01-01

    Since Darwin first noted that the process of speciation was indeed the "mystery of mysteries," scientists have tried to develop testable models for the development of reproductive incompatibilities-the first step in the formation of a new species. Early theorists proposed that chromosome rearrangements were implicated in the process of reproductive isolation; however, the chromosomal speciation model has recently been questioned. In addition, recent data from hybrid model systems indicates that simple epistatic interactions, the Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, are more complex. In fact, incompatibilities are quite broad, including interactions among heterochromatin, small RNAs, and distinct, epigenetically defined genomic regions such as the centromere. In this review, we will examine both classical and current models of chromosomal speciation and describe the "evolving" theory of genetic conflict, epigenetics, and chromosomal speciation. PMID:20438362

  17. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  18. Infrared Microspectroscopy Detects Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification (PMCA)-induced Conformational Alterations in Hamster Scrapie Progeny Seeds*

    PubMed Central

    Daus, Martin L.; Wagenführ, Katja; Thomzig, Achim; Boerner, Susann; Hermann, Peter; Hermelink, Antje; Beekes, Michael; Lasch, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The self-replicative conformation of misfolded prion proteins (PrP) is considered a major determinant for the seeding activity, infectiousness, and strain characteristics of prions in different host species. Prion-associated seeding activity, which converts cellular prion protein (PrPC) into Proteinase K-resistant, infectious PrP particles (PrPTSE), can be monitored in vitro by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). Thus, PMCA has been established as a valuable analytical tool in prion research. Currently, however, it is under discussion whether prion strain characteristics are preserved during PMCA when parent seeds are amplified in PrPC substrate from the identical host species. Here, we report on the comparative structural analysis of parent and progeny (PMCA-derived) PrP seeds by an improved approach of sensitive infrared microspectroscopy. Infrared microspectroscopy revealed that PMCA of native hamster 263K scrapie seeds in hamster PrPC substrate caused conformational alterations in progeny seeds that were accompanied by an altered resistance to Proteinase K, higher sedimentation velocities in gradient ultracentrifugations, and a longer incubation time in animal bioassays. When these progeny seeds were propagated in hamsters, misfolded PrP from brain extracts of these animals showed mixed spectroscopic and biochemical properties from both parental and progeny seeds. Thus, strain modifications of 263K prions induced by PMCA seem to have been partially reversed when PMCA products were reinoculated into the original host species. PMID:24163371

  19. Rapid generation of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, X.Y.; Meltzer, P.S.; Trent, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    A strategy for rapid construction of whole chromosome painting probes (WCPs) by chromosome microdissection has recently been developed. WCPs were prepared from 20 copies of each target chromosome microdissected from normal human metaphase chromosomes and then directly amplified by PCR using a universal primer. Fifteen WCPs, including chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 19, 20, 21, 22, and X, have been generated using this strategy. The probe complexity and hybridization specificity of these WCPs have been characterized by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Analysis of WCPs constructed by chromosome microdissection indicated that microdissected WCPs invariably provide strong and uniform signal intensity with no cytologically apparent cross-hybridization. To demonstrate the application of WCPs generated from microdissection, the authors have used these probes to detect complex chromosome rearrangements in a melanoma cell line, UM93-007. Two different translocations involving three chromosomes [t(1;3;13) and t(1;7;13)] have been identified, both of which were undetectable by conventional banding analysis. Further application of these WCPs (including generation of WCPs from mouse and other species) should greatly facilitate the cytogenetic analysis of complex chromosome rearrangements. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Development of an analytical technique for the detection of alteration minerals formed in bentonite by reaction with alkaline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, H.; Shibata, M.; Owada, H.; Kaneko, M.; Kuno, Y.; Asano, H.

    A multibarrier system consisting of cement-based backfill, structures and support materials, and a bentonite-based buffer material has been studied for the TRU waste disposal concept being developed in Japan, the aim being to restrict the migration of radionuclides. Concern regarding bentonite-based materials in this disposal environment relates to long-term alteration under hyper-alkaline conditions due to the presence of cementitious materials. In tests simulating the interaction between bentonite and cement, formation of secondary minerals due to alteration reactions under the conditions expected for geological disposal of TRU waste (equilibrated water with cement at low liquid/solid ratio) has not been observed, although alteration was observed under extremely hyper-alkaline conditions with high temperatures. This was considered to be due to the fact that analysis of C-S-H gel formed at the interface as a secondary mineral was difficult using XRD, because of its low crystallinity and low content. This paper describes an analytical technique for the characterization of C-S-H gel using a heavy liquid separation method which separates C-S-H gel from Kunigel V1 bentonite (bentonite produced in Japan) based on the difference in specific gravity between the crystalline minerals constituting Kunigel V1 and the secondary C-S-H gel. For development of C-S-H gel separation methods, simulated alteration samples were prepared by mixing 990 mg of unaltered Kunigel V1 and 10 mg of C-S-H gel synthesized using pure chemicals at a ratio of Ca/Si = 1.2. The simulated alteration samples were dispersed in bromoform-methanol mixtures with specific gravities ranging from 2.00 to 2.57 g/cm 3 and subjected to centrifuge separation to recover the light density fraction. Subsequent XRD analysis to identify the minerals was complemented by dissolution in 0.6 N hydrochloric acid to measure the Ca and Si contents. The primary peak (2 θ = 29.4°, Cu Kα) and secondary peaks (2 θ = 32.1

  1. Membrane-mediated changes in the structure of chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, N D; Budker, V G; Dubrovskaya, V A; Khristoljubova, N B; Kiseleva, E V; Matveeva, N M; Sukojan, M A

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper the interaction of metaphase chromosomes and chromatin with model and natural lipid membranes was studied. It was shown that chromatin and chromosomes are able to form complexes with membranes in the presence of divalent cations. In such complexes, the typical structure of chromosomes is altered. The character of this alteration in chromosomal structure was investigated with the use of electron microscopy and chemical modification with dimethylsulphate (DMS). The latter is possible because, according to the presented data, the condensation of chromatin into chromosomes is associated with a decrease in accessibility of N-3 in adenine (the protection of the minor groove of DNA) to modifications, and with an increased methylation of N-1 in adenine (the disarrangement of the secondary structure of DNA). It was shown that the interaction of chromosomes with liposomes provides various levels of unfolding up to the appearance of chromatin-like structures. The secondary DNA structure of decondensed chromosomes coincides with the secondary structure of chromosomal but not chromatin DNA, whereas the extent of shielding of the minor groove of DNA in such decondensed structures typical for chromatin DNA. It is possible to suggest that the chromosomal decondensation in telophase of mitosis is initiated by the action of a membrane component of the developing nuclear envelope. PMID:3926416

  2. Detection and mapping of hydrothermally altered rocks in the vicinity of the Comstock Lode, Virginia Range, Nevada, using enhanced Landsat images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashley, Roger P.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Rowan, L.C.; Abrams, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    the color-ratio composite as limonitic altered rocks. This problem represents the most important limitation to the use of enhanced Landsat images for detection and mapping of hydrothermally altered rocks. Reflectance spectra of altered and unaltered rocks taken in the field in the Virginia Range show that most altered rocks have a conspicuous absorption band near 2.2 ?m produced by clay minerals or alunite, whereas unaltered rocks have no features in this spectral region. Thus spectral information for selected bands in the 1.1-2.5 ?m region may allow discrimination between limonitic altered and limonitic unaltered rocks (Rowan and others, 1977; Abrams and others, 1977; Rowan and Abrams, 1978). Another potential limitation is loss of spectral information on slopes with low effective sun angle. Although a minor problem in the Virginia Range, loss of information sufficient to preclude identification of limonitic altered rocks occurs with effective sun angle lower than 20-25 degrees. Thus, even at moderate latitudes substantial parts of areas with high topographic relief may be lost to observation.

  3. Chromosome differentiation patterns during cichlid fish evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cichlid fishes have been the subject of increasing scientific interest because of their rapid adaptive radiation which has led to an extensive ecological diversity and their enormous importance to tropical and subtropical aquaculture. To increase our understanding of chromosome evolution among cichlid species, karyotypes of one Asian, 22 African, and 30 South American cichlid species were investigated, and chromosomal data of the family was reviewed. Results Although there is extensive variation in the karyotypes of cichlid fishes (from 2n = 32 to 2n = 60 chromosomes), the modal chromosome number for South American species was 2n = 48 and the modal number for the African ones was 2n = 44. The only Asian species analyzed, Etroplus maculatus, was observed to have 46 chromosomes. The presence of one or two macro B chromosomes was detected in two African species. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene revealed a variable number of clusters among species varying from two to six. Conclusions The karyotype diversification of cichlids seems to have occurred through several chromosomal rearrangements involving fissions, fusions and inversions. It was possible to identify karyotype markers for the subfamilies Pseudocrenilabrinae (African) and Cichlinae (American). The karyotype analyses did not clarify the phylogenetic relationship among the Cichlinae tribes. On the other hand, the two major groups of Pseudocrenilabrinae (tilapiine and haplochromine) were clearly discriminated based on the characteristics of their karyotypes. The cytogenetic mapping of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene did not follow the chromosome diversification in the family. The dynamic evolution of the repeated units of rRNA genes generates patterns of chromosomal distribution that do not help follows the phylogenetic relationships among taxa. The presence of B chromosomes in cichlids is of particular interest because they may not be represented in the reference genome

  4. Persistent Biomechanical Alterations After ACL Reconstruction Are Associated With Early Cartilage Matrix Changes Detected by Quantitative MR

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Keiko; Pedoia, Valentina; Su, Favian; Souza, Richard B.; Li, Xiaojuan; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in preventing early osteoarthritis is debated. Restoring the original biomechanics may potentially prevent degeneration, but apparent pathomechanisms have yet to be described. Newer quantitative magnetic resonance (qMR) imaging techniques, specifically T1ρ and T2, offer novel, noninvasive methods of visualizing and quantifying early cartilage degeneration. Purpose: To determine the tibiofemoral biomechanical alterations before and after ACL reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate the association between biomechanics and cartilage degeneration using T1ρ and T2. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Knee MRIs of 51 individuals (mean age, 29.5 ± 8.4 years) with unilateral ACL injuries were obtained prior to surgery; 19 control subjects (mean age, 30.7 ± 5.3 years) were also scanned. Follow-up MRIs were obtained at 6 months and 1 year. Tibial position (TP), internal tibial rotation (ITR), and T1ρ and T2 were calculated using an in-house Matlab program. Student t tests, repeated measures, and regression models were used to compare differences between injured and uninjured sides, observe longitudinal changes, and evaluate correlations between TP, ITR, and T1ρ and T2. Results: TP was significantly more anterior on the injured side at all time points (P < .001). ITR was significantly increased on the injured side prior to surgery (P = .033). At 1 year, a more anterior TP was associated with elevated T1ρ (P = .002) and T2 (P = .026) in the posterolateral tibia and with decreased T2 in the central lateral femur (P = .048); ITR was associated with increased T1ρ in the posteromedial femur (P = .009). ITR at 6 months was associated with increased T1ρ at 1 year in the posteromedial tibia (P = .029). Conclusion: Persistent biomechanical alterations after ACL reconstruction are related to significant changes in cartilage T1ρ and T2 at 1 year

  5. Cell division patterns and chromosomal segregation defects in oral cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kaseb, Hatem O; Lewis, Dale W; Saunders, William S; Gollin, Susanne M

    2016-09-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a serious public health problem caused primarily by smoking and alcohol consumption or human papillomavirus. The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory posits that CSCs show unique characteristics, including self-renewal and therapeutic resistance. Examining biomarkers and other features of CSCs is critical to better understanding their biology. To this end, the results show that cellular SOX2 immunostaining correlates with other CSC biomarkers in OSCC cell lines and marks the rare CSC population. To assess whether CSC division patterns are symmetrical, resulting in two CSC, or asymmetrical, leading to one CSC and one cancer cell, cell size and fluorescence intensity of mitotic cells stained with SOX2 were analyzed. Asymmetrical SOX2 distribution in ≈25% of the mitoses analyzed was detected. Chromosomal instability, some of which is caused by chromosome segregation defects (CSDs), is a feature of cancer cells that leads to altered gene copy numbers. We compare chromosomal instability (as measured by CSDs) between CSCs (SOX2+) and non-CSCs (SOX2-) from the same OSCC cell lines. CSDs were more common in non-CSCs (SOX2-) than CSCs (SOX2+) and in symmetrical CSC (SOX2+) mitotic pairs than asymmetrical CSC (SOX2+/SOX2-) mitotic pairs. CSCs showed fewer and different types of CSDs after ionizing radiation treatment than non-CSCs. Overall, these data are the first to demonstrate both symmetrical and asymmetrical cell divisions with CSDs in OSCC CSC. Further, the results suggest that CSCs may undergo altered behavior, including therapeutic resistance as a result of chromosomal instability due to chromosome segregation defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27123539

  6. Sequence conservation on the Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, L.; Lau, C.

    1994-09-01

    The Y chromosome is present in all mammals and is considered to be essential to sex determination. Despite intense genomic research, only a few genes have been identified and mapped to this chromosome in humans. Several of them, such as SRY and ZFY, have been demonstrated to be conserved and Y-located in other mammals. In order to address the issue of sequence conservation on the Y chromosome, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA from a human Y cosmid library as a probe to study the Y chromosomes from other mammalian species. Total DNA from 3,000-4,500 cosmid pools were labeled with biotinylated-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes. For human and primate preparations, human cot1 DNA was included in the hybridization mixture to suppress the hybridization from repeat sequences. FISH signals were detected on the Y chromosomes of human, gorilla, orangutan and baboon (Old World monkey) and were absent on those of squirrel monkey (New World monkey), Indian munjac, wood lemming, Chinese hamster, rat and mouse. Since sequence analysis suggested that specific genes, e.g. SRY and ZFY, are conserved between these two groups, the lack of detectable hybridization in the latter group implies either that conservation of the human Y sequences is limited to the Y chromosomes of the great apes and Old World monkeys, or that the size of the syntenic segment is too small to be detected under the resolution of FISH, or that homologeous sequences have undergone considerable divergence. Further studies with reduced hybridization stringency are currently being conducted. Our results provide some clues as to Y-sequence conservation across species and demonstrate the limitations of FISH across species with total DNA sequences from a particular chromosome.

  7. Detection of Human Herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) Reactivation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients with Inherited Chromosomally Integrated HHV-6A by Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Sedlak, Ruth Hall; Hill, Joshua A; Nguyen, Thuy; Cho, Michelle; Levin, Greg; Cook, Linda; Huang, Meei-Li; Flamand, Louis; Zerr, Danielle M; Boeckh, Michael; Jerome, Keith R

    2016-05-01

    The presence of inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) donors or recipients confounds molecular testing for HHV-6 reactivation, which occurs in 30 to 50% of transplants. Here we describe a multiplex droplet digital PCR clinical diagnostic assay that concurrently distinguishes between HHV-6 species (A or B) and identifies inherited ciHHV-6. By applying this assay to recipient post-HCT plasma and serum samples, we demonstrated reactivation of HHV-6B in 25% (4/16 recipients) of HCT recipients with donor- or recipient-derived inherited ciHHV-6A, underscoring the need for diagnostic testing for HHV-6 infection even in the presence of ciHHV-6. PMID:26888901

  8. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Erwinia amylovora Strains from Mexico Detects Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in rpsL Conferring Streptomycin Resistance and in the avrRpt2 Effector Altering Host Interactions.

    PubMed

    Smits, Theo H M; Guerrero-Prieto, Víctor M; Hernández-Escarcega, Germán; Blom, Jochem; Goesmann, Alexander; Rezzonico, Fabio; Duffy, Brion; Stockwell, Virginia O

    2014-01-01

    We report draft genome sequences of three Mexican Erwinia amylovora strains. A novel plasmid, pEA78, was identified. Comparative genomics revealed an rpsL chromosomal mutation conferring high-level streptomycin resistance in two strains. In the effector gene avrRpt2, a single nucleotide polymorphism was detected that overcomes fire blight disease resistance in Malus × robusta 5. PMID:24459281

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI detects acute radiotherapy-induced alterations in mandibular microvasculature: prospective assessment of imaging biomarkers of normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandulache, Vlad C.; Hobbs, Brian P.; Mohamed, Abdallah S.R.; Frank, Steven J.; Song, Juhee; Ding, Yao; Ger, Rachel; Court, Laurence E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Hazle, John D.; Wang, Jihong; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Garden, Adam S.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Colen, Rivka R.; Elshafeey, Nabil; Elbanan, Mohamed; Hutcheson, Katherine A.; Lewin, Jan S.; Chambers, Mark S.; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Weber, Randal S.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity is an important consideration in the continued development of more effective external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) regimens for head and neck tumors. The ability to detect EBRT-induced changes in mandibular bone vascularity represents a crucial step in decreasing potential toxicity. To date, no imaging modality has been shown to detect changes in bone vascularity in real time during treatment. Based on our institutional experience with multi-parametric MRI, we hypothesized that DCE-MRI can provide in-treatment information regarding EBRT-induced changes in mandibular vascularity. Thirty-two patients undergoing EBRT treatment for head and neck cancer were prospectively imaged prior to, mid-course, and following treatment. DCE-MRI scans were co-registered to dosimetric maps to correlate EBRT dose and change in mandibular bone vascularity as measured by Ktrans and Ve. DCE-MRI was able to detect dose-dependent changes in both Ktrans and Ve in a subset of patients. One patient who developed ORN during the study period demonstrated decreases in Ktrans and Ve following treatment completion. We demonstrate, in a prospective imaging trial, that DCE-MRI can detect dose-dependent alterations in mandibular bone vascularity during chemoradiotherapy, providing biomarkers that are physiological correlates of acute of acute mandibular vascular injury and recovery temporal kinetics. PMID:27499209

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI detects acute radiotherapy-induced alterations in mandibular microvasculature: prospective assessment of imaging biomarkers of normal tissue injury.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity is an important consideration in the continued development of more effective external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) regimens for head and neck tumors. The ability to detect EBRT-induced changes in mandibular bone vascularity represents a crucial step in decreasing potential toxicity. To date, no imaging modality has been shown to detect changes in bone vascularity in real time during treatment. Based on our institutional experience with multi-parametric MRI, we hypothesized that DCE-MRI can provide in-treatment information regarding EBRT-induced changes in mandibular vascularity. Thirty-two patients undergoing EBRT treatment for head and neck cancer were prospectively imaged prior to, mid-course, and following treatment. DCE-MRI scans were co-registered to dosimetric maps to correlate EBRT dose and change in mandibular bone vascularity as measured by Ktrans and Ve. DCE-MRI was able to detect dose-dependent changes in both Ktrans and Ve in a subset of patients. One patient who developed ORN during the study period demonstrated decreases in Ktrans and Ve following treatment completion. We demonstrate, in a prospective imaging trial, that DCE-MRI can detect dose-dependent alterations in mandibular bone vascularity during chemoradiotherapy, providing biomarkers that are physiological correlates of acute of acute mandibular vascular injury and recovery temporal kinetics. PMID:27499209

  11. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil

    PubMed Central

    Francés, Alexandra; Hildur, Kristin; Barberà, Joan Albert; Rodríguez-Trigo, Gema; Zock, Jan-Paul; Giraldo, Jesús; Monyarch, Gemma; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Emma; de Castro Reis, Fernanda; Souto, Ana; Gómez, Federico P.; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Templado, Cristina; Fuster, Carme

    2016-01-01

    Background The identification of breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage could help to detect genes involved in genetic disorders, most notably cancer. Until now, only one published study, carried out by our group, has identified chromosome bands affected by exposure to oil from an oil spill. In that study, which was performed two years after the initial oil exposure in individuals who had participated in clean-up tasks following the wreck of the Prestige, three chromosomal bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31) were found to be especially prone to breakage. A recent follow-up study, performed on the same individuals, revealed that the genotoxic damage had persisted six years after oil exposure. Objectives To determine whether there exist chromosome bands which are especially prone to breakages and to know if there is some correlation with those detected in the previous study. In addition, to investigate if the DNA repair problems detected previously persist in the present study. Design Follow-up study performed six years after the Prestige oil spill. Setting Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages. Participants Fishermen highly exposed to oil spill who participated in previous genotoxic study six years after the oil. Measurements Chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes. For accurate identification of the breakpoints involved in chromosome damage of circulating lymphocytes, a sequential stain/G-banding technique was employed. To determine the most break-prone chromosome bands, two statistical methods, the Fragile Site Multinomial and the chi-square tests (where the bands were corrected by their length) were used. To compare the chromosome lesions, structural chromosome alterations and gaps/breaks between two groups of individuals we used the GEE test which takes into account a possible within-individual correlation. Dysfunctions in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosome damage, were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin by the GEE test. Results Cytogenetic

  12. Global detection of molecular changes reveals concurrent alteration of several biological pathways in nonsmall cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Z.; Kapoor, M.; Newton, K; Cheon, K.; Ramaswamy, A.; Lotan, R.; Strong, L. C.; Koo, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    To identify the molecular changes that occur in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), we compared the gene expression profile of the NCI-H292 (H292) NSCLC cell line with that of normal human tracheobronchial epithelial (NHTBE) cells. The NHTBE cells were grown in a three-dimensional organotypic culture system that permits maintenance of the normal pseudostratified mucociliary phenotype characteristic of bronchial epithelium in vivo. Microarray analysis using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide chip U95Av2 revealed that 1,683 genes showed a > 1.5-fold change in expression in the H292 cell line relative to the NHTBE cells. Specifically, 418 genes were downregulated and 1,265 were upregulated in the H292 cells. The expression data for selected genes were validated in several different NSCLC cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis. Further analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that WNT responses, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and cell proliferation were significantly altered in the H292 cells. Functional analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting confirmed concurrent changes in the activity of these pathways in the H292 line. These findings show that (1) NSCLC cells display deregulation of the WNT, apoptosis, proliferation and cell cycle pathways, as has been found in many other types of cancer cells, and (2) that organotypically cultured NHTBE cells can be used as a reference to identify genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in tumor cells derived from bronchogenic epithelium. PMID:16049682

  13. {sup 1}H NMR-based spectroscopy detects metabolic alterations in serum of patients with early-stage ulcerative colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Lin, Lianjie; Xu, Yanbin; Lin, Yan; Jin, Yu; Zheng, Changqing

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Twenty ulcerative colitis patients and nineteen healthy controls were enrolled. •Increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, phenylalanine, and decreased lipid were found. •We report early stage diagnosis of ulcerative colitis using NMR-based metabolomics. -- Abstract: Ulcerative colitis (UC) has seriously impaired the health of citizens. Accurate diagnosis of UC at an early stage is crucial to improve the efficiency of treatment and prognosis. In this study, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR)-based metabolomic analysis was performed on serum samples collected from active UC patients (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 19), respectively. The obtained spectral profiles were subjected to multivariate data analysis. Our results showed that consistent metabolic alterations were present between the two groups. Compared to healthy controls, UC patients displayed increased 3-hydroxybutyrate, β-glucose, α-glucose, and phenylalanine, but decreased lipid in serum. These findings highlight the possibilities of NMR-based metabolomics as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for UC.

  14. Alterations in collagen structure in hypermobility and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes detected by Raman spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Carina K.; Gniadecka, Monika; Ullman, Susanne; Halberg, Poul; Kobayasi, Takasi; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2000-11-01

    Patients with hypermobility syndrome (HS) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) were investigated by means of in vivo near- infrared Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy. HS is a benign and common condition (up to 5 percent of the population of the Western World). EDS is a rare, inherited connective tissue disease characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and other, occasionally serious, organ changes. EDS and HS may be related disorders. We investigated 13 patients with HS, 8 patients with EDS, and 24 healthy volunteers by means of in vivo Raman spectroscopy. The patients were classified according to Beighton and Holzberg et al. No difference in age between the three groups was found (HS 41 (33-49), EDS 36 (25-47), controls 37 (31-42); mean, 95% confidence intervals, respectively). Spectral differences were found in the intensity of the amide-III bands around 1245 and 1270 cm-1 in HS and EDS compared with healthy skin (Kruskal-Wallis, p equals 0,02 for intensity ratios (I1245/I1270) between the investigated groups). To elucidate the character of the alterations in the amide-III bands a curve fitting procedure was applied. In conclusion, Raman spectroscopy may aid in the diagnosis of HS and EDS. Moreover the technique may be useful for analyzing the molecular changes occurring in these syndromes.

  15. Chromosomal aberrations in onion (Allium cepa) induced by water chlorination by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sabti, K.; Kurelec, B.

    1985-01-01

    It has recently come to light that water chlorination generates mutagens and carcinogens. The mutagenicity of nonvolatile mutagenic by-products of water chlorination has been demonstrated in short-term biological testings. The predictive value of short-term tests is considerably enhanced by the use of more than one test system. A scientifically stringent approach in formulating a testing program for the assessment of genotoxins is to rely on tests that directly measure gene mutations and chromosome alterations. Chromosome aberrations (CA) become such a relevant bioassay. The CA measurement in the allium test is suitable for measuring the cytogenotoxic potential of chemicals present in water; it is simple, cheap, sensitive, and it does not require a generally undefined step of concentrating chemicals present in polluted waters. In the present investigation CA in Allium were chosen for the detection of mutagenic potential of a polluted river waters before and after the under-breakpoint chlorination.

  16. [Identification of chromosomal aberration in esophageal cancer cells by mixed BAC DNA probes of chromosome arms and regions].

    PubMed

    Jiajie, Hao; Chunli, Wang; Wenyue, Gu; Xiaoyu, Cheng; Yu, Zhang; Xin, Xu; Yan, Cai; Mingrong, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal aberration is an important genetic feature of malignant tumor cells. This study aimed to clarify whether BAC DNA could be used to identify chromosome region and arm alterations. For each chromosome region, five to ten 1 Mb BAC DNA clones were selected to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the particular region. All of the mixed clones from regions which could cover the whole chromosome arm were then mixed to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the arms. Mixed BAC DNA probes of arms and regions were labeled by degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and Nick translation techniques, respectively. The specificities of these probes were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the metaphase chromosomes of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. FISH with arm-specific mixed BAC DNA probes showed that chromosomal rearrangements and involved chromosome arms were confirmed in several esophageal cancer cells. By using region-specific mixed probes, the breakpoint on 1q from the derivative chromosome t(1q;7q) was identified in 1q32-q41 in esophageal KYSE140 cells. In conclusion, we established an effective labeling method for 1 Mb BAC DNA mixed clone probes, and chromosome arm and region rearrangements could be identified in several esophageal cancer cells by using these probes. Our study provides a more precise method for identification of chromosomal aberration by M-FISH, and the established method may also be applied to the karyotype analysis of hematological malignancies and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:24929514

  17. IUE's View of Callisto: Detection of an SO2 Absorption Correlated to Possible Torus Neutral Wind Alterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Arthur L.; Domingue, Deborah L.

    1997-01-01

    Observations taken with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) detected a 0.28 micron absorption feature on Callisto's leading and Jupiter-facing hemispheres. This feature is similar to Europa's 0.28 micron feature, however it shows no correlation with magnetospheric ion bombardment. The strongest 0.28 micron signature is seen in the region containing the Valhalla impact. This absorption feature also shows some spatial correlation to possible neutral wind interactions, suggestive of S implantation (rather than S(sub x)) into Callisto's water ice surface, Indications of possible temporal variations (on the 10% level) are seen at other wavelengths between the 1984-1986 and the 1996 observations.

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging based network analysis detects alterations of neuroconnectivity in patients with clinically early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Jewells, Valerie; Kim, Minjeong; Chen, Yasheng; Moon, Andrew; Armao, Diane; Troiani, Luigi; Markovic-Plese, Silva; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-12-01

    Although it is inarguable that conventional MRI (cMRI) has greatly contributed to the diagnosis and assessment of multiple sclerosis (MS), cMRI does not show close correlation with clinical findings or pathologic features, and is unable to predict prognosis or stratify disease severity. To this end, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with tractography and neuroconnectivity analysis may assist disease assessment in MS. We, therefore, attempted this pilot study for initial assessment of early relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Neuroconnectivity analysis was used for evaluation of 24 early RRMS patients within 2 years of presentation, and compared to the network measures of a group of 30 age-and-gender-matched normal control subjects. To account for the situation that the connections between two adjacent regions may be disrupted by an MS lesion, a new metric, network communicability, was adopted to measure both direct and indirect connections. For each anatomical area, the brain network communicability and average path length were computed and compared to characterize the network changes in efficiencies. Statistically significant (P < 0.05) loss of communicability was revealed in our RRMS cohort, particularly in the frontal and hippocampal/parahippocampal regions as well as the motor strip and occipital lobes. Correlation with the 25-foot Walk test with communicability measures in the left superior frontal (r = -0.71) as well as the left superior temporal gyrus (r = -0.43) and left postcentral gyrus (r = -0.41) were identified. Additionally identified were increased communicability between the deep gray matter structures (left thalamus and putamen) with the major interhemispheric and intrahemispheric white matter tracts, the corpus callosum, and cingulum, respectively. These foci of increased communicability are thought to represent compensatory changes. The proposed DTI-based neuroconnectivity analysis demonstrated quantifiable, structurally relevant alterations of fiber

  19. Reference point indentation is insufficient for detecting alterations in traditional mechanical properties of bone under common experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Krege, John B; Aref, Mohammad W; McNerny, Erin; Wallace, Joseph M; Organ, Jason M; Allen, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    Reference point indentation (RPI) was developed as a novel method to assess mechanical properties of bone in vivo, yet it remains unclear what aspects of bone dictate changes/differences in RPI-based parameters. The main RPI parameter, indentation distance increase (IDI), has been proposed to be inversely related to the ability of bone to form/tolerate damage. The goal of this work was to explore the relationshipre-intervention RPI measurebetween RPI parameters and traditional mechanical properties under varying experimental conditions (drying and ashing bones to increase brittleness, demineralizing bones and soaking in raloxifene to decrease brittleness). Beams were machined from cadaveric bone, pre-tested with RPI, subjected to experimental manipulation, post-tested with RPI, and then subjected to four-point bending to failure. Drying and ashing significantly reduced RPI's IDI, as well as ultimate load (UL), and energy absorption measured from bending tests. Demineralization increased IDI with minimal change to bending properties. Ex vivo soaking in raloxifene had no effect on IDI but tended to enhance post-yield behavior at the structural level. These data challenge the paradigm of an inverse relationship between IDI and bone toughness, both through correlation analyses and in the individual experiments where divergent patterns of altered IDI and mechanical properties were noted. Based on these results, we conclude that RPI measurements alone, as compared to bending tests, are insufficient to reach conclusions regarding mechanical properties of bone. This proves problematic for the potential clinical use of RPI measurements in determining fracture risk for a single patient, as it is not currently clear that there is an IDI, or even a trend of IDI, that can determine clinically relevant changes in tissue properties that may contribute to whole bone fracture resistance. PMID:27072518

  20. Chromosome Movement in Mitosis Requires Microtubule Anchorage at Spindle Poles

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael B.; Howard, Louisa; Compton, Duane A.

    2001-01-01

    Anchorage of microtubule minus ends at spindle poles has been proposed to bear the load of poleward forces exerted by kinetochore-associated motors so that chromosomes move toward the poles rather than the poles toward the chromosomes. To test this hypothesis, we monitored chromosome movement during mitosis after perturbation of nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) and the human homologue of the KIN C motor family (HSET), two noncentrosomal proteins involved in spindle pole organization in animal cells. Perturbation of NuMA alone disrupts spindle pole organization and delays anaphase onset, but does not alter the velocity of oscillatory chromosome movement in prometaphase. Perturbation of HSET alone increases the duration of prometaphase, but does not alter the velocity of chromosome movement in prometaphase or anaphase. In contrast, simultaneous perturbation of both HSET and NuMA severely suppresses directed chromosome movement in prometaphase. Chromosomes coalesce near the center of these cells on bi-oriented spindles that lack organized poles. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy verify microtubule attachment to sister kinetochores, but this attachment fails to generate proper tension across sister kinetochores. These results demonstrate that anchorage of microtubule minus ends at spindle poles mediated by overlapping mechanisms involving both NuMA and HSET is essential for chromosome movement during mitosis. PMID:11157972

  1. Evidence for Sex Chromosome Turnover in Proteid Salamanders.

    PubMed

    Sessions, Stanley K; Bizjak Mali, Lilijana; Green, David M; Trifonov, Vladimir; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of genomic and reproductive biology is to understand the evolution of sex determination and sex chromosomes. Species of the 2 genera of the Salamander family Proteidae - Necturus of eastern North America, and Proteus of Southern Europe - have similar-looking karyotypes with the same chromosome number (2n = 38), which differentiates them from all other salamanders. However, Necturus possesses strongly heteromorphic X and Y sex chromosomes that Proteus lacks. Since the heteromorphic sex chromosomes of Necturus were detectable only with C-banding, we hypothesized that we could use C-banding to find sex chromosomes in Proteus. We examined mitotic material from colchicine-treated intestinal epithelium, and meiotic material from testes in specimens of Proteus, representing 3 genetically distinct populations in Slovenia. We compared these results with those from Necturus. We performed FISH to visualize telomeric sequences in meiotic bivalents. Our results provide evidence that Proteus represents an example of sex chromosome turnover in which a Necturus-like Y-chromosome has become permanently translocated to another chromosome converting heteromorphic sex chromosomes to homomorphic sex chromosomes. These results may be key to understanding some unusual aspects of demographics and reproductive biology of Proteus, and are discussed in the context of models of the evolution of sex chromosomes in amphibians. PMID:27351721

  2. Possible origin of B chromosome in Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Amorim, Igor Costa; Milani, Diogo; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; Rocha, Marília França; Moura, Rita Cássia

    2016-08-01

    B chromosomes have so far been described in about 80 species of Coleoptera, mainly using conventional staining analysis. In this study, 152 individuals of the dung beetle Dichotomius sericeus (Coleoptera), collected from three isolated geographical areas in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, were analyzed to determine the frequency, prevalence, distribution, meiotic behavior, and possible B chromosome origin. The cytogenetic analysis consisted of conventional staining, C-banding, triple fluorochrome staining (CMA3/DA/DAPI), and fluorescent in situ hybridization using ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) and H3 histone gene as probes, as well as microdissection and chromosome painting of the B chromosome. The B chromosomes were detected in all populations analyzed. Analysis revealed the heterochromatic nature and the presence of G+C-rich blocks and 18S rDNA on the B chromosome. FISH with DNA from microdissected B chromosome painted the entire extension of the B chromosome for all populations, besides the pericentromeric regions of all the autosomes, as well as the X chromosome. Finally, cross-hybridization in nine related species of Dichotomius using the microdissected B chromosome as probe did not reveal any hybridization signal. The results suggest an intraspecific and monophyletic origin for B chromosomes in D. sericeus, probably from the second or third autosomal pair. PMID:27375029

  3. UMI-4C for quantitative and targeted chromosomal contact profiling.

    PubMed

    Schwartzman, Omer; Mukamel, Zohar; Oded-Elkayam, Noa; Olivares-Chauvet, Pedro; Lubling, Yaniv; Landan, Gilad; Izraeli, Shai; Tanay, Amos

    2016-08-01

    We developed a targeted chromosome conformation capture (4C) approach that uses unique molecular identifiers (UMIs) to derive high-complexity quantitative chromosome contact profiles with controlled signal-to-noise ratios. UMI-4C detects chromosomal interactions with improved sensitivity and specificity, and it can easily be multiplexed to allow robust comparison of contact distributions between loci and conditions. This approach may open the way to the incorporation of contact distributions into quantitative models of gene regulation. PMID:27376768

  4. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNAs in Characidium (Teleostei, Characiformes): Genomic Organization and Diversification of ZW Sex Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Scacchetti, Priscilla C; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Pansonato-Alves, José C; Vicari, Marcelo R; Artoni, Roberto F; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    The speciose neotropical genus Characidium has proven to be a good model for cytogenetic exploration. Representatives of this genus often have a conserved diploid chromosome number; some species exhibit a highly differentiated ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system, while others do not show any sex-related chromosome heteromorphism. In this study, chromosome painting using a W-specific probe and comparative chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences, including ribosomal clusters and 4 microsatellite motifs - (CA)15, (GA)15, (CG)15, and (TTA)10 -, were performed in 6 Characidium species, 5 of which possessed a heteromorphic ZW sex chromosome system. The W-specific probe showed hybridization signals on the W chromosome of all analyzed species, indicating homology among the W chromosomes. Remarkably, a single major rDNA-bearing chromosome pair was found in all species. The 18S rDNA localized to the sex chromosomes in C. lanei, C. timbuiense and C. pterostictum, while the major rDNA localized to one autosome pair in C. vidali and C. gomesi. In contrast, the number of 5S rDNA-bearing chromosomes varied. Notably, minor ribosomal clusters were identified in the W chromosome of C. vidali. Microsatellites were widely distributed across almost all chromosomes of the karyotypes, with a greater accumulation in the subtelomeric regions. However, clear differences in the abundance of each motif were detected in each species. In addition, the Z and W chromosomes showed the differential accumulation of distinct motifs. Our results revealed variability in the distribution of repetitive DNA sequences and their possible association with sex chromosome diversification in Characidium species. PMID:26277929

  5. Plant sex chromosome evolution.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    It is now well established that plants have an important place in studies of sex chromosome evolution because of the repeated independent evolution of separate sexes and sex chromosomes. There has been considerable recent progress in studying plant sex chromosomes. In this review, I focus on how these recent studies have helped clarify or answer several important questions about sex chromosome evolution, and I shall also try to clarify some common misconceptions. I also outline future work that will be needed to make further progress, including testing some important ideas by genetic, molecular, and developmental approaches. Systems with different ages can clearly help show the time course of events during changes from an ancestral co-sexual state (hermaphroditism or monoecy), and I will also explain how different questions can be studied in lineages whose dioecy or sex chromosomes evolved at different times in the past. PMID:23125359

  6. Replication needed to detect alterations in the composition of rodent, rabbit, or human testes via volume density approaches.

    PubMed

    Berndtson, William E

    2010-01-01

    Sperm production is an important variable affecting the reproductive capacity of men and other male mammals. Because spermatogenesis is highly susceptible to disruption, volume density techniques that enable the composition of testicular tissue to be characterized or sperm production rates to be quantified are used extensively to assess potential impacts of known or suspected reproductive toxins, the safety of proposed human or animal drugs, and basic studies on spermatogenesis in normal individuals. The number of subjects used per treatment group for such studies has been variable. However, the power and sensitivity of any experiment is dependent on the inherent variability associated with the end point(s) of interest and the number of replicates (ie, animals or men per treatment group) employed per treatment group. Because the reliability of one's experimental outcome should be of utmost consideration, it is important to characterize the typical levels of inherent variability associated with one's chosen end point(s) and to answer the question: how many subjects are required per treatment group to provide an experiment with a given power and sensitivity for detecting actual treatment effects? This study was undertaken to 1) characterize the inherent variability associated with the volume density of several testicular components in rodents, rabbits, and humans and among cell numbers derived from volume density data and 2) identify the approximate number of replicates that would be required to provide future studies of predictable power and sensitivity for which data were to be generated via the volume density approach. Replication requirements differed, sometimes by several orders of magnitude, among these species and among end points within a single species. In addition, for many of these species and end points, the number of replicates necessary to ensure modest power and sensitivity for detecting treatment differences exceeded that used in most investigations

  7. A cloned DNA segment from the telomeric region of human chromosome 4p is not detectably rearranged in Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, C; Casher, D; Bull, L; Cox, D R; Myers, R M

    1990-01-01

    Genetic linkage studies have mapped the Huntington disease (HD) mutation to the distal region of the short arm of human chromosome 4. Analysis of recombination events in this region has produced contradictory locations for HD. One possible location is in the region distal to the D4S90 marker, which is located within 300 kilobases of the telomere. Other crossover events predict a more centromeric position for HD. Here we analyze the telomeric region of 4p in detail. Cloned DNA segments were derived from this region by utilizing a radiation-induced somatic cell hybrid as a source of DNA combined with preparative pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to enrich for the telomeric fraction. Additional DNA was obtained by using the cloned segments as multiple start points for cosmid walks. This strategy proved to be an effective method for cloning 250 kilobases of DNA in the region telomeric to D4S90. Hybridization analysis with the cloned DNA did not provide any evidence for the presence of rearrangements of 100 base pairs or greater in the DNA of individuals affected with HD. We also found no change in the size or structure of the 4p telomere in these samples. Images PMID:2144903

  8. A cloned DNA segment from the telomeric region of human chromosome 4p is not detectably rearranged in Huntington disease patients.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, C; Casher, D; Bull, L; Cox, D R; Myers, R M

    1990-09-01

    Genetic linkage studies have mapped the Huntington disease (HD) mutation to the distal region of the short arm of human chromosome 4. Analysis of recombination events in this region has produced contradictory locations for HD. One possible location is in the region distal to the D4S90 marker, which is located within 300 kilobases of the telomere. Other crossover events predict a more centromeric position for HD. Here we analyze the telomeric region of 4p in detail. Cloned DNA segments were derived from this region by utilizing a radiation-induced somatic cell hybrid as a source of DNA combined with preparative pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to enrich for the telomeric fraction. Additional DNA was obtained by using the cloned segments as multiple start points for cosmid walks. This strategy proved to be an effective method for cloning 250 kilobases of DNA in the region telomeric to D4S90. Hybridization analysis with the cloned DNA did not provide any evidence for the presence of rearrangements of 100 base pairs or greater in the DNA of individuals affected with HD. We also found no change in the size or structure of the 4p telomere in these samples. PMID:2144903

  9. JAK2 V617F detected in two B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients without coexisting Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    YANG, YI-NING; QIN, YOU-WEN; WANG, CHUN

    2014-01-01

    The JAK2 V617F mutation has been observed in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-MPNs), including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and idiopathic myelofibrosis. This mutation has also been observed in a small number of other myeloid malignancies, such as acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The JAK2 V617F allele has rarely been evaluated in lymphoproliferative disorders. In total, 28 JAK2 V617F-positive B-cell lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients have previously been reported and all presented with Ph-MPN concomitantly. However, following investigation of the JAK2 V617F mutation in 63 B-CLL patients at the Shanghai First People’s Hospital (Shanghai, China) between January 2008 and December 2012 via allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, two B-CLL patients without a history of Ph-MPN were identified to carry the JAK2 V617F allele. PMID:25013507

  10. Detection of Chromosome X;18 Breakpoints and Translocation of the Xq22.3;18q23 Regions Resulting in Variable Fertility Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Szvetko, Attila; Martin, Nicole; Joy, Chris; Hayward, Andrea; Watson, Bob; Cary, Andrew; Withers, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    We describe a familial pattern of gonosomal-autosomal translocation between the X and 18 chromosomes, balanced and unbalanced forms, in male and female siblings. The proposita was consulted for hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Karyotype analysis revealed a balanced 46, X, t(X;18)(q22.3;q23) genotype. The sister of the proband presented with oligomenorrhea with irregular menses and possesses an unbalanced form of the translocation 46, X, der(X), t(X;18)(q22.3;q23). The brother of the proband was investigated and was found to possess the balanced form of the same translocation, resulting in disrupted spermatogenesis. Maternal investigation revealed the progenitor karyotype 46, X, t(X;18)(q22.3;q23). Maternal inheritance and various genomic events contributed to the resultant genotypes. Primary infertility was initially diagnosed in all progeny; however, the male individual recently fathered twins. We briefly review the mechanisms associated with X;18 translocations and describe a pattern of inheritance, where breakpoints and translocation of the Xq22.3;18q23 regions have resulted in variable fertility. PMID:23074692

  11. Detection of chromosome x;18 breakpoints and translocation of the xq22.3;18q23 regions resulting in variable fertility phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Szvetko, Attila; Martin, Nicole; Joy, Chris; Hayward, Andrea; Watson, Bob; Cary, Andrew; Withers, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    We describe a familial pattern of gonosomal-autosomal translocation between the X and 18 chromosomes, balanced and unbalanced forms, in male and female siblings. The proposita was consulted for hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Karyotype analysis revealed a balanced 46, X, t(X;18)(q22.3;q23) genotype. The sister of the proband presented with oligomenorrhea with irregular menses and possesses an unbalanced form of the translocation 46, X, der(X), t(X;18)(q22.3;q23). The brother of the proband was investigated and was found to possess the balanced form of the same translocation, resulting in disrupted spermatogenesis. Maternal investigation revealed the progenitor karyotype 46, X, t(X;18)(q22.3;q23). Maternal inheritance and various genomic events contributed to the resultant genotypes. Primary infertility was initially diagnosed in all progeny; however, the male individual recently fathered twins. We briefly review the mechanisms associated with X;18 translocations and describe a pattern of inheritance, where breakpoints and translocation of the Xq22.3;18q23 regions have resulted in variable fertility. PMID:23074692

  12. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, Sabarish; Liao, Pao-Chuan; Shin, Min C.; Tsap, Leonid V.

    2006-12-01

    The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell, and its state. Analysis of chromosome structure is significant in the detection of diseases, identification of chromosomal abnormalities, study of DNA structural conformation, in-depth study of chromosomal surface morphology, observation of in vivo behavior of the chromosomes over time, and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The methodology incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  13. Reconstruction of genomic rearrangements in great apes and gibbons by chromosome painting.

    PubMed Central

    Jauch, A; Wienberg, J; Stanyon, R; Arnold, N; Tofanelli, S; Ishida, T; Cremer, T

    1992-01-01

    The homology between hylobatid chromosomes and other primates has long remained elusive. We used chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization of all human chromosome-specific DNA libraries to "paint" the chromosomes of primates and establish homologies between the human, great ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan), and gibbon karyotypes (Hylobates lar species group, 2n = 44). The hybridization patterns unequivocally demonstrate the high degree of chromosomal homology and synteny of great ape and human chromosomes. Relative to human, no translocations were detected in great apes, except for the well-known fusion-origin of human chromosome 2 and a 5;17 translocation in the gorilla. In contrast, numerous translocations were detected that have led to the massive reorganization of the gibbon karyotype: the 22 autosomal human chromosomes have been divided into 51 elements to compose the 21 gibbon autosomes. Molecular cytogenetics promises to finally allow hylobatids to be integrated into the overall picture of chromosomal evolution in the primates. Images PMID:1528869

  14. Near-infrared reflectance of zunyite: implications for field mapping and remote-sensing detection of hydrothermally altered high alumina rocks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Several hydroxyl-bearing minerals have diagnostic absorption bands in the 2.0-2.4 mu m wave length range, and can be identified with an orbital radiometer and with high-resolution airborne and field portable spectrometers. Among such minerals, zunyite, 143Al13Si5O20(OH,F)18Cl, has distinctive spectral absorption characteristics and is notably restricted to, and thus an indicator mineral of, advanced argillic alteration. Although seldom noted because it visually resembles quartz, zunyite is probably not as rare as generally believed. Laboratory measurements and general considerations underlie suggestions favouring the feasibility of detecting zunyite, alone and in mixtures with other Al-OH minerals, using field portable spectrometers.-G.J.N.

  15. Hematobiochemical alterations and direct blood polymerase chain reaction detection of Theileria annulata in naturally infected crossbred cows

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Anita; Bhanot, Vandna; Bisla, R. S.; Ganguly, Indrajit; Singh, Harpreet; Chaudhri, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine hemato-biochemical changes and rapid diagnosis of Theileria annulata in naturally infected crossbred cows. Materials and Methods: Blood samples from lactating crossbred cows (n=40) between 3 and 7 years of age and showing clinical signs of tropical theileriosis were collected, with or without anticoagulant, and analyzed for tropical theileriosis by direct smear, direct blood polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of merozoite-piroplasm surface antigen (Tams1) gene specific amplicon, estimation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Healthy crossbred cows (n=6), examined free from hemoprotozoan infections were included as control. Results: The infected crossbred cows revealed significantly (p<0.001) lower values of total erythrocytic counts (4.46±0.2 × 106/µL), hemoglobin (Hb 6.025±0.39 g%), packed cell volume (17.05±1.1%), mean corpuscular volume (37.94±1.70 fL) and mean corpuscular Hb (13.5±0.48 pg; p<0.002) compared with healthy control. The serum samples of infected cows revealed profound (p<0.05) hyponatremia (Na 133.21±2.36 mEq/l) and hypocalcemia (Ca 8.39±0.34 mg%). Infected crossbred cows showed a significant increase (p<0.05) of mean serum activity of alanine aminotransferase (61.45±13.36 U/L), aspartate aminotransferase (146.1±20.97 U/L), blood urea nitrogen (28.26±3.90 mg%), creatinine (1.55±0.13 mg%), direct bilirubin (0.33±0.04 mg%; p<0.001) and lactate dehydrogenase (3001.32±167.0 U/L; p<001). Blood direct PCR revealed a 721-bp fragment amplified from the target gene encoding 30-kDa major merozoite surface antigen of T. annulata using specific primer pairs. This assay was positive for all the infected animals. Conclusion: The assessments of hemato-biochemical parameters in T. annulata infected crossbred cows may be useful in understanding disease pathogenesis, prognosis and corrective measures for supportive therapy. Moreover, blood direct PCR can reliably be used for rapid detection of T. annulata

  16. Direct characterization of factor VIII in plasma: detection of a mutation altering a thrombin cleavage site (arginine-372----histidine).

    PubMed Central

    Arai, M; Inaba, H; Higuchi, M; Antonarakis, S E; Kazazian, H H; Fujimaki, M; Hoyer, L W

    1989-01-01

    An immunoadsorbent method has been developed for the direct analysis of normal and variant plasma factor VIII. Using this method, the molecular defect responsible for mild hemophilia A has been identified for a patient whose plasma factor VIII activity is 0.05 unit/ml, even though the factor VIII antigen content is 3.25 units/ml. Although the variant factor VIII has an apparently normal molecular mass and chain composition, the 92-kDa heavy chain accumulates when the variant protein is incubated with thrombin and the 44-kDa heavy chain fragment cannot be detected. In contrast, thrombin cleavage of the 80-kDa light chain to the 72-kDa fragment is normal. As these data indicate a loss of factor VIII cleavage by thrombin at arginine-372, the genetic defect was determined by polymerase-chain-reaction amplification of exon 8 of the factor VIII gene and direct sequencing of the amplified product. A single-base substitution (guanine----adenine) was identified that produces an arginine to histidine substitution at amino acid residue 372. These data identify the molecular basis of an abnormal factor VIII, "factor VIII-Kumamoto," that lacks procoagulant function because of impaired thrombin activation. Images PMID:2498882

  17. Common Somatic Alterations Identified in Maffucci Syndrome by Molecular Karyotyping

    PubMed Central

    Amyere, Mustapha; Dompmartin, Anne; Wouters, Vinciane; Enjolras, Odile; Kaitila, Ilkka; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Godfraind, Catherine; Mulliken, John Butler; Boon, Laurence Myriam; Vikkula, Miikka

    2014-01-01

    Maffucci syndrome (MS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by multiple central cartilaginous tumors (enchondromas) in association with cutaneous spindle cell hemangiomas. These patients have a high incidence of malignant transformation. No familial case is known and the etiopathogenic cause remains unknown. In enchondromatosis (Ollier disease, OD), which is comprised of enchondromas only, 4 mutations in the PTHR1 gene have been identified in 4 patients; 3 were somatic and 1 was germline. No PTHR1 mutations have been detected in MS, whereas somatic IDH1 and, more rarely, IDH2 mutations have been observed in 77% of patients with MS and 81% of patients with OD. These genetic alterations are shared with other tumors, including glioma, leukemia and carcinoma. To search for underlying somatic genomic causes, we screened MS tissues using Affymetrix SNP-chips. We looked for CNVs, LOH and uniparental isodisomy (UPID) by performing pairwise analyses between allelic intensities in tumoral DNA versus the corresponding blood-extracted DNA. While common chromosomal anomalies were absent in constitutional DNA, several shared CNVs were identified in MS-associated tumors. The most frequently encountered somatic alterations were localized in 2p22.3, 2q24.3 and 14q11.2, implicating these chromosomal rearrangements in the formation of enchondromas and spindle cell hemangiomas in MS. In one chondrosarcoma specimen, large amplifications and/or deletions were observed in chromosomes 3, 6, 9, 10, 12, 13, and 19. Some of these genetic changes have been reported in other chondrosarcomas suggesting an etiopathogenic role. No LOH/UPID was observed in any Maffucci tissue. Our findings identify frequent somatic chromosomal rearrangements on 2p22.3, 2q24.3 and 14q11.2, which may unmask mutations leading to the lesions pathognomonic of MS. PMID:25565925

  18. DNA Probe Pooling for Rapid Delineation of Chromosomal Breakpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Kwan, Johnson; Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly F.; Wang, Mei; Escudero, Tomas; Munne', Santiago; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich

    2009-01-30

    Structural chromosome aberrations are hallmarks of many human genetic diseases. The precise mapping of translocation breakpoints in tumors is important for identification of genes with altered levels of expression, prediction of tumor progression, therapy response, or length of disease-free survival as well as the preparation of probes for detection of tumor cells in peripheral blood. Similarly, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for carriers of balanced, reciprocal translocations benefit from accurate breakpoint maps in the preparation of patient-specific DNA probes followed by a selection of normal or balanced oocytes or embryos. We expedited the process of breakpoint mapping and preparation of case-specific probes by utilizing physically mapped bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. Historically, breakpoint mapping is based on the definition of the smallest interval between proximal and distal probes. Thus, many of the DNA probes prepared for multi-clone and multi-color mapping experiments do not generate additional information. Our pooling protocol described here with examples from thyroid cancer research and PGD accelerates the delineation of translocation breakpoints without sacrificing resolution. The turnaround time from clone selection to mapping results using tumor or IVF patient samples can be as short as three to four days.

  19. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  20. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  1. A complex chromosomal rearrangement involving chromosomes 2, 5, and X in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Moreira, Danielle de Paula; Davis-Wright, Nicole; Sanders, Stephan; Mason, Christopher; Orabona, Guilherme Müller; Vadasz, Estevão; Bertola, Débora Romeo; State, Matthew W; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2012-07-01

    Here, we describe a female patient with autism spectrum disorder and dysmorphic features that harbors a complex genetic alteration, involving a de novo balanced translocation t(2;X)(q11;q24), a 5q11 segmental trisomy and a maternally inherited isodisomy on chromosome 5. All the possibly damaging genetic effects of such alterations are discussed. In light of recent findings on ASD genetic causes, the hypothesis that all these alterations might be acting in orchestration and contributing to the phenotype is also considered. PMID:22592906

  2. Deficit of mitonuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-02-01

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, display underrepresentations of mitonuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions over the generality of the role of sexual conflict in shaping the distribution of mt-N genes. Here we tested whether mt-N genes moved off of the therian X chromosome following sex chromosome formation, consistent with the role of sexual conflict, or whether the paucity of mt-N genes on the therian X is a chance result of an underrepresentation on the ancestral regions that formed the X chromosome. We used a synteny-based approach to identify the ancestral regions in the platypus and chicken genomes that later formed the therian X chromosome. We then quantified the movement of mt-N genes on and off of the X chromosome and the distribution of mt-N genes on the human X and ancestral X regions. We failed to find an excess of mt-N gene movement off of the X. The bias of mt-N genes on ancestral therian X chromosomes was also not significantly different from the biases on the human X. Together our results suggest that, rather than conflict driving mt-N genes off of the mammalian X, random biases on chromosomes that formed the X chromosome could explain the paucity of mt-N genes in the therian lineage. PMID:25637223

  3. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  4. Mosaic chromosomal aberrations in synovial fibroblasts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and other inflammatory joint diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kinne, Raimund W; Liehr, Thomas; Beensen, Volkmar; Kunisch, Elke; Zimmermann, Thomas; Holland, Heidrun; Pfeiffer, Robert; Stahl, Hans-Detlev; Lungershausen, Wolfgang; Hein, Gert; Roth, Andreas; Emmrich, Frank; Claussen, Uwe; Froster, Ursula G

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were comparatively assessed in nuclei extracted from synovial tissue, primary-culture (P-0) synovial cells, and early-passage synovial fibroblasts (SFB; 98% enrichment; P-1, P-4 [passage 1, passage 4]) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA; n = 21), osteoarthritis (OA; n = 24), and other rheumatic diseases. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and skin fibroblasts (FB) (P-1, P-4) from the same patients, as well as SFB from normal joints and patients with joint trauma (JT) (n = 4), were used as controls. Analyses proceeded by standard GTG-banding and interphase centromere fluorescence in situ hybridization. Structural chromosomal aberrations were observed in SFB (P-1 or P-4) from 4 of 21 RA patients (19%), with involvement of chromosome 1 [e.g. del(1)(q12)] in 3 of 4 cases. In 10 of the 21 RA cases (48%), polysomy 7 was observed in P-1 SFB. In addition, aneusomies of chromosomes 4, 6, 8, 9, 12, 18, and Y were present. The percentage of polysomies was increased in P-4. Similar chromosomal aberrations were detected in SFB of OA and spondylarthropathy patients. No aberrations were detected in i) PBL or skin FB from the same patients (except for one OA patient with a karyotype 45,X[10]/46,XX[17] in PBL and variable polysomies in long-term culture skin FB); or ii) synovial tissue and/or P-1 SFB of normal joints or of patients with joint trauma. In conclusion, qualitatively comparable chromosomal aberrations were observed in synovial tissue and early-passage SFB of patients with RA, OA, and other inflammatory joint diseases. Thus, although of possible functional relevance for the pathologic role of SFB in RA, these alterations probably reflect a common response to chronic inflammatory stress in rheumatic diseases. PMID:11549374

  5. A new chromosome was born: comparative chromosome painting in Boechera.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marcus A

    2015-09-01

    Comparative chromosome painting is a powerful tool to study the evolution of chromosomes and genomes. Analyzing karyotype evolution in cruciferous plants highlights the origin of aberrant chromosomes in apomictic Boechera and further establishes the cruciferous plants as important model system for our understanding of plant chromosome and genome evolution. PMID:26228436

  6. Chromosomal deletions and tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dong, J T

    2001-01-01

    Chromosomal deletion appears to be the earliest as well as the most frequent somatic genetic alteration during carcinogenesis. It inactivates a tumor suppressor gene in three ways, that is, revealing a gene mutation through loss of heterozygosity as proposed in the two-hit theory, inducing haploinsufficiency through quantitative hemizygous deletion and associated loss of expression, and truncating a genome by homozygous deletion. Whereas the two-hit theory has guided the isolation of many tumor suppressor genes, the haploinsufficiency hypothesis seems to be also useful in identifying target genes of chromosomal deletions, especially for the deletions detected by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). At present, a number of chromosomal regions have been identified for their frequent deletions in prostate cancer, including 2q13-q33, 5q14-q23, 6q16-q22, 7q22-q32, 8p21-p22, 9p21-p22, 10q23-q24, 12p12-13, 13q14-q21, 16q22-24, and 18q21-q24. Strong candidate genes have been identified for some of these regions, including NKX3.1 from 8p21, PTEN from 10q23, p27/Kip1 from 12p13, and KLF5 from 13q21. In addition to their location in a region with frequent deletion, there are functional and/or genetic evidence supporting the candidacy of these genes. Thus far PTEN is the most frequently mutated gene in prostate cancer, and KLF5 showed the most frequent hemizygous deletion and loss of expression. A tumor suppressor role has been demonstrated for NKX3.1, PTEN, and p27/Kip1 in knockout mice models. Such genes are important targets of investigation for the development of biomarkers and therapeutic regimens. PMID:12085961

  7. Chromosome elimination, addition and introgression in intertribal partial hybrids between Brassica rapa and Isatis indigotica

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yuqin; Sun, Jian; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Partial hybrids with female-parent-type phenotypes and chromosome numbers but altered genomic compositions have been reported in wide crosses of several plants. In order to introgress desirable genes from a wild relative, Isatis indigotica (a dye and medicinal plant; 2n = 14), into Brassica crops, intertribal sexual hybridizations were carried out with B. rapa (2n = 20), and the resulting hybrids and their progenies were characterized. Methods Using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), chromosomal/genomic components of the hybrids and their progenies were analysed. Key Results Many hybrid plants were obtained from the mature seeds harvested from the B. rapa × I. indigotica cross, and these exhibited different morphological traits. However, the majority of them did not survive and only three plants grew to maturity. These three hybrids showed poor growth and much smaller stature than the two parents, but had some morphological traits and chemical composition of I. indigotica. One plant had 2n = 10, the haploid chromosome number of B. rapa, and was absolutely sterile. The other two plants had 20 and 22 somatic chromosomes and were male sterile but produced seeds following pollinations with B. rapa. All back-cross progenies over several generations maintained a B. rapa-type phenotype and also displayed some variations in morphological characters and fatty acid compositions. They were all 2n = 20 and showed good seed-set. The hybrid with 2n = 22 produced some progeny plants with 2n = 21 and 2n = 22. GISH detected two chromosomes of I. indigotica in the hybrid with 2n = 22 but none in the one with 2n = 20. AFLP bands specific for I. indigotica, novel for two parents or absent in B. rapa, were detected in the two hybrids and their progenies. These progeny plants were novel B. rapa types with an altered genomic constitution or alien additions. Conclusions Complete or partial chromosome elimination and

  8. In vivo detection of exercised-induced ultrastructural changes in genetically-altered murine skeletal muscle using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boppart, Stephen

    2006-02-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are a known source of form birefringence in biological tissue. The birefringence present in skeletal muscle is associated with the ultrastructure of individual sarcomeres, specifically the arrangement of A-bands corresponding to the thick myosin filaments. Certain structural proteins that prevent damage and maintain the structural and functional health of the muscle fiber preserve the organization of the Abands in skeletal muscle. Therefore, the level of birefringence detected can estimate the health of the muscle as well as the damage incurred during exercise. Murine skeletal muscle from both genetically-altered (mdx) and normal (wild-type) specimens were imaged in vivo with a fiber-based PSOCT imaging system to quantitatively determine the level of birefringence present in the tissue before and after exercise. The mdx muscle lacks dystrophin, a structural protein that is mutated in Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans. Muscle from these mdx mice exhibited a marked decrease in birefringence after exercise, whereas the wild-type muscle was highly birefringent before and after exercise. The quantitative results from this tissue optics study suggest for the first time that there is a distinct relationship between the degree of birefringence detected using PS-OCT and the sarcomeric ultrastructure present within skeletal muscle.

  9. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Van't Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  10. Performance Evaluation of NIPT in Detection of Chromosomal Copy Number Variants Using Low-Coverage Whole-Genome Sequencing of Plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Linhua; Yin, Xuyang; Wang, Jun; Chen, Dayang; Chen, Fang; Jiang, Hui; Ren, Jinghui; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the performance of noninvasively prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal copy number variants (CNVs) in clinical samples, using a whole-genome sequencing method. Method A total of 919 archived maternal plasma samples with karyotyping/microarray results, including 33 CNVs samples and 886 normal samples from September 1, 2011 to May 31, 2013, were enrolled in this study. The samples were randomly rearranged and blindly sequenced by low-coverage (about 7M reads) whole-genome sequencing of plasma DNA. Fetal CNVs were detected by Fetal Copy-number Analysis through Maternal Plasma Sequencing (FCAPS) to compare to the karyotyping/microarray results. Sensitivity, specificity and were evaluated. Results 33 samples with deletions/duplications ranging from 1 to 129 Mb were detected with the consistent CNV size and location to karyotyping/microarray results in the study. Ten false positive results and two false negative results were obtained. The sensitivity and specificity of detection deletions/duplications were 84.21% and 98.42%, respectively. Conclusion Whole-genome sequencing-based NIPT has high performance in detecting genome-wide CNVs, in particular >10Mb CNVs using the current FCAPS algorithm. It is possible to implement the current method in NIPT to prenatally screening for fetal CNVs. PMID:27415003

  11. Cytogenetic effects of radiotherapy. Breakpoint distribution in induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrios, L.; Miro, R.; Caballin, M.R.; Fuster, C.; Guedea, F.; Subias, A.; Egozcue, J. )

    1989-08-01

    A total of 660 breakpoints were identified in the chromosome aberrations detected in lymphocytes from cancer patients after radiotherapy. The results show that chromosomes 1, 3, and 7 were significantly more affected than other chromosomes by ionizing radiation in vivo. Chromosome arms 1p, 1q, 7q, and 11p were also significantly more affected. Some bands also showed a special sensitivity to radiation, and band 1q32 was the most affected. This band is proposed as a hot point for the clastogenic effect of ionizing radiation. A significant clustering of breakpoints in G bands was also found, especially at the telomeres, as previously described by other authors. Clustering of breakpoints was also observed in bands where fragile sites, protooncogenes, breakpoints involved in chromosomal cancer rearrangements, and breakpoints involved in chromosomal evolution of the Hominoidea are located.

  12. Spectral karyotyping analysis of human and mouse chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Barenboim-Stapleton, Linda; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Classical banding methods provide basic information about the identities and structures of chromosomes on the basis of their unique banding patterns. Spectral karyotyping (SKY), and the related multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), are chromosome-specific multicolor FISH techniques that augment cytogenetic evaluations of malignant disease by providing additional information and improved characterization of aberrant chromosomes that contain DNA sequences not identifiable using conventional banding methods. SKY is based on cohybridization of combinatorially labeled chromosome-painting probes with unique fluorochrome signatures onto human or mouse metaphase chromosome preparations. Image acquisition and analysis use a specialized imaging system, combining Sagnac interferometer and CCD camera images to reconstruct spectral information at each pixel. Here we present a protocol for SKY analysis using commercially available SkyPaint probes, including procedures for metaphase chromosome preparation, slide pretreatment and probe hybridization and detection. SKY analysis requires approximately 6 d. PMID:17406576

  13. Genetic markers on chromosome 7.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, L C

    1988-01-01

    Chromosome 7 is frequently associated with chromosome aberrations, rearrangements, and deletions. It also contains many important genes, gene families, and disease loci. This brief review attempts to summarise these and other interesting aspects of chromosome 7. With the rapid accumulation of cloned genes and polymorphic DNA fragments, this chromosome has become an excellent substrate for molecular genetic studies. PMID:3290488

  14. CHROMOSOME VELOCITY DURING MITOSIS AS A FUNCTION OF CHROMOSOME SIZE AND POSITION

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, R. Bruce

    1965-01-01

    Chromosome velocity has been studied in living Melanoplus differentialis spermatocytes by phase contrast cinemicrography. Melanoplus chromosomes (and bivalents) differ in length by as much as 1:3.5. As expected, no size-dependent velocity differences were detected in anaphase, and this is also shown to be true for the less predictable movements during prometaphase congression. The size of the X chromosome can change during observation following x-irradiation, but this is equally without influence on velocity. However, an effect of position on velocity is found in both prometaphase and in anaphase: the chromosomes furthest from the central interpolar axis move 25 per cent faster than more central chromosomes. A simple mechanical model relating frictional resistance and mitotic forces to chromosome velocity is discussed in detail. Calculations from the model suggest that a significant difference in the force acting on a large, as compared with a small chromosome is necessary to account for the observed similarity in velocity. Therefore, it is concluded that the mitotic forces are so organized or regulated that velocity is, within limits, independent of load. The implications of velocity-load independence in relation to the molecular origin of mitotic forces are discussed. PMID:14342826

  15. Increased initial levels of chromosome damage and heterogeneous chromosome repair in ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote cells.

    PubMed

    Pandita, T K; Hittelman, W N

    1994-10-01

    Individuals heterozygous for ataxia telangiectasia (AT) appear clinically normal but have a 2-3-fold overall excess risk of cancer. Various approaches have been used to identify AT heterozygotes, however, the results are ambiguous. We recently reported that AT homozygotes exhibit more initial chromosome damage after irradiation than normal cells despite identical levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) as well as a reduced fast repair component at both the DNA and chromosome levels. To determine whether AT heterozygotes exhibit the AT or normal cellular phenotype, we compared four AT heterozygote lymphoblastoid cell lines with normal control and AT homozygote lymphoblastoid cells with regard to cell survival, initial levels of damage, and repair at the DNA and chromosome levels after gamma-irradiation in G1, S, and G2 phase (estimated by neutral DNA filter elution and premature chromosome condensation). There was no significant difference in survival, induction and repair of DNA DSBs, or chromosome repair between AT heterozygote and normal cells. In contrast, all four AT heterozygote cell lines showed increased levels of chromosome damage; G1 phase cells showed intermediate levels and G2 phase cells showed levels equivalent to the AT homozygote phenotype. These results suggest that premature chromosome condensation may be useful for detecting AT heterozygotes. PMID:7523872

  16. Incidence of Chromosome Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    A minority of conceptions result in live births. Of recognized conceptions, 15% result in spontaneous abortions, up to 60% of which are due to chromosome abnormalities. The incidence of the different disorders is given. Of live births, one in 200 suffers a chromosome abnormality. The common abnormalities are described with their incidence. The effect of maternal age on this incidence is pronounced, but even so must be kept in proportion for counselling purposes.

  17. Chromosome doubling method

    DOEpatents

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  18. Pure chromosome-specific PCR libraries from single sorted chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, D R; Choongkittaworn, N M; Dyer, K A; Aten, J; Otto, P; Behler, C; Bryant, E M; Rabinovitch, P S

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome-specific DNA libraries can be very useful in molecular and cytogenetic genome mapping studies. We have developed a rapid and simple method for the generation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences that relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a single flow-sorted chromosome or chromosome fragment. Previously reported methods for the development of chromosome libraries require larger numbers of chromosomes, with preparation of pure chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry, generation of somatic cell hybrids containing targeted chromosomes, or a combination of both procedures. These procedures are labor intensive, especially when hybrid cell lines are not already available, and this has limited the generation of chromosome-specific DNA libraries from nonhuman species. In contrast, a single sorted chromosome is a pure source of DNA for library production even when flow cytometric resolution of chromosome populations is poor. Furthermore, any sorting cytometer may be used with this technique. Using this approach, we demonstrate the generation of PCR libraries suitable for both molecular and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies from individual baboon and canine chromosomes, separate human homologues, and a rearranged marker chromosome from a transformed cell line. PCR libraries specific to subchromosomal regions have also been produced by sorting a small chromosome fragment. This simple and rapid technique will allow generation of nonhuman linkage maps and probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization and the characterization of marker chromosomes from solid tumors. In addition, allele-specific libraries generated by this strategy may also be useful for mapping genetic diseases. Images PMID:8016078

  19. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  20. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy detects alterations induced by organotin(IV) carboxylates in MCF-7 cells at sub-cytotoxic/-genotoxic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Muhammad S; Mirza, Bushra; Hussain, Mukhtiar; Hanif, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Walsh, Michael J; Martin, Francis L

    2008-01-01

    The environmental impact of metal complexes such as organotin(IV) compounds is of increasing concern. Genotoxic effects of organotin(IV) compounds (0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml) were measured using the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay to measure DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay to determine micronucleus formation. Biochemical-cell signatures were also ascertained using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. In the comet assay, organotin(IV) carboxylates induced significantly-elevated levels of DNA SSBs. Elevated micronucleus-forming activities were also observed. Following interrogation using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, infrared spectra in the biomolecular range (900 cm-1 – 1800 cm-1) derived from organotin-treated MCF-7 cells exhibited clear alterations in their biochemical-cell fingerprint compared to control-cell populations following exposures as low as 0.0001 μg/ml. Mono-, di- or tri-organotin(IV) carboxylates (0.1 μg/ml, 1.0 μg/ml or 10.0 μg/ml) were markedly cytotoxic as determined by the clonogenic assay following treatment of MCF-7 cells with ≥ 1.0 μg/ml. Our results demonstrate that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy can be applied to detect molecular alterations induced by organotin(IV) compounds at sub-cytotoxic and sub-genotoxic concentrations. This biophysical approach points to a novel means of assessing risk associated with environmental contaminants. PACS codes: 87.15.-v, 87.17.-d, 87.18.-h PMID:19351425

  1. A review of metaphase chromosome image selection techniques for automatic karyotype generation.

    PubMed

    Arora, Tanvi; Dhir, Renu

    2016-08-01

    The karyotype is analyzed to detect the genetic abnormalities. It is generated by arranging the chromosomes after extracting them from the metaphase chromosome images. The chromosomes are non-rigid bodies that contain the genetic information of an individual. The metaphase chromosome image spread contains the chromosomes, but these chromosomes are not distinct bodies; they can either be individual chromosomes or be touching one another; they may be bent or even may be overlapping and thus forming a cluster of chromosomes. The extraction of chromosomes from these touching and overlapping chromosomes is a very tedious process. The segmentation of a random metaphase chromosome image may not give us correct and accurate results. Therefore, before taking up a metaphase chromosome image for analysis, it must be analyzed for the orientation of the chromosomes it contains. The various reported methods for metaphase chromosome image selection for automatic karyotype generation are compared in this paper. After analysis, it has been concluded that each metaphase chromosome image selection method has its advantages and disadvantages. PMID:26676686

  2. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  3. Geographic distribution of chromosome and microsatellite DNA polymorphisms in Oncorhynchus mykiss native to western Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ostberg, C.O.; Thorgaard, G.H.

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome studies of native populations of Oncorhynchus mykiss (steelhead and rainbow trout) in western Washington and southern British Columbia revealed the presence of two evolutionarily distinct chromosome lineages. Populations between, and including, the Elwha River, Washington, and Chilliwack River, British Columbia, contained 2n = 60 chromosomes. Populations on the central Washington coast contained 2n = 58 chromosomes. The north Washington coast and western Strait of Juan de Fuca contained individuals with 58, 59, or 60 chromosomes, suggesting this is a transition zone between 58 and 60 chromosome groups. The differences in chromosomal structure between 2n = 58 and 2n = 60 groups are presumably a Robertsonian rearrangement and an inversion. Allelic variation at three microsatellite loci (One ??6, One ??11 and Omy 77) also was examined, and no significant variation was detected among the 58 and 60 chromosome races. A hypothesis is presented concerning the origin of the 60 chromosome lineage.

  4. Loops determine the mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2013-03-01

    In mitosis, chromosomes undergo a condensation into highly compacted, rod-like objects. Many models have been put forward for the higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes including radial loop and hierarchical folding models. Additionally, mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes under different conditions were measured. However, the internal organization of mitotic chromosomes still remains unclear. Here we present a polymer model for mitotic chromosomes and show how chromatin loops play a major role for their mechanical properties. The key assumption of the model is the ability of the chromatin fibre to dynamically form loops with the help of binding proteins. Our results show that looping leads to a tight compaction and significantly increases the bending rigidity of chromosomes. Moreover, our qualitative prediction of the force elongation behaviour is close to experimental findings. This indicates that the internal structure of mitotic chromosomes is based on self-organization of the chromatin fibre. We also demonstrate how number and size of loops have a strong influence on the mechanical properties. We suggest that changes in the mechanical characteristics of chromosomes can be explained by an altered internal loop structure. YZ gratefully appreciates funding by the German National Academic Foundation (Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes) and support by the Heidelberg Graduate School for Mathematical and Computational Methods in the Sciences (HGS MathComp).

  5. Interchromosomal Duplications on the Bactrocera oleae Y Chromosome Imply a Distinct Evolutionary Origin of the Sex Chromosomes Compared to Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gabrieli, Paolo; Gomulski, Ludvik M.; Bonomi, Angelica; Siciliano, Paolo; Scolari, Francesca; Franz, Gerald; Jessup, Andrew; Malacrida, Anna R.; Gasperi, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    Background Diptera have an extraordinary variety of sex determination mechanisms, and Drosophila melanogaster is the paradigm for this group. However, the Drosophila sex determination pathway is only partially conserved and the family Tephritidae affords an interesting example. The tephritid Y chromosome is postulated to be necessary to determine male development. Characterization of Y sequences, apart from elucidating the nature of the male determining factor, is also important to understand the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes within the Tephritidae. We studied the Y sequences from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae. Its Y chromosome is minute and highly heterochromatic, and displays high heteromorphism with the X chromosome. Methodology/Principal Findings A combined Representational Difference Analysis (RDA) and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) approach was used to investigate the Y chromosome to derive information on its sequence content. The Y chromosome is strewn with repetitive DNA sequences, the majority of which are also interdispersed in the pericentromeric regions of the autosomes. The Y chromosome appears to have accumulated small and large repetitive interchromosomal duplications. The large interchromosomal duplications harbour an importin-4-like gene fragment. Apart from these importin-4-like sequences, the other Y repetitive sequences are not shared with the X chromosome, suggesting molecular differentiation of these two chromosomes. Moreover, as the identified Y sequences were not detected on the Y chromosomes of closely related tephritids, we can infer divergence in the repetitive nature of their sequence contents. Conclusions/Significance The identification of Y-linked sequences may tell us much about the repetitive nature, the origin and the evolution of Y chromosomes. We hypothesize how these repetitive sequences accumulated and were maintained on the Y chromosome during its evolutionary history. Our data reinforce the idea that the

  6. Substantial prevalence of microdeletions of the Y-chromosome in infertile men with idiopathic azoospermia and oligozoospermia detected using a sequence-tagged site-based mapping strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Najmabadi, H.; Huang, V.; Bhasin, D.

    1996-04-01

    Genes on the long arm of Y (Yq), particularly within interval 6, are believed to play a critical role in human spermatogenesis. Cytogenetically detectable deletions of this region are associated with azoospermia in men, but are relatively uncommon. The objective of this study was to validate a sequence-tagged site (STS)-mapping strategy for the detection of Yq microdeletions and to use this method to determine the proportion of men with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia who carry microdeletions in Yq. STS mapping of a sufficiently large sample of infertile men should also help further localize the putative gene(s) involved in the pathogenesis of male infertility. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes of 16 normal fertile men, 7 normal fertile women, 60 infertile men, and 15 patients with the X-linked disorder, ichthyosis. PCR primers were synthesized for 26 STSs that span Yq interval 6. None of the 16 normal men of known fertility had microdeletions. Seven normal fertile women failed to amplify any of the 26 STSs, providing evidence of their Y specificity. No microdeletions were detected in any of the 15 patients with ichthyosis. Of the 60 infertile men typed with 26 STSs, 11 (18%; 10 azoospermic and 1 oligozoospermic) failed to amplify 1 or more STS. Interestingly, 4 of the 11 patients had microdeletions in a region that is outside the Yq region from which the DAZ (deleted in azoospermia gene region) gene was cloned. In an additional 3 patients, microdeletions were present both inside and outside the DAZ region. The physical locations of these microdeletions provide further support for the concept that a gene(s) on Yq deletion interval 6 plays an important role in spermatogenesis. The presence of deletions that do not overlap with the DAZ region suggests that genes other than the DAZ gene may also be implicated in the pathogenesis of some subsets of male infertility. 48 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Hierarchical radial and polar organisation of chromosomes in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Millan, N M; Lau, P; Hann, M; Ioannou, D; Hoffman, D; Barrionuevo, M; Maxson, W; Ory, S; Tempest, H G

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that chromosomes occupy distinct positions within the interphase nuclei, conferring a potential functional implication to the genome. In addition, alterations in the nuclear organisation patterns have been associated with disease phenotypes (e.g. cancer or laminopathies). The human sperm is the smallest cell in the body with specific DNA packaging and the mission of delivering the paternal genome to the oocyte during fertilisation. Studies of nuclear organisation in the sperm have postulated nonrandom chromosome position and have proposed a chromocentre model with the centromeres facing toward the interior and the telomeres toward the periphery of the nucleus. Most studies have assessed the nuclear address in the sperm longitudinally predominantly using centromeric or telomeric probes and to a lesser extent with whole chromosome paints. To date, studies investigating the radial organisation of human sperm have been limited. The purpose of this study was to utilise whole chromosome paints for six clinically important chromosomes (18, 19, 21, 22, X, and Y) to investigate nuclear address by assessing their radial and longitudinal nuclear organisation. A total of 10,800 sperm were analysed in nine normozoospermic individuals. The results have shown nonrandom chromosome position for all chromosomes using both methods of analysis. We present novel radial and polar analysis of chromosome territory localization within the human sperm nucleus. Specifically, a hierarchical organisation was observed radially with chromosomes organised from the interior to the periphery (chromosomes 22, 21, Y, X, 19, and 18 respectively) and polar organisation from the sperm head to tail (chromosomes X, 19, Y, 22, 21, and 18, respectively). We provide evidence of defined nuclear organisation in the human sperm and discuss the function of organisation and potential possible clinical ramifications of these results in regards to male infertility and early human development

  8. Detection of mecA and enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with bovine mastitis and characterization of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) in MRSA strains.

    PubMed Central

    Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Assadbeigi, Behnaz; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Hoseini, Nafiseh Sadat; Rezaei, Nahid; Havaei, Seyed Rouhollah

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main causatives of bovine mastitis. Resistance of some strains to methicillin, can complicate the treatment of its infections. On the other hand, enterotoxin production is also important. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the methicillin resistance and enterotoxin production in S. aureus isolates caused bovine mastitis. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and fifty milk samples were collected. After isolation of Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA strains were detected by cefoxitin disc diffusion and oxacillin agar screening methods. DNA was extracted by phenol – chloroform method and PCR was applied for mecA, sea and seb genes. SCCmec types of mecA gene were identified using multiplex-PCR. Results: Fifty-four (12%) S. aureus were isolated. Out of these, 10 and 9 MRSA strains identified by cefoxitin disc diffusion and oxacillin agar screening methods, respectively. All 10 MRSA isolates identified by cefoxitin disc diffusion, were positive for mecA gene and all of them belonged to SCCmec type IV. The sea genes were detected in 19 isolates and only two isolates were positive for seb genes. One isolate possessed both sea and seb genes. Conclusion: Findings of this study indicated that results of cefoxitin disc diffusion test is in concordance with the PCR for mecA gene and has a higher sensitivity compared to oxacillin agar screening method. Finally, Our findings suggest that enterotoxin A is the dominant type. PMID:26668704

  9. Screening for five mutations detects 97% of cystic fibrosis (CF) chromosomes and predicts a carrier frequency of 1:29 in the Jewish Ashkenazi population

    SciTech Connect

    Abeliovich, D.; Lavon, I.P.; Lerer, I.; Cohen, T. ); Cutting, G.R. ); Springer, C.; Avital, A.

    1992-11-01

    To determine the distribution and frequency of cystic fibrosis (CF) mutations in the Israeli population, the authors have screened 96 patients for 11 relatively common mutations. Five mutations - [Delta]F508, G542X, W1282X, N1303K, and 3849 + 10kb C[yields]T-were found to account for 97% of the CF alleles in the Ashkenazi Jews. In contrast, of the 11 mutations tested, only [Delta]F508 was detected in Jewish patients of Sephardic or Oriental origin, accounting for 43% of the CF alleles. Four mutations - [Delta]F508, G542X, W1282X, and N1303K- accounted for 55% of the CF alleles in Arab patients. In a pilot screening study, a random sample of 424 Ashkenazi individuals was analyzed for three mutations - [Delta]F508, W128X, and G542X. Thirteen individuals were detected as heterozygotes (six for [Delta]F508 and seven for W1282X), predicting a heterozygote frequency of 1:29. This is similar to the frequency of carriers in the Caucasian population of northern European ancestry. On the basis of these data, the Ashkenazi populations is considered to be a candidate for CF heterozygote screening. 32 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  11. Chromosome 6p amplification and cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Gda C; Zielenska, M; Prasad, M; Squire, J A

    2007-01-01

    Chromosomal imbalances represent an important mechanism in cancer progression. A clear association between DNA copy‐number aberrations and prognosis has been found in a variety of tumours. Comparative genomic hybridisation studies have detected copy‐number increases affecting chromosome 6p in several types of cancer. A systematic analysis of large tumour cohorts is required to identify genomic imbalances of 6p that correlate with a distinct clinical feature of disease progression. Recent findings suggest that a central part of the short arm of chromosome 6p harbours one or more oncogenes directly involved in tumour progression. Gains at 6p have been associated with advanced or metastatic disease, poor prognosis, venous invasion in bladder, colorectal, ovarian and hepatocellular carcinomas. Copy number gains of 6p DNA have been described in a series of patients who presented initially with follicle centre lymphoma, which subsequently transformed to diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Melanoma cytogenetics has consistently identified aberrations of chromosome 6, and a correlation with lower overall survival has been described. Most of the changes observed in tumours to date map to the 6p21–p23 region, which encompasses approximately half of the genes on all of chromosome 6 and one third of the number of CpG islands in this chromosome. Analyses of the genes that cluster to the commonly amplified regions of chromosome 6p have helped to identify a small number of molecular pathways that become deregulated during tumour progression in diverse tumour types. Such pathways offer promise for new treatments in the future. PMID:16790693

  12. Chromosomes of kinetoplastida.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Ploeg, L H; Cornelissen, A W; Barry, J D; Borst, P

    1984-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-sized DNA molecules (molecular karyotypes) of five genera (nine species) of kinetoplastida after cell lysis and deproteinization of DNA in agarose blocks and size fractionation of the intact DNA molecules by pulsed field gradient (PFG) gel electrophoresis. With the possible exception of Trypanosoma vivax and Crithidia fasciculata, all species have at least 20 chromosomes. There are large differences between species in molecular karyotype and in the chromosomal distribution of the genes for alpha- and beta-tubulin, rRNA and the common mini-exon sequence of kinetoplastid mRNAs. In all cases, the rRNA genes are in DNA that is larger than 500 kb. Whereas T. brucei has approximately 100 mini-chromosomes of 50-150 kb, only few are found in T. equiperdum; T. vivax has no DNA smaller than 2000 kb. As all three species exhibit antigenic variation, small chromosomes with telomeric variant surface glycoprotein genes cannot be vital to the mechanism of antigenic variation. The apparent plasticity of kinetoplastid genome composition makes PFG gel electrophoresis a potentially useful tool for taxonomic studies. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6526012

  13. Value of videoroscopy in the detection of alterations of  Actinic Cheilitis and the selection of biopsy areas

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Ana-Maria; Ferrari, Thiago; Domingos, Tabata; Cunha, Karin; Dias, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    Background To demonstrate the value of videoroscopy in identifying lesions and alterations not seen by oroscopy and to select the area for biopsy. Material and Methods Eighty patients were subjected to anamnesis, physical exam, videoroscopy exam, toluidine blue test and biopsy. A diagram of the lips was created to record the exact location where the lesion was found. Results Physical exam identified 287 lesions, and videoroscopy identified 587 lesions; erythema and white lesions were the most common lesions associated with actinic cheilitis. Of the 59 performed biopsies, 32 (52.4%) cases were identified by videoroscopy that showed lesions that were not detected during physical examination. Conclusions The establishment of a diagram of the lip permitted registration of the precise location of the lesion. Videoroscopy was effective in locating lesions not seen by oroscopy. Both videoroscopy and the diagram of the lips allowed for better and earlier diagnosis and better patient follow-up for those with actinic cheilitis. Key words: Actinic cheilitis, potentially malignant disorder, videoroscopy, dermatoscopy, lip. oroscopy, diagram of lip. PMID:25662549

  14. Application of the FICTION technique for the simultaneous detection of immunophenotype and chromosomal abnormalities in routinely fixed, paraffin wax embedded bone marrow trephines

    PubMed Central

    Korać, P; Jones, M; Dominis, M; Kušec, R; Mason, D Y; Banham, A H; Ventura, R A

    2005-01-01

    The use of interphase fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to study cytogenetic abnormalities in routinely fixed paraffin wax embedded tissue has become commonplace over the past decade. However, very few studies have applied FISH to routinely fixed bone marrow trephines (BMTs). This may be because of the acid based decalcification methods that are commonly used during the processing of BMTs, which may adversely affect the suitability of the sample for FISH analysis. For the first time, this report describes the simultaneous application of FISH and immunofluorescent staining (the FICTION technique) to formalin fixed, EDTA decalcified and paraffin wax embedded BMTs. This technique allows the direct correlation of genetic abnormalities to immunophenotype, and therefore will be particularly useful for the identification of genetic abnormalities in specific tumour cells present in BMTs. The application of this to routine clinical practice will assist diagnosis and the detection of minimal residual disease. PMID:16311361

  15. Spectral Karyotyping for identification of constitutional chromosomal abnormalities at a national reference laboratory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Spectral karyotyping is a diagnostic tool that allows visualization of chromosomes in different colors using the FISH technology and a spectral imaging system. To assess the value of spectral karyotyping analysis for identifying constitutional supernumerary marker chromosomes or derivative chromosomes at a national reference laboratory, we reviewed the results of 179 consecutive clinical samples (31 prenatal and 148 postnatal) submitted for spectral karyotyping. Over 90% of the cases were requested to identify either small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) or chromosomal exchange material detected by G-banded chromosome analysis. We also reviewed clinical indications of those cases with marker chromosomes in which chromosomal origin was identified by spectral karyotyping. Our results showed that spectral karyotyping identified the chromosomal origin of marker chromosomes or the source of derivative chromosomal material in 158 (88%) of the 179 clinical cases; the identification rate was slightly higher for postnatal (89%) compared to prenatal (84%) cases. Cases in which the origin could not be identified had either a small marker chromosome present at a very low level of mosaicism (< 10%), or contained very little euchromatic material. Supplemental FISH analysis confirmed the spectral karyotyping results in all 158 cases. Clinical indications for prenatal cases were mainly for marker identification after amniocentesis. For postnatal cases, the primary indications were developmental delay and multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). The most frequently encountered markers were of chromosome 15 origin for satellited chromosomes, and chromosomes 2 and 16 for non-satellited chromosomes. We were able to obtain pertinent clinical information for 47% (41/88) of cases with an identified abnormal chromosome. We conclude that spectral karyotyping is sufficiently reliable for use and provides a valuable diagnostic tool for establishing the origin of supernumerary marker

  16. Complex reorganization and predominant non-homologous repair following chromosomal breakage in karyotypically balanced germline rearrangements and transgenic integration

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Colby; Jacobsen, Jessie C.; Ernst, Carl; Hanscom, Carrie; Heilbut, Adrian; Blumenthal, Ian; Mills, Ryan E.; Kirby, Andrew; Lindgren, Amelia M.; Rudiger, Skye R.; McLaughlan, Clive J.; Bawden, C. Simon; Reid, Suzanne J.; Faull, Richard L. M.; Snell, Russell G.; Hall, Ira M.; Shen, Yiping; Ohsumi, Toshiro K.; Borowsky, Mark L.; Daly, Mark J.; Lee, Charles; Morton, Cynthia C.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.; Talkowski, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    We defined the genetic landscape of balanced chromosomal rearrangements at nucleotide resolution by sequencing 141 breakpoints from cytogenetically-interpreted translocations and inversions. We confirm that the recently described phenomenon of “chromothripsis” (massive chromosomal shattering and reorganization) is not unique to cancer cells but also occurs in the germline where it can resolve to a karyotypically balanced state with frequent inversions. We detected a high incidence of complex rearrangements (19.2%) and substantially less reliance on microhomology (31%) than previously observed in benign CNVs. We compared these results to experimentally-generated DNA breakage-repair by sequencing seven transgenic animals, and revealed extensive rearrangement of the transgene and host genome with similar complexity to human germline alterations. Inversion is the most common rearrangement, suggesting that a combined mechanism involving template switching and non-homologous repair mediates the formation of balanced complex rearrangements that are viable, stably replicated and transmitted unaltered to subsequent generations. PMID:22388000

  17. Rapid identification of chromosomal rearrangements by PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Giradet, A.; Andreo, B.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, malformation/mental retardation syndromes and carcinogenesis. The variety of structural rearrangements is almost infinite and an identification by conventional cytogenetics is often labor intensive and may remain doubtful. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics have provided new tools for detecting chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure is actually the most employed technique and has led to numerous clinical applications. However, techniques required to produce suitable probes are time consuming and not accessible to all cytogenetics laboratories. The PRimed In Situ labeling (PRINS) method provides an alternate way for in situ chromosome screening. In this procedure, the chromosomal detection is performed by in situ annealing of a specific primer and subsequent primer extension by a Taq DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Application of PRINS in clinical diagnosis is still limited. We have developed a semi-automatic PRINS protocol and used it to identify the origin of several chromosomal abnormalities. We report here the results of studies of three structural rearrangements: a translocation t(21;21), a supernumerary ring marker chromosome 18 and a complex chromosome 13 mosaicism involving a 13;13 Robertsonian translocation and a ring chromosome 13.

  18. Methods of biological dosimetry employing chromosome-specific staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Further, methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. Still further, the invention provides for automated means to detect and analyse chromosomal abnormalities.

  19. Methods And Compositions For Chromosome-Specific Staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    2003-08-19

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Further, methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. Still further, the invention provides for automated means to detect and analyse chromosomal abnormalities.

  20. Kinase Expression and Chromosomal Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Tissues: Investigations at the Molecular and Microscopic Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich; Kwan, Johnson; Lu, Chun-Mei; Ito, Yuko; Wang, Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Hayward, Simon W.; Weier, Jingly F.; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.

    2009-07-07

    Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, USSR, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the 'ret-negative' tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.

  1. Chromosome microduplication in somatic cells decreases the genetic stability of human reprogrammed somatic cells and results in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Chang, Liang; Zhao, Hongcui; Li, Rong; Fan, Yong; Qiao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells, including cloned embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, offer a limitless cellular source for regenerative medicine. However, their derivation efficiency is limited, and a large proportion of cells are arrested during reprogramming. In the current study, we explored chromosome microdeletion/duplication in arrested and established reprogrammed cells. Our results show that aneuploidy induced by somatic cell nuclear transfer technology is a key factor in the developmental failure of cloned human embryos and primary colonies from implanted cloned blastocysts and that expression patterns of apoptosis-related genes are dynamically altered. Overall, ~20%-53% of arrested primary colonies in induced plurpotent stem cells displayed aneuploidy, and upregulation of P53 and Bax occurred in all arrested primary colonies. Interestingly, when somatic cells with pre-existing chromosomal mutations were used as donor cells, no cloned blastocysts were obtained, and additional chromosomal mutations were detected in the resulting iPS cells following long-term culture, which was not observed in the two iPS cell lines with normal karyotypes. In conclusion, aneuploidy induced by the reprogramming process restricts the derivation of pluripotent stem cells, and, more importantly, pre-existing chromosomal mutations enhance the risk of genome instability, which limits the clinical utility of these cells. PMID:25965553

  2. Chromosomes and clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Robert James McKinlay

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome abnormalities may cast light on the nature of mechanisms whereby normal anatomy evolves, and abnormal anatomy arises. Correlating genotype to phenotype is an exercise in which the geneticist and the anatomist can collaborate. The increasing power of the new genetic methodologies is enabling an increasing precision in the delineation of chromosome imbalances, even to the nucleotide level; but the classical skills of careful observation and recording remain as crucial as they always have been. Clin. Anat. 29:540-546, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990310

  3. Vaccine-associated varicella and rubella infections in severe combined immunodeficiency with isolated CD4 lymphocytopenia and mutations in IL7R detected by tandem whole exome sequencing and chromosomal microarray

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, D K; Martinez, C A; Sorte, H S; Forbes, L R; Demmler-Harrison, G J; Hanson, I C; Pearson, N M; Noroski, L M; Zaki, S R; Bellini, W J; Leduc, M S; Yang, Y; Eng, C M; Patel, A; Rodningen, O K; Muzny, D M; Gibbs, R A; Campbell, I M; Shaw, C A; Baker, M W; Zhang, V; Lupski, J R; Orange, J S; Seeborg, F O; Stray-Pedersen, A

    2014-01-01

    In areas without newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), disease-defining infections may lead to diagnosis, and in some cases, may not be identified prior to the first year of life. We describe a female infant who presented with disseminated vaccine-acquired varicella (VZV) and vaccine-acquired rubella infections at 13 months of age. Immunological evaluations demonstrated neutropenia, isolated CD4 lymphocytopenia, the presence of CD8+ T cells, poor lymphocyte proliferation, hypergammaglobulinaemia and poor specific antibody production to VZV infection and routine immunizations. A combination of whole exome sequencing and custom-designed chromosomal microarray with exon coverage of primary immunodeficiency genes detected compound heterozygous mutations (one single nucleotide variant and one intragenic copy number variant involving one exon) within the IL7R gene. Mosaicism for wild-type allele (20–30%) was detected in pretransplant blood and buccal DNA and maternal engraftment (5–10%) demonstrated in pretransplant blood DNA. This may be responsible for the patient's unusual immunological phenotype compared to classical interleukin (IL)-7Rα deficiency. Disseminated VZV was controlled with anti-viral and immune-based therapy, and umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation was successful. Retrospectively performed T cell receptor excision circle (TREC) analyses completed on neonatal Guthrie cards identified absent TREC. This case emphasizes the danger of live viral vaccination in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) patients and the importance of newborn screening to identify patients prior to high-risk exposures. It also illustrates the value of aggressive pathogen identification and treatment, the influence newborn screening can have on morbidity and mortality and the significant impact of newer genomic diagnostic tools in identifying the underlying genetic aetiology for SCID patients. PMID:25046553

  4. Vaccine-associated varicella and rubella infections in severe combined immunodeficiency with isolated CD4 lymphocytopenia and mutations in IL7R detected by tandem whole exome sequencing and chromosomal microarray.

    PubMed

    Bayer, D K; Martinez, C A; Sorte, H S; Forbes, L R; Demmler-Harrison, G J; Hanson, I C; Pearson, N M; Noroski, L M; Zaki, S R; Bellini, W J; Leduc, M S; Yang, Y; Eng, C M; Patel, A; Rodningen, O K; Muzny, D M; Gibbs, R A; Campbell, I M; Shaw, C A; Baker, M W; Zhang, V; Lupski, J R; Orange, J S; Seeborg, F O; Stray-Pedersen, A

    2014-12-01

    In areas without newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), disease-defining infections may lead to diagnosis, and in some cases, may not be identified prior to the first year of life. We describe a female infant who presented with disseminated vaccine-acquired varicella (VZV) and vaccine-acquired rubella infections at 13 months of age. Immunological evaluations demonstrated neutropenia, isolated CD4 lymphocytopenia, the presence of CD8(+) T cells, poor lymphocyte proliferation, hypergammaglobulinaemia and poor specific antibody production to VZV infection and routine immunizations. A combination of whole exome sequencing and custom-designed chromosomal microarray with exon coverage of primary immunodeficiency genes detected compound heterozygous mutations (one single nucleotide variant and one intragenic copy number variant involving one exon) within the IL7R gene. Mosaicism for wild-type allele (20-30%) was detected in pretransplant blood and buccal DNA and maternal engraftment (5-10%) demonstrated in pretransplant blood DNA. This may be responsible for the patient's unusual immunological phenotype compared to classical interleukin (IL)-7Rα deficiency. Disseminated VZV was controlled with anti-viral and immune-based therapy, and umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation was successful. Retrospectively performed T cell receptor excision circle (TREC) analyses completed on neonatal Guthrie cards identified absent TREC. This case emphasizes the danger of live viral vaccination in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) patients and the importance of newborn screening to identify patients prior to high-risk exposures. It also illustrates the value of aggressive pathogen identification and treatment, the influence newborn screening can have on morbidity and mortality and the significant impact of newer genomic diagnostic tools in identifying the underlying genetic aetiology for SCID patients. PMID:25046553

  5. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Alain; Ducos, Alain; Yerle, Martine

    2003-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+) translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5) were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2) from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases. PMID:14604515

  6. Chromosome abnormalities in Indonesian patients with short stature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Short stature is associated with several disorders including wide variations of chromosomal disorders and single gene disorders. The objective of this report is to present the cytogenetic findings in Indonesian patients with short stature. Methods G-banding and interphase/metaphase FISH were performed on short stature patients with and without other clinical features who were referred by clinicians all over Indonesia to our laboratory during the year 2003–2009. Results The results of chromosomal analysis of ninety seven patients (mean age: 10.7 years old) were collected. The group of patients with other clinical features showed sex chromosome abnormalities in 45% (18/40) and autosomal abnormalities in 10% (4/40), whereas those with short stature only, 42.1% (24/57) had sex chromosome abnormalities and 1.75% (1/57) had autosomal abnormalities. The autosomal chromosomal abnormalities involved mostly subtelomeric regions. Results discrepancies between karyotype and FISH were found in 10 patients, including detection of low-level monosomy X mosaicism in 6 patients with normal karyotype, and detection of mosaic aneuploidy chromosome 18 in 1 patient with 45,XX,rob(13;14)(q10;q10). Statistical analysis showed no significant association between the groups and the type of chromosomal abnormalities. Conclusion Chromosome abnormalities account for about 50% of the short stature patients. Wide variations of both sex and autosomal chromosomes abnormalities were detected in the study. Since three out of five patients had autosomal structural abnormalities involving the subtelomeric regions, thus in the future, subtelomeric FISH or even a more sensitive method such as genomic/SNP microarray is needed to confirm deletions of subtelomeric regions of chromosome 9, 11 and 18. Low-level mosaicism in normal karyotype patients indicates interphase FISH need to be routinely carried out in short stature patients as an adjunct to karyotyping. PMID:22863325

  7. Chromosomal homologies among vampire bats revealed by chromosome painting (phyllostomidae, chiroptera).

    PubMed

    Sotero-Caio, C G; Pieczarka, J C; Nagamachi, C Y; Gomes, A J B; Lira, T C; O'Brien, P C M; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Souza, M J; Santos, N

    2011-01-01

    Substantial effort has been made to elucidate karyotypic evolution of phyllostomid bats, mostly through comparisons of G-banding patterns. However, due to the limited number of G-bands in respective karyotypes and to the similarity of non-homologous bands, an accurate evolutionary history of chromosome segments remains questionable. This is the case for vampire bats (Desmodontinae). Despite several proposed homologies, banding data have not yet provided a detailed understanding of the chromosomal changes within vampire genera. We examined karyotype differentiation of the 3 species within this subfamily using whole chromosomal probes from Phyllostomus hastatus (Phyllostominae) and Carollia brevicauda (Carolliinae). Painting probes of P. hastatus respectively detected 22, 21 and 23 conserved segments in Diphylla ecaudata, Diaemus youngi, and Desmodus rotundus karyotypes, whereas 27, 27 and 28 were respectively detectedwith C. brevicauda paints. Based on the evolutionary relationships proposed by morphological and molecular data, we present probable chromosomal synapomorphies for vampire bats and propose chromosomes that were present in the common ancestor of the 5 genera analyzed. Karyotype comparisons allowed us to relate a number of conserved chromosomal segments among the 5 species, providing a broader database for understanding karyotype evolution in the family. PMID:21178354

  8. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  9. Chromosomal evolution among leaf-nosed nectarivorous bats – evidence from cross-species chromosome painting (Phyllostomidae, Chiroptera)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New World leaf-nosed bats, Phyllostomidae, represent a lineage of Chiroptera marked by unprecedented morphological/ecological diversity and extensive intergeneric chromosomal reorganization. There are still disagreements regarding their systematic relationships due to morphological convergence among some groups. Their history of karyotypic evolution also remains to be documented. Results To better understand the evolutionary relationships within Phyllostomidae, we developed chromosome paints from the bat species Macrotus californicus. We tested the potential of these paints as phylogenetic tools by looking for chromosomal signatures in two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids whose independent origins have been statistically supported by molecular phylogenies. By examining the chromosomal homologies defined by chromosome painting among two representatives of the subfamily Glossophaginae (Glossophaga soricina and Anoura cultrata) and one species from the subfamily Lonchophyllinae (Lonchophylla concava), we found chromosomal correspondence in regions not previously detected by other comparative cytogenetic techniques. We proposed the corresponding human chromosomal segments for chromosomes of the investigated species and found two syntenic associations shared by G. soricina and A. cultrata. Conclusion Comparative painting with whole chromosome-specific paints of M. californicus demonstrates an extensive chromosomal reorganization within the two lineages of nectarivorous phyllostomids, with a large number of chromosomes shared between M. californicus and G. soricina. We show that the evolution of nectar-feeding bats occurs mainly by reshuffling of chiropteran Evolutionarily Conserved Units (ECUs). Robertsonian fusions/fissions and inversions seem to be important modifiers of phyllostomid karyotypes, and autapomorphic character states are common within species. Macrotus californicus chromosome paints will be a valuable tool for documenting the pattern of

  10. [Study on chromosomes aberration in wheat-rye disomics addition lines induced by the gametocidal chromosome 2C].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhong-Ping; Wang, Zhan-Bin; Xu, Xiang-Ling; Li, Ji-Lin

    2004-11-01

    In the present study,Chinese Spring-Imperial (1 R-7R) wheat-rye disomic addition lines were hybridized with Chinese Spring-2C (derived from Aegilops cylindrica) disomic addition lines. The F1 hybrids were examined by mitotic and meiotic analysis. There were observed abnormal chromosome configurations. A total of 430 F2 plants were obtained by self-pollination. Chromosomes aberrations, such as translocation, deletions, isobrachial and dicentromere chromosomes, are identified in F2 individual plants by C-banding combined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Additionally, chromosome spontaneous substitutions such as 2C substituting for wheat chromosomes 2A, 2B and 2D were also observed. The rule and frequency of chromosome aberration in F2 are the following: 22 out of 430 F2 plants (5.11%) were found involving aberration rye chromosomes. Among them, 10 plants were identified as wheat-rye chromosome translocation lines comprising 2.3%. Rye chromosome deletions comprised 12 of them (2.79%). 3 isobrachial aberrations were detected (about 0.7%), too. Most of the translocation lines are with wheat centromere, only one of them is with rye centromere. Rye chromosome aberrations occurred unevenly among homoeologous groups. There were 5 in 1R, 3 in 2R, 1 in 3R, 3 in 4R, 6 in 5R and 4 in 6R. The majority of the translocation lines are terminal translocation. 54 out of the total 430 progenies are wheat deletions,and 27 are distributed in the A group, 20 in the B group and 7 in the D group respectively. Finally,we discussed the possible cause for the uneven chromosome aberration among homoeologous groups in wheat and rye as well as the effect characteristics of 2C on wheat and rye chromosome. PMID:15651680

  11. Chromosomal mapping of pancreatic islet morphological features and regulatory hormones in the spontaneously diabetic (Type 2) Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Clare; Argoud, Karène; Wilder, Steven P; Ouali, Fetta; Ktorza, Alain; Kaisaki, Pamela J; Gauguier, Dominique

    2010-10-01

    Insulin resistance and altered endocrine pancreas function are central pathophysiological features of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat is a model of spontaneous T2DM characterised by reduced beta cell mass and genetically determined glucose intolerance and altered insulin secretion. To identify genetic determinants of endocrine pancreas histopathology, we carried out quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of histological phenotypes (beta cell mass -BCM and insulin-positive cell area -IPCA) and plasma concentration of hormones and growth factors in a F2 cohort derived from GK and normoglycemic Brown Norway rats. Although IPCA and BCM in the duodenal region of the pancreas were highly positively correlated (P < 10(-6)), and similarly in the splenic region, both measures were poorly correlated when comparing duodenal and splenic phenotypes. Strongest evidence of linkage to pancreas morphological traits was obtained between BCM and chromosome 10 (LOD 3.2). Evidence of significant linkage (LOD 4.2) to plasma corticosterone was detected in a region of chromosome 1 distal to other QTLs previously identified in the GK. Male-specific genetic effects were detected, including linkages (LOD > 4) to growth hormome (GH) on chromosome 6 and prolactin on chromosome 17. These data suggest independent genetic control of the structure and function of ontologically different regions of the endocrine pancreas. Novel QTLs for corticosterone, prolactin and GH may contribute to diabetes in the GK. The QTLs that we have identified in this, and previous genetic studies collectively underline the complex and multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes in the GK strain. PMID:20878524

  12. A cohesin-based structural platform supporting homologous chromosome pairing in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    The pairing and recombination of homologous chromosomes during the meiotic prophase is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes in meiosis. However, the mechanism by which homologous chromosomes achieve this pairing has remained an open question. Meiotic cohesins have been shown to affect chromatin compaction; however, the impact of meiotic cohesins on homologous pairing and the fine structures of cohesion-based chromatin remain to be determined. A recent report using live-cell imaging and super-resolution microscopy demonstrated that the lack of meiotic cohesins alters the chromosome axis structures and impairs the pairing of homologous chromosomes. These results suggest that meiotic cohesin-based chromosome axis structures are crucial for the pairing of homologous chromosomes. PMID:26856595

  13. Cytogenetic Insights into the Evolution of Chromosomes and Sex Determination Reveal Striking Homology of Turtle Sex Chromosomes to Amphibian Autosomes.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Eugenia E; Badenhorst, Daleen; Lee, Ling S; Literman, Robert; Trifonov, Vladimir; Valenzuela, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Turtle karyotypes are highly conserved compared to other vertebrates; yet, variation in diploid number (2n = 26-68) reflects profound genomic reorganization, which correlates with evolutionary turnovers in sex determination. We evaluate the published literature and newly collected comparative cytogenetic data (G- and C-banding, 18S-NOR, and telomere-FISH mapping) from 13 species spanning 2n = 28-68 to revisit turtle genome evolution and sex determination. Interstitial telomeric sites were detected in multiple lineages that underwent diploid number and sex determination turnovers, suggesting chromosomal rearrangements. C-banding revealed potential interspecific variation in centromere composition and interstitial heterochromatin at secondary constrictions. 18S-NORs were detected in secondary constrictions in a single chromosomal pair per species, refuting previous reports of multiple NORs in turtles. 18S-NORs are linked to ZW chromosomes in Apalone and Pelodiscus and to X (not Y) in Staurotypus. Notably, comparative genomics across amniotes revealed that the sex chromosomes of several turtles, as well as mammals and some lizards, are homologous to components of Xenopus tropicalis XTR1 (carrying Dmrt1). Other turtle sex chromosomes are homologous to XTR4 (carrying Wt1). Interestingly, all known turtle sex chromosomes, except in Trionychidae, evolved via inversions around Dmrt1 or Wt1. Thus, XTR1 appears to represent an amniote proto-sex chromosome (perhaps linked ancestrally to XTR4) that gave rise to turtle and other amniote sex chromosomes. PMID:27423490

  14. Prophage lambda induces terminal recombination in Escherichia coli by inhibiting chromosome dimer resolution. An orientation-dependent cis-effect lending support to bipolarization of the terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Corre, J; Patte, J; Louarn, J M

    2000-01-01

    A prophage lambda inserted by homologous recombination near dif, the chromosome dimer resolution site of Escherichia coli, is excised at a frequency that depends on its orientation with respect to dif. In wild-type cells, terminal hyper- (TH) recombination is prophage specific and undetectable by a test involving deletion of chromosomal segments between repeats identical to those used for prophage insertion. TH recombination is, however, detected in both excision and deletion assays when Deltadif, xerC, or ftsK mutations inhibit dimer resolution: lack of specialized resolution apparently results in recombinogenic lesions near dif. We also observed that the presence near dif of the prophage, in the orientation causing TH recombination, inhibits dif resolution activity. By its recombinogenic effect, this inhibition explains the enhanced prophage excision in wild-type cells. The primary effect of the prophage is probably an alteration of the dimer resolution regional control, which requires that dif is flanked by suitably oriented (polarized) stretches of DNA. Our model postulates that the prophage inserted near dif in the deleterious orientation disturbs chromosome polarization on the side of the site where it is integrated, because lambda DNA, like the chromosome, is polarized by sequence elements. Candidate sequences are oligomers that display skewed distributions on each oriC-dif chromosome arm and on lambda DNA. PMID:10628967

  15. Characterization of chromosomal architecture in Arabidopsis by chromosome conformation capture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The packaging of long chromatin fibers in the nucleus poses a major challenge, as it must fulfill both physical and functional requirements. Until recently, insights into the chromosomal architecture of plants were mainly provided by cytogenetic studies. Complementary to these analyses, chromosome conformation capture technologies promise to refine and improve our view on chromosomal architecture and to provide a more generalized description of nuclear organization. Results Employing circular chromosome conformation capture, this study describes chromosomal architecture in Arabidopsis nuclei from a genome-wide perspective. Surprisingly, the linear organization of chromosomes is reflected in the genome-wide interactome. In addition, we study the interplay of the interactome and epigenetic marks and report that the heterochromatic knob on the short arm of chromosome 4 maintains a pericentromere-like interaction profile and interactome despite its euchromatic surrounding. Conclusion Despite the extreme condensation that is necessary to pack the chromosomes into the nucleus, the Arabidopsis genome appears to be packed in a predictive manner, according to the following criteria: heterochromatin and euchromatin represent two distinct interactomes; interactions between chromosomes correlate with the linear position on the chromosome arm; and distal chromosome regions have a higher potential to interact with other chromosomes. PMID:24267747

  16. Chromosome Variations And Human Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soudek, D.

    1974-01-01

    Article focused on the science of cytogenetics, which studied the transmission of the units of heredity called chromosomes, and considered the advantage of proper diagnosis of genetic diseases, treated on the chromosomal level. (Author/RK)

  17. Why Chromosome Palindromes?

    PubMed Central

    Betrán, Esther; Demuth, Jeffery P.; Williford, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W) evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the “palindromes as protectors” view: (1) genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2) under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes. PMID:22844637

  18. The Y Chromosome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  19. Why chromosome palindromes?

    PubMed

    Betrán, Esther; Demuth, Jeffery P; Williford, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W) evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the "palindromes as protectors" view: (1) genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2) under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes. PMID:22844637

  20. IMACULAT — An Open Access Package for the Quantitative Analysis of Chromosome Localization in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2013-01-01

    The alteration in the location of the chromosomes within the nucleus upon action of internal or external stimuli has been implicated in altering genome function. The effect of stimuli at a whole genome level is studied by using two-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to delineate whole chromosome territories within a cell nucleus, followed by a quantitative analysis of the spatial distribution of the chromosome. However, to the best of our knowledge, open access software capable of quantifying spatial distribution of whole chromosomes within cell nucleus is not available. In the current work, we present a software package that computes localization of whole chromosomes - Image Analysis of Chromosomes for computing localization (IMACULAT). We partition the nucleus into concentric elliptical compartments of equal area and the variance in the quantity of any chromosome in these shells is used to determine its localization in the nucleus. The images are pre-processed to remove the smudges outside the cell boundary. Automation allows high throughput analysis for deriving statistics. Proliferating normal human dermal fibroblasts were subjected to standard a two-dimensional FISH to delineate territories for all human chromosomes. Approximately 100 images from each chromosome were analyzed using IMACULAT. The analysis corroborated that these chromosome territories have non-random gene density based organization within the interphase nuclei of human fibroblasts. The ImageMagick Perl API has been used for pre-processing the images. The source code is made available at www.sanchak.com/imaculat.html. PMID:23577217

  1. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype. PMID:25119760

  2. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells. PMID:26940867

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