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Sample records for detecting focused ultrasound-induced

  1. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75 ± 0.26 (mean ± standard error of the mean). The authors’ spectroscopic investigation has shown that HIFU-treated tissues have a greater optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients than native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. In fact, at 720 and 845 nm, the ratio of the optical absorption coefficient of HIFU-treated tissues to that of native tissues was 1.13 and 1.17, respectively; on the other hand, the ratio of the reduced scattering coefficient of HIFU-treated tissues to that of native tissues was 13.22 and 14.67 at 720 and 845 nm, respectively. Consequently, HIFU-treated tissues have a higher effective attenuation coefficient and a lower light penetration depth than native tissues in the wavelength range 500–900 nm. Conclusions: Using a PA approach, HIFU-treated tissues interrogated at 720 and 845 nm optical wavelengths can be differentiated from untreated tissues. Based on the authors’ spectroscopic investigation, the authors conclude that the observed PA contrast between HIFU-induced thermal lesions and untreated tissue is due, in part, to the increase in the optical absorption coefficient, the reduced scattering coefficient and, therefore, the deposited laser energy fluence in HIFU-treated tissues.

  2. In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced bloodbrain barrier opening in mice

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood­brain barrier cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood­brain barrier opening in mice Yao-Sheng Tung1 ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles was studied in order to better identify the underlying

  3. Low Dose Focused Ultrasound Induces Enhanced Tumor Accumulation of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sta Maria, Naomi S.; Barnes, Samuel R.; Weist, Michael R.; Colcher, David; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital antitumor role as part of the innate immune system. Efficacy of adoptive transfer of NK cells depends on their ability to recognize and target tumors. We investigated whether low dose focused ultrasound with microbubbles (ldbFUS) could facilitate the targeting and accumulation of NK cells in a mouse xenograft of human colorectal adenocarcinoma (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-expressing LS-174T implanted in NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIl2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mice) in the presence of an anti-CEA immunocytokine (ICK), hT84.66/M5A-IL-2 (M5A-IL-2). Human NK cells were labeled with an FDA-approved ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide particle, ferumoxytol. Simultaneous with the intravenous injection of microbubbles, focused ultrasound was applied to the tumor. In vivo longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified enhanced accumulation of NK cells in the ensonified tumor, which was validated by endpoint histology. Significant accumulation of NK cells was observed up to 24 hrs at the tumor site when ensonified with 0.50 MPa peak acoustic pressure ldbFUS, whereas tumors treated with at 0.25 MPa showed no detectable NK cell accumulation. These clinically translatable results show that ldbFUS of the tumor mass can potentiate tumor homing of NK cells that can be evaluated non-invasively using MRI. PMID:26556731

  4. Pulsed Focused Ultrasound Induced Displacements in Confined In Vitro Blood Clots

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cameron C.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound has been shown to potentiate the effects of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to improve clot lysis in a range of in vitro and in vivo studies as well as in clinical trials. One possible mechanism of action is acoustic radiation force induced clot displacements. In this study we investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of clot displacements and strain initiated by focused ultrasound pulses. Displacements were produced by a 1.51 MHz f-number 1 transducer over a range of acoustic powers (1–85 W) in clots constrained within an agar vessel phantom channel. Displacements were tracked during and after a 5.45 ms therapy pulse using a 20 MHz high frequency ultrasound imaging probe. Peak thrombus displacements were found to be linear as a function of acoustic power up to 60 W before leveling off near 128 ?m for the highest transmit powers. The time to peak displacement and recovery time of blood clots were largely independent of acoustic powers with measured values near 2 ms. A linear relationship between peak axial strain and transmit power was observed, reaching a peak value of 11% at 35 W. The peak strain occurred ~0.75 mm from the focal zone for all powers investigated in both lateral and axial directions. These results indicate that substantial displacements can be induced by focused ultrasound in confined blood clots, and that the spatial and temporal displacement patterns are complex and highly dependant on exposure conditions, which has implications for future work investigating their link to clot lysis and for developing approaches to exploit these effects. PMID:22194235

  5. Neuromodulation accompanying focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Chun; Liu, Hao-Li; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Chung-Yin; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) induces microbubble cavitation in the vasculature and temporarily disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to enable therapeutic agent delivery. However, it remains unclear whether FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by neuromodulation. Here we characterized the functional effects of FUS-induced BBB opening by measuring changes in somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses. Rats underwent burst-mode FUS (mechanical index (MI) of 0.3, 0.55 or 0.8) to the forelimb region in the left primary somatosensory cortex to induce BBB opening. Longitudinal measurements were followed for up to 1 week to characterize the temporal dynamics of neuromodulation. We observed that 0.8-MI FUS profoundly suppressed SSEP amplitude and prolonged latency, and this effect lasted 7 days. 0.55-MI FUS resulted in minimal and short-term suppression of SSEP for less than 60?minutes and didn’t affect latency. BOLD responses were also suppressed in an MI-dependent manner, mirroring the effect on SSEPs. Furthermore, repetitive delivery of 0.55-MI FUS every 3 days elicited no accumulative effects on SSEPs or tissue integrity. This is the first evidence that FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by reversible changes in neuron responses, and may provide valuable insight toward the development of FUS-induced BBB opening for clinical applications. PMID:26490653

  6. Feasibility study on photoacoustic guidance for high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Phuc; Kim, Jeehyun; Ha, Kang-lyeol; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) application was evaluated to map punctured blood vessels thermally treated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for hemostasis. A single-element HIFU transducer with a central frequency of 2.0 MHz, was used to induce thermal hemostasis on the punctured arteries. The HIFU-treated lesion was imaged and localized by high-contrast PAI guidance. The results showed that complete hemostasis was achieved after treatment of the damaged blood vessels within 25 to 52 s at the acoustic intensity of 3600 W/cm2. The coagulation time for the animal artery was ˜20% longer than that of the phantom possibly due to a lower Young's modulus. The reconstructed PA images were able to distinguish the treated area from the surrounding tissue in terms of augmented signal amplitudes (up to three times). Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that the optimal imaging wavelength was found to be 700 nm in order to reconstruct high-contrast photoacoustic images on HIFU-treated lesions. The proposed PAI integrated with HIFU treatment can be a feasible application to obtain safe and rapid hemostasis for acute arterial bleeding.

  7. Imaging of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced lesions in soft biological tissue using thermoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xing; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Lihong V; Fang, Yuncai R; Zanelli, Claudio I; Howard, Samuel M

    2005-01-01

    An imaging technology, thermoacoustic tomograpy (TAT), was applied to the visualization of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced lesions. A single, spherically focused ultrasonic transducer, operating at a central frequency of approximately 4 MHz, was used to generate a HIFU field in fresh porcine muscle. Microwave pulses from a 3-GHz microwave generator were then employed to generate thermoacoustic sources in this tissue sample. The thermoacoustic signals were detected by an unfocused ultrasonic transducer that was scanned around the sample. To emphasize the boundaries between the lesion and its surrounding tissue, a local-tomography-type reconstruction method was applied to reconstruct the TAT images of the lesions. Good contrast was obtained between the lesion and the tissue surrounding it. Gross pathologic photographs of the tissue samples confirmed the TAT images. This work demonstrates that TAT may potentially be used to image HIFU-induced lesions in biological tissues. PMID:15719948

  8. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P; Kim, Kang

    2014-02-21

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using US-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5-14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13-24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n = 10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n = 10) with low fat content (4.8 ± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ? 3 s and ? 9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively, to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (-0.065 ± 0.079%) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (-0.124 ± 0.037%). Using histology as a gold standard to classify mouse livers, US-TSI had a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 90%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis. PMID:24487698

  9. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P.; Kim, Kang

    2014-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using US-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5-14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13-24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n = 10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n = 10) with low fat content (4.8 ± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ˜3 s and ˜9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively, to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (-0.065 ± 0.079%) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (-0.124 ± 0.037%). Using histology as a gold standard to classify mouse livers, US-TSI had a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 90%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis.

  10. Targeted Drug Delivery with Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening Using Acoustically-Activated Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cherry C.; Sheeran, Paul S.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Olumolade, Oluyemi O.; Dayton, Paul A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to locally, transiently and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus allowing targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the brain for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Currently, microbubbles are the only agents that have been used to facilitate the FUS-induced BBB opening. However, they are constrained within the intravascular space due to their micron-size diameters, limiting the delivery effect at or near the microvessels. In the present study, acoustically-activated nanodroplets were used as a new class of contrast agents to mediate FUS-induced BBB opening in order to study the feasibility of utilizing these nanoscale phase-shift particles for targeted drug delivery in the brain. Significant dextran delivery was achieved in the mouse hippocampus using nanodroplets at clinically relevant pressures. Passive cavitation detection was used in the attempt to establish a correlation between the amount of dextran delivered in the brain and the acoustic emission recorded during sonication. Conventional microbubbles with the same lipid shell composition and perfluorobutane core as the nanodroplets were also used to compare the efficiency of FUS-induced dextran delivery. It was found that nanodroplets had a higher BBB opening pressure threshold but a lower stable cavitation threshold than microbubbles, suggesting that contrast agent-dependent acoustic emission monitoring was needed. More homogeneous dextran delivery within the targeted hippocampus was achieved using nanodroplets without inducing inertial cavitation or compromising safety. Our results offered a new means of developing the FUS-induced BBB opening technology for potential extravascular targeted drug delivery in the brain, extending the potential drug delivery region beyond the cerebral vasculature. PMID:24096019

  11. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion. PMID:24264647

  12. Focused ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption to enhance chemotherapeutic drugs (BCNU) delivery for glioblastoma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2010-03-01

    Focused ultrasound has been recently found to capable of temporally and reversibly disrupt local blood-brain barrier (BBB) and opens new frontier in delivering varies type of drugs into brain for central nerve system (CNS) disorder treatment. In this study, we aim to investigate the feasibility of delivering 1, 3-bits (2-chloroethyl) -1-nitrosourea (BCNU) to treat glioblastoma in animal models and evaluate whether this approach would gain treatment efficacy. Under the presence of microbubbles administration, a 400-kHz focused ultrasound was employed to deliver burst-tone ultrasonic energy stimulation to disrupt BBB in animal brains transcranially, and in-vivo monitored by magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). C6-glioma cells were cultured and implanted into Sprague-Dawley rats as the brain-tumor model. BCNU deposited in brain was quantified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and brain tissues were examined histologically. MRI was employed to longitudinal evaluate the brain tumor treatment including the analysis of tumor progression and animal survival. We confirmed that the focused ultrasound, under the secure ultrasonic energy level, can significantly enhance the BCNU penetration through BBB over 300% than control without cause hemorrhage. Apparent improvement of treatment efficacy achieved by combining focused ultrasound with BCNU delivery, including significant suppression of tumor growth and a prolonged animal survival. This study highly support that this treatment strategy could be clinically-relevant and may help to provide another potential strategy in increasing local chemotherapeutic drugs for brain-tumor treatment.

  13. Feasibility of optoacoustic visualization of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in live tissue.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Parag V; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander A

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D optoacoustic imaging system was used to visualize thermal lesions produced in vivo using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). A 7.5-MHz, surgical, focused transducer with a radius of curvature of 35 mm and an aperture diameter of 23 mm was used to generate HIFU. A pulsed laser, which could operate at 755 nm and 1064 nm, was used to illuminate excised tissue and mice using a bifurcated fiber bundle resulting in two wide beams of light. Tomographic images were obtained while the specimens were rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezo-composite transducers. These images were then combined to reconstruct 3-D volume images (voxel resolution 0.5 mm), which were acquired before and after HIFU exposure. In vivo optoacoustic images acquired at 1064 nm provided visualization of HIFU lesions. The lesion was indicated by a negative optoacoustic contrast. The molecular nature of such contrast may possibly be associated with reduction of the optical absorption due to reduced concentration of blood, tissue dehydration, denaturation of proteins and porphyrins, and reduction of thermoacoustic efficiency in the thermally treated tissue. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential of optoacoustic imaging to assess and monitor the progress of HIFU therapy. PMID:20459235

  14. Feasibility of optoacoustic visualization of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in live tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D optoacoustic imaging system was used to visualize thermal lesions produced in vivo using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). A 7.5-MHz, surgical, focused transducer with a radius of curvature of 35 mm and an aperture diameter of 23 mm was used to generate HIFU. A pulsed laser, which could operate at 755 nm and 1064 nm, was used to illuminate excised tissue and mice using a bifurcated fiber bundle resulting in two wide beams of light. Tomographic images were obtained while the specimens were rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezo-composite transducers. These images were then combined to reconstruct 3-D volume images (voxel resolution 0.5 mm), which were acquired before and after HIFU exposure. In vivo optoacoustic images acquired at 1064 nm provided visualization of HIFU lesions. The lesion was indicated by a negative optoacoustic contrast. The molecular nature of such contrast may possibly be associated with reduction of the optical absorption due to reduced concentration of blood, tissue dehydration, denaturation of proteins and porphyrins, and reduction of thermoacoustic efficiency in the thermally treated tissue. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential of optoacoustic imaging to assess and monitor the progress of HIFU therapy. PMID:20459235

  15. Pressure and microbubble size dependence study of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening reversibility in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Vlachos, Fotios; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Feshitan, Jameel; Borden, Mark; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-10-01

    Most currently available therapeutic compounds cannot cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and their delivery to the brain remains a critical impediment. Focused Ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to open the BBB locally, non-invasively and reversibly. In this study, we investigated the dependence of BBB opening's reversibility timeline on the peak-rarefactional pressure (PRP) varied from 0.30 MPa to 0.60 MPa and the microbubble size in mice in vivo. The microbubbles used were monodispersed with diameters of 1-2, 4-5 or 6-8 microns. The contrast agent's (Gd) diffusion was used to quantify the opening, in T1-weighted high resolution MR images acquired on the day of sonication and up to five days thereafter. The volume of opening was found to increase with both pressure and microbubble diameter. The duration required for closing was found to be proportional to the volume of opening on the day of opening, and ranged from 24 hours, for the 1-2 um and 0.45 MPa, to 5 days for the 6-8 um and higher PRPs. Overall, larger bubbles did not show significant differences, and the BBB-opened region reduced steadily and radially towards the focal region until complete reinstatement was achieved.

  16. Automated detection of ocular focus.

    PubMed

    Hunter, David G; Nusz, Kevin J; Gandhi, Nainesh K; Quraishi, Imran H; Gramatikov, Boris I; Guyton, David L

    2004-01-01

    We characterize objectively the state of focus of the human eye, utilizing a bull's eye photodetector to detect the double-pass blur produced from a point source of light. A point fixation source of light illuminates the eye. Fundus-reflected light is focused by the optical system of the eye onto a bull's eye photodetector [consisting of an annulus (A) and a center (C) of approximately equal active area]. To generate focus curves, C/A is measured with a range of trial lenses in the light path. Three human eyes and a model eye are studied. In the model eye, the focus curve showed a sharp peak with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of +/-0.25 D. In human eyes, the ratio C/A was >4 at best focus in all cases, with a FWHM of +/-1 D. The optical apparatus detects ocular focus (as opposed to refractive error) in real time. A device that can assess focus rapidly and objectively will make it possible to perform low-cost, mass screening for focusing problems such as may exist in children at risk for amblyopia. PMID:15447031

  17. Ultrasound-Induced Disruption of Amphiphilic Block Copolymer Micelles

    E-print Network

    Zhao, Yue

    Ultrasound-Induced Disruption of Amphiphilic Block Copolymer Micelles Juan Xuan, Maxime Pelletier study,[7] we found that micelles of an amphiphilic poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(2-tetrahydro- pyranyl

  18. Controlled Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Passive Acoustic Emissions Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R2?=?0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology. PMID:23029240

  19. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  20. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  1. A Feed-forward Neural Network Algorithm to Detect Thermal Lesions Induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Shakhssalim, Naser; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive ultrasound surgeries such as high intensity focused ultrasound have been developed to treat tumors or to stop bleeding. In this technique, incorporation of a suitable imaging modality to monitor and control the treatments is essential so several imaging methods such as X-ray, Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging have been proposed to monitor the induced thermal lesions. Currently, the only ultrasound imaging technique that is clinically used for monitoring this treatment is standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging. This paper describes a novel method for detecting high intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions using a feed forward neural-network. This study was carried on in vitro animal tissue samples. Backscattered radio frequency signals were acquired in real-time during treatment in order to detect induced thermal lesions. Changes in various tissue properties including tissue's attenuation coefficient, integrated backscatter, scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution, frequency dependent scatterer amplitudes and tissue vibration derived from the backscattered radio frequency data acquired 10 minutes after treatment regarding to before treatment were used in this study. These estimated parameters were used as features of the neural network. Estimated parameters of two sample tissues including two thermal lesions and their segmented B-mode images were used along with the pathological results as training data for the neural network. The results of the study shows that the trained feed forward neural network could effectively detect thermal lesions in vitro. Comparing the estimated size of the thermal lesion (9.6 mm × 8.5 mm) using neural network with the actual size of that from physical examination (10.1 mm × 9 mm) shows that we could detect high intensity focused ultrasound thermal lesions with the difference of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm. PMID:23724369

  2. Comparison of ultrasound-induced bioeffects in glass catfish after injection with optison and liquid perflourocarbon droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruvada, Subha; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2003-04-01

    This work is an investigation of ultrasound-induced bioeffects in vivo. Glass catfish were used for these experiments because they are optically transparent. Anaesthetized fish were injected with either optison (OPT) or liquid perflourocarbon droplets (LPD), using microinjection techniques. Shortly after injection, the fish were insonified with one of two single element focused transducers (1.091 MHz and 0.747 MHz). An inverted microscope combined with a digital camera was used to optically monitor ultrasound interaction with the blood vessels in the tail of the fish at 200x magnification. The entire interaction was videotaped and digitized. The fish were insonified at power levels between 1-80 W, which translated into acoustic pressures from 0.45-15 MPa. Sonications were pulsed with burst lengths of 10 ms and 100 ms and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The entire length of one sonication at a specific pressure was 20 seconds. The effects of the sonication were analyzed at each pressure level. The ultrasound-induced bioeffects due to OPT and LPD were compared. Threshold values for damage were lower after OPT injection than after LPD injection, especially at lower frequencies.

  3. The origin of ultrasound-induced friction reduction in microscopic mechanical contacts.

    PubMed

    Hesjedal, Thorsten; Behme, Gerd

    2002-03-01

    We present a study of the origin of ultrasound-induced friction reduction in microscopic mechanical contacts. The effect of friction reduction caused by Rayleigh-type surface acoustic waves (SAWs) is demonstrated for propagating and two-dimensional, standing wave fields using lateral force microscopy (LFM). It is shown that with increasing wave amplitude, friction is completely suppressed. To detect and distinguish between the effect of lateral and vertical surface oscillation components on the cantilever movement, we employed multimode scanning acoustic force microscopy (SAFM). We found that the friction reduction effect is only due to the vertical oscillation component. Because this effect does not appear for purely in-plane polarized Love waves, we concluded that the mechanical diode effect is most probably responsible for the SAW-induced lubrication. This explanation is also supported by vertical and longitudinal SAFM measurements, which show that, in areas where friction is completely suppressed, low frequency vertical cantilever oscillations can still be observed, whereas lateral or torsional oscillations are no longer excited. PMID:12322886

  4. Preface to the Focus Issue: Chaos Detection Methods and Predictability

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17–21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue.

  5. Attention focusing and anomaly detection in systems monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the potential for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an anomaly occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing. The technique involves reasoning about the distance between two frequency distributions, and is used to detect both anomalous system parameters and 'broken' causal dependencies. These two forms of information together isolate the locus of anomalous behavior in the system being monitored.

  6. Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage: Role of acoustic boundary conditions at the pleural surface

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage: Role of acoustic boundary conditions at the pleural surface intercostal tissue and lung was evaluated as a possible explanation for the enhanced lung damage the volume of air inspired and expired. The acoustic impedance difference between intercostal tissue and lung

  7. Electrostrictive limit and focusing effects in pulsed photoacoustic detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heritier, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    We give an analytical solution in the time and frequency domain for the cylindrical pressure wave generated by a laser pulse traveling in a liquid, which is valid over a wide range of laser beam dimensions and pulse durations. This leads to a simple prediction of the ultimate limitation set by the electrostrictive coupling and an easy analysis of the focusing effects on the photoacoustic signal. Two separate detection schemes were considered and show different behavior.

  8. Computer-assisted detection of epileptiform focuses on SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorczyk, Dawid; Dunin-W?sowicz, Dorota; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2010-09-01

    Epilepsy is a common nervous system disease often related to consciousness disturbances and muscular spasm which affects about 1% of the human population. Despite major technological advances done in medicine in the last years there was no sufficient progress towards overcoming it. Application of advanced statistical methods and computer image analysis offers the hope for accurate detection and later removal of an epileptiform focuses which are the cause of some types of epilepsy. The aim of this work was to create a computer system that would help to find and diagnose disorders of blood circulation in the brain This may be helpful for the diagnosis of the epileptic seizures onset in the brain.

  9. Ultrasound induced improvement in optical coherence tomography (OCT) resolution

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, John O.; Brezinski, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a rapidly emerging technology for high-resolution biomedical imaging. The axial resolution of this technology is determined by the bandwidth of the source. Commercial sources generally provide resolutions of 10–20 ?m whereas laboratory-based solid state lasers have resolutions of ?4 ?m. The resolution in tissue depends almost exclusively on detecting single scattered events. However, the phenomenon known as multiple scattering results in a deterioration of resolution as a function of depth. In this study, OCT was combined with ultrasound in an attempt to reduce the effect of multiple scattering. The theory is that, with parallel ultrasound and OCT beams, multiply scattered light with a momentum component significantly perpendicular to the OCT beam will be reduced because the light is Doppler shifted outside the bandpass filter of the OCT detection electronics. A 7.5-MHz ultrasound transducer was used to introduce the photon/phonon interaction. A reflecting metal plate was placed within biological tissue, and the point spread function (PSF) was assessed off the reflector. The PSF was determined in the presence of no ultrasound, pulsed ultrasound, and continuous-wave (CW) ultrasound. CW ultrasound resulted in a 17% improvement (P < 0.001) in resolution and pulsed ultrasound resulted in 8% (P < 0.01). Image noise reduction could also be noted. Combining OCT with a parallel ultrasound beam results in an improvement in resolution through a reduced effect of multiple scattering due to photon/phonon interaction. With higher frequencies, better control of the acoustical beam, and tests in media with higher rates of multiple scattering, improved results are anticipated. PMID:12119391

  10. Ultrasound-induced cellular uptake of plasmonic gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, Alexander; Wilson, Katheryne; Homan, Kimberly; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2011-03-01

    Delivery of contrast agents and their interaction with cells is emerging as an important tool in cancer imaging and therapy. An alternative to traditional molecular targeting schemes that induce endocytotic uptake of contrast agents in cells is presented here. Specifically, the application of high-intensity, focused ultrasound (HIFU) was used to enhance uptake of gold nanorods in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. A significant increase was observed in gold nanorod uptake when cells were incubated with nanorods and treated with HIFU. Additionally, inclusion of liquid-filled, perfluorocarbon (PFC) microdroplets in cell samples incubated with nanorods and treated with HIFU exhibited greater uptake of gold over those samples exposed to HIFU without microdroplets. Furthermore, the level of acoustic pressure required to increase nanoparticle uptake did not significantly decrease cell viability. Therefore, improved intracellular delivery of nanoparticle contrast agents is possible using HIFU without compromising cell viability. Since nanoparticle delivery is mechanically induced, this method can apply to a broad range of cancer imaging and therapy applications.

  11. Salient Region Detection by UFO: Uniqueness, Focusness and Objectness Peng Jiang 1

    E-print Network

    Ling, Haibin

    Salient Region Detection by UFO: Uniqueness, Focusness and Objectness Peng Jiang 1 Haibin Ling 2 three important visual cues namely uniqueness, focusness and objectness (UFO). In particular, uniqueness, named UFO saliency, which

  12. Realigning the Focus of Plagiarism Detection Using "Plagiarismdetect.com"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabapathy, Elangkeeran A/L; Rahim, Rozlan Abd; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which "plagiarismdetect.com," an internet help/tool to detect plagiarism helps academicians tackle the ever-growing problem of plagiarism. Concerned with term papers, essays and most of the time with full-blown research reports, a tool like "plagiarismdetect.com" may…

  13. JAFFA: High sensitivity transcriptome-focused fusion gene detection.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Nadia M; Majewski, Ian J; Oshlack, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and, as such, structural alterations and fusion genes are common events in the cancer landscape. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is a powerful method for profiling cancers, but current methods for identifying fusion genes are optimised for short reads. JAFFA (https://github.com/Oshlack/JAFFA/wiki) is a sensitive fusion detection method that outperforms other methods with reads of 100 bp or greater. JAFFA compares a cancer transcriptome to the reference transcriptome, rather than the genome, where the cancer transcriptome is inferred using long reads directly or by de novo assembling short reads. PMID:26019724

  14. A pulsed THz Imaging System with a line focus and a balanced 1-D detection

    E-print Network

    A pulsed THz Imaging System with a line focus and a balanced 1-D detection scheme with two with a line focus intended to speed up measurements. A balanced 1-D detection scheme working with two time. Speed is mainly limited by the need for mechanical delay stages as well as by single-pixel

  15. Detection of liquid hazardous molecules using linearly focused Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo Gyeong; Chung, Jin Hyuk

    2013-05-01

    In security, it is an important issue to analyze hazardous materials in sealed bottles. Particularly, prompt nondestructive checking of sealed liquid bottles in a very short time at the checkpoints of crowded malls, stadiums, or airports is of particular importance to prevent probable terrorist attack using liquid explosives. Aiming to design and fabricate a detector for liquid explosives, we have used linearly focused Raman spectroscopy to analyze liquid materials in transparent or semi-transparent bottles without opening their caps. Continuous lasers with 532 nm wavelength and 58 mW/130 mW beam energy have been used for the Raman spectroscopy. Various hazardous materials including flammable liquids and explosive materials have successfully been distinguished and identified within a couple of seconds. We believe that our technique will be one of suitable methods for fast screening of liquid materials in sealed bottles.

  16. Low intensity-pulsed ultrasound induced apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingfang; Liu, Bangzhong; Liu, Guanghua; Wang, Ping; Yang, Mingzhen; Li, Yun; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether low intensity-pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) could induce apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, SMMC-7721, and to define the mechanism of ultrasound-induced apoptosis, in vitro. MTT assay was used to measure cell proliferation. Apoptosis was investigated by multiple methods such as flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, Ca(2+) mobilizations, pro- and anti-apoptotic protein expression, and light as well as ultramicroscopic morphology. The results provide evidence that LIPUS induced a dose-dependent effect on cell viability and apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells. Specifically, exposure of cells to >0.5 W/cm(2) intensity significantly increased cell apoptosis, caused shifts in cell cycle phase, and induced structural changes. Ultrasound significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and modulated expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax. The findings suggest that this novel technology can be used to induce SMMC-7721 apoptosis via the Ca(2+)/mitochondrial pathway and could potentially be of clinical use for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (SMMC-7721 cell line) and other cancers. PMID:26231998

  17. Histological and Ultrastructural Effects of Ultrasound-induced Cavitation on Human Skin Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Alessandro Quattrini; Freschi, Giancarlo; Russo, Giulia Lo

    2013-01-01

    Background: In aesthetic medicine, the most promising techniques for noninvasive body sculpturing purposes are based on ultrasound-induced fat cavitation. Liporeductive ultrasound devices afford clinically relevant subcutaneous fat pad reduction without significant adverse reactions. This study aims at evaluating the histological and ultrastructural changes induced by ultrasound cavitation on the different cell components of human skin. Methods: Control and ultrasound-treated ex vivo abdominal full-thickness skin samples and skin biopsies from patients pretreated with or without ultrasound cavitation were studied histologically, morphometrically, and ultrastructurally to evaluate possible changes in adipocyte size and morphology. Adipocyte apoptosis and triglyceride release were also assayed. Clinical evaluation of the effects of 4 weekly ultrasound vs sham treatments was performed by plicometry. Results: Compared with the sham-treated control samples, ultrasound cavitation induced a statistically significant reduction in the size of the adipocytes (P < 0.001), the appearance of micropores and triglyceride leakage and release in the conditioned medium (P < 0.05 at 15 min), or adipose tissue interstitium, without appreciable changes in microvascular, stromal, and epidermal components and in the number of apoptotic adipocytes. Clinically, the ultrasound treatment caused a significant reduction of abdominal fat. Conclusions: This study further strengthens the current notion that noninvasive transcutaneous ultrasound cavitation is a promising and safe technology for localized reduction of fat and provides experimental evidence for its specific mechanism of action on the adipocytes. PMID:25289235

  18. Improving Photoacoustic-guided Focusing in Scattering Media by Spectrally Filtered Detection

    E-print Network

    Chaigne, Thomas; Gateau, Jérôme; Boccara, Claude; Gigan, Sylvain; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally and numerically study the potential of photoacoustic-guiding for light focusing through scattering samples via wavefront-shaping and iterative optimization. We experimentally demonstrate that the focusing efficiency on an extended absorber can be improved by iterative optimization of the high frequency components of the broadband photoacoustic signal detected with a spherically focused transducer. We demonstrate more than 8-fold increase in the photoacoustic signal generated by a 30 microns wire using a narrow frequency band around 60MHz. We numerically confirm that such optimization leads to a smaller optical focus than using the low frequency content of the photoacoustic feedback.

  19. Flexible Integration of Both High Imaging Resolution and High Power Arrays for Ultrasound-Induced Thermal Strain Imaging (US-TSI)

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Lucero, Steven; Dutta, Debaditya; Yu, Francois T.H.; Chen, Xucai

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI) for carotid artery plaque detection requires both high imaging resolution (<100 ?m) and sufficient US induced heating to elevate the tissue temperature (~1-3°C within 1-3 cardiac cycles) in order to produce a noticeable change in sound speed in the targeted tissues. Since the optimization of both imaging and heating in a monolithic array design is particularly expensive and inflexible, a new integrated approach is presented that utilizes independent ultrasound arrays to meet the requirements for this particular application. This work demonstrates a new approach in dual-array construction. A 3D printed manifold was built to support both a high resolution 20 MHz commercial imaging array and 6 custom heating elements operating in the 3.5-4 MHz range. For the application of US-TSI on carotid plaque characterization, the tissue target site is 20 to 30 mm deep, with a typical target volume of 2 mm (elevation) × 8 mm (azimuthal) × 5 mm (depth). The custom heating array performance was fully characterized for two design variants (flat and spherical apertures), and can easily deliver 30 W of total acoustic power to produce intensities greater than 15 W/cm2 in tissue target region. PMID:24297029

  20. Stand-off explosive detection utilizing low power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection and subwavelength focusing wideband super lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2015-05-01

    The need for advanced techniques to detect improvised explosive devices (IED) at stand-off distances greater than ten (10) meters has driven AMI Research and Development (AMI) to develop a solution to detect and identify the threat utilizing a forward looking Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) combined with our CW radar technology Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection system. The novel features include a near-field sub-wavelength focusing antenna, a wide band 300 KHz to 300 MHz rapidly scanning CW radar facilitated by a high Q antenna/tuner, and an advanced processor utilizing Rabi transitions where the nucleus oscillates between states under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. AMI's Sub-wavelength Focusing Wide Band Super Lens uses a Near-Field SAR, making detection possible at distances greater than ten (10) meters. This super lens is capable of operating on the near-field and focusing electromagnetic waves to resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. When applied to the case of a vehicle approaching an explosive hazard the methodologies of synthetic aperture radar is fused with the array based super resolution and the NQR data processing detecting the explosive hazard.

  1. IMAGE MATCHING ERROR DETECTION WITH FOCUS ON MATCHING OF SAR AND OPTICAL IMAGES

    E-print Network

    Schindler, Konrad

    IMAGE MATCHING ERROR DETECTION WITH FOCUS ON MATCHING OF SAR AND OPTICAL IMAGES Soukal Peter Radar) images of various spatial resolutions and naturally different bands. The aims of such matching could be various, like image co-registration, needed for various applications, where a combination

  2. A Distance Measure for Attention Focusing and Anomaly Detection in Systems Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, R.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the potential for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an anomaly occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. Previous results on extending traditional anomaly detection techniques are summarized. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing.

  3. Neuronavigation-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening: A preliminary study in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-11-01

    FUS-induced BBB opening is a promising technique for noninvasive and local delivery of drugs into the brain. Here we propose the novel use of a neuronavigation system to guide the FUS-induced BBB opening procedure, and investigate its feasibility in vivo in large animals. We developed an interface between the neuronavigator and FUS to allow guidance of the focal energy produced by the FUS transducer. The system was tested in 29 pigs by more than 40 sonication procedures and evaluated by MRI. Gd-DTPA concentration was quantitated in vivo by MRI R1 relaxometry and compared by ICP-OES assay. Brain histology after FUS exposure was investigated by HE and TUNEL staining. Neuronavigation could successfully guide the focal beam with comparable precision to neurosurgical stereotactic procedures (2.3 ± 0.9 mm). FUS pressure of 0.43 MPa resulted in consistent BBB-opening. Neuronavigation-guided BBB-opening increased Gd-DTPA deposition by up to 1.83 mM (140% increase). MR relaxometry demonstrated high correlation to ICP-OES measurements (r2 = 0.822), suggesting that Gd-DTPA deposition can be directly measured by imaging. Neuronavigation could provide sufficient precision for guiding FUS to temporally and locally open the BBB. Gd-DTPA deposition in the brain could be quantified by MR relaxometry, providing a potential tool for the in vivo quantification of therapeutic agents in CNS disease treatment.

  4. Note: Focus error detection device for thermal expansion-recovery microscopy (ThERM).

    PubMed

    Domené, E A; Martínez, O E

    2013-01-01

    An innovative focus error detection method is presented that is only sensitive to surface curvature variations, canceling both thermoreflectance and photodefelection effects. The detection scheme consists of an astigmatic probe laser and a four-quadrant detector. Nonlinear curve fitting of the defocusing signal allows the retrieval of a cutoff frequency, which only depends on the thermal diffusivity of the sample and the pump beam size. Therefore, a straightforward retrieval of the thermal diffusivity of the sample is possible with microscopic lateral resolution and high axial resolution (~100 pm). PMID:23387710

  5. Diffraction analysis and evaluation of several focus- and track-error detection schemes for magneto-optical disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Mansuripur, M.

    1992-01-01

    A commonly used tracking method on pre-grooved magneto-optical (MO) media is the push-pull technique, and the astigmatic method is a popular focus-error detection approach. These two methods are analyzed using DIFFRACT, a general-purpose scalar diffraction modeling program, to observe the effects on the error signals due to focusing lens misalignment, Seidel aberrations, and optical crosstalk (feedthrough) between the focusing and tracking servos. Using the results of the astigmatic/push-pull system as a basis for comparison, a novel focus/track-error detection technique that utilizes a ring toric lens is evaluated as well as the obscuration method (focus error detection only).

  6. Effect of gravitational focusing on annual modulation in dark-matter direct-detection experiments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Samuel K; Lisanti, Mariangela; Peter, Annika H G; Safdi, Benjamin R

    2014-01-10

    The scattering rate in dark-matter direct-detection experiments should modulate annually due to Earth's orbit around the Sun. The rate is typically thought to be extremized around June 1, when the relative velocity of Earth with respect to the dark-matter wind is maximal. We point out that gravitational focusing can alter this modulation phase. Unbound dark-matter particles are focused by the Sun's gravitational potential, affecting their phase-space density in the lab frame. Gravitational focusing can result in a significant overall shift in the annual-modulation phase, which is most relevant for dark matter with low scattering speeds. The induced phase shift for light O(10)??GeV dark matter may also be significant, depending on the threshold energy of the experiment. PMID:24483881

  7. Defect detection around rebars in concrete using focused ultrasound and reverse time migration.

    PubMed

    Beniwal, Surendra; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2015-09-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations have been performed to assess the feasibility of damage detection around rebars in concrete using focused ultrasound and a Reverse Time Migration (RTM) based subsurface imaging algorithm. Since concrete is heterogeneous, an unfocused ultrasonic field will be randomly scattered by the aggregates, thereby masking information about damage(s). A focused ultrasonic field, on the other hand, increases the possibility of detection of an anomaly due to enhanced amplitude of the incident field in the focal region. Further, the RTM based reconstruction using scattered focused field data is capable of creating clear images of the inspected region of interest. Since scattering of a focused field by a damaged rebar differs qualitatively from that of an undamaged rebar, distinct images of damaged and undamaged situations are obtained in the RTM generated images. This is demonstrated with both numerical and experimental investigations. The total scattered field, acquired on the surface of the concrete medium, is used as input for the RTM algorithm to generate the subsurface image that helps to identify the damage. The proposed technique, therefore, has some advantage since knowledge about the undamaged scenario for the concrete medium is not necessary to assess its integrity. PMID:26032923

  8. 3D topographic correction of the BSR heat flow and detection of focused fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Li, Hong-Lin; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is a seismic indicator of the bottom of a gas hydrate stability zone. Its depth can be used to calculate the seafloor surface heat flow. The calculated BSR heat flow variations include disturbances from two important factors: (1) seafloor topography, which focuses the heat flow over regions of concave topography and defocuses it over regions of convex topography, and (2) the focused warm fluid flow within the accretionary prism coming from depths deeper than BSR. The focused fluid flow can be detected if the contribution of the topography to the BSR heat flow is removed. However, the analytical equation cannot solve the topographic effect at complex seafloor regions. We prove that 3D finite element method can model the topographic effect on the regional background heat flow with high accuracy, which can then be used to correct the topographic effect and obtain the BSR heat flow under the condition of perfectly flat topography. By comparing the corrected BSR heat flow with the regional background heat flow, focused fluid flow regions can be detected that are originally too small and cannot be detected using present-day equipment. This method was successfully applied to the midslope region of northern Cascadia subducting margin. The results suggest that the Cucumber Ridge and its neighboring area are positive heat flow anomalies, about 10%-20% higher than the background heat flow after 3D topographic correction. Moreover, the seismic imaging associated the positive heat flow anomaly areas with seabed fracture-cavity systems. This suggests flow of warm gas-carrying fluids along these high-permeability pathways, which could result in higher gas hydrate concentrations.

  9. Detection of Cracks at Welds in Steel Tubing Using Flux Focusing Electromagnetic Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, Jim; Nath, Shridhar; Simpson, John; Namkung, Min

    1994-01-01

    The inspection of weldments in critical pressure vessel joints is a major concern in the nuclear power industry. Corrosive environments can speed the fatigue process and access to the critical area is often limited. Eddy current techniques have begun to be used to help overcome these obstacles [1]. As direct contact and couplants are not required, remote areas can be inspected by simply snaking an eddy current coil into the intake tube of the vessel. The drawback of the eddy current method has been the high sensitivity to small changes in the conductivity and permeability of the test piece which are known to vary at weldments [1]. The flaw detection mechanism of the flux focusing electromagnetic probe can help alleviate these difficulties and provide a unique capability for detecting longitudinal fatigue cracks in critical tube structures. The Flux Focusing Electromagnetic Flaw Detector, originally invented for the detection of fatigue and corrosion damage in aluminum plates [2-3], has been adapted for use in testing steel tubing for longitudinal fatigue cracks. The modified design allows for the probe to be placed axisymmetrically into the tubing, inducing eddy currents in the tube wall. The pickup coil of the probe is fixed slightly below the primary windings and is rotated 90 so that its axis is normal to the tube wall. The magnetic flux of the primary coil is focused through the use of ferromagnetic material so that in the absence of fatigue damage there will be no flux linkage with the pickup coil. The presence of a longitudinal fatigue crack will cause the eddy currents induced in the tube wall to flow around the flaw and directly under the pickup coil. The magnetic field associated with these currents will then link the pickup coil and an unambiguous increase in the output voltage of the probe will be measured. The use of the flux focusing electromagnetic probe is especially suited for the detection of flaws originating at or near tube welds. The probe is shown to discriminate against signals due solely to the weld joint so that flaw signals are not hidden in the background in these locations. Experimental and finite element modeling results are presented for the flaw detection capabilities of the probe in stainless steel tubes.

  10. Isoelectric focusing in agarose gel for detection of oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal and other biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Csako, Gyorgy

    2012-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) coupled with immunodetection (immunofixation or immunoblotting) has become the leading technique for the detection and study of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and also is increasingly used in other body fluids such as the tear and serum. Limited commercial availability of precast agarose IEF gels for research and a need for customization prompted reporting a detailed general protocol for the preparation and casting of agarose IEF gel along with sample, control, and isoelectric point marker preparation and carrying out the focusing itself for CSF OCBs. However, the method is readily adaptable to the use of other body fluid specimens and, possibly, research specimens such as culture fluids as well. PMID:22585491

  11. Magnetic focusing immunosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivarnik, Philip E.; Cao, He; Letcher, Stephen V.; Pierson, Arthur H.; Rand, Arthur G.

    1999-01-01

    From 1988 through 1992 Salmonellosis accounted for 27% of the total reported foodborne disease outbreaks and 57% of the outbreaks in which the pathogen was identified. The prevalence of Salmonellosis and the new requirements to monitor the organism as a marker in pathogen reduction programs will drive the need for rapid, on-site testing. A compact fiber optic fluorometer using a red diode laser as an excitation source and fiber probes for analyte detection has been constructed and used to measure Salmonella. The organisms were isolated with anti-Salmonella magnetic beads and were labeled with a secondary antibody conjugated to a red fluorescent dye. The response of the system was proportional to the concentration of Salmonella typhimurium from 3.2 X 105 colony forming units (CFU)/ml to 1.6 X 107 CFU/ml. The system was developed to utilize a fiber-optic magnetic focusing problem that attracted the magnetic microspheres to the surface of a sample chamber directly in front of the excitation and emission fibers. The signal obtained from a homogenous suspension of fluorescent magnetic microspheres was 9 to 10 picowatts. After focusing, the signal from the fluorescent labeled magnetic microspheres increased to 200 picowatts, approximately 20 times greater than the homogeneous suspension. The magnetic focusing assay detected 1.59 X 105 colony forming units/ml of Salmonella typhimurium cultured in growth media. The process of magnetic focusing in front of the fibers has the potential to reduce the background fluorescence from unbound secondary antibodies, eliminating several rinsing steps, resulting in a simple rapid assay.

  12. Oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal fluid detected by PhastSystem isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Wybo, I; Van Blerk, M; Malfait, R; Goubert, P; Gorus, F

    1990-01-01

    Pharmacia's "PhastSystem" for semi-automated isoelectric focusing (IEF) in thin precast polyacrylamide gels (PAGE) was found to be as sensitive as high-resolution protein electrophoresis (HRPE) in agarose gels and conventional PAGE-IEF for detection of oligoclonal banding (OB) in concentrated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. Both PhastSystem IEF and HRPE revealed OB in CSF from eight of nine multiple sclerosis patients and four of 10 patients with various types of infection of the central nervous system as opposed to only two of 70 patients with miscellaneous neuropsychiatric disorders. The PhastSystem also frequently detected OB in silver-stained, unconcentrated CSF from patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:1688744

  13. Optical Generation and Detection of High-Frequency Focused Ultrasound and Associated Nonlinear Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baac, Hyoung Won

    In this thesis, optical generation and detection of high-frequency ultrasound are presented. On the generation side, high-efficiency optical transmitters have been devised and developed which can generate high-frequency and high-amplitude pressure. Conventional optoacoustic transmitters have suffered from poor optoacoustic energy conversion efficiency (10-7˜10-8). Therefore, pressure amplitudes were usually weak for long-range imaging (several cm) and too weak to induce any therapeutic effects. Here, far beyond such traditional regime, therapeutic pressure amplitudes of tens of MPa were achieved optoacoustically. First, high-efficiency optoacoustic sources were developed in planar geometries by using carbon nanotubepolymer composites. The planar transmitters could generate 18-fold stronger pressure than thin metallic films used as references, together with providing broadband and high-frequency spectra over 120 MHz. Then, the thin-film transmitters were formed on concave substrates to generate and simultaneously focus the ultrasound. Unprecedented optoacoustic pressure was achieved at lens focus: >50 MPa in positive and >20 MPa in negative peaks. These amplitudes were sufficient to induce strong shock waves and acoustic cavitation. Due to the high-frequency operation, such therapeutic pressure and the induced effects were tightly localized onto focal widths of 75microm in lateral and 400 microm in axial directions, which are an order of magnitude smaller than those of traditional piezoelectric transducers. The shock waves and the cavitation effects were investigated in various ways. High focal gains and short distances for shock formation were suggested as main features. The optoacoustic approach is expected to open numerous opportunities for a broad range of biomedical applications demanding high-accuracy treatment with minimal damage volumes around focal zones. For optical detection of ultrasound, optical microring resonators have been used due to their broadband frequency responses (˜100 MHz) and high sensitivity. However, their spatial responses due to the particular ring shape have not been investigated especially for high-frequency ranges. Here, the microring responses were characterized in this regime. As a final subject, the microrings were used to detect focused ultrasound and realize novel optoacoustic 4f imaging systems which have capabilities of fast 3-D imaging without requiring mathematical reconstruction steps. High-resolution performances were demonstrated by resolving polymer microspheres of 100-microm diameter.

  14. Straightforward production of encoded microbeads by Flow Focusing: potential applications for biomolecule detection.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, A M; Martín-Banderas, L; González-Prieto, R; Rodríguez-Gil, A; Berdún-Alvarez, T; Cebolla, A; Chávez, S; Flores-Mosquera, M

    2006-10-31

    Fluorescently encoded polymeric microparticles are acquiring great importance in the development of simultaneous multianalyte screening assays. We have developed a very versatile and straightforward method for the production of dye-labeled microparticles with a very reproducible size distribution and freely-chosen and discernible fluorescent properties. Our method combines Flow Focusing technology with a solvent evaporation/extraction procedure in a single step, yielding spherical, non-aggregate and non-porous particles. We have designed a multi-coloured bead array which includes the possibility of modifying the surface properties of the microparticles, which offer excellent properties for covalent attachment of biomolecules such as peptides, oligonucleotides, proteins, etc. We also show the potential of the fluorescently labeled microspheres for the detection of biomolecule (peptides and oligonucelotides) interactions using flow cytometry. PMID:16814497

  15. Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Detection of Longitudinal Flaws in Metallic Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radially focused eddy current sensor detects longitudinal flaws in a metal tube. A drive coil induces eddy currents within the wall of the metal tube. A pick-up cod is spaced apart from the drive coil along the length of the metal tube. The pick@up coil is positioned with one end thereof lying adjacent the wall of the metal tube such that the pick-up coil's longitudinal axis is perpendicular to the wall of the metal tube. To isolate the pick-up coil from the magnetic flux of the drive coil and the flux from the induced eddy currents. except the eddy currents diverted by a longitudinal flaw. an electrically conducting material high in magnetic permeability surrounds all of the pick-up coil except its one end that is adjacent the walls of the metal tube. The electrically conducting material can extend into and through the drive coil in a coaxial relationship therewith.

  16. Ultrasound-induced hyperthermia for the spatio-temporal control of gene expression in bone repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher; Padilla, Frédéric; Zhang, Man; Vilaboa, Nuria; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, Brian; Franceschi, Renny

    2012-10-01

    Spatial and temporal control over the expression of growth/differentiation factors is of great interest for regeneration of bone, but technologies capable of providing tight and active control over gene expression remain elusive. We propose the use of focused ultrasound for the targeted activation of heat shock-sensitive expression systems in engineered bone. We report in vitro results with cells that express firefly luciferase (fLuc) under the control of a heat shock protein promoter. Cells were embedded in fibrin scaffolds and exposed to focused ultrasound, using a custom 3.3MHz transducer (focal length 4", f-number 1.33", focal dimension 1.2mm lateral FWHM) in CW mode for 2-20 minutes at intensities ISPTA=120-440 W/cm2. The kinetics of ultrasound-mediated activation of the cells was compared with that of strictly thermal activation. Bioluminescence imaging revealed fLuc expression in an area ?2.5mm in diameter at the position of the ultrasound focus, and the diameter and intensity of the signal increased with the amplitude of the acoustic energy. We also found that ultrasound activated fLuc expression with substantially shorter exposures than thermal activation. Our results demonstrate the potential for focused ultrasound to selectively activate the expression of a gene of interest in an engineered tissue and suggest that focused ultrasound activates the heat shock pathway by a combination of thermal and non-thermal mechanisms.

  17. THRESHOLD ESTIMATES OF ULTRASOUND-INDUCED LUNG HEMORRHAGE IN ADULT RATS: ROLE OF PULSE DURATION

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    -diameter, lithium niobate ultrasonic transducer. Water-based (highly degassed water, 22°C) pulse-echo ultrasonic ultrasonically exposed groups (10 rats/group) and one sham group (20 rats). The 20 ultrasonically exposed groups duration is warranted. Methods Exposimetry Ultrasonic exposures were conducted using one focused, 19-mm

  18. SEIS/INSIGHT and Mars seismology: Development status and focus on the Impact detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, Philippe; Banerdt, William; Pike, Tom; Giardini, Domenico; Christensen, Ulli; Banfield, Don; Mimoun, David; Laudet, Philippe; de Raucourt, Sebastien; Bierwirth, Marco; Zweifel, Peter; Calcutt, Simon; Hurst, Ken; Bruce, Carl

    2014-05-01

    The INSIGHT NASA Discovery mission will deploy in September 2016 a 3 axis Very Broad band seismometer and a 3 axis SP seismometer, as well as other instruments enabling the installation of a complete geophysical observatory recording seismic, heat flow, magnetic and geodetic signals, in addition to atmospheric wind, pressure and temperature. We first present the science goals status of the SEIS experiment and its development status. The SEIS sensor assembly, which contains both the VBB and SP seismometer, will be deployed on the Martian ground by a robotic arm from a Phoenix-type lander platform and protected by a wind and thermal shield. The wind and thermal shield, a vacuum sphere for VBBs and a passive compensation system will achieve a very high protection of the seismometers against temperature and pressure variations, allowing the sensor to operate in the rough Martian thermal environment while reaching a detection threshold below 10^(-9) m/s/s Hz^(-1/2) in the VBB bandwidth and 10^(-8) m/s/s Hz^(-1/2) for the SP. A levelling system will allow the VBB to operate, while providing to both seismometer the best possible mechanical coupling with the ground motion. The SEIS instrument will be provided by CNES, which will coordinate a wide set of international contributors from the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, the Imperial College from London and the Open University, the Max-Planck Insitute of Lindau, the École polytechnique fédérale de Zurich (ETHZ), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Institut de l'Aéronautique et de l'Espace from Toulouse. We then illustrate the science goals by a focus on the capability of INSIGHT to detect either seismic or acoustic signals from impacts, with both the seismometers and the pressure sensor, and present both amplitude and occurrence expectation, based on comparative modeling between Mars, Earth and the Moon.

  19. Ipsi- and Contralateral Motor Response Using Ultrasound-induced Neurostimulation in Deeply Anesthetized Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Hermes; Wang, Shutao; Chen, Hong; Wang, Qi; Aurup, Christian; Fan, Kathtleen; Carneiro, Antonio; Konofagou, Elisa

    Ultrasound neurostimulation has been proven capable of eliciting motor responses. However, the studies in sedated rodents presented problems with target specificity due to the use of low ultrasound frequencies (<700 kHz). Here, we show that focused ultrasound (FUS) in mega-Hz range was able to evoke motor responses in mice under deep anesthesia. Contralateral movements of the hind limbs were observed when sonications were carried out at +2 mm of Lambda and ±2 mm lateral of midline in three mice. Moreover, stimulating other regions of the somatosensory and cerebellum induced trunk and ipsilateral limb movements in all six mice.

  20. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in-vitro and predict in-vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom’s response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue, at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-Mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High speed imaging of the optically-transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation. PMID:21030142

  1. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection.

    PubMed

    Barreda, F-A; Nicolas, C; Sirven, J-B; Ouf, F-X; Lacour, J-L; Robert, E; Benkoula, S; Yon, J; Miron, C; Sublemontier, O

    2015-01-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21??m, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed. PMID:26498694

  2. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreda, F.-A.; Nicolas, C.; Sirven, J.-B.; Ouf, F.-X.; Lacour, J.-L.; Robert, E.; Benkoula, S.; Yon, J.; Miron, C.; Sublemontier, O.

    2015-10-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21??m, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed.

  3. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, F.-A.; Nicolas, C.; Sirven, J.-B.; Ouf, F.-X.; Lacour, J.-L.; Robert, E.; Benkoula, S.; Yon, J.; Miron, C.; Sublemontier, O.

    2015-01-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21??m, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed. PMID:26498694

  4. Diagnostic Ultrasound Induced Inertial Cavitation to Non-Invasively Restore Coronary and Microvascular Flow in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Feng; Gao, Shunji; Wu, Juefei; Lof, John; Radio, Stanley; Vignon, Francois; Shi, William; Powers, Jeffry; Unger, Evan; Everbach, E. Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Porter, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound induced cavitation has been explored as a method of dissolving intravascular and microvascular thrombi in acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to determine the type of cavitation required for success, and whether longer pulse duration therapeutic impulses (sustaining the duration of cavitation) could restore both microvascular and epicardial flow with this technique. Accordingly, in 36 hyperlipidemic atherosclerotic pigs, thrombotic occlusions were induced in the mid-left anterior descending artery. Pigs were then randomized to either a) ½ dose tissue plasminogen activator (0.5 mg/kg) alone; or same dose plasminogen activator and an intravenous microbubble infusion with either b) guided high mechanical index short pulse (2.0 MI; 5 usec) therapeutic ultrasound impulses; or c) guided 1.0 mechanical index long pulse (20 usec) impulses. Passive cavitation detectors indicated the high mechanical index impulses (both long and short pulse duration) induced inertial cavitation within the microvasculature. Epicardial recanalization rates following randomized treatments were highest in pigs treated with the long pulse duration therapeutic impulses (83% versus 59% for short pulse, and 49% for tissue plasminogen activator alone; p<0.05). Even without epicardial recanalization, however, early microvascular recovery occurred with both short and long pulse therapeutic impulses (p<0.005 compared to tissue plasminogen activator alone), and wall thickening improved within the risk area only in pigs treated with ultrasound and microbubbles. We conclude that although short pulse duration guided therapeutic impulses from a diagnostic transducer transiently improve microvascular flow, long pulse duration therapeutic impulses produce sustained epicardial and microvascular re-flow in acute myocardial infarction. PMID:23922797

  5. Ultrasound-induced thermal therapy of hyperplasia in ringed expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (eptfe) access grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Query, Michael Earl

    Hemodialysis vascular access, the interface between a dialysis patient and a dialysis machine, is quite literally the lifeblood of a patient's health. Vascular access dysfunction is the leading cause of hospitalization in hemodialysis patients. The occlusive growth of neointimal hyperplasia (NH) in expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) ringed grafts is the primary cause of failure. To further develop a proposed thermal ultrasound treatment to reduce or prevent NH in arteriovenous vascular grafts, the acoustic properties of ePTFE were studied in water and alcohol solutions. Previous reports of ePTFE acoustic properties are critiqued. It was found that the acoustic transmission and attenuation through ePTFE, and therefore the potential for an ultrasound-based therapy for NH, are heavily dependent on the medium in which the graft is immersed, suggesting that the acoustic properties of implanted grafts will change as grafts mature in vivo. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of water-soaked ePTFE were 0.478 +/- 1.43 x 10-2 MRayl and 1.78 +/- 0.111 Np/cm*MHz, respectively, while the acoustic impedance and attenuation of ePTFE in alcohol were 1.49 +/- 0.149 MRayl and 0.77 +/- 1.1 x 10-2 Np/cm*MHz, respectively. The use of focused ultrasound to heat implanted ringed ePTFE grafts was numerically modeled from 1.35- and 1.443-MHz transducers for in vitro geometries. Power deposition and heating, in turn, differed by an order of magnitude between various graft acoustic properties. Graft rings were predicted to be substantial absorbing and scattering features. In vitro phantom models were constructed: one with and one without thermocouples. At 1 W of acoustic power, the maximum temperature rise was 8? C. The thermocouple model containing a water-soaked graft did not experience heating in the far graft wall. The MRTI model confirmed that the graft rings are an absorbing/scattering feature. Heating was not prevented in the presence of water flow through the graft. Water was not heated significantly. Overall, results suggest ultrasound exposure can be used to generate temperature rises corresponding with the potential prevention or inhibition of NH in ringed ePTFE vascular grafts. A hybrid therapeutic/diagnostic transducer design with a therapeutic semi-annular array surrounding a diagnostic linear array is presented. Compared to a solid transducer of the same dimensions, there were only marginal aberrations in the focal plane. Numerical optimization of the element drive configuration indicated that the least distorted focal plane was produced by uniform phase and magnitude at each element.

  6. Modelling ultrasound-induced mild hyperthermia of hyperplasia in vascular grafts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) vascular grafts frequently develop occlusive neointimal hyperplasia as a result of myofibroblast over-growth, leading to graft failure. ePTFE exhibits higher ultrasound attenuation than native soft tissues. We modelled the selective absorption of ultrasound by ePTFE, and explored the feasibility of preventing hyperplasia in ePTFE grafts by ultrasound heating. Specifically, we simulated the temperature profiles of implanted grafts and nearby soft tissues and blood under ultrasound exposure. The goal was to determine whether ultrasound exposure of an ePTFE graft can generate temperatures sufficient to prevent cell growth on the graft without damaging nearby soft tissues and blood. Methods Ultrasound beams from two transducers (1.5 and 3.2 MHz) were simulated in two graft/tissue models, with and without an intra-graft cellular layer mimicking hyperplasia, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The resulting power deposition patterns were used as a heat source for the Pennes bioheat equation in a COMSOL® Multiphysics heat transfer model. 50°C is known to cause cell death and therefore the transducer powers were adjusted to produce a 13°C temperature rise from 37°C in the ePTFE. Results Simulations showed that both the frequency of the transducers and the presence of hyperplasia significantly affect the power deposition patterns and subsequent temperature profiles on the grafts and nearby tissues. While neither transducer significantly raised the temperature of the blood, the 1.5-MHz transducer was less focused and heated larger volumes of the graft and nearby soft tissues than the 3.2-MHz transducer. The presence of hyperplasia had little effect on the blood's temperature, but further increased the temperature of the graft and nearby soft tissues in response to either transducer. Skin cooling and blood flow play a significant role in preventing overheating of the native tissues. Conclusions Modelling shows that ultrasound can selectively heat ePTFE grafts and produce temperatures that cause cell death on the graft. The temperature increase in blood is negligible and that in the adjacent soft tissues may be minimized by skin cooling and using appropriate transducers. Therefore, ultrasound heating may have the potential to reduce neointimal hyperplasia and failure of ePTFE vascular grafts. PMID:22054016

  7. A Distance Measure for Attention Focusing and Anaomaly Detection in Systems Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by.

  8. Capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay as a new nanoscale approach for the detection of oligoclonal bands.

    PubMed

    Halbgebauer, Steffen; Haußmann, Ute; Klafki, Hans; Tumani, Hayrettin; Wiltfang, Jens; Otto, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The detection of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in cerebrospinal fluid is an indicator of intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulins which is a neurochemical sign of chronic inflammatory brain diseases. Intrathecally synthesized IgGs are typically observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. The current standard protocol for the detection of OCBs is IEF on agarose or polyacrylamide gels followed by immunoblotting or silver staining. These methods are time consuming, show substantial interlaboratory variation and cannot be used in a high throughput-approach. We have developed a new nanoscale method for the detection of OCBs based on automated capillary IEF followed by immunological detection. Evidence for intrathecal IgG synthesis was found in all tested patients (n = 27) with multiple sclerosis, even in two subjects who did not have oligoclonal bands according to standard methods. The test specificity was at 97.5% (n = 19). Our findings indicate that the novel OCB-CIEF-immunoassay is suitable for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of OCBs in clinical samples. Furthermore, the method allows for a higher sample throughput than the current standard methods. PMID:25348366

  9. Abstract--Elasticity imaging techniques have shown great potential in detecting High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) lesions based on their distinct biomechanical properties. However, quantitative. In the present study, fresh canine livers were ablated ex vivo using six different acoustic powers and time application for the ultrasound­based elasticity imaging techniques has been the assessment and monitoring

  10. Conceptual design and development of GEM based detecting system for tomographic tungsten focused transport monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Malinowski, K.; Kowalska-Strz?ciwilk, E.; Po?niak, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Zabo?otny, W.; Woje?ski, A.; Kolasi?ski, P.; Mazon, D.; Malard, P.

    2015-10-01

    Implementing tungsten as a plasma facing material in ITER and future fusion reactors will require effective monitoring of not just its level in the plasma but also its distribution. That can be successfully achieved using detectors based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. This work presents the conceptual design of the detecting unit for poloidal tomography to be tested at the WEST project tokamak. The current stage of the development is discussed covering aspects which include detector's spatial dimensions, gas mixtures, window materials and arrangements inside and outside the tokamak ports, details of detector's structure itself and details of the detecting module electronics. It is expected that the detecting unit under development, when implemented, will add to the safe operation of tokamak bringing the creation of sustainable nuclear fusion reactors a step closer. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  11. Detection of a right carotid focus of 18F-FDG predicted an ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Bélissant, Ophélie; Champion, Laurence; Alberini, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman was referred into our department for staging of an endometrial carcinoma. In addition to peritoneal and nodes metastases, F-FDG PET/CT showed a calcified plaque of the right carotid with focal uptake. One month later, the patient presented left hemiparesis, suggesting a right hemisphere stroke. MRI confirmed frontal infarction in the anterior cerebral artery territory. F-FDG is suggested to be a valuable tool to detect vessel wall inflammation; detection of focal arterial uptake on PET/CT suggests unstable plaque and requires urgent patient's management to prevent vascular events in a population already weakened by both disease and therapy. PMID:25140539

  12. Single-Fluorophore Detection in Femtoliter Droplets Generated by Flow Focusing.

    PubMed

    Weinmeister, Robert; Freeman, Emma; Eperon, Ian C; Stuart, Alison M; Hudson, Andrew J

    2015-10-27

    Aqueous microdroplets with a volume of a few femtoliters are an ideal sample size for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. In particular, they enable prolonged measurements to be made on individual molecules that can diffuse freely in the surrounding medium. However, the rapid production of monodisperse droplets in a hydrodynamic flow, such as microfluidic flow focusing, will often involve volumes that are typically too large (>0.5 pL) for single-molecule studies. Desired volumes of a few femtoliters, or smaller, can be produced by either tip streaming or step emulsification in a flow-focusing device; however, in both of these methods, the aqueous droplets are dispersed in a large volume of the continuous phase, where individual droplets can diffuse perpendicular to the flow direction, and the monodispersity of droplet size produced by tip streaming is difficult to sustain for more than transient time scales. We show here that the optimized design and fabrication of microfluidic devices with shallow channel depths can result in the reliable production of stable droplets of a few femtoliters at a high rate in the dripping regime of flow focusing. Furthermore, the generated microdroplets are localized in a two-dimensional plane to enable immediate analysis. We have demonstrated the fluorescence monitoring of single molecules of encapsulated green fluorescent protein. The apparatus is straightfoward, inexpensive, and readily assembled within an ordinary laboratory environment. PMID:26365461

  13. Detection of silver nanoparticles inside marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana by electron microscopy and focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    García, César Pascual; Burchardt, Alina D; Carvalho, Raquel N; Gilliland, Douglas; António, Diana C; Rossi, François; Lettieri, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    In the following article an electron/ion microscopy study will be presented which investigates the uptake of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, a primary producer aquatic species. This organism has a characteristic silica exoskeleton that may represent a barrier for the uptake of some chemical pollutants, including nanoparticles (NPs), but that presents a technical challenge when attempting to use electron-microscopy (EM) methods to study NP uptake. Here we present a convenient method to detect the NPs interacting with the diatom cell. It is based on a fixation procedure involving critical point drying which, without prior slicing of the cell, allows its inspection using transmission electron microscopy. Employing a combination of electron and ion microscopy techniques to selectively cut the cell where the NPs were detected, we are able to demonstrate and visualize for the first time the presence of AgNPs inside the cell membrane. PMID:24797958

  14. PLLA nanofibrous paper-based plasmonic substrate with tailored hydrophilicity for focusing SERS detection.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jundong; Tong, Liping; Tang, Siying; Guo, Zhinan; Zhang, Han; Li, Penghui; Wang, Huaiyu; Du, Chang; Yu, Xue-Feng

    2015-03-11

    We report a new paper-based surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate platform contributed by a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibrous paper adsorbed with plasmonic nanostructures, which can circumvent many challenges of the existing SERS substrates. This PLLA nanofibrous paper has three-dimensional porous structure, extremely clean surface with good hydrophobicity (contact angle is as high as 133.4°), and negligible background interference under Raman laser excitation. Due to the strong electrostatic interaction between PLLA nanofiber and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) molecules, the CTAB-coated gold nanorods (GNRs) are efficiently immobilized onto the fibers. Such a hydrophobic paper substrate with locally hydrophilic SERS-active area can confine analyte molecules and prevent the random spreading of molecules. The confinement leads to focusing effect and the GNRs-PLLA SERS substrate is found to be highly sensitive (0.1 nM Rhodamine 6G and malachite green) and exhibit excellent reproducibility (?8% relative standard deviation (RSD)) and long-term stability. Furthermore, it is also cost-efficient, with simple fabrication methodology, and demonstrates high sample collection efficiency. All of these benefits ensure that this GNRs-PLLA substrate is a really perfect choice for a variety of SERS applications. PMID:25697378

  15. Characterization of single ?-tracks by photoresist detection and AFM analysis-focus on biomedical science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Nadia; Myhra, Sverre; Chakalova, Radka; Hill, Mark A.; Thomson, James; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2013-11-01

    The interactions between energetic ions and biological and/or organic target materials have recently attracted theoretical and experimental attention, due to their implications for detector and device technologies, and for therapeutic applications. Most of the attention has focused on detection of the primary ionization tracks, and their effects, while recoil target atom tracks remain largely unexplored. Detection of tracks by a negative tone photoresist (SU-8), followed by standard development, in combination with analysis by atomic force microscopy, shows that both primary and recoil tracks are revealed as conical spikes, and can be characterized at high spatial resolution. The methodology has the potential to provide detailed information about single impact events, which may lead to more effective and informative detector technologies and advanced therapeutic procedures. In comparison with current characterization methods the advantageous features include: greater spatial resolution by an order of magnitude (20 nm) detection of single primary and associated recoil tracks; increased range of fluence (to 2.5 × 109 cm-2) sensitivity to impacts at grazing angle incidence; and better definition of the lateral interaction volume in target materials.

  16. Genetic analysis of Dobrava-Belgrade virus from western Serbia--a newly detected focus in the Balkan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Stamenkovi?, G; Nikoli?, V; Blagojevi?, J; Bugarski-Stanojevi?, V; Adna?evi?, T; Stanojevi?, M; Vujoševi?, M

    2015-03-01

    Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) is a hantavirus species that causes the most severe form of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Europe. DOBV has been detected in three Apodemus rodents: A. flavicollis, A. agrarius and A. ponticus. These emerging viruses appear throughout the Balkan Peninsula including Serbia as its central part. In this study, we examined the seroprevalence, molecular epidemiology and phylogenetics of DOBV from A. flavicollis captured at six Serbian localities. Furthermore, we applied microsatellite typing of host animal genome to analyse the role of host kinship in DOBV animal transmission. The overall IgG seropositivity rate over 3 years (2008-2010) was 11.9% (22/185). All seropositive samples were subjected to RT-PCR and DNA sequencing for S and L genome segments (pos. 291-1079 nt and 2999-3316 nt, respectively). DOBV was genetically detected in three samples from mountain Tara in western Serbia, a newly detected DOBV focus in the Balkans. No sequence data from human cases from Serbia are available for the studied period. However, collected DOBV isolates in this work phylogenetically clustered together with isolates from Serbian human cases dating from 2002, with 1.9% nucleotide divergence. We determined the level of kinship between seropositive and seronegative animal groups and found no significant difference, suggesting that horizontal virus transmission in the studied population was the same within and among the hatches. Our findings are the first genetic detection of DOBV in rodents in Serbia. We confirm wide and continuous hantavirus presence in the examined parts of the Balkans, underlying the necessity of continual monitoring of hantavirus circulation in A. flavicollis. PMID:24867363

  17. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (?EX ? 280 nm, ?EM ? 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  18. Nanocrystalline Tin Oxide Nanofibers Deposited by a Novel Focused Electrospinning Method. Application to the Detection of TATP Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, José Pedro; Fernández, Maria Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Matatagui, Daniel; Sayago, Isabel; Horrillo, Maria Carmen; Gracia, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    A new method of depositing tin dioxide nanofibers in order to develop chemical sensors is presented. It involves an electrospinning process with in-plane electrostatic focusing over micromechanized substrates. It is a fast and reproducible method. After an annealing process, which can be performed by the substrate heaters, it is observed that the fibers are intertwined forming porous networks that are randomly distributed on the substrate. The fiber diameters oscillate from 100 nm to 200 nm and fiber lengths reach several tens of microns. Each fiber has a polycrystalline structure with multiple nano-grains. The sensors have been tested for the detection of acetone and hydrogen peroxide (precursors of the explosive triacetone triperoxide, TATP) in air in the ppm range. High and fast responses to these gases have been obtained. PMID:25521384

  19. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n??=??60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24?h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2??=??0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2??=??0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P??

  20. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n??=??60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24?h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r(2)??=??0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r(2)??=??0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P??

  1. Rapid Focused Sequencing: A Multiplexed Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Strain Typing of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Zolotova, Anna; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Background The intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the United States in 2001 has heightened concern about the use of pathogenic microorganisms in bioterrorism attacks. Many of the deadliest bacteria, including the Class A Select Agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, are highly infectious via the pulmonary route when released in aerosolized form. Hence, rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for detection of these biothreats and characterization of their potential impact on the exposed population are of critical importance to initiate and support rapid military, public health, and clinical responses. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed microfluidic multiplexed PCR and sequencing assays based on the simultaneous interrogation of three pathogens per assay and ten loci per pathogen. Microfluidic separation of amplified fluorescently labeled fragments generated characteristic electrophoretic signatures for identification of each agent. The three sets of primers allowed significant strain typing and discrimination from non-pathogenic closely-related species and environmental background strains based on amplicon sizes alone. Furthermore, sequencing of the 10 amplicons per pathogen, termed “Rapid Focused Sequencing,” allowed an even greater degree of strain discrimination and, in some cases, can be used to determine virulence. Both amplification and sequencing assays were performed in microfluidic biochips developed for fast thermal cycling and requiring 7 µL per reaction. The 30-plex sequencing assay resulted in genotypic resolution of 84 representative strains belonging to each of the three biothreat species. Conclusions/Significance The microfluidic multiplexed assays allowed identification and strain differentiation of the biothreat agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis and clear discrimination from closely-related species and several environmental background strains. The assays may be extended to detect a large number of pathogens, are applicable to the evaluation of both environmental and clinical samples, and have the potential to be applied in military, public health, and clinical diagnostic settings. PMID:23418519

  2. Intracerebral administration of ultrasound-induced dissolution of lipid-coated GDNF microbubbles provides neuroprotection in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoying; Cui, Guiyun; Yang, Xinxin; Zhang, Zunsheng; Shi, Hongjuan; Zu, Jie; Hua, Fang; Shen, Xia

    2014-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Neurotrophic factors, such as glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), have been shown to provide a neuroprotective effect in PD rats. We have previously reported that ultrasound-induced lipid-coated GDNF microspheres, which release GDNF in a sustained manner after low frequency ultrasound stimulation, can reduce hypoxic-ischemic injury in neonatal rats. In the present study, we investigated whether lipid-coated GDNF microspheres can provide a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of PD. After a rat model of PD was produced by 6-hydroxydompamine (6-OHDA) injections, lipid-coated GDNF microspheres (1.5mg/kg) were injected into the striatum of PD rats. We found that GDNF levels were increased in the striatum of PD rats after lipid-coated GDNF microspheres administration following low frequency ultrasound stimulation (20kHz, 5min per day, daily for 4 weeks). Moreover, GDNF microspheres reduced apomorphine-induced rotations, and increased striatal dopamine and nigral tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels in PD rats. Additionally, GDNF microspheres reduced caspase-3, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and OX-6 levels induced by 6-OHDA injections in PD rats. These data indicated that lipid-coated GDNF microspheres can provide a neuroprotective effect in PD rats. PMID:24583079

  3. The Dense Plasma Focus Opportunities in Detection of Hidden Objects by Using Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Inspection System (NINIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V.; Dubrovsky, A.; Karpi?ski, L.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.; Strzy?ewski, P.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2006-12-01

    Dense Plasma Focus device is proposed for use as a neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration. Our devices PF-6, recently put into operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw, Poland, and PF-10 belonging to the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia, have energy storages in its capacitor banks 7.4 kJ and 13 kJ as a maximum. Operated with the DPF chambers of a special design they have a current maximum up to ˜760 kA with a quarter period of the discharge equal to 1 microsecond. They generate circa 109 of 2.5-MeV neutrons in one pulse of ? 10-ns duration when working with deuterium, what permit to expect 1011 14-MeV neutrons at their operation with DT-mixture. This feature gives a principal possibility to create a "single-shot detection system" for interrogation of hidden objects. It means that all necessary information will be received during a single bright pulse of neutrons having duration in a nanosecond range by means of the time-of-flight technique with a short flight base. It might be a base for the creation of the Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Inspection System (NINIS). These characteristics of the neutron source open a number of opportunities while interrogation time in this case would now depend only on the data-processing system.

  4. Detection of Nitro-Based and Peroxide-Based Explosives by Fast Polarity-Switchable Ion Mobility Spectrometer with Ion Focusing in Vicinity of Faraday Detector

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qinghua; Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haiyang

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been widely deployed for on-site detection of explosives. The common nitro-based explosives are usually detected by negative IMS while the emerging peroxide-based explosives are better detected by positive IMS. In this study, a fast polarity-switchable IMS was constructed to detect these two explosive species in a single measurement. As the large traditional Faraday detector would cause a trailing reactant ion peak (RIP), a Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity was developed by reducing the detector radius to 3.3?mm and increasing the voltage difference between aperture grid and its front guard ring to 591?V, which could remove trailing peaks from RIP without loss of signal intensity. This fast polarity-switchable IMS with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector was employed to detect a mixture of 10?ng 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 50?ng hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) by polarity-switching, and the result suggested that [TNT-H]? and [HMTD+H]+ could be detected in a single measurement. Furthermore, the removal of trailing peaks from RIP by the Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity also promised the accurate identification of KClO4, KNO3 and S in common inorganic explosives, whose product ion peaks were fairly adjacent to RIP. PMID:26021282

  5. Pharmacokinetics of BPA in Gliomas with Ultrasound Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption as Measured by Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lin, Yi-Li; Chou, Fong-In; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chang, Lun-Wei; Hsieh, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles for targeted drug delivery. Previous studies have illustrated the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery across the BBB after sonication using indirect visualization techniques. In this study, we investigated the in vivo extracellular kinetics of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) in glioma-bearing rats with FUS-induced BBB disruption by microdialysis. After simultaneous intravenous administration of BPA and FUS exposure, the boron concentration in the treated brains was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With FUS, the mean peak concentration of BPA-f in the glioma dialysate was 3.6 times greater than without FUS, and the area under the concentration-time curve was 2.1 times greater. This study demonstrates that intracerebral microdialysis can be used to assess local BBB transport profiles of drugs in a sonicated site. Applying microdialysis to the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics is useful for obtaining selective information within a specific brain site after FUS-induced BBB disruption. PMID:24936788

  6. High-precision topography measurement through accurate in-focus plane detection with hybrid digital holographic microscope and white light interferometer module.

    PubMed

    Li?ewski, Kamil; Tomczewski, S?awomir; Kozacki, Tomasz; Kostencka, Julianna

    2014-04-10

    High-precision topography measurement of micro-objects using interferometric and holographic techniques can be realized provided that the in-focus plane of an imaging system is very accurately determined. Therefore, in this paper we propose an accurate technique for in-focus plane determination, which is based on coherent and incoherent light. The proposed method consists of two major steps. First, a calibration of the imaging system with an amplitude object is performed with a common autofocusing method using coherent illumination, which allows for accurate localization of the in-focus plane position. In the second step, the position of the detected in-focus plane with respect to the imaging system is measured with white light interferometry. The obtained distance is used to accurately adjust a sample with the precision required for the measurement. The experimental validation of the proposed method is given for measurement of high-numerical-aperture microlenses with subwavelength accuracy. PMID:24787417

  7. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  8. A microfluidic device for label-free detection of Escherichia coli in drinking water using positive dielectrophoretic focusing, capturing, and impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myounggon; Jung, Taekeon; Kim, Youngjin; Lee, Changgeun; Woo, Kyungchul; Seol, Jae Hun; Yang, Sung

    2015-12-15

    While sensors that allow for high-throughput enumeration of microorganisms within drinking water are useful for water quality monitoring, it is particularly challenging to accurately quantify microorganisms that are present in low numbers (<100 CFU/mL) in a high-throughput manner. Negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP) is typically utilized in DEP-based cell focusing methods; however, due to its low conductivity, drinking water cannot be analyzed by this approach. Here, we report a positive DEP (pDEP)-based Escherichia coli detection system that is integrated with a focusing and sensing electrode. By incorporating a passivation layer, we avoided issues with adhesion of E. coli to the electrode, and achieved efficient cell focusing under high flow rate conditions (1500 ?L/h). The resulting focused E. coli cells were then trapped on the sensor electrode, resulting in changes in impedance. The proposed system was evaluated using four different E. coli populations (150-1500 CFU/mL). We successfully enumerated populations as low as 300 CFU/mL within 1 min, and the signal variation was 1.13±0.37%. The device introduced in this study provides the basis for the development of portable, highly sensitive microorganism sensors that enable rapid detection of bacteria in drinking water. PMID:26264268

  9. Using a 4.7 kJ Plasma Focus for introspective imaging of metallic objects and for neutronic detection of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, C.; Clausse, A.; Martínez, J.; Llovera, R.; Tartaglione, A.; Vénere, M.; Barbuzza, R.; del Fresno, M.

    2001-04-01

    A compact Plasma Focus operated in Deuterium has been used as a pulsed radiation source for two different applications: x-ray introspective imaging of metallic objects and water detection by elastic neutron scattering. The samples for radiographic imaging were located outside the PF chamber, about 1 m away from the chamber wall. High-sensitivity, fast-response commercial radiographic film was used as x-ray detector. Experimental images are presented demonstrating a very high penetration power of the x-ray beam. Among many other applications, the presented technique is specially suited for ultrafast introspective visualization of pieces manufactured on metal. Regarding to the second application, a method to detect the presence of water in the neighborhood of a compact Plasma Focus is presented. The measuring system is composed by two silver activation detectors operated simultaneously on every shot. The first detector is used to register the PF neutron yield; whereas the other one is used to detect neutrons scattered by the blanket. Our results indicate that the constructed system is able to detect water contents of few percents in volume. Because of the scattered nature of the prospection neutrons, the method admits side-on substance interrogation, i.e., the interrogated substance does not need to be placed in the PF-to-detector line of sight.

  10. Exploring recruitment barriers and facilitators in early cancer detection trials: the use of pre-trial focus groups

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recruiting to randomized controlled trials is fraught with challenges; with less than one third recruiting to their original target. In preparation for a trial evaluating the effectiveness of a blood test to screen for lung cancer (the ECLS trial), we conducted a qualitative study to explore the potential barriers and facilitators that would impact recruitment. Methods Thirty two people recruited from community settings took part in four focus groups in Glasgow and Dundee (UK). Thematic analysis was used to code the data and develop themes. Results Three sub-themes were developed under the larger theme of recruitment strategies. The first of these themes, recruitment options, considered that participants largely felt that the invitation to participate letter should come from GPs, with postal reminders and face-to-face reminders during primary care contacts. The second theme dealt with understanding randomization and issues related to the control group (where bloods were taken but not tested). Some participants struggled with the concept or need for randomization, or for the need for a control group. Some reported that they would not consider taking part if allocated to the control group, but others were motivated to take part even if allocated to the control group by altruism. The final theme considered perceived barriers to participation and included practical barriers (such as flexible appointments and reimbursement of travel expenses) and psychosocial barriers (such as feeling stigmatized because of their smoking status and worries about being coerced into stopping smoking). Conclusions Focus groups provided useful information which resulted in numerous changes to proposed trial documentation and processes. This was in order to address participants information needs, improve comprehension of the trial documentation, enhance facilitators and remove barriers to participation. The modifications made in light of these findings may enhance trial recruitment and future trials may wish to consider use of pretrial focus groups. PMID:24678918

  11. Serum lipidomics profiling using LC-MS and high-energy collisional dissociation fragmentation: focus on triglyceride detection and characterization.

    PubMed

    Bird, Susan S; Marur, Vasant R; Sniatynski, Matthew J; Greenberg, Heather K; Kristal, Bruce S

    2011-09-01

    There is a growing need both clinically and experimentally to improve the characterization of blood lipids. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method, developed for the qualitative and semiquantitative detection of lipids in biological samples and previously validated in mitochondrial samples, was now evaluated for the profiling of serum lipids. Data were acquired using high-resolution, full scan MS and high-energy, collisional dissociation (HCD), all ion fragmentation. The method was designed for efficient separation and detection in both positive and negative ionization mode and evaluated using standards spanning seven lipid classes. Platform performance, related to the identification and characterization of serum triglycerides (TGs), was assessed using extracted ion chromatograms with mass tolerance windows of 5 ppm or less from full scan exact mass measurements determined using SIEVE nondifferential LC-MS analysis software. The platform showed retention time coefficients of variation (CV) of <0.3%, mass accuracy values of <2 ppm error, and peak area CV of <13%, with the majority of that error coming from sample preparation and extraction rather than the LC-MS analysis, and linearity was shown to be over 4 orders of magnitude (r(2) = 0.999) for the standard TG (15:0)(3) spiked into serum. Instrument mass accuracy and precision were critical to the identification of unknown TG species, in part because these parameters enabled us to reduce false positives. In addition to detection and relative quantitation of TGs in serum, TG structures were characterized through the use of alternating HCD scans at different energies to produce diagnostic fragmentations on all ions in the analysis. The lipidomics method was applied to serum samples from 192 rats maintained on diets differing in macronutrient composition. The analysis identified 86 TG species with 81 unique masses that varied over 3.5 orders of magnitude and showed diet-dependency, consistent with TGs linking diet and disease risk. PMID:21774539

  12. Molecular Detection of Leishmania in Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from a Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Focus at Xakriabá Indigenous Reserve, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rêgo, Felipe Dutra; Rugani, Jeronimo Marteleto Nunes; Shimabukuro, Paloma Helena Fernandes; Tonelli, Gabriel Barbosa; Quaresma, Patrícia Flávia; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Autochthonous cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) have been reported since 2001 in the Xakriabá Indigenous Reserve located in the municipality of São João das Missões in northern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. In order to study the presence of Leishmania DNA in phlebotomine sand flies, six entomological collections were carried out from July 2008 through July 2009, using 40 light traps placed in peridomicile areas of 20 randomly selected houses. From October 2011 through August 2012, another six collections were carried out with 20 light traps distributed among four trails (five traps per trail) selected for a previous study of wild and synanthropic hosts of Leishmania. A total of 4,760 phlebotomine specimens were collected belonging to ten genera and twenty-three species. Single female specimens or pools with up to ten specimens of the same locality, species and date, for Leishmania detection by molecular methods. Species identification of parasites was performed with ITS1 PCR-RFLP using HaeIII enzyme and genetic sequencing for SSU rRNA target. The presence of Leishmania DNA was detected in eleven samples from peridomicile areas: Lu. longipalpis (two), Nyssomyia intermedia (four), Lu. renei (two), Lu. ischnacantha, Micropygomyia goiana and Evandromyia lenti (one pool of each specie). The presence of Leishmania DNA was detected in twelve samples from among the trails: Martinsmyia minasensis (six), Ny. intermedia (three), Mi. peresi (two) and Ev. lenti (one). The presence of Leishmania infantum DNA in Lu. longipalpis and Leishmania braziliensis DNA in Ny. intermediasupport the epidemiological importance of these species of sand flies in the cycle of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, respectively. The results also found other species associated with Leishmania DNA, such as Mt. minasensis and Ev. lenti, which may participate in a wild and/or synanthropic cycle of Leishmania transmission in the studied area. PMID:25853254

  13. New pediatric vision screener employing polarization-modulated, retinal-birefringence-scanning-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system: opto-mechanical design and operation.

    PubMed

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L

    2014-06-01

    Amblyopia ("lazy eye") is a major public health problem, caused by misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or defocus. If detected early in childhood, there is an excellent response to therapy, yet most children are detected too late to be treated effectively. Commercially available vision screening devices that test for amblyopia's primary causes can detect strabismus only indirectly and inaccurately via assessment of the positions of external light reflections from the cornea, but they cannot detect the anatomical feature of the eyes where fixation actually occurs (the fovea). Our laboratory has been developing technology to detect true foveal fixation, by exploiting the birefringence of the uniquely arranged Henle fibers delineating the fovea using retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), and we recently described a polarization-modulated approach to RBS that enables entirely direct and reliable detection of true foveal fixation, with greatly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and essentially independent of corneal birefringence (a confounding variable with all polarization-sensitive ophthalmic technology). Here, we describe the design and operation of a new pediatric vision screener that employs polarization-modulated, RBS-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system, and demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach. PMID:24911020

  14. New pediatric vision screener employing polarization-modulated, retinal-birefringence-scanning-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system: opto-mechanical design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L.

    2014-06-01

    Amblyopia ("lazy eye") is a major public health problem, caused by misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or defocus. If detected early in childhood, there is an excellent response to therapy, yet most children are detected too late to be treated effectively. Commercially available vision screening devices that test for amblyopia's primary causes can detect strabismus only indirectly and inaccurately via assessment of the positions of external light reflections from the cornea, but they cannot detect the anatomical feature of the eyes where fixation actually occurs (the fovea). Our laboratory has been developing technology to detect true foveal fixation, by exploiting the birefringence of the uniquely arranged Henle fibers delineating the fovea using retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), and we recently described a polarization-modulated approach to RBS that enables entirely direct and reliable detection of true foveal fixation, with greatly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and essentially independent of corneal birefringence (a confounding variable with all polarization-sensitive ophthalmic technology). Here, we describe the design and operation of a new pediatric vision screener that employs polarization-modulated, RBS-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system, and demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach.

  15. Comparative study on the effectiveness of different mosquito traps in arbovirus surveillance with a focus on WNV detection.

    PubMed

    Pezzin, Alex; Sy, Victoria; Puggioli, Arianna; Veronesi, Rodolfo; Carrieri, Marco; Maccagnani, Bettina; Bellini, Romeo

    2016-01-01

    The selection of the ideal trap for arbovirus surveillance is an issue of primary importance to increase the sensitivity of virus detection and the cost-effectiveness of the entomological surveillance. During the summer 2011, the effectiveness of five types of mosquito traps (CDC gravid trap, CO2(-)baited trap, BG-Sentinel™ and two experimental prototypes) to attract females potentially infected with West Nile virus were assessed. The study was carried out in three natural wetland sites located in the Emilia-Romagna Region (Northern Italy), using a Latin square scheme. Single night collections of adult females were performed and determination of species and physiological state (gravid, nulliparous or parous) was made upon return to the laboratory. The species most frequently collected in the gravid trap was Culex pipiens sl. L., being gravid females the large majority of the individuals. Species diversity was much higher in CO2(-)baited traps, which may therefore enable a more comprehensive description of the vector species composition and their role in arboviruses circulation. Our findings indicate that gravid traps can be a valid tool and should be integrated in the West Nile virus surveillance system in the Emilia-Romagna region, mainly based on collections made with CO2-baited traps. PMID:26466982

  16. Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Sequence- Based Detection of Leishmania Infection of Sand Flies in Recently Emerged Endemic Focus of Zoonotic Cutaneous Leishmaniasis, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Kourosh; Badzohreh, Abdollah; Sarkari, Bahador; Fakoorziba, Mohammad Reza; Kalantari, Mohsen; Moemenbellah-Fard, Mohammad Djaefar; Ali-Akbarpour, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Geographical distribution of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) has continuously been extended in recent years in Iran. The Beiza District is one of the newly-emerged endemic foci of ZCL in southern Iran. The main aim of the present study was to detect the vector(s) of ZCL in this area. Methods: To detect the fauna and vectors of ZCL in this district, sand flies were caught using sticky papers. Seventy randomly selected female sand flies out of 730 were molecularly investigated for Leishmania infection using species-specific nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay between April and October 2010. Results: A total of 2543 sand flies were caught. The fauna was identified as 10 species (five Phlebotomus spp. and five Sergentomyia spp.). Phlebotomus papatasi was the most dominant species both indoors and outdoors (37.55% and 16.35 %, respectively). L. major was detected in 5 out of 48 investigated Phlebotomus papatasi (10.41%). Sequence-based characterization was carried out to confirm the PCR findings. The positive samples were shown to have 75-88% similarity with L. major sequences in GenBank. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, similar to the other foci of ZCL in Iran, P. papatasi is the proven and primary vector of CL. This study could be drawn upon for future strategy planning in this newly emerged endemic focus. PMID:24031105

  17. Physiological Age Structure and Leishmania spp. Detection in Phlebotomus (Larroussius) orientalis (Parrot, 1936) (Diptera: Psychodidae) at an Endemic Focus of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebresilassie, Araya; Abbasi, Ibrahim; Kirstein, Oscar David; Aklilu, Essayas; Yared, Solomon; Tekie, Habte; Balkew, Meshesha; Warburg, Alon; Hailu, Asrat; Gebre-Michael, Teshome

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani is endemic in northern Ethiopia, where P. orientalis is the most important presumed vector. This study was designed to determine the physiological age structure and the occurrence of Leishmania infection in the vector of VL in Tahtay Adiyabo district, northern Ethiopia. Sand flies were collected using CDC light traps from peridomestic and agricultural fields between May 2011 and April 2012 and P. orientalis females were dissected for age determination and detection of Leishmania promastigotes. Sand flies were also analyzed for L. donovani detection using molecular methods. Of 1,282 P. orientalis examined for abdominal stages and age characterization, 66.2%, 28.2%, 4.1%, and 1.6% were unfed, freshly fed, half-gravid, and gravid. Parous rate in unfed females was 34.1% and 35.4% in peridomestic and agricultural fields, respectively. Out of 921 P. orientalis females dissected, one specimen (0.1%) was found naturally infected with promastigotes. Five pools (25 females) of unfed P. orientalis were also found with DNA of Leishmania spp. In particular, a single P. orientalis was positive for L. donovani (0.5%). Based on this and other evidences (abundance, human blood feeding, and xenodiagnostic studies), P. orientalis is the principal vector of VL in this endemic focus. PMID:26294920

  18. Focused Screening and Treatment (FSAT): A PCR-Based Strategy to Detect Malaria Parasite Carriers and Contain Drug Resistant P. falciparum, Pailin, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Stefan; Nguon, Sokomar; Kim, Saorin; Habib, Najibullah; Khim, Nimol; Sum, Sarorn; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Bjorge, Steven; Thomson, Andrew; Kheng, Sim; Chea, Nguon; Yok, Sovann; Top, Samphornarann; Ros, Seyha; Sophal, Uth; Thompson, Michelle M.; Mellor, Steve; Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Yeang, Chhiang; Yeung, Shunmay; Duong, Socheat; Newman, Robert D.; Menard, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in Pailin province, along the border between Thailand and Cambodia, have become resistant to artemisinin derivatives. To better define the epidemiology of P. falciparum populations and to assess the risk of the possible spread of these parasites outside Pailin, a new epidemiological tool named “Focused Screening and Treatment” (FSAT), based on active molecular detection of asymptomatic parasite carriers was introduced in 2010. Cross-sectional malariometric surveys using PCR were carried out in 20 out of 109 villages in Pailin province. Individuals detected as P. falciparum carriers were treated with atovaquone-proguanil combination plus a single dose of primaquine if the patient was non-G6PD deficient. Interviews were conducted to elicit history of cross-border travel that might contribute to the spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites. After directly observed treatment, patients were followed up and re-examined on day 7 and day 28. Among 6931 individuals screened, prevalence of P. falciparum carriers was less than 1%, of whom 96% were asymptomatic. Only 1.6% of the individuals had a travel history or plans to go outside Cambodia, with none of those tested being positive for P. falciparum. Retrospective analysis, using 2010 routine surveillance data, showed significant differences in the prevalence of asymptomatic carriers discovered by FSAT between villages classified as “high risk” and “low risk” based on malaria incidence data. All positive individuals treated and followed-up until day 28 were cured. No mutant-type allele related to atovaquone resistance was found. FSAT is a potentially useful tool to detect, treat and track clusters of asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum along with providing valuable epidemiological information regarding cross-border movements of potential malaria parasite carriers and parasite gene flow. PMID:23049687

  19. An enzyme-linked immuno focus assay for rapid detection and enumeration, and a newborn mouse model for human non-polio enteroviruses associated with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rao, C Durga; Reddy, Harikrishna; Naidu, Jagadish R; Raghavendra, A; Radhika, N S; Karande, Anjali

    2015-11-01

    We have recently reported significant association of non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) with acute and persistent diarrhea (18-21% of total diarrheal cases), and non-diarrheal Increased Frequency of Bowel Movements (IFoBM-ND) (about 29% of the NPEV infections) in children and that the NPEV-associated diarrhea was as significant as rotavirus diarrhea. However, their diarrhea-causing potential is yet to be demonstrated in an animal model system. Since the determination of virus titers by the traditional plaque assay takes 4-7 days, there is a need for development of a rapid method for virus titer determination to facilitate active clinical research on enterovirus-associated diarrhea. The goal of this study is to develop a cell-based rapid detection and enumeration method and to demonstrate the diarrhea-inducing potential of purified and characterized non-polio enteroviruses, which were isolated from diarrheic children. Here we describe generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against purified strains belonging to different serotypes, and development of an enzyme-linked immuno focus assay (ELIFA) for detection and enumeration of live NPEV particles in clinical and purified virus samples, and a newborn mouse model for NPEV diarrhea. Plaque-purified NPVEs, belonging to different serotypes, isolated from children with diarrhea, were grown in cell culture and purified by isopycnic CsCl density gradient centrifugation. By ELIFA, NPEVs could be detected and enumerated within 12h post-infection. Our results demonstrated that Coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) and CVB5 strains, isolated from diarrheic children, induced severe diarrhea in orally-inoculated 9-12 day-old mouse pups, fulfilling Koch's postulates. The methods described here would facilitate studies on NPEV-associated gastrointestinal disease. PMID:26300372

  20. Molecular detection and identification of Leishmania infection in naturally infected sand flies in a focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis in northern Morocco

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by various species of the flagellate protozoan Leishmania. During the past 20 years, cutaneous leishmaniasis has emerged as a major public health threat in Morocco. The main objective of this study was to study the occurrence of Leishmania infection in vectors and to identify sand fly blood meal sources in an endemic locality of cutaneous leishmaniasis within Sefrou province, where the vectors of leishmaniasis were still unknown. Methods 2650 sand flies were collected using CDC miniature light traps and identified morphologically. The identified sand flies were tested for Leishmania infection by nested PCR. The source of blood meal of 10 freshly engorged females: 6 Phlebotomus longicuspis and 4 Phlebotomus sergenti, was determined using the Cyt b sequence. Results The collected sand flies consisted of 10 species, seven of which belonged to the genus Phlebotomus and three to the genus Sergentomyia. The most abundant species was P. longicuspis, accounting for 72% of the total sand flies collected. In females of three P. longicuspis and four P. sergenti, Leishmania infantum and Leishmania tropica DNA was detected, respectively. The source of blood meal of engorged females showed that all sand flies tested fed on humans. Conclusions We report for the first time the natural infection of P. longicuspis with L. infantum in Morocco. The high frequency of this species in this region, in addition to its anthropophilic character make P. longicuspis the putative vector of L. infantum in this cutaneous leishmaniasis focus where L. tropica is confirmed as the causative agent of the disease and P. sergenti as its vector. The presence of L. infantum, and its presumed vector in this area, makes this a site of high risk of visceral leishmaniasis, mostly because of the proximity of a focus of human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:24990497

  1. Detection of ultrasound-modulated photons in diffuse media using the photorefractive effect.

    PubMed

    Murray, Todd W; Sui, Lei; Maguluri, Gopi; Roy, Ronald A; Nieva, Alex; Blonigen, Florian; DiMarzio, Charles A

    2004-11-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography is a dual-wave sensing technique in which diffusive light in a turbid medium interacts with an imposed acoustic field. A phase-modulated photon field emanates from the interaction region and carries with it information about the optomechanical properties of the medium. We present a technique for detection of ultrasound-induced optical phase modulation using an adaptive, photorefractive-crystal-based interferometry system. Experimental results are presented demonstrating detection of ultrasound-modulated signals in highly scattering media by use of pulsed ultrasound insonation. PMID:15584277

  2. Ion focusing

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  3. Tsunami focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillane, M. C.; Titov, V. V.; Moore, C. W.; Aydin, B.; Kanoglu, U.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    Tsunamis are long waves generated by impulsive disturbances of the seafloor or coastal topography caused by earthquakes, submarine/subaerial mass failures. They evolve substantially through three dimensional - 2 spatial+1 temporal - spreading as the initial surface deformation propagates. This is referred to as its directivity and focusing. A directivity function was first defined by Ben-Menahem (1961, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 51, 401-435) using the source length and the rupture velocity. Okal (2003, Pure Appl. Geophys. 160, 2189-2221) discussed the details of the analysis of Ben-Menahem (1961) and demonstrated the distinct difference between the directivity patterns of landslide and earthquake generated tsunamis. Marchuk and Titov (1989, Proc. IUGG/IOC International Tsunami Symposium, July 31 - August 3, 1989, Novosibirsk, USSR. p.11-17) described the process of tsunami focusing for a rectangular initial deformation combining positive and negative surface displacements. They showed the existence of a focusing point where abnormal tsunami wave height can be registered. Here, first, we describe and quantify numerically tsunami focusing processes for a combined positive and negative - N-wave type - strip source representing the 17 July 1998 Papua New Guinea and 17 July 2006 Java events. Specifically, considering field observations and tsunami focusing, we propose a source mechanism for the 17 July 2006 Java event. Then, we introduce a new analytical solution for a strip source propagating over a flat bottom using the linear shallow-water wave equation. The analytical solution of Carrier and Yeh (2005, Computer Modeling In Engineering & Sciences, 10(2), 113-121) appears to have two drawbacks. One, the solution involves singular complete elliptic integral of the first kind which results in a self-similar approximate solution for the far-field at large times. Two, only the propagation of Gaussian shaped finite-crest wave profiles can be modeled. Our solution is not only exact but also more general and allows the use of realistic initial waveform such as N-waves defined by Tadepalli and Synolakis (1994, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 445, 99-112). We explore parametric dependence of the focusing height and distance on the initial wave parameters through the analytical solution.

  4. A Systematic Review of Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnosis Focused on Diagnostic Confirmation, Early Detection, and Prediction of Unfavorable Outcomes in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Wolfger, Barbara; Timsit, Edouard; White, Brad J; Orsel, Karin

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of newly arrived feedlot cattle are affected with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Economic losses could be reduced by accurate, early detection. This review evaluates the available literature regarding BRD confirmatory diagnostic tests, early detection methods, and modalities to estimate post-therapeutic prognosis or predict unfavorable or fatal outcomes. Scientific evidence promotes the use of haptoglobin to confirm BRD status. Feeding behavior, infrared thermography, and reticulorumen boluses are promising methods. Retrospective analyses of routinely collected treatment and cohort data can be used to identify cattle at risk of unfavorable outcome. Other methods have been reviewed but require further study. PMID:26210764

  5. Ultrasound Induces Aging in Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espíndola, David; Galaz, Belfor; Melo, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    Aging and rejuvenation have been identified as the general mechanisms that rule the time evolution of granular materials subjected to some external confinement pressure. In creep experiments performed in a triaxial configuration, we obtained evidence that relatively high intensity ultrasound waves propagating through the material induce both weakening and significant plasticity. In the framework of glassy materials, it is shown that the effect of ultrasound can be simply accounted for by a general variable, the fluidity, whose dynamics are described by an effective aging parameter that strongly decreases with sound amplitude and vanishes at the yield stress limit. The response from step perturbations in ultrasound intensity provided a method to assess the effective-viscosity jumps which are direct evidence of acoustic fluidization.

  6. Investigation into the use of smartphone as a machine vision device for engineering metrology and flaw detection, with focus on drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razdan, Vikram; Bateman, Richard

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the use of a Smartphone and its camera vision capabilities in Engineering metrology and flaw detection, with a view to develop a low cost alternative to Machine vision systems which are out of range for small scale manufacturers. A Smartphone has to provide a similar level of accuracy as Machine Vision devices like Smart cameras. The objective set out was to develop an App on an Android Smartphone, incorporating advanced Computer vision algorithms written in java code. The App could then be used for recording measurements of Twist Drill bits and hole geometry, and analysing the results for accuracy. A detailed literature review was carried out for in-depth study of Machine vision systems and their capabilities, including a comparison between the HTC One X Android Smartphone and the Teledyne Dalsa BOA Smart camera. A review of the existing metrology Apps in the market was also undertaken. In addition, the drilling operation was evaluated to establish key measurement parameters of a twist Drill bit, especially flank wear and diameter. The methodology covers software development of the Android App, including the use of image processing algorithms like Gaussian Blur, Sobel and Canny available from OpenCV software library, as well as designing and developing the experimental set-up for carrying out the measurements. The results obtained from the experimental set-up were analysed for geometry of Twist Drill bits and holes, including diametrical measurements and flaw detection. The results show that Smartphones like the HTC One X have the processing power and the camera capability to carry out metrological tasks, although dimensional accuracy achievable from the Smartphone App is below the level provided by Machine vision devices like Smart cameras. A Smartphone with mechanical attachments, capable of image processing and having a reasonable level of accuracy in dimensional measurement, has the potential to become a handy low-cost Machine vision system for small scale manufacturers, especially in field metrology and flaw detection.

  7. Object detection Object detection

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    · driver assistance, autonomous driving · content-based image search · smart object counting · automatic Federer, Eiffel tower, ... · Object category detection · pedestrians, cars, faces, dogs, ... · semantic license plates, zip codes, checks · faces - automatic focus and color adjustment · people, cars, roadsigns

  8. Object detection Object detection

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    · driver assistance, autonomous driving · content-based image search · smart object counting · automatic Federer, Eiffel tower, ... ! · Object category detection · pedestrians, cars, faces, dogs, ... · semantic license plates, zip codes, checks · faces - automatic focus and color adjustment · people, cars, roadsigns

  9. Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhances Delivery of Doxorubicin in a Preclinical Model of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Tatiana D; D'Andrea, Samantha; Starr, Frank; Chen, Hong; McCune, Jeannine S; Risler, Linda J; Mashadi-Hossein, Afshin; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-09-15

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by extensive stromal desmoplasia, which decreases blood perfusion and impedes chemotherapy delivery. Breaking the stromal barrier could both increase perfusion and permeabilize the tumor, enhancing chemotherapy penetration. Mechanical disruption of the stroma can be achieved using ultrasound-induced bubble activity-cavitation. Cavitation is also known to result in microstreaming and could have the added benefit of actively enhancing diffusion into the tumors. Here, we report the ability to enhance chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin penetration using ultrasound-induced cavitation in a genetically engineered mouse model (KPC mouse) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. To induce localized inertial cavitation in pancreatic tumors, pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) was used either during or before doxorubicin administration to elucidate the mechanisms of enhanced drug delivery (active vs. passive drug diffusion). For both types, the pHIFU exposures that were associated with high cavitation activity resulted in disruption of the highly fibrotic stromal matrix and enhanced the normalized doxorubicin concentration by up to 4.5-fold compared with controls. Furthermore, normalized doxorubicin concentration was associated with the cavitation metrics (P < 0.01), indicating that high and sustained cavitation results in increased chemotherapy penetration. No significant difference between the outcomes of the two types, that is, doxorubicin infusion during or after pHIFU treatment, was observed, suggesting that passive diffusion into previously permeabilized tissue is the major mechanism for the increase in drug concentration. Together, the data indicate that pHIFU treatment of pancreatic tumors when resulting in high and sustained cavitation can efficiently enhance chemotherapy delivery to pancreatic tumors. . PMID:26216548

  10. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Salome; Hendriksen, Niels B; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment. PMID:25979887

  11. A dense plasma focus-based neutron source for a single-shot detection of illicit materials and explosives by a nanosecond neutron pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Latyshev, S. V.; Miklaszewski, R. A.; Chernyshova, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wi?cek, U.; Tomaszewski, K.; Lemeshko, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Recent progress in a single-pulse Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Investigation System (NINIS) intended for interrogation of hidden objects by means of measuring elastically scattered neutrons is presented in this paper. The method uses very bright neutron pulses having duration of the order of 10 ns only, which are generated by dense plasma focus (DPF) devices filled with pure deuterium or DT mixture as a working gas. The small size occupied by the neutron bunch in space, number of neutrons per pulse and mono-chromaticity (?E/E~1%) of the neutron spectrum provides the opportunity to use a time-of-flight (TOF) technique with flying bases of about a few metres. In our researches we used DPF devices having bank energy in the range 2-7 kJ. The devices generate a neutron yield of the level of 108-109 2.45 MeV and 1010-1011 14 MeV neutrons per pulse with pulse duration ~10-20 ns. TOF base in the tests was 2.2-18.5 m. We have demonstrated the possibility of registering of neutrons scattered by the substances under investigation—1 litre bottles with methanol (CH3OH), phosphoric (H2PO4) and nitric (HNO3) acids as well as a long object—a 1 m gas tank filled with deuterium at high pressure. It is shown that the above mentioned short TOF bases and relatively low neutron yields are enough to distinguish different elements' nuclei composing the substance under interrogation and to characterize the geometry of lengthy objects in some cases. The wavelet technique was employed to 'clean' the experimental data registered. The advantages and restrictions of the proposed and tested NINIS technique in comparison with other methods are discussed.

  12. Molecular Phylogeny of the Lactuca Alliance (Cichorieae Subtribe Lactucinae, Asteraceae) with Focus on Their Chinese Centre of Diversity Detects Potential Events of Reticulation and Chloroplast Capture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Huan; Peng, Hua; Kilian, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    The first comprehensive molecular phylogenetic reconstruction of the Cichorieae subtribe Lactucinae is provided. Sequences for two datasets, one of the nuclear rDNA ITS region, the other of five concatenated non-coding chloroplast DNA markers including the petD region and the psbA-trnH, 5?trnL(UAA)-trnF, rpl32-trnL(UAG) and trnQ(UUG)-5?rps16 spacers, were, with few exceptions, newly generated for 130 samples of 78 species. The sampling spans the entire subtribe Lactucinae while focusing on its Chinese centre of diversity; more than 3/4 of the Chinese Lactucinae species are represented. The nuclear and plastid phylogenies inferred from the two independent datasets show various hard topological incongruences. They concern the internal topology of major lineages, in one case the placement of taxa in major lineages, the relationships between major lineages and even the circumscription of the subtribe, indicating potential events of ancient as well as of more recent reticulation and chloroplast capture in the evolution of the subtribe. The core of the subtribe is clearly monophyletic, consisting of the six lineages, Cicerbita, Cicerbita II, Lactuca, Melanoseris, Notoseris and Paraprenanthes. The Faberia lineage and the monospecific Prenanthes purpurea lineage are part of a monophyletic subtribe Lactucinae only in the nuclear or plastid phylogeny, respectively. Morphological and karyological support for their placement is considered. In the light of the molecular phylogenetic reconstruction and of additional morphological data, the conflicting taxonomies of the Chinese Lactuca alliance are discussed and it is concluded that the major lineages revealed are best treated at generic rank. An improved species level taxonomy of the Chinese Lactucinae is outlined; new synonymies and some new combinations are provided. PMID:24376566

  13. Phlebotomus sergenti in a Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Focus in Azilal Province (High Atlas, Morocco): Molecular Detection and Genotyping of Leishmania tropica, and Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ajaoud, Malika; Es-Sette, Nargys; Charrel, Rémi N; Laamrani-Idrissi, Abderahmane; Nhammi, Haddou; Riyad, Myriam; Lemrani, Meryem

    2015-01-01

    Background Phlebotomus (Paraphlebotomus) sergenti is at least one of the confirmed vectors for the transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica and distributed widely in Morocco. This form of leishmaniasis is considered largely as anthroponotic, although dogs were found infected with Leishmania tropica, suggestive of zoonosis in some rural areas. Methodology and Findings This survey aimed at (i) studying the presence of Leishmania in field caught Phlebotomus sergenti, (ii) investigating genetic diversity within Leishmania tropica and (iii) identifying the host-blood feeding preferences of Phlebotomus sergenti. A total of 4,407 sand flies were collected in three rural areas of Azilal province, using CDC miniature light traps. Samples collected were found to consist of 13 species: Phlebotomus spp. and 3 Sergentomyia spp. The most abundant species was Phlebotomus sergenti, accounting for 45.75 % of the total. 965 female Phlebotomus sergenti were screened for the presence of Leishmania by ITS1-PCR-RFLP, giving a positive rate of 5.7% (55/965), all being identified as Leishmania tropica. Nucleotide heterogeneity of PCR-amplified ITS1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS2 was noted. Analyses of 31 sequences obtained segregated them into 16 haplotypes, of which 7 contain superimposed peaks at certain nucleotide positions, suggestive of heterozygosity. Phlebotomus sergenti collected were found to feed on a large variety of vertebrate hosts, as determined by Cytochrome b sequencing of the DNA from the blood meals of 64 engorged females. Conclusion Our findings supported the notion that Phlebotomus sergenti is the primary vector of Leishmania tropica in this focus, and that the latter is genetically very heterogeneous. Furthermore, our results might be suggestive of a certain level of heterozygosity in Leishmania tropica population. This finding, as well as the feeding of the vectors on different animals are of interest for further investigation. PMID:25826399

  14. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Micha? J.; Bujak, Renata; Daghir, Emilia

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) is a widespread technique for the analysis of peptides and proteins in biological samples. CIEF is used to separate mixtures of compounds on the basis of differences in their isoelectric point. Aspects of sample preparation, capillary selection, zone mobilization procedures as well as various detection modes used have been described and discussed. Moreover CIEF, coupled to various types of detection techniques (MALDI or LIF), has increasingly been applied to the analysis of variety different high-molecular compounds. CIEF is considered as a highly specific analytical method which may be routinely used in the separation of rare hemoglobin variants. In addition, the application of CIEF in proteomic field have been discussed on the examples of analyses of glycoproteins and immunoglobins due to the meaning in clinical diagnostic.

  15. Cost of Security Auditing Focus

    E-print Network

    Cost of Security Auditing Focus Matthew Chambers (Michigan Technological University) Kevin Lopez (California State University, San Bernardino) Casey Mortensen (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology? ¤ What is the cost of security? #12;Auditd ¤ Kernel level service ¤ Intrusion Detection System ¤ Does

  16. "Only" and Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallduvi, Enric

    The relationship of the word "only," one of a class of words known as scalar particles, focus adverbs, focus inducers, or focus-sensitive particles, with the "focus" of the sentence is examined. It is suggested, based on analysis of discourse structure, that this "association with focus" is not an inherent property of this scalar particle. The…

  17. Movement out of focus

    E-print Network

    Erlewine, Michael Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the consequences of overt and covert movement on association with focus. The interpretation of focus-sensitive operators such as only and even depends on the presence of a focused constituent ...

  18. Variable-focus terahertz lens.

    PubMed

    Scherger, Benedikt; Jördens, Christian; Koch, Martin

    2011-02-28

    We present a variable focus lens for the THz range. The focal length can be changed by pumping a medical white oil in and out of the lens body. Due to the optical transparency of the liquid and a similar refractive index in the visible frequency range, the THz beam path can be aligned using conventional optical light sources. This type of lens might find applications in terahertz based quality control, stand-off detection and wireless communication systems. PMID:21369284

  19. Focus Sensitive Coordination

    E-print Network

    Hulsey, Sarah McNearney

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates the role of the Focus Sensitive Operators (FSOs) even and also when found inside of a coordination. Coordinations of this form are called Focus Sensitive Coordinations (FSC) and include or even, ...

  20. Alternating phase focused linacs

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    A heavy particle linear accelerator employing rf fields for transverse and ongitudinal focusing as well as acceleration. Drift tube length and gap positions in a standing wave drift tube loaded structure are arranged so that particles are subject to acceleration and succession of focusing and defocusing forces which contain the beam without additional magnetic or electric focusing fields.

  1. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  2. FOCUS: Sustainable Mathematics Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mireles, Selina V.; Acee, Taylor W.; Gerber, Lindsey N.

    2014-01-01

    The FOCUS (Fundamentals of Conceptual Understanding and Success) Co-Requisite Model Intervention (FOCUS Intervention) for College Algebra was developed as part of the Developmental Education Demonstration Projects (DEDP) in Texas. The program was designed to use multiple services, courses, and best practices to support student completion of a…

  3. Focus, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus, 2001

    2001-01-01

    These three issues of 2000-2001 "Focus" present a collection of papers focusing on issues related to poverty. The first issue discusses child support enforcement policy and low-income families, highlighting such issues as fragile families and child wellbeing; low-income families and the child support enforcement system; child support enforcement…

  4. Modeling localized delivery of Doxorubicin to the brain following focused ultrasound enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhan, Tam; Burgess, Alison; Lilge, Lothar; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-10-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is a well-established chemotherapeutic agent, however it has limited efficacy in treating brain malignancies due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated that focused ultrasound induced BBB disruption (BBBD) enables efficient delivery of Dox to the brain. For future treatment planning of BBBD-based drug delivery, it is crucial to establish a mathematical framework to predict the effect of transient BBB permeability enhancement on the spatiotemporal distribution of Dox at the targeted area. The constructed model considers Dox concentrations within three compartments (plasma, extracellular, intracellular) that are governed by various transport processes (e.g. diffusion in interstitial space, exchange across vessel wall, clearance by cerebral spinal fluid, uptake by brain cells). By examining several clinical treatment aspects (e.g. sonication scheme, permeability enhancement, injection mode), our simulation results support the experimental findings of optimal interval delay between two consecutive sonications and therapeutically-sufficient intracellular concentration with respect to transfer constant Ktrans range of 0.01-0.03?min-1. Finally, the model suggests that infusion over a short duration (20-60?min) should be employed along with single-sonication or multiple-sonication at 10?min interval to ensure maximum delivery to the intracellular compartment while attaining minimal cardiotoxicity via suppressing peak plasma concentration.

  5. Flat focusing mirror.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y C; Kicas, S; Trull, J; Peckus, M; Cojocaru, C; Vilaseca, R; Drazdys, R; Staliunas, K

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  6. New molecular identifiers for Simulium limbatum and Simulium incrustatum s.l. and the detection of genetic substructure with potential implications for onchocerciasis epidemiology in the Amazonia focus of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Priscila A; Crainey, James L; Almeida, Tatiana P; Shelley, Anthony J; Luz, Sergio L B

    2013-08-01

    The Amazonia onchocerciasis focus of southern Venezuela and northern Brazil is the larger of the two remaining Latin American onchocerciasis foci where disease transmission still occurs and is often regarded as the most challenging of all the Latin American foci to eliminate onchocerciasis. The site is home to a population of over 20,000 semi-nomadic, hunter-gatherer Yanomami people and is made-up of a mosaic of rainforest and savannah ecologies, which are influenced by the area's undulating terrain and rich geological diversity. At least six blackfly vectors have been implicated in onchocerciasis transmission in this focus; however, because of the difficulty in their routine identification the relative importance of each has been obscured. Simulium limbatum and Simulium incrustatum s.l. have both been recorded as vectors in the Amazonia focus, but they are difficult to discriminate morphologically and thus the ecological range of these species, and indeed the presence of S. limbatum in the Amazonia focus at all, have remained controversial. In the work described here, we report 15 S. incrustatum s.l. CO1 sequences and 27 S. limbatum sequences obtained from field-caught adult female blackflies collected from forest and savannah localities, inside and just outside the Amazonia focus. Phylogenetic analysis with the sequences generated in this study, showed that both the S. limbatum and the S. incrustatum s.l. CO1 sequences obtained (even from specimens living in sympatry) all fell into discrete species-specific bootstrap-supported monophyletic groups and thus confirmed the utility of the CO1 gene for identifying both these species inside the Amazonia focus. As the S. limbatum-exclusive cluster included CO1 sequences obtained from forest-caught and morphologically identified specimens these results provide the clearest evidence yet of the presence of S. limbatum inside the Amazonia focus. The question, however, of whether S. limbatum is actually a vector in the focus still remains unanswered as the data presented here also suggest that S. limbatum found in the savannahs adjacent to, but outside the Amazonia focus (and which represent the only S. limbatum population to be unambiguously incriminated as a host of Onchocerca volvulus), are genetically distinct from those living inside the focus. These findings highlight the need for a clearer picture of the vector taxonomy inside the Amazonia onchocerciasis focus. PMID:23545131

  7. Givenness, focus, and prosody

    E-print Network

    Bader, Christopher (Christopher Banks), 1954-

    2001-01-01

    In this dissertation, I investigate the grammatical effects of focus and the inseparable phenomenon of givenness. As Schwarzschild (1999) has proposed, a proper understanding of givenness eliminates the need for a separate ...

  8. Focusing on Urban Excellence

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Affairs Christophe Pierre. Chancellor Allen-Meares's Six Overarching Goals (2012) Focus on our academic Allen-Meares with UI President Robert Easter #12;` 4 I. The UIC Planning Process UIC has evolved

  9. Inertial focusing in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-07-11

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future. PMID:24905880

  10. Facility Focus: Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Hawthorn Court Community Center at Iowa State University, Ames, and the HUB-Robeson Center at Pennsylvania State University. Focuses on the food service offered in these new student-life buildings. Includes photographs. (EV)

  11. Focusing corner cube

    DOEpatents

    Monjes, J.A.

    1985-09-12

    This invention retortreflects and focuses a beam of light. The invention comprises a modified corner cube reflector wherein one reflective surface is planar, a second reflective surface is spherical, and the third reflective surface may be planar or convex cylindrical.

  12. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  13. Focus on Careers: NEUROSCIENCE

    E-print Network

    Hickey, Timothy J.

    Focus on Careers: NEUROSCIENCE Neuroscience graduate study at Brandeis covers a broad's or doctoral program. Areas of particular strength include computational neuroscience, neurogenetics, and interdisciplinary studies of plasticity and memory. Neuroscience graduates also have the opportunity to benefit from

  14. Inertial Focusing in Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Joseph M.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future. PMID:24905880

  15. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  16. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  17. Sagittal focusing Laue monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Zhong; Zhong (Stony Brook, NY), Hanson; Jonathan (Wading River, NY), Hastings; Jerome (Stanford, CA), Kao; Chi-Chang (Setauket, NY), Lenhard; Anthony (Medford, NY), Siddons; David Peter (Cutchogue, NY), Zhong; Hui (Coram, NY)

    2009-03-24

    An x-ray focusing device generally includes a slide pivotable about a pivot point defined at a forward end thereof, a rail unit fixed with respect to the pivotable slide, a forward crystal for focusing x-rays disposed at the forward end of the pivotable slide and a rearward crystal for focusing x-rays movably coupled to the pivotable slide and the fixed rail unit at a distance rearward from the forward crystal. The forward and rearward crystals define reciprocal angles of incidence with respect to the pivot point, wherein pivoting of the slide about the pivot point changes the incidence angles of the forward and rearward crystals while simultaneously changing the distance between the forward and rearward crystals.

  18. [Focused musculoskeletal sonography].

    PubMed

    Horn, Rudolf

    2015-09-16

    Even in emergent situations, focused musculoskeletal sonography must not be overlooked. It has a place in traumatology no less valuable than its place in internal medicine. It can be used to identify traumatic joint effusions, occult fractures and fissures, joint inflammation, muscle and tendon rupture; it can differentiate soft tissue swelling, locate a foreign body, or identify the location of fractures. Focused ultrasound should be performed by the attending physician directly at the patient’s bedside, in order to answer these specific questions. PMID:26373910

  19. Comparative study of temperature measurements in ex vivo swine muscle and a tissue-mimicking material during high intensity focused ultrasound exposures.

    PubMed

    Maruvada, S; Liu, Y; Pritchard, W F; Herman, B A; Harris, G R

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) can provide a convenient, stable, and reproducible means for testing high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices. When TMMs containing thermal sensors are used to measure ultrasound-induced temperature rise, it is important that measurement results reasonably represent those that occur in biological tissue. Therefore the aim of this paper is to compare the thermal behavior of the TMM under HIFU exposure to that of ex vivo tissue. This was accomplished using both a previously developed TMM and fresh ex vivo swine muscle that were instrumented with bare 50 µm thin wire thermocouples. HIFU at 825 kHz was focused at the thermocouple junction. 30 s exposures of increasing peak negative pressure (1 to 5 MPa) were applied and the temperature profile during and after sonication was recorded. B-mode imaging was used to monitor bubble activity during sonication. If bubble formation was noted during the sonication, the sonication was repeated at the same pressure levels two more times at 20 min intervals. Temperature traces obtained at various pressure levels demonstrated similar types of heating profiles in both the tissue and TMM, the exact nature of which depended on whether bubbles formed during the HIFU exposure. The onset of bubble activity occurred at lower ultrasonic pressures in the TMM, but the basic temperature rise features due to HIFU exposure were essentially the same for both materials. PMID:22127191

  20. Focusing on the Invisible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the question of whether or not the design and development of an educational laboratory really changes when the focus is on nanotechnology. It explores current laboratory building trends and the added considerations for building a nanotechnology laboratory. The author leaves the reader with additional points to consider…

  1. ENC Focus Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, Annette, Ed.

    The mission of the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC) is to identify effective curriculum resources, create high-quality professional development materials, and disseminate useful information and products to improve K-12 mathematics and science teaching and learning. This issue of "ENC Focus" contains articles related to mathematics teaching…

  2. REPRODUCTIONREVIEW Focus on Meiosis

    E-print Network

    Terasaki, Mark

    REPRODUCTIONREVIEW Focus on Meiosis Stops and starts in mammalian oocytes: recent advances grow and undergo meiosis within ovarian follicles. Oocytes are arrested at the first meiotic prophase stimulates the immature oocyte to resume meiosis. Meiotic arrest depends on a high level of cAMP within

  3. Focus on Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Donald S., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    This collection of essays focuses on issues in bilingual education. First, Elizabeth Flynn examines different kinds of bilingual programs; efforts made towards cultural pluralism in a number of countries; national benefits to be derived from bilingualism; the needs of American ethnic groups, new immigrants, and foreign students; and the pros and…

  4. Focus: Economic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCorkle, Sarapage; Meszaros, Bonnie T.; Odorzynski, Sandra J.; Schug, Mark C.; Watts, Michael

    The "Focus" series, part of the National Council on Economic Education's (NCEE) EconomicsAmerica program, uses economics to enhance learning in subjects such as history, geography, civics, and personal finance, as well as economics. Activities are interactive, reflecting the belief that students learn best through active, highly personalized…

  5. Instructional Technology. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on implementing instructional technology in ways that benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Cruising the Web with English Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green) presents three scenarios using the World Wide Web in…

  6. Bilingual Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on instructional practices, evaluation, and the state of bilingual education. "Effective Implementation of Bilingual Programs: Reflections from the Field" (Abelardo Villarreal, Adela Solis) describes the key characteristics of successful bilingual programs: vision and goals; program leadership; linkage to central office…

  7. Youth Leadership. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on motivating young people to learn by providing leadership opportunities in school. "Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program: Assessing Progress" (Josie Danini Supik) examines the program's success. This program, which trains high-risk middle and high school students as tutors of younger children, has dramatically lowered dropout…

  8. Policy Update. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the drastic revision of the Texas education code undertaken during the 1995 state legislative session. "Education Policy Reform: Key Points for Districts" (Albert Cortez, Mikki Symonds) outlines critical issues in the legislation that have an impact on educational quality: charter schools exempt from state regulations;…

  9. Focus on the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Optometric Education, 1996

    1996-01-01

    In an interview, the incoming president of the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO), Thomas L. Lewis, discusses his goals for the association, the challenges facing optometric education in the next decade, cooperation between ASCO and other professional organizations in optometry, his mentors in the profession, his focus as a…

  10. Focus on the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Optometric Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    An interview with the new president of the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry, John Schoessler, considers issues the president wishes to focus on during his presidency, changes in optometry students over the years, people who influenced his educational ideas, and research currently being conducted at Ohio State University College of…

  11. Focusing educational initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.

    1990-01-01

    The United States will soon be facing a critical shortage of aerospace scientists and engineers. To address this problem, Space Grant Colleges can assist in focusing interest in existing educational initiatives and in creating new educational opportunities, particularly for women and underrepresented minorities.

  12. Public Engagement. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter includes six articles that examine key issues facing public schools and communities related to accountability, bilingual education, immigrant education, school finance, and school choice. In addressing these issues, articles focus on the importance of community involvement and input in local school reform efforts aimed at achieving…

  13. School Reform. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue addresses school reform, focusing on accountability, attrition, public-supported private education, equitable education, and schoolwide reform. "School-Student Performance and Accountability" (Jose A. Cardenas) discusses what constitutes good performance in school; the shifting emphasis among the input, output, and process of…

  14. Theme: Focus on Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, James J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "The More Things Change..." (Connors); "Students--Bored of Education?" (Earle); "Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow" (Wesch et al.); "Attitude and the Value of Environment" (Foster); "Fins, Feathers and Fur" (Crank); "Greenhouse as a Focus for Agriscience" (Hurst); and "Agricultural and Environmental Education at Milton Hershey School"…

  15. .: Optics & Photonics Focus

    E-print Network

    Rogers, John A.

    quickly zoom to focus on near or far objects by appropriately adjusting the shape of the crystalline lens that behave much like the crystalline lens. These lenses typically use an elastic, liquid-filled membrane that changes its shape with the liquid pressure. Rogers' group adopted this approach and built a tunable lens

  16. Focus on First Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Shari S.

    The result of a collaboration between the El Paso, Texas, school district and community agencies, the Focus on First Graders program provides early intervention and prevention using a comprehensive approach to providing a variety of services at the school to at-risk first graders from low income families. Teachers and parents were surveyed to…

  17. Focus: International Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Gerald J.; Watts, Michael W.; Wentworth, Donald R.

    The "Focus" series, part of the National Council on Economic Education's (NCEE) EconomicsAmerica program, uses economics to enhance learning in subjects such as history, geography, civics, and personal finance, as well as economics. Activities are interactive, reflecting the belief that students learn best through active, highly personalized…

  18. RESEARCH IN FOCUS: MANUFACTURING

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    RESEARCH IN FOCUS: ADVANCED MANUFACTURING HERE'S WHAT PARTNERING WITH U OF T ENGINEERING DELIVERS & Engineering is a hub of advanced manufacturing research. Our reputation as the top engineering school -- An extra spark of innovation to your company -- Collaboration with U of T Engineering's world

  19. Immigrant Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter includes five articles on immigrant education that focus on successful school programs and educational policy issues. In "Immigrant Education from the Administrators' Perspective" (Pam McCollum, Juanita Garcia), three principals of south Texas secondary schools with successful immigrant programs discuss their views on the adequacy…

  20. Education Policy. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on educational policy in the Texas legislature in relation to student retention, Internet access, and sexual harassment. "1999 Texas Legislative Session--End of an Era?" (Albert Cortez, Maria Robledo Montecel) examines educational equity issues facing legislators: school funding, including the…

  1. Homework. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahal, Michelle Layer

    2010-01-01

    Homework has been an integral part of the educational system for over 100 years. What likely began as simple memorization tasks has evolved into complex projects and sparked an increasingly heated debate over the purpose and value of homework assignments. This "Focus On" examines the purpose of homework, how to create homework that has value,…

  2. Focus on Efficient Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort. Office of Resource Management.

    Compiled as a workshop handbook, this guide presents information to help food service program administrators comply with federal regulations and evaluate and upgrade their operations. Part I discusses requirements of the National School Lunch Program, focusing on the "offer versus serve" method of service enacted in 1976 to reduce waste. After an…

  3. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  4. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  5. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Gough, Richard A. (Kensington, CA); Ji, Qing (Berkeley, CA); Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  6. Focused on Robert E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, shows a geological feature dubbed 'Robert E.' Light from the top is illuminating the feature, which is located within the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Several images, each showing a different part of 'Robert E' in good focus, were merged to produce this view. The area in this image, taken on Sol 15 of the Opportunity mission, is 2.2 centimeters (0.8 inches) across.

  7. Generator powered plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    An earlier set of experiments will be described briefly, in which plate flux compression generators were used to power a Plasma Focus. Currents, voltages and 'rundown times' obtained in these experiments are shown to agree well with a simple model. This same model is then used to show how dramatic operational improvements could be obtained with use of an appropriate fuse, provided the model remained valid.

  8. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  9. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  10. Digital focusing schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, Benjamin D.; Trolinger, James D.; L'Esperance, Drew

    2015-09-01

    Since its invention in the 19th century, schlieren imaging has been an essential method for studying many aerodynamic effects, particularly convection and shock waves, but the classical method using parabolic mirrors is extremely difficult to set up and very expensive for large fields of view. Focusing schlieren methods have made large- area schlieren more feasible but have tended to be difficult to align and set up, limiting their utility in many applications We recently developed an alternative approach which utilizes recent advances in digital display technology to produce simpler schlieren system that yields similar sensitivity with greater flexibility.

  11. Dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device

    DOEpatents

    James, Conrad D. (Albuquerque, NM); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Mark S. (Tijeras, NM)

    2010-05-11

    A dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device uses interdigitated microelectrodes to provide a spatially non-uniform electric field in a fluid that generates a dipole within particles in the fluid. The electric field causes the particles to either be attracted to or repelled from regions where the electric field gradient is large, depending on whether the particles are more or less polarizable than the fluid. The particles can thereby be forced into well defined stable paths along the interdigitated microelectrodes. The device can be used for flow cytometry, particle control, and other process applications, including cell counting or other types of particle counting, and for separations in material control.

  12. Isoelectric focusing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.; Egen, N. B.; Mosher, R. A.; Twitty, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of space electrophoresis is conditioned by the fact that all electrophoretic techniques require the suppression of gravity-caused convection. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) is a powerful variant of electrophoresis, in which amphoteric substances are separated in a pH gradient according to their isoelectric points. A new apparatus for large scale IEF, utilizing a recycling principle, has been developed. In the ground-based prototype, laminar flow is provided by a series of parallel filter elements. The operation of the apparatus is monitored by an automated array of pH and ultraviolet absorption sensors under control of a desk-top computer. The apparatus has proven to be useful for the purification of a variety of enzymes, snake venom proteins, peptide hormones, and other biologicals, including interferon produced by genetic engineering techniques. In planning for a possible space apparatus, a crucial question regarding electroosmosis needs to be addressed To solve this problem, simple focusing test modules are planned for inclusion in an early Shuttle flight.

  13. Frequency-dependent ultrasound-induced transformation in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Jeremy; Windmill, James; Agbeze-Onuma, Maduka; Kalin, Robert M; Argondizza, Peter; Knapp, Charles W

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound-enhanced gene transfer (UEGT) is continuing to gain interest across many disciplines; however, very few studies investigate UEGT efficiency across a range of frequencies. Using a variable frequency generator, UEGT was tested in E. coli at six ultrasonic frequencies. Results indicate frequency can significantly influence UEGT efficiency positively and negatively. A frequency of 61 kHz improved UEGT efficiency by ~70 % higher, but 99 kHz impeded UEGT to an extent worse than no ultrasound exposure. The other four frequencies (26, 133, 174, and 190 kHz) enhanced transformation compared to no ultrasound, but efficiencies did not vary. The influence of frequency on UEGT efficiency was observed across a range of operating frequencies. It is plausible that frequency-dependent dynamics of mechanical and chemical energies released during cavitational-bubble collapse (CBC) are responsible for observed UEGT efficiencies. PMID:25048242

  14. Accommodation of Plastic Deformation by Ultrasound-Induced Grain Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R. K.; Petrov, R. H.; Hermans, M. J. M.; Richardson, I. M.

    2015-08-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction was used to investigate the softening effect in low-carbon steel [Fe-0.051C-0.002Si-0.224Mn-0.045Al (wt pct)] during tensile deformation with in situ ultrasonic treatment. A bimodal grain size distribution is observed with relatively small equiaxed grains with an average diameter of 10 ?m at the grain boundaries of large elongated grains. The formation of these relatively small equiaxed grains is interpreted in terms of dynamic recrystallization by lattice and sub-grain rotation.

  15. Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation from gas-stabilizing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, J. J.; Graham, S.; Myers, R.; Carlisle, R.; Stride, E.; Coussios, C. C.

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of cavitation from nanoparticles has been hindered by the inability to control nanobubble size. We present a method to manufacture nanoparticles with a tunable single hemispherical depression (nanocups) of mean diameter 90, 260, or 650 nm entrapping a nanobubble. A modified Rayleigh-Plesset crevice model predicts the inertial cavitation threshold as a function of cavity size and frequency, and is verified experimentally. The ability to tune cavitation nanonuclei and predict their behavior will be useful for applications ranging from cancer therapy to ultrasonic cleaning.

  16. Focus on: neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, C Fernando; Puglia, Michael P; Zucca, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Neurotransmitter systems have been long recognized as important targets of the developmental actions of alcohol (i.e., ethanol). Short- and long-term effects of ethanol on amino acid (e.g., ?-aminobutyric acid and glutamate) and biogenic amine (e.g., serotonin and dopamine) neurotransmitters have been demonstrated in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Researchers have detected ethanol effects after exposure during developmental periods equivalent to the first, second, and third trimesters of human pregnancy. Results support the recommendation that pregnant women should abstain from drinking-even small quantities-as effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter systems have been detected at low levels of exposure. Recent studies have elucidated new mechanisms and/or consequences of the actions of ethanol on amino acid and biogenic amine neuro-transmitter systems. Alterations in these neurotransmitter systems could, in part, be responsible for many of the conditions associated with FASD, including (1) learning, memory, and attention deficits; (2) motor coordination impairments; (3) abnormal responsiveness to stress; and (4) increased susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disorders, such as substance abuse and depression, and also neurological disorders, such as epilepsy and sudden infant death syndrome. However, future research is needed to conclusively establish a causal relationship between these conditions and developmental dysfunctions in neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23580048

  17. Focus on Quantum Memories

    E-print Network

    Gavin Brennen; Elisabeth Giacobino; Christoph Simon

    2015-04-10

    Quantum memories are essential for quantum information processing and long-distance quantum communication. The field has recently seen a lot of progress, and the present focus issue offers a glimpse of these developments, showing both experimental and theoretical results from many of the leading groups around the world. On the experimental side, it shows work on cold gases, warm vapors, rare-earth ion doped crystals and single atoms. On the theoretical side there are in-depth studies of existing memory protocols, proposals for new protocols including approaches based on quantum error correction, and proposals for new applications of quantum storage. Looking forward, we anticipate many more exciting results in this area.

  18. Focus on Quantum Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennen, Gavin; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Simon, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Quantum memories are essential for quantum information processing and long-distance quantum communication. The field has recently seen a lot of progress, and the present focus issue offers a glimpse of these developments, showing both experimental and theoretical results from many of the leading groups around the world. On the experimental side, it shows work on cold gases, warm vapors, rare-earth ion doped crystals and single atoms. On the theoretical side there are in-depth studies of existing memory protocols, proposals for new protocols including approaches based on quantum error correction, and proposals for new applications of quantum storage. Looking forward, we anticipate many more exciting results in this area.

  19. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural kidney stones. For the model stones, the erosion rate of the C-C waveform showed a distinct advantage with the combined high and low frequency waves over either wave alone. For optimization of the high frequency ultrasound intensity, we investigated the relationship between subharmonic emission from cavitation bubbles and stone erosion volume. For stone tracking we have also developed a non-invasive ultrasound theragnostic system (NIUTS) that compensates for kidney motion. Natural stones were eroded and most of the resulting fragments were less than 1 mm in diameter. The small fragments were small enough to pass through the urethra. The results demonstrate that, with the precise control of cavitation activity, focused ultrasound has the potential to be used to develop a less invasive and more controllable lithotripsy system. PMID:26486335

  20. The design of aerial camera focusing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Changchang; Yang, Hongtao; Niu, Haijun

    2015-10-01

    In order to ensure the imaging resolution of aerial camera and compensating defocusing caused by the changing of atmospheric temperature, pressure, oblique photographing distance and other environmental factor [1,2], and to meeting the overall design requirements of the camera for the lower mass and smaller size , the linear focusing mechanism is designed. Through the target surface support, the target surface component is connected with focusing driving mechanism. Make use of precision ball screws, focusing mechanism transforms the input rotary motion of motor into linear motion of the focal plane assembly. Then combined with the form of linear guide restraint movement, the magnetic encoder is adopted to detect the response of displacement. And the closed loop control is adopted to realize accurate focusing. This paper illustrated the design scheme for a focusing mechanism and analyzed its error sources. It has the advantages of light friction and simple transmission chain and reducing the transmission error effectively. And this paper also analyses the target surface by finite element analysis and lightweight design. Proving that the precision of focusing mechanism can achieve higher than 3um, and the focusing range is +/-2mm.

  1. Ion Motion inthe Adiabatic Focuser

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.M.; Yu, S.S.

    2006-06-10

    In this paper we numerically study the effect of ion motion in an adiabatic focuser, motivated by a recent suggestion that ion motion in an adiabatic focuser might be significant and even preclude operation of the focuser as previously envisioned. It is shown that despite ion motion the adiabatic focuser should work as well as originally envisioned.

  2. A study on the flip angle for an optimal T1-weighted image based on the 3D-THRIVE MRI technique: Focusing on the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the optimal flip angle (FA) for a T1-weighted image in the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A 3D-T1-weighted high-resolution isotropic volume examination (THRIVE) technique was used to determine the dependence of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on the change in FA. This study targeted 40 liver cancer patients (25 men and 15 women aged 50 to 70 years with a mean age of 60.32 ± 6.2 years) who visited this hospital to undergo an abdominal MRI examination from January to June 2013. A 3.0 Tesla MRI machine (Philips, Medical System, Achieva) and a MRI receiver coil for data reception with a 16-channel multicoil were used in this study. The THRIVE (repetition time (TR): 8.1 ms, echo time (TE): 3.7 ms, matrix: 172 × 172, slice thickness: 4 mm, gap: 2 mm, field of view (FOV): 350 mm, and band width (BW): 380.1 Hz) technique was applied as a pulse sequence. The time required for the examination was 19 seconds, and the breath-hold technique was used. Axial images were obtained at five FAs: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25°. The signal intensities of the liver, the lesion and the background noise were measured based on the acquired images before the SNR and the CNR were calculated. To evaluate the image at the FA, we used SPSS for Windows ver. 17.0 to conduct a one-way ANOVA test. A Bonferroni test was conducted as a post-hoc test. The SNRs of the hemorrhagic HCC in the 3D-THRIVE technique were 35.50 ± 4.12, 97.00 ± 10.24, 66.09 ± 7.29, 53.84 ± 5.43, and 42.92 ± 5.11 for FAs of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°, respectively (p = 0.0430), whereas the corresponding CNRs were 30.50 ± 3.84, 43.00 ± 5.42, 36.54 ± 4.09, 32.30 ± 2.79, and 31.69 ± 3.21 (p = 0.0003). At a small FA of 10, the SNR and the CNR showed the highest values. As the FA was increased, the SNR and the CNR values showed a decreasing tendency. In conclusion, the optimal T1-weighted image FA should be set to 10° to detect a HCC by using the 3D-THRIVE abdominal MRI technique.

  3. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  4. Focus Point Supersymmetry in Extended Gauge Mediation

    E-print Network

    Ding, Ran; Staub, Florian; Zhu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a small extenion of the minimal gauge mediation through the combination of extended gauge mediation and conformal sequestering. We show that the focus point supersymmetry can be realized naturally, and the ?ne-tuning is signifcantly reduced compared to the minimal gauge mediation and extended gauge mediation without focus point. The Higgs boson mass is around 125 GeV, the gauginos remain light, and the gluino is likely to be detected at the next run of the LHC. However, the multi-TeV squarks is out of the reach of the LHC. The numerical calculation for ?netuning shows that this model remains natural.

  5. COMPRENDO: Focus and Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Allera, Axel; Bachmann, Jean; Berntsson, Pia; Beresford, Nicola; Carnevali, Daniela Candia; Ciceri, Francesca; Dagnac, Thierry; Falandysz, Jerzy; Galassi, Silvana; Hala, David; Janer, Gemma; Jeannot, Roger; Jobling, Susan; King, Isabella; Klingmüller, Dietrich; Kloas, Werner; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Levada, Ramon; Lo, Susan; Lutz, Ilka; Oehlmann, Jörg; Oredsson, Stina; Porte, Cinta; Rand-Weaver, Marian; Sakkas, Vasilis; Sugni, Michela; Tyler, Charles; van Aerle, Ronny; van Ballegoy, Christoph; Wollenberger, Leah

    2006-01-01

    Tens of thousands of man-made chemicals are in regular use and discharged into the environment. Many of them are known to interfere with the hormonal systems in humans and wildlife. Given the complexity of endocrine systems, there are many ways in which endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can affect the body’s signaling system, and this makes unraveling the mechanisms of action of these chemicals difficult. A major concern is that some of these EDCs appear to be biologically active at extremely low concentrations. There is growing evidence to indicate that the guiding principle of traditional toxicology that “the dose makes the poison” may not always be the case because some EDCs do not induce the classical dose–response relationships. The European Union project COMPRENDO (Comparative Research on Endocrine Disrupters—Phylogenetic Approach and Common Principles focussing on Androgenic/Antiandrogenic Compounds) therefore aims to develop an understanding of potential health problems posed by androgenic and antiandrogenic compounds (AACs) to wildlife and humans by focusing on the commonalities and differences in responses to AACs across the animal kingdom (from invertebrates to vertebrates). PMID:16818253

  6. Initiative for Explosives Detection

    E-print Network

    Initiative for Explosives Detection Highly Concealed Bulk Explosives Detection This focus area emphasizes the detection of explosives or IEDs hidden in vehicles, buildings or various types of containers of highly concealed explosives include the development of enhanced energy sources, improved electronics

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, N. M. R.; Ribeiro, Ricardo M.

    2009-09-01

    Graphene physics is currently one of the most active research areas in condensed matter physics. Countless theoretical and experimental studies have already been performed, targeting electronic, magnetic, thermal, optical, structural and vibrational properties. Also, studies that modify pristine graphene, aiming at finding new physics and possible new applications, have been considered. These include patterning nanoribbons and quantum dots, exposing graphene's surface to different chemical species, studying multilayer systems, and inducing strain and curvature (modifying in this way graphene's electronic properties). This focus issue includes many of the latest developments on graphene research. Focus on Graphene Contents Electronic properties of graphene and graphene nanoribbons with 'pseudo-Rashba' spin-orbit coupling Tobias Stauber and John Schliemann Strained graphene: tight-binding and density functional calculations R M Ribeiro, Vitor M Pereira, N M R Peres, P R Briddon and A H Castro Neto The effect of sublattice symmetry breaking on the electronic properties of doped graphene A Qaiumzadeh and R Asgari Interfaces within graphene nanoribbons J Wurm, M Wimmer, I Adagideli, K Richter and H U Baranger Weak localization and transport gap in graphene antidot lattices J Eroms and D Weiss Electronic properties of graphene antidot lattices J A Fürst, J G Pedersen, C Flindt, N A Mortensen, M Brandbyge, T G Pedersen and A-P Jauho Splitting of critical energies in the n=0 Landau level of graphene Ana L C Pereira Double-gated graphene-based devices S Russo, M F Craciun, M Yamamoto, S Tarucha and A F Morpurgo Pinning and switching of magnetic moments in bilayer graphene Eduardo V Castro, M P López-Sancho and M A H Vozmediano Electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons Katsunori Wakabayashi, Yositake Takane, Masayuki Yamamoto and Manfred Sigrist Many-body effects on out-of-plane phonons in graphene J González and E Perfetto Graphene zigzag ribbons, square lattice models and quantum spin chains Mahdi Zarea and Nancy Sandler On the universal ac optical background in graphene V P Gusynin, S G Sharapov and J P Carbotte Heat conduction in graphene: experimental study and theoretical interpretation S Ghosh, D L Nika, E P Pokatilov and A A Balandin Calculation of the Raman G peak intensity in monolayer graphene: role of Ward identities D M Basko Electronic transport in bilayer graphene Mikito Koshino Magnetic Kronig-Penney model for Dirac electrons in single-layer graphene M Ramezani Masir, P Vasilopoulos and F M Peeters Electrical transport in high-quality graphene pnp junctions Jairo Velasco Jr, Gang Liu, Wenzhong Bao and Chun Ning Lau Local density of states and scanning tunneling currents in graphene N M R Peres, Ling Yang and Shan-Wen Tsai Gaps and tails in graphene and graphane B Dóra and K Ziegler Quasi-ferromagnet spintronics in the graphene nanodisc-lead system Motohiko Ezawa Range and correlation effects in edge disordered graphene nanoribbons Alessandro Cresti and Stephan Roche Remarks on the tight-binding model of graphene Cristina Bena and Gilles Montambaux

  8. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated. PMID:26486330

  9. Microflow Cytometers with Integrated Hydrodynamic Focusing

    PubMed Central

    Frankowski, Marcin; Theisen, Janko; Kummrow, Andreas; Simon, Peter; Ragusch, Hülya; Bock, Nicole; Schmidt, Martin; Neukammer, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates the suitability of microfluidic structures for high throughput blood cell analysis. The microfluidic chips exploit fully integrated hydrodynamic focusing based on two different concepts: Two-stage cascade focusing and spin focusing (vortex) principle. The sample—A suspension of micro particles or blood cells—is injected into a sheath fluid streaming at a substantially higher flow rate, which assures positioning of the particles in the center of the flow channel. Particle velocities of a few m/s are achieved as required for high throughput blood cell analysis. The stability of hydrodynamic particle positioning was evaluated by measuring the pulse heights distributions of fluorescence signals from calibration beads. Quantitative assessment based on coefficient of variation for the fluorescence intensity distributions resulted in a value of about 3% determined for the micro-device exploiting cascade hydrodynamic focusing. For the spin focusing approach similar values were achieved for sample flow rates being 1.5 times lower. Our results indicate that the performances of both variants of hydrodynamic focusing suit for blood cell differentiation and counting. The potential of the micro flow cytometer is demonstrated by detecting immunologically labeled CD3 positive and CD4 positive T-lymphocytes in blood. PMID:23571670

  10. Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hartlein, R.A.; Hampton, R.N.

    2010-12-30

    This report summarizes an extensive effort made to understand how to effectively use the various diagnostic technologies to establish the condition of medium voltage underground cable circuits. These circuits make up an extensive portion of the electric delivery infrastructure in the United States. Much of this infrastructure is old and experiencing unacceptable failure rates. By deploying efficient diagnostic testing programs, electric utilities can replace or repair circuits that are about to fail, providing an optimal approach to improving electric system reliability. This is an intrinsically complex topic. Underground cable systems are not homogeneous. Cable circuits often contain multiple branches with different cable designs and a range of insulation materials. In addition, each insulation material ages differently as a function of time, temperature and operating environment. To complicate matters further, there are a wide variety of diagnostic technologies available for assessing the condition of cable circuits with a diversity of claims about the effectiveness of each approach. As a result, the benefits of deploying cable diagnostic testing programs have been difficult to establish, leading many utilities to avoid the their use altogether. This project was designed to help address these issues. The information provided is the result of a collaborative effort between Georgia Tech NEETRAC staff, Georgia Tech academic faculty, electric utility industry participants, as well as cable system diagnostic testing service providers and test equipment providers. Report topics include: •How cable systems age and fail, •The various technologies available for detecting potential failure sites, •The advantages and disadvantages of different diagnostic technologies, •Different approaches for utilities to employ cable system diagnostics. The primary deliverables of this project are this report, a Cable Diagnostic Handbook (a subset of this report) and an online knowledge based system (KBS) that helps utilities select the most effective diagnostic technologies for a given cable circuit and circuit conditions.

  11. Hydrodynamic focusing – a versatile tool

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Joel P.; Justin, Gusphyl A.; Nasir, Mansoor; Ligler, Frances S.

    2011-01-01

    The control of hydrodynamic focusing in a microchannel has inspired new approaches for microfluidic mixing, separations, sensors, cell analysis and microfabrication. Achieving a flat interface between the focusing and focused fluids is dependent on Reynolds number and device geometry, and many hydrodynamic focusing systems can benefit from this understanding. For applications where a specific cross-sectional shape is desired for the focused flow, advection generated by grooved structures in the channel walls can be used to define the shape of the focused flow. Relative flow rates of the focused flow and focusing streams can be manipulated to control the crosssectional area of the focused flows. This manuscript discusses the principles for defining the shape of the interface between the focused and focusing fluids and provides examples from our lab that use hydrodynamic focusing for impedance-based sensors, flow cytometry, and microfabrication to illustrate the breadth of opportunities for introducing new capabilities into microfluidic systems. We evaluate each example for the advantages and limitations integral to utilization of hydrodynamic focusing for that particular application. PMID:21952728

  12. Dual focus diffractive optical element with extended depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Isao

    2014-09-01

    A dual focus property and an extended depth of focus were verified by a new type of diffractive lens displaying on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices. This type of lens is useful to read information on multilayer optical discs and tilted discs. The radial undulation of the phase groove on the diffractive lens gave the dual focus nature. The focal extension was performed by combining the dual focus lens with the axilens that was invented for expanding the depth of focus. The number of undulations did not affect the intensity along the optical axis but the central spot of the diffraction pattern.

  13. Focusators for laser-branding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doskolovich, L. L.; Kazanskiy, N. L.; Kharitonov, S. I.; Uspleniev, G. V.

    A new method is investigated for synthesis of computer-generated optical elements: focusators that are able to focus the radial-symmetrical laser beam into complex focal contours, in particular into alphanumeric symbols. The method is based on decomposition of the focal contour into segments of straight lines and semi-circles, following corresponding spacing out of the focusator on elementary segments (concentric rings or sectors) and solution of the inverse task of focusing from focusator segments into corresponding elements of the focal contour. The results of numerical computing of the field from synthesized focusators into the letters are presented. The theoretical efficiency of the focusators discussed is no less than 85%. The amplitude masks and the results of operational studies of synthesized focusators are presented.

  14. Focusing Electron Beams at SLAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the development of a set of magnets that focus high-energy electron and positron beams causing them to collide, annihilate each other, and generate new particles. Explains how dipoles bend the beam, how quadrupoles focus the beam, how the focal length is calculated, and the superconducting final focus. (MDH)

  15. Community Gardens Focus Group Report

    E-print Network

    Community Gardens Focus Group Report Produced for Auckland City Council July 2002 Auckland University of Technology #12;Community Gardens Focus Groups A series of 3 focus groups were conducted over 2 Council regarding Community Gardens. The groups consisted of 6-8 people in each with the following

  16. Ultrasonic inspection apparatus and method using a focused wave device

    DOEpatents

    Gieske, John H. (Albuquerque, NM); Roach, Dennis P. (Albuquerque, NM); Walkington, Phillip D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An ultrasonic pulse echo inspection apparatus and method for detecting structural failures. A focus lens is coupled to the transducer to focus the ultrasonic signal on an area to be inspected and a stop is placed in the focus lens to block selected ultrasonic waves. Other waves are not blocked and are transmitted through the structure to arrive at interfaces therein concurrently to produce an echo response with significantly less distortion.

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-10-01

    Control of quantum phenomena has grown from a dream to a burgeoning field encompassing wide-ranging experimental and theoretical activities. Theoretical research in this area primarily concerns identification of the principles for controlling quantum phenomena, the exploration of new experimental applications and the development of associated operational algorithms to guide such experiments. Recent experiments with adaptive feedback control span many applications including selective excitation, wave packet engineering and control in the presence of complex environments. Practical procedures are also being developed to execute real-time feedback control considering the resultant back action on the quantum system. This focus issue includes papers covering many of the latest advances in the field. Focus on Quantum Control Contents Control of quantum phenomena: past, present and future Constantin Brif, Raj Chakrabarti and Herschel Rabitz Biologically inspired molecular machines driven by light. Optimal control of a unidirectional rotor Guillermo Pérez-Hernández, Adam Pelzer, Leticia González and Tamar Seideman Simulating quantum search algorithm using vibronic states of I2 manipulated by optimally designed gate pulses Yukiyoshi Ohtsuki Efficient coherent control by sequences of pulses of finite duration Götz S Uhrig and Stefano Pasini Control by decoherence: weak field control of an excited state objective Gil Katz, Mark A Ratner and Ronnie Kosloff Multi-qubit compensation sequences Y Tomita, J T Merrill and K R Brown Environment-invariant measure of distance between evolutions of an open quantum system Matthew D Grace, Jason Dominy, Robert L Kosut, Constantin Brif and Herschel Rabitz Simplified quantum process tomography M P A Branderhorst, J Nunn, I A Walmsley and R L Kosut Achieving 'perfect' molecular discrimination via coherent control and stimulated emission Stephen D Clow, Uvo C Holscher and Thomas C Weinacht A convenient method to simulate and visually represent two-photon power spectra of arbitrarily and adaptively shaped broadband laser pulses M A Montgomery and N H Damrauer Accurate and efficient implementation of the von Neumann representation for laser pulses with discrete and finite spectra Frank Dimler, Susanne Fechner, Alexander Rodenberg, Tobias Brixner and David J Tannor Coherent strong-field control of multiple states by a single chirped femtosecond laser pulse M Krug, T Bayer, M Wollenhaupt, C Sarpe-Tudoran, T Baumert, S S Ivanov and N V Vitanov Quantum-state measurement of ionic Rydberg wavepackets X Zhang and R R Jones On the paradigm of coherent control: the phase-dependent light-matter interaction in the shaping window Tiago Buckup, Jurgen Hauer and Marcus Motzkus Use of the spatial phase of a focused laser beam to yield mechanistic information about photo-induced chemical reactions V J Barge, Z Hu and R J Gordon Coherent control of multiple vibrational excitations for optimal detection S D McGrane, R J Scharff, M Greenfield and D S Moore Mode selectivity with polarization shaping in the mid-IR David B Strasfeld, Chris T Middleton and Martin T Zanni Laser-guided relativistic quantum dynamics Chengpu Liu, Markus C Kohler, Karen Z Hatsagortsyan, Carsten Muller and Christoph H Keitel Continuous quantum error correction as classical hybrid control Hideo Mabuchi Quantum filter reduction for measurement-feedback control via unsupervised manifold learning Anne E B Nielsen, Asa S Hopkins and Hideo Mabuchi Control of the temporal profile of the local electromagnetic field near metallic nanostructures Ilya Grigorenko and Anatoly Efimov Laser-assisted molecular orientation in gaseous media: new possibilities and applications Dmitry V Zhdanov and Victor N Zadkov Optimization of laser field-free orientation of a state-selected NO molecular sample Arnaud Rouzee, Arjan Gijsbertsen, Omair Ghafur, Ofer M Shir, Thomas Back, Steven Stolte and Marc J J Vrakking Controlling the sense of molecular rotation Sharly Fleischer, Yuri Khodorkovsky, Yehiam Prior and Ilya Sh Averbukh Optimal control of interacting particles: a

  18. Double Bifurcation of Nilpotent Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yirong; Li, Feng

    In this paper, an interesting bifurcation phenomenon is investigated — a 3-multiple nilpotent focus of the planar dynamical systems could be broken into two element focuses and an element saddle, and the limit cycles could bifurcate out from two element focuses. As an example, a class of cubic systems with 3-multiple nilpotent focus O(0, 0) is investigated, we prove that nine limit cycles with the scheme 7 ? (1 ? 1) could bifurcate out from the origin when the origin is a weak focus of order 8. At the end of this paper, the double bifurcations of a class of Z2 equivalent cubic system with 3-multiple nilpotent focus or center O(0, 0) are investigated.

  19. Scalability of Redundancy Detection in Focused Document Collections

    E-print Network

    Stolle, Reinhard

    is potentially more of a bottle- neck. 1 Introduction We describe aspects of a prototype system be- ing developed. This is being ap- plied to Eureka, a database of around 40,000 technician-authored, free-text tips concerning on the hypothesis that deep sym- bolic analysis, mapping texts onto formal se- mantic/knowledge representations

  20. Scalability of Redundancy Detection in Focused Document Collections

    E-print Network

    Stolle, Reinhard

    Cover (2E30072) to break. Cause: The plastic jacket made the cable too stiff. This causes stress to be c Cause: The left cover safety cable is breaking, allowing the left cover to pivot too far, breaking

  1. Geosciences Reinvestment:Geosciences Reinvestment: Undergraduate FocusUndergraduate Focus

    E-print Network

    Geosciences Reinvestment:Geosciences Reinvestment: Undergraduate FocusUndergraduate Focus College of GeosciencesGeosciences Thursday, 7 April 2005Thursday, 7 April 2005 #12;GeosciencesGeosciences · Exposes with atmosphere, ocean, and land environments College of GeosciencesGeosciences #12;· 4 academic and 3 research

  2. MBG FOCUS TALK MBG Focus Talks in Molecular Biology

    E-print Network

    Bataillon, Thomas

    MBG FOCUS TALK MBG Focus Talks in Molecular Biology AARHUS UNIVERSITY DEPT. OF MOLECULAR BIOLOGY.D McGill University Translating the biology of protein tyrosine phosphatases into novel cancer species and point to interesting features of the evolution of the tyrosine phosphatase gene families

  3. Variational Depth From Focus Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Michael; Benning, Martin; Schonlieb, Carola; Cremers, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of reconstructing a depth map from a sequence of differently focused images, also known as depth from focus or shape from focus. We propose to state the depth from focus problem as a variational problem including a smooth but nonconvex data fidelity term, and a convex nonsmooth regularization, which makes the method robust to noise and leads to more realistic depth maps. Additionally, we propose to solve the nonconvex minimization problem with a linearized alternating directions method of multipliers (ADMM), allowing to minimize the energy very efficiently. A numerical comparison to classical methods on simulated as well as on real data is presented.

  4. Sparsity promoting automatic focusing in digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Paturzo, Melania; Javidi, Bahram; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Sparsity properties of digital holograms have been investigated for application in compressive holography, permitting the discovery of the sparsest reconstruction plane in which the recovery of digital holograms is suitable. Recent approaches for denoising and phase retrieval are also proposed exploiting the sparsity properties of digital holograms. Thus it can be shown a strong correlation between holograms sparsity and focal plane detection, making a sparsity measure coefficient as a candidate to be used for focus plane calculation. Here we implement different sparsity metrics, that are able to measure a degree of sparsity of reconstructed digital hologram and we investigate their relation with the automatic focusing criterions, highlighting the possibility to use a sparsity measure as refocusing metric as well as the contrary, i.e. using image contrast coefficients as sparsity measures. Our analysis will be reported for digital holograms recorded in both lensless and microscope configuration and for both amplitude and pure-phase objects.

  5. New Results from the FOCUS/E831 Experiment

    E-print Network

    Kim, D Y; Alimonti, G; Anjos, J C; Arena, V; Barberis, S; Bediaga, I; Benussi, L; Bertani, L; Bianco, S; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Boschini, M; Butler, J N; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cawlfield, C; Cerutti, A; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Cho, K; Chung, Y S; Cinquini, L; Cuautle, E; Cumalat, J P; D'Angelo, P; Davenport, T F; De Miranda, J M; Di Corato, M; Dini, P; Dos Reis, A C; Edera, L; Engh, D; Erba, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Gardner, R; Garren, L A; Giammarchi, M; Gianini, G; Gottschalk, E E; Green, S W; Göbel, C; Han, T; Hernández, H; Hosack, M; Inzani, P; Johns, W E; Kang, J S; Kasper, P H; Kim, D Y; Ko, B R; Kreymer, A E; Kryemadhi, A; Kutschke, R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Leveraro, F; Liguori, G; Link, J M; Lopes-Pegna, D; Luiggi, E; López, A M; Magnin, J; Malvezzi, S; Massafferri, A; Menasce, D; Merlo, M M; Mezzadri, M; Mitchell, R; Moroni, L; Méndez, H; Nehring, M S; O'Reilly, B; Pantea, D; Paris, A; Park, H; Pedrini, D; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; Pon, C; Prelz, F; Quinones, J; Rahimi, A; Ramírez, J E; Ratti, S P; Reyes, M; Riccardi, C; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Segoni, I; Sheaff, M; Sheldon, P D; Stenson, K; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vaandering, E W; Vitulo, P; Vázquez, F; Wahl, M; Wang, M; Webster, M; Wilson, J R; Wiss, J; Yager, P M; Zallo, A; Zhang, Y; Kim, Doris Yangsoo

    2003-01-01

    The E831/FOCUS experiment at Fermilab is a photoproduction experiment which generated high quality charm particles. During its run, we obtained a large data set, including more than 1 million charm mesons in the Kpi/K2pi/K3pi mode decays. The current analysis efforts by the collaboration members are quite active and diverse. I will summarize the recent papers published by the FOCUS group on topics of semileptonic decays of charm mesons.

  6. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  7. Focus on Careers: COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS

    E-print Network

    Hickey, Timothy J.

    Focus on Careers: COMPUTATIONAL LINGUISTICS Computational linguistics is the scientific on linguistic theory and computer science. Computational linguistics techniques are employed whenever a person systems Computational linguistic centers Information technology Federal government Neuroscience research

  8. Wolter Optics for Neutron Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildner, D. F. R.; Gubarev, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    Focusing optics based on Wolter optical geometries developed for x-ray grazing incidence beams can be designed for neutron beams. Wolter optics are formed by grazing incidence reflections from two concentric conic sections (for example, a paraboloid and a hyperboloid). This has transformed observational X-ray astronomy by increasing the sensitivity by many orders of magnitude for research in astrophysics and cosmology. To increase the collection area, many reflecting mirrors of different diameters are nested with a common focal plane. These mirrors are fabricated using nickel-electroformed replication techniques. We apply these ideas to neutron focusing using nickel mirrors. We show an initial test of a conical mirror using a beam of cold neutrons. key words: electroformed nickel replication, focusing optics, grazing angle incidence, mirror reflection, neutron focusing, Wolter optics

  9. Research Focus WorkatFEERCiscenteredonthreeinterrelated

    E-print Network

    controls and control theory. R&D Facilities FEERC contains seven engine dynamom- eter test cells that rangeResearch Focus WorkatFEERCiscenteredonthreeinterrelated areas of research: fuels, engines, and emis synthetic and renewable sources. The FEERCconductsresearchoninnovativeinternal combustion engine

  10. Oculometer focus and mirror control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic focusing system designed around an ultrasonic range measurement is described. Besides maintaining the focus, subject distance is a by-product which could lighten the NOVA computational effort. An automatic head tracking unit is also discussed. It is intended to reduce the search time required when track is lost. An X-Y ultrasonic measurement is also made in this design to control the deflection mirrors.

  11. A continuous plasma final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.

    1990-02-01

    Scaling laws are set down for a plasma cell used for transport, focusing and current neutralization of fine, intense, relativistic electron beams. It is found that there exists a minimum beam spot size, {sigma}{sub min} {approximately} {epsilon}{sub n}(I{sub A}/{gamma}I){sup 1/2}, in such a focusing system. Propagation issues, including channel formation, synchrotron radiation, beam ionization and instabilities, are discussed. Three numerical examples are considered. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. EUV Focus Sensor: Design and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Teyssier, Maureen E.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2005-05-01

    We describe performance modeling and design optimization of a prototype EUV focus sensor (FS) designed for use with existing 0.3-NA EUV projection-lithography tools. At 0.3-NA and 13.5-nm wavelength, the depth of focus shrinks to 150 nm increasing the importance of high-sensitivity focal-plane detection tools. The FS is a free-standing Ni grating structure that works in concert with a simple mask pattern of regular lines and spaces at constant pitch. The FS pitch matches that of the image-plane aerial-image intensity: it transmits the light with high efficiency when the grating is aligned with the aerial image laterally and longitudinally. Using a single-element photodetector, to detect the transmitted flux, the FS is scanned laterally and longitudinally so the plane of peak aerial-image contrast can be found. The design under consideration has a fixed image-plane pitch of 80-nm, with aperture widths of 12-40-nm (1-3 wavelengths), and aspect ratios of 2-8. TEMPEST-3D is used to model the light transmission. Careful attention is paid to the annular, partially coherent, unpolarized illumination and to the annular pupil of the Micro-Exposure Tool (MET) optics for which the FS is designed. The system design balances the opposing needs of high sensitivity and high throughput optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio in the measured intensity contrast.

  13. EUV focus sensor: design and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Teyssier, Maureen E.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2005-05-01

    We describe performance modeling and design optimization of a prototype EUV focus sensor (FS) designed for use with existing 0.3-NA EUV projection-lithography tools. At 0.3-NA and 13.5-nm wavelength, the depth of focus shrinks to 150 nm increasing the importance of high-sensitivity focal-plane detection tools. The FS is a free-standing Ni grating structure that works in concert with a simple mask pattern of regular lines and spaces at constant pitch. The FS pitch matches that of the image-plane aerial-image intensity: it transmits the light with high efficiency when the grating is aligned with the aerial image laterally and longitudinally. Using a single-element photodetector, to detect the transmitted flux, the FS is scanned laterally and longitudinally so the plane of peak aerial-image contrast can be found. The design under consideration has a fixed image-plane pitch of 80-nm, with aperture widths of 12-40-nm (1-3 wave-lengths), and aspect ratios of 2-8. TEMPEST-3D is used to model the light transmission. Careful attention is paid to the annular, partially coherent, unpolarized illumination and to the annular pupil of the Micro-Exposure Tool (MET) optics for which the FS is designed. The system design balances the opposing needs of high sensitivity and high throughput opti-mizing the signal-to-noise ratio in the measured intensity contrast.

  14. AXAF SIM focus mechanism study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H. D.; Whitbeck, E.

    1994-01-01

    The design requirements and initial design concept for the AXAF-I Science Instrument Module (SIM) were reviewed at Ball on September 29, 1993. The concept design SIM focus mechanism utilizes a planetary gearset, with redundant motors, to drive a large ring (called 'main housing bearing') via a spur gearset. This large drive ring actuates three tangent bar links (called 'push rods'), which in turn actuate three levers (called 'pin levers'). Each of the three pin levers rotates an 'eccentric pin,' which in turn moves the base of a bipod flexure in both the radial (normal to optical axis) and axial (focus along optical axis) directions. Three bipod flexures are employed, equally spaced at 120 degrees apart, the base of each being translated in the two directions as described above. A focus adjustment is made by rotating the drive ring, which drives the push rods and therefore the pin levers, which in turn rotate the eccentric pins, finally imparting the two motions to the base of each of the bipod flexures. The axial translation (focus adjustment) of the focused structure is the sum of the direct axial motion plus axial motion which comes from uniformly squeezing the three bipod bases radially inward. SAO documented the following concerns regarding the focus mechanism in memo WAP-FY94-001, dated October 7, 1993: (1) The focus adjustment depends, in large part, on the structural properties (stiffnesses and end fixities) of the bipod flexures, push rods, pin levers and eccentric pins. If these properties are not matched very well, then lateral translations as well as unwanted rotations of the focussed structure will accompany focus motion. In addition, the stackup of linkage tolerances and any nonuniform wear in the linkages will result in the same unwanted motions. Thermal gradients will also affect these motions. At the review Ball did not present supporting analyses to support their choice of this design concept. (2) The proposed 'primary' method of measuring focus is by counting motor steps. The 'backup' method is by a pot mounted on the drive ring. Neither method provides for a direct measurement of the quantity desired (focus position). This is of concern because of the long and indirect relationship between focus and the sensed quantity (drive ring rotation). There are three sinusoidal relationships and structural stiffness in the path, and the resulting calibration is likely to be highly nonlinear. These methods would require an accurate ground calibration. (3) Ground calibration (and verification) of focus vs. drive position must be done in 1-g on the ground. This calibration will be complicated by both the structural characteristics of the bipods and the fact that the CG of the translating portion of the SIM is not on the optical axis (thereby causing unwated rotations and changing the focus position vs. motor step and pot readout relationships). The SIM translating weight could be offloaded, but the calibration then becomes sensitive to any errors in offloading (both magnitude and direction). There are concerns as to whether a calibration to the required accuracy can be accomplished on the ground. (4) The choice of a potentiometer as the focus position sensor is questionable in terms of reliability for a five year mission. The results of SAO's study of items 1, 2 and 3 described above are presented in this report.

  15. A continuous plasma final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.

    1989-11-01

    Scaling laws are set down for a plasma cell used for transport, focusing and current neutralization of fine, intense, relativistic electron beams. It is found that there exists a minimum beam spot size, {sigma}{sub min} {approximately} {var epsilon}{sub n}(I{sub A}/{gamma}I){sup 1/2}, in such a focusing system. Propagation issues, including channel formation, synchrotron radiation, beam ionization and instabilities, are discussed. Numerical examples are given for a proof-of-principle experiment at KEK, an application for luminosity enhancement at the SLC, and a hypothetical TeV electron-positron collider. For a TeV collider, it is found that the effect of ion-motion on focusing, and the effect of Buneman instability on current neutralization must be considered. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.; Lenard, R.

    1984-12-10

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting energy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  17. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, Thomas E. (Fairfax, VA); Powell, James R. (Shoreham, NY); Lenard, Roger (Redondo Beach, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting rgy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  18. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing

    E-print Network

    A. M. Lacasta; L. Ramirez-Piscina; J. M. Sancho; K. Lindenberg

    2012-12-13

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate (t to the power -1/2) to very close to the perfect mixing rate, (t to the power -1).

  19. Planar metalens realizing subwavelength focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qian; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Shuming; Ruan, Ningjuan

    2015-08-01

    Planar metalens composed of V-shaped nano-antennas which can realize subwavelength focusing has been fabricated by Focused Ion Beam etching technology. The metalens was completely flat due to the phase manipulation deriving from the different V-shaped nano-antennas aligned in concentric circles. Comparing to conventional curved lens, the as-made metalens was flat and ultrathin (less than thickness of 100 nm) with light weight. Simulation results demonstrated that the focal length can be accurately controlled by changing the arrangement of the nano-antennas.

  20. Recent advances in microfluidic detection systems

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher A; Duong, Cindy T; Grimley, Alix; Roper, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous detection methods available for methods are being put to use for detection on these miniaturized systems, with the analyte of interest driving the choice of detection method. In this article, we summarize microfluidic 2 years. More focus is given to unconventional approaches to detection routes and novel strategies for performing high-sensitivity detection. PMID:20414455

  1. Monolingual and Crosslingual Plagiarism Detection

    E-print Network

    Rosso, Paolo

    Monolingual and Crosslingual Plagiarism Detection Towards the Competition @ SEPLN09 Alberto Barr´on, Universidad Polit´ecnica de Valencia {lbarron, prosso}@dsic.upv.es Abstract. Automatic plagiarism detection., our work has been focused on both mono- lingual and crosslingual plagiarism detection. The monolingual

  2. World History. Focus on Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Jean; Clark, James; Herscher, Walter

    This book opens with an exploration of the first economic revolution, which set the stage for the dramatic unfolding of the role economics has played in world history. The lessons focus on two topics: (1) why some economies grew and prospered while others remained stagnant or declined; and (2) what causes people to make choices that help or hinder…

  3. Standards and Assessment. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter includes three articles, two of which focus on standards for student evaluation and for admission to higher education. "A Measuring Stick for Standards and TEKS: Meeting the Needs of Second Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green, Adela Solis) examines beliefs embodied in the notion of standards; defines content, performance, and…

  4. Technology for Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on technology for education to benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program Students Meet Peers Via Video Conference" (Linda Cantu, Leticia Lopez-De La Garza) describes how at-risk student…

  5. Staying in School. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on issues related to high Texas dropout rates among Hispanic and other minority group students and on dropout prevention strategies. "School Finance Inequities Mean Schools Are Not Ready To Teach" (Maria Robledo Montecel) deplores the recent Texas Supreme Court ruling that state educational funding is constitutional,…

  6. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary I. (Sunnyvale, CA); Maccagno, Pierre (Stanford, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  7. Focus Article MATLAB library LIBRA

    E-print Network

    Focus Article MATLAB library LIBRA Sabine Verboven1 and Mia Hubert2 LIBRA stands for `library), principal component regression (RPCR), partial least squares regression (RSIMPLS), classification (RDA Comp Stat 2010 2 509­515 The library for robust analysis, LIBRA, contains robust statistical methods

  8. Zoonotic focus of plague, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Bitam, Idir; Baziz, Belkacem; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Belkaid, Miloud; Raoult, Didier

    2006-12-01

    After an outbreak of human plague, 95 Xenopsylla cheopis fleas from Algeria were tested for Yersinia pestis with PCR methods. Nine fleas were definitively confirmed to be infected with Y. pestis biovar orientalis. Our results demonstrate the persistence of a zoonotic focus of Y. pestis in Algeria. PMID:17326957

  9. Zoonotic Focus of Plague, Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Bitam, Idir; Baziz, Belkacem; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Belkaid, Miloud

    2006-01-01

    After an outbreak of human plague, 95 Xenopsylla cheopis fleas from Algeria were tested for Yersinia pestis with PCR methods. Nine fleas were definitively confirmed to be infected with Y. pestis biovar orientalis. Our results demonstrate the persistence of a zoonotic focus of Y. pestis in Algeria. PMID:17326957

  10. Creating Wave-Focusing Materials

    E-print Network

    A. G. Ramm

    2008-05-16

    Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

  11. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  12. Teaching and Learning. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes four articles that focus on teaching and learning strategies to benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Would You Read Me a Story?: In Search of Reading Strategies That Work for the Early Childhood Classroom" (Hilaria Bauer) discusses how…

  13. Tsunami Amplification due to Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. W.; Kanoglu, U.; Titov, V. V.; Aydin, B.; Spillane, M. C.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Tsunami runup measurements over the periphery of the Pacific Ocean after the devastating Great Japan tsunami of 11 March 2011 showed considerable variation in far-field and near-field impact. This variation of tsunami impact have been attributed to either directivity of the source or by local topographic effects. Directivity arguments alone, however, cannot explain the complexity of the radiated patterns in oceans with trenches and seamounts. Berry (2007, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 463, 3055-3071) discovered how such underwater features may concentrate tsunamis into cusped caustics and thus cause large local amplifications at specific focal points. Here, we examine focusing and local amplification, not by considering the effects of underwater diffractive lenses, but by considering the details of the dipole nature of the initial profile, and propose that certain regions of coastline are more at-risk, not simply because of directivity but because typical tsunami deformations create focal regions where abnormal tsunami wave height can be registered (Marchuk and Titov, 1989, Proc. IUGG/IOC International Tsunami Symposium, Novosibirsk, USSR). In this work, we present a new general analytical solution of the linear shallow-water wave equation for the propagation of a finite-crest-length source over a constant depth without any restriction on the initial profile. Unlike the analytical solution of Carrier and Yeh (2005, Comp. Mod. Eng. & Sci. 10(2), 113-121) which was restricted to initial conditions with Gaussian profiles and involved approximation, our solution is not only exact, but also general and allows the use of realistic initial waveform such as N-waves as defined by Tadepalli and Synolakis (1994, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 445, 99-112). We then verify our analytical solution for several typical wave profiles, both with the NOAA tsunami forecast model MOST (Titov and Synolakis, 1998, J. Waterw. Port Coast. Ocean Eng. 124(4), 157-171) which is validated and verified through (Synolakis et al., 2008, Pure Appl. Geophys. 165(11-12), 2197-2228), and with a Boussinesq model, to illustrate the role focusing can play for different initial conditions, and to show the robust nature of focusing with respect to dispersion. We also show how the focusing effect might have played a role in the 17 July 1998 Papua New Guinea and 17 July 2006 Java events, and also the 11 March 2011 Great Japan earthquake and tsunami. Our results strongly imply that focusing increases the shoreline amplification of the tsunami.; Schematic of focusing; initial displacement (upper left), wave evolution (upper right, lower left), maximum wave amplitude with focusing (lower right).

  14. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and technology and promote new research and development in this field.

  15. EDITORIAL: Focus on Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2007-11-01

    Gravitational lensing emerged as an observational field following the 1979 discovery of a doubly imaged quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy. In the 1980s and '90s dozens of other multiply imaged systems were observed, as well as time delay measurements, weak and strong lensing by galaxies and galaxy clusters, and the discovery of microlensing in our galaxy. The rapid pace of advances has continued into the new century. Lensing is currently one of best techniques for finding and mapping dark matter over a wide range of scales, and also addresses broader cosmological questions such as understanding the nature of dark energy. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics presents a snapshot of current research in some of the exciting areas of lensing. It provides an occasion to look back at the advances of the last decade and ahead to the potential of the coming years. Just about a decade ago, microlensing was discovered through the magnification of stars in our galaxy by invisible objects with masses between that of Jupiter and a tenth the mass of the Sun. Thus a new component of the mass of our galaxy, dubbed MACHOs, was established (though a diffuse, cold dark matter-like component is still needed to make up most of the galaxy mass). More recently, microlensing led to another exciting discovery—of extra-solar planets with masses ranging from about five times that of Earth to that of Neptune. We can expect many more planets to be discovered through ongoing surveys. Microlensing is the best technique for finding Earth mass planets, though it is not as productive overall as other methods and does not allow for follow up observations. Beyond planet hunting, microlensing has enabled us to observe previously inaccessible systems, ranging from the surfaces of other stars to the accretion disks around the black holes powering distant quasars. Galaxies and galaxy clusters at cosmological distances can produce dramatic lensing effects: multiple images of background galaxies or quasars which are strongly magnified and sheared. In the last decade, double and quadruply imaged systems due to galactic lenses have been studied with optical and radio observations. An interesting result obtained from the flux ratio 'anomalies' of quadruply imaged systems is the statistical detection of dark sub-clumps in galaxy halos. More broadly, while we have learned a lot about the mass distribution in lens galaxies and improved time delay constraints on the Hubble constant, the limitations of cosmological studies with strong lensing due to uncertainties in lens mass models have also come to be appreciated. That said, progress will no doubt continue with qualitative advances in observations such as astrometric counterparts to the flux anomalies, clever ideas such as the use of spectroscopic signatures to assemble the SLACS lens sample, and combining optical imaging, spectroscopy and radio data to continue the quest for a set of golden lenses to measure the Hubble constant. Galaxy clusters are a fascinating arena for studying the distribution of dark and baryonic matter. Weak and strong lensing information can be combined with dynamical information from the spectroscopic measurements of member galaxies and x-ray/Sunyaev Zeldovich measurements of the hot ionized gas. Hubble Space Telescope observations have yielded spectacular images of clusters, such as Abell 1689, which has over a hundred multiply imaged arcs. Mass measurements have progressed to the level of 10 percent accuracy for several clusters. Unfortunately, it is unclear if one can do much better for individual clusters given inherent limitations such as unknown projection effects. The statistical study of clusters is likely to remain a promising way to study dark matter, gravity theories, and cosmology. Techniques to combine weak and strong lensing information to obtain the mass distribution of clusters have also advanced, and work continues on parameter-free techniques that are agnostic to the relation of cluster light and mass. An interesting twist in cluster lensing was provided by the pos

  16. GRAVITATIONALLY FOCUSED DARK MATTER AROUND COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.

    2011-12-01

    If dark matter self-annihilates then it may produce an observable signal when its density is high. The details depend on the intrinsic properties of dark matter and how it clusters in space. For example, the density profile of some dark matter candidates may rise steeply enough toward the Galactic Center that self-annihilation may produce detectable {gamma}-ray emission. Here, we discuss the possibility that an annihilation signal arises near a compact object (e.g., neutron star or black hole) even when the density of dark matter in the neighborhood of the object is uniform. Gravitational focusing produces a local enhancement of density with a profile that falls off approximately as the inverse square-root of distance from the compact star. While geometric dilution may overwhelm the annihilation signal from this local enhancement, magnetic fields tied to the compact object can increase the signal's contrast relative to the background.

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on terahertz plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Marco; Nahata, Ajay; Akalin, Tahsin; Beruete, Miguel; Sorolla, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonics is one of the growing fields in modern photonics that has garnered increasing interest over the last few years. In this focus issue, the specific challenges concerning terahertz plasmonics have been addressed and most recent advances in this specific field have been highlighted. The articles demonstrate the diversity and the opportunities of this rich field by covering a variety of topics ranging from the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on artificially structures surfaces, 2D manipulation of surface plasmons and SPPs, plasmonic focusing, plasmonic high-Q resonators for sensing applications, plasmonically enhanced terahertz antennas to terahertz field manipulation by use of plasmonic structures. The articles substantiate the impact of plasmonics and its great innovative potential for terahertz technology. In memory of Professor Mario Sorolla Ayza.

  18. Oblique focus ICCD laboratory evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    An oblique focus intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) was constructed and operated in a vacuum system. Special gratings were obtained and an optical system set up to try to model a candidate UV spectrometer (Milieu Interstellaire et Intergalactique-MISIG), and to produce small enough images to test the theoretical subpixel resolution capability of the ICCD system. The efforts were only partly successful. Based on the results, a similar detector was built and flown successfully on a Princeton rocket program.

  19. Protein: A nutrient in focus.

    PubMed

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Clairmont, Stephanie; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Tremblay, Angelo; Elango, Rajavel

    2015-08-01

    Protein is an essential component of a healthy diet and is a focus of research programs seeking to optimize health at all stages of life. The focus on protein as a nutrient often centers on its thermogenic and satiating effect, and when included as part of a healthy diet, its potential to preserve lean body mass. A growing body of literature, including stable isotope based studies and longer term dietary interventions, suggests that current dietary protein recommendations may not be sufficient to promote optimal muscle health in all populations. A protein intake moderately higher than current recommendations has been widely endorsed by many experts and working groups and may provide health benefits for aging populations. Further, consuming moderate amounts of high-quality protein at each meal may optimally stimulate 24-h muscle protein synthesis and may provide a dietary platform that favors the maintenance of muscle mass and function while promoting successful weight management in overweight and obese individuals. Dietary protein has the potential to serve as a key nutrient for many health outcomes and benefits might be increased when combined with adequate physical activity. Future studies should focus on confirming these health benefits from dietary protein with long-term randomized controlled studies. PMID:26197807

  20. FOREWORD: Focus on Organic Conductors Focus on Organic Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uji, Shinya; Mori, Takehiko; Takahashi, Toshihiro

    2009-04-01

    Organic materials are usually thought of as electrical insulators. Progress in chemical synthesis, however, has brought us a rich variety of conducting organic materials, which can be classified into conducting polymers and molecular crystals. Researchers can realize highly conducting molecular crystals in charge-transfer complexes, where suitable combinations of organic electron donor or acceptor molecules with counter ions or other organic molecules provide charge carriers. By means of a kind of chemical doping, the charge-transfer complexes exhibit high electrical conductivity and, thanks to their highly crystalline nature, even superconductivity has been observed. This focus issue of Science and Technology of Advanced Materials is devoted to the research into such 'organic conductors' The first organic metal was (TTF)(TCNQ), which was found in 1973 to have high conductivity at room temperature and a metal-insulator transition at low temperatures. The first organic superconductor was (TMTSF)2PF6, whose superconductivity under high pressures was reported by Jérome in 1980. After these findings, the research on organic conductors exploded. Hundreds of organic conductors have been reported, among which more than one hundred exhibit superconductivity. Recently, a single-component organic conductor has been found with metallic conductivity down to low temperatures. In these organic conductors, in spite of their simple electronic structures, much new physics has arisen from the low dimensionality. Examples are charge and spin density waves, characteristic metal-insulator transitions, charge order, unconventional superconductivity, superconductor-insulator transitions, and zero-gap conductors with Dirac cones. The discovery of this new physics is undoubtedly derived from the development of many intriguing novel organic conductors. High quality single crystals are indispensable to the precise measurement of electronic states. This focus issue includes comprehensive reviews on the chemistry and physics of recently found interesting organic conductors, as well as experimental and theoretical surveys of novel intriguing phenomena and electronic states of organic charge-transfer salts. Recent upheaval in organic electronics has reinvigorated interest in organic semiconductors. To reflect this trend, the focus issue contains reviews on organic transistor materials and single-crystal organic transistors. We are grateful to all authors who contributed to the focus issue, and hope that it will become an important resource for the future development of this field.

  1. Research Focus Symmetry perception in humans and macaques

    E-print Network

    Kastner, Sabine

    Research Focus Symmetry perception in humans and macaques Diane M. Beck, Mark A. Pinsk and Sabine Kastner Department of Psychology, Center for the Study of Brain, Mind, and Behavior, Princeton University, Green Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA The human ability to detect symmetry has been a topic of interest

  2. Nonthermal ablation with microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound close to the optic tract without affecting nerve function

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Power, Chanikarn; Jolesz, Ferenc; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Object Tumors at the skull base are challenging for both resection and radiosurgery given the presence of critical adjacent structures, such as cranial nerves, blood vessels, and brainstem. Magnetic resonance imaging–guided thermal ablation via laser or other methods has been evaluated as a minimally invasive alternative to these techniques in the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS) offers a noninvasive method of thermal ablation; however, skull heating limits currently available technology to ablation at regions distant from the skull bone. Here, the authors evaluated a method that circumvents this problem by combining the FUS exposures with injected microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agent. These microbubbles concentrate the ultrasound-induced effects on the vasculature, enabling an ablation method that does not cause significant heating of the brain or skull. Methods In 29 rats, a 525-kHz FUS transducer was used to ablate tissue structures at the skull base that were centered on or adjacent to the optic tract or chiasm. Low-intensity, low-duty-cycle ultrasound exposures (sonications) were applied for 5 minutes after intravenous injection of an ultrasound contrast agent (Definity, Lantheus Medical Imaging Inc.). Using histological analysis and visual evoked potential (VEP) measurements, the authors determined whether structural or functional damage was induced in the optic tract or chiasm. Results Overall, while the sonications produced a well-defined lesion in the gray matter targets, the adjacent tract and chiasm had comparatively little or no damage. No significant changes (p > 0.05) were found in the magnitude or latency of the VEP recordings, either immediately after sonication or at later times up to 4 weeks after sonication, and no delayed effects were evident in the histological features of the optic nerve and retina. Conclusions This technique, which selectively targets the intravascular microbubbles, appears to be a promising method of noninvasively producing sharply demarcated lesions in deep brain structures while preserving function in adjacent nerves. Because of low vascularity—and thus a low microbubble concentration—some large white matter tracts appear to have some natural resistance to this type of ablation compared with gray matter. While future work is needed to develop methods of monitoring the procedure and establishing its safety at deep brain targets, the technique does appear to be a potential solution that allows FUS ablation of deep brain targets while sparing adjacent nerve structures. PMID:24010975

  3. Targeted therapy using nanotechnology: focus on cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Vanna; Pala, Nicolino; Sechi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology have contributed to the development of engineered nanoscale materials as innovative prototypes to be used for biomedical applications and optimized therapy. Due to their unique features, including a large surface area, structural properties, and a long circulation time in blood compared with small molecules, a plethora of nanomaterials has been developed, with the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases, in particular by improving the sensitivity and recognition ability of imaging contrast agents and by selectively directing bioactive agents to biological targets. Focusing on cancer, promising nanoprototypes have been designed to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents, as well as for early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. However, several obstacles, including difficulty in achieving the optimal combination of physicochemical parameters for tumor targeting, evading particle clearance mechanisms, and controlling drug release, prevent the translation of nanomedicines into therapy. In spite of this, recent efforts have been focused on developing functionalized nanoparticles for delivery of therapeutic agents to specific molecular targets overexpressed on different cancer cells. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has resulted in a new programmable nanotherapeutic formulation of docetaxel, namely BIND-014, which recently entered Phase II clinical testing for patients with solid tumors. BIND-014 has been developed to overcome the limitations facing delivery of nanoparticles to many neoplasms, and represents a validated example of targeted nanosystems with the optimal biophysicochemical properties needed for successful tumor eradication. PMID:24531078

  4. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  5. The quest for customer focus.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ranjay; Oldroyd, James B

    2005-04-01

    Companies have poured enormous amounts of money into customer relationship management, but in many cases the investment hasn't really paid off. That's because getting closer to customers isn't about building an information technology system. It's a learning journey-one that unfolds over four stages, requiring people and business units to coordinate in progressively more sophisticated ways. The journey begins with the creation of a companywide repository containing each interaction a customer has with the company, organized not by product, purchase, or location, but by customer. Communal coordination is what's called for at this stage, as each group contributes its information to the data pool separately from the others and then taps into it as needed. In the second stage, one-way serial coordination from centralized IT through analytical units and out to the operating units allows companies to go beyond just assembling data to drawing inferences. In stage three, companies shift their focus from past relationships to future behavior. Through symbiotic coordination, information flows back and forth between central analytic units and various organizational units like marketing, sales, and operations, as together they seek answers to questions like "How can we prevent customers from switching to a competitor?" and "Who would be most likely to buy a new product in the future"? In stage four, firms begin to move past discrete, formal initiatives and, through integral coordination, bring an increasingly sophisticated understanding oftheir customers to bear in all day-to-day operations. Skipping stages denies organizations the sure foundation they need to build a lasting customer-focused mind-set. Those that recognize this will invest their customer relationship dollars much more wisely-and will see their customer-focusing efforts pay offon the bottom line. PMID:15807042

  6. Rotating apparatus for isoelectric focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an isoelectric focusing apparatus, wherein stabilization of the fluid containing the isolated proteins is achieved by carrying out the separation in a rotating cylinder with the separation cavity of the cylinder being segmented by means of filter elements. The filter elements are constituted of a material offering some degree of resistance to fluid convection, but allowing relatively free and unhindered passage of current and transport of proteins. The combined effect of segmentation and rotation has been found to be superior to either segmentation or rotation alone in maintaining the stability of the migrated fractions.

  7. Focus on rotary drill rigs

    SciTech Connect

    Schivley, G.P. Jr.

    1987-06-01

    This article discusses the drill rig, focusing on the rotary drill rigs. There are two principal drilling methods - rotary and percussion. In certain situations, percussion drilling is the most practical method, but for most applications, rotary drilling using the rotary-tricone bit with either steel-toothed cones or carbide inserts, is the common and accepted drilling technique. There are four principal reasons for a rotary drill rig: to provide power to the rotary-tricone bit; to provide air to clean the hole; to provide a life-support system for the rotary-tricone bits; and, to provide a stable and efficient platform from which to drill the hole.

  8. Focusing properties of mushroom microlenses

    E-print Network

    Boriskin, A V; Benson, T; Sewell, P; Nosich, A I

    2010-01-01

    Focusing properties of a novel type photoresist microlens are studied. A specific character of the microlens is its mushroom shape. Recently it was predicted and experimentally revealed that such a lens integrated with a light-emitting diode is capable of enhancing its output efficiency and directivity. In our paper we describe the true electromagnetic performance of a mushroom lens by applying a mathematically rigorous method of boundary integral equations. Numerical results are presented for the mushroom lens illuminated with a plane E-polarized wave and include figures describing the evolution of the lens focal spot and near field maps.

  9. A focused bibliography on robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergler, H. W.

    1983-08-01

    The present bibliography focuses on eight robotics-related topics believed by the author to be of special interest to researchers in the field of industrial electronics: robots, sensors, kinematics, dynamics, control systems, actuators, vision, economics, and robot applications. This literature search was conducted through the 1970-present COMPENDEX data base, which provides world-wide coverage of nearly 3500 journals, conference proceedings and reports, and the 1969-1981 INSPEC data base, which is the largest for the English language in the fields of physics, electrotechnology, computers, and control.

  10. Pain pharmacology: focus on opioids

    PubMed Central

    Fornasari, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Summary The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20–25% worldwide. Although major improvements in pain control have been obtained, more than 50% of the patients reports inadequate relief. It is accepted that chronic pain, if not adequately and rapidly treated, can become a disease in itself, often intractable and maybe irreversible. This is mainly due to neuroplasticity of pain pathways. In the present review I will discuss about pain depicting the rational for the principal pharmacological interventions and finally focusing on opioids, that represent a primary class of drug to treat pain. PMID:25568646

  11. Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Feasibility study in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Rieck, Birgit; Bates, David; Pichardo, Samuel E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Curiel, Laura E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Zhang, Kunyan; Escott, Nicholas; Mougenot, Charles

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. Methods: 50?l of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 5} colony forming units (cfu)/?l was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5?°C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Results: Macroscopic evaluation of treated abscess indicated a diminution of external size of abscess 1 day after treatment. Treatment did not cause open wounds. The median (lower to upper quartile) bacterial count 1 day after treatment was 6.18 × 10{sup 3} (0.76 × 10{sup 3}–11.18 × 10{sup 3}), 2.86 × 10{sup 3} (1.22 × 10{sup 3}–7.07 × 10{sup 3}), and 3.52 × 10{sup 3} (1.18 × 10{sup 3}–6.72 × 10{sup 3}) cfu/100 ?l for control, MT and HT groups, respectively; for the 4-day end point, the count was 1.37 × 10{sup 3} (0.67 × 10{sup 3}–2.89 × 10{sup 3}), 1.35 × 10{sup 3} (0.09 × 10{sup 3}–2.96 × 10{sup 3}), and 0.07 × 10{sup 3} (0.03 × 10{sup 3}–0.36 × 10{sup 3}) cfu/100 ?l for control, MT and HT, showing a significant reduction (p = 0.002) on the bacterial load four days after focused ultrasound treatment when treating at high temperature (HT). The MPO amount remained unchanged between groups and days, indicating no change on local neutrophil recruitment in the abscess caused by the treatment. The white blood cell count remained unchanged between groups and days indicating that no systemic inflammatory response was caused by the treatment. Conclusions: Focused ultrasound induces a therapeutic effect in abscesses induced by MRSA. This effect is observed as a reduction of the number bacteria without significantly altering the amount of MPO at the site of a MRSA-induced abscess. These initial results suggest that focused ultrasound is a viable option for the treatment of localized MRSA-related infections.

  12. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloud Physics FOCUS ON CLOUD PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkovich, Gregory; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2008-07-01

    Cloud physics has for a long time been an important segment of atmospheric science. It is common knowledge that clouds are crucial for our understanding of weather and climate. Clouds are also interesting by themselves (not to mention that they are beautiful). Complexity is hidden behind the common picture of these beautiful and interesting objects. The typical school textbook definition that a cloud is 'a set of droplets or particles suspended in the atmosphere' is not adequate. Clouds are complicated phenomena in which dynamics, turbulence, microphysics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer interact on a wide range of scales, from sub-micron to kilometres. Some of these interactions are subtle and others are more straightforward. Large and small-scale motions lead to activation of cloud condensation nuclei, condensational growth and collisions; small changes in composition and concentration of atmospheric aerosol lead to significant differences in radiative properties of the clouds and influence rainfall formation. It is justified to look at a cloud as a composite, nonlinear system which involves many interactions and feedback. This system is actively linked into a web of atmospheric, oceanic and even cosmic interactions. Due to the complexity of the cloud system, present-day descriptions of clouds suffer from simplifications, inadequate parameterizations, and omissions. Sometimes the most fundamental physics hidden behind these simplifications and parameterizations is not known, and a wide scope of view can sometimes prevent a 'microscopic', deep insight into the detail. Only the expertise offered by scientists focused on particular elementary processes involved in this complicated pattern of interactions allows us to shape elements of the puzzle from which a general picture of clouds can be created. To be useful, every element of the puzzle must be shaped precisely. This often creates problems in communication between the sciences responsible for shaping elements of the puzzle, and those which combine them. Scales, assumptions and the conditions used in order to describe a particular single process of interest must be consistent with the conditions in clouds. The papers in this focus issue of New Journal of Physics collectively demonstrate (i) the variation in scientific approaches towards investigating cloud processes, (ii) the various stages of shaping elements of the puzzle, and (iii) some attempts to put the pieces together. These papers present just a small subset of loosely arranged elements in an initial stage of puzzle creation. Addressed by this issue is one of the important problems in our understanding of cloud processes—the interaction between cloud particles and turbulence. There is currently a gap between the cloud physics community and scientists working in wind tunnels, on turbulence theory and particle interactions. This collection is intended to narrow this gap by bringing together work by theoreticians, modelers, laboratory experimentalists and those who measure and observe actual processes in clouds. It forms a collage of contributions showing various approaches to cloud processes including: • theoretical works with possible applications to clouds (Bistagnino and Boffetta, Gustavsson et al), • an attempt to construct a phenomenological description of clouds and rain (Lovejoy and Schertzer), • simplified models designed to parameterize turbulence micro- and macro-effects (Celani et al, Derevyanko et al), • focused theoretical research aimed at particular cloud processes (Ayala et al, parts I and II, Wang et al), • laboratory and modeling studies of complex cloud processes (Malinowski et al). This collage is far from being complete but, hopefully, should give the reader a representative impression of the current state of knowledge in the field. We hope it will be useful to all scientists whose work is inspired by cloud processes. Focus on Cloud Physics Contents The development of ice in a cumulus cloud over southwest England Yahui Huang, Alan M Blyth, Philip R A Brown, Tom W Choularton,

  13. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

  14. Development of a Focusing DIRC

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, J.; Bedajanek, I.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Mazaheri, G.; Ratcliff, B.; Suzuki, K.; Schwiening, J.; Uher, J.; Va'vra, J.; /SLAC

    2006-12-12

    Benefiting from the recent introduction of new fast vacuum-based photon detectors with a transit time spread of {sigma}{sub TTS} {approx} 30-150 ps, we are developing a novel RICH detector capable of correcting the chromatic error through good time measurements; we believe that this is the first time such a technique has been demonstrated. We have built and successfully tested a particle identification detector called ''Focusing DIRC''. The concept of the prototype is based on the BaBar DIRC, with several important improvements: (a) much faster pixelated photon detectors based on Burle MCP-PMTs and Hamamatsu MaPMTs, (b) a focusing mirror which allows the photon detector to be smaller and less sensitive to background in future applications, (c) electronics allowing the measurement of single photon timing to better than {sigma} {approx} 100-200ps, which allows a correction of the chromatic error. The detector was tested in a SLAC 10GeV/c electron test beam. This detector concept could be used for particle identification at Super B-factory, ILC, GlueX, Panda, etc.

  15. Antipodal focusing of seismic waves observed with the USArray

    PubMed Central

    Retailleau, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; Guilbert, J.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Mw = 5.3 earthquake that occurred in the Southeast Indian Ridge on 2010 February 11 using USArray data. The epicentre of this event is antipodal to the USArray, providing us with an opportunity to observe in details the antipodal focusing of seismic waves in space and time. We compare the observed signals with synthetic seismograms computed for a spherically symmetric earth model (PREM). A beamforming analysis is performed over the different seismic phases detected at antipodal distances. Direct spatial snapshots of the signals and the beamforming results show that the focusing is well predicted for the first P-wave phases such as PKP or PP. However, converted phases (SKSP, PPS) show a deviation of the energy focusing to the south, likely caused by the Earth's heterogeneity. Focusing of multiple S-wave phases strongly deteriorates and is barely observable. PMID:26074723

  16. Signal focusing through active transport

    E-print Network

    Godec, Aljaz

    2015-01-01

    In biological cells and novel diagnostic devices biochemical receptors need to be sensitive to extremely small concentration changes of signaling molecules. The accuracy of such molecular signaling is ultimately limited by the counting noise imposed by the thermal diffusion of molecules. Many macromolecules and organelles transiently bind to molecular motors and are then actively transported. We here show that a random albeit directed delivery of signaling molecules to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor reduces the correlation time of the counting noise, effecting an improved sensing precision. The conditions for this active focusing are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results are relevant for a better understanding of molecular cellular signaling and the design of novel diagnostic devices.

  17. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  18. Rotating Apparatus for Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1986-01-01

    Remixing of separated fractions prevented. Improved isoelectric focusing apparatus helps to prevent electro-osmosis and convection, both of which cause remixing of separated fractions. Fractionating column segmented and rotated about horizontal axis: Only combined effects of both features fully effective in making good separations. Improved apparatus slowly rotated continuously or rocked (at rotational amplitude of at least 180 degrees) about its horizontal axis so average gravitational vector experienced by fluid is zero and convection is therefore suppressed. Electro-osmosis suppressed and convection further suppressed by separating column into disklike compartments along its length with filters. Experiments have shown dimensions of apparatus not critical. Typical compartment and column volumes are 2 and 40 ml, respectively. Rotation speeds lie between 3 and 30 rpm.

  19. Non-focusing active warhead

    DOEpatents

    Hornig, Howard C. (Castro Valley, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A non-nuclear, non-focusing, active warhead that comprises a high explosive charge contained within a casing of reactive metal. When the high explosive is detonated, the reactive metal is dispersed and reacts with the air, which significantly increases the explosive yield of the warhead. The active warhead produces therefore much higher blast effects with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional munitions. The warhead is highly effective against such targets as aircraft which typically have thin fuselages, for example. The explosiveness of this warhead can be enhanced further by elevating the temperature and therefore the reactivity of the reactive metal before or during the explosion. New methods of enhancing the reactivity of the metal are also taught.

  20. Hormone Purification by Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1985-01-01

    Various ground-based research approaches are being applied to a more definitive evaluation of the natures and degrees of electroosmosis effects on the separation capabilities of the Isoelectric Focusing (IEF) process. A primary instrumental system for this work involves rotationally stabilized, horizontal electrophoretic columns specially adapted for the IEF process. Representative adaptations include segmentation, baffles/screens, and surface coatings. Comparative performance and development testing are pursued against the type of column or cell established as an engineering model. Previously developed computer simulation capabilities are used to predict low-gravity behavior patterns and performance for IEF apparatus geometries of direct project interest. Three existing mathematical models plus potential new routines for particular aspects of simulating instrument fluid patterns with varied wall electroosmosis influences are being exercised.

  1. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end planes to stable loops caused by annealing M Endo, B J Lee, Y A Kim, Y J Kim, H Muramatsu, T Yanagisawa, T Hayashi, M Terrones and M S Dresselhaus Energetics and electronic structure of C70-peapods and one-dimensional chains of C70 Susumu Okada, Minoru Otani and Atsushi Oshiyama Theoretical characterization of several models of nanoporous carbon F Valencia, A H Romero, E Hernández, M Terrones and H Terrones First-principles molecular dynamics study of the stretching frequencies of hydrogen molecules in carbon nanotubes Gabriel Canto, Pablo Ordejón, Cheng Hansong, Alan C Cooper and Guido P Pez The geometry and the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes: beyond the ideal behaviour Jeno Kürti, Viktor Zólyomi, Miklos Kertesz and Sun Guangyu Curved nanostructured materials Humberto Terrones and Mauricio Terrones A one-dimensional Ising model for C70 molecular ordering in C70-peapods Yutaka Maniwa, Hiromichi Kataura, Kazuyuki Matsuda and Yutaka Okabe Nanoengineering of carbon nanotubes for nanotools Yoshikazu Nakayama and Seiji Akita Narrow diameter double-wall carbon nanotubes: synthesis, electron microscopy and inelastic light scattering R R Bacsa, E Flahaut, Ch Laurent, A Peigney, S Aloni, P Puech and W S Bacsa Sensitivity of sin

  3. Micron-focused ion beamlets

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2010-05-15

    A multiple beam electrode system (MBES) is used to provide focused ion beamlets of elements from a compact microwave plasma. In this study, a honeycomb patterned plasma electrode with micron size apertures for extracting ion beamlets is investigated. The performance of the MBES is evaluated with the help of two widely adopted and commercially available beam simulation tools, AXCEL-INP and SIMION, where the input parameters are obtained from our experiments. A simple theoretical model based upon electrostatic ray optics is employed to compare the results of the simulations. It is found that the results for the beam focal length agree reasonably well. Different geometries are used to optimize the beam spot size and a beam spot {approx}5-10 {mu}m is obtained. The multiple ion beamlets will be used to produce microfunctional surfaces on soft matter like polymers. Additionally, the experimental set-up and plans are presented in the light of above applications.

  4. Tank Focus Area pretreatment activities

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.; Manke, K.L.

    1997-03-01

    Plans call for the high-level wastes to be retrieved from the tanks and immobilized in a stable waste form suitable for long-term isolation. Chemistry and chemical engineering operations are required to retrieve the wastes, to condition the wastes for subsequent steps, and to reduce the costs of the waste management enterprise. Pretreatment includes those processes between retrieval and immobilization, and includes preparation of suitable feed material for immobilization and separations to partition the waste into streams that yield lower life-cycle costs. Some of the technologies being developed by the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to process these wastes are described. These technologies fall roughly into three areas: (1) solid/liquid separation (SLS), (2) sludge pretreatment, and (3) supernate pretreatment.

  5. Megaloblastic anemia: back in focus.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jagdish

    2010-07-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA), in most instances in developing countries, results from deficiency of vitamin B(12) or folic acid. Over the last two to three decades, incidence of MA seems to be increasing. Of the two micronutrients, folic acid deficiency contributed to MA in a large majority of cases. Now deficiency of B(12) is far more common. In addition to anemia, occurrence of neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia is increasingly being reported. Among cases presenting with pancytopenia, MA stands out as an important (commonest cause in some series) cause. This article focuses on these and certain other aspects of MA. Possible causes of increasing incidence of MA are discussed. Observations on other clinical features like neurocognitive dysfunction, associated hyperhomocysteinemeia and occurrence of tremors and thrombocytosis during treatment are highlighted. PMID:20589460

  6. Subcycle Pulsed Focused Vector Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Qiang; Zheng Jian; Becker, Wilhelm

    2006-12-22

    An accurate description of a subcycle pulsed beam (SCPB) is presented based on the complex-source model. The fields are exact solutions of Maxwell's equations and applicable to a focused pulsed beam with a pulse duration down to and below one cycle of the carrier wave and with arbitrary polarization state. Depending on the pulse duration, the pulse is blueshifted, and its wings are chirped. This effect, which we refer to as 'self-induced blueshift' goes beyond the carrier-envelope description. The corresponding phase is a temporal analog of the Gouy phase. The energy gain of a relativistic electron swept over by an SCPB is very sensitive to the proper form chosen to describe the pulse.

  7. Clinical focus: infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Adler, Hugh; Lambert, John S

    2014-04-01

    Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to a number of infectious diseases, such as influenza, hepatitis E, malaria, and tuberculosis. The management of many other infections-including urinary tract infections, human immunodeficiency virus, and sexually transmitted diseases-is also made more complex by pregnancy; even if some infections do not pose a great risk to the expectant mother, they can impact fetal and neonatal development, thus posing a treatment challenge to physicians. By focusing on the most important diseases that physicians may encounter in pregnant patients, this review outlines the challenges associated with managing important infectious diseases in the pregnant population and references the most recent evidence and international treatment guidelines. PMID:24769790

  8. Signal focusing through active transport

    E-print Network

    Aljaz Godec; Ralf Metzler

    2015-01-13

    In biological cells and novel diagnostic devices biochemical receptors need to be sensitive to extremely small concentration changes of signaling molecules. The accuracy of such molecular signaling is ultimately limited by the counting noise imposed by the thermal diffusion of molecules. Many macromolecules and organelles transiently bind to molecular motors and are then actively transported. We here show that a random albeit directed delivery of signaling molecules to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor reduces the correlation time of the counting noise, effecting an improved sensing precision. The conditions for this active focusing are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results are relevant for a better understanding of molecular cellular signaling and the design of novel diagnostic devices.

  9. Non-focusing active warhead

    DOEpatents

    Hornig, H.C.

    1998-12-22

    A non-nuclear, non-focusing, active warhead that comprises a high explosive charge contained within a casing of reactive metal is disclosed. When the high explosive is detonated, the reactive metal is dispersed and reacts with the air, which significantly increases the explosive yield of the warhead. The active warhead produces therefore much higher blast effects with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional munitions. The warhead is highly effective against such targets as aircraft which typically have thin fuselages, for example. The explosiveness of this warhead can be enhanced further by elevating the temperature and therefore the reactivity of the reactive metal before or during the explosion. New methods of enhancing the reactivity of the metal are also taught. 4 figs.

  10. Verification of Focusing System for Time-of-Propagation Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Y.

    The results of verifying focusing system for Time Of Propagation (TOP) counter is presented. The TOP counter have been developed as a new detector for particle identification at Belle-II experiment, which is a Ring Imaging Cherenkov counter with precise timing information. Performance of the TOP counter is directly depended on the time resolution for single photon detection. Propagated Cherenkov photons have group velocity related to wavelength. It generates fluctuation of propagation time approximately 53 ps/m. Chromatic dispersion provides serious deterioration of time resolution. Against this problem, the focusing mirror is planed to introduce. It focuses Cherenkov light to different channels of MCP-PMT by different wavelength, and so that the deterioration of time resolution is suppressed. We verified focusing mechanism using 120 GeV/c ? beam at CERN. Using a prototype TOP counter with the focusing mirror, we could confirm a work of focusing mechanism. The time resolution improved from 147 ps to 95 ps by using focusing mirror.

  11. Robust Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Ten-Huei (Technical Monitor); Collins, Emmanuel G.; Song, Tinglun; Curry, Tramone; Selekwa, Majura

    2003-01-01

    This research used mixed structured singular value theory to develop new estimator (or observer) based approaches to fault detection for dynamic systems. The initial developments were based on minimizing the H-infinity, I-1 and H2 system norms. The resultant fault detection algorithms were each shown to be successful, but the fault detection algorithm based on the I-1 norm was best able to detect abrupt faults. This latter technique was further improved by using fuzzy logic for the fault evaluation. Based on an anomaly observed in this research and apparently ignored in the literature, current research focuses on the determination of a fault using a norm of the change in the residual (the difference between the output of the system and observer) and not simply a norm of the residual itself. This research may lead to a fundamental contribution to research in fault detection and isolation.

  12. Focus on quantum Einstein gravity Focus on quantum Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjorn, Jan; Reuter, Martin; Saueressig, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The gravitational asymptotic safety program summarizes the attempts to construct a consistent and predictive quantum theory of gravity within Wilson's generalized framework of renormalization. Its key ingredient is a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow which controls the behavior of the theory at trans-Planckian energies and renders gravity safe from unphysical divergences. Provided that the fixed point comes with a finite number of ultraviolet-attractive (relevant) directions, this construction gives rise to a consistent quantum field theory which is as predictive as an ordinary, perturbatively renormalizable one. This opens up the exciting possibility of establishing quantum Einstein gravity as a fundamental theory of gravity, without introducing supersymmetry or extra dimensions, and solely based on quantization techniques that are known to work well for the other fundamental forces of nature. While the idea of gravity being asymptotically safe was proposed by Steven Weinberg more than 30 years ago [1], the technical tools for investigating this scenario only emerged during the last decade. Here a key role is played by the exact functional renormalization group equation for gravity, which allows the construction of non-perturbative approximate solutions for the RG-flow of the gravitational couplings. Most remarkably, all solutions constructed to date exhibit a suitable non-Gaussian fixed point, lending strong support to the asymptotic safety conjecture. Moreover, the functional renormalization group also provides indications that the central idea of a non-Gaussian fixed point providing a safe ultraviolet completion also carries over to more realistic scenarios where gravity is coupled to a suitable matter sector like the standard model. These theoretical successes also triggered a wealth of studies focusing on the consequences of asymptotic safety in a wide range of phenomenological applications covering the physics of black holes, early time cosmology and the big bang, as well as TeV-scale gravity models testable at the Large Hadron Collider. On different grounds, Monte-Carlo studies of the gravitational partition function based on the discrete causal dynamical triangulations approach provide an a priori independent avenue towards unveiling the non-perturbative features of gravity. As a highlight, detailed simulations established that the phase diagram underlying causal dynamical triangulations contains a phase where the triangulations naturally give rise to four-dimensional, macroscopic universes. Moreover, there are indications for a second-order phase transition that naturally forms the discrete analog of the non-Gaussian fixed point seen in the continuum computations. Thus there is a good chance that the discrete and continuum computations will converge to the same fundamental physics. This focus issue collects a series of papers that outline the current frontiers of the gravitational asymptotic safety program. We hope that readers get an impression of the depth and variety of this research area as well as our excitement about the new and ongoing developments. References [1] Weinberg S 1979 General Relativity, an Einstein Centenary Survey ed S W Hawking and W Israel (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Attosecond Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Krausz, Ferenc; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-02-01

    Investigations of light matter interactions and motion in the microcosm have entered a new temporal regime, the regime of attosecond physics. It is a main 'spin-off' of strong field (i.e., intense laser) physics, in which nonperturbative effects are fundamental. Attosecond pulses open up new avenues for time-domain studies of multi-electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas, and solids on their natural, quantum mechanical time scale and at dimensions shorter than molecular and even atomic scales. These capabilities promise a revolution in our microscopic knowledge and understanding of matter. The recent development of intense, phase-stabilized femtosecond (10-15 s) lasers has allowed unparalleled temporal control of electrons from ionizing atoms, permitting for the first time the generation and measurement of isolated light pulses as well as trains of pulses on the attosecond (1 as = 10-18 s) time scale, the natural time scale of the electron itself (e.g., the orbital period of an electron in the ground state of the H atom is 152 as). This development is facilitating (and even catalyzing) a new class of ultrashort time domain studies in photobiology, photochemistry, and photophysics. These new coherent, sub-fs pulses carried at frequencies in the extreme ultraviolet and soft-x-ray spectral regions, along with their intense, synchronized near-infrared driver waveforms and novel metrology based on sub-fs control of electron light interactions, are spawning the new science of attosecond physics, whose aims are to monitor, to visualize, and, ultimately, to control electrons on their own time and spatial scales, i.e., the attosecond time scale and the sub-nanometre (Ångstrom) spatial scale typical of atoms and molecules. Additional goals for experiment are to advance the enabling technologies for producing attosecond pulses at higher intensities and shorter durations. According to theoretical predictions, novel methods for intense attosecond pulse generation may in future involve using overdense plasmas. Electronic processes on sub-atomic spatio-temporal scales are the basis of chemical physics, atomic, molecular, and optical physics, materials science, and even some life science processes. Research in these areas using the new attosecond tools will advance together with the ability to control electrons themselves. Indeed, we expect that developments will advance in a way that is similar to advances that have occurred on the femtosecond time scale, in which much previous experimental and theoretical work on the interaction of coherent light sources has led to the development of means for 'coherent control' of nuclear motion in molecules. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is centered on experimental and theoretical advances in the development of new methodologies and tools for electron control on the attosecond time scale. Topics such as the efficient generation of harmonics; the generation of attosecond pulses, including those having only a few cycles and those produced from overdense plasmas; the description of various nonlinear, nonperturbative laser matter interactions, including many-electron effects and few-cycle pulse effects; the analysis of ultrashort propagation effects in atomic and molecular media; and the development of inversion methods for electron tomography, as well as many other topics, are addressed in the current focus issue dedicated to the new field of 'Attosecond Physics'. Focus on Attosecond Physics Contents Observing the attosecond dynamics of nuclear wavepackets in molecules by using high harmonic generation in mixed gases Tsuneto Kanai, Eiji J Takahashi, Yasuo Nabekawa and Katsumi Midorikawa Core-polarization effects in molecular high harmonic generation G Jordan and A Scrinzi Interferometric autocorrelation of an attosecond pulse train calculated using feasible formulae Y Nabekawa and K Midorikawa Attosecond pulse generation from aligned molecules—dynamics and propagation in H2+ E Lorin, S Chelkowski and A D Bandrauk Broadband generation in a Raman crystal driven by a pair of time-de

  14. Knowledge focus via software agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henager, Donald E.

    2001-09-01

    The essence of military Command and Control (C2) is making knowledge intensive decisions in a limited amount of time using uncertain, incorrect, or outdated information. It is essential to provide tools to decision-makers that provide: * Management of friendly forces by treating the "friendly resources as a system". * Rapid assessment of effects of military actions againt the "enemy as a system". * Assessment of how an enemy should, can, and could react to friendly military activities. Software agents in the form of mission agents, target agents, maintenance agents, and logistics agents can meet this information challenge. The role of each agent is to know all the details about its assigned mission, target, maintenance, or logistics entity. The Mission Agent would fight for mission resources based on the mission priority and analyze the effect that a proposed mission's results would have on the enemy. The Target Agent (TA) communicates with other targets to determine its role in the system of targets. A system of TAs would be able to inform a planner or analyst of the status of a system of targets, the effect of that status, adn the effect of attacks on that system. The system of TAs would also be able to analyze possible enemy reactions to attack by determining ways to minimize the effect of attack, such as rerouting traffic or using deception. The Maintenance Agent would scheudle maintenance events and notify the maintenance unit. The Logistics Agent would manage shipment and delivery of supplies to maintain appropriate levels of weapons, fuel and spare parts. The central idea underlying this case of software agents is knowledge focus. Software agents are createad automatically to focus their attention on individual real-world entities (e.g., missions, targets) and view the world from that entities perspective. The agent autonomously monitors the entity, identifies problems/opportunities, formulates solutions, and informs the decision-maker. The agent must be able to communicate to receive and disseminate information and provide the decision-maker with assistance via focused knowledge. THe agent must also be able to monitor the state of its own environment and make decisions necessary to carry out its delegated tasks. Agents bring three elements to the C2 domain that offer to improve decision-making. First, they provide higher-quality feedback and provide it more often. In doing so, the feedback loop becomes nearly continuous, reducing or eliminating delays in situation updates to decision-makers. Working with the most current information possible improves the control process, thus enabling effects based operations. Second, the agents accept delegation of actions and perform those actions following an established process. Agents' consistent actions reduce the variability of human input and stabilize the control process. Third, through the delegation of actions, agents ensure 100 percent consideration of plan details.

  15. The Unfocused Focus Group: Benefit or Bane?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    Facilitating successful focus groups requires both science and art. One element that can fully challenge focus group facilitators includes how to handle the unfocused focus group. This article describes "unfocus" and the benefits and disadvantages of unfocus in focus groups. Lessons learned from and approaches taken on this journey are shared to…

  16. SIAM Workshop: Focus on Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    2000-07-12

    The Fourth SlAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held on July 12, 2000 at the Westin Rio Mar Hotel in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico. The Department of Energy provided partial support for this event. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities. The meeting opened with a discussion of some data collected by the American Mathematical Society on Ph.D.'s awarded in the U.S. to citizens and non-citizens, further classified as blacks, latinos, asians and native americans. The activity continued with nine technical talks by underrepresented minority graduate students, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum chaired by Dr. Richard Tapia (Rice University) in which issues related to the participation of minorities in national meetings and proposal writing where discussed. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants. The students attended as well the three SlAM plenary talks during the day and the community lecture in the evening. The activity had a lively participation of students and representatives from various academic institutions and sponsoring agencies. In particular, we had the participation of 24 undergraduate students from the Mathematics REU program of the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao.

  17. Findings: LANL outsourcing focus groups

    SciTech Connect

    Jannotta, M.J.; McCabe, V.B.

    1996-12-31

    In March 1996, a series of 24 3-hour dialog focus groups were held with randomly selected Laboratory employees and contractors to gain their perceptions regarding potentials and problems for privatization and consolidation. A secondary goal was to educate and inform the workforce about potentials and issues in privatization and consolidation. Two hundred and thirty-six participants engaged in a learning session and structured input exercises resulting in 2,768 usable comments. Comments were categorized using standard qualitative methods; resulting categories included positive and negative comments on four models (consolidation, spin offs, outsourcing, and corporate partnering) and implications for the workforce, the Laboratory, and the local economy. Categories were in the areas of increasing/decreasing jobs, expertise, opportunity/salary/benefits, quality/efficiency, and effect on the local area and economy. An additional concern was losing Laboratory culture and history. Data were gathered and categorized on employee opinion regarding elements of successful transition to the four models, and issues emerged in the areas of terms and conditions of employment; communication; involvement; sound business planning; ethics and fairness; community infrastructure. From the aggregated opinion of the participants, it is recommended that decision-makers: Plan using sound business principles and continually communicate plans to the workforce; Respect workforce investments in the Laboratory; Tell the workforce exactly what is going on at all times; Understand that economic growth in Northern New Mexico is not universally viewed as positive; and Establish dialog with stakeholders on growth issues.

  18. Focused electron beam induced deposition: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Porrati, Fabrizio; Schwalb, Christian; Winhold, Marcel; Sachser, Roland; Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan; Fantner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a direct-writing technique with nanometer resolution, which has received strongly increasing attention within the last decade. In FEBID a precursor previously adsorbed on a substrate surface is dissociated in the focus of an electron beam. After 20 years of continuous development FEBID has reached a stage at which this technique is now particularly attractive for several areas in both, basic and applied research. The present topical review addresses selected examples that highlight this development in the areas of charge-transport regimes in nanogranular metals close to an insulator-to-metal transition, the use of these materials for strain- and magnetic-field sensing, and the prospect of extending FEBID to multicomponent systems, such as binary alloys and intermetallic compounds with cooperative ground states. Results: After a brief introduction to the technique, recent work concerning FEBID of Pt–Si alloys and (hard-magnetic) Co–Pt intermetallic compounds on the nanometer scale is reviewed. The growth process in the presence of two precursors, whose flux is independently controlled, is analyzed within a continuum model of FEBID that employs rate equations. Predictions are made for the tunability of the composition of the Co–Pt system by simply changing the dwell time of the electron beam during the writing process. The charge-transport regimes of nanogranular metals are reviewed next with a focus on recent theoretical advancements in the field. As a case study the transport properties of Pt–C nanogranular FEBID structures are discussed. It is shown that by means of a post-growth electron-irradiation treatment the electronic intergrain-coupling strength can be continuously tuned over a wide range. This provides unique access to the transport properties of this material close to the insulator-to-metal transition. In the last part of the review, recent developments in mechanical strain-sensing and the detection of small, inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing nanogranular FEBID structures are highlighted. Conclusion: FEBID has now reached a state of maturity that allows a shift of the focus towards the development of new application fields, be it in basic research or applied. This is shown for selected examples in the present review. At the same time, when seen from a broader perspective, FEBID still has to live up to the original idea of providing a tool for electron-controlled chemistry on the nanometer scale. This has to be understood in the sense that, by providing a suitable environment during the FEBID process, the outcome of the electron-induced reactions can be steered in a controlled way towards yielding the desired composition of the products. The development of a FEBID-specialized surface chemistry is mostly still in its infancy. Next to application development, it is this aspect that will likely be a guiding light for the future development of the field of focused electron beam induced deposition. PMID:23019557

  19. Sentence-Level Rewriting Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Litman, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Writers usually need iterations of revisions and edits during their writings. To better understand the process of rewriting, we need to know what has changed be-tween the revisions. Prior work mainly focuses on detecting corrections within sentences, which is at the level of words or phrases. This paper proposes to detect revision changes at the…

  20. The Development of Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, David I.; Burack, Jacob A.; Miller, Danny; Joseph, Shari; Enns, James T.

    2006-01-01

    Changes to a scene often go unnoticed if the objects of the change are unattended, making change detection an index of where attention is focused during scene perception. We measured change detection in school-age children and young adults by repeatedly alternating two versions of an image. To provide an age-fair assessment we used a bimanual…

  1. Focusing on Cause or Cure?

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Lauren C.; Cho, Mildred K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomedical research is influenced by many factors, including the involvement of stakeholder groups invested in research outcomes. Stakeholder involvement in research efforts raise questions of justice as their specific interests and motivations play a role in directing research resources that ultimately produce knowledge shaping how different conditions (and affected individuals) are understood and treated by society. This issue is highly relevant to child psychiatry research where diagnostic criteria and treatment strategies are often controversial. Biological similarities and stakeholder differences between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) provide an opportunity to explore this issue by comparing research foci and stakeholder involvement in these conditions. Methods A subset of ADHD and ASD research articles published between 1970-2010 were randomly selected from the PubMed database and coded for research focus, funding source(s), and author-reported conflicts of interest (COIs). Chi-square analyses were performed to identify differences between and within ADHD and ASD research across time. Results The proportion of ADHD research dedicated to basic, description, and treatment research was roughly similar and remained stable over time, while ASD research showed a significant increase in basic research over the past decade. Government was the primary research funder for both conditions, but for-profit funders were a notable presence in ADHD research, while joint-funding efforts between non-profit and government funders were a notable presence in ASD research. Lastly, COIs were noted more frequently in ADHD than in ASD research. Conclusions Our study shows significant differences in research foci and funding sources between the conditions, and identifies the specific involvement of for-profit and non-profit groups in ADHD and ASD, respectively. Our findings highlight the relationship between stakeholders outside the research community and research trajectories and suggest that examinations of these relationships must be included in broader considerations of biomedical research ethics. PMID:24729931

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Molecular Electronics FOCUS ON MOLECULAR ELECTRONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Elke; Reineker, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The notion 'molecular electronics' has been used more frequently since the 1970s and summarizes a series of physical phenomena and ideas for their application in connection with organic molecules, oligomers, polymers, organic aggregates and solids. The properties studied in this field were connected to optical and electrical phenomena, such as optical absorption, fluorescence, nonlinear optics, energy transport, charge transfer, electrical conductance, and electron and nuclear spin-resonance. The final goal was and is to build devices which can compete or surpass some aspects of inorganic semiconductor devices. For example, on the basis of organic molecules there exist rectifiers, transistors, molecular wires, organic light emitting diodes, elements for photovoltaics, and displays. With respect to applications, one aspect of the organic materials is their broad variability and the lower effort and costs for their processability. The step from microstructures to the investigation of nanostructures is a big challenge also in this field and has lead to what nowadays is called molecular electronics in its narrow sense. In this field the subjects of the studies are often single molecules, e.g. single molecule optical spectroscopy, electrical conductance, i.e. charge transport through a single molecule, the influence of vibrational degrees of freedom, etc. A challenge here is to provide the techniques for addressing in a reproducible way the molecular scale. In another approach small molecular ensembles are studied in order to avoid artefacts from particular contact situations. The recent development of the field is presented in [1 8]. In this Focus Issue we present new results in the field of 'molecular electronics', both in its broad and specialized sense. One of the basic questions is the distribution of the energy levels responsible for optical absorption on the one hand and for the transport of charge on the other. A still unanswered question is whether the Wannier exciton model applies in which the excitation is distributed over several molecules or whether a good description is given by the Frenkel exciton model with the electron and the whole being localized at the same molecular unit. In organic semiconductors the charge transport usually occurs on the basis of holes because of the presence of many defects giving rise to a localization of the electrons. It is therefore a challenge to produce materials with both positive and negative mobile charge carriers. In the 1990s V M Agranovich introduced the idea of hybrid excitons, i.e. of nanostructured materials consisting of both organic and inorganic semiconductors. At the interface between the organic and inorganic parts new excitons can appear, being a superposition of both Frenkel and Wannier excitons and having both the high oscillator strength of the Frenkel and the large optical nonlinearity of the Wannier exciton. The problem is to find optimum combinations of the organic and inorganic parts to enable the hybrid structure concept to work. Micro-cavities also play an important role in the investigation of organic materials resulting in a new state (polariton) as the superposition of a photon and an exciton because of the large exciton photon interaction. A similar excitation arises because of the interaction between plasmons and photons. A special geometrical shape of a nano-cavity increases the interaction between the electromagnetic radiation and a dipole sitting in the cavity. The interaction between vibronic degrees of freedom and electronic excitations plays an important role for various phenomena such as nonlinear processes, the question of coherence, information on the shape of a potential hypersurface, etc. With the help of femtosecond laser pulses, detailed information on such vibrations can be obtained. Also of great importance is the investigation of the energy transfer in artificial light-harvesting systems, e.g. in dendrimers. Finally the combination of experimental and theoretical investigations allows for a comparison of the spectra of two molecules wi

  3. Focus takes time: structural effects on reading.

    PubMed

    Lowder, Matthew W; Gordon, Peter C

    2015-12-01

    Previous eye-tracking work has yielded inconsistent evidence regarding whether readers spend more or less time encoding focused information compared with information that is not focused. We report the results of an eye-tracking experiment that used syntactic structure to manipulate whether a target word was linguistically defocused, neutral, or focused, while controlling for possible oculomotor differences across conditions. As the structure of the sentence made the target word increasingly more focused, reading times systematically increased. We propose that the longer reading times for linguistically focused words reflect deeper encoding, which explains previous findings showing that readers have better subsequent memory for focused versus defocused information. PMID:25962686

  4. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    'Plasma Healthcare' is an emerging interdisciplinary research topic of rapidly growing importance, exploring considerable opportunities at the interface of plasma physics, chemistry and engineering with life sciences. Some of the scientific discoveries reported so far have already demonstrated clear benefits for healthcare in areas of medicine, food safety, environmental hygiene, and cosmetics. Examples include ongoing studies of prion inactivation, chronic wound treatment and plasma-mediated cancer therapy. Current research ranges from basic physical processes, plasma chemical design, to the interaction of plasmas with (i) eukaryotic (mammalian) cells; (ii) prokaryotic (bacteria) cells, viruses, spores and fungi; (iii) DNA, lipids, proteins and cell membranes; and (iv) living human, animal and plant tissues in the presence of biofluids. Of diverse interests in this new field is the need for hospital disinfection, in particular with respect to the alarming increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics, the concomitant needs in private practices, nursing homes etc, the applications in personal hygiene—and the enticing possibility to 'design' plasmas as possible pharmaceutical products, employing ionic as well as molecular agents for medical treatment. The 'delivery' of the reactive plasma agents occurs at the gaseous level, which means that there is no need for a carrier medium and access to the treatment surface is optimal. This focus issue provides a close look at the current state of the art in Plasma Medicine with a number of forefront research articles as well as an introductory review. Focus on Plasma Medicine Contents Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination Helen C Baxter, Patricia R Richardson, Gaynor A Campbell, Valeri I Kovalev, Robert Maier, James S Barton, Anita C Jones, Greg DeLarge, Mark Casey and Robert L Baxter Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low-pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two-dimensional cold atmospheric plasma jet array for uniform treatment of large-area

  5. Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound: An in vivo study

    E-print Network

    Cui, Huizhong; Zhang, Ti; Yang, Xinmai

    2013-04-01

    Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was studied in vivo using a small animal model. Laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected...

  6. Auto-focusing method for remote gaze tracking camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Oh; Lee, Hyeon Chang; Cho, Chul Woo; Gwon, Su Yeong; Park, Kang Ryoung; Lee, Heekyung; Cha, Jihun

    2012-06-01

    Gaze tracking determines what a user is looking at; the key challenge is to obtain well-focused eye images. This is not easy because the human eye is very small, whereas the required resolution of the image should be large enough for accurate detection of the pupil center. In addition, capturing a user's eye image by a remote gaze tracking system within a large working volume at a long Z distance requires a panning/tilting mechanism with a zoom lens, which makes it more difficult to acquire focused eye images. To solve this problem, a new auto-focusing method for remote gaze tracking is proposed. The proposed approach is novel in the following four ways: First, it is the first research on an auto-focusing method for a remote gaze tracking system. Second by using user-dependent calibration at initial stage, the weakness of the previous methods that use facial width in captured image to estimate Z distance between a user and camera, wherein each person has the individual variation of facial width, is solved. Third, the parameters of the modeled formula for estimating the Z distance are adaptively updated using the least squares regression method. Therefore, the focus becomes more accurate over time. Fourth, the relationship between the parameters and the face width is fitted locally according to the Z distance instead of by global fitting, which can enhance the accuracy of Z distance estimation. The results of an experiment with 10,000 images of 10 persons showed that the mean absolute error between the ground-truth Z distance measured by a Polhemus Patriot device and that estimated by the proposed method was 4.84 cm. A total of 95.61% of the images obtained by the proposed method were focused and could be used for gaze detection.

  7. Onset of nonlinear self-focusing of femtosecond laser pulses in air: Conventional vs spatiotemporal focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ya; Xie, Hongqiang; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Guihua; Zeng, Bin; He, Fei; Chu, Wei; Yao, Jinping; Qiao, Lingling

    2015-08-01

    We report an experimental comparison of critical intensities of nonlinear self-focusing in air with conventional focusing and spatiotemporal focusing schemes. Our results show that the conventional focusing with the focal lens completely filled with the incident beam allows for a higher peak intensity near the focus against the nonlinear self-focusing than the spatiotemporal focusing scheme. This is because in the high-numerical-aperture condition, the focal spot will have a compact size, which results in a high focal intensity. Meanwhile, the Rayleigh length of the focused beam will be substantially shortened, which efficiently postpones the onset of self-focusing.

  8. Techniques For Focusing In Zone Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Twitty, Garland E.; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    In two techniques for focusing in zone electrophoresis, force of applied electrical field in each charged particle balanced by restoring force of electro-osmosis. Two techniques: velocity-gradient focusing (VGF), suitable for rectangular electrophoresis chambers; and field-gradient focusing (FGF), suitable for step-shaped electrophoresis chambers.

  9. Middle Level Teachers Using Focus Group Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Focus group discussions offer participants time to discuss particular topics. This article discusses some results of several graduate students' attempts to implement focus group research. After a brief review of literature reflecting the use of focus groups and recommendations for their use, the author reports their reactions and their…

  10. FINAL REPORT ON THREE FOCUS GROUPS

    E-print Network

    Hammack, Richard

    FINAL REPORT ON THREE FOCUS GROUPS AMONG FACULTY AND CLASSIFIED EMPLOYEES on CLIMATE SURVEY the findings from three focus groups conducted for Virginia Commonwealth University's Equity and Diversity-wide survey, and 2,051 of the 4,672 full-time faculty and staff responded (44%). The focus groups were

  11. Regulatory Focus and Goal Emphasis: Setting

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    1 Regulatory Focus and Goal Emphasis: Setting Minimal, Maximal, and Aspiration Level Goals Kathryn UniversityColumbia University What is Regulatory Focus? Self-regulation Principle:Self-regulation Principle assigned goal scoreParticipants assigned goal score #12;3 Questions Regulatory Focus affects Goal SettingRegulatory

  12. Remote focusing of a light beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Nikolai I.

    2016-01-01

    The remote focusing of light in a graded-index medium via mode interference is demonstrated using exact analytical solutions of the wave equation. Strong focusing of a light beam occurs at extremely long distances and this repeats periodically with distance. The high efficiency transfer of a strongly focused subwavelength spot through an optical waveguide over large distances takes place with a period of revival. The simulated intensity distributions of a focused light beam and focusing efficiency (power in a central spot/total power) are presented. The far-field super-resolution imaging capabilities of a graded-index waveguide are also analyzed.

  13. Acoustic focusing by metal circular ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2015-02-01

    We report an exotic acoustic focusing effect through a simple brass circular ring structure immersed in water. The acoustic waves can be focused on a prefect point at the centre of the ring structure. This exotic acoustic focusing phenomenon arises from the intrinsic modes in the ring structure at some special eigenfrequencies, which is essentially distinct from the previous studies originating from the negative refraction. The focusing effect is closely related to the size and shape of the ring structure. Interesting applications of the focusing mechanism in black box detectors in the sea and medical ultrasound treatment are further discussed.

  14. Focus area: Neuroscience & Cognition Utrecht (NCU), May, 2014 Focus area Neuroscience & Cognition Utrecht (NCU)

    E-print Network

    Dignum, Frank

    Focus area: Neuroscience & Cognition Utrecht (NCU), May, 2014 1 Focus area Neuroscience & Cognition Centre Rudolf Magnus Societal and scientific challenges for neuroscience and cognition research The world pathologies, which may generate essential leads for supporting sustainable #12;Focus area: Neuroscience

  15. Detection of and Experimental Constraints on WIMPs

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    68 Chapter 2 Detection of and Experimental Constraints on WIMPs 2.1 Introduction The indirect used to search for WIMP dark matter, which fall under the categories of indirect and direct detection the sensitivity of various detection methods. I focus on WIMPs in the context of the MSSM, though parts

  16. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Schryver, Jack C; Sukumar, Sreenivas R

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  17. Research Focus Hiding in plain sight

    E-print Network

    Beatty, Christopher

    , there has been no field evidence that it works to reduce the detection rates of natural prey. In a recent for this long-recognized phenomenon and suggest several new avenues of research. Avoiding detection Organisms are thought to use several different techniques to avoid being detected by predators. Thus, they can adopt

  18. Partial focusing by indefinite complementary metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qiang; Liu, Ruopeng; Mock, Jack J.; Cui, Tie Jun; Smith, David R.

    2008-09-01

    We have experimentally realized a two-dimensional partial focusing within a planar waveguide using complementary indefinite metamaterials. When the electric fields emitted from the dipole are TE polarized, the focusing condition requires negative magnetic response in the propagation direction of the waveguide, which can be achieved by the complementary electric resonator (CELC) structures. We have carefully designed the experimental configurations and the dimensions for the CELC structures. The experimental result is consistent with the theoretical prediction, which validates the partial focusing phenomenon.

  19. Needs of Non-Energy Focused Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Liakus, C.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the informational needs of non-energy focused contractors, including what information they need to motivate them to become energy-focused, the BARA team studied the type of information provided by the national programs, trade associations, and manufacturers that were researched for the related technical report: Effective Communication of Energy Efficiency. While that report focused on the delivery method, format, and strategy of the information, this study examines the content being put forward.

  20. Needs of Non Energy-Focused Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the informational needs of non energy-focused contractors, including what information they need to motivate them to become energy-focused, the BARA team studied the type of information provided by the national programs, trade associations, and manufacturers that were researched for the related technical report: Effective Communication of Energy Efficiency. While that report focused on the delivery method, format, and strategy of the information, this study examines the content being put forward.

  1. Muon g -2 in focus point SUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2015-08-01

    We point out that the anomaly of the muon g -2 can easily be explained in a focus point supersymmetry (SUSY) scenario, which realizes the seminatural SUSY. Among known focus point SUSY scenarios, we find that a model based on Higgs-gaugino mediation works with a mild fine-tuning ? =40 - 80 . We propose two new focus point SUSY scenarios where the anomaly of the muon g -2 is also explained. These scenarios are variants of the widely known focus point SUSY based on gravity mediation with universal scalar masses.

  2. Muon g-2 in Focus Point SUSY

    E-print Network

    Keisuke Harigaya; Tsutomu T. Yanagida; Norimi Yokozaki

    2015-05-08

    We point out that the anomaly of the muon $g-2$ can be easily explained in a focus point supersymmetry scenario, which realizes the semi-natural supersymmetry. Among known focus point supersymmetry scenarios, we find that a model based on Higgs-gaugino mediation works with a mild fine-tuning $\\Delta=40$-$80$. We propose two new focus point supersymmetry scenarios where the anomaly of the muon $g-2$ is also explained. These scenarios are variants of the widely known focus point supersymmetry based on gravity mediation with universal scalar masses.

  3. Automatic focusing system of BSST in Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Peng-Yi; Liu, Jia-Jing; Zhang, Guang-yu; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Automatic focusing (AF) technology plays an important role in modern astronomical telescopes. Based on the focusing requirement of BSST (Bright Star Survey Telescope) in Antarctic, an AF system is set up. In this design, functions in OpenCV is used to find stars, the algorithm of area, HFD or FWHM are used to degree the focus metric by choosing. Curve fitting method is used to find focus position as the method of camera moving. All these design are suitable for unattended small telescope.

  4. FEMP Focus: 2011 Volume 20 Issue 1

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-05

    Department of Energy (DOE); Federal Energy Management Program; FEMP Focus Newsletter; December 2010; Alternative Financing, Guidance Documents, Recovery Act Technical Assistance, Training, Energy Awareness

  5. Relative focus map estimation using blind deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Levente; Szirányi, Tamás

    2005-11-15

    An automatic focus map extraction method is presented that uses a modification of blind deconvolution for estimation of localized blurring functions. We use these local blurring functions [so-called point-spread functions (PSFs)] for extraction of focus areas on ordinary images. In this inverse task our goal is not image reconstruction but the estimation of localized PSFs and the relative focus map. Thus the method is less sensitive than general deconvolution is to noise and ill-posed deconvolution problems. The focus areas can be estimated without any knowledge of the shooting conditions or of the optical system used. PMID:16315708

  6. Focus-of-attention for human activity recognition from UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghouts, G. J.; van Eekeren, A. W. M.; Dijk, J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a system to extract metadata about human activities from full-motion video recorded from a UAV. The pipeline consists of these components: tracking, motion features, representation of the tracks in terms of their motion features, and classification of each track as one of the human activities of interest. We consider these activities: walk, run, throw, dig, wave. Our contribution is that we show how a robust system can be constructed for human activity recognition from UAVs, and that focus-of-attention is needed. We find that tracking and human detection are essential for robust human activity recognition from UAVs. Without tracking, the human activity recognition deteriorates. The combination of tracking and human detection is needed to focus the attention on the relevant tracks. The best performing system includes tracking, human detection and a per-track analysis of the five human activities. This system achieves an average accuracy of 93%. A graphical user interface is proposed to aid the operator or analyst during the task of retrieving the relevant parts of video that contain particular human activities. Our demo is available on YouTube.

  7. Auto focus and image registration techniques for infrared imaging of microelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, Daniela; Köck, Helmut; Plankensteiner, Kathrin; Glavanovics, Michael

    2013-07-01

    An infrared (IR) microscope camera system is used to measure the temperature distribution of power devices during electrical stress pulses. A calibration is required to correlate the target temperature to the corresponding raw data of the IR camera. The IR microscope camera system contains a fixed lens; this means that the whole camera has to be moved to detect focus images. During the heating up or cooling down process, the thermo-mechanical expansion influences the measurement results. For the calibration of the power device, focus images and a pixel-by-pixel registration of individual images are required. In this paper, methods are discussed to prepare the images for the calibration process. The issues concerning finding the focus image and guaranteeing a pixel-by-pixel overlap in the image sequence are solved and evaluated by the proposed auto focus and the image correlation algorithms. An IR camera equipped with a fixed focus lens is used to perform the measurements; hence, no geometrical distortion occurs. To detect the focus position and corresponding focus image, the principle of passive focusing is used, where a focus curve is recorded. Different methods are discussed to compute the focus value. Image registration is applied to compute the distortion between the images and guarantee a pixel-by-pixel overlap. In our case, the most significant parameter is the displacement; hence, the SIFT algorithm of Lowe and a simple image correlation algorithm are implemented and compared.

  8. Best focus shift mechanism for thick masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Martin; Raghunathan, Ananthan

    2015-03-01

    The best focus shift due to thick mask effects is well known, both in ArF, and more importantly in EUV, where the shorter wavelength is small compared to both mask openings and absorber height. While the effect is stronger in opaque features in clear field masks, the best focus shift is visible in dark field masks as well, and it becomes even more pronounced when scattering bars are added to non-dense features. This pattern dependent focus variation can be predicted in both exact EMF simulations and fast image calculations that are used for optical proximity correction (OPC). Even though this focus shift can be predicted and patterns can be corrected in OPC, we would like to understand the mechanism that causes this focus shift. This can help us understand if, in addition to best focus shift, the image quality is further deteriorated due to the thick mask effects. The best focus shift is found to be an interplay of the complex diffraction coefficient due to thick mask effects and the direction of the light that is incident on the mask, or coherence value ?. A change in focus adds a phase term to each of the complex diffraction coefficients, causing their rotation in a phasor diagram. Best focus is found when the phasors have an angle of 0 or 180 degrees to each other and depending on which diffracted orders are caught in the pupil and contribute to imaging. We investigate the effect of partial coherence, mask thickness, and assist feature placement on best focus shift. We observe a waveguide effect in the absorber gaps because of the reduced real index of refraction in the absorber layer, making vacuum the optically dense medium. We suggest ways to lessen the best focus shifts through assist feature placement or the use of alternative absorbers that are closer matched to the dielectric index of vacuum.

  9. FOCUS: a charm photo-production experiment at FERMILAB

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, Salvador; Vazquez, Fabiola

    1998-02-01

    FOCUS is designed to detect states of matter combining one or more charm quarks with light quarks (strange, up, down). The experiment aims to create 10 times as many such particles as in previous experiments and to observe rare phenomena that may shed light on fundamental interactions of the strong and electroweak forces. The experiment collected data during the 1996-97 fixed target run, and investigate several topics on charm physics including high precision studies of charm semileptonic decays, QCD studies using double charm events, measurements of D{sup 0}'s absolute branching fraction, systematic investigation of charm baryons and their lifetimes, and searches for D{sup 0} mixing, CP violation, rare and forbidden decays, and fully leptonic decays of D{sup +}. Based on E687 experience, FOCUS (E831) expects to fully reconstruct 10{sup 6} charm particle decays.

  10. Introduction to Focus Issue: Mesoscales in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendral, Juan A.; Criado, Regino; Leyva, Inmaculada; Buldú, Javier M.; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene

    2011-03-01

    Although the functioning of real complex networks is greatly determined by modularity, the majority of articles have focused, until recently, on either their local scale structure or their macroscopical properties. However, neither of these descriptions can adequately describe the important features that complex networks exhibit due to their organization in modules. This Focus Issue precisely presents the state of the art on the study of complex networks at that intermediate level. The reader will find out why this mesoscale level has become an important topic of research through the latest advances carried out to improve our understanding of the dynamical behavior of modular networks. The contributions presented here have been chosen to cover, from different viewpoints, the many open questions in the field as different aspects of community definition and detection algorithms, moduli overlapping, dynamics on modular networks, interplay between scales, and applications to biological, social, and technological fields.

  11. Attentional Focus Effects in Balance Acrobats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulf, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    Performing and learning motor skills has been shown to be enhanced if the performer adopts an external relative to internal focus (or no focus) of attention (Wulf, 2007). The present study examined the generalizability of this effect to top-level performers (balance acrobats). Participants performed a balance task (standing on an inflated rubber…

  12. Harmonic generation with temporally focused ultrashort pulses

    E-print Network

    Silberberg, Yaron

    Harmonic generation with temporally focused ultrashort pulses Dan Oron and Yaron Silberberg of harmonic generation with temporally focused ultrashort pulses are explored both theoreti- cally and experimentally. Analyzing the phase-matching conditions for harmonic generation we find a corre- spondence

  13. Peer Led Focus Groups and Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Cathy

    2006-01-01

    Peer led focus groups, a qualitative social science research method, and their use with young people are examined. The paper outlines three developments that have contributed to their emergence, namely: traditional focus groups, peer education and participatory research. Drawing on a study in progress, the advantages and challenges associated with…

  14. Identifying Information Focuses in Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hong-yan

    2011-01-01

    The study explains the process of learners' listening comprehension within Halliday's information theory in functional grammar, including the skills of identifying focuses while listening in college English teaching. Identifying information focuses in listening is proved to improve the students' communicative listening ability by the means of a…

  15. How I Learned to Conduct Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rio-Roberts, Maribel

    2011-01-01

    The use of focus groups may provide researchers with important insights into research questions via participant discussion and interaction. As a human services practitioner and researcher, I became interested in learning how to conduct focus groups in order to apply these steps to my research and gain valuable insights about the human experience…

  16. Teaching Focus Group Interviewing: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Focus group interviewing is widely used by academic and applied researchers. Given the popularity and strengths of this method, it is surprising how rarely focus group interviewing is taught in the undergraduate classroom and how few resources exist to support instructors who wish to train students to use this technique. This article fills the gap…

  17. Focusing Research in Universities: Implications for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlin, Chris

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores some of the implications for research management in universities of the explicit identification of areas of research focus. In particular, it examines how research facilitation can work with research focus to enable universities to organise and project their research capabilities more effectively. This combination of research…

  18. Inclusive Focus Particles in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sang-gu

    2011-01-01

    When discussing focus particles, it has been common practice to rely on the dichotomy of inclusive vs. exclusive particles, "a la" Konig (1991). Inclusive focus particles are often further divided into scalar particles, such as "also", "too", and "either", and non-scalar particles, such as "even". In this thesis, I advance a comparative analysis…

  19. Module: Material Structure Focus: Crystal Structures

    E-print Network

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    Module: Material Structure Focus: Crystal Structures Duration: 43 minute period Contact: Daniel with the class crystalline structure. 2. Students will perform a lab on crystal structure. Assignment: 1. dsteinbe@princeton.edu #12;Module: Material Structure Focus: Crystal Structures Duration: 43 minute period

  20. Out of Focus: Children's Conceptions of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Larry K.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that used focus group discussions to evaluate fifth graders' understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome before receiving HIV education. Results indicated students' conceptions about HIV were more naive than expected. The focus groups were effective in evaluating students' process of…

  1. MUSIC algorithms for rebar detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solimene, Raffaele; Leone, Giovanni; Dell'Aversano, Angela

    2013-12-01

    The MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) algorithm is employed to detect and localize an unknown number of scattering objects which are small in size as compared to the wavelength. The ensemble of objects to be detected consists of both strong and weak scatterers. This represents a scattering environment challenging for detection purposes as strong scatterers tend to mask the weak ones. Consequently, the detection of more weakly scattering objects is not always guaranteed and can be completely impaired when the noise corrupting data is of a relatively high level. To overcome this drawback, here a new technique is proposed, starting from the idea of applying a two-stage MUSIC algorithm. In the first stage strong scatterers are detected. Then, information concerning their number and location is employed in the second stage focusing only on the weak scatterers. The role of an adequate scattering model is emphasized to improve drastically detection performance in realistic scenarios.

  2. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    The final focus system of a linear collider must perform two primary functions, it must focus the two opposing beams so that their transverse dimensions at the interaction point are small enough to yield acceptable luminosity, and it must steer the beams together to maintain collisions. In addition, the final focus system must transport the outgoing beams to a location where they can be recycled or safely dumped. Elementary optical considerations for linear collider final focus systems are discussed, followed by chromatic aberrations. The design of the final focus system of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is described. Tuning and diagnostics and steering to collision are discussed. Most of the examples illustrating the concepts covered are drawn from the SLC, but the principles and conclusions are said to be generally applicable to other linear collider designs as well. 26 refs., 17 figs. (LEW)

  3. Optical trapping of nanoparticles by full solid-angle focusing

    E-print Network

    Salakhutdinov, Vsevolod; Carbone, Luigi; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Bramati, Alberto; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    We propose and implement a dipole-trap for nanoparticles that is based on focusing from the full solid angle with a deep parabolic mirror. The key aspect is the generation of a linear-dipole mode. For such a mode, our calculations predict a trapping potential that is deeper and tighter than the potential obtainable with microscope objectives. We demonstrate the trapping of dot-in-rod nanoparticles. From the detected fluorescence photons we obtain intensity correlation functions of second order with $g^{(2)}(0)< 0.5$, suggesting the trapping of a single quantum emitter.

  4. Leak detection

    E-print Network

    Zapfe, K

    2007-01-01

    This paper will give an introduction to the leak detection of vacuum systems. Various methods to detect leaks as well as the most widely used helium leak detectors and their different applications are presented. Practical examples in the context of accelerator vacuum systems will illustrate the topic.

  5. Localized Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound Surgery Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Recently, an in vivo real-time ultrasound-based monitoring technique that uses localized harmonic motion (LHM) to detect changes in tissues during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) has been proposed to control the exposure. This technique can potentially be used as well for targeting imaging. In the present study we evaluated the potential of using LHM to detect changes in stiffness and the feasibility of using it for imaging purposes in phantoms and in vivo tumor detection. A single-element FUS transducer (80 mm focal length, 100 mm diameter, 1.485 MHz) was used for inducing a localized harmonic motion and a separate ultrasound diagnostic transducer excited by a pulser/receiver (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion. The motion was estimated using cross-correlation techniques on the acquired RF signal. Silicon phantom studies were performed in order to determine the size of inclusion that was possible to detect using this technique. Inclusions were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude and it was possible to depict inclusions as small as 4 mm. The amplitude of the induced LHM was always lower at the inclusions as compared with the one obtained at the surroundings. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs and LHM was induced and measured at the tumor region. Tumors (as small as 10 mm in length and 4 mm in width) were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude. PMID:21683514

  6. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Vann, C.S.

    1993-08-31

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a Cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the Cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the Cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a Cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  7. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.

    1992-12-31

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beams originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD`s are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens in positioned coaxial with the cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a cassegrain system using a series of shuttles and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  8. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S. (Fremont, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  9. Deep-Focusing Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Jensen, J. M.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Birch, A. C.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much progress has been made by measuring the travel times of solar acoustic waves from a central surface location to points at equal arc distance away. Depth information is obtained from the range of arc distances examined, with the larger distances revealing the deeper layers. This method we will call surface-focusing, as the common point, or focus, is at the surface. To obtain a clearer picture of the subsurface region, it would, no doubt, be better to focus on points below the surface. Our first attempt to do this used the ray theory to pick surface location pairs that would focus on a particular subsurface point. This is not the ideal procedure, as Born approximation kernels suggest that this focus should have zero sensitivity to sound speed inhomogeneities. However, the sensitivity is concentrated below the surface in a much better way than the old surface-focusing method, and so we expect the deep-focusing method to be more sensitive. A large sunspot group was studied by both methods. Inversions based on both methods will be compared.

  10. EDITORIAL: Focus on Micro- and Nanofluidics FOCUS ON MICRO- AND NANOFLUIDICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdari, Armand; Stone, Howard A.

    2009-07-01

    This focus issue of New Journal of Physics concentrates on recent developments in microfluidics, and related small-scale flow themes. This subject touches on many areas with the common element that they are engaged with understanding, measuring or manipulating flows at the scale of a few hundred microns or smaller. Microfluidics is of interest to many scientists and engineers from many disciplines because it is a toolbox from which they can investigate basic questions in their respective fields. In particular, the field has led to new studies of small-scale fluid flows, especially those dominated by surface effects, which is crucial for understanding electrokinetics, chemical reactions and phase changes, and multiphase systems, including those involving dispersed liquid and gas phases, suspended particles, cells, vesicles, capsules, etc. The lower length scale of these kinds of flows concerns nanoscale manipulation of objects such as DNA or nanoparticles, nanofabrication of surfaces, studies of the flow within nanometers of substrates, etc. Microfluidics has also given rise to technologies because it enables design and implementation of new devices for sensing, detection, measurement, materials characterization, combinatorial discovery, cellular-scale manipulation, miniaturization of reactors, etc. The fact that these systems are small, cheap, physically flexible, portable, multifunctional, and, when they are working, produce measurements quickly, offers many new avenues for innovation. In this issue we highlight contributions from around the world that explore research directions inspired by the manifold possibilities of microfluidics. In particular, the papers include reports of single-phase flows that are driven by electrical fields, so-called electrokinetics. Although the field has its origins in the 19th century, if not even earlier, new theoretical ideas are required to understand dynamics close to charged surfaces, and new applications of the basic ideas are being introduced for driving flows and manipulating suspended particles (e.g. DNA). In addition, the subject of mixing and the study of transport processes coupling diffusion and convection is a necessary component of many studies aimed at lab-on-a-chip environments. At the other extreme from mixing there is interest in the precise placement of particles in microfluidic flows. Although the majority of microfluidic studies focus on the consequences of low Reynolds number motions, the flows can frequently have large enough particle-scale Reynolds numbers that inertial effects can appear. Also, chemical gradients, via osmotic effects, can be significant, and, where surface effects are significant, particle deposition can occur. Multiphase flows constitute another major area of microfluidic research. For example, there has been great interest in using drops as individual containers since both the chemical composition inside and outside the drop can be controlled. Also, the interface between the two phases provides both a natural chemical barrier (surfactants are generally added to reduce the probability of coalescence between drops) as well as potentially being the site for reactions or localized organization of particles suspended in solution. Thus, there is interest in both the controlled breakup of liquid threads, the dynamics of such a thread, which can fold or buckle, and application of these processes to fabricating new materials. Not surprisingly the themes mentioned in this short summary are just a small window into the myriad of ideas being investigated in the research world of small-scale flows that is the playground of micro- and nanofluidics. We are grateful to all of the contributors for their efforts and to the referees, whose feedback has added value to every contribution. We hope you, as readers, will find benefit in the many ideas discussed in this Focus on Micro- and Nanofluidics, which represents a sampling of current activity, including experiment, simulation and theory, in this rapidly developing field. Focus on Micro- and Nanofluidics Content

  11. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  12. Designing focusing solenoids for superconducting RF accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; Wokas, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The design of a focusing solenoid for use in a superconducting RF linac requires resolving a range of problems with conflicting requirements. Providing the required focusing strength contradicts the goal of minimizing the stray field on the surfaces of adjacent superconducting RF cavities. The requirement of a compact solenoid, able to fit into a gap between cavities, contradicts the need of mechanical support necessary to restrain electromagnetic forces that can result in coil motion and subsequent quenching. In this report we will attempt to address these and other issues arising during the development of focusing solenoids. Some relevant test data will also be presented.

  13. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Lykke, Keith R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lill, Thorsten B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  14. Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, S.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

  15. A Poorly Focused Talk Prof. Hank Dietz

    E-print Network

    Dietz, Henry G. "Hank"

    penlight) Manual focus to 1m, 2m, or 3m Expose to show detail inside OOF PSF #12;What Went Wrong? Most;Undercorrected / Overcorrected Spherical Aberration #12;Dust & Dirt #12;Oily Fingerprint #12;Fungus Infection #12

  16. Out-of-focus point spread functions

    E-print Network

    Dietz, Henry G. "Hank"

    light source at 10m (often can use a white LED penlight) Manual focus to 1m, 2m, or 3m Expose to show Spherical Aberration #12;Dust & Dirt #12;Oily Fingerprint #12;Fungus Infection #12;Nicked Element #12

  17. Focusing Internet Searches for World Music Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Discusses the importance of focusing Internet searches for world music resources. Importance of teaching about music from various cultures; Benefits of identifying a characteristic instrument by name or stylistic terms; Types of music web sites.

  18. Social Work Intervention Focused on Transitions

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-04

    Study Focus: 30-day Rehospitalizations Among At-risk Older Adults Randomized to a Social Work-driven Care Transitions Intervention; Heart Disease; Diabetes; Hypertension; Cancer; Depression; Asthma; Chronic Heart Failure; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Stroke

  19. Apparatus for focusing flowing gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Nogar, N.S.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-05-20

    Apparatus for focusing gas streams. The principle of hydrodynamic focusing is applied to flowing gas streams in order to provide sample concentration for improved photon and sample utilization in resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis. In a concentric nozzle system, gas samples introduced from the inner nozzle into the converging section of the outer nozzle are focused to streams 50-250-..mu..m in diameter. In some cases diameters of approximately 100-..mu..m are maintained over distances of several centimeters downstream from the exit orifice of the outer nozzle. The sheath gas employed has been observed to further provide a protective covering around the flowing gas sample, thereby isolating the flowing gas sample from possible unwanted reactions with nearby surfaces. A single nozzle variation of the apparatus for achieving hydrodynamic focusing of gas samples is also described.

  20. Current Ergonomics Projects with Healthcare Focus

    E-print Network

    Kaber, David B.

    Current Ergonomics Projects with Healthcare Focus · Using virtual reality (VR) and haptic devices skill training. #12;Surgical Simulation · Method: ­ Develop prototype simulator based on task analysis device (Phantom) with simulation ­ Conduct experiment to assess discrete movement and tracking task

  1. The plasma focus as a thruster 

    E-print Network

    Hardy, Richard Lee

    2005-02-17

    The need for low propellant weight, high efficiency propulsion systems is a glaring need for various space missions. This thesis presents the thrust modeling of the Dense Plasma Focus plasma motion phases. It also contrasts some of the engineering...

  2. Micro free-flow isoelectric focusing

    E-print Network

    Albrecht, Jacob William

    2008-01-01

    To unravel the complexity of cellular systems, protein prefractionation tools can be used to reduce cell lysate complexity and increase assay sensitivity. Rapid free flow isoelectric focusing (FF-IEF) is achieved in a ...

  3. Hydrodynamic focusing of a particle flux

    SciTech Connect

    Makhviladze, G.M.; Melikhov, O.I.; Nikolova, I.P.

    1995-12-01

    Based on numerical integration of the equations of mechanics of multiphase media, an effect of focusing of a particle flux generated by a source located on the upper wall of a closed vessel has been revealed and investigated.

  4. The final focus test beam project

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.

    1991-05-01

    An overview is given of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) that is being constructed as a prototype final focus system for a future electron-positron linear collider. This beam line will use as input the 50 GeV electron beam from the SLC linac, and is designed to reduce the transverse dimensions of the beam spot at the focal point to 1 {mu}m. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Results from the final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.; Final Focus Test Beam Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    first experimental results from the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) are given in this report. The FFTB has been constructed as a prototype for the final focus system of a future TeV-scale electron-positron linear collider. The vertical dimension of the 47 GeV electron beam form the SLAC linac has been reduced at the focal point of the FFTB by a demagnification of 320 to a beam height of approximately 70 nanometers.

  6. Tight focusing of an asymmetric Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, Victor V.; Stafeev, Sergey S.; Porfirev, Alexey P.

    2015-12-01

    Tight focusing of a linearly polarized asymmetric Bessel beam, which has a topological charge n=3 and a crescent shape, was investigated numerically and experimentally. Using the Debye formulae, it was shown that the aplanatic lens of numerical aperture NA=0.9 forms a crescent in the focal plane. Experimentally, an asymmetric Bessel beam was formed by a spatial light modulator and focused by an immersive lens (NA=1.25). The crescent was also formed in the focal plane.

  7. Two-axis sagittal focusing monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Edwin G; Stelmach, Christopher; Zhong, Zhong

    2014-05-13

    An x-ray focusing device and method for adjustably focusing x-rays in two orthogonal directions simultaneously. The device and method can be operated remotely using two pairs of orthogonal benders mounted on a rigid, open frame such that x-rays may pass through the opening in the frame. The added x-ray flux allows significantly higher brightness from the same x-ray source.

  8. Results from the Scaled Final Focus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    MacLaren, S.A.; de Hoon, M.J.L.; Falten, A.; Ghiorso, W.; Seidl, P.

    2000-09-15

    Vacuum ballistic focusing is the straightforward method to obtain a heavy ion beam spot size necessary to drive an inertial confinement fusion target. The beam is first expanded then focused to obtain the desired convergence angles at the exit of the last element. This is done in an attempt to achieve a focal spot size in which emittance is the limiting factor; however, aberrations and space charge will influence the spot radius. Proper scaling of particle energy, mass, beam current, beam emittance, and magnetic field replicates the dynamics of a full driver beam at the focus in a small laboratory experiment. By scaling the beam current to {approximately}100 {mu}A, 160 keV Cs+ has been used to study experimentally a proposed driver design at one-tenth scale. Once a nominal focal spot is achieved, the magnet strengths are deliberately de-tuned to simulate the effect of an off-momentum slice of the beam. Additionally, several methods will be used to inject electrons into beam following the last focusing element in order to study the neutralization of space charge and its effect on the focus. Transverse phase space and beam current density measurements at various stages of the focus will be presented as well spot size measurements from the various trials. This data will be compared to the results of a PIC model of the experiment.

  9. Focus-distance-controlled 3D TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Nobuaki; Kim, Kyung-tae; Son, Jung-Young; Murata, Tatsuya; Orima, Takatoshi

    1997-05-01

    There is a phenomenon that a 3D image appears in proportion to a focus distance when something is watched through a convex lens. An adjustable focus lens which can control the focus distance of the convex lens is contrived and applied to 3D TV. We can watch 3D TV without eyeglasses. The 3D TV image meets the NTSC standard. A parallax data and a focus data about the image can be accommodated at the same time. A continuous image method realizes much wider views. An anti 3D image effect can be avoided by using this method. At present, an analysis of proto-type lens and experiment are being carried out. As a result, a phantom effect and a viewing area can be improved. It is possible to watch the 3D TV at any distance. Distance data are triangulated by two cameras. A plan of AVI proto type using ten thousands lenses is discussed. This method is compared with four major conventional methods. As a result, it is revealed that this method can make the efficient use of integral photography and varifocal type method. In the case of integral photography, a miniaturization of this system is possible. But it is difficult to get actual focus. In the case of varifocal type method, there is no problem with focusing, but the miniaturization is impossible. The theory investigated in this paper makes it possible to solve these problems.

  10. Focus-distance-controlled 3D TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Nobuaki; Kim, Kyung-tae; Son, Jung-Young; Murata, Tatsuya; Orima, Takatoshi

    1996-09-01

    There is a phenomenon that a 3D image appears in proportion to a focus distance when something is watched through a convex lens. An adjustable focus lens which can control the focus distance of the convex lens is contrived and applied to 3D TV. We can watch 3D TV without eyeglasses. The 3D TV image meets the NTSC standard. A parallax data and a focus data about the image can be accommodated at the same time. A continuous image method realizes much wider views. An anti 3D image effect can be avoided by using this method. At present, an analysis of proto-type lens and experiment are being carried out. As a result, a phantom effect and a viewing area can be improved. It is possible to watch the 3D TV at any distance. Distance data are triangulated by two cameras. A plan of AVI photo type using ten thousand lenses is discussed. This method is compared with four major conventional methods. As a result, it is revealed that this method can make the efficient use of Integral Photography and Varifocal type method. In the case of Integral Photography, a miniaturization of this system is possible. But it is difficult to get actual focus. In the case of varifocal type method, there is no problem with focusing, but the miniaturization is impossible. The theory investigated in this paper makes it possible to solve these problems.

  11. Topicality and Impact in Social Media: Diverse Messages, Focused Messengers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lilian; Menczer, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    We have a limited understanding of the factors that make people influential and topics popular in social media. Are users who comment on a variety of matters more likely to achieve high influence than those who stay focused? Do general subjects tend to be more popular than specific ones? Questions like these demand a way to detect the topics hidden behind messages associated with an individual or a keyword, and a gauge of similarity among these topics. Here we develop such an approach to identify clusters of similar hashtags in Twitter by detecting communities in the hashtag co-occurrence network. Then the topical diversity of a user’s interests is quantified by the entropy of her hashtags across different topic clusters. A similar measure is applied to hashtags, based on co-occurring tags. We find that high topical diversity of early adopters or co-occurring tags implies high future popularity of hashtags. In contrast, low diversity helps an individual accumulate social influence. In short, diverse messages and focused messengers are more likely to gain impact. PMID:25710685

  12. Detecting Earthquakes--Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Basic concepts associated with seismic wave propagation through the earth and the location of seismic events were explained in part 1 (appeared in January 1983 issue). This part focuses on the construction of a student seismometer for detecting earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions anywhere on the earth's surface. (Author/JN)

  13. Semantic focusing allows fully automated single-layer slide scanning of cervical cytology slides.

    PubMed

    Lahrmann, Bernd; Valous, Nektarios A; Eisenmann, Urs; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Grabe, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-based cytology (LBC) in conjunction with Whole-Slide Imaging (WSI) enables the objective and sensitive and quantitative evaluation of biomarkers in cytology. However, the complex three-dimensional distribution of cells on LBC slides requires manual focusing, long scanning-times, and multi-layer scanning. Here, we present a solution that overcomes these limitations in two steps: first, we make sure that focus points are only set on cells. Secondly, we check the total slide focus quality. From a first analysis we detected that superficial dust can be separated from the cell layer (thin layer of cells on the glass slide) itself. Then we analyzed 2,295 individual focus points from 51 LBC slides stained for p16 and Ki67. Using the number of edges in a focus point image, specific color values and size-inclusion filters, focus points detecting cells could be distinguished from focus points on artifacts (accuracy 98.6%). Sharpness as total focus quality of a virtual LBC slide is computed from 5 sharpness features. We trained a multi-parameter SVM classifier on 1,600 images. On an independent validation set of 3,232 cell images we achieved an accuracy of 94.8% for classifying images as focused. Our results show that single-layer scanning of LBC slides is possible and how it can be achieved. We assembled focus point analysis and sharpness classification into a fully automatic, iterative workflow, free of user intervention, which performs repetitive slide scanning as necessary. On 400 LBC slides we achieved a scanning-time of 13.9±10.1 min with 29.1±15.5 focus points. In summary, the integration of semantic focus information into whole-slide imaging allows automatic high-quality imaging of LBC slides and subsequent biomarker analysis. PMID:23585899

  14. Multicenter comparative study of a new ELISA, PLATELIA RABIES II, for the detection and titration of anti-rabies glycoprotein antibodies and comparison with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) on human samples from vaccinated and non-vaccinated people.

    PubMed

    Feyssaguet, M; Dacheux, L; Audry, L; Compoint, A; Morize, J L; Blanchard, I; Bourhy, H

    2007-03-01

    The envelope glycoprotein G of rabies virus induces the production of neutralising antibodies, which are important in protection against rabies. Therefore, titration of anti-envelope glycoprotein antibodies is a good indicator of the degree of immunity in people during anti-rabies treatment or after vaccination. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, a booster vaccine dose should be given if the rabies antibody titre falls below 0.5 IU/ml. Titration of anti-rabies antibodies is also useful for plasma centers in the preparation and standardization of human anti-rabies gamma-globulins for therapeutic use and to a lesser extent for the diagnosis of rabies in human sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This paper presents a new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), PLATELIA RABIES II, developed for rabies envelope glycoprotein antibody detection or titration and its comparison to the current reference method (RFFIT). The data collected during validation of the test in a multicenter study are analysed to give a sound overall knowledge of the capabilities of the PLATELIA RABIES II, for instance specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, detection limit and quantitation limit. To this aim, human serum samples from a total of 1348 vaccinated or non-vaccinated people were tested in parallel using the new ELISA and the RFFIT for the presence of anti-rabies antibodies. Data generated indicate a linear relationship across the range of titration between the two methods. The sensitivity reaches 98.6% and the specificity 99.4%. This study indicates that this new ELISA test is as sensitive and specific as the current standardized reference method. The method is simple, safe, rapid and can be considered as a useful alternative to the neutralisation test. PMID:17224214

  15. EDITORIAL: Focus issue on string cosmology Focus issue on string cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Moniz, P. R. L. V.

    2011-08-01

    String cosmology is a grand opportunity. The field involves elements of a promising framework, string theory, that brings together gravity and quantum mechanics and attempts to unify all the interactions. Confirming the concepts of string theory is presently beyond the reach of ground-based laboratories but the heavens may provide a setting for testing the string theoretic framework. Specifically, as cosmology develops into a rigorous, data-driven scientific discipline, windows into earlier epochs and higher energies are becoming available. If string theory controlled the evolution of the very early universe it is conceivable that it might have left imprints that are still detectable today. With this possibility in mind, this focus issue of Classical and Quantum Gravity appraises recent applications of string-theoretic and string-inspired ideas to the cosmos. The contents of this issue span the following areas: (1) Inflationary scenarios within different kinds of string-theoretic sectors (C P Burgess and L McAllister; M Cicoli and F Quevedo) (2) Alternatives to conventional inflation and dark matter/energy models with novel dynamics or matter content (J-L Lehners; M Trodden and K Hinterbichler) (3) Cosmic scenarios arising from the landscape of string vacua (M Kleban; B Freivogel) (4) Dynamical mechanisms determining the number of dimensions and resolving cosmic singularities (R H Brandenberger; B Craps and O Evnin) (5) Possible subsequent consequences of an early stringy phase (E J Copeland, L Pogosian and T Vachaspati; A Mazumdar) (6) Whether an observational `window' might be accessible (D J Mulryne and J Ward). The articles in this issue also survey a number of potentially promising directions for the future.

  16. Measurement of focused ultrasonic fields using a scanning laser vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuebing; Tyrer, John; Zhihong, Ping; Shiquan, Wang

    2007-05-01

    With the development of optical techniques, scanning laser vibrometers have been applied successfully in measuring particle velocities and distributions in ultrasonic fields. In this paper, to develop the optical interferometry in measuring focused fields with small amplitude, the "effective" refractive index used for plane waves and extended for spherical waves is presented, the piezo-optic effect as a function of the incident angle of the laser beam is simulated, and the ultrasonic field produced by a concave spherical transducer is calculated numerically around its focal region. To verify the feasibility of the optical method in detecting focused ultrasonic fields, a measurement system was set up that utilized both a scanning laser vibrometer and a membrane hydrophone. Measurements were made in different zones of a focusing transducer, and good results were acquired from the optical interferometry in regions where acoustic waves travel in plane form or spherical form. The data obtained from the optical method are used to reconstruct acoustic fields, and it is found that the focal plane, the maximum pressure, and the beamwidth of the transducer can be forecasted accurately. PMID:17550161

  17. High-efficiency wideband flat focusing reflector mediated by metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ji-Bao; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jia-Fu; Li, Yong-Feng; Feng, Ming-De; Qu, Shao-Bo

    2015-09-01

    We propose to achieve a high-efficiency wideband flat focusing reflector using metasurfaces. To obtain the wide band, the polarization conversion mechanism is introduced into the reflector design, based on the fact that the reflection phases of cross-polarized waves are linear in quite a wide band. This facilitates the design of wideband parabolic reflection phase profile. As an example, we design two reflective focusing metasurfaces with one- and two-dimensional in-plane parabolic reflection phase profiles based on elliptical split ring resonators (ESRRs). Both the simulation and experiment verify the wideband focusing performance in 10.0-22.0 GHz of the flat reflectors. Due to the wide operating band, such reflectors have important application values in communication, detection, measurement, imaging, etc. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61331005, 11274389, and 11204378), the Postdoctoral Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 2013M532131 and 2014M552451), and the Foundation of the Author of National Excellent Doctoral Dissertation of China (Grant No. 201242).

  18. SWCX Emission from the Helium Focusing Cone - Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Collier, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary results from an XMM-Newton campaign to study solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from the heliospheric focusing cone of interstellar helium are presented. The detections of enhanced O VII and O VIII emission from the cone are at the 2(sigma) and 4(sigma) levels. The solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission in the heliosphere not associated with distinct objects (e.g., comets and planets including exospheric material in and near Earth s magnetosheath) is proportional to the flux of the solar wind and the space density of neutral material. The neutral material originates in the interstellar medium (ISM) and passes through the solar system due to the relative motion of the Sun and the ISM. The flow of the neutral material through the solar system is strongly perturbed by the Sun both by gravity and by radiation pressure. Because of the relative radiative scattering cross sections and the effect of solar gravitation the density of interstellar hydrogen near the Sun is reduced while interstellar helium is gravitationally focused. This creates a helium focusing cone downstream of the Sun [e.g., 1, and references therein].

  19. Low-frequency ultrasound-induced transport across non-raft-forming ternary lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Small, Eleanor F; Dan, Nily R; Wrenn, Steven P

    2012-10-01

    We examined the effect of bilayer composition on membrane sensitivity to low-frequency ultrasound (LFUS) in bilayers composed of ternary mixtures of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), dipalmitoyl-phosphocholine (DPPC), and cholesterol. The phase diagram of this system does not display macroscopic phase coexistence between liquid phases (although there are suggestions that there is coexistence between a liquid and a solid phase). Samples from across the composition space were exposed to 20 kHz, continuous wave ultrasound, and the response of the bilayer was quantified using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy to measure the release of a self-quenching dye, calcein, from large unilamellar vesicles. Dynamic light scattering measurements indicate that, in this system, release proceeds primarily by transport through the vesicle bilayer. While vesicle destruction might account, at least in part, for the light scattering trends observed, evidence of destruction was not as obvious as in other lipid systems. Values for bilayer permeability are obtained by fitting release kinetics to a two-film theory mathematical model. The permeability due to LFUS is found to increase with increasing DPPC content, as the bilayer tends toward the solid-ordered phase. Permeability, and thus sensitivity to LFUS, decreases with either POPC or cholesterol mole fractions. In the liquid regime of this system, there is no recorded phase transition; thus cholesterol is the determining factor in release rates. However, the presence of domain boundaries between distinctly differing phases of liquid and solid is found to cause release rates to more than double. The correlation of permeability with phase behavior might prove useful in designing and developing therapies based on ultrasound and membrane interactions. PMID:22974532

  20. Response of previously irradiated skin to combinations of x radiation and ultrasound-induced hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.G.; Sager, H.; Constable, W.; Goodchild, N.

    1983-11-01

    Areas of skin approximately 1.5 cm in diameter on the legs of mice were made hyperthermic (30 min at 42.7/sup 0/C) by exposure to an ultrasound beam (780 kHz), a single dose of x irradiation (2000 rad), or a combination of these treatments. After 35 days, when the acute reaction had reached a steady state, the same tissue was given a second treatment by either hyperthermia, irradiation, or a combination of hyperthermia and irradiation. When the first treatment was irradiation and the second treatment was either irradiation or a combination of hyperthermia and irradiation, the acute skin reactions were similar to those of skin not previously irradiated, indicating a large proportion of recovery from the first irradiation. When irradiation was the first treatment, a comparison of second treatments by hyperthermia plus irradiation with irradiation alone showed a thermal enhancement of 1.45. When the first treatment was hyperthermia plus irradiation, a comparison of second treatments by hyperthermia plus irradiation with irradiation also showed an enhancement factor of 1.45 for the combined treatment.

  1. Effect of ultrasound-induced hyperthermia and x irradiation on skin

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Constable, W.; Sager, H.; Elkon, D.

    1983-11-01

    Local hyperthermia for up to 60 min at 42.5 to 43.0/sup 0/C was induced in the skin of the mouse leg using ultrasound (780 kHz, 0.5 to 2.0 W/cm/sup 2/). X radiation at doses of 10 to 30 Gy was delivered either before, during, or after the hyperthermia and the skin reactions were followed for 50 days. The thermal enhancement factor (TEF) was estimated using three criteria: (1) the maximum skin reaction; (2) the skin reaction integrated over the 50-day experimental period; (3) the skin reaction integrated over Days 8 to 32, which have a larger estimate The TEF was independent of the sequence of heat and x radiation for intervals up to 1 hr. For 1 hr of hyperthermia, the TEF as measured by the maximum skin reaction did not change with radiation doses of 10 to 20 Gy. When the skin reaction integrated over 50 days or Days 8 to 32 was used as the criterion of response, the TEF varied with radiation dose from 4.7 at 10 Gy to 1.6 at 20 Gy. For a fixed radiation dose of 20 Gy, the TEF was not increased significantly by extending the duration of the hyperthermia from 30 to 60 min. The TEF for a radiation dose of 20 Gy delivered in three fractions over 5 days was smaller than that for a single 10-Gy fraction.

  2. Can ultrasounds induce cytotoxicity in presence of hematoporphyrin derivative as photodynamic therapy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Anne; Guillemin, Francois H.; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Eikermann, Karine; Schmitt, Sabine; Stoss, Markus; Hopfel, Dieter; Barth, Gerhard; Bolotina-Bezdetnaya, Lina

    1996-01-01

    Ultrasounds were described by a few authors as possibly inducing sonodynamic reaction, with singlet oxygen production, as photodynamic therapy. The aim of this project was to evidence this effect and to try to explain its different mechanisms. A specific device was developed with a strict control of temperature to avoid hyperthermia and of acoustical intensity: the characteristics of the US beam and the reproducibility of treatment conditions were strictly evaluated. We studied the frequency of 2.21 MHz using an antiresonance frequency of a transducer. US treatment was applied continuously or in pulsed mode. Human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) were used to test the cytotoxicity using trypan blue exclusion test. Analyses were performed using cell suspensions. Different intensities were studied ranging from 0 to 3.7 W/cm2. Moreover, fluorescence emission spectra of hematoporphyrine derivative (HpD) were recorded before and after US treatment. Results of viability showed a higher cytotoxicity with US alone or with HpD in cell suspensions from 3.7 W/cm2 (20% survival). These results show that cavitation alone can account for the cytotoxic effects of sonotherapy. In fact, cavitation is higher with continuous than with pulsed US treatment. No significant difference was found with or without HpD. HpD fluorescence spectra did not differ before and after US treatment suggesting that no modification of HpD structure was induced by US. Fluorescence spectra showed a very slow and small decrease in fluorescence intensity with time probably caused by the low interfering light used for the experiment. In conclusion, in our experiments, ultrasounds do not seem to induce any chemical reaction with photosensitizers, conversely to what was already reported. However, other photosensitizers, molecules and different cell lines (less resistant) must be studied in order to conclude about the absence of cytotoxicity of this technique.

  3. Microflow-induced shear stress on biomaterial wall by ultrasound-induced encapsulated microbubble oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ji-Wen; Qian, Sheng-You; Sun, Jia-Na; Lü, Yun-Bin; Hu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    A model of an ultrasound-driven encapsulated microbubble (EMB) oscillation near biomaterial wall is presented and used for describing the microflow-induced shear stress on the wall by means of a numerical method. The characteristic of the model lies in the explicit treatment of different types of wall for the EMB responses. The simulation results show that the radius-time change trends obtained by our model are consistent with the existing models and experimental results. In addition, the effect of the elastic wall on the acoustic EMB response is stronger than that of the rigid wall, and the shear stress on the elastic wall is larger than that of the rigid wall. The closer the EMB to the wall, the greater the shear stress on the wall. The substantial shear stress on the wall surface occurs inside a circular zone with a radius about two-thirds of the bubble radius. This paper may be of interest in the study of potential damage mechanisms to the microvessel for drug and gene delivery due to sonoporation. Projects supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174077 and 11474090), the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province, China (Grant No. 13JJ3076), the Science Research Program of Education Department of Hunan Province, China (Grant No. 14A127), and the Doctoral Fund of University of South China (Grant No. 2011XQD46).

  4. A fast and switchable microfluidic mixer based on ultrasound-induced vaporization of perfluorocarbon.

    PubMed

    Bezagu, Marine; Arseniyadis, Stellios; Cossy, Janine; Couture, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael; Monti, Fabrice; Tabeling, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Mixing two fluids together within a microfluidic device still remains a challenging operation today. In order to achieve this goal, a number of effective micromixers have been developed over the years based on the use of either passive or active systems. Typically, passive mixers require no external energy, are more robust, and are easy to manufacture albeit they are poorly flexible. Active mixers, on the other hand, rely on external disturbance and are thus more difficult to use but are proven to have greater efficacy. Here, we report a particularly effective, remotely induced and switchable microfluidic mixer, which relies on the concomitant use of ultrasound and a perfluorocarbon (PFC) phase, with the latter benefiting from its immiscibility with most fluids and its low boiling point. More specifically, our approach is based on localized vaporization of a PFC phase at the focal zone of a transducer leading to efficient mixing of two adjacent fluids. The results show that mixing occurs ~100 ms following the delivery of the acoustic pulse, while a laminar flow is re-established on roughly the same time scale. Overall, this method is simple and effective, does not require tailored channel geometries, is compatible with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic microfluidic systems, and is applicable to a wide range of Reynolds numbers (10(-4) < Re < 2.10(0)), and the PFC phase can be easily separated from the mixed phase at the end of the run. PMID:25778877

  5. Ultrasound-induced dissolution of lipid-coated and uncoated gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Cox, Debra J; Thomas, James L

    2010-09-21

    The 1.1 MHz ultrasound response of micrometer-scale perfluorobutane gas bubbles, coated with a mixture of 90 mol % saturated phospholipid (disteroylphosphatidylcholine, DSPC) or unsaturated phospholipid (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, DOPC) and 10 mol % PEG-lipid, was studied by optical microscopy. Uncoated bubbles were also studied. Bubbles, resting buoyantly against the wall of a polystyrene cuvette, were exposed to brief pulses of ultrasound (?200 kPa amplitude) at a repetition rate of 25 Hz; images of the bubbles were taken after every other pulse. The coating had little effect on the initial response: large (>10 ?m diameter) bubbles showed no size change, while smaller bubbles rapidly shrank (or fragmented) to reach a stable or metastable diameter-ca. 2 ?m for coated bubbles and 4 ?m for uncoated bubbles. The coating had a significant effect on further bubble evolution: after reaching a metastable size, uncoated bubbles and DOPC-coated bubbles continued to shrink slowly and ultimately vanished entirely, while DSPC-coated bubbles did not change perceptibly during the duration of the exposure. Numerical modeling using the modified Herring equation showed that the size range in which DSPC bubbles responded does correspond well with the bubble resonance; the long-term stability of these bubbles may be related to the ability of the DSPC to form a two-dimensional solid at ambient temperature or to phase separate from the PEG-lipid. PMID:20722377

  6. Ultrasound-induced modulation of cardiac rhythm in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, Andrew; Vecchio, Christopher; Sunny, Youhan; Bawiec, Christopher R; Lewin, Peter A; Kresh, J Yasha; Kohut, Andrew R

    2015-06-01

    Isolated neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were used to study the influence of ultrasound on the chronotropic response in a tissue culture model. The beat frequency of the cells, varying from 40 to 90 beats/min, was measured based upon the translocation of the nuclear membrane captured by a high-speed camera. Ultrasound pulses (frequency = 2.5 MHz) were delivered at 300-ms intervals [3.33 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF)], in turn corresponding to 200 pulses/min. The intensity of acoustic energy and pulse duration were made variable, 0.02-0.87 W/cm(2) and 1-5 ms, respectively. In 57 of 99 trials, there was a noted average increase in beat frequency of 25% with 8-s exposures to ultrasonic pulses. Applied ultrasound energy with a spatial peak time average acoustic intensity (Ispta) of 0.02 W/cm(2) and pulse duration of 1 ms effectively increased the contraction rate of cardiomyocytes (P < 0.05). Of the acoustic power tested, the lowest level of acoustic intensity and shortest pulse duration proved most effective at increasing the electrophysiological responsiveness and beat frequency of cardiomyocytes. Determining the optimal conditions for delivery of ultrasound will be essential to developing new models for understanding mechanoelectrical coupling (MEC) and understanding novel nonelectrical pacing modalities for clinical applications. PMID:25858493

  7. Effects of Microbubble Size on Ultrasound-Induced Transdermal Delivery of High-Molecular-Weight Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Ho, Hsin-Chiao; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hang-Kang; Wang, Chih-Hung

    2015-01-01

    The transdermal delivery of a wide range of high-molecular-weight drugs is limited by the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis representing a significant barrier to penetration across the skin. This study first determined the different effects of different-size ultrasound (US) contrast agents and microbubbles (MBs) for enhancing the transdermal delivery of high-molecular-weight drugs. The effects of US-mediated different-size (1.4, 2.1, and 3.5 ?m) MBs (as a contrast agent) and ascorbyl tetraisopalmitate (VC-IP) on enhancing skin transdermal delivery were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that at a power density of 3 W/cm2 the penetration depth in group US combined with 3.5-?m MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+3.5) was 34% and 14% higher than those in groups US combined with 1.4-?m MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+1.4) and US combined with 2.1-?m MBs and penetrating VC-IP (U+2.1), respectively, for the agarose phantoms, while the corresponding increases for pigskin were 37% and 19%.In terms of the skin permeation of VC-IP, the VC-IP concentration in group U+3.5 was 23% and 10% higher in than those in groups U+1.4 and U+2.1, respectively. The whitening effect (luminosity index) of mice skin in group U+3.5 had increased (significantly) by 28% after 1 week, by 34% after 2 weeks, and tended to stabilize after 3 weeks (45%) in C57BL/6J mice over a 4-week experimental period. The results obtained in this study indicate that combining US with MBs of different sizes can produce different degrees of skin permeability so as to enhance the delivery of VC-IP to inhibit melanogenesis, without damaging the skin in mice. PMID:26390051

  8. Modeling bubble dynamics and radical kinetics in ultrasound induced microalgal cell disruption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal cell disruption induced by acoustic cavitation was simulated through solving the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field and their radial kinetics (chemical kinetics of radical species) occurring in the bubble during its oscillation, as well as calculating the bubble wall pressure at the collapse point. Modeling results indicated that increasing ultrasonic intensity led to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed during acoustic cavitation, however, the pressure generated when the bubbles collapsed decreased. Therefore, cumulative collapse pressure (CCP) of bubbles was used to quantify acoustic disruption of a freshwater alga, Scenedesmus dimorphus, and a marine alga, Nannochloropsis oculata and compare with experimental results. The strong correlations between CCP and the intracellular lipid fluorescence density, chlorophyll-a fluorescence density, and cell particle/debris concentration were found, which suggests that the developed models could accurately predict acoustic cell disruption, and can be utilized in the scale up and optimization of the process. PMID:26384877

  9. Dark Matter: Direct Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chardin, G.

    2009-12-16

    The identification of Dark Matter is an outstanding question of contemporary physics. I summarize the main experimental strategies developed to answer this question, focusing on cryogenic detectors and comparing these detectors to their double-phase xenon and argon competitors. I discuss in particular the main developments in charge-phonon (CDMS, EDELWEISS) and light-phonon detectors (CRESST, ROSEBUD). Finally, I discuss the prospects of WIMP detection within the next few years by the CDMS, CRESST, EDELWEISS and XENON experiments, and their successors EURECA, GEODM and XENON-1 ton.

  10. Ionospheric Estimation and Integrity Threat Detection

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    Ionospheric Estimation and Integrity Threat Detection Andrew J. Hansen Todd Walter Y.C. Chao Per is focused on ionospheric estimation using tomographic inversion and integrity monitoring of WAAS ionospheric currently focuses on the study of GPS dual-frequency measure- ment calibration, WAAS ionospheric modeling

  11. (Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules)

    SciTech Connect

    de la Mora, J.F.

    1990-01-08

    By accelerating a gas containing suspended particles or large molecules through a converging nozzle, the suspended species may be focused and therefore used to write fine lines on a surface. Our objective was to study the limits on how narrow this focal region could be as a function of particle size. We find that, for monodisperse particles with masses m{sub p} some 3.6 {times} 10{sup 5} times larger than the molecular mass m of the carrier gas (diameters above some 100{angstrom}), there is no fundamental obstacle to directly write submicron features. However, this conclusion has been verified experimentally only with particles larger than 0.1 {mu}m. Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies on the defocusing role of Brownian motion for very small particles or heavy molecules have shown that high resolution (purely aerodynamic) focusing is impossible with volatile molecules whose masses are typically smaller than 1000 Dalton. For these, the minimal focal diameter after optimization appears to be 5{radical}(m/m{sub p}) times the nozzle diameter d{sub n}. But combinations of focused lasers and aerodynamic focusing appear as promising for direct writing with molecular precursors. Theoretical and numerical schemes capable of predicting the evolution of the focusing beam, including Brownian motion effects, have been developed, although further numerical work would be desirable. 11 refs.

  12. Focused ultrasound guided relocation of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    Abrol, Nitin; Kekre, Nitin S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Complete removal of all fragments is the goal of any intervention for urinary stones. This is more important in lower pole stones where gravity and spatial orientation of lower pole infundibulum may hinder spontaneous passage of fragments. Various adjuvant therapies (inversion, diuresis, percussion, oral citrate, etc.) are described to enhance stone-free rate but are not widely accepted. Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of fragments is a recently described technique aimed at improving results of intervention for stone disease. Purpose of this review is to discuss development of this technology and its potential clinical applications. Materials and Methods: Pubmed search was made using key words “Focused ultrasound” and “kidney stone”. All English language articles were reviewed by title. Relevant studies describing development and application of focused ultrasound in renal stones were selected for review. Results: Focused ultrasound has proven its efficacy in successfully relocating up to 8 mm stone fragments in vitro and in pigs. Relocation is independent of stone composition. The latest model allows imaging and therapy with a single handheld probe facilitating its use by single operator. The acoustic energy delivered by the new prototype is even less than that used for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Therapeutic exposure has not caused thermal injury in pig kidneys. Conclusion: Focused ultrasound-guided relocation of stones is feasible. Though it is safe in application in pigs, technology is awaiting approval for clinical testing in human beings. This technology has many potential clinical applications in the management of stone disease. PMID:25624572

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on High Energy Particle Astronomy FOCUS ON HIGH ENERGY PARTICLE ASTRONOMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Rene A.; Covault, Corbin E.

    2009-05-01

    Astrophysics as a sub-discipline provides both unique opportunities and unique challenges relative to other fields of physics. On the one hand, the scope of astrophysics is literally universal, and we are free to examine the most interesting and exotic phenomena to be found anywhere. On the other hand, our access to the universe is limited to only those bits of information that nature happens to provide to us here on Earth. As astrophysicists, we have no direct control over our subject of study. We cannot conduct experiments to arrange stars in galaxies to our liking. We cannot initiate supernovas at specific times and places just to test our hypotheses. What we can do is to squeeze whatever information possible out of the the tiny particles that have traveled across vast distances to act as messengers to Earth from space. Fortunately, we are getting quite good at building a picture of the universe from the available astrophysical information. Nearly a decade into the millennium, scientists have deployed an impressive collection of sensitive observatories that are especially capable of unlocking the secrets of some of the most persistent astrophysical puzzles. In particular, in the fields of high-energy astrophysics corresponding to gamma-ray, cosmic ray and neutrino detection, we are moving to a new generation of experimental techniques that are dramatically more sensitive than prior efforts. These new instruments have two key properties: (1) increased collection area, which is critical for the low fluxes corresponding to high-energy messenger particles, and (2) precision directional reconstructions which allow observers to trace back the paths of these messengers to the originating astrophysical objects. Furthermore, as observational techniques mature, results from these complementary instruments provide an increasingly comprehensive picture of some of the more elusive astrophysical subjects. Each photon, cosmic ray, and neutrino result reported represents another clue to understanding the nature of high-energy objects both within and outside our galaxy. And yet, along with new understandings, we are also faced with new puzzles. Each of the papers in this focus issue presents the field of high-energy particle astronomy from the perspective of a given instrumental approach, corresponding to the current state-of-the-art for a particular class of messenger particle in a given energy range. For gamma-ray astronomy, we have a excellent report by R Johnson and R Mukherjee on results from space-borne telescopes, first from the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and then from the recently commissioned Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The detailed paper by J Hinton describes a wealth of results from several ground-based gamma-ray telescopes using the atmospheric Cherenokov technique. Gamma-ray results and the prospects from air-shower detectors which can provide all-sky monitoring are very well described in a paper by G Sinnis. Larger plans for the future of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy are summarized in a paper by F Krennrich (in preparation). We also include two papers for 'non-photon' particle detection, a summary of the exciting new results for cosmic ray physics by P Sommers and S Westerhoff and an article by K Hoffman describing the astrophysics and capabilities of truly remarkable, large-volume neutrino detectors. For both cosmic rays and neutrinos, the fields seem to be on the threshold of doing astronomy—that is, associating specific detected particles with particular astrophysical objects. Together, the fully operational space- and ground-based gamma-ray observatories and the new large-area experiments for cosmic ray and neutrino detection represent a new era in astronomy. We can be confident that the field of high-energy particle astronomy will continue to rapidly develop as more exciting results from these instruments are reported in the future. Focus on High Energy Particle Astronomy Contents Gamma ray astronomy with atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes: the future Frank Krennrich GeV telescopes: results and prospects

  14. Fast Fight Detection

    PubMed Central

    Serrano Gracia, Ismael; Deniz Suarez, Oscar; Bueno Garcia, Gloria; Kim, Tae-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Action recognition has become a hot topic within computer vision. However, the action recognition community has focused mainly on relatively simple actions like clapping, walking, jogging, etc. The detection of specific events with direct practical use such as fights or in general aggressive behavior has been comparatively less studied. Such capability may be extremely useful in some video surveillance scenarios like prisons, psychiatric centers or even embedded in camera phones. As a consequence, there is growing interest in developing violence detection algorithms. Recent work considered the well-known Bag-of-Words framework for the specific problem of fight detection. Under this framework, spatio-temporal features are extracted from the video sequences and used for classification. Despite encouraging results in which high accuracy rates were achieved, the computational cost of extracting such features is prohibitive for practical applications. This work proposes a novel method to detect violence sequences. Features extracted from motion blobs are used to discriminate fight and non-fight sequences. Although the method is outperformed in accuracy by state of the art, it has a significantly faster computation time thus making it amenable for real-time applications. PMID:25860667

  15. Nature Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harr, Natalie; Lee, Richard E.; Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Richard Louv's "Last Child in the Woods" (2008) added to a growing consensus to get children outside and experiencing nature. Using ideas from place-based education, the authors present a simple year-long project that brings science, nature, and other curriculum standards to life right in your school yard. With a focus on journaling, this project…

  16. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing Immunoassay for Fat Cell Differentiation Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Johlfs, Mary G.; Gorjala, Priyatham; Urasaki, Yasuyo; Le, Thuc T.; Fiscus, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    Profiling cellular proteome is critical to understanding signal integration during cell fate determination. In this study, the capability of capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays to detect post-translational modifications (PTM) of protein isoforms is demonstrated. cIEF immunoassays exhibit protein detection sensitivity at up to 5 orders of magnitude higher than traditional methods. This detection ultra-sensitivity permits proteomic profiling of several nanograms of tissue samples. cIEF immunoassays are employed to simultaneously profile three protein kinases during fat cell differentiation: cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PKG-I) of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, protein kinase B (Akt) of the insulin signaling pathway, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Interestingly, a switch in the expression level of PKG- isoforms is observed during fat cell differentiation. While both PKG-I? and PKG-I? isoforms are present in preadipocytes, only PKG-I? isoform is expressed in adipocytes. On the other hand, the phosphorylation level increases for Akt while decreases for ERK1 and ERK2 following the maturation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. Taken together, cIEF immunoassay provides a highly sensitive means to study fat cell differentiation proteomics. cIEF immunoassay should be a powerful proteomics tool to study complex protein signal integration in biological systems. PMID:26132171

  17. Focused plasmonic trapping of metallic particles.

    PubMed

    Min, Changjun; Shen, Zhe; Shen, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuquan; Fang, Hui; Yuan, Guanghui; Du, Luping; Zhu, Siwei; Lei, Ting; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2013-01-01

    Scattering forces in focused light beams push away metallic particles. Thus, trapping metallic particles with conventional optical tweezers, especially those of Mie particle size, is difficult. Here we investigate a mechanism by which metallic particles are attracted and trapped by plasmonic tweezers when surface plasmons are excited and focused by a radially polarized beam in a high-numerical-aperture microscopic configuration. This contrasts the repulsion exerted in optical tweezers with the same configuration. We believe that different types of forces exerted on particles are responsible for this contrary trapping behaviour. Further, trapping with plasmonic tweezers is found not to be due to a gradient force balancing an opposing scattering force but results from the sum of both gradient and scattering forces acting in the same direction established by the strong coupling between the metallic particle and the highly focused plasmonic field. Theoretical analysis and simulations yield good agreement with experimental results. PMID:24305554

  18. Particle ordering in inertially focused microfluidic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphry, Katherine; Kulkarni, Pandurang; di Carlo, Dino; Edd, Jon; Toner, Mehmet; Morris, Jeffrey; Weitz, David; Stone, Howard

    2008-11-01

    We study inertially driven focusing of particles [1], which has recently been exploited in a controlled fashion in microfluidic devices [2]. In particular, we characterize the focusing as a function of particle and channel Reynolds number by reporting particle position in directions perpendicular to the flow, and a large distance from the fluid inlet. Focusing of dilute suspensions leads to a linear arrangement of particles whose spacing is primarily a function of concentration and channel aspect ratio. All results are compared with simulations, which provide mechanistic insights into particle behavior.[1] G. Segré and A. Silberberg, Nature 189, 209 (1961). [2] D. Di Carlo, D. Irimia, R. G. Tompkins, and M. Toner, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 18892 (2007).

  19. Focusing upgrade for sectors 11 through 19

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, J.C.

    1985-01-25

    In order to transport high current, single bunch beams to the SLC positron source for spring 1986 testing, it will be necessary to augment the strength of available focusing in sectors 11 through 19. We have decided to replace the sector doublet type QB quadrupoles with stronger type QE magnets. In conjunction with new Vax controlled power supplies, this sector 11 through 19 doublet lattice can be run at optimal settings for beam energies of several GeV up to the full SLC energy of 32 GeV by sector 19. Installation of the temporary stronger focusing is planned for summer 1985; full SLC FODO array focusing is scheduled for the following summer. This note presents the intermediate solution for sectors 11 through 19. In addition, the sector 10 quadrupole strengths required for matching beams into the doublet array are given. 1 figure, 4 tables.

  20. Focusing experiments with an inverse reflex tetrode

    SciTech Connect

    Pershing, D.E.; Golden, J.; Pasour, J.A.; Kapetanakos, C.A.

    1982-05-01

    The focusing properties of an Inverse Reflex Tetrode (IRT) used for ion beam generation have been investigated experimentally. Focusing is achieved by replacing the planar (0/sup 0/) electrodes of a standard IRT with moderately inwardly tapered electrodes (7.5, 10, and 15/sup 0/). The greatest degree of focusing is obtained with the 15/sup 0/ electrodes as determined by beam profile measurements using streak photography and nuclear activation techniques at various axial target positions. A scissoring effect is observed, due to temporal variations in generator voltage and current, that is manifested by an axial variation in the focal point with time. Calculations of proton trajectories confirm the experimental results and demonstrate the importance of self-fields within the A-K gap in determining the characteristics of an ion beam generated by an IRT.

  1. MR-Guided Transcranial Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Jean-François; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Previous chapters introduced the ability of using focused ultrasound to ablate tissues. It has led to various clinical applications in the treatment of uterine fibroid, prostate or liver cancers. Nevertheless, treating the brain non-invasively with focused ultrasound has been considered beyond reach for almost a century: The skull bone protects the brain from mechanical injuries, but it also reflects and refracts ultrasound, making it difficult to target the brain with focused ultrasound. Fortunately, aberration correction techniques have been developed recently and thermal lesioning in the thalamus has been achieved clinically. This chapter introduces the aberration effect of the skull bone and how it can be corrected non-invasively. It also presents the latest clinical results obtained with thermal ablation and introduces novel non-thermal approaches that could revolutionize brain therapy in the future. PMID:26486334

  2. Plasma focus experiments powered by explosive generators

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, B.L.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Fowler, C.M.; Garn, W.B.; Kruse, H.W.; King, J.C.; Bartram, D.E.; Kruse, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The plasma focus project began as an effort to develop an intense, pulsed, expendable neutron radiographic source. Since previous efforts to power a plasma focus with explosive generators had been successful, we proposed to couple our plate generators to a coaxial-geometry plasma focus to achieve this goal. Utilizing a small capacitor bank and a selected set of diagnostics, the explosive experiments were successfully conducted with maximum currents of 1.5 MA to 2.4 MA. A maximum neutron yield of approx. 3 x 10/sup 11/ (DD) neutrons was achieved at the 2.4 MA level. Since the neutron yield did scale as a power of the maximum delivered current, and the neutron-producing source region was small, we conclude that this approach is an attractive option to achieve a neutron radiographic source. The need for a reliable open-circuiting switch at several megamperes has resulted in postponement of the project.

  3. Quasi In-Focus Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Masato; Kurata, Takayuki; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2004-02-01

    We propose here a unique method for in-focus imaging over the entire cross-sectional area of interest. This is the so-called quasi in-focus optical coherence tomography (OCT) or multiple OCT in which OCT images are obtained by shifting the focal plane of an objective, followed by piling up of these OCT images. A preliminary experiment was made using chicken tissue as a sample; as a result, a stripe pattern of fibrous muscle was clearly observed over a depth of more than 3 mm. In in-vitro tomographic imaging of the human stomach wall, quasi in-focus OCT can provide a very clear image of the muscularis mucosae, which is a bending film like tissue of a few tens of microns thickness, showing that our method is useful for the early-stage diagnosis of stomach cancer.

  4. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOEpatents

    Schmucker, John E. (Hurt, VA); Blasi, Raymond J. (Harrison City, PA); Archer, William B. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  5. Task-focused modeling in automated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vriesenga, Mark R.; Peleg, K.; Sklansky, Jack

    1993-01-01

    Machine vision systems analyze image data to carry out automation tasks. Our interest is in machine vision systems that rely on models to achieve their designed task. When the model is interrogated from an a priori menu of questions, the model need not be complete. Instead, the machine vision system can use a partial model that contains a large amount of information in regions of interest and less information elsewhere. We propose an adaptive modeling scheme for machine vision, called task-focused modeling, which constructs a model having just sufficient detail to carry out the specified task. The model is detailed in regions of interest to the task and is less detailed elsewhere. This focusing effect saves time and reduces the computational effort expended by the machine vision system. We illustrate task-focused modeling by an example involving real-time micropropagation of plants in automated agriculture.

  6. High-intensity focused ultrasound monitoring using harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) under boiling or slow denaturation conditions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Marquet, Fabrice; Wang, Shutao; Apostolakis, Iason-Zacharias; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-07-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a recently developed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring method that utilizes an amplitude-modulated therapeutic ultrasound beam to induce an oscillatory radiation force at the HIFU focus and estimates the focal tissue displacement to monitor the HIFU thermal treatment. In this study, the performance of HMIFU under acoustic, thermal, and mechanical effects was investigated. The performance of HMIFU was assessed in ex vivo canine liver specimens (n = 13) under slow denaturation or boiling regimes. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to assess the acoustic cavitation activity, and a bare-wire thermocouple was used to monitor the focal temperature change. During lesioning with slow denaturation, high quality displacements (correlation coefficient above 0.97) were observed under minimum cavitation noise, indicating the tissue initial-softening-then- stiffening property change. During HIFU with boiling, HMIFU monitored a consistent change in lesion-to-background displacement contrast (0.46 ± 0.37) despite the presence of strong cavitation noise due to boiling during lesion formation. Therefore, HMIFU effectively monitored softening-then-stiffening during lesioning under slow denaturation, and detected lesioning under boiling with a distinct change in displacement contrast under boiling in the presence of cavitation. In conclusion, HMIFU was shown under both boiling and slow denaturation regimes to be effective in HIFU monitoring and lesioning identification without being significantly affected by cavitation noise. PMID:26168177

  7. 3D optical two-mirror scanner with focus-tunable lens.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Petr; Miks, Antonin

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents formulas for a ray tracing in the optical system of two-mirror optical scanner with a focus-tunable lens. Furthermore, equations for the calculation of focal length which ensure focusing of a beam in the desired point in a detection plane are derived. The uncertainty description of such focal length follows as well. The chosen vector approach is general; therefore, the application of formulas in various configurations of the optical systems is possible. In the example situation, the authors derived formulas for mirrors' rotations and the focal length depending on the position of the point in the detection plane. PMID:26368115

  8. Crystal diffraction lens telescope for focusing nuclear gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.; Graber, T.; Ballmoos, P. von; Naya, J.; Albernhe, F.; Vedrenne, G.; Faiz, M.

    1996-08-01

    A crystal diffraction lens was constructed at Argonne National Laboratory for use as a telescope to focus nuclear gamma rays. It consisted of 600 single crystals of germanium arranged in 8 concentric rings. The mounted angle of each crystal was adjusted to intercept and diffract the incoming gamma rays with an accuracy of a few arc sec. The performance of the lens was tested in two ways. In one case, the gamma rays were focused on a single medium size germanium detector. In the second case, the gamma rays were focused on the central germanium detector of a 3 x 3 matrix of small germanium detectors. The efficiency, image concentration and image quality, and shape were measured. The tests performed with the 3 x 3 matrix detector system were particularly interesting. The wanted radiation was concentrated in the central detector. The 8 other detectors were used to detect the Compton scattered radiation, and their energy was summed with coincident events in the central detector. This resulted in a detector with the efficiency of a large detector (all 9 elements) and the background of a small detector (only the central element). The use of the 3 x 3 detector matrix makes it possible to tell if the source is off axis and, if so, to tell in which direction. The crystal lens acts very much like a simple convex lens for visible light. Thus if the source is off to the left then the image will focus off to the right illuminating the detector on the right side: telling one in which direction to point the telescope. Possible applications of this type of crystal lens to balloon and satellite experiments will be discussed.

  9. CY15 Livermore Computing Focus Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Tom M.; Cupps, Kim C.; D'Hooge, Trent E.; Fahey, Tim J.; Fox, Dave M.; Futral, Scott W.; Gary, Mark R.; Goldstone, Robin J.; Hamilton, Pam G.; Heer, Todd M.; Long, Jeff W.; Mark, Rich J.; Morrone, Chris J.; Shoopman, Jerry D.; Slavec, Joe A.; Smith, David W.; Springmeyer, Becky R; Stearman, Marc D.; Watson, Py C.

    2015-01-20

    The LC team undertook a survey of primary Center drivers for CY15. Identified key drivers included enhancing user experience and productivity, pre-exascale platform preparation, process improvement, data-centric computing paradigms and business expansion. The team organized critical supporting efforts into three cross-cutting focus areas; Improving Service Quality; Monitoring, Automation, Delegation and Center Efficiency; and Next Generation Compute and Data Environments In each area the team detailed high level challenges and identified discrete actions to address these issues during the calendar year. Identifying the Center’s primary drivers, issues, and plans is intended to serve as a lens focusing LC personnel, resources, and priorities throughout the year.

  10. Hormone purification by isoelectric focusing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of a ground-prototype of an apparatus for recycling isoelectric focusing was evaluated in an effort to provide technology for large scale purification of peptide hormones, proteins, and other biologicals. Special emphasis was given to the effects of gravity on the function of the apparatus and to the determination of potential advantages deriveable from its use in a microgravity environment. A theoretical model of isoelectric focusing sing chemically defined buffer systems for the establishment of the pH gradients was developed. The model was transformed to a form suitable for computer simulations and was used extensively for the design of experimental buffers.

  11. Ion heating in a plasma focus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.; Gary, S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Ion acceleration and heating in a plasma focus were investigated by the numerical integration of the three-dimensional equations of motion. The electric and magnetic fields given were derived from experimental data. The results obtained show that during the collapse phase of focus formation, ions are efficiently heated to temperatures of several keV. During the phase of rapid current reduction, ions are accelerated to large velocities in the axial direction. The results obtained with the model are in general agreement with experimental results.

  12. Focused phosphorus ion beam implantation into silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madokoro, Y.; Shukuri, S.; Umemura, K.; Tamura, M.

    1989-03-01

    Phosphorus implantation into (100) silicon using a 32-keV focused ion beam is investigated from the standpoints of electrical properties and damage to the implanted layers. Phosphorus ions are extracted from the Pt?P?Sb alloy liguid-metal-ion source. Electrical properties are measured by isochronal annealing with Hall measurements and radiation damage is evaluated using a transmission electron microscope. Compared with the conventional implantation method, focused ion beam implantation causes heavier radiation damage and forms amorphous layers at a dose of 2 × 10 14 cm -2 due to high current density.

  13. Data Networking for Autonomous Fatigue Crack Detection

    E-print Network

    Yi, Yung

    Data Networking for Autonomous Fatigue Crack Detection Jinhwan Jung, Deawoo Kim, Hankyeol Lee monitoring, where sensors are distributed to monitor buildings, bridges, large dams, and etc. Out of a large number of application domains we focus on the fa- tigue crack detection of a structure, e.g., bridge

  14. Fingerprint detection

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, George C. (Rt. 1, Box 428B, Espanola, NM 87532)

    1992-01-01

    A method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints is provided and includes contacting a substrate containing a latent print thereon with a colloidal metal composition for time sufficient to allow reaction of said colloidal metal composition with said latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print. Further, the method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints can include contacting the metal composition-latent print reaction product with a secondary metal-containing solution for time sufficient to allow precipitation of said secondary metal thereby enhancing the visibility of the latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print.

  15. Focusing on moving targets through scattering samples

    E-print Network

    Yang, Changhuei

    . http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OPTICA.1.000227 1. INTRODUCTION Focusing light through highly scattering-2536/14/040227-06$15/0$15.00 © 2014 Optical Society of America Research Article Vol. 1, No. 4 / October 2014 / Optica 227 #12

  16. Using Structural Relationships for Focused XML Retrieval

    E-print Network

    de Vries, Arjen P.

    , The Netherlands {georgina, thijs, arjen}@cwi.nl Abstract. In focused XML retrieval, information retrieval systems retrieval systems use conventional information retrieval techniques to determine the order in which to best present results to the user, but, as opposed to traditional IR systems, they also choose the retrieval

  17. Beam hysteresis via reorientational self-focusing.

    PubMed

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Piccardi, Armando; Kravets, Nina; Assanto, Gaetano

    2014-10-15

    We theoretically investigate light self-trapping in nonlinear dielectrics with a reorientational response subject to threshold, specifically nematic liquid crystals. Beyond a finite excitation, two solitary waves exist for any given power, with an hysteretic dynamics due to feedback between beam size, self-focusing and the nonlinear threshold. Soliton stability is discussed on the basis of the system free energy. PMID:25361096

  18. special focus Women war survivors Leadership training

    E-print Network

    offers support for people living with long-term health conditions 28 RISkY BUSINESS Reducing the chances transportation Support for business in the downturn HOPE for people with long term health conditions MadE tO MEa of reoffending with improvements to risk management training Special focus - Engineering 14 HEaVY METal Saving

  19. Module: Material Structure Focus: Allotropes of Sulfur

    E-print Network

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    Module: Material Structure Focus: Allotropes of Sulfur Duration: 43 minute period Contact: Daniel to define the term "allotrope." 4. Students will be able to compare and contrast the 3 allotropes of sulfur. Materials: Vegetable Oil Safety Goggles Powdered Sulfur Bunsen Burner Filter Paper Test Tube Cold Distilled

  20. Generating Alternatives: Interpreting Focus in Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Christina S.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates a class of context-dependent expressions--focus-sensitive particles--as a way of addressing how language users draw on contextual information to interpret expressions whose meanings are underdetermined by their forms. While the problem of context dependence has been widely studied, the question of precisely what…

  1. Quality? Is it Allowed? FACTC Focus, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr, Mark, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "FACTC Focus" is a publication of Faculty Association of Community and Technical Colleges (FACTC) with the purpose of presenting diverse views on faculty issues. Included in this issue are: (1) Shooting In The Dark: Evaluating Distance Learning Instruction (Stephanie Delaney); (2) Trust Who? - Trust and Learning: Crafting a Conversation That…

  2. Focus Article Governance issues in developing

    E-print Network

    AghaKouchak, Amir

    discharges, nonpoint source pollution, and sewerage overspills. Moreover, the approach can be applied governance issues in developing innovative pollutant offset programs by focusing on a case study being contribute to the development of an expansive water quality offset framework applicable to point source

  3. Focusers of obliquely incident laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharskiy, A. V.; Danilov, V. A.; Popov, V. V.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Sisakyan, I. N.; Sayfer, V. A.; Stepanov, V. V.

    1984-08-01

    Focusing obliquely incident laser radiation along a given line in space with a given intensity distribution is treated as a problem of synthesizing a mirror surface. The intricate shape of such a surface, characterized by a function z= z (u,v) in the approximation of geometrical optics, is determined from the equation phi (u,v,z) - phi O(u,v,z)=O, which expresses that the incident field and the reflected field have identical eikonals. Further calculations are facilitated by replacing continuous mirror with a more easily manufactured piecewise continuous one. The problem is solved for the simple case of a plane incident wave with a typical iconal phi O(u,v,z)= -z cos0 at a large angle to a focus mirror in the z-plane region. Mirrors constructed on the basis of the theoretical solution were tested in an experiment with a CO2 laser. A light beam with Gaussian intensity distribution was, upon incidence at a 45 deg angle, focused into a circle or into an ellipse with uniform intensity distribution. Improvements in amplitudinal masking and selective tanning technology should reduce energy losses at the surface which results in efficient laser focusing mirrors.

  4. Teaching Introductory Physics with an Environmental Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinuk, Mathew; Moll, Rachel F.; Kotlicki, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Throughout North America the curriculum of introductory physics courses is nearly standardized. In 1992, Tobias wrote that four texts dominate 90% of the introductory physics market and current physics education research is focusing on how to sustain educational reforms. The instructional team at the University of British Columbia (UBC) recently…

  5. Focus. Volume 27, Number 2, Winter 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caspar, Emma, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of "Focus" is to provide coverage of poverty-related research, events, and issues, and to acquaint a large audience with the work of the Institute for Research on Poverty by means of short essays on selected pieces of research. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Progress toward Improving the U.S. Poverty Measure:…

  6. Dropout Prevention & Attrition Rates. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains six articles focusing on dropouts, potential dropouts, dropout rates, and dropout prevention, particularly in Texas and among Hispanics and other minority groups. "Improving Student Performance: Study Identifies Better Approach" (Maria Robledo Montecel, Josie Danini Supik, and Jose A. Cardenas) correlates student…

  7. Gifted and Talented Students. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on issues surrounding gifted and talented students, especially as they relate to poor, minority, or limited-English-proficient children. "Traditional Methods of Identifying Gifted Students Overlooks Many" (Linda Cantu) presents findings from the National Educational Longitudinal Study that…

  8. Focus on Basics, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This volume of newsletters focuses on connecting research and practice in adult literacy programs. Issue A of August 2001 includes: "Techniques for Teaching Beginning-Level Reading to Adults" (Ashley Hager); "Beginning ESOL Learners' Advice to Their Teachers" (MaryAnn Cunningham Florez); "The Neurobiology of Reading and Dyslexia" (Sally E.…

  9. Focused: Martin Stratmann recommends bundling excellence

    E-print Network

    Falge, Eva

    it into a model organism for research on aging. 28 A Hint of Immortality Eternal life? The freshwater polyp Hydra nearly achieved immortality. And they grapple with the social consequences of aging in humans ­ when are not a contradiction. FOCUS 18 Living in Fast Motion 26 Infographic: The Diversity of Aging 28 A Hint of Immortality 34

  10. Technology assessment: line-focus concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Banas, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The current engineering development status of line-focus solar concentrating collectors is described, specifically the parabolic trough, and near-term development emphasis in the areas of structures, reflective materials, receivers, selective coatings, trackers, drives, wind loads, foundations, and field layouts is briefly summarized.

  11. Focus Article Open challenges in magnetic drug

    E-print Network

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    Focus Article Open challenges in magnetic drug targeting Benjamin Shapiro,1,2 Sandip Kulkarni,1 Aleksander Nacev,3 Silvia Muro,1,4 Pavel Y. Stepanov3 and Irving N. Weinberg3 The principle of magnetic drug is that highlight- ing these challenges will help researchers translate magnetic drug targeting from a novel concept

  12. |Research Focus Tits, noise and urban bioacoustics

    E-print Network

    Katti, Madhusudan

    , a reflexive increase in the amplitude (loudness) of a signal in response to increased ambient noise (Figure 1|Research Focus Tits, noise and urban bioacoustics Madhusudan Katti and Paige S. Warren Center, are noisy. Researchers are only just beginning to identify the implications of an increase in noise

  13. Focus on Form in Live Chats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wen-Chun; Eslami, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of incidental focus on form in promoting second language development in text-based live chats. Sixteen college-level Taiwanese English language learners were partnered with American college students to complete two communicative tasks via synchronous chats on Instant Messenger. Language-related episodes…

  14. Facilitating Focused Internet Measurements Case Western Reserve

    E-print Network

    Rabinovich, Michael "Misha"

    Facilitating Focused Internet Measurements Zhihua Wen Case Western Reserve University Electrical Engineering & Computer Science 10900 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44106-7071 zhihua.wen@case.edu Sipat Triukose This paper describes our implementation of and initial ex- periences with DipZoom (for "Deep Internet

  15. REPRODUCTIONEDITORIAL Focus on determinants of male fertility

    E-print Network

    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

    in vitro (e.g. by in vitro fertilization) or in vivo (e.g. by artificial insemination). The latterREPRODUCTIONEDITORIAL Focus on determinants of male fertility E R S Roldan Reproductive Ecology the main determinants of male fertility would allow us to advance our knowledge of male reproductive

  16. Focusing the Gaze: Teacher Interrogation of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayler, Jennifer M.; Keddie, Amanda

    2007-01-01

    Within an Australian context of diminishing opportunities for equitable educational outcomes, this paper calls for teacher engagement in a "politics of resistance" through their focused gaze in relation to the ways in which they are positioned in their everyday practice. Our belief is that the resultant knowledge might equip teachers to see more…

  17. Module: Material Structure Focus: Hydrogen Bonding & Crystallization.

    E-print Network

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    and demonstrate the process of growing crystals. Materials: Water Copper Sulfate Cup Petri Dish Petri Dish Water sulfate in each Petri dish to act as a "seed" crystal. I came across another crystal growing exerciseModule: Material Structure Focus: Hydrogen Bonding & Crystallization. Duration: 43 minute period

  18. International Focus: Highlighting APPA Members Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazner, Steve, Comp.

    2011-01-01

    While most APPA member institutions are located in the United States and Canada, there are also 45 of member institutions located internationally--from Australia and New Zealand to Southeast Asia to the Middle East to Europe. This article focuses on four of its international members: (1) American University of Kuwait (AUK); (2) American University…

  19. FOCUS: MARINE GEOMORPHOLOGY AS A DETERMINANT FOR

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    FOCUS: MARINE GEOMORPHOLOGY AS A DETERMINANT FOR ESSENTIAL LIFE HABITAT AND MARINE PROTECTED AREA DESIGN Marine Geomorphology in the Design of Marine Reserve Networks William D. Heyman Texas A Geographer explores the development of marine reserve networks based on geomorphology, fish biology

  20. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

    1998-06-30

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

  1. Module: Introduction to Material Science Focus: Nanoscience

    E-print Network

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    Module: Introduction to Material Science Focus: Nanoscience Duration: 43 minute period Contact-258-5598 Objectives: 1. Students will be able to define the term "nanoscience." 2. Students will be able to discuss. Procedures: 1. Introduce and discuss the term "nanoscience." 2. Give PowerPoint presentation

  2. Revitalize Electrical Program with Renewable Energy Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karns, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Starting a renewable energy technology (RET) program can be as simple as shifting the teaching and learning focus of a traditional electricity program toward energy production and energy control systems. Redirecting curriculum content and delivery to address photovoltaic solar (PV solar) technology and small wind generation systems is a natural…

  3. Using Focus Groups to Clarify Customer Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Mary M.; Temares, M. Lewis

    1993-01-01

    Although traditional surveys are a valuable tool for college institutional researchers and others gathering data to support quality improvement programs, focus groups offer another technique for understanding university community members' needs and opinions by probing areas of special interest. University of Miami (Florida) experience illustrates…

  4. Superintendent Leadership: Focusing on District Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Tanya A.; Adams, Jeffery S.; Smith, Dwayne E.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a problem-based learning project focusing on superintendent leadership and stakeholder influence of school district culture. Current research findings suggest the importance of superintendent leadership in assessing, influencing, and enhancing school district culture. Multiple scholars wrote literature in the area of…

  5. Presentational Focus in Heritage and Monolingual Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoot, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    In Spanish, it is most commonly claimed that constituents in narrow presentational focus appear rightmost, where they also get main stress (1a), while stress in situ (1b) is infelicitous. (1) [Context: Who bought a car?]. a. Compró un carro mi [mamá][subscript F]. bought a car my mom. b. Mi [mamá ][subscript F] compró un carro. However, some…

  6. Application for Validation: The FOCUS Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Public Schools, OR.

    The goal of the FOCUS project is the development and implementation of an alternative school program for high school students which will provide relevant opportunities for student growth, both personal and academic, and thereby reduce the number of dropouts, academic failures, and pupil indifference and disenchantment. Part I of the document deals…

  7. Reading Motivation: A Focus on English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protacio, Maria Selena

    2012-01-01

    Because of the numerous challenges that ELs face, such as having to concurrently learn the curriculum and the English language, it is critical to focus on motivation. However, little attention has been given to ELs' motivation to read in English. Based on an interview study, results indicate that ELs may be motivated to read in English to learn…

  8. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stutz, Roger A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are isclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters.

  9. Environmental Flux and Locally Focused College Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepley, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews insights from place-based education and ecological models of writing to show how these theories can work together to shape locally focused composition pedagogies. From place-based education, the researcher takes an emphasis on physical specificity, and from ecological models of writing, the researcher takes an emphasis on…

  10. Module: Material Structure Focus: Adhesion & Cohesion

    E-print Network

    Rowley, Clarence W.

    Module: Material Structure Focus: Adhesion & Cohesion Duration: 43 minute period Contact: Daniel will develop a working understanding of adhesion and cohesion. Materials: Water Pipette (or Dropper) Plastic and illustrate the terms "adhesion" and "cohesion." 3. Students will complete a lab on adhesion and cohesion

  11. Quality control of murine monoclonal antibodies using isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    The quality control of murine hybridoma secretory products has been performed using two approaches for isoelectric focusing affinity immunoblot analysis: (1) a method in which antigen-coated nitrocellulose is placed on top of an acrylamide gel containing isoelectrically focused ascites to bind the antigen specific monoclonal antibody; and (2) a method in which focused ascite proteins were passively blotted onto nitrocellulose and specific monoclonal antibodies were detected with enzyme-conjugated antigen. Analysis by both methods of batches of ascites containing antihuman IgG antibodies that were produced by six hybridomas permitted effective monitoring of immunoreactive antibodies for pI microheterogeneity.

  12. Ovulation Detection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... org • URL www.asrm.org PATIENT’S FACT SHEET Ovulation Detection Ovulation, the release of an egg from its follicle ... into the woman’s vagina near the time of ovulation. The man’s sperm must be capable of swimming ...

  13. Detection device

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber, (2) a central chamber, and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  14. EDITORIAL: Focus on the neural interface Focus on the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of an effective connection between neural tissue and computers has inspired scientists and engineers to develop new ways of controlling and obtaining information from the nervous system. These applications range from `brain hacking' to neural control of artificial limbs with brain signals. Notwithstanding the significant advances in neural prosthetics in the last few decades and the success of some stimulation devices such as cochlear prosthesis, neurotechnology remains below its potential for restoring neural function in patients with nervous system disorders. One of the reasons for this limited impact can be found at the neural interface and close attention to the integration between electrodes and tissue should improve the possibility of successful outcomes. The neural interfaces research community consists of investigators working in areas such as deep brain stimulation, functional neuromuscular/electrical stimulation, auditory prostheses, cortical prostheses, neuromodulation, microelectrode array technology, brain-computer/machine interfaces. Following the success of previous neuroprostheses and neural interfaces workshops, funding (from NIH) was obtained to establish a biennial conference in the area of neural interfaces. The first Neural Interfaces Conference took place in Cleveland, OH in 2008 and several topics from this conference have been selected for publication in this special section of the Journal of Neural Engineering. Three `perspectives' review the areas of neural regeneration (Corredor and Goldberg), cochlear implants (O'Leary et al) and neural prostheses (Anderson). Seven articles focus on various aspects of neural interfacing. One of the most popular of these areas is the field of brain-computer interfaces. Fraser et al, report on a method to generate robust control with simple signal processing algorithms of signals obtained with electrodes implanted in the brain. One problem with implanted electrode arrays, however, is that they can fail to record reliably neural signals for long periods of time. McConnell et al show that by measuring the impedance of the tissue, one can evaluate the extent of the tissue response to the presence of the electrode. Another problem with the neural interface is the mismatch of the mechanical properties between electrode and tissue. Basinger et al use finite element modeling to analyze this mismatch in retinal prostheses and guide the design of new implantable devices. Electrical stimulation has been the method of choice to activate externally the nervous system. However, Zhang et al show that a novel dual hybrid device integrating electrical and optical stimulation can provide an effective interface for simultaneous recording and stimulation. By interfacing an EMG recording system and a movement detection system, Johnson and Fuglevand develop a model capable of predicting muscle activity during movement that could be important for the development of motor prostheses. Sensory restoration is another unsolved problem in neural prostheses. By developing a novel interface between the dorsal root ganglia and electrodes arrays, Gaunt et al show that it is possible to recruit afferent fibers for sensory substitution. Finally, by interfacing directly with muscles, Jung and colleagues show that stimulation of muscles involved in locomotion following spinal cord damage in rats can provide an effective treatment modality for incomplete spinal cord injury. This series of articles clearly shows that the interface is indeed one of the keys to successful therapeutic neural devices. The next Neural Interfaces Conference will take place in Los Angeles, CA in June 2010 and one can expect to see new developments in neural engineering obtained by focusing on the neural interface.

  15. Hormone purification by isoelectric focusing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the program was the definition and development of optimal methods for electrophoretic separations in microgravity. The approach is based on a triad consisting of ground based experiments, mathematical modeling and experiments in microgravity. Zone electrophoresis is a rate process, where separation is achieved in uniform buffers on the basis of differences in electrophoretic mobilities. Optimization and modeling of continuous flow electrophoresis mainly concern the hydrodynamics of the flow process, including gravity dependent fluid convection due to density gradients and gravity independent electroosmosis. Optimization of focusing requires a more complex model describing the molecular transport processes involved in electrophoresis of interacting systems. Three different focusing instruments were designed, embodying novel principles of fluid stabilization. Fluid stability was achieved by: (1) flow streamlining by means of membrane elements in combination with rapid fluid recycling; (2) apparatus rotation in combination with said membrane elements; and (3) shear stress induced by rapid recycling through a narrow gap channel.

  16. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  17. Tunable focus graphene-based terahertz lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To extend the usage of the terahertz wave, we present a simple method for variable focus length terahertz wave lens based on graphene. The focus length of the graphene-based terahertz lens can be tunable by changing the applied electric field without change the configuration. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, numerical simulation performed with the aid of the finite element method is used to evaluate the terahertz performance of the proposed device. With an appropriate design, the focal length of the proposed device can be tuned from 7.3 ?m to 15.2 ?m. The total size of the present graphene lens is only 3.5 ?m×13 ?m. It is believed to be applicable for future communication, imaging and sensing in terahertz range.

  18. Radio frequency focused interdigital linear accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Donald A.; Starling, W. Joel

    2006-08-29

    An interdigital (Wideroe) linear accelerator employing drift tubes, and associated support stems that couple to both the longitudinal and support stem electromagnetic fields of the linac, creating rf quadrupole fields along the axis of the linac to provide transverse focusing for the particle beam. Each drift tube comprises two separate electrodes operating at different electrical potentials as determined by cavity rf fields. Each electrode supports two fingers, pointing towards the opposite end of the drift tube, forming a four-finger geometry that produces an rf quadrupole field distribution along its axis. The fundamental periodicity of the structure is equal to one half of the particle wavelength .beta..lamda., where .beta. is the particle velocity in units of the velocity of light and .lamda. is the free space wavelength of the rf. Particles are accelerated in the gaps between drift tubes. The particle beam is focused in regions inside the drift tubes.

  19. Neutron production mechanism in a plasma focus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Shomo, L. P.; Williams, M. D.; Hermansdorfer, H.

    1971-01-01

    The neutrons emitted by a plasma focus were analyzed by using a time-of-flight method. Flight paths as large as 80 m were used to obtain better than 10% energy resolution. The energy spectrum of neutrons from d-d reactions in the plasma focus shows a sharp onset with average maximum energies of 2.8 and 3.2 MeV in the radial and the axial directions, respectively. The average half-width of the energy spectrum was 270 keV with a shot-to-shot variation between 150 and 400 keV. Simultaneous measurements in the axial and radial directions showed no appreciable difference in the half-widths and thus indicated randomly oriented ion velocities in the plasma. A converging ion model is described which is found to be in agreement with the measured quantities.

  20. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  1. Focus on high energy density physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Norreys, Peter

    2014-06-01

    High-energy-density physics concerns the behavior of systems at high pressure, often involving the interplay of plasma, relativistic, quantum mechanical and electromagnetic effects. The field is growing rapidly in its scope of activity thanks to advances in experimental, laser and computational technologies. This ‘focus on’ collection presents papers discussing forefront research that spans the field, providing a sense of its breadth and of the interlinking of its parts.

  2. Sound focusing by gradient index sonic lenses

    E-print Network

    Alfonso Climente; Daniel Torrent; Jose Sanchez-Dehesa

    2010-06-14

    Gradient index sonic lenses based on two-dimensional sonic crystals are here designed, fabricated and characterized. The index-gradient is achieved in these type of flat lenses by a gradual modification of the sonic crystal filling fraction along the direction perpendicular to the lens axis. The focusing performance is well described by an analytical model based on ray theory as well as by numerical simulations based on the multiple-scattering theory.

  3. Rapid prototyping fabrication of focused ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Cain, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) fabrication techniques are currently widely used in diverse industrial and medical fields, providing substantial advantages in development time and costs in comparison to more traditional manufacturing processes. This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducers using RP technology. The construction of a large-aperture hemispherical transducer designed by computer software is described to demonstrate the process. The transducer was conceived as a modular design consisting of 32 individually focused 50.8-mm (2-in) PZT-8 element modules distributed in a 300-mm hemispherical scaffold with a geometric focus of 150 mm. The entire structure of the array, including the module housings and the hemispherical scaffold was fabricated through a stereolithography (SLA) system using a proprietary photopolymer. The PZT elements were bonded to the lenses through a quarter-wave tungsten-epoxy matching layer developed in-house specifically for this purpose. Modules constructed in this manner displayed a high degree of electroacoustic consistency, with an electrical impedance mean and standard deviation of 109 ± 10.2 ? for the 32 elements. Time-of-flight measurements for individually pulsed modules mounted on the hemispherical scaffold showed that all pulses arrived at the focus within a 350 ns range, indicating a good degree of element alignment. Pressure profile measurements of the fully assembled transducer also showed close agreement with simulated results. The measured focal beam FWHM dimensions were 1.9 × 4.0 mm (1.9 × 3.9 mm simulated) in the transversal and axial directions respectively. Total material expenses associated with the construction of the transducer were approximately 5000 USD (as of 2011). The versatility and lower fabrication costs afforded by RP methods may be beneficial in the development of complex transducer geometries suitable for a variety of research and clinical applications. PMID:25167156

  4. STEM Focus in Innoventure Competition Theme

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-31

    This report documents the inclusion of the STEM focus in the annual competition theme for the Innoventure youth project. The STEM concepts have always played a part in the selection of the theme. However, this year, STEM is intentionally mentioned in the description of the theme to emphasize the importance of these concepts. This work is a part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant.

  5. Focus group discussions of daylighting practices

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, B.F.; Harkreader, S.A.

    1988-11-01

    This research was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Buildings and Community systems and conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of an ongoing effort to enhance the commercial use of federally developed technologies. One such technology is the use of daylighting practices in the design of nonresidential buildings. This document is a report of the findings from meetings of focus groups conducted to gain insight into building designers' perceptions and attitudes about daylighting systems.

  6. Photoacoustic cell using elliptical acoustic focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heritier, J.-M.; Fouquet, J. E.; Siegman, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    A photoacoustic cell has been developed in the form of an elliptical cylinder in which essentially all the acoustic energy generated by a laser beam passing down one axis is focused onto a cylindrical acoustic tranducer located along the other axis. Preliminary measurements on a liquid-filled cell of this design show high sensitivity and a notably clean impulse response. A similar design may be useful for photoacoustic measurements in vapors as well.

  7. Vision Trainer Teaches Focusing Techniques at Home

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Based on work Stanford Research Institute did for Ames Research Center, Joseph Trachtman developed a vision trainer to treat visual focusing problems in the 1980s. In 2014, Trachtman, operating out of Seattle, released a home version of the device called the Zone-Trac. The inventor has found the biofeedback process used by the technology induces an alpha-wave brain state, causing increased hand-eye coordination and reaction times, among other effects

  8. Permanent magnet focused X-band photoinjector

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Rosenzweig, James (Los Angeles, CA)

    2002-09-10

    A compact high energy photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injection and the linac. High electron beam brightness is achieved by accelerating a tightly focused electron beam in an integrated, multi-cell, X-band rf linear accelerator (linac). The photoelectron linac employs a Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, easing manufacturing tolerances and costs.

  9. Automatic Focus Adjustment of a Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2005-01-01

    AUTOFOCUS is a computer program for use in a control system that automatically adjusts the position of an instrument arm that carries a microscope equipped with an electronic camera. In the original intended application of AUTOFOCUS, the imaging microscope would be carried by an exploratory robotic vehicle on a remote planet, but AUTOFOCUS could also be adapted to similar applications on Earth. Initially control software other than AUTOFOCUS brings the microscope to a position above a target to be imaged. Then the instrument arm is moved to lower the microscope toward the target: nominally, the target is approached from a starting distance of 3 cm in 10 steps of 3 mm each. After each step, the image in the camera is subjected to a wavelet transform, which is used to evaluate the texture in the image at multiple scales to determine whether and by how much the microscope is approaching focus. A focus measure is derived from the transform and used to guide the arm to bring the microscope to the focal height. When the analysis reveals that the microscope is in focus, image data are recorded and transmitted.

  10. Focused Recharge in a Theoretical Raingarden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaillant, A. R.; Dussaillant, A. R.; Potter, K. W.; Wu, C.

    2001-05-01

    Traditional stormwater management, which relies heavily on detention, does not mitigate groundwater depletion resulting from groundwater pumping and loss of groundwater recharge. In recent years there has been increasing interest in the use of practices, such as raingardens, that encourage infiltration of stormwater as a means of mitigating groundwater impacts. These can be particularly effective when infiltration is focused in order to maximize groundwater recharge. However, traditional hydrologic models are not well suited to describe focused infiltration. We have developed a model of focused recharge that can be applied in the design and evaluation of raingardens. The rain garden is represented by three homogeneous layers of soil. The upper layer represents the root zone. The middle layer is a high conductivity layer that provides water storage. The lower layer represents the urban soil, which may restrict water flow. To continuously simulate recharge, runoff and evapotranspiration during the wet and dry periods, a Richards equation is used to estimate soil water movement. Runoff from the garden is approximated by a weir equation, assuming a maximum ponding depth of 15 cm. Evapotranspiration is based on the Priestley & Taylor model, taking into account the partition of radiation through the plant canopy and the available soil water. A fully implicit finite difference approach is used to solve the model equation, with a modified Picard iteration for mass balancing. Results of the raingarden water budget will be presented for long-term continuous simulations.

  11. Pencil beam generation from a focused tranducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, M. Melo; van Neer, P. L. M. J.; Volker, A.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning using a focused transducer gives a narrow focus depth, although locally there is a high resolution. Because the focal point can be considered as a second source, the wavefield can be split in its causal and anticausal parts. Imaging can be performed efficiently with a mapping algorithm in the wavenumber domain (f-k or Stolt migration), achieving a pencil beam. This work investigates the potential of this mapping algorithm on simulated and experimentally obtained pulseecho data of a line of point deflectors (pins) mounted in a water tank. The simulated dataset was created using an in-house implementation of a wavefield extrapolation algorithm, and the experimental dataset was obtained using an xyz-system. A 1MHz transducer was used with diameter 1.5" and focal distance 3". The aforementioned concept is illustrated on simulated data, where the -6dB lateral point spread functions (PSF) were improved by 91.3%, 0% and 90.5% in the near-field (2.5cm), focus (7.4cm) and far-field (13.5cm), respectively. Measurements confirm this pattern, and showed improvements in the PSFs by 86.8%, 0% and 60.0% at the same distances. The resolution enhancement, produced by the mapping algorithm, is such that effectively a pencil beam is obtained in both the simulations and experiments.

  12. Focusing DIRC Design for Super B

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.; /SLAC

    2009-12-17

    In this paper we present a new design of the Focusing DIRC for the Barrel PID to be used at the proposed Super-B factory. The new imaging optics is made of a solid Fused Silica block with a double folded optics using two mirrors, one cylindrical and one flat, focusing photons on a detector plane conveniently accessible for the detector access. The design assumes that the BaBar bar boxes are re-used without any modification, including the wedges and windows. Each bar box will have its own focusing block, which will contain 40 H-9500 (or H-8500) MaPMTs according to present thinking. There are 12 bar boxes in the entire detector, so the entire SuperB FDIRC system would have 480 MaPMTs. The design is very compact and therefore reduces sensitivity to the background. The chosen MaPMTs are fast enough to be able both to reject the background and to perform the chromatic correction. The 3D optics simulation is coded with the Mathematica program. The work in this paper was a basis of the LDRD proposal made to SLAC in 2009 [1].

  13. Optical Range-Finding from Image Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckler, Paul Reese

    Scope of the study. Much of the labor-intensive work in agriculture consists of reaching out, grasping an object, and then placing the object in a desired position. This repetitious work exploits the unsurpassed hand-eye coordination in human beings. Substitution of machines for manual labor will require simulation of human hand-eye coordination. Most robots in agricultural applications will need the ability to recognize and manipulate three-dimensional objects. With present technology, this requirement makes agricultural robotic systems uneconomical, except for special applications. A method for gauging the distance from a video camera to an object of interest was investigated. By using a calibrated camera-lens system, range was related to focus. Optimum focus of the image was determined by maximizing the high -frequency content of the Fourier transform of the object image. The Walsh-Hadamard transform was investigated as an alternative focusing function. Software was developed to determine optimum image focus and control a motorized camera lens. Findings and conclusions. Range values from the video camera to target objects were calculated by the system. Calculated values were compared with measured distances. Differences between calculated and actual distance averaged less than 0.5%. The Walsh-Hadamard transform provided focus information comparable to the Fourier transform. Using double precision floating-point arithmetic, the Walsh-Hadamard transform executed more than three times faster than the Fourier transform. Distance values calculated using the Walsh -Hadamard transform differed from values calculated with the Fourier transform by less than 1%. This system used a passive, non-triangulation technique to obtain the distance from the machine vision camera to the object of interest. A passive non-triangulation system was the simplest image acquisition requirements, since it does not require a second camera, structured lighting, camera movement, or time-of-flight measurement equipment. This simplicity must be balanced against the limited information obtained from a monocular view of the scene. For range measurement, this method should provide adequate information for robot arm guidance. The simple hardware requirements are also an advantage when designing a rugged, cost-effective system for use in agricultural applications.

  14. Measuring communicative participation using the FOCUS©1: Focus on the Outcomes of Communication Under Six

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Stonell, N; Washington, K; Oddson, B; Robertson, B; Rosenbaum, P

    2013-01-01

    Background The FOCUS© is a new outcome tool for use by both parents and clinicians that measures changes in the communicative participation skills of preschool children. Changes in communicative participation skills as measured by the FOCUS were compared across three groups of children: those with speech impairments only (SI), those with language impairments only (LI) and those with both speech and language impairments (S/LI). Methods Participating families (n = 112, 75 male children) were recruited through 13 Canadian organizations. Children ranged from 10 months to 6 years 0 months (mean = 2.11 years; SD = 1.18 years) and attended speech-language intervention. Parents completed the FOCUS at the start and end of treatment. There were 23 children in the SI group, 62 children in the LI group and 27 children in the S/LI group. The average amount of the children's therapy varied from 7 to 10 h. Results The FOCUS captures changes in communicative participation for children with a range of communication disorder types and severities. All three groups of children made clinically important improvements according to their FOCUS scores (MCID ? 16 points). The FOCUS captured improvements in intelligibility, independent communication, play and socialization. Conclusions The FOCUS measured positive changes in communicative participation skills for all three groups of children after 7–10 h of speech-language therapy. An outcome measure that targets only specific speech and language skills would miss many of the important social function changes associated with speech-language treatment. PMID:23763248

  15. Extension of the Focusable Mass Range in Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with Multiple Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Dennis, Elise; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Carado, Anthony J.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2012-11-15

    Since the underlying theory of Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (DOFMS) was reported in 2007,[1] laboratory results[2, 3] have proven its practical viability. However, these previous implementations of DOFMS considered ion detection only over narrow DOF-detection windows, with 25-mm being the greatest detection length explored. These small mass windows cannot be used to evaluate how DOFMS focusing performs over greater DOF detection lengths and mass ranges. In the present study, we expand on previous studies by placing two spatially selective ion detectors along the detection plane of the DOFMS instrument. Ion signals are simultaneously collected from both DOF detectors in order to simulate DOFMS performance with a longer spatially selective ion detector.

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on High Energy Cosmic Rays FOCUS ON HIGH ENERGY COSMIC RAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teshima, Masahiro; Watson, Alan A.

    2009-06-01

    The topic of high-energy cosmic rays has recently attracted significant attention. While the AGASA and HiRes Observatories have closed after many years of successful operation, the Pierre Auger Observatory began taking data in January 2004 and the first results have been reported. Plans for the next generation of instruments are in hand: funding is now being sought for the northern phase of the Auger Observatory and plans for a space detector, JEM-EUSO, to be launched in 2013-14 are well advanced with the long-term target of a dedicated satellite for the 2020s. It therefore seemed an appropriate time to make a collection of outstanding and original research articles from the leading experimental groups and from some of the theorists who seek to interpret the hard-won data and to speculate on the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays. This focus issue in New Journal of Physics on the topic of high energy cosmic rays, contains a comprehensive account of the work of the Yakutsk group (A A Ivanov, S P Knurenko and I Ye Sleptsov) who have used Cerenkov radiation produced by shower particles in the air to provide the basis for energy calibration. This technique contrasts with that of detecting fluorescence radiation from space that is proposed for the JEM-EUSO instrument to be placed on the International Space Station in 2013, described by Y Takahashi. Supplementing this is an article by A Santangelo and A Petrolini describing the scientific goals, requirements and main instrument features of the Super Extreme Universe Space Observatory mission (S-EUSO). The use of fluorescence light to measure energies was the key component of the HiRes instrument and is also used extensively by the Pierre Auger Collaboration so an article, by F Arqueros, F Blanco and J Rosado, summarizing the properties of fluorescence emission, still not fully understood, is timely. M Nagano, one of the architects of the AGASA Observatory, has provided an overview of the experimental situation with regard to the energy spectrum of the highest energy cosmic rays. The remaining contributions are of a more theoretical nature and discuss propagation (T Stanev), the time structure of multi-messenger signals (G H W Sigl), ultra-high energy cosmic ray production near black holes (A Yu Neronov, D V Semikoz and I I Tkachev), production in jets associated with black holes (C D Dermer, S Razzaque, J Finke and A Atoyan) and emission from a specific object, Cen A (M Kachelriess, S S Ostapchenko and R Tomas). Additionally the potential of high energy cosmic rays to give information about features of hadronic interactions, specifically the cross-section for p-air collisions, is discussed in the paper by R Ulrich et al. We thank all our authors most sincerely for their efforts and Tim Smith and his editorial team for their hard work. We believe that this collection of articles will be of great value to workers in the field: further contributions to this focus issue will be published during the course of 2009. Focus on High Energy Cosmic Rays Contents The cosmic ray energy spectrum as measured using the Pierre Auger Observatory Giorgio Matthiae The northern site of the Pierre Auger Observatory Johannes Blümer and the Pierre Auger Collaboration Searching for new physics with ultrahigh energy cosmic rays Floyd W Stecker and Sean T Scully On the measurement of the proton-air cross section using air shower data R Ulrich, J Blümer, R Engel, F Schüssler and M Unger High energy radiation from Centaurus A M Kachelrieß, S Ostapchenko and R Tomàs Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays from black hole jets of radio galaxies C D Dermer, S Razzaque, J D Finke and A Atoyan Ultra-high energy cosmic ray production in the polar cap regions of black hole magnetospheres A Yu Neronov, D V Semikoz and I I Tkachev Time structure and multi-messenger signatures of ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources Günter Sigl Propagation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays Todor Stanev Search for the end of the energy spectrum of primary cosmic rays M Nagano Analysis of the fluorescence emission from atmospheric ni

  17. Subwavelength focusing by binary multi-annular plates: design theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Shen, Tong; Yang, Shuming; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2015-03-01

    Subwavelength focus can be created by one single binary multi-annular plate (MAP) through diffraction interference. Based on vectorial angular spectrum theory, a universal, efficient optimization method for designing subwavelength focusing MAPs is described using genetic algorithm and fast Hankel transform algorithm. The method can use arbitrarily polarized vector beams for illumination and can be applied to design multi-amplitude MAPs. It is shown by examples that the minimum feature size is not necessarily at subwavelength, and can be extended to several wavelengths. The longitudinally polarized electric component cannot be neglected in order to accurately reconstruct the real subwavelength focus. In the experiment, the best focal plane of MAP is precisely positioned through confocal scanning mechanism, in which a virtual confocal pinhole detection method is implemented. The wide-field, high-numerical aperture microscopic imaging system predominantly detects the transversely polarized electric components.

  18. Self-rated health and ethnicity: focus on indigenous populations

    PubMed Central

    Bombak, Andrea E.; Bruce, Sharon G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Self-rated health (SRH) is a commonly used measure in surveys to assess general health status or health-related quality of life. Differences have been detected in how different ethnic groups and nationalities interpret the SRH measure and assess their health. This review summarizes the research conducted on SRH within and between ethnic groups, with a focus on indigenous groups. Study design and methods A search of published academic literature on SRH and ethnicity, including a comprehensive review of all relevant indigenous research, was conducted using PubMed and summarized. Results A wide variety of research on SRH within ethnic groups has been undertaken. SRH typically serves as an outcome measure. Minority respondents generally rated their health worse than the dominant population. Numerous culturally-specific determinants of SRH have been identified. Cross-national and cross-ethnicity comparisons of the associations of SRH have been conducted to assess the validity of SRH. While SRH is a valid measure within a variety of ethnicities, differences in how SRH is assessed by ethnicities have been detected. Research in indigenous groups remains generally under-represented in the SRH literature. Conclusions These results suggest that different ethnic groups and nationalities vary in SRH evaluations, interpretation of the SRH measure, and referents employed in rating health. To effectively assess and redress health disparities and establish culturally-relevant and effective health interventions, a greater understanding of SRH is required, particularly among indigenous groups, in which little research has been conducted. PMID:22663937

  19. Lymphatic Imaging: Focus on Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    In view of the importance of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in tumor staging and patient management, sensitive and accurate imaging of SLNs has been intensively explored. Along with the advance of the imaging technology, various contrast agents have been developed for lymphatic imaging. In this review, the lymph node imaging agents were summarized into three groups: tumor targeting agents, lymphatic targeting agents and lymphatic mapping agents. Tumor targeting agents are used to detect metastatic tumor tissue within LNs, lymphatic targeting agents aim to visualize lymphatic vessels and lymphangionesis, while lymphatic mapping agents are mainly for SLN detection during surgery after local administration. Coupled with various signal emitters, these imaging agents work with single or multiple imaging modalities to provide a valuable way to evaluate the location and metastatic status of SLNs. PMID:25897334

  20. Detecting Falling Snow from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Johnson, Ben; Munchak, Joe

    2012-01-01

    There is an increased interest in detecting and estimating the amount of falling snow reaching the Earth's surface in order to fully capture the atmospheric water cycle. An initial step toward global spaceborne falling snow algorithms includes determining the thresholds of detection for various active and passive sensor channel configurations, snow event cloud structures and microphysics, snowflake particle electromagnetic properties, and surface types. In this work, cloud resolving model simulations of a lake effect and synoptic snow event were used to determine the minimum amount of snow (threshold) that could be detected by the following instruments: the W -band radar of CloudSat, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) Ku and Ka band, and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) channels from 10 to 183 plus or minus 7 GHz. Eleven different snowflake shapes were used to compute radar reflectivities and passive brightness temperatures. Notable results include: (1) the W-Band radar has detection thresholds more than an order of magnitude lower than the future GPM sensors, (2) the cloud structure macrophysics influences the thresholds of detection for passive channels, (3) the snowflake microphysics plays a large role in the detection threshold for active and passive instruments, (4) with reasonable assumptions, "the passive 166 GHz channel has detection threshold values comparable to the GPM DPR Ku and Ka band radars with approximately 0.05 g per cubic meter detected at the surface, or an approximately 0.5-1 millimeter per hr. melted snow rate (equivalent to 0.5-2 centimeters per hr. solid fluffy snowflake rate). With detection levels of falling snow known, we can focus current and future retrieval efforts on detectable storms and concentrate advances on achievable results. We will also have an understanding of the light snowfall events missed by the sensors and not captured in the global estimates.

  1. Development of a capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay to measure DJ-1 isoforms in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Besong Agbo, D; Klafki, H; Poschmann, G; Seyfarth, K; Genius, J; Janßen, C; Stühler, K; Wurst, W; Meyer, H E; Klingenspor, M; Wiltfang, J

    2013-12-15

    We report on the development of a novel assay protocol for the separation and detection of charge isoforms of DJ-1 in biological samples by automated capillary isoelectric focusing followed by immunological detection. DJ-1 (PARK7) is considered as a biomarker candidate for Parkinson's disease and may potentially support the differentiation of clinical subtypes of the disease. The new method allows for separation and subsequent relative quantitative comparison of different isoforms of DJ-1 in biological samples. The assay was successfully applied to the analysis of DJ-1 isoform patterns in brains from mice subjected to normal or high-fat diet and revealed statistically significant group differences. Furthermore, in a pooled and concentrated sample of human cerebrospinal fluid that was depleted of albumin and immunoglobulin G, four different charge variants of DJ-1 could be detected. Taken together, the capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay for DJ-1 represents a promising tool that may ultimately serve in clinical biomarker studies. PMID:24055619

  2. Development of shear-vertical-wave point-focusing electromagnetic acoustic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takishita, Takashi; Ashida, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Nobutomo; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Hirao, Masahiko

    2015-07-01

    A shear-vertical-wave point-focusing electromagnetic acoustic transducer is developed for the purpose of detecting stress corrosion cracking in stainless steel. The transducer is composed of a permanent magnet and two identical concentric meander-line coils, one for the transmitter and the other for the receiver, and the shear-vertical waves are excited and detected by the Lorentz force mechanism. The meander-line coils are designed so that the phases of all the excited shear-vertical waves are focused in phase at a focal point. The focal area is evaluated experimentally, and it is confirmed that the developed transducer is capable of detecting slit defects deeper than 0.05 mm at the bottom surface of a stainless-steel plate 20 mm thick.

  3. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Hadidi, Kamal (Cambridge, MA)

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  4. Narrowing the Focus: Experimental Studies on Exhaustivity and Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Mary Byram

    2013-01-01

    Focus structure has a profound effect on language production and processing. Yet, despite that focus has so much influence on an utterance, it still remains unclear what the meaning of focus is. Some theories consider focus to be entirely pragmatic, having no influence on the truth conditions or presuppositions of a focused sentence. Other…

  5. How Focus at Encoding Affects Children's Source Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Stacie L.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Bingman, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Retention of source information is enhanced by focus on speakers' feelings about statements even though recognition is reduced for both adults and children. However, does any focus on another person lead to enhanced source monitoring, or is a particular kind of focus required? Does other-focus enhance source monitoring, or does self-focus detract…

  6. Development of a Tissue-Mimicking Phantom for Evaluating the Focusing Performance of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Jing Zongyu; Li Faqi; Zou Jiangzhong; Wang Zhibiao

    2006-05-08

    Objectives: To develop a tissue mimicking phantom which can be used to evaluate the focusing performance of the HIFU transducer, and the phantom should has the same acoustic characteristic and thermotics characteristic as the biological tissue. Materials and methods: The tissue mimicking phantom was made from water, gelatin, fresh biologic tissue Its ultrasonic parameters (attenuation coefficient) of the phantom was measured by the method of radiation pressure, and thermotics parameters of the phantom, including thermal conductivity, specific heat/fusion point et al were tested under the Measurement meter. The HIFU biological effect of the phantom was evaluated under the Model JC focused ultrasound tumor therapeutic system, developed and produced by Chongqing HIFU Technology Co. Ltd (working frequency: 0.7MHz; acoustic power: 200W; focal distance: 135mm; Acoustic focal region: 3x3x25 cubic mm). Results: The self-made phantom is sable, has smooth and glossy appearance, well-distributed construction, and good elasticity. We measured the followed values for acoustic and thermal properties: density 1049{+-}2 kg/m3; attenuation 0.532{+-}0.017 dB/cm (0.8 MHz), 0.612{+-}0.021 dB/cm (1.0 MHz); thermal conductivity 0.76{+-}0.08 W/m/- deg. C; specific heat 3653{+-}143 J/kg- deg. C; fusion point154{+-}8 deg. C. The BFR induced in the phantom after HIFU exposure was stable in its size and appearance. Conclusion: We produced and improved one tissue mimicking phantom successfully which had semblable ultrasound and thermphysical properties like the soft tissue, and can replace the bovine liver to investigate the HIFU biological effect and to detect the focusing performance of the HIFU energy transducer. The research was supported by Chongqing University of Medical Science (CX200320)

  7. Deep focus earthquakes in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, Alexandre; Brunet, Fabrice; Hilairet, Nadège; Gasc, Julien; Wang, Yanbin; Green, Harry W., II

    2014-05-01

    While the existence of deep earthquakes have been known since the 1920's, the essential mechanical process responsible for them is still poorly understood and remained one of the outstanding unsolved problems of geophysics and rock mechanics. Indeed, deep focus earthquake occur in an environment fundamentally different from that of shallow (<100 km) earthquakes. As pressure and temperature increase with depth however, intra-crystalline plasticity starts to dominate the deformation regime so that rocks yield by plastic flow rather than by brittle fracturing. Olivine phase transitions have provided an attractive alternative mechanism for deep focus earthquakes. Indeed, the Earth mantle transition zone (410-700km) is the locus of the two successive polymorphic transitions of olivine. Such scenario, however, runs into the conceptual barrier of initiating failure in a pressure (P) and temperature (T) regime where deviatoric stress relaxation is expected to be achieved through plastic flow. Here, we performed laboratory deformation experiments on Germanium olivine (Mg2GeO4) under differential stress at high pressure (P=2-5GPa) and within a narrow temperature range (T=1000-1250K). We find that fractures nucleate at the onset of the olivine to spinel transition. These fractures propagate dynamically (i.e. at a non-negligible fraction of the shear wave velocity) so that intense acoustic emissions are generated. Similar to deep-focus earthquakes, these acoustic emissions arise from pure shear sources, and obey the Gutenberg-Richter law without following Omori's law. Microstructural observations prove that dynamic weakening likely involves superplasticity of the nanocrystalline spinel reaction product at seismic strain rates. Although in our experiments the absolute stress value remains high compared to stresses expected within the cold core of subducted slabs, the observed stress drops are broadly consistent with those calculated for deep earthquakes. Constant differential stress conditions at failure over a wide range of confinement (2-5GPa) strongly suggest that transformational faulting is largely independent of normal stress and thus involves non-frictional processes. We suggest that rupture nucleation is controlled by dislocation density and spinel nucleation kinetics, while propagation is controlled by superplastic flow. High stress and high dislocation density conditions can be met in a cold subducting slab full of metastable olivine, due to stress concentrations at the micro and mesoscopic scales because of buckling, folding, and/or inherited fractures. This is particularly true in the Tonga-Kermadec region for instance, for which the largest catalog of deep focus earthquake is available.

  8. Mixed Waste Focus Area program management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Beitel, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    This plan describes the program management principles and functions to be implemented in the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE Complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation and disposal.

  9. A Low Cost Electrostatically Focused TWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancil, Bernard K.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Williams, W. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ring-loop circuits are well known for their simplicity, low cost, compactness, low mass, high gain and efficiency and absence of backward wave oscillations. Peak powers over 20 kw have been achieved. They also have low harmonic output and excellent phase performance. We have developed a double ring-loop circuit that permits electrostatic focusing of an electron beam to at least 0.4 micro pervs. This eliminates the magnet stack and further lowers cost and weight. It permits glass rod fastening of circuit elements as well as gun and collector assemblies, as is done in cathode ray tubes. Using CRT construction techniques, the TWT can be built on automated equipment.

  10. Focus on Hybrid Magnetic/Superconducting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, L.; Li, Q.; Moshchalkov, V.

    2011-02-01

    Like antagonistic cousins from a common heritage, the competition between superconductivity and magnetism for correlated electron states, and coexistence in some rare cases, produces a rich variety of physical behavior, useful materials, and technologically important properties. Many pages of Superconductor Science and Technology are devoted to cuprates, pnictides, and other compounds where the mechanism of superconductivity itself is intertwined with magnetism. This focus issue explores another area, in which superconductivity and magnetism are combined as a hybrid system to create new properties not possible with either system alone, or to improve upon the properties of either system in dramatic ways. In recent years, great progress has been made in this exciting, relatively new field, followed by many workshops and special sessions in major international conferences. A concise and up-to-date focus issue of Superconductor Science and Technology is timely to summarize the latest developments. We, the Guest Editors, would like to thank those colleagues who contributed their most recent and interesting findings to this focus issue: Silhanek and co-workers reported both theoretical and experimental investigations of the dynamics of vortex chains for different arrangements of magnetic moments. Their approach of time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau formalism now replaces the previously proposed empirical models to explain the most relevant properties of the dynamics of these S/F hybrid systems. Hikino and co-workers presented a new route to observe the spin-wave excitation by the Josephson effect, through a theoretical investigation of the resistively shunted junction model, extended by considering the gauge invariance including magnetization. When the magnetization is driven by the microwave adjusted to the ferromagnetic resonance frequency, the dc supercurrent is induced in the junction, and the current-voltage curve shows step structures as a function of applied voltage. The magnitudes of step-height can be controlled by tuning the shape of interface. Nevirkovets and Belogolovskii demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that an ultra thin ferromagnetic layer, nearly transparent for non-superconducting charge transport, can block the transport of charge-carrier superconducting correlations as a cut-off filter in some device applications, for instance, a few nanometer thick ferromagnetic layer in a double barrier S{sub 1}IS{sub 2}FIS{sub 3} multi-terminal devices (S, I, and F are superconductor, insulator, and ferromagnetic metal, respectively) considerably improves the device's input-output isolation in comparison with the symmetric S{sub 1}IS{sub 2}IS{sub 3} devices. These are just a few examples among many exciting works published in this focus issue.

  11. SS focused technology: Gateways and NOS's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartenstein, R.

    1985-01-01

    The extensions and enhancements of the fiber optic data bus technology supported by the Space Station Focused Technology Program are discussed. This includes the operating software for the network called the Network Operating System (NOS); gateways and bridges for multiple network topologies; and very large scale topology implimentations to shrink the size and power of the Bus Interface Unit (BIU) down to more manageable dimensions. CMOS is being investigated for the lower speed (parallel) logic. Gallium arsendide is being studied for the high speed (serial) logic.

  12. Heavy ion fusion final focus system

    SciTech Connect

    Krafft, G.

    1980-10-01

    A system for transporting and focusing a 10 GeV U/sup +4/ beam in the high current regime is outlined. First descriptions of the beam model and the beam parameters used in the design are given. The goals and requirements are then briefly discussed, and an explanation of the design approach follows. A description of the system itself is next, followed by some discussion of its tolerances, both to momentum and current deviations. A brief summary of simulation results is then included. This note concludes with a short description of possible modifications and an evaluation of the design.

  13. Variable focus photographic lens without mechanical movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiabi; Peng, Runling; Zhuang, Songlin

    2007-09-01

    A novel design of a zoom lens system without motorized movements is proposed. The lens system consists of a fixed lens and two double-liquid variable-focus lenses. The liquid lenses, made out of two immiscible liquids, are based on the principle of electrowetting: an effect controlling the wetting properties of a liquid on a solid by modifying the applied voltage at the solid-liquid interface. The structure and principle of the lens system are introduced in this paper. And detailed calculations and simulation examples are presented to predict how two liquid lenses are related to meet the basic requirements of zoom lenses.

  14. Colloid Coalescence with Focused X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Kim, J. T.; Je, J. H.; Yi, J. M.; Wang, S.; Lee, W.-K.

    2011-07-01

    We show direct evidence that focused x rays enable us to merge polymer colloidal particles at room temperature. This phenomenon is ascribed to the photochemical scission of colloids with x rays, reducing the molecular weight, glass transition temperature, surface tension, and viscosity of colloids. The observation of the neck bridge growth with time shows that the x-ray-induced colloid coalescence is analogous to viscoelastic coalescence. This finding suggests a feasible protocol of photonic nanofabrication by sintering or welding of polymers, without thermal damage, using x-ray photonics.

  15. Focus Issue on surface plasmon photonics introduction.

    PubMed

    Levy, Uriel; Berini, Pierre; Maier, Stefan A; Mortensen, N Asger

    2015-12-14

    The 7th International Conference on Surface Plasmon Photonics (SPP7) was held in Jerusalem, Israel from May 31st to June 5th, 2015. This independent series of biennial conferences is widely regarded as the premier series in the field, and the 7th edition maintained the tradition of excellence. This Focus Issue collects 23 papers related to research presented at SPP7. While this number is small compared to the total number of papers presented at the conference, the issue is representative and provides a good overview of the field at this point in time. PMID:26698998

  16. Cascaded Free-flow Isoelectric Focusing for Improved Focusing Speed and Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jacob W.; El-Ali, Jamil; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the first implementation of cascaded stages for a microfabricated free-flow isoelectric focusing device. Both analytical and computational models for IEF suggest device performance will be improved by utilizing multiple stages to reduce device residence time. These models are shown to be applicable by using focusing of small IEF markers as a demonstration. We also show focusing of fluorescently tagged proteins under different channel geometries, with the most efficient focusing occurring in the cascaded design, as predicted by theory. An additional aim of this work is to demonstrate the compatibility of cascaded FF-IEF with common bioanalytical tools. As an example, outlet fractions from cascaded FF-IEF were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Processing of whole cell lysate followed by immunoblotting for cell signaling markers demonstrates the reduction of albumin from samples, as well as the enrichment of apoptotic markers. PMID:17994708

  17. || 23.04.2015Focus specialization at IVP 1 Focus: Manufacturing Science -IVP

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    appliances Medical technology Aircraft industry Semi-finished parts (sheet metal, profiles, tubes, wire Thermal forming processes Development of high strength steels by ETG processes #12;|| Focus topic II

  18. Balancing technology-focused and solution-focused strategies in the high-tech industry

    E-print Network

    Bassalee, Wassim

    2013-01-01

    Companies in the high-tech industry can pursue a range of strategies around delivering value to their customers. A technology focus strategy enables organizations to offer to their customers products that feature best-in-class ...

  19. Link Detection in XML Documents: What about repeated links?

    E-print Network

    Kamps, Jaap

    Link Detection in XML Documents: What about repeated links? Junte Zhang University of Amsterdam kamps@uva.nl ABSTRACT Link detection is a special case of focused retrieval where potential links between documents have to be detected au- tomatically. The use case, as studied at INEX's Link the Wiki

  20. Human Body Detection in the RoboCup Rescue Scenario

    E-print Network

    Sukthankar, Gita Reese

    Human Body Detection in the RoboCup Rescue Scenario Shahram Bahadori, Luca Iocchi Dipartimento di in the recent years for human body detection (HBD) via visual information. The focus of this work environments. The paper both discusses problems arising in human body detection from visual information

  1. SUDS: An Infrastructure for Creating Dynamic Software Defect Detection Tools

    E-print Network

    Larson, Eric

    1 SUDS: An Infrastructure for Creating Dynamic Software Defect Detection Tools ERIC LARSON is a powerful infrastructure for creating dynamic software defect detection tools. It contains phases for both detection tools created with SUDS by focusing the instrumentation on types of defects, sources of data

  2. Air Monitoring for Hazardous Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C. Richard; Griffin, Timothy P.; Adams, Frederick W.; Naylor, Guy; Haskell, William; Floyd, David; Curley, Charles; Follistein, Duke W.

    2004-01-01

    The Hazardous Gas Detection Lab (HGDL) at Kennedy Space Center is involved in the design and development of instrumentation that can detect and quantify various hazardous gases. Traditionally these systems are designed for leak detection of the cryogenic gases used for the propulsion of the Shuttle and other vehicles. Mass spectrometers are the basis of these systems, which provide excellent quantitation, sensitivity, selectivity, response times and detection limits. A Table lists common gases monitored for aerospace applications. The first five gases, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are historically the focus of the HGDL.

  3. Diode and Final Focus Simulations for DARHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Thomas P.; Welch, Dale R.; Carlson, Randolph L.

    1997-05-01

    We have used the numerical simulation codes uc(ivory,) uc(iprop) and uc(pbguns) to simulate beam dynamics in the diode and final focus of the 4 kA, 20 MV DARHT linear accelerator. A low emittance 4 MV, 4 kA source for a 4-pulse injector was designed using uc(ivory) and uc(pbguns.) Due to the long pulse length (four 70 ns pulses over 1 ?sec), we have kept the field stress to < 200 kV/cm over the cathode electrode, and to ? 50 kV/cm on the radial insulator stacks. The normalized edge emittance produced by the diode optics is only ? 130 mm-mrad. In the final-focus region, we have used uc(iprop) to model the effect of ion emission from the target. The intense electric field of the beam at the 1 mm diameter focal spot produces substantial ion velocities, and, if the space-charge-limited current density can be supplied, significant focal spot degradation may occur due to ion space-charge. Calculations for the ITS test stand, which has a larger focal spot, show that the effect should be observable for H^+ and C^+ ion species. The effect may be lessened if there is insufficient ion density on the target to supply the space-charge-limited current density, or if the ion charge-to-mass ratio is sufficiently large.

  4. Planar Holographic Metasurfaces for Terahertz Focusing

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Astafev, Mikhail A.; Beruete, Miguel; Navarro-Cía, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Scientists and laymen alike have always been fascinated by the ability of lenses and mirrors to control light. Now, with the advent of metamaterials and their two-dimensional counterpart metasurfaces, such components can be miniaturized and designed with additional functionalities, holding promise for system integration. To demonstrate this potential, here ultrathin reflection metasurfaces (also called metamirrors) designed for focusing terahertz radiation into a single spot and four spaced spots are proposed and experimentally investigated at the frequency of 0.35 THz. Each metasurface is designed using a computer-generated spatial distribution of the reflection phase. The phase variation within 360 deg is achieved via a topological morphing of the metasurface pattern from metallic patches to U-shaped and split-ring resonator elements, whose spectral response is derived from full-wave electromagnetic simulations. The proposed approach demonstrates a high-performance solution for creating low-cost and lightweight beam-shaping and beam-focusing devices for the terahertz band. PMID:25583565

  5. Planar holographic metasurfaces for terahertz focusing.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Astafev, Mikhail A; Beruete, Miguel; Navarro-Cía, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Scientists and laymen alike have always been fascinated by the ability of lenses and mirrors to control light. Now, with the advent of metamaterials and their two-dimensional counterpart metasurfaces, such components can be miniaturized and designed with additional functionalities, holding promise for system integration. To demonstrate this potential, here ultrathin reflection metasurfaces (also called metamirrors) designed for focusing terahertz radiation into a single spot and four spaced spots are proposed and experimentally investigated at the frequency of 0.35 THz. Each metasurface is designed using a computer-generated spatial distribution of the reflection phase. The phase variation within 360 deg is achieved via a topological morphing of the metasurface pattern from metallic patches to U-shaped and split-ring resonator elements, whose spectral response is derived from full-wave electromagnetic simulations. The proposed approach demonstrates a high-performance solution for creating low-cost and lightweight beam-shaping and beam-focusing devices for the terahertz band. PMID:25583565

  6. SIAM Workshop: Focus on Diversity 2001

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-01

    The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) held a workshop focused on underrepresented minorities--graduate and undergraduate students, postdocs, and recent Ph.D's--in the mathematical and computational sciences on July 11, 2001, as part of the SIAM Annual Meeting in San Diego, California. The workshop was intended to accomplish several goals: (1) to a provide workshop focused on careers for and retention of minority students in the mathematical and computational sciences; (2) to bring together a mixture of people from different levels of professional experience, ranging from undergraduate students to senior scientists in an informal setting in order to share career experiences and options; (3) to provide an opportunity for minority graduate students, postdocs, and recent Ph.D's to present their research at an international meeting; (4) to expose undergraduate students to the many professional opportunities resulting from graduate degrees in science and mathematics; and (5) to encourage undergraduate and graduate students to speak frankly with each other about personal issues and experiences associated with pursuing a scientific career.

  7. Art exhibit focuses on African astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Connections between Africans and astronomy are the focus of a new exhibition in the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D. C. “African Cosmos: Stellar Arts,” which includes artwork, cultural items, and scientific displays from ancient to contemporary times, is the first major exhibit “that brings together arts and science focused on Africa's contribution to keen observations of the heavens over time,” curator Christine Mullen Kreamer said at a 20 June news briefing. Among the exhibit's nearly 100 objects are an ancient Egyptian mummy board that includes a representation of the sky goddess Nut, sculptures by the Dogon people of Mali depicting figures in relation to the cosmos, a video that uses data from two square degrees of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey, and a nearly floor-to-ceiling “Rainbow Serpent” constructed of plastic containers by Benin artist Hazoume. An untitled acrylic painting (Figure 1) by South African Gavin Jantjes evokes a myth of the Khoi San people of southern Africa, as it portrays a girl throwing evening fire embers into the night sky, where they remained as the Milky Way.

  8. Analysis of polyamidoamine dendrimers by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Upadhaya, Samik K; Swanson, Douglas R; Tomalia, Donald A; Sharma, Ajit

    2014-01-01

    Polyamidoamine dendrimers have been studied extensively for their potential applications in nanomedicine. Their uses as imaging, drug, and nucleic acid delivery agents are nearing clinical trials. As such, characterization of polyamidoamine dendrimers and their nano-devices is of immense importance for monitoring the efficiency of their synthesis, purity, and quality control of manufactured products as well as their in vivo behavior. We report here the analysis of polyamidoamine dendrimers possessing various cores and surface groups with a simple and inexpensive isoelectric focusing method. The isoelectric points of the dendrimers were readily determined from a calibration plot generated by running proteins with known pI values. The isoelectric points for various surface-modified polyamidoamine dendrimers ranged from 4 to 9. Polyamidoamine dendrimers possessing terminal hydroxyl groups gave a pI?>?7, while those with terminal carboxyl groups exhibit a pI?focusing thus offers another important tool for characterizing these nanomolecules. PMID:24247550

  9. Scanning focused refractive-index microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Teng-Qian; Ye, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Mei, Jian-Chun; Zhou, Wen-Yuan; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel scanning focused refractive-index microscopy (SFRIM) technique to obtain the refractive index (RI) profiles of objects. The method uses a focused laser as the light source, and combines the derivative total reflection method (DTRM), projection magnification, and scanning technique together. SFRIM is able to determine RIs with an accuracy of 0.002, and the central spatial resolution achieved is 1?µm, which is smaller than the size of the focal spot. The results of measurements carried out on cedar oil and a gradient-refractive-index (GRIN) lens agree well with theoretical expectations, verifying the accuracy of SFRIM. Furthermore, using SFRIM, to the best of our knowledge we have extracted for the first time the RI profile of a periodically modulated photosensitive gelatin sample. SFRIM is the first RI profile-resolved reflected light microscopy technique that can be applied to scattering and absorbing samples. SFRIM enables the possibility of performing RI profile measurements in a variety of applications, including optical waveguides, photosensitive materials and devices, photorefractive effect studies, and RI imaging in biomedical fields. PMID:25008374

  10. Time reversal focusing applied to lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J L; Wu, F; Fink, M

    1996-04-01

    Time reversal of ultrasonic field allows a very efficient approach to focusing pulsed ultrasonic waves through lossless inhomogeneous media. Time reversal mirrors (TRM) are made of large transducer arrays, allowing the incident acoustic field to be sampled, time reversed and re-emitted. Time reversal processing permits a choice of any temporal window to be time reversed, allowing operation in an iterative mode. In multitarget media, this process converges on the most reflective target, i.e., the dominant scatterer. In this paper, the time reversal process is applied to track, in real time, a moving gall bladder or kidney stone embedded in its surrounding medium. We investigate the feasibility of a piezoelectric shock wave generator in which the focal zone is moved electronically to track the stone during a lithotripsy treatment. We show that TRM allows us to obtain sharp focusing on one bright point of the stone. The time of flight profile is then determined and used in a least-mean-square method to calculate the spatial coordinates of the stone. PMID:8813030

  11. 21 CFR 312.86 - Focused FDA regulatory research.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Focused FDA regulatory research. 312.86 Section...Severely-debilitating Illnesses § 312.86 Focused FDA regulatory research. At the discretion of the agency, FDA may undertake focused regulatory...

  12. Origins of Life Home About this Focus Group

    E-print Network

    Williams, Loren

    Origins of Life Home About this Focus Group Directory OOL Seminar Series Publications Projects » Focus Groups » Current » Origins of Life Community Page » Yin and Yang: Polypeptide and Polynucleotide http://astrobiology2.arc.nasa.gov/focus-groups/current/origins

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors FOCUS ON DILUTE MAGNETIC SEMICONDUCTORS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Scott A.; Gallagher, Bryan

    2008-05-01

    This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is devoted to the materials science of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). A DMS is traditionally defined as a diamagnetic semiconductor doped with a few to several atomic per cent of some transition metal with unpaired d electrons. Several kinds of dopant dopant interactions can in principle couple the dopant spins leading to a ferromagnetic ground state in a dilute magnetic system. These include superexchange, which occurs principally in oxides and only between dopants with one intervening oxygen, and double exchange, in which dopants of different formal charges exchange an electron. In both of these mechanisms, the ferromagnetic alignment is not critically dependent on free carriers in the host semiconductor because exchange occurs via bonds. A third mechanism, discovered in the last few years, involves electrons associated with lattice defects that can apparently couple dopant spins. This mechanism is not well understood. Finally, the most desirable mechanism is carrier-mediated exchange interaction in which the dopant spins are coupled by itinerant electrons or holes in the host semiconductor. This mechanism introduces a fundamental link between magnetic and electrical transport properties and offers the possibility of new spintronic functionalities. In particular electrical gate control of ferromagnetism and the use of spin polarized currents to carry signals for analog and digital applications. The spin light emitting diode is a prototypical device of this kind that has been extensively used to characterize the extent of spin polarization in the active light emitting semiconductor heterostructure. The prototypical carrier mediated ferromagnetic DMS is Mn-doped GaAs. This and closely related narrow gap III V materials have been very extensively studied. Their properties are generally quite well understood and they have led to important insights into fundamental properties of ferromagnetic systems with strong spin-orbit coupling. They have also led to the demonstration of a wide range of novel phenomena including some, like tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance, which have subsequently been achieved in metal ferromagnetic systems. However despite considerable effort over many years the maximum Curie point achieved in (Ga,Mn)As is still less than 200 K. So unless some major new breakthrough is achieved these materials are unlikely to be of use for practical spin electronics technologies. In 2000, Dietl et al [1] published a seminal paper in which mean field theory was used to predict which of the common diamagnetic semiconductors would exhibit a Curie point above ambient if doped with 5 at.% Mn and a hole concentration of 3.5 × 1020 cm-3. Of the many host semiconductors simulated, only ZnO and GaN were predicted to exhibit a critical temperature in excess of 300 K. Since 2000, high-Tc DMS research has proliferated in both experimental and theoretical arenas. Many papers have been published containing claims of new DMS materials based largely on limited film growth, powder diffraction, and magnetometry. In these papers, a film which exhibits a hysteretic SQUID or VSM loop at 300 K and phase purity with only the host semiconductor detected by XRD are often claimed to be true ferromagnetic DMSs. Many of these papers are flawed because the criteria for a well-defined DMS are much more extensive. These include: (i) a random dopant distribution, (ii) a well-known and preferably unique charge state and preferentially a unique local structural environment for the dopant, (iii) a demonstrated coupling of the dopant spin to the host band structure, leading to spin polarization of the majority carriers, and (iv) a rational dependence of the saturation magnetization and Curie point on the magnetic dopant and carrier concentrations. Implicit in this list is that trivial causes of ferromagnetism, such as magnetic contamination and magnetic secondary phase formation, are eliminated. Yet, in many papers, the authors have not carried out the necessary control experiments and materials c

  14. Holistic video detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shaogang

    2007-10-01

    There are large amount of CCTV cameras collecting colossal amounts of video data about people and their behaviour. However, this overwhelming amount of data also causes overflow of information if their content is not analysed in a wider context to provide selective focus and automated alert triggering. To date, truly semantics based video analytic systems do not exist. There is an urgent need for the development of automated systems to monitor holistically the behaviours of people, vehicles and the whereabout of objects of interest in public space. In this work, we highlight the challenges and recent progress towards building computer vision systems for holistic video detection in a distributed network of multiple cameras based on object localisation, categorisation and tagging from different views in highly cluttered scenes.

  15. Optimally focused cold atom systems obtained using density-density correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Putra, Andika; Campbell, Daniel L.; Price, Ryan M.; Spielman, I. B.; De, Subhadeep; CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012

    2014-01-15

    Resonant absorption imaging is a common technique for detecting the two-dimensional column density of ultracold atom systems. In many cases, the system's thickness along the imaging direction greatly exceeds the imaging system's depth of field, making the identification of the optimally focused configuration difficult. Here we describe a systematic technique for bringing Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) and other cold-atom systems into an optimal focus even when the ratio of the thickness to the depth of field is large: a factor of 8 in this demonstration with a BEC. This technique relies on defocus-induced artifacts in the Fourier-transformed density-density correlation function (the power spectral density, PSD). The spatial frequency at which these artifacts first appear in the PSD is maximized on focus; the focusing process therefore both identifies and maximizes the range of spatial frequencies over which the PSD is uncontaminated by finite-thickness effects.

  16. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  17. Smoke detection

    DOEpatents

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-10-27

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  18. Smoke detection

    DOEpatents

    Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-11-05

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  19. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  20. Adjustable Focus Optical Correction Lens (AFOCL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Bruce R.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments along with the status of the characterization of a PLZT-based Adjustable Focus Optical Correction Lens (AFOCL) test device. The activities described in this report were undertaken by members of the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) under NASA Contract NAS8-00188. The effort was led by Dr. Bruce Peters as the Principal Investigator and supported by Dr. Patrick Reardon, Ms. Deborah Bailey, and graduate student Mr. Jeremy Wong. The activities outlined for the first year of the contract were to identify vendors and procure a test device along with performing the initial optical characterization of the test device. This activity has been successfully executed and test results are available and preliminary information was published at the SPIE Photonics West Conference in San Jose, January 2001. The paper, "Preliminary investigation of an active PLZT lens," was well received and generated response with several questions from the audience. A PLZT test device has been commercially procured from an outside vendor: The University of California in San Diego (UCSD) in partnership with New Interconnect Packaging Technologies (NIPT) Inc. The device has been subjected to several tests to characterize the optical performance of the device at wavelengths of interest. The goal was to evaluate the AFOCL similar to a conventional lens and measure any optical aberrations present due to the PLZT material as a deviation in the size of the diffraction limited spot (blur), the presence of diffracted energy into higher orders surrounding the focused spot (a variation in Strehl), and/or a variation or spread in the location of the focused energy away from the optical axis (a bias towards optical wedge, spherical, comma, or other higher order aberrations). While data has been collected indicative of the imaging quality of the AFOCL test device, it was not possible to fully characterize the optical performance of the AFOCL alone because there were significant optical distortions due to fabrication related issues.