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Sample records for detecting focused ultrasound-induced

  1. Hemorrhage detection during focused-ultrasound induced blood-brain-barrier opening by using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Chen, Jin-Chung; Hsu, Po-Hong; Wu, Xin-Yu; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2008-04-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound has been discovered to be able to locally and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which can be detected using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, side effects such as microhemorrhage, erythrocyte extravasations or even extensive hemorrhage may also occur. Although current contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI can be used to detect the changes in BBB permeability, its efficacy in detecting tissue hemorrhage after focused-ultrasound sonication remains limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging (MR-SWI) for identifying possible tissue hemorrhage associated with disruption of the BBB induced by focused ultrasound in a rat model. The brains of 42 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 107 sonications, either unilaterally or bilaterally. Localized BBB opening was achieved by delivering burst-mode focused ultrasound energy into brain tissue in the presence of microbubbles. Rats were studied by T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI techniques, as well as by SWI. Tissue changes were analyzed histologically and the extent of apoptosis was investigated with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick-end labeling method. The results demonstrated that SWI is more sensitive than standard T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI techniques in detecting hemorrhages after brain sonication. Longitudinal study showed that SWI is sensitive to the recovery process of the damage and, therefore, could provide important and complementary information to the conventional MR images. Potential applications such as drug delivery in the brain might be benefited. PMID:18313204

  2. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75 ± 0.26 (mean ± standard error of the mean). The authors’ spectroscopic investigation has shown that HIFU-treated tissues have a greater optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients than native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. In fact, at 720 and 845 nm, the ratio of the optical absorption coefficient of HIFU-treated tissues to that of native tissues was 1.13 and 1.17, respectively; on the other hand, the ratio of the reduced scattering coefficient of HIFU-treated tissues to that of native tissues was 13.22 and 14.67 at 720 and 845 nm, respectively. Consequently, HIFU-treated tissues have a higher effective attenuation coefficient and a lower light penetration depth than native tissues in the wavelength range 500–900 nm. Conclusions: Using a PA approach, HIFU-treated tissues interrogated at 720 and 845 nm optical wavelengths can be differentiated from untreated tissues. Based on the authors’ spectroscopic investigation, the authors conclude that the observed PA contrast between HIFU-induced thermal lesions and untreated tissue is due, in part, to the increase in the optical absorption coefficient, the reduced scattering coefficient and, therefore, the deposited laser energy fluence in HIFU-treated tissues.

  3. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging for the Detection of Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Lin, Wun-Hao; Ting, Chien-Yu; Chai, Wen-Yen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently and locally opened by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles (MBs). Various imaging modalities and contrast agents have been used to monitor this process. Unfortunately, direct ultrasound imaging of BBB opening with MBs as contrast agent is not feasible, due to the inability of MBs to penetrate brain parenchyma. However, FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by changes in blood flow and perfusion, suggesting the possibility of perfusion-based ultrasound imaging. Here we evaluated the use of MB destruction-replenishment, which was originally developed for analysis of ultrasound perfusion kinetics, for verifying and quantifying FUS-induced BBB opening. MBs were intravenously injected and the BBB was disrupted by 2 MHz FUS with burst-tone exposure at 0.5-0.7 MPa. A perfusion kinetic map was estimated by MB destruction-replenishment time-intensity curve analysis. Our results showed that the scale and distribution of FUS-induced BBB opening could be determined at high resolution by ultrasound perfusion kinetic analysis. The accuracy and sensitivity of this approach was validated by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Our successful demonstration of ultrasound imaging to monitor FUS-induced BBB opening provides a new approach to assess FUS-dependent brain drug delivery, with the benefit of high temporal resolution and convenient integration with the FUS device. PMID:25161701

  4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging for the detection of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Lin, Wun-Hao; Ting, Chien-Yu; Chai, Wen-Yen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently and locally opened by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles (MBs). Various imaging modalities and contrast agents have been used to monitor this process. Unfortunately, direct ultrasound imaging of BBB opening with MBs as contrast agent is not feasible, due to the inability of MBs to penetrate brain parenchyma. However, FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by changes in blood flow and perfusion, suggesting the possibility of perfusion-based ultrasound imaging. Here we evaluated the use of MB destruction-replenishment, which was originally developed for analysis of ultrasound perfusion kinetics, for verifying and quantifying FUS-induced BBB opening. MBs were intravenously injected and the BBB was disrupted by 2 MHz FUS with burst-tone exposure at 0.5-0.7 MPa. A perfusion kinetic map was estimated by MB destruction-replenishment time-intensity curve analysis. Our results showed that the scale and distribution of FUS-induced BBB opening could be determined at high resolution by ultrasound perfusion kinetic analysis. The accuracy and sensitivity of this approach was validated by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Our successful demonstration of ultrasound imaging to monitor FUS-induced BBB opening provides a new approach to assess FUS-dependent brain drug delivery, with the benefit of high temporal resolution and convenient integration with the FUS device. PMID:25161701

  5. Fast algorithm in estimating high intensity focused ultrasound induced lesions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng

    2010-01-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) has been emerging as a new and effective modality in non-invasive thermal ablation for cancers and solid tumours. Although a theoretical model is available for calculating thermal field and the consequent lesion production, its computation is too time-consuming (~ 1 day) for HIFU treatment planning on the site. In this study, several approximations were made on the BioHeat equation to estimate HIFU-induced lesions. Experimental results, estimation and theoretical calculation were compared with each other in a good agreement. However, the computation time for 25 treatment spots was only 1 min. Altogether, the developed fast algorithm provides an accurate outcome in a timely fashion and can push the wide acceptance of HIFU technology in clinics. PMID:21228456

  6. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound induced Gene Activation in Solid Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2006-05-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to activate trans-gene expression in a mouse tumor model was investigated. 4T1 cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously in the hind limbs of Balb/C mice and adenovirus luciferase gene vectors under the control of heat shock protein 70B promoter (Adeno-hsp70B-Luc) were injected intratumoraly for gene transfection. One day following the virus injection, the transfected tumors were heated to a peak temperature of 55, 65, 75, and 85°C, respectively, in 10s at multiple sites around the center of the tumor using a HIFU transducer operated at either 1.1-MHz (fundamental) or 3.3-MHz (3rd harmonic) frequency. Inducible luciferase gene expression was found to vary from 15-fold to 120-fold of the control group following 1.1-MHz HIFU exposure. The maximum gene activation was produced at a peak temperature of 65˜75°C one day following HIFU exposure and decayed gradually to baseline level within 7 days. The inducible gene activation produced by 3.3-MHz HIFU exposure (75°C-10s) was found to be comparable to that produced by hyperthermia (42°C-30min). Altogether, these results demonstrate the feasibility of using HIFU as a simple and versatile physical means to regulate trans-gene expression in vivo. This unique feature may be explored in the future for a synergistic combination of HIFU-induced thermal ablation with heat-induced gene therapy for improved cancer therapy.

  7. Microbubble type and distribution dependence of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shutao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Olumolade, Oluyemi; Feshitan, Jameel A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound, in the presence of microbubbles, has been used non-invasively to induce reversible blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening in both rodents and non-human primates. This study was aimed at identifying the dependence of BBB opening properties on polydisperse microbubble (all clinically approved microbubbles are polydisperse) type and distribution by using a clinically approved ultrasound contrast agent (Definity microbubbles) and in-house prepared polydisperse (IHP) microbubbles in mice. A total of 18 C57 BL/6 mice (n = 3) were used in this study, and each mouse was injected with either Definity or IHP microbubbles via the tail vein. The concentration and size distribution of activated Definity and IHP microbubbles were measured, and the microbubbles were diluted to 6 × 10(8)/mL before injection. Immediately after microbubble administration, mice were subjected to focused ultrasound with the following parameters: frequency = 1.5 MHz, pulse repetition frequency = 10 Hz, 1000 cycles, in situ peak rarefactional acoustic pressures = 0.3, 0.45 and 0.6 MPa for a sonication duration of 60 s. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was used to confirm BBB opening and allowed for image-based analysis. Permeability of the treated region and volume of BBB opening did not significantly differ between the two types of microbubbles (p > 0.05) at peak rarefractional acoustic pressures of 0.45 and 0.6 MPa, whereas IHP microbubbles had significantly higher permeability and opening volume (p < 0.05) at the relatively lower pressure of 0.3 MPa. The results from this study indicate that microbubble type and distribution could have significant effects on focused ultrasound-induced BBB opening at lower pressures, but less important effects at higher pressures, possibly because of the stable cavitation that governs the former. This difference may have become less significant at higher pressures, where inertial cavitation typically occurs. PMID:24239362

  8. Quasi-static elastography and its application in investigation of focused ultrasound induced tissue lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Ling, Tao; Shen, Yong; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Hairong; Li, Faqi

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of Focused Ultrasound (FUS) therapy has always been a key factor for a successful therapy. Although B-mode ultrasound has long been used for monitoring FUS therapy, the gray scale changes can not precisely reflect the lesion formation inside the tissue, while MR thermometry is considered to be too expensive. In this study, elastography had been performed using a commercial ultrasound system to investigate lesions produced by FUS irradiation in vitro. Several motion detection algorithms had been performed to improve the motion detection accuracy in the elastography. The effects of different algorithms on the motion detection accuracy were compared. Experimental results on the FUS induced lesion in swine muscle were introduced. The results indicated that lesions induced by small dosage of FUS inside the tissue can be successfully detected, which has a profound clinical meaning for the monitoring of FUS therapy.

  9. Low Dose Focused Ultrasound Induces Enhanced Tumor Accumulation of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sta Maria, Naomi S.; Barnes, Samuel R.; Weist, Michael R.; Colcher, David; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital antitumor role as part of the innate immune system. Efficacy of adoptive transfer of NK cells depends on their ability to recognize and target tumors. We investigated whether low dose focused ultrasound with microbubbles (ldbFUS) could facilitate the targeting and accumulation of NK cells in a mouse xenograft of human colorectal adenocarcinoma (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-expressing LS-174T implanted in NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIl2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mice) in the presence of an anti-CEA immunocytokine (ICK), hT84.66/M5A-IL-2 (M5A-IL-2). Human NK cells were labeled with an FDA-approved ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide particle, ferumoxytol. Simultaneous with the intravenous injection of microbubbles, focused ultrasound was applied to the tumor. In vivo longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified enhanced accumulation of NK cells in the ensonified tumor, which was validated by endpoint histology. Significant accumulation of NK cells was observed up to 24 hrs at the tumor site when ensonified with 0.50 MPa peak acoustic pressure ldbFUS, whereas tumors treated with at 0.25 MPa showed no detectable NK cell accumulation. These clinically translatable results show that ldbFUS of the tumor mass can potentiate tumor homing of NK cells that can be evaluated non-invasively using MRI. PMID:26556731

  10. Photoacoustic micro-imaging of focused ultrasound induced blood-brain-barrier opening in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Hsu, Po-Hung; Liu, Hao-Li; Wang, Churng-Ren Chris; Li, Meng-Lin

    2010-02-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) prevents most of the drug from transmitting into the brain tissue and decreases the treatment performance for brain disease. One of the methods to overcome the difficulty of drug delivery is to locally increase the permeability of BBB with high-intensity focused ultrasound. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of photoacoustic microscopy of focused-ultrasound induced BBB opening in a rat model in vivo with gold nanorods (AuNRs) as a contrast agent. This study takes advantage of the strong near-infrared absorption of AuNRs and their extravasation tendency from BBB opening foci due to their nano-scale size. Before the experiments, craniotomy was performed on rats to provide a path for focused ultrasound beam. Localized BBB opening at the depth of about 3 mm from left cortex of rat brains was achieved by delivering 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound energy into brain tissue in the presence of microbubbles. PEGylated AuNRs with a peak optical absorption at ~800 nm were then intravenously administered. Pre-scan prior to BBB disruption and AuNR injection was taken to mark the signal background. After injection, the distribution of AuNRs in rat brains was monitored up to 2 hours. Experimental results show that imaging AuNRs reveals BBB disruption area in left brains while there are no changes observed in the right brains. From our results, photoacoustic imaging plus AuNRs shows the promise as a novel monitoring strategy in identifying the location and variation of focused-ultrasound BBB-opening in a rat model.

  11. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P.; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer, and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5-14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13-24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n=10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n=10) with low fat content (4.8± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ~3 s and ~9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (−0.065±0.079%) were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (−0.124±0.037%). Using histology as a gold standard to classify mouse livers, US-TSI had a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 90%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis. PMID:24487698

  12. Neural immune modulation and immunotherapy assisted by focused ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has long been regarded as an immune-privileged site, with the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limiting the entering of systemic immune cells and components. Exposure of low-energy focused ultrasound (FUS) with the presence of microbubbles has been found to provide a temporary and targeted opening of the BBB without inflicting brain damage or inflammation, and is thus an attractive means of delivering CNS therapeutic agents and raising the potential for targeted CNS immunotherapy. Based on our recent studies on enhancing brain-tumor immune-related therapy via this mechanism, (1) we summarize current approaches using FUS-induced BBB opening to promote immune regulation and project potential directions for FUS-induced CNS immunotherapy. PMID:26378609

  13. Neuromodulation accompanying focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Chun; Liu, Hao-Li; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Chung-Yin; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) induces microbubble cavitation in the vasculature and temporarily disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to enable therapeutic agent delivery. However, it remains unclear whether FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by neuromodulation. Here we characterized the functional effects of FUS-induced BBB opening by measuring changes in somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses. Rats underwent burst-mode FUS (mechanical index (MI) of 0.3, 0.55 or 0.8) to the forelimb region in the left primary somatosensory cortex to induce BBB opening. Longitudinal measurements were followed for up to 1 week to characterize the temporal dynamics of neuromodulation. We observed that 0.8-MI FUS profoundly suppressed SSEP amplitude and prolonged latency, and this effect lasted 7 days. 0.55-MI FUS resulted in minimal and short-term suppression of SSEP for less than 60 minutes and didn’t affect latency. BOLD responses were also suppressed in an MI-dependent manner, mirroring the effect on SSEPs. Furthermore, repetitive delivery of 0.55-MI FUS every 3 days elicited no accumulative effects on SSEPs or tissue integrity. This is the first evidence that FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by reversible changes in neuron responses, and may provide valuable insight toward the development of FUS-induced BBB opening for clinical applications. PMID:26490653

  14. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5?m) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer. PMID:25043556

  15. Neuromodulation accompanying focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Liu, Hao-Li; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Chung-Yin; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) induces microbubble cavitation in the vasculature and temporarily disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to enable therapeutic agent delivery. However, it remains unclear whether FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by neuromodulation. Here we characterized the functional effects of FUS-induced BBB opening by measuring changes in somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses. Rats underwent burst-mode FUS (mechanical index (MI) of 0.3, 0.55 or 0.8) to the forelimb region in the left primary somatosensory cortex to induce BBB opening. Longitudinal measurements were followed for up to 1 week to characterize the temporal dynamics of neuromodulation. We observed that 0.8-MI FUS profoundly suppressed SSEP amplitude and prolonged latency, and this effect lasted 7 days. 0.55-MI FUS resulted in minimal and short-term suppression of SSEP for less than 60 minutes and didn't affect latency. BOLD responses were also suppressed in an MI-dependent manner, mirroring the effect on SSEPs. Furthermore, repetitive delivery of 0.55-MI FUS every 3 days elicited no accumulative effects on SSEPs or tissue integrity. This is the first evidence that FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by reversible changes in neuron responses, and may provide valuable insight toward the development of FUS-induced BBB opening for clinical applications. PMID:26490653

  16. Feasibility study on photoacoustic guidance for high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Phuc; Kim, Jeehyun; Ha, Kang-lyeol; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) application was evaluated to map punctured blood vessels thermally treated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for hemostasis. A single-element HIFU transducer with a central frequency of 2.0 MHz, was used to induce thermal hemostasis on the punctured arteries. The HIFU-treated lesion was imaged and localized by high-contrast PAI guidance. The results showed that complete hemostasis was achieved after treatment of the damaged blood vessels within 25 to 52 s at the acoustic intensity of 3600 W/cm2. The coagulation time for the animal artery was ˜20% longer than that of the phantom possibly due to a lower Young's modulus. The reconstructed PA images were able to distinguish the treated area from the surrounding tissue in terms of augmented signal amplitudes (up to three times). Spectroscopic studies demonstrated that the optimal imaging wavelength was found to be 700 nm in order to reconstruct high-contrast photoacoustic images on HIFU-treated lesions. The proposed PAI integrated with HIFU treatment can be a feasible application to obtain safe and rapid hemostasis for acute arterial bleeding.

  17. Neurons but not glial cells overexpress ubiquitin in the rat brain following focused ultrasound-induced opening of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A; Reinz, E; Fatar, M; Jenne, J; Hennerici, M G; Meairs, S

    2010-08-11

    Focused ultrasound-induced opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of ultrasound contrast agents is a promising strategy for a targeted drug delivery to the brain. The aim of our study was to identify whether brain molecular stress pathways are targeted by ultrasound treatment. Using an upper level of acoustic pressures in combination with microbubbles, which have been previously reported as reliable for BBB opening without causing tissue damage, we found that ultrasound leads to an increased ubiquitinylation of proteins in neuronal (11+/-3 ubiquitin-overexpressing cells per optical field) but not glial cells 6 h post-insonation, increasing to 16 (+/-4) labelled cells after 24 h. No changes in the expression of Hsp70 and Hsc70 were detected over 24 h. Ultrasound treatment was followed by limited apoptosis after 24 h (32+/-6 cleaved-caspase 3-positive cells per optical field) in the insonated areas. Only neurons were identified in the apoptotic population. Although these observations may not be applicable for all acoustic parameters useful for BBB opening, they demonstrate that insonation of the rat brain with the parameters used in our experiments is a useful tool for BBB opening and induces specific cellular stress response restricted to neuronal cells. PMID:20416361

  18. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P.; Kim, Kang

    2014-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using US-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5-14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13-24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n = 10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n = 10) with low fat content (4.8 ± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ˜3 s and ˜9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively, to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (-0.065 ± 0.079%) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (-0.124 ± 0.037%). Using histology as a gold standard to classify mouse livers, US-TSI had a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 90%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis.

  19. Permeability dependence study of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening at distinct pressures and microbubble diameters using DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Fotios; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Konofagou, Elisa

    2011-09-01

    Blood-brain barrier opening using focused ultrasound and microbubbles has been experimentally established as a noninvasive and localized brain drug delivery technique. In this study, the permeability of the opening is assessed in the murine hippocampus after the application of focused ultrasound at three different acoustic pressures and microbubble sizes. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the transfer rates were estimated, yielding permeability maps and quantitative K(trans) values for a predefined region of interest. The volume of blood-brain barrier opening according to the K(trans) maps was proportional to both the pressure and the microbubble diameter. A K(trans) plateau of ∼0.05 min(-1) was reached at higher pressures (0.45 and 0.60 MPa) for the larger sized bubbles (4-5 and 6-8 μm), which was on the same order as the K(trans) of the epicranial muscle (no barrier). Smaller bubbles (1-2 μm) yielded significantly lower permeability values. A small percentage (7.5%) of mice showed signs of damage under histological examination, but no correlation with permeability was established. The assessment of the blood-brain barrier permeability properties and their dependence on both the pressure and the microbubble diameter suggests that K(trans) maps may constitute an in vivo tool for the quantification of the efficacy of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening. PMID:21465543

  20. Targeted drug delivery with focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using acoustically-activated nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cherry C; Sheeran, Paul S; Wu, Shih-Ying; Olumolade, Oluyemi O; Dayton, Paul A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-12-28

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to locally, transiently and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus allowing targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the brain for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Currently, microbubbles are the only agents that have been used to facilitate the FUS-induced BBB opening. However, they are constrained within the intravascular space due to their micron-size diameters, limiting the delivery effect at or near the microvessels. In the present study, acoustically-activated nanodroplets were used as a new class of contrast agents to mediate FUS-induced BBB opening in order to study the feasibility of utilizing these nanoscale phase-shift particles for targeted drug delivery in the brain. Significant dextran delivery was achieved in the mouse hippocampus using nanodroplets at clinically relevant pressures. Passive cavitation detection was used in the attempt to establish a correlation between the amount of dextran delivered in the brain and the acoustic emission recorded during sonication. Conventional microbubbles with the same lipid shell composition and perfluorobutane core as the nanodroplets were also used to compare the efficiency of an FUS-induced dextran delivery. It was found that nanodroplets had a higher BBB opening pressure threshold but a lower stable cavitation threshold than microbubbles, suggesting that contrast agent-dependent acoustic emission monitoring was needed. A more homogeneous dextran delivery within the targeted hippocampus was achieved using nanodroplets without inducing inertial cavitation or compromising safety. Our results offered a new means of developing the FUS-induced BBB opening technology for potential extravascular targeted drug delivery in the brain, extending the potential drug delivery region beyond the cerebral vasculature. PMID:24096019

  1. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption enhances the delivery of cytarabine to the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Han-Qing; Lü, Lin; Wang, Feng; Luo, Yun; Lou, Shi-Feng

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles for targeted delivery of cytarabine to the brain. Sprague-Dawly rats (weighing 200-250 g) received focused ultrasound with intravenous injection microbubbles. At 0, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours (n=5 for each time point) after sonication, animals received intravenous administration of cytarabine at a normal dose of 4 mg/kg body weight. Additional five rats were given with a high dose (50 mg/kg body weight) of cytarabine alone. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral cytarabine were determined. FUS in conjunction with microbubbles caused a transient BBB opening. Sonication exposure promoted cytarabine accumulation at the sonicated site. Animals injected with a normal dose of cytarabine 2 hours after sonication had similar concentrations of cerebral cytarabine compared to those with higher cytarabine without sonication. FUS can temporarily open the BBB and thus facilitate the penetration of systemic cytarabine into the brain. PMID:23174101

  2. Feasibility of optoacoustic visualization of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in live tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-03-01

    A 3-D optoacoustic imaging system was used to visualize thermal lesions produced in vivo using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). A 7.5-MHz, surgical, focused transducer with a radius of curvature of 35 mm and an aperture diameter of 23 mm was used to generate HIFU. A pulsed laser, which could operate at 755 nm and 1064 nm, was used to illuminate excised tissue and mice using a bifurcated fiber bundle resulting in two wide beams of light. Tomographic images were obtained while the specimens were rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezo-composite transducers. These images were then combined to reconstruct 3-D volume images (voxel resolution 0.5 mm), which were acquired before and after HIFU exposure. In vivo optoacoustic images acquired at 1064 nm provided visualization of HIFU lesions. The lesion was indicated by a negative optoacoustic contrast. The molecular nature of such contrast may possibly be associated with reduction of the optical absorption due to reduced concentration of blood, tissue dehydration, denaturation of proteins and porphyrins, and reduction of thermoacoustic efficiency in the thermally treated tissue. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential of optoacoustic imaging to assess and monitor the progress of HIFU therapy.

  3. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion. PMID:24264647

  4. Permeability assessment of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, F.; Tung, Y.-S.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles has been shown to successfully open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the mouse brain. In this study, we compute the BBB permeability after opening in vivo. The spatial permeability of the BBB-opened region was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). The DCE-MR images were post-processed using the general kinetic model (GKM) and the reference region model (RRM). Permeability maps were generated and the Ktrans values were calculated for a predefined volume of interest in the sonicated and the control area for each mouse. The results demonstrated that Ktrans in the BBB-opened region (0.02 ± 0.0123 for GKM and 0.03 ± 0.0167 min-1 for RRM) was at least two orders of magnitude higher when compared to the contra-lateral (control) side (0 and 8.5 × 10-4 ± 12 × 10-4 min-1, respectively). The permeability values obtained with the two models showed statistically significant agreement and excellent correlation (R2 = 0.97). At histological examination, it was concluded that no macroscopic damage was induced. This study thus constitutes the first permeability assessment of FUS-induced BBB opening using DCE-MRI, supporting the fact that the aforementioned technique may constitute a safe, non-invasive and efficacious drug delivery method.

  5. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening to enhance temozolomide delivery for glioblastoma treatment: a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chu, Po-Chun; Wang, Hay-Yan Jack; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Lee, Pei-Yun; Tseng, I-Chou; Feng, Li-Ying; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-monitored focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption to enhance Temozolomide (TMZ) delivery for improving Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) treatment. MRI-monitored FUS with microbubbles was used to transcranially disrupt the BBB in brains of Fisher rats implanted with 9L glioma cells. FUS-BBB opening was spectrophotometrically determined by leakage of dyes into the brain, and TMZ was quantitated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma by LC-MS\\MS. The effects of treatment on tumor progression (by MRI), animal survival and brain tissue histology were investigated. Results demonstrated that FUS-BBB opening increased the local accumulation of dyes in brain parenchyma by 3.8-/2.1-fold in normal/tumor tissues. Compared to TMZ alone, combined FUS treatment increased the TMZ CSF/plasma ratio from 22.7% to 38.6%, reduced the 7-day tumor progression ratio from 24.03 to 5.06, and extended the median survival from 20 to 23 days. In conclusion, this study provided preclinical evidence that FUS BBB-opening increased the local concentration of TMZ to improve the control of tumor progression and animal survival, suggesting its clinical potential for improving current brain tumor treatment. PMID:23527068

  6. Effect of ultrasound contrast agent dose on the duration of focused-ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Ho, Feng-Ming; Chang, Chi-Hong

    2009-12-01

    It has been shown that focused ultrasound (FUS) is capable of noninvasive and reversible disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) at target regions when applied in the presence of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of UCA dose on the reversibility of BBB disruption induced by the same acoustical power of FUS. Sonications were applied at an ultrasound frequency of 1 MHz with a 5% duty cycle and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The brains of 66 male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sonications with three doses of UCA. BBB integrity was evaluated via femoral vein injection of Evans Blue (EB) while the rats were anesthetized. The relationship between UCA dose and the region of EB extravasation was evaluated at an acoustic power of 1.43 W. The BBB disruption, as indexed by the amount of EB extravasation, was the largest immediately after the sonications. The quantity of Evans blue extravasation decreased as a function of time at various UCA doses. This study demonstrates that the appropriate dose of UCA not only enhance the BBB opening but also effectively aid in controlling the duration of BBB disruption. PMID:20000948

  7. Permeability assessment of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, F; Tung, Y-S; Konofagou, E E

    2010-09-21

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles has been shown to successfully open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the mouse brain. In this study, we compute the BBB permeability after opening in vivo. The spatial permeability of the BBB-opened region was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). The DCE-MR images were post-processed using the general kinetic model (GKM) and the reference region model (RRM). Permeability maps were generated and the K(trans) values were calculated for a predefined volume of interest in the sonicated and the control area for each mouse. The results demonstrated that K(trans) in the BBB-opened region (0.02 +/- 0.0123 for GKM and 0.03 +/- 0.0167 min(-1) for RRM) was at least two orders of magnitude higher when compared to the contra-lateral (control) side (0 and 8.5 x 10(-4) +/- 12 x 10(-4) min(-1), respectively). The permeability values obtained with the two models showed statistically significant agreement and excellent correlation (R(2) = 0.97). At histological examination, it was concluded that no macroscopic damage was induced. This study thus constitutes the first permeability assessment of FUS-induced BBB opening using DCE-MRI, supporting the fact that the aforementioned technique may constitute a safe, non-invasive and efficacious drug delivery method. PMID:20736501

  8. Low-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Induces Reversal of Tumor-Induced T Cell Tolerance and Prevents Immune Escape.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanmay; Quinn, Thomas J; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Basu, Indranil; Partanen, Ari; Tom, Wolfgang A; Macian, Fernando; Guha, Chandan

    2016-02-15

    Immune responses against cancer cells are often hindered by immunosuppressive mechanisms that are developed in the tumor microenvironment. Induction of a hyporesponsive state in tumor Ag-specific T cells is one of the major events responsible for the inability of the adaptive immune system to mount an efficient antitumor response and frequently contributes to lessen the efficacy of immunotherapeutic approaches. Treatment of localized tumors by focused ultrasound (FUS) is a minimally invasive therapy that uses a range of input energy for in situ tumor ablation through the generation of thermal and cavitation effect. Using a murine B16 melanoma tumor model, we show that a variant of FUS that delivers a reduced level of energy at the focal point and generates mild mechanical and thermal stress in target cells has the ability to increase immunogenic presentation of tumor Ags, which results in reversal of tumor-induced T cell tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the combination of nonablative low-energy FUS with an ablative hypofractionated radiation therapy results in synergistic control of primary tumors and leads to a dramatic reduction in spontaneous pulmonary metastases while prolonging recurrence-free survival only in immunocompetent mice. PMID:26755821

  9. Quantitative observation of focused-ultrasound-induced vascular leakage and deformation via fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Lin, Kung-Min; Lin, Yu-Xiang; Lin, Tzu-Han; Chang, Ting-Chia; Lee, Jiann-Der; Liu, Hao-Li

    2013-10-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is a recently discovered noninvasive technique for local and temporal enhancement of vascular permeability, which facilitates drug delivery from the vessels into the surrounding tissue. However, exposure to FUS at a high intensity may cause permanent damage. To investigate the effects of the FUS treatment on blood vessels, we propose to use fluorescein angiography (FA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for real-time observation of the diffusion of fluorescence dye from blood vessels and to evaluate the morphological changes of the vessels in vivo. With time-resolved FA imaging, the relationship between the exposed power and the improved permeability of the vessels can be assessed according to the enhancement of the fluorescent intensity due to the dye leakage. Furthermore, the variation of the time-resolved fluorescent intensities can be used to identify the occurrence of dye leakage. In contrast, OCT can be implemented for the reconstruction of tissue microstructures. To quantitatively evaluate the morphological changes of the vessels after the FUS exposure with OCT, a new algorithm was proposed to estimate the vessel area based on the comparison of backscattering properties resulting from the tissue and vascular structures. Results showed that the vessel area increased as the exposed power increased, and the area became significantly larger at a higher FUS exposure power of 10 W. In conclusion, integrated FA and OCT observation can be potentially effective for monitoring the outcome and investigating the effects of FUS treatment. PMID:23812607

  10. Pressure and microbubble size dependence study of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening reversibility in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Vlachos, Fotios; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Feshitan, Jameel; Borden, Mark; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-10-01

    Most currently available therapeutic compounds cannot cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and their delivery to the brain remains a critical impediment. Focused Ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to open the BBB locally, non-invasively and reversibly. In this study, we investigated the dependence of BBB opening's reversibility timeline on the peak-rarefactional pressure (PRP) varied from 0.30 MPa to 0.60 MPa and the microbubble size in mice in vivo. The microbubbles used were monodispersed with diameters of 1-2, 4-5 or 6-8 microns. The contrast agent's (Gd) diffusion was used to quantify the opening, in T1-weighted high resolution MR images acquired on the day of sonication and up to five days thereafter. The volume of opening was found to increase with both pressure and microbubble diameter. The duration required for closing was found to be proportional to the volume of opening on the day of opening, and ranged from 24 hours, for the 1-2 um and 0.45 MPa, to 5 days for the 6-8 um and higher PRPs. Overall, larger bubbles did not show significant differences, and the BBB-opened region reduced steadily and radially towards the focal region until complete reinstatement was achieved.

  11. Microbubble-size dependence of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, James J; Feshitan, Jameel A; Baseri, Babak; Wang, Shougang; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Borden, Mark A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of neurological agents is severely limited, because large compounds do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Focused ultrasound (FUS) sonication in the presence of microbubbles has been shown to temporarily open the BBB, allowing systemically administered agents into the brain. Until now, polydispersed microbubbles (1-10 microm in diameter) were used, and, therefore, the bubble sizes better suited for inducing the opening remain unknown. Here, the FUS-induced BBB opening dependence on microbubble size is investigated. Bubbles at 1-2 and 4-5 microm in diameter were separately size-isolated using differential centrifugation before being systemically administered in mice (n = 28). The BBB opening pressure threshold was identified by varying the peak-rarefactional pressure amplitude. BBB opening was determined by fluorescence enhancement due to systemically administered, fluorescent-tagged, 3-kDa dextran. The identified threshold fell between 0.30 and 0.46 MPa in the case of 1-2 microm bubbles and between 0.15 and 0.30 MPa in the 4-5 microm case. At every pressure studied, the fluorescence was greater with the 4-5 mum than with the 1-2 microm bubbles. At 0.61 MPa, in the 1-2 microm bubble case, the fluorescence amount and area were greater in the thalamus than in the hippocampus. In conclusion, it was determined that the FUS-induced BBB opening was dependent on both the size distribution in the injected microbubble volume and the brain region targeted. PMID:19846365

  12. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening for non-viral, non-invasive, and targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Yin; Hsieh, Han-Yi; Pitt, William G; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Tseng, I-Chou; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2015-08-28

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure in the presence of microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and is an emerging technique for non-invasive brain therapeutic agent delivery. Given the potential to deliver large molecules into the CNS via this technique, we propose a reliable strategy to synergistically apply FUS-BBB opening for the non-invasive and targeted delivery of non-viral genes into the CNS for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we developed a gene-liposome system, in which the liposomes are designed to carry plasmid DNA (pDNA, containing luciferase reporter gene) to form a liposomal-plasmid DNA (LpDNA) complex. Pulsed FUS exposure was delivered to induce BBB opening (500-kHz, burst length=10ms, 1% duty cycle, PRF=1Hz). The longitudinal expression of luciferase was quantitated via an in vivo imaging system (IVIS). The reporter gene expression level was confirmed via immunoblotting, and histological staining was used to identify transfected cells via fluorescent microscopy. In a comparison of gene transduction efficiency, the LpDNA system showed better cell transduction than the pDNA system. With longitudinal observation of IVIS monitoring, animals with FUS treatment showed significant promotion of LpDNA release into the CNS and demonstrated enhanced expression of genes upon sonication with FUS-BBB opening, while both the luciferase and GDNF protein expression were successfully measured via Western blotting. The gene expression peak was observed at day 2, and the gene expression level was up to 5-fold higher than that in the untreated hemisphere (compared to a 1-fold increase in the direct-inject positive-control group). The transfection efficiency was also found to be LpDNA dose-dependent, where higher payloads of pDNA resulted in a higher transfection rate. Immunoblotting and histological staining confirmed the expression of reporter genes in glial cells as well as astrocytes. This study suggests that IV administration of LpDNA in combination with FUS-BBB opening can provide effective gene delivery and expression in the CNS, demonstrating the potential to achieve non-invasive and targeted gene delivery for treatment of CNS diseases. PMID:26071631

  13. In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in mice.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Vlachos, Fotios; Choi, James J; Deffieux, Thomas; Selert, Kirsten; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-10-21

    The in vivo cavitation response associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening as induced by transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles was studied in order to better identify the underlying mechanism in its noninvasive application. A cylindrically focused hydrophone, confocal with the FUS transducer, was used as a passive cavitation detector (PCD) to identify the threshold of inertial cavitation (IC) in the presence of Definity® microbubbles (mean diameter range: 1.1-3.3 µm, Lantheus Medical Imaging, MA, USA). A vessel phantom was first used to determine the reliability of the PCD prior to in vivo use. A cerebral blood vessel was simulated by generating a cylindrical channel of 610 µm in diameter inside a polyacrylamide gel and by saturating its volume with microbubbles. The microbubbles were sonicated through an excised mouse skull. Second, the same PCD setup was employed for in vivo noninvasive (i.e. transdermal and transcranial) cavitation detection during BBB opening. After the intravenous administration of Definity® microbubbles, pulsed FUS was applied (frequency: 1.525 or 1.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 0.15-0.60 MPa, duty cycle: 20%, PRF: 10 Hz, duration: 1 min with a 30 s interval) to the right hippocampus of twenty-six (n = 26) mice in vivo through intact scalp and skull. T1 and T2-weighted MR images were used to verify the BBB opening. A spectrogram was generated at each pressure in order to detect the IC onset and duration. The threshold of BBB opening was found to be at a 0.30 MPa peak-rarefactional pressure in vivo. Both the phantom and in vivo studies indicated that the IC pressure threshold had a peak-rarefactional amplitude of 0.45 MPa. This indicated that BBB opening may not require IC at or near the threshold. Histological analysis showed that BBB opening could be induced without any cellular damage at 0.30 and 0.45 MPa. In conclusion, the cavitation response could be detected without craniotomy in mice and IC may not be required for BBB opening at relatively low pressures. PMID:20876972

  14. In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Vlachos, Fotios; Choi, James J.; Deffieux, Thomas; Selert, Kirsten; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2010-10-01

    The in vivo cavitation response associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening as induced by transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles was studied in order to better identify the underlying mechanism in its noninvasive application. A cylindrically focused hydrophone, confocal with the FUS transducer, was used as a passive cavitation detector (PCD) to identify the threshold of inertial cavitation (IC) in the presence of Definity® microbubbles (mean diameter range: 1.1-3.3 µm, Lantheus Medical Imaging, MA, USA). A vessel phantom was first used to determine the reliability of the PCD prior to in vivo use. A cerebral blood vessel was simulated by generating a cylindrical channel of 610 µm in diameter inside a polyacrylamide gel and by saturating its volume with microbubbles. The microbubbles were sonicated through an excised mouse skull. Second, the same PCD setup was employed for in vivo noninvasive (i.e. transdermal and transcranial) cavitation detection during BBB opening. After the intravenous administration of Definity® microbubbles, pulsed FUS was applied (frequency: 1.525 or 1.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 0.15-0.60 MPa, duty cycle: 20%, PRF: 10 Hz, duration: 1 min with a 30 s interval) to the right hippocampus of twenty-six (n = 26) mice in vivo through intact scalp and skull. T1 and T2-weighted MR images were used to verify the BBB opening. A spectrogram was generated at each pressure in order to detect the IC onset and duration. The threshold of BBB opening was found to be at a 0.30 MPa peak-rarefactional pressure in vivo. Both the phantom and in vivo studies indicated that the IC pressure threshold had a peak-rarefactional amplitude of 0.45 MPa. This indicated that BBB opening may not require IC at or near the threshold. Histological analysis showed that BBB opening could be induced without any cellular damage at 0.30 and 0.45 MPa. In conclusion, the cavitation response could be detected without craniotomy in mice and IC may not be required for BBB opening at relatively low pressures.

  15. Overview of ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.; Simpson, Douglas G.; Frizzell, Leon A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zachary, James F.

    2003-10-01

    It is well documented that ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage can occur in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs, and monkeys. Our own experimental studies have focused on mice, rats, and pigs as animal models. The characteristics of the lesions produced in mice, rats and pigs were similar to those described in studies by our research group and others, suggesting a common pathogenesis for the initiation and propagation of the lesions at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Five experimental in vivo studies have been conducted to evaluate whether cavitation is responsible for ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage. The studies evaluated the dependencies of hydrostatic pressure, frequency, pulse polarity, contrast agents and lung inflation, and the results of each study appeared inconsistent with the hypothesis that the mechanism for the production of a lung hemorrhage was inertial cavitation. Other dependencies evaluated included beam width, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration, exposure duration, and animal species and age. The thresholds for producing ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage, in general, were less than the FDA's regulatory limit of a Mechanical Index (MI) of 1.9. Further, the MI does not appear to provide a risk-based index for lung hemorrhage. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. R01EB02641.

  16. Paramagnetic perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) microbubbles for the induction of focused-ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening and concurrent MR and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Liu, Hao-Li; Su, Chia-Hao; Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Weng, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Po-Hung; Huang, Sheng-Min; Wu, Shih-Yen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents new albumin-shelled Gd-DTPA microbubbles (MBs) that can concurrently serve as a dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound (US) imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to assist blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening and detect intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during focused ultrasound brain drug delivery. Perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were prepared with a mean diameter of 2320 nm and concentration of 2.903×10(9) MBs ml(-1) using albumin-(Gd-DTPA) and by sonication with perfluorocarbon (C(3)F(8)) gas. The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were then centrifuged and the procedure was repeated until the free Gd(3+) ions were eliminated (which were detected by the xylenol orange sodium salt solution). The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were also characterized and evaluated both in vitro and in vivo by US and MR imaging. Focused US was used with the albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs to induce disruption of the BBB in 18 rats. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence MR imaging. Heavy T(2)*-weighted 3D fast low-angle shot sequence MR imaging was used to detect ICH. In vitro US imaging experiments showed that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can significantly enhance the US contrast in T(1)-, T(2)- and T(2)*-weighted MR images. The r(1) and r(2) relaxivities for Gd-DTPA were 7.69 and 21.35 s(-1)mM(-1), respectively, indicating that the MBs represent a positive contrast agent in T(1)-weighted images. In vivo MR imaging experiments on 18 rats showed that focused US combined with albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can be used to both induce disruption of the BBB and detect ICH. To compare the signal intensity change between pure BBB opening and BBB opening accompanying ICH, albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MB imaging can provide a ratio of 5.14 with significant difference (p = 0.026), whereas Gd-DTPA imaging only provides a ratio of 2.13 and without significant difference (p = 0.108). The results indicate that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs have potential as a US/MR dual-modality contrast agent for BBB opening and differentiating focused-US-induced BBB opening from ICH, and can monitor the focused ultrasound brain drug delivery process. PMID:22510713

  17. Paramagnetic perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) microbubbles for the induction of focused-ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening and concurrent MR and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Liu, Hao-Li; Su, Chia-Hao; Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Weng, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Po-Hung; Huang, Sheng-Min; Wu, Shih-Yen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents new albumin-shelled Gd-DTPA microbubbles (MBs) that can concurrently serve as a dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound (US) imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to assist blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening and detect intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during focused ultrasound brain drug delivery. Perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were prepared with a mean diameter of 2320 nm and concentration of 2.903×109 MBs ml-1 using albumin-(Gd-DTPA) and by sonication with perfluorocarbon (C3F8) gas. The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were then centrifuged and the procedure was repeated until the free Gd3+ ions were eliminated (which were detected by the xylenol orange sodium salt solution). The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were also characterized and evaluated both in vitro and in vivo by US and MR imaging. Focused US was used with the albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs to induce disruption of the BBB in 18 rats. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence MR imaging. Heavy T2*-weighted 3D fast low-angle shot sequence MR imaging was used to detect ICH. In vitro US imaging experiments showed that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can significantly enhance the US contrast in T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted MR images. The r1 and r2 relaxivities for Gd-DTPA were 7.69 and 21.35 s-1mM-1, respectively, indicating that the MBs represent a positive contrast agent in T1-weighted images. In vivo MR imaging experiments on 18 rats showed that focused US combined with albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can be used to both induce disruption of the BBB and detect ICH. To compare the signal intensity change between pure BBB opening and BBB opening accompanying ICH, albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MB imaging can provide a ratio of 5.14 with significant difference (p = 0.026), whereas Gd-DTPA imaging only provides a ratio of 2.13 and without significant difference (p = 0.108). The results indicate that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs have potential as a US/MR dual-modality contrast agent for BBB opening and differentiating focused-US-induced BBB opening from ICH, and can monitor the focused ultrasound brain drug delivery process.

  18. A quantitative pressure and microbubble-size dependence study of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening reversibility in vivo using MRI.

    PubMed

    Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Vlachos, Fotios; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2012-03-01

    Focused ultrasound in conjunction with the systemic administration of microbubbles has been shown to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) selectively, noninvasively and reversibly. In this study, we investigate the dependence of the BBB opening's reversibility on the peak-rarefactional pressure (0.30-0.60 MPa) as well as the microbubble size (diameters of 1-2, 4-5, or 6-8 μm) in mice using contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted (CE-T(1)) MR images (9.4 T). Volumetric measurements of the diffusion of Gd-DTPA-BMA into the brain parenchyma were used for the quantification of the BBB-opened region on the day of sonication and up to 5 days thereafter. The volume of opening was found to increase with both pressure and microbubble diameter. The duration required for closing was found to be proportional to the volume of opening on the day of opening, and ranged from 24 h, for the smaller microbubbles, to 5 days at high peak-rarefactional pressures. Overall, larger bubbles did not show significant differences. Also, the extent of BBB opening decreased radially towards the focal region until the BBB's integrity was restored. In the cases where histological damage was detected, it was found to be highly correlated with hyperintensity on the precontrast T(1) images. PMID:21858862

  19. Dependence of the reversibility of focused- ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening on pressure and pulse length in vivo.

    PubMed

    Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2013-11-01

    The most challenging aspect of intravenously-administered drugs currently developed to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases is their impermeability through the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a specialized vasculature system protecting the brain microenvironment. Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to open the BBB locally, noninvasively, and reversibly. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of FUS (center frequency: 1.5 MHz) pulse length (PL), ranging here from 67 μs to 6.7 ms, on the physiology of the FUS-induced BBB opening. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to quantify the permeability changes using transfer rate (Ktrans) mapping, the volume of BBB opening (VBBB) and the reversibility timeline of the FUS-induced BBB opening, with the systemic administration of microbubbles at different acoustic pressures, ranging from 0.30 to 0.60 MPa. Permeability and volume of opening were both found to increase with the acoustic pressure and pulse length. At 67-μs PL, the opening pressure threshold was 0.45 MPa, with BBB opening characteristics similar to those induced with 0.60 MPa at the same PL, as well as with 0.67-ms PL/0.30 MPa. On average, these cases had Ktrans = 0.0049 ± 0.0014 min-1 and VBBB = 3.7 ± 4.3 mm(3), and closing occurred within 8 h. The 6.7-ms PL/0.30 MPa induced similar opening with 0.67-ms PL/0.45 MPa, and a closing timeline of 24 to 48 h. On average, Ktrans was 0.0091 ± 0.0029 min-1 and VBBB was 14.13 ± 7.7 mm(3) in these cases. Also, there were no significant differences between the 6.7-ms PL/0.45 MPa, 0.67-ms PL/0.60 MPa and 6.7-ms PL/0.60 MPa cases, yielding on average a Ktrans of 0.0100 ± 0.0023 min-1 and VBBB equal to 20.1 ± 5.7 mm(3). Closing occurred within 48 to 72 h in these cases. Stacked histograms of the Ktrans provided further insight to the nonuniform spatial distribution of permeability changes and revealed a correlation with the closing timeline. These results also suggest a beneficial complementary relationship between the elongation of the PL and the decrease of the peak negative acoustic pressures, and vice versa. Linear regression between Ktrans and VBBB showed a good correlation fit. Also, the time required for closing linearly increased with VBBB. The volume rate of decrease was measured to be 11.4 ± 4.0 mm3 per day, suggesting that the closing timeline could be predicted from the initial volume of opening. Finally, no histological damage was detected in any of the cases 7 d post-FUS, indicating the safety of the methodology and parameters used. PMID:24158283

  20. Gold-nanorod contrast-enhanced photoacoustic micro-imaging of focused-ultrasound induced blood-brain-barrier opening in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Liu, Hao-Li; Hsu, Po-Hung; Lin, Chia-Yu; Wang, Churng-Ren Chris; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Li, Meng-Lin

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we develop a novel photoacoustic imaging technique based on gold nanorods (AuNRs) for quantitatively monitoring focused-ultrasound (FUS) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening in a rat model in vivo. This study takes advantage of the strong near-infrared absorption (peak at ≈ 800 nm) of AuNRs and the extravasation tendency from BBB opening foci due to their nano-scale size to passively label the BBB disruption area. Experimental results show that AuNR contrast-enhanced photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) successfully reveals the spatial distribution and temporal response of BBB disruption area in the rat brains. The quantitative measurement of contrast enhancement has potential to estimate the local concentration of AuNRs and even the dosage of therapeutic molecules when AuNRs are further used as nano-carrier for drug delivery or photothermal therapy. The photoacoustic results also provide complementary information to MRI, being helpful to discover more details about FUS induced BBB opening in small animal models. PMID:22734752

  1. Pharmacodynamic analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-monitored focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening for drug delivery to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Hsieh, Han-Yi; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2013-01-01

    Microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound (FUS) can enhance the delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain for brain tumor treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of brain tumor conditions on the distribution and dynamics of small molecule leakage into targeted regions of the brain after FUS-BBB opening. A total of 34 animals were used, and the process was monitored by 7T-MRI. Evans blue (EB) dye as well as Gd-DTPA served as small molecule substitutes for evaluation of drug behavior. EB was quantified spectrophotometrically. Spin-spin (R1) relaxometry and area under curve (AUC) were measured by MRI to quantify Gd-DTPA. We found that FUS-BBB opening provided a more significant increase in permeability with small tumors. In contrast, accumulation was much higher in large tumors, independent of FUS. The AUC values of Gd-DTPA were well correlated with EB delivery, suggesting that Gd-DTPA was a good indicator of total small-molecule accumulation in the target region. The peripheral regions of large tumors exhibited similar dynamics of small-molecule leakage after FUS-BBB opening as small tumors, suggesting that FUS-BBB opening may have the most significant permeability-enhancing effect on tumor peripheral. This study provides useful information toward designing an optimized FUS-BBB opening strategy to deliver small-molecule therapeutic agents into brain tumors. PMID:23607093

  2. Noninvasive localized delivery of Herceptin to the mouse brain by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Manabu; McDannold, Nathan; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-08-01

    Antibody-based anticancer agents are promising chemotherapeutic agents. Among these agents, Herceptin (trastuzumab), a humanized anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/c-erbB2) monoclonal antibody, has been used successfully in patients with breast cancer. However, in patients with brain metastasis, the blood-brain barrier limits its use, and a different delivery method is needed to treat these patients. Here, we report that Herceptin can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the mouse central nervous system through the blood-brain barrier under image guidance by using an MRI-guided focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier disruption technique. The amount of Herceptin delivered to the target tissue was correlated with the extent of the MRI-monitored barrier opening, making it possible to estimate indirectly the amount of Herceptin delivered. Histological changes attributable to this procedure were minimal. This method may represent a powerful technique for the delivery of macromolecular agents such as antibodies to treat patients with diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:16868082

  3. Noninvasive localized delivery of Herceptin to the mouse brain by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Manabu; McDannold, Nathan; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-08-01

    Antibody-based anticancer agents are promising chemotherapeutic agents. Among these agents, Herceptin (trastuzumab), a humanized anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/c-erbB2) monoclonal antibody, has been used successfully in patients with breast cancer. However, in patients with brain metastasis, the blood-brain barrier limits its use, and a different delivery method is needed to treat these patients. Here, we report that Herceptin can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the mouse central nervous system through the blood-brain barrier under image guidance by using an MRI-guided focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier disruption technique. The amount of Herceptin delivered to the target tissue was correlated with the extent of the MRI-monitored barrier opening, making it possible to estimate indirectly the amount of Herceptin delivered. Histological changes attributable to this procedure were minimal. This method may represent a powerful technique for the delivery of macromolecular agents such as antibodies to treat patients with diseases of the central nervous system. brain tumor | microbubble

  4. Pharmacodynamic and therapeutic investigation of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening for enhanced temozolomide delivery in glioma treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chen, Ju-Yu; Wang, Hay-Yan Jack; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure with the presence of microbubbles has been shown to transiently open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and thus has potential to enhance the delivery of various kinds of therapeutic agents into brain tumors. The purpose of this study was to assess the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of FUS-BBB opening for enhanced temozolomide (TMZ) delivery in glioma treatment. FUS exposure with microbubbles was delivered to open the BBB of nude mice that were either normal or implanted with U87 human glioma cells. Different TMZ dose regimens were tested, ranging from 2.5 to 25 mg/kg. Plasma and brain samples were obtained at different time-points ranging from 0.5 to 4 hours, and the TMZ concentration within samples was quantitated via a developed LC-MS/MS procedure. Tumor progression was followed with T2-MRI, and animal survival and brain tissue histology were conducted. Results demonstrated that FUS-BBB opening caused the local TMZ accumulation in the brain to increase from 6.98 to 19 ng/mg. TMZ degradation time in the tumor core was found to increase from 1.02 to 1.56 hours. Improved tumor progression and animal survival were found at different TMZ doses (up to 15% and 30%, respectively). In conclusion, this study provides preclinical evidence that FUS-BBB opening increases the local concentration of TMZ to improve the control of tumor progression and animal survival, suggesting the potential for clinical application to improve current brain tumor treatment. PMID:25490097

  5. Pharmacodynamic and Therapeutic Investigation of Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening for Enhanced Temozolomide Delivery in Glioma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chen, Ju-Yu; Wang, Hay-Yan Jack; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure with the presence of microbubbles has been shown to transiently open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and thus has potential to enhance the delivery of various kinds of therapeutic agents into brain tumors. The purpose of this study was to assess the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of FUS-BBB opening for enhanced temozolomide (TMZ) delivery in glioma treatment. FUS exposure with microbubbles was delivered to open the BBB of nude mice that were either normal or implanted with U87 human glioma cells. Different TMZ dose regimens were tested, ranging from 2.5 to 25 mg/kg. Plasma and brain samples were obtained at different time-points ranging from 0.5 to 4 hours, and the TMZ concentration within samples was quantitated via a developed LC-MS/MS procedure. Tumor progression was followed with T2-MRI, and animal survival and brain tissue histology were conducted. Results demonstrated that FUS-BBB opening caused the local TMZ accumulation in the brain to increase from 6.98 to 19 ng/mg. TMZ degradation time in the tumor core was found to increase from 1.02 to 1.56 hours. Improved tumor progression and animal survival were found at different TMZ doses (up to 15% and 30%, respectively). In conclusion, this study provides preclinical evidence that FUS-BBB opening increases the local concentration of TMZ to improve the control of tumor progression and animal survival, suggesting the potential for clinical application to improve current brain tumor treatment. PMID:25490097

  6. Analysis of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier permeability in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease using two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Alison; Nhan, Tam; Moffatt, Clare; Klibanov, A L; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-10-28

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) can cause temporary, localized increases in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability for effective drug delivery to the brain. In pre-clinical models of Alzheimer's disease, FUS has successfully been used to deliver therapeutic agents and endogenous therapeutic molecules to the brain leading to plaque reduction and improved behavior. However, prior to moving to clinic, questions regarding how the compromised vasculature in Alzheimer's disease responds to FUS need to be addressed. Here, we used two-photon microscopy to study changes in FUS-mediated BBB permeability in transgenic (TgCRND8) mice and their non-transgenic littermates. A custom-built ultrasound transducer was attached to the skull, covering a cranial window. Methoxy-X04 was used to visualize amyloid deposits in vivo. Fluorescent intravascular dyes were used to identify leakage from the vasculature after the application of FUS. Dye leakage occurred in both transgenic and non-transgenic mice at similar acoustic pressures but exhibited different leakage kinetics. Calculation of the permeability constant demonstrated that the vasculature in the transgenic mice was much less permeable after FUS than the non-transgenic littermates. Further analysis demonstrated that the change in vessel diameter following FUS was lessened in amyloid coated vessels. These data suggest that changes in vessel diameter may be directly related to permeability and the presence of amyloid plaque may reduce the permeability of a vessel after FUS. This study indicates that the FUS parameters used for the delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain may need to be adjusted for application in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25107692

  7. Magnetic-resonance imaging for kinetic analysis of permeability changes during focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening and brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chai, Wen-Yen; Chu, Po-Chun; Tsai, Meng-Yen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Wai, Yau-Yau; Liu, Hao-Li

    2014-10-28

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with the presence of microbubbles has been shown to induce transient and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules which normally cannot penetrate into the brain. The success of FUS brain-drug delivery relies on its integration with in-vivo imaging to monitor kinetic change of therapeutic molecules into the brain. In this study, we developed a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) technique for kinetic analysis of delivered molecules during FUS-BBB opening. Three kinetic parameters (Ktrans, Ve, Kep) were characterized dynamically to describe BBB-permeability at two FUS exposure conditions (0.4 or 0.8MPa) over 24h. Ktrans, defined as the influx volume transfer constant from plasma to EES, and Ve, the EES volume fraction, were both found to be pressure-dependent. Ktrans and Ve showed a peak increase of 0.0086-0.0131min(-1) (for 0.4-0.8MPa pressure), and 0.0431-0.0692, respectively, immediately after FUS exposure. Both parameters subsequently decreased exponentially as a function of time, with estimated half-lives of decay of 2.89-5.3 and 2.2-4.93h, respectively. The kinetics of Kep, defined as the efflux rate constant from the extracellular extravascular space (EES) to the plasma, were complementary to Ktrans, with an initial decrease from 0.2010 to 0.1901min(-1) followed by a significantly longer recovery time (half-life of 17.39-99.92h). Our observations strongly supported the existence of imbalanced and mismatched kinetics of influx (Ktrans) and efflux (Kep) between the plasma and EES, indicating the existence of directional permeability during FUS-BBB opening. We further showed that kinetic change determined by DCE-MRI correlated well with the concentration of Evans Blue (EB)-albumin (coefficient of 0.74-0.89). These findings suggest that MRI kinetic monitoring may serve as an alternative method for in-vivo monitoring of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) change of therapeutic agents during drug delivery to the brain, and provide useful information for future optimization of FUS-BBB opening. PMID:24969355

  8. Automated detection of ocular focus.

    PubMed

    Hunter, David G; Nusz, Kevin J; Gandhi, Nainesh K; Quraishi, Imran H; Gramatikov, Boris I; Guyton, David L

    2004-01-01

    We characterize objectively the state of focus of the human eye, utilizing a bull's eye photodetector to detect the double-pass blur produced from a point source of light. A point fixation source of light illuminates the eye. Fundus-reflected light is focused by the optical system of the eye onto a bull's eye photodetector [consisting of an annulus (A) and a center (C) of approximately equal active area]. To generate focus curves, C/A is measured with a range of trial lenses in the light path. Three human eyes and a model eye are studied. In the model eye, the focus curve showed a sharp peak with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of +/-0.25 D. In human eyes, the ratio C/A was >4 at best focus in all cases, with a FWHM of +/-1 D. The optical apparatus detects ocular focus (as opposed to refractive error) in real time. A device that can assess focus rapidly and objectively will make it possible to perform low-cost, mass screening for focusing problems such as may exist in children at risk for amblyopia. PMID:15447031

  9. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  10. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  11. Detecting blood-brain barrier disruption within minimal hemorrhage following transcranial focused ultrasound: a correlation study with contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jun-Cheng; Wu, Sheng-Kai; Lin, Win-Li; Tseng, Wen-Yih I

    2011-03-01

    Focused ultrasound combined with an intravascular ultrasound contrast agent can induce transient disruption of the blood-brain barrier, and the blood-brain barrier disruption can be detected by contrast-enhanced MRI. There is, however, no study investigating the ability of various MR methods to detect focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption within minimal hemorrhage. Sonication was applied to 15 rat brains with four different doses of ultrasound contrast agent (0, 10, 30, or 50 μL/kg), and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin echo, gradient echo images, and longitudinal relaxation rate mapping along with effective transverse relaxation time-weighted and susceptibility-weighted images were acquired. Volume-of-interest-based and threshold-based analyses were performed to quantify the contrast enhancement, which was then correlated with the ultrasound contrast agent dose and with the amount of Evans blue extravasation. Both effective transverse relaxation time-weighted and susceptibility-weighted images did not detect histology-proved intracranial hemorrhage at 10 μL/kg, but MRI failed to detect mild intracranial hemorrhage at 30 μL/kg. All tested sequences showed detectable contrast enhancement increasing with ultrasound contrast agent dose. In correlating with Evans blue extravasation, the gradient echo sequence was slightly better than the spin echo sequence and was comparable to longitudinal relaxation rate mapping. In conclusion, both gradient echo and spin echo sequences were all reliable in indicating the degree of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption within minimal hemorrhage. PMID:20941741

  12. LESIONS OF ULTRASOUND-INDUCED LUNG HEMORRHAGE ARE NOT CONSISTENT WITH THERMAL INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, James F.; Blue, James P.; Miller, Rita J.; Ricconi, Brian J.; Eden, J. Gary; O'Brien, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal injury, a potential mechanism of ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage, was studied by comparing lesions induced by an infrared laser (a tissue-heating source) with those induced by pulsed ultrasound. A 600-mW continuous-wave CO2 laser (wavelength ∼10.6 μm) was focused (680-μm beamwidth) on the surface of the lungs of rats for a duration between 10 to 40 s; ultrasound beamwidths were between 310 and 930 μm. After exposure, lungs were examined grossly and then processed for microscopic evaluation. Grossly, lesions induced by laser were somewhat similar to those induced by ultrasound; however, microscopically, they were dissimilar. Grossly, lesions were oval, red to dark red and extended into subjacent tissue to form a cone. The surface was elevated, but the center of the laser-induced lesions was often depressed. Microscopically, the laser-induced injury consisted of coagulation of tissue, cells and fluids, whereas injury induced by ultrasound consisted solely of alveolar hemorrhage. These results suggest that ultrasound-induced lung injury is most likely not caused by a thermal mechanism. PMID:17112962

  13. Preface to the Focus Issue: Chaos Detection Methods and Predictability

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17–21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue.

  14. Preface to the Focus Issue: Chaos Detection Methods and Predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17-21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue.

  15. Characterization of ultrasound-induced pulmonary capillary hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Suresh, M. V.; Dou, Chunyan; Yu, B; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2014-01-01

    Routine pulmonary ultrasound for diagnosis of disease or injury relies on interpretation of image features, such as comet-tail artifacts, which can also be indicative of the poorly understood phenomenon of ultrasound-induced pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH). Evans blue extraction and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were evaluated for assessment of PCH induced by ultrasound scanning. Rats anesthetized with ketamine with or without xylazine received sham or scanning for 5 min with a 7.6 MHz linear array. Evans blue extraction and BAL albumin measurements failed to demonstrate significant increases for scanning, even though the induction of comet-tail artifacts was significant. BAL cell counts had an insignificant increase relative to shams at a near-threshold Mechanical Index (MI) of 0.52 (P=0.07), but a highly significant increase at MI=0.9 (P=0.001). The possibility of xylazine-induced elevated albumin was tested, but no significant decrease was found for sham or scanned rats with ketamine-only anesthesia. Interestingly, without xylazine, the widths of comet-tail artifacts in the ultrasound images were significantly smaller (P=0.001) and cell counts in BAL fluid also were reduced (P=0.014). The BAL cell-count method provides a valuable additional means of PCH quantification. PMID:24583360

  16. Attention focusing and anomaly detection in systems monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the potential for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an anomaly occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing. The technique involves reasoning about the distance between two frequency distributions, and is used to detect both anomalous system parameters and 'broken' causal dependencies. These two forms of information together isolate the locus of anomalous behavior in the system being monitored.

  17. Visualization of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles using the synchrotron x-ray Analyzer Based Imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Izadifar, Mohammad; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Dean

    2014-12-01

    Observing cavitation bubbles deep within tissue is very difficult. The development of a method for probing cavitation, irrespective of its location in tissues, would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. A synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, which is capable of detecting cavitation bubbles induced in water by a sonochemistry system, is reported here; this could possibly be extended to the study of therapeutic ultrasound in tissues. The two different x-ray imaging techniques of Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI) and phase contrast imaging (PCI) were examined in order to detect ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles. Cavitation was not observed by PCI, however it was detectable with ABI. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at six different acoustic power levels and six different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The results indicate the potential utility of this technique for cavitation studies in tissues, but it is time consuming. This may be improved by optimizing the imaging method.

  18. Preface to the Focus Issue: chaos detection methods and predictability.

    PubMed

    Gottwald, Georg A; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17-21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue. PMID:24985454

  19. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  20. Computer-assisted detection of epileptiform focuses on SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorczyk, Dawid; Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dorota; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2010-09-01

    Epilepsy is a common nervous system disease often related to consciousness disturbances and muscular spasm which affects about 1% of the human population. Despite major technological advances done in medicine in the last years there was no sufficient progress towards overcoming it. Application of advanced statistical methods and computer image analysis offers the hope for accurate detection and later removal of an epileptiform focuses which are the cause of some types of epilepsy. The aim of this work was to create a computer system that would help to find and diagnose disorders of blood circulation in the brain This may be helpful for the diagnosis of the epileptic seizures onset in the brain.

  1. Detection of Contrast Agents: Plane Wave Versus Focused Transmission.

    PubMed

    Viti, Jacopo; Vos, Hendrik J; Jong, Nico de; Guidi, Francesco; Tortoli, Piero

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging provides a cost-effective diagnostic tool to assess tissue perfusion and vascular pathologies. However, excessive transmission (TX) levels may negatively impact both uniform diffusion and survival rates of contrast agents, limiting their density and thus their echogenicity. Contrast detection methods with both high sensitivity and low-contrast destruction rate are thus essential to maintain diagnostic capabilities. Plane-wave TX with a high number of compounding angles has been suggested to produce good quality images at pressure levels that do not destroy UCA. In this paper, we performed a quantitative evaluation of detection efficacy of flowing UCA with either traditional focused scanning or ultrafast plane-wave imaging. Amplitude modulation (AM) at nondestructive pressure levels was implemented in the ULA-OP ultrasound research platform. The influence of the number of compounding angles, peak-negative pressure, and flow speed on the final image quality was investigated. Results show that the images obtained by compounding multiple angled plane waves offer a greater contrast (up to a 12-dB increase) with respect to focused AM. This increase is attributed mainly to noise reduction caused by the coherent summation in the compounding step. Additionally, we show that highly sensitive detection is already achieved with a limited compounding number ( ), thus suggesting the feasibility of continuous contrast monitoring at a high frame rate. This capability is essential to properly detect contrast agents flowing at high speed, as an excessive angle compounding is shown to be destructive for the contrast signal, as the UCA motion quickly causes loss of correlation between consecutive echoes. PMID:26642451

  2. Rotating flux-focusing eddy current probe for flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks about circular fasteners and other circular inhomogeneities in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil, The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. By rotating the probe in a path around a circular fastener such as a rivet while maintaining a constant distance between the probe and the center of a rivet, the signal due to current flow about the rivet can be held constant. Any further changes in the current distribution, such as due to a fatigue crack at the rivet joint, can be detected as an increase in the output voltage above that due to the flow about the rivet head.

  3. Ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Konofagou, Elisa E; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Choi, James; Deffieux, Thomas; Baseri, Babak; Vlachos, Fotios

    2012-06-01

    Over 4 million U.S. men and women suffer from Alzheimer's disease; 1 million from Parkinson's disease; 350,000 from multiple sclerosis (MS); and 20,000 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Worldwide, these four diseases account for more than 20 million patients. In addition, aging greatly increases the risk of neurodegenerative disease. Although great progress has been made in recent years toward understanding of these diseases, few effective treatments and no cures are currently available. This is mainly due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that allows only 5% of the 7000 small-molecule drugs available to treat only a tiny fraction of these diseases. On the other hand, safe and localized opening of the BBB has been proven to present a significant challenge. Of the methods used for BBB disruption shown to be effective, Focused Ultrasound (FUS), in conjunction with microbubbles, is the only technique that can induce localized BBB opening noninvasively and regionally. FUS may thus have a huge impact in trans-BBB brain drug delivery. The primary objective in this paper is to elucidate the interactions between ultrasound, microbubbles and the local microenvironment during BBB opening with FUS, which are responsible for inducing the BBB disruption. The mechanism of the BBB opening in vivo is monitored through the MRI and passive cavitation detection (PCD), and the safety of BBB disruption is assessed using H&E histology at distinct pressures, pulse lengths and microbubble diameters. It is hereby shown that the BBB can be disrupted safely and transiently under specific acoustic pressures (under 0.45 MPa) and microbubble (diameter under 8 μm) conditions. PMID:22201586

  4. Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Choi, James; Deffieux, Thomas; Baseri, Babak; Vlachos, Fotios

    2014-01-01

    Over 4 million U.S. men and women suffer from Alzheimer's disease; 1 million from Parkinson's disease; 350,000 from multiple sclerosis (MS); and 20,000 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Worldwide, these four diseases account for more than 20 million patients. In addition, aging greatly increases the risk of neurodegenerative disease. Although great progress has been made in recent years toward understanding of these diseases, few effective treatments and no cures are currently available. This is mainly due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that allows only 5% of the 7000 small-molecule drugs available to treat only a tiny fraction of these diseases. On the other hand, safe and localized opening of the BBB has been proven to present a significant challenge. Of the methods used for BBB disruption shown to be effective, Focused Ultrasound (FUS), in conjunction with microbubbles, is the only technique that can induce localized BBB opening noninvasively and regionally. FUS may thus have a huge impact in trans-BBB brain drug delivery. The primary objective in this paper is to elucidate the interactions between ultrasound, microbubbles and the local microenvironment during BBB opening with FUS, which are responsible for inducing the BBB disruption. The mechanism of the BBB opening in vivo is monitored through the MRI and passive cavitation detection (PCD), and the safety of BBB disruption is assessed using H&E histology at distinct pressures, pulse lengths and microbubble diameters. It is hereby shown that the BBB can be disrupted safely and transiently under specific acoustic pressures (under 0.45 MPa) and microbubble (diameter under 8 μm) conditions. PMID:22201586

  5. Detection of Axial Cracks Using Focused Guided Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S.; Lowe, M.; Ratassepp, M.; Brett, C.

    2010-02-01

    The interaction of fundamental torsional mode guided waves with axially aligned defects in pipes has been investigated. This follows previously presented work involving similarly aligned defects in plates. Results from both finite element computer models and real pipes are presented and the data shows good agreement. The dependence of reflection coefficient on crack length was measured for both through thickness and part depth (80% through thickness) axially aligned notches. In particular the use of guided wave focusing has been examined. Focusing is necessary to improve the reflection coefficient from axially aligned defects, as it has been shown that the signals are very weak. The Common Source Method (CSM) of focusing has been applied which makes it possible to apply focusing to previously collected data. The results show that the reflection coefficient is approximately doubled when focusing is employed. However this is still insufficient to locate axial cracking in most practical cases.

  6. Ultrasonic Sensitivity of Strain-Insensitive Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors and Evaluation of Ultrasound-Induced Strain

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Hiroshi; Kumakura, Kenji; Ogihara, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    In conventional ultrasound detection in structures, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is glued on or embedded in the structure. However, application of strain to the structure can influence the sensitivity of the FBG toward ultrasound and can prevent its effective detection. An FBG can work as a strain-insensitive ultrasound sensor when it is not directly glued to the monitored structure, but is instead applied to a small thin plate to form a mobile sensor. Another possible configuration is to affix an FBG-inscribed optical fiber without the grating section attached to the monitored structure. In the present study, sensitivity to ultrasound propagated through an aluminum plate was compared for a strain-insensitive FBG sensor and an FBG sensor installed in a conventional manner. Strains induced by ultrasound from a piezoelectric transducer and by quasi-acoustic emission of a pencil lead break were also quantitatively evaluated from the response amplitude of the FBG sensor. Experimental results showed that the reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio for ultrasound detection with strain-insensitive FBG sensors, relative to traditionally-installed FBG sensors, was only 6 dB, and the ultrasound-induced strain varied within a range of sub-micron strains. PMID:22163523

  7. Focal Delivery of AAV2/1-transgenes Into the Rat Brain by Localized Ultrasound-induced BBB Opening.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Angelika; Reinz, Eileen; Leuchs, Barbara; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen; Fatar, Marc; Geers, Bart; Lentacker, Ine; Hennerici, Michael G; de Smedt, Stefaan C; Meairs, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of drugs and macromolecules to the central nervous system (CNS) is hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Several approaches have been used to overcome this hindrance to facilitate the treatment of various CNS diseases. We now present results showing that chimeric adeno-associated virus 2/1 (AAV2/1) particles containing the coding region for the LacZ gene are efficiently delivered into the rat brain upon intravenous (IV) administration after BBB opening by focused ultrasound in the presence of vascular acoustic resonators. We show that the transgene is correctly and efficiently expressed in cells located in the neighborhood of the insonated focus, especially in the vicinity of small vessels and capillaries. Histochemical LacZ staining allows the identification of large amounts of cells expressing the enzymatically active protein. Using double immunofluorescence (IF) with antibodies against tubulinIII and bacterial LacZ, we identified these cells to be mostly neurons. A small proportion of the transduced cells was recognized as glial cells, reacting positive in the IF with antibodies against astrocytic markers. These results demonstrate that our approach allows a very specific, localized, and efficient expression of intravenously administered transgenes in the brain of rats upon ultrasound-induced BBB opening.Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e73; doi:10.1038/mtna.2012.64; published online 19 February 2013. PMID:23423361

  8. Realigning the Focus of Plagiarism Detection Using "Plagiarismdetect.com"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabapathy, Elangkeeran A/L; Rahim, Rozlan Abd; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which "plagiarismdetect.com," an internet help/tool to detect plagiarism helps academicians tackle the ever-growing problem of plagiarism. Concerned with term papers, essays and most of the time with full-blown research reports, a tool like "plagiarismdetect.com" may…

  9. Ultrasound-induced cellular uptake of plasmonic gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, Alexander; Wilson, Katheryne; Homan, Kimberly; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2011-03-01

    Delivery of contrast agents and their interaction with cells is emerging as an important tool in cancer imaging and therapy. An alternative to traditional molecular targeting schemes that induce endocytotic uptake of contrast agents in cells is presented here. Specifically, the application of high-intensity, focused ultrasound (HIFU) was used to enhance uptake of gold nanorods in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. A significant increase was observed in gold nanorod uptake when cells were incubated with nanorods and treated with HIFU. Additionally, inclusion of liquid-filled, perfluorocarbon (PFC) microdroplets in cell samples incubated with nanorods and treated with HIFU exhibited greater uptake of gold over those samples exposed to HIFU without microdroplets. Furthermore, the level of acoustic pressure required to increase nanoparticle uptake did not significantly decrease cell viability. Therefore, improved intracellular delivery of nanoparticle contrast agents is possible using HIFU without compromising cell viability. Since nanoparticle delivery is mechanically induced, this method can apply to a broad range of cancer imaging and therapy applications.

  10. JAFFA: High sensitivity transcriptome-focused fusion gene detection.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Nadia M; Majewski, Ian J; Oshlack, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and, as such, structural alterations and fusion genes are common events in the cancer landscape. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is a powerful method for profiling cancers, but current methods for identifying fusion genes are optimised for short reads. JAFFA (https://github.com/Oshlack/JAFFA/wiki) is a sensitive fusion detection method that outperforms other methods with reads of 100 bp or greater. JAFFA compares a cancer transcriptome to the reference transcriptome, rather than the genome, where the cancer transcriptome is inferred using long reads directly or by de novo assembling short reads. PMID:26019724

  11. Detection of liquid hazardous molecules using linearly focused Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Soo Gyeong; Chung, Jin Hyuk

    2013-05-01

    In security, it is an important issue to analyze hazardous materials in sealed bottles. Particularly, prompt nondestructive checking of sealed liquid bottles in a very short time at the checkpoints of crowded malls, stadiums, or airports is of particular importance to prevent probable terrorist attack using liquid explosives. Aiming to design and fabricate a detector for liquid explosives, we have used linearly focused Raman spectroscopy to analyze liquid materials in transparent or semi-transparent bottles without opening their caps. Continuous lasers with 532 nm wavelength and 58 mW/130 mW beam energy have been used for the Raman spectroscopy. Various hazardous materials including flammable liquids and explosive materials have successfully been distinguished and identified within a couple of seconds. We believe that our technique will be one of suitable methods for fast screening of liquid materials in sealed bottles.

  12. The Influence of Dexmedetomidine on Ultrasound-induced Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Dong, Zhihong; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-04-01

    The use of xylazine, a veterinary sedative, with ketamine for rat anesthesia has been shown to enhance the pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) effect of diagnostic ultrasound. This study was undertaken to assess whether the sedative/analgesic dexmedetomidine, commonly used in the intensive care unit, can also enhance ultrasound-induced PCH. Female Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized with various combinations of ketamine plus xylazine or dexmedetomidine. The dosage of dexmedetomidine was reduced for some groups to doses relevant to human clinical usage. The right thorax of all rats was shaved and depilated for ultrasound transmission and the rats were scanned with diagnostic ultrasound using a 7.6-MHz linear array in a 38°C de-gassed water bath. There was no significant difference in PCH results for the recommended anesthetic dosages of ketamine plus xylazine and ketamine plus 500 μg/kg dexmedetomidine. The varied doses of dexmedetomidine enhanced the PCH, even for the lowest dose of 4 μg/kg, equivalent to a low human dose of 0.64 μg/kg. There was no significant difference in PCH for 500 μg/kg dexmedetomidine with or without ketamine. Further research is needed to identify and characterize other factors that may modify the patient risk from ultrasound-induced PCH. PMID:26774471

  13. A phantom for visualization of three-dimensional drug release by ultrasound-induced mild hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chun-Yen; Kruse, Dustin; Seo, Jai Woong; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound-induced mild hyperthermia has advantages for noninvasive, localized and controlled drug delivery. In this study, a tissue-mimicking agarose-based phantom with a thermally sensitive indicator was developed for studying the spatial drug delivery profile using ultrasound-induced mild hyperthermia. Methods: Agarose powder, regular evaporated milk, Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (DPBS), n-propanol, and silicon carbide powder were homogeneously mixed with low temperature sensitive liposomes (LTSLs) loaded with a self-quenched near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye. A dual-mode linear array ultrasound transducer was used for insonation at 1.54 MHz with a total acoustic power and acoustic pressure of 2.0 W and 1.5 MPa, respectively. After insonation, the dye release pattern in the phantom was quantified based on optical images, and the three-dimensional release profile was reconstructed and analyzed. A finite-difference time-domain-based algorithm was developed to simulate both the temperature distribution and spatial dye diffusion as a function of time. Finally, the simulated dye diffusion patterns were compared to experimental measurements. Results: Self-quenching of the fluorescent dye in DPBS was substantial at a concentration of 6.25 × 10−2 mM or greater. The transition temperature of LTSLs in the phantom was 35 °C, and the release reached 90% at 37 °C. The simulated temperature for hyperthermia correlated with the thermocouple measurements with a mean error between 0.03 ± 0.01 and 0.06 ± 0.02 °C. The R2 value between the experimental and simulated spatial extent of the dye diffusion, defined by the half-peak level in the elevation, lateral and depth directions, was 0.99 (slope = 1.08), 0.95 (slope = 0.99), and 0.80 (slope = 1.04), respectively, indicating the experimental and simulated dye release profiles were similar. Conclusions: The combination of LTSLs encapsulating a fluorescent dye and an optically transparent phantom is useful for visualizing and modeling drug release in vitro following ultrasound-induced mild hyperthermia. The coupled temperature simulation and dye-diffusion simulation tools were validated with the experimental system and can be used to optimize the thermal dose and spatial and temporal dye release pattern. PMID:23927360

  14. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation. PMID:25660883

  15. Three-Dimensional Simulation of Ultrasound-Induced Microalgal Cell Disruption.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Yuan, W; Hale, Andy

    2016-03-01

    The three-dimensional distribution (x, y, and z) of ultrasound-induced microalgal cell disruption in a sonochemical reactor was predicted by solving the Helmholtz equation using a three-dimensional acoustic module in the COMSOL Multiphysics software. The simulated local ultrasound pressure at any given location (x, y, and z) was found to correlate with cell disruption of a freshwater alga, Scenedesmus dimorphus, represented by the change of algal cell particle/debris concentration, chlorophyll-a fluorescence density (CAFD), and Nile red stained lipid fluorescence density (LFD), which was also validated by the model reaction of potassium iodide oxidation (the Weissler reaction). Furthermore, the effect of ultrasound power intensity and processing duration on algal cell disruption was examined to address the limitation of the model. PMID:26660670

  16. Ultrasensitive detection of microbial cells using magnetic focus enhanced lateral flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen; Cho, Il-Hoon; Zhou, Zhongwu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    We report on an improved lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) sensor with a magnetic focus for ultrasensitive naked-eye detection of pathogenic microorganisms at a near single cell limit without any pre-enrichment steps, by allowing the magnetic probes to focus the labelled pathogens to the target zone of the LF strip. PMID:26978736

  17. Analysis of SAR moving grid processing for focusing and detection of ground moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, Daniel E.; Saville, Michael A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper investigates the performance of single-channel SAR-GMTI systems in the focusing and detection of translating ground targets moving in the presence of a clutter background. Specifically, focusing and detection performance is investigated by applying the Moving Grid Processing (MGP) focusing technique to a scene containing an accelerating target moving in the presence of both uniform and correlated K-distributed clutter backgrounds. The increase in detection sensitivity resulting from the focusing operation is found to result from two separable effects, target focusing and clutter defocusing. While the detection sensitivity gain due to target focusing is common for both clutter types, the gain due to clutter defocusing is found to be significantly greater for textured clutter than for uniform clutter, by approximately 5 to 6 dB in the simulated scenario under consideration. This paper concludes with a discussion of the phenomenological causes for this difference and implications of this finding for single channel SAR-GMTI systems operating in heterogeneous clutter environments.

  18. Measurement of focused ultrasonic fields based on colour edge detection and curve fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Chang, S.; Yang, P.; He, L.

    2016-03-01

    This paper utilizes firstly both a scanning device and an optic fiber hydrophone to establish a measurement system, and then proposes the parameter measurement of the focused transducer based on edge detection of the visualized acoustic data and curve fitting. The measurement system consists of a water tank with wedge absorber, stepper motors driver, system controller, a focused transducer, an optic fiber hydrophone and data processing software. On the basis of the visualized processing for the original scanned data, the -3 dB beam width of the focused transducer is calculated using the edge detection of the acoustic visualized image and circle fitting method by minimizing algebraic distance. Experiments on the visualized ultrasound data are implemented to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. The data obtained from the scanning device are utilized to reconstruct acoustic fields, and it is found that the -3 dB beam width of the focused transducer can be predicted accurately.

  19. Ultrasound-Induced Heart Rate Decrease: Role of the Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Coiado, Olivia C.; Buiochi, Elaine B.; O’Brien, William D.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the role of the vagus nerve (VN) in the ultrasound (US)-induced negative chronotropic effect (deceased heart rate). One of the functions of the VN is to mediate lowering of the heart rate. A previous study showed a decrease of ~20% in the heart rate but the mechanism of the effect was not investigated. Sprague Dawley rats (n = 20) were exposed transthoracically to ultrasonic pulses at an approximate duty factor of 1% with sequentially 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitudes (PRPAs). The ultrasonic exposure parameters herein were chosen to match those of the previous study to have confidence that an ultrasound-induced negative chronotropic effect would occur. For each of the three PRPA sequences, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) started slightly greater than the rat’s heart rate and then was decreased sequentially in 1-Hz steps every 10 s (i.e., 6, 5, and 4 Hz for a total duration of 30 s). The experiments were organized in a standard (2 × 2) factorial design with VN (cut versus intact) as one factor and US (on versus off) as another factor. VN (intact/cut) and US (on/off) groups were divided into four groups each consisting of 5 animals: 1) VN intact-US off, 2) VN intact-US on, 3) VN cut-US off, and 4) VN cut-US on. Two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures was used to compare heart rate, cardiac output, systolic volume, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, respiratory rate, and arterial pressure before and after ultrasound stimulation. In this study, the heart rate decreased ~4% for the non-vagotomy and vagotomy groups. The ultrasound effect was significant for heart rate (p = 0.02) and cardiac output (p = 0.005) at 3 min post US exposure; the vagotomy effect was not significant. For heart rate, the Bonferroni test showed no differences between the four groups. The vagotomy group showed similar ultrasound-induced cardiac effects compared with the non-vagotomy group, suggesting that the vagus nerve is not influenced by the ultrasound exposure procedures. The US application caused a negative chronotropic effect of the rat heart without affecting the hemodynamic conditions. The results at this point are suggestive for an alternative cardiac pacing capability. PMID:25643082

  20. Stand-off explosive detection utilizing low power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection and subwavelength focusing wideband super lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2015-05-01

    The need for advanced techniques to detect improvised explosive devices (IED) at stand-off distances greater than ten (10) meters has driven AMI Research and Development (AMI) to develop a solution to detect and identify the threat utilizing a forward looking Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) combined with our CW radar technology Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection system. The novel features include a near-field sub-wavelength focusing antenna, a wide band 300 KHz to 300 MHz rapidly scanning CW radar facilitated by a high Q antenna/tuner, and an advanced processor utilizing Rabi transitions where the nucleus oscillates between states under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. AMI's Sub-wavelength Focusing Wide Band Super Lens uses a Near-Field SAR, making detection possible at distances greater than ten (10) meters. This super lens is capable of operating on the near-field and focusing electromagnetic waves to resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. When applied to the case of a vehicle approaching an explosive hazard the methodologies of synthetic aperture radar is fused with the array based super resolution and the NQR data processing detecting the explosive hazard.

  1. Modeling and simulation of a detecting method for segmented mirror co-focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yong; Wang, Jing; Sun, Shengli; Chen, Guilin

    2006-02-01

    Segmented mirror method is widely adopted in large optical telescopes nowadays in the world. Using segmented mirrors to make up a large mirror requires the segmented mirrors co-focus. It needs corresponding co-focus detecting methods to measure the co-focus errors. In China this kind of research is insufficient nowadays. In the paper, Zernike polynomial is used as Optical-Mechanical Interface, with the help of the engineering softwares, such as UG, Patran, Matlab, and the optical software CODE V to model and simulate the widely used Shack-Hartmann method. The relationship between S-H measurement and segmented mirror co-focus is found. Finally, a computer aided design method for optical measuring of segmented mirror co-focus is proposed.

  2. Application of capillary isoelectric focusing and peptide mass fingerprinting in carbohydrate-deficient transferrin detection.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lian-Zhong; Jin, Hong-Wei; Huang, He-Qing

    2011-05-30

    Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT) is a specific biomarker of alcohol abuse and is widely used in clinical diagnosis to detect and follow up excessive alcohol consumption. However, false %CDT results still exist in CDT detection, because of interference from genetic variants and the lack of standardization in CDT analysis. Therefore, it is still very important to find a method with high sensitivity and high accuracy for CDT detection. Here, we compared the detection sensitivity and accuracy of pI values based methods [isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (IEF-PAGE) and capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF)] with hydrophobic characteristic based methods [reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC)] on CDT detection. Moreover, we investigated the potential of peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF), a method based on the mass spectrometry to identify human transferrin (HTf) variants including CDT isoforms and genetic variants, based on their specific peptide masses. Results indicated that PMF can identify HTf variants including CDT isoforms and genetic variants based on their specific peptides, and CIEF showed higher sensitivity detection of HTf variants than RP-HPLC and IEF-PAGE did. Accordingly, we suggest that PMF is suitable for identifying CDT with high accuracy, and CIEF has potential for detection of CDT and genetic variants with high sensitivity; moreover, they are both worth further investigation in clinical diagnosis. PMID:21504004

  3. Low intensity-pulsed ultrasound induced apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingfang; Liu, Bangzhong; Liu, Guanghua; Wang, Ping; Yang, Mingzhen; Li, Yun; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether low intensity-pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) could induce apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, SMMC-7721, and to define the mechanism of ultrasound-induced apoptosis, in vitro. MTT assay was used to measure cell proliferation. Apoptosis was investigated by multiple methods such as flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, Ca(2+) mobilizations, pro- and anti-apoptotic protein expression, and light as well as ultramicroscopic morphology. The results provide evidence that LIPUS induced a dose-dependent effect on cell viability and apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells. Specifically, exposure of cells to >0.5 W/cm(2) intensity significantly increased cell apoptosis, caused shifts in cell cycle phase, and induced structural changes. Ultrasound significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and modulated expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax. The findings suggest that this novel technology can be used to induce SMMC-7721 apoptosis via the Ca(2+)/mitochondrial pathway and could potentially be of clinical use for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (SMMC-7721 cell line) and other cancers. PMID:26231998

  4. Effect of contrast agent on the incidence of ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.; Simpson, Douglas G.; Frizzell, Leon A.; Zachary, James F.

    2003-10-01

    The objective is to test further the hypothesis that if inertial cavitation in the vasculature of the lung is the physical mechanism responsible for ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage, then the addition of cavitation nuclei to the blood will enhance the occurrence of lung hemorrhage. A factorial design was used to study the effects of two types of injected agents (IA; 0.25 mL per rat of saline or Optison given intravenously) and two levels of pulsed ultrasound exposure (UE; in situ peak rarefactional pressures of 2.74 and 5.86 MPa) on the incidence and size of lung lesions. Ten 10-to-11-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed at each of the four combinations of IA and UE at 3.1 MHz for 10 s (1-kHz PRF, 1.2-microns PD). Rats administered contrast agent prior to exposure did not have an increase in lesion occurrence or size compared to rats that received saline with no contrast agent. These results provide further evidence that the mechanism of lung hemorrhage is not inertial cavitation. These findings are consistent with another group's results from another species (mouse) showing no increase in the area of lung hemorrhage using a different contrast agent (Albunex) when exposed to pulsed ultrasound. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. R01EB02641.

  5. Multi-focus parallel detection of fluorescent molecules at picomolar concentration with photonic nanojets arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ghenuche, Petru; Torres, Juan de; Ferrand, Patrick; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-09-29

    Fluorescence sensing and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are powerful methods to detect and characterize single molecules; yet, their use has been restricted by expensive and complex optical apparatus. Here, we present a simple integrated design using a self-assembled bi-dimensional array of microspheres to realize multi-focus parallel detection scheme for FCS. We simultaneously illuminate and collect the fluorescence from several tens of microspheres, which all generate their own photonic nanojet to efficiently excite the molecules and collect the fluorescence emission. Each photonic nanojet contributes to the global detection volume, reaching FCS detection volumes of several tens of femtoliters while preserving the fluorescence excitation and collection efficiencies. The microspheres photonic nanojets array enables FCS experiments at low picomolar concentrations with a drastic reduction in apparatus cost and alignment constraints, ideal for microfluidic chip integration.

  6. Focusing surface plasmon polaritons and detecting Stokes parameters utilizing nanoslits distributed plasmonic lenses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian; Yuan, Haiming; Yang, Hanning; Li, Siren; Sun, Xiudong

    2016-04-01

    A method to detect the full Stokes parameters utilizing a double-ring and Archimedes-curves distributed nanoslits plasmonic lenses is proposed. We demonstrate theoretically and numerically that both of these two plasmonic lenses can focus surface plasmon polaritons to centrally symmetric fields with subwavelength-sized focal spots under linear, elliptical, and circular polarization incidence. The intensity at the focal spots is modulated by the polarization state of incident light. Utilizing this intensity polarization sensitivity, the full Stokes parameters of incident light are detected by recoding only four intensities at the focal spots of these two plasmonic lenses. PMID:27192318

  7. Note: Focus error detection device for thermal expansion-recovery microscopy (ThERM).

    PubMed

    Domené, E A; Martínez, O E

    2013-01-01

    An innovative focus error detection method is presented that is only sensitive to surface curvature variations, canceling both thermoreflectance and photodefelection effects. The detection scheme consists of an astigmatic probe laser and a four-quadrant detector. Nonlinear curve fitting of the defocusing signal allows the retrieval of a cutoff frequency, which only depends on the thermal diffusivity of the sample and the pump beam size. Therefore, a straightforward retrieval of the thermal diffusivity of the sample is possible with microscopic lateral resolution and high axial resolution (~100 pm). PMID:23387710

  8. Effect of pulse polarity and energy on ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage in adult rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frizzell, Leon A.; Zachary, James F.; O'Brien, William D.

    2003-05-01

    The objective of this study was to further assess the role of inertial cavitation in ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage by examining the effect of pulse polarity at a common in situ (at the lung surface) peak rarefactional pressure [pr(in situ)] and at a common in situ pulse intensity integral (PIIin situ). A total of 60 rats was divided into three experimental groups of 20 animals per group and randomly exposed to pulsed ultrasound. The groups were exposed as follows: Group 1 to 0° polarity pulses (compression followed by rarefraction) at a pr(in situ) of 3.48 MPa and a PIIin situ of 4.78 Ws/m2, group 2 to 180° polarity pulses (rarefraction followed by compression) at a pr(in situ) of 3.72 MPa and a PIIin situ of 2.55 Ws/m2, and group 3 to 180° polarity pulses at a pr(in situ) of 4.97 MPa and a PIIin situ of 4.79 Ws/m2. For all experimental groups, the frequency was 2.46 MHz, the exposure duration was 240 s, the pulse repetition frequency was 2.5 kHz, and the pulse duration was 0.42 μs. Six sham animals were also randomly distributed among the experimental animals. The lesion surface area and depth were determined for each rat as well as lesion occurrence (percentage of rats with lesions) per group. It was found that lesion occurrence and size correlated better with PIIin situ than with pr(in situ), suggesting that a mechanism other than inertial cavitation was responsible for the damage.

  9. Neuronavigation-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening: A preliminary study in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-11-01

    FUS-induced BBB opening is a promising technique for noninvasive and local delivery of drugs into the brain. Here we propose the novel use of a neuronavigation system to guide the FUS-induced BBB opening procedure, and investigate its feasibility in vivo in large animals. We developed an interface between the neuronavigator and FUS to allow guidance of the focal energy produced by the FUS transducer. The system was tested in 29 pigs by more than 40 sonication procedures and evaluated by MRI. Gd-DTPA concentration was quantitated in vivo by MRI R1 relaxometry and compared by ICP-OES assay. Brain histology after FUS exposure was investigated by HE and TUNEL staining. Neuronavigation could successfully guide the focal beam with comparable precision to neurosurgical stereotactic procedures (2.3 ± 0.9 mm). FUS pressure of 0.43 MPa resulted in consistent BBB-opening. Neuronavigation-guided BBB-opening increased Gd-DTPA deposition by up to 1.83 mM (140% increase). MR relaxometry demonstrated high correlation to ICP-OES measurements (r2 = 0.822), suggesting that Gd-DTPA deposition can be directly measured by imaging. Neuronavigation could provide sufficient precision for guiding FUS to temporally and locally open the BBB. Gd-DTPA deposition in the brain could be quantified by MR relaxometry, providing a potential tool for the in vivo quantification of therapeutic agents in CNS disease treatment.

  10. Isoelectric focusing and ELISA for detecting adulteration of donkey milk with cow milk.

    PubMed

    Pizzano, Rosa; Salimei, Elisabetta

    2014-06-25

    Donkey milk has been recently revalued intensely due to its nutritional properties. Moreover, donkey milk has been proposed as an effective alternative food for some infants with cow milk allergy. Two fast analytical methods were proposed to detect the fraudulent practice of blending cow milk to donkey milk. Detection of cow αs1-casein bands along the profiles of experimental donkey-cow milk mixtures analyzed by isoelectric focusing was adequate to estimate cow milk used as adulterant of donkey milk starting from 5% (v/v). An ELISA-based method using the antipeptide antibodies raised against the 1-28 sequence stretch of cow β-casein was also developed for an accurate definition of composition of donkey-cow milk mixtures. The presence of cow milk at levels as low as 0.5% (v/v) was detected in donkey-cow milk mixtures prepared at laboratory scale and assayed by ELISA. PMID:24892189

  11. 3D topographic correction of the BSR heat flow and detection of focused fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Li, Hong-Lin; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is a seismic indicator of the bottom of a gas hydrate stability zone. Its depth can be used to calculate the seafloor surface heat flow. The calculated BSR heat flow variations include disturbances from two important factors: (1) seafloor topography, which focuses the heat flow over regions of concave topography and defocuses it over regions of convex topography, and (2) the focused warm fluid flow within the accretionary prism coming from depths deeper than BSR. The focused fluid flow can be detected if the contribution of the topography to the BSR heat flow is removed. However, the analytical equation cannot solve the topographic effect at complex seafloor regions. We prove that 3D finite element method can model the topographic effect on the regional background heat flow with high accuracy, which can then be used to correct the topographic effect and obtain the BSR heat flow under the condition of perfectly flat topography. By comparing the corrected BSR heat flow with the regional background heat flow, focused fluid flow regions can be detected that are originally too small and cannot be detected using present-day equipment. This method was successfully applied to the midslope region of northern Cascadia subducting margin. The results suggest that the Cucumber Ridge and its neighboring area are positive heat flow anomalies, about 10%-20% higher than the background heat flow after 3D topographic correction. Moreover, the seismic imaging associated the positive heat flow anomaly areas with seabed fracture-cavity systems. This suggests flow of warm gas-carrying fluids along these high-permeability pathways, which could result in higher gas hydrate concentrations.

  12. Diffraction analysis and evaluation of several focus- and track-error detection schemes for magneto-optical disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Mansuripur, M.

    1992-01-01

    A commonly used tracking method on pre-grooved magneto-optical (MO) media is the push-pull technique, and the astigmatic method is a popular focus-error detection approach. These two methods are analyzed using DIFFRACT, a general-purpose scalar diffraction modeling program, to observe the effects on the error signals due to focusing lens misalignment, Seidel aberrations, and optical crosstalk (feedthrough) between the focusing and tracking servos. Using the results of the astigmatic/push-pull system as a basis for comparison, a novel focus/track-error detection technique that utilizes a ring toric lens is evaluated as well as the obscuration method (focus error detection only).

  13. Flexible Integration of Both High Imaging Resolution and High Power Arrays for Ultrasound-Induced Thermal Strain Imaging (US-TSI)

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Lucero, Steven; Dutta, Debaditya; Yu, Francois T.H.; Chen, Xucai

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI) for carotid artery plaque detection requires both high imaging resolution (<100 μm) and sufficient US induced heating to elevate the tissue temperature (~1-3°C within 1-3 cardiac cycles) in order to produce a noticeable change in sound speed in the targeted tissues. Since the optimization of both imaging and heating in a monolithic array design is particularly expensive and inflexible, a new integrated approach is presented that utilizes independent ultrasound arrays to meet the requirements for this particular application. This work demonstrates a new approach in dual-array construction. A 3D printed manifold was built to support both a high resolution 20 MHz commercial imaging array and 6 custom heating elements operating in the 3.5-4 MHz range. For the application of US-TSI on carotid plaque characterization, the tissue target site is 20 to 30 mm deep, with a typical target volume of 2 mm (elevation) × 8 mm (azimuthal) × 5 mm (depth). The custom heating array performance was fully characterized for two design variants (flat and spherical apertures), and can easily deliver 30 W of total acoustic power to produce intensities greater than 15 W/cm2 in tissue target region. PMID:24297029

  14. Detection of Cracks at Welds in Steel Tubing Using Flux Focusing Electromagnetic Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, Jim; Nath, Shridhar; Simpson, John; Namkung, Min

    1994-01-01

    The inspection of weldments in critical pressure vessel joints is a major concern in the nuclear power industry. Corrosive environments can speed the fatigue process and access to the critical area is often limited. Eddy current techniques have begun to be used to help overcome these obstacles [1]. As direct contact and couplants are not required, remote areas can be inspected by simply snaking an eddy current coil into the intake tube of the vessel. The drawback of the eddy current method has been the high sensitivity to small changes in the conductivity and permeability of the test piece which are known to vary at weldments [1]. The flaw detection mechanism of the flux focusing electromagnetic probe can help alleviate these difficulties and provide a unique capability for detecting longitudinal fatigue cracks in critical tube structures. The Flux Focusing Electromagnetic Flaw Detector, originally invented for the detection of fatigue and corrosion damage in aluminum plates [2-3], has been adapted for use in testing steel tubing for longitudinal fatigue cracks. The modified design allows for the probe to be placed axisymmetrically into the tubing, inducing eddy currents in the tube wall. The pickup coil of the probe is fixed slightly below the primary windings and is rotated 90 so that its axis is normal to the tube wall. The magnetic flux of the primary coil is focused through the use of ferromagnetic material so that in the absence of fatigue damage there will be no flux linkage with the pickup coil. The presence of a longitudinal fatigue crack will cause the eddy currents induced in the tube wall to flow around the flaw and directly under the pickup coil. The magnetic field associated with these currents will then link the pickup coil and an unambiguous increase in the output voltage of the probe will be measured. The use of the flux focusing electromagnetic probe is especially suited for the detection of flaws originating at or near tube welds. The probe is shown to discriminate against signals due solely to the weld joint so that flaw signals are not hidden in the background in these locations. Experimental and finite element modeling results are presented for the flaw detection capabilities of the probe in stainless steel tubes.

  15. [Detections of the Focal Regions Temperature for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiaping; Zhang, Jucheng; Wang, Zhikang

    2015-03-01

    As a tumor thermal ablation technology in cancer therapy, HIFU (High Intensity Focused Ultrasound) has been developed rapidly in recent years. With the technology becoming more and more mature, it's clinical application is becoming more and more widely. In HIFU therapy, the high-intensity ultrasound energy is focused in the target tumor tissue, generating heat within very short time, causing coagulation necrosis, so that the effect of the treatment is achieved. To ensure safe and therapeutic efficacy, HIFU therapy needs to be properly monitored by medical imaging, and temperature in the target has to be precisely measured, this article is based on the current domestic and foreign detection methods of the focal region temperature. PMID:26204742

  16. Remote Detection of Concealed Radioactive Materials by Using Focused Powerful Terahertz Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2016-06-01

    This review paper summarizes the results of studies of a novel concept of the remote detection of concealed radioactive materials by using focused high-power terahertz (THz) radiation. The concept is based on the known fact that the ambient electron density in air is low (one to three free electrons per cubic centimeter). These electrons can serve as seed electrons from which an avalanche breakdown in strong electromagnetic fields starts. When a powerful THz radiation is focused in a small spot, the breakdown-prone volume can be much smaller than a cubic centimeter. So, the probability of having some free electrons in this volume and, hence, the probability of breakdown are low in the absence of additional sources of air ionization. However, in the vicinity of radioactive materials (10-20 m), the electron density can be higher, and, hence, there are always some seed free electrons from which the avalanche ionization will start. Thus, the breakdown rate in this case can be close to 100 %. Realization of this concept requires studies of various physical and technical issues. First, it is necessary to develop a high-power source of (sub-) THz radiation whose power, frequency, and pulse duration are sufficient for realizing this goal. Second, it is necessary to analyze numerous issues important for realizing this concept. Among these issues are (a) enhancement of the ionization level of air molecules in the presence of hidden radioactive materials, (b) estimating the minimum detectable mass of radioactive material, (c) formation of breakdown-prone volumes in focused THz wave beams, and (d) effect of atmospheric conditions on the propagation and focusing of THz wave beams and on the optimal location of the breakdown-prone volume between a container with hidden radioactive material and a THz antenna. The results of these studies are described below.

  17. Magnetic focusing immunosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivarnik, Philip E.; Cao, He; Letcher, Stephen V.; Pierson, Arthur H.; Rand, Arthur G.

    1999-01-01

    From 1988 through 1992 Salmonellosis accounted for 27% of the total reported foodborne disease outbreaks and 57% of the outbreaks in which the pathogen was identified. The prevalence of Salmonellosis and the new requirements to monitor the organism as a marker in pathogen reduction programs will drive the need for rapid, on-site testing. A compact fiber optic fluorometer using a red diode laser as an excitation source and fiber probes for analyte detection has been constructed and used to measure Salmonella. The organisms were isolated with anti-Salmonella magnetic beads and were labeled with a secondary antibody conjugated to a red fluorescent dye. The response of the system was proportional to the concentration of Salmonella typhimurium from 3.2 X 105 colony forming units (CFU)/ml to 1.6 X 107 CFU/ml. The system was developed to utilize a fiber-optic magnetic focusing problem that attracted the magnetic microspheres to the surface of a sample chamber directly in front of the excitation and emission fibers. The signal obtained from a homogenous suspension of fluorescent magnetic microspheres was 9 to 10 picowatts. After focusing, the signal from the fluorescent labeled magnetic microspheres increased to 200 picowatts, approximately 20 times greater than the homogeneous suspension. The magnetic focusing assay detected 1.59 X 105 colony forming units/ml of Salmonella typhimurium cultured in growth media. The process of magnetic focusing in front of the fibers has the potential to reduce the background fluorescence from unbound secondary antibodies, eliminating several rinsing steps, resulting in a simple rapid assay.

  18. Remote Detection of Concealed Radioactive Materials by Using Focused Powerful Terahertz Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2016-02-01

    This review paper summarizes the results of studies of a novel concept of the remote detection of concealed radioactive materials by using focused high-power terahertz (THz) radiation. The concept is based on the known fact that the ambient electron density in air is low (one to three free electrons per cubic centimeter). These electrons can serve as seed electrons from which an avalanche breakdown in strong electromagnetic fields starts. When a powerful THz radiation is focused in a small spot, the breakdown-prone volume can be much smaller than a cubic centimeter. So, the probability of having some free electrons in this volume and, hence, the probability of breakdown are low in the absence of additional sources of air ionization. However, in the vicinity of radioactive materials (10-20 m), the electron density can be higher, and, hence, there are always some seed free electrons from which the avalanche ionization will start. Thus, the breakdown rate in this case can be close to 100 %. Realization of this concept requires studies of various physical and technical issues. First, it is necessary to develop a high-power source of (sub-) THz radiation whose power, frequency, and pulse duration are sufficient for realizing this goal. Second, it is necessary to analyze numerous issues important for realizing this concept. Among these issues are (a) enhancement of the ionization level of air molecules in the presence of hidden radioactive materials, (b) estimating the minimum detectable mass of radioactive material, (c) formation of breakdown-prone volumes in focused THz wave beams, and (d) effect of atmospheric conditions on the propagation and focusing of THz wave beams and on the optimal location of the breakdown-prone volume between a container with hidden radioactive material and a THz antenna. The results of these studies are described below.

  19. Multipoint focus-detecting method for measurement of biological nonsmooth surface topography

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yao; Zeng Lijiang

    2005-05-15

    To measure the 3D characteristic of biological nonsmooth surface, a multipoint focus-detecting method based on the light splitting effect of crossed grating was developed. The surface profile is obtained by analyzing the variation in spot size on it rather than in light intensity used in conventional confocal method. Thus the influence of surface reflectivity variation could be reduced. The system is simple and the lateral resolution could be adjusted by changing the moving step of the stage on which the sample lies. Currently the axial uncertainty is about 20 {mu}m. The profile of fish scales was measured and the uncertainties were analyzed.

  20. Capillary isoelectric focusing of proteins and microorganisms in dynamically modified fused silica with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Růzicka, Filip; Horký, Jaroslav; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2006-09-01

    We suggest a method for the reproducible and efficient capillary isoelectric focusing of proteins and microorganisms in the pH gradient 3-10. The method involves the segmental injection of the simple ampholytes, the solution of the selected electrolytes, and the sample mixture of bioanalytes and carrier ampholytes to the fused silica capillaries dynamically modified by poly(ethylene glycol), PEG 4000, which is added to the catholyte, the anolyte and injected solutions. In order to receive the reproducible results, the capillaries were rinsed by the mixture of acetone/ethanol between analyses. For the tracing of the pH gradients the low-molecular-mass pI markers were used. The simple proteins and the mixed cultures of microorganisms, Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCM 8191, Escherichia coli CCM 3954, Candida albicans CCM 8180, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae CCM 6187, Enterococcus faecalis CCM 4224, Staphylococcus epidermidis CCM 4418 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, were focused and separated by the method suggested. The minimum detectable number of microbial cells was 5x10(2) to 1x10(3) with on-column UV detection at 280 nm. PMID:16765111

  1. Detection of sub-horizontal flaws in concrete using the synthetic aperture focusing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Zahra

    Concrete deteriorates over time due to environmental changes and/or poor construction processes which can eventually lead to partial or total failure of a structure. Deterioration in concrete manifests itself in different forms such as: freeze and thaw, chemical attack, surface and internal flaws. Concrete and shotcrete linings are widely used as support systems in underground excavations. Surprisingly, a fragmented, damaged shotcrete support system can actually create a less stable environment than the unsupported rock mass. Detection of internal flaws remains a difficult task as they are not always observable on the surface. Yet, the potential to expand and cause damage to the structure is omnipresent. The focus of this work is to locate and characterize two main and common features in concrete structures, (1) sub-horizontal cracks; (2) rock-concrete interfaces. Traditionally, this has been difficult to detect by currently available NDT methods. To obtain high resolution images of cracks in concrete, an extension of the ultrasonic nondestructive technique known as Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) has been used. However, in order to achieve our research objective, we developed a modified SAFT code in this work. The results of this study demonstrate that the resolving power of our modified 3D SAFT algorithm can provide an accurate profile of both a rock-concrete interface and/or cracks with angles varying from 5 to 15 degrees within concrete slabs having thicknesses of up to twenty centimetres.

  2. Evaluation of Ultrasound-Induced Damage to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by Flow Cytometry and Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Ahn, Juhee; Liu, Donghong; Chen, Shiguo; Ye, Xingqian; Ding, Tian

    2016-01-01

    As a nonthermal sterilization technique, ultrasound has attracted great interest in the field of food preservation. In this study, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy were employed to investigate ultrasound-induced damage to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. For flow cytometry studies, single staining with propidium iodide (PI) or carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) revealed that ultrasound treatment caused cell death by compromising membrane integrity, inactivating intracellular esterases, and inhibiting metabolic performance. The results showed that ultrasound damage was independent of initial bacterial concentrations, while the mechanism of cellular damage differed according to the bacterial species. For the Gram-negative bacterium E. coli, ultrasound worked first on the outer membrane rather than the cytoplasmic membrane. Based on the double-staining results, we inferred that ultrasound treatment might be an all-or-nothing process: cells ruptured and disintegrated by ultrasound cannot be revived, which can be considered an advantage of ultrasound over other nonthermal techniques. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the mechanism of ultrasound-induced damage was multitarget inactivation, involving the cell wall, cytoplasmic membrane, and inner structure. Understanding of the irreversible antibacterial action of ultrasound has great significance for its further utilization in the food industry. PMID:26746712

  3. Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Detection of Longitudinal Flaws in Metallic Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radially focused eddy current sensor detects longitudinal flaws in a metal tube. A drive coil induces eddy currents within the wall of the metal tube. A pick-up cod is spaced apart from the drive coil along the length of the metal tube. The pick@up coil is positioned with one end thereof lying adjacent the wall of the metal tube such that the pick-up coil's longitudinal axis is perpendicular to the wall of the metal tube. To isolate the pick-up coil from the magnetic flux of the drive coil and the flux from the induced eddy currents. except the eddy currents diverted by a longitudinal flaw. an electrically conducting material high in magnetic permeability surrounds all of the pick-up coil except its one end that is adjacent the walls of the metal tube. The electrically conducting material can extend into and through the drive coil in a coaxial relationship therewith.

  4. Further purification and characterization of serum proteins used to detect cystic fibrosis genotypes by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Wilson, G B; Fudenberg, H H

    1976-01-01

    Sera from cystic fibrosis (CF) homozygotes and obligate heterozygotes contain a CF factor (gamma CF factor) not found by isoelectric focusing in thin-layer polyacrylamide gels in most normal control sera. In addition, sera from most obligate heterozygotes lack another protein (bland B, C, or D) that is commonly found in sera from most normal and cystic fibrosis individuals. A standardized, biophysical assay is described that employs isoelectric focusing for the detection of both CF homozygotes and heterozygotes based on the analysis of whole serum for the presence of the gamma CF factor and bands B, C, and D. Results of analyzing sera from selected CF patients by isoelectric focusing indicated that there is a general correlation between the amount of the gamma CF factor and the clinical severity of the disease. Partial purification and characterization of the gamma CF factor and protein bands B, C, and D was accomplished by using DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Sephadex G-200 gel filtration, sequential molecular filtration through a series of Amicon Diaflo ultrafiltration membranes, affinity chromatography, and cellulose acetate electrophoresis. The gamma CF factor is a cationic protein with a pI of 8.46+/-0.05, has gamma electrophoretic mobility, a molecular weight between 3,500 and 10,000, and apparently exists in CF serum in 2 forms (free in solution and complexed to IgG). Bands B, C, and D are cationic proteins with pI values of 7.85 to 8.10, have gamma electrophoretic mobility and a molecular weight of approximately 100,000-150,000. PMID:996793

  5. Determination of arsenic in seafood by focused microwave digestion and hydride generation-atomic fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Vilanó, M; Rubio, R

    2001-01-01

    A new method was developed for total arsenic determination in seafood products such as oysters, mussels, tuna fish, and algae. Matrix decomposition and oxidation to arsenate of all the arsenic compounds in the product were completed in 25 min by using a 3-step program of focused microwaves (40-120 W) with nitric and sulfuric acids. Quantitation was performed by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence detection (HG-AFS). Results of method optimization are presented and discussed. A detection limit <125 microg/kg arsenic was obtained; the quantitation limit was close to 400 microg/kg, with repeatability and reproducibility <5% relative standard deviation. Validation was performed by analyzing 4Reference Materials (arsenic concentration expressed as mg/kg): The National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1566a Oyster tissue (14.0 +/- 1.2); the Bureau Community of Reference (now Standard Measurements & Testing Program) CRM 278 Mussel tissue (5.9 +/- 0.2) and CRM 627 Tuna fish (4.8 +/- 0.3); and the International Atomic Energy Agency RM 140 Fucus sample (44.3 +/- 2.1). PMID:11324624

  6. Corrosion Detection in Airframes Using a New Flux-Focusing Eddy Current Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz; Nath, Shridhar; Namkung, Min

    1994-01-01

    A new flux-focusing eddy current probe was recently developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The new probe is similar in design to a reflection type eddy current probe, but is unique in that it does not require the use of an impedance bridge for balancing. The device monitors the RMS output voltage of a pickup coil and, as a result, is easier to operate and interpret than traditional eddy current instruments. The unique design feature of the probe is a ferromagnetic cylinder, typically 1020 steel, which separates a concentrically positioned drive and pickup coil. The increased permeability of the steel causes the magnetic flux produced by the drive coil to be focused in a ring around the pickup coil. At high frequencies the eddy currents induced in both the sample and the cylinder allow little or no flux to link with the pickup coil. This results in a self-nulling condition which has been shown to be useful for the unambiguous detection of cracks in conducting materials. As the frequency is lowered the flux produced by the drive coil begins to link with the pickup coil causing an output which, among other things, is proportional to the thickness of the test specimen. This enables highly accurate measurements of the thickness of conducting materials and helps to facilitate the monitoring of thickness variations in a conducting structure such as an aircraft fuselage. Under ideal laboratory conditions the probe can sense thickness changes on the order of 1% as illustrated. However, this is highly dependent upon the thickness, and the geometric complexity of the sample being tested and for practical problems the sensitivity is usually much less. In this presentation we highlight some of the advantages and limitations in using the probe to inspect aircraft panels for corrosion and other types of material nonuniformities. In particular, we present preliminary results which illustrate the probes capabilities for detecting first and second layer corrosion in aircraft panels which may contain air gaps between the layers. Since the probe utilized eddy currents its corrosion detection capabilities are similar to convectional eddy current techniques, but the new probe is much easier to use.

  7. Computer-aided tissue characterization using ultrasound-induced thermal effects: analytical formulation and in-vitro animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud, Mohammad I.; Mousavi, Parvin; Imani, Farhad; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound radio-frequency (RF) time series analysis provides an effective tissue characterization method to differentiate between healthy and cancerous prostate tissues. In this paper, an analytical model is presented that partially describes the variations in tissue acoustic properties that accompany ultrasound RF time series acquisition procedures. These ultrasound-induced effects, which depend on tissue mechanical and thermophysical properties, are hypothesized to be among the major contributors to the tissue typing capabilities of the RF time series analysis. The model is used to derive two tissue characterization features. The two features are used with a support vector machine classifier to characterize three animal tissue types: chicken breast, bovine liver, and bovine steak. Accuracy values as high as 90% are achieved when the proposed features are employed to differentiate these tissue types. The proposed model may provide a framework to optimize the ultrasound RF time series analysis for future clinical procedures.

  8. SEIS/INSIGHT and Mars seismology: Development status and focus on the Impact detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, Philippe; Banerdt, William; Pike, Tom; Giardini, Domenico; Christensen, Ulli; Banfield, Don; Mimoun, David; Laudet, Philippe; de Raucourt, Sebastien; Bierwirth, Marco; Zweifel, Peter; Calcutt, Simon; Hurst, Ken; Bruce, Carl

    2014-05-01

    The INSIGHT NASA Discovery mission will deploy in September 2016 a 3 axis Very Broad band seismometer and a 3 axis SP seismometer, as well as other instruments enabling the installation of a complete geophysical observatory recording seismic, heat flow, magnetic and geodetic signals, in addition to atmospheric wind, pressure and temperature. We first present the science goals status of the SEIS experiment and its development status. The SEIS sensor assembly, which contains both the VBB and SP seismometer, will be deployed on the Martian ground by a robotic arm from a Phoenix-type lander platform and protected by a wind and thermal shield. The wind and thermal shield, a vacuum sphere for VBBs and a passive compensation system will achieve a very high protection of the seismometers against temperature and pressure variations, allowing the sensor to operate in the rough Martian thermal environment while reaching a detection threshold below 10^(-9) m/s/s Hz^(-1/2) in the VBB bandwidth and 10^(-8) m/s/s Hz^(-1/2) for the SP. A levelling system will allow the VBB to operate, while providing to both seismometer the best possible mechanical coupling with the ground motion. The SEIS instrument will be provided by CNES, which will coordinate a wide set of international contributors from the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, the Imperial College from London and the Open University, the Max-Planck Insitute of Lindau, the École polytechnique fédérale de Zurich (ETHZ), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Institut de l'Aéronautique et de l'Espace from Toulouse. We then illustrate the science goals by a focus on the capability of INSIGHT to detect either seismic or acoustic signals from impacts, with both the seismometers and the pressure sensor, and present both amplitude and occurrence expectation, based on comparative modeling between Mars, Earth and the Moon.

  9. Isoelectric point determination of live polioviruses by capillary isoelectric focusing with whole column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; van Eikenhorst, Gerco; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2013-06-18

    Using a capillary isoelectric focusing-whole column imaging detection (CIEF-WCID) method, the isoelectric points (pI) of complete intact polioviruses were determined. The polioviruses that were analyzed are the commonly used viruses for the production of inactivated polio vaccines (IPV)-Mahoney (type 1), MEF (type 2), and Saukett (type 3)-as well as for attenuated oral polio vaccines (OPV) and Sabin types 1, 2, and 3. A method for analyzing biological hazardous components (biological safety level 2) was set up for the CIEF-WCID analyzer used. This method is based on closed circuits. The determined pI's were 6.2 for Mahoney, 6.7 for MEF-1, and 5.8 for Saukett. The pI's of Sabin types 1, 2, and 3 viruses were 7.4, 7.2, and 6.3, respectively. Resolution of the virus peaks was shown to be reproducible. Using this adjusted CIEF-WCID technique, the pI of biologically hazardous components like toxins or viruses can be determined, which is beneficial for the development of vaccine production methods among others. PMID:23672432

  10. The detection of a spleen focus-forming virus neoantigen by lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Gillis, S; Gillis, A E; Smith, K A

    1978-07-01

    The existence of a nonvirion tumor-associated cell surface antigen (TASA) on cells transformed with Friend (FLV) on Rauscher (RLV) leukemia virus has been difficult to demonstrate. Antisera raised against classically defined Friend- Moloney-Rauscher antigenic determinants have been shown to react with virus structural proteins coded for by genetic information contained in the lymphatic leukemia or helper (LLV) virus genome. The recent development of nontrans-formed fibroblast cell lines which contain the replication-defective spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) genome, free of replicating LLV, has allowed investigation of an SFFV-specific antigen. We have applied the techniques of mixed tumor-lymphocyte culture stimulation followed by lymphocyte-mediated cytolysis assays to search for the cell surface expression of an antigen coded expressly by SFFV genetic information. SFFV nonproducer-immune, in vitro activated spleen cells were capable of effecting the lysis of SFFV-containing BALB/c 3T3 and Fischer rat epithelial, cloned cell lines. Normal BALB/c 3T3 and BALB/c 3T3 cells infected with three types of ecotropic LLV were unaffected. Syngeneic FLV and RLV-induced murine leukemia cells were also killed by SFFV nonproducer-immune lymphocytes. In addition, Kirsten sarcoma virus-transformed, replication-defective and replication-rescued BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts were not susceptible to SFFV antigen-directed cytolysis. Antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytolysis assays using monospecific goat antisera confirmed that SFFV nonproducers lacked cell surface expression of virion structural proteins. These observations suggest that the antigen detected in LMC experiments was not coded for by genetic information contained in the helper component of FLV, and that it represents a true SFFV-specific cell surface antigen. Based upon the recent molecular evaluation of the SFFV genome as consisting of both xenotropic and ecotropic virus sequences, it appears reasonable that xenotropic genetic information may be responsible for expression of the SFFV- specific antigen. Since the replication-defective SFFV genome is also responsible for the malignant transformation associated with FLV-induced erythroleukemia, one might postulate that gene sequences capable of programming transformation may also code for the TASA detected in these studies. PMID:78957

  11. Capillary isoelectric focusing and fluorometric detection of proteins and microorganisms dynamically modified by poly(ethylene glycol) pyrenebutanoate.

    PubMed

    Horka, Marie; Ruzicka, Filip; Horký, Jaroslav; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2006-12-15

    The nonionogenic pyrene-based tenside, poly(ethylene glycol) pyrenebutanoate, was prepared and applied in capillary isoelectric focusing with fluorometric detection. This dye was used here as a buffer additive in capillary isoelectric focusing for a dynamic modification of the sample of proteins and microorganisms. The values of the isoelectric points of the labeled bioanalytes were calculated with use of the fluorescent pI markers and were found comparable with pI of the native compounds. The mixed cultures of proteins and microorganisms, Escherichia coli CCM 3954, Staphylococcus epidermidis CCM 4418, Proteus vulgaris, Enterococcus faecalis CCM 4224, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, the strains of the yeast cells, Candida albicans CCM 8180, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were reproducibly focused and separated by the suggested technique. Using UV excitation for the on-column fluorometric detection, the minimum detectable amount was down to 10 cells injected on the separation capillary. PMID:17165837

  12. Comparison between isoelectric focusing methods for the detection of orosomucoid phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Montiel, M D; Carracedo, A; Lopez-Rodriguez, I; Rodriguez-Calvo, M S; Concheiro, L; Huguet, E; Gené, M

    1988-06-01

    Orosomucoid (ORM) polymorphism was investigated by different methods including isoelectric focusing in acid pH ranges followed by silver staining, print immunofixation of desialyzed ORM, fixation using a lectin from the sea-weed Codium tomentosum, isoelectric focusing followed by immunofixation in miniaturized gels and isoelectric focusing in immobilized pH gradients. Population genetics studies were carried out in Galicia (NW Spain) and two new ORM variants were found. PMID:2466659

  13. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreda, F.-A.; Nicolas, C.; Sirven, J.-B.; Ouf, F.-X.; Lacour, J.-L.; Robert, E.; Benkoula, S.; Yon, J.; Miron, C.; Sublemontier, O.

    2015-10-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21 μm, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed.

  14. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, F.-A.; Nicolas, C.; Sirven, J.-B.; Ouf, F.-X.; Lacour, J.-L.; Robert, E.; Benkoula, S.; Yon, J.; Miron, C.; Sublemontier, O.

    2015-01-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21 μm, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed. PMID:26498694

  15. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection.

    PubMed

    Barreda, F-A; Nicolas, C; Sirven, J-B; Ouf, F-X; Lacour, J-L; Robert, E; Benkoula, S; Yon, J; Miron, C; Sublemontier, O

    2015-01-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21 μm, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed. PMID:26498694

  16. Ultrasound-induced hyperthermia for the spatio-temporal control of gene expression in bone repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher; Padilla, Frédéric; Zhang, Man; Vilaboa, Nuria; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, Brian; Franceschi, Renny

    2012-10-01

    Spatial and temporal control over the expression of growth/differentiation factors is of great interest for regeneration of bone, but technologies capable of providing tight and active control over gene expression remain elusive. We propose the use of focused ultrasound for the targeted activation of heat shock-sensitive expression systems in engineered bone. We report in vitro results with cells that express firefly luciferase (fLuc) under the control of a heat shock protein promoter. Cells were embedded in fibrin scaffolds and exposed to focused ultrasound, using a custom 3.3MHz transducer (focal length 4", f-number 1.33", focal dimension 1.2mm lateral FWHM) in CW mode for 2-20 minutes at intensities ISPTA=120-440 W/cm2. The kinetics of ultrasound-mediated activation of the cells was compared with that of strictly thermal activation. Bioluminescence imaging revealed fLuc expression in an area ≥2.5mm in diameter at the position of the ultrasound focus, and the diameter and intensity of the signal increased with the amplitude of the acoustic energy. We also found that ultrasound activated fLuc expression with substantially shorter exposures than thermal activation. Our results demonstrate the potential for focused ultrasound to selectively activate the expression of a gene of interest in an engineered tissue and suggest that focused ultrasound activates the heat shock pathway by a combination of thermal and non-thermal mechanisms.

  17. Clearance of albumin following ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening is mediated by glial but not neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Angelika; Reinz, Eileen; Fatar, Marc; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephen

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound-mediated opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of gas-filled microbubbles is a potential strategy for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier to promote regeneration after ischemic stroke. However, related bioeffects and potential side-effects that could limit a translation into clinical application are poorly understood so far. We therefore examined the clearance of extravasated albumin following ultrasound-mediated BBB opening. Autofluorescence of albumin-bound Evans Blue dye indicated cellular albumin uptake as soon as 30min after insonation (2±0.72 cells/optical field). Cellular albumin uptake increased constantly over 24h (22±3.33 cells/optical field, p<0.05). Initially, the majority of albumin-positive cells were located in the periphery of brain capillaries. Most albumin phagocyting cells stained positive for CD163 and Iba-1, identifying them as activated microglia. Further, a small fraction of albumin-positive cells stained positive for the astroglial markers GFAP/S100B. Some perivascular cells with intracellular albumin were shown to express the endothelial marker protein EN4. Albumin uptaking cells stained negative for the neuronal TubulinIII. Thus, ultrasound-induced BBB opening leads to albumin extravasation which is phagocytized predominantly by activated microglia, astrocytes and endothelial cells. As albumin uptake into neurons has been shown to be neurotoxic, rapid albumin clearance by microglia might prevent neuronal cell death. PMID:21820103

  18. Ultrasound-induced ordering in poly(3-hexylthiophene): role of molecular and process parameters on morphology and charge transport.

    PubMed

    Aiyar, Avishek R; Hong, Jung-Il; Izumi, Jessica; Choi, Dalsu; Kleinhenz, Nabil; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2013-04-10

    Facile methods for controlling the microstructure of polymeric semiconductors are critical to the success of large area flexible electronics. Here we explore ultrasonic irradiation of solutions of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as a simple route to creating ordered molecular aggregates that result in a one to two order of magnitude improvement in field effect mobility. A detailed investigation of the ultrasound induced phenomenon, including the role of solvent, polymer regioregularity (RR) and film deposition method, is conducted. Absorption spectroscopy reveals that the development of low energy vibronic features is dependent on both the regioregularity as well as the solvent, with the latter especially influential on the intensity and shape of the band. Use of either higher regioregular polymer or ultrasonic irradiation of lower regioregular polymer solutions results in high field effect mobilities that are nearly independent of the dynamics of the film formation process. Surprisingly, no distinct correlation between thin-film morphology and macroscopic charge transport could be ascertained. The relationships between molecular and process parameters are very subtle: modulation of one effects changes in the others, which in turn impact charge transport on the macroscale. Our results provide insight into the degree of control that is required for the development of reproducible, robust materials and processes for advanced flexible electronics based on polymeric materials. PMID:23474078

  19. Ultrasound-induced cavitation enhances the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of an oncolytic virus in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Arvanitis, Costas D; Rifai, Bassel; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-01-30

    We investigated whether ultrasound-induced cavitation at 0.5 MHz could improve the extravasation and distribution of a potent breast cancer-selective oncolytic adenovirus, AdEHE2F-Luc, to tumour regions that are remote from blood vessels. We developed a novel tumour-mimicking model consisting of a gel matrix containing human breast cancer cells traversed by a fluid channel simulating a tumour blood vessel, through which the virus and microbubbles could be made to flow. Ultrasonic pressures were chosen to maximize either broadband emissions, associated with inertial cavitation, or ultraharmonic emissions, associated with stable cavitation, while varying duty cycle to keep the total acoustic energy delivered constant for comparison across exposures. None of the exposure conditions tested affected cell viability in the absence of the adenovirus. When AdEHE2F-Luc was delivered via the vessel, inertial cavitation increased transgene expression in tumour cells by up to 200 times. This increase was not observed in the absence of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor cell expression, discounting sonoporation as the mechanism of action. In the presence of inertial cavitation, AdEHE2F-Luc distribution was greatly improved in the matrix surrounding the vessel, particularly in the direction of the ultrasound beam; this enabled AdEHE2F-Luc to kill up to 80% of cancer cells within the ultrasound focal volume in the gel 24 hours after delivery, compared to 0% in the absence of cavitation. PMID:21982902

  20. [Focus on methods for detection of sentinel nodes in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Cohen, E; Bricou, A; Boujenah, J; Barranger, E

    2016-01-01

    The sentinel node procedure (GS) is the recommended technique for axillary surgical exploration in localized breast cancer with no clinical or radiological lymph node involvement. This surgical technique is based on a dual isotope and colorimetric detection. Although it allows a significant reduction in morbidity compared to axillary dissection (CA), this procedure induces a number of organizational constraints, in particular for the radioisotope injection. Specially for this reason, other GS methods have emerged in recent years, some of which appear promising (detection by fluorescence and magnetic iron). The objective of this paper was to carry out a synthesis of the reference method of detection (radioisotope) GS and analyze the recent literature on new detection methods. PMID:26698220

  1. Capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay as a new nanoscale approach for the detection of oligoclonal bands.

    PubMed

    Halbgebauer, Steffen; Haußmann, Ute; Klafki, Hans; Tumani, Hayrettin; Wiltfang, Jens; Otto, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The detection of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in cerebrospinal fluid is an indicator of intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulins which is a neurochemical sign of chronic inflammatory brain diseases. Intrathecally synthesized IgGs are typically observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. The current standard protocol for the detection of OCBs is IEF on agarose or polyacrylamide gels followed by immunoblotting or silver staining. These methods are time consuming, show substantial interlaboratory variation and cannot be used in a high throughput-approach. We have developed a new nanoscale method for the detection of OCBs based on automated capillary IEF followed by immunological detection. Evidence for intrathecal IgG synthesis was found in all tested patients (n = 27) with multiple sclerosis, even in two subjects who did not have oligoclonal bands according to standard methods. The test specificity was at 97.5% (n = 19). Our findings indicate that the novel OCB-CIEF-immunoassay is suitable for the rapid and highly sensitive detection of OCBs in clinical samples. Furthermore, the method allows for a higher sample throughput than the current standard methods. PMID:25348366

  2. Mammillary Body: Chronic Refractory Epilepsy Seizure Focus Detected by 18F-FDG PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pragati; Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Sahoo, Manas Kumar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions, which affect nearly 1% of the entire population. We present F-FDG PET-CT findings of a mammillary body epileptic focus in a 50-year-old woman with a 5-year history of seizure and behavior disturbance and memory problems for the past 4 years. PMID:26859207

  3. Conceptual design and development of GEM based detecting system for tomographic tungsten focused transport monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Malinowski, K.; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, E.; Poźniak, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Zabołotny, W.; Wojeński, A.; Kolasiński, P.; Mazon, D.; Malard, P.

    2015-10-01

    Implementing tungsten as a plasma facing material in ITER and future fusion reactors will require effective monitoring of not just its level in the plasma but also its distribution. That can be successfully achieved using detectors based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. This work presents the conceptual design of the detecting unit for poloidal tomography to be tested at the WEST project tokamak. The current stage of the development is discussed covering aspects which include detector's spatial dimensions, gas mixtures, window materials and arrangements inside and outside the tokamak ports, details of detector's structure itself and details of the detecting module electronics. It is expected that the detecting unit under development, when implemented, will add to the safe operation of tokamak bringing the creation of sustainable nuclear fusion reactors a step closer. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  4. Ipsi- and Contralateral Motor Response Using Ultrasound-induced Neurostimulation in Deeply Anesthetized Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Hermes; Wang, Shutao; Chen, Hong; Wang, Qi; Aurup, Christian; Fan, Kathtleen; Carneiro, Antonio; Konofagou, Elisa

    Ultrasound neurostimulation has been proven capable of eliciting motor responses. However, the studies in sedated rodents presented problems with target specificity due to the use of low ultrasound frequencies (<700 kHz). Here, we show that focused ultrasound (FUS) in mega-Hz range was able to evoke motor responses in mice under deep anesthesia. Contralateral movements of the hind limbs were observed when sonications were carried out at +2 mm of Lambda and ±2 mm lateral of midline in three mice. Moreover, stimulating other regions of the somatosensory and cerebellum induced trunk and ipsilateral limb movements in all six mice.

  5. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in-vitro and predict in-vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom’s response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue, at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-Mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High speed imaging of the optically-transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation. PMID:21030142

  6. Capillary isoelectric focusing--useful tool for detection of the biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Filip; Horka, Marie; Hola, Veronika; Votava, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    The biofilm formation is an important factor of S. epidermidis virulence. Biofilm-positive strains might be clinically more important than biofilm-negative ones. Unlike biofilm-negative staphylococci, biofilm-positive staphylococci are surrounded with an extracellular polysaccharide substance. The presence of this substance on the surface can affect physico-chemical properties of the bacterial cell, including surface charge. 73 S. epidermidis strains were examined for the presence of ica operon, for the ability to form biofilm by Christensen test tube method and for the production of slime by Congo red agar method. Isoelectric points (pI) of these strains were determined by means of Capillary Isoelectric Focusing. The biofilm negative strains focused near pI value 2.3, while the pI values of the biofilm positive strains were near 2.6. Isoelectric point is a useful criterion for the differentiation between biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative S. epidermidis strains. PMID:17157942

  7. Single-Fluorophore Detection in Femtoliter Droplets Generated by Flow Focusing.

    PubMed

    Weinmeister, Robert; Freeman, Emma; Eperon, Ian C; Stuart, Alison M; Hudson, Andrew J

    2015-10-27

    Aqueous microdroplets with a volume of a few femtoliters are an ideal sample size for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. In particular, they enable prolonged measurements to be made on individual molecules that can diffuse freely in the surrounding medium. However, the rapid production of monodisperse droplets in a hydrodynamic flow, such as microfluidic flow focusing, will often involve volumes that are typically too large (>0.5 pL) for single-molecule studies. Desired volumes of a few femtoliters, or smaller, can be produced by either tip streaming or step emulsification in a flow-focusing device; however, in both of these methods, the aqueous droplets are dispersed in a large volume of the continuous phase, where individual droplets can diffuse perpendicular to the flow direction, and the monodispersity of droplet size produced by tip streaming is difficult to sustain for more than transient time scales. We show here that the optimized design and fabrication of microfluidic devices with shallow channel depths can result in the reliable production of stable droplets of a few femtoliters at a high rate in the dripping regime of flow focusing. Furthermore, the generated microdroplets are localized in a two-dimensional plane to enable immediate analysis. We have demonstrated the fluorescence monitoring of single molecules of encapsulated green fluorescent protein. The apparatus is straightfoward, inexpensive, and readily assembled within an ordinary laboratory environment. PMID:26365461

  8. Detection of Silver Nanoparticles inside Marine Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana by Electron Microscopy and Focused Ion Beam

    PubMed Central

    Pascual García, César; Burchardt, Alina D.; Carvalho, Raquel N.; Gilliland, Douglas; C. António, Diana; Rossi, François; Lettieri, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    In the following article an electron/ion microscopy study will be presented which investigates the uptake of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, a primary producer aquatic species. This organism has a characteristic silica exoskeleton that may represent a barrier for the uptake of some chemical pollutants, including nanoparticles (NPs), but that presents a technical challenge when attempting to use electron-microscopy (EM) methods to study NP uptake. Here we present a convenient method to detect the NPs interacting with the diatom cell. It is based on a fixation procedure involving critical point drying which, without prior slicing of the cell, allows its inspection using transmission electron microscopy. Employing a combination of electron and ion microscopy techniques to selectively cut the cell where the NPs were detected, we are able to demonstrate and visualize for the first time the presence of AgNPs inside the cell membrane. PMID:24797958

  9. Agroterrorism targeting livestock: a review with a focus on early detection systems.

    PubMed

    Elbers, Armin; Knutsson, Rickard

    2013-09-01

    Agroterrorism targeting livestock can be described as the intentional introduction of an animal disease agent against livestock with the purpose of causing economic damage, disrupting socioeconomic stability of a country, and creating panic and distress. This type of terrorism can be alluring to terrorists because animal disease agents are easily available. This review addresses the vulnerabilities of the livestock industry to agroterrorism. However, we also show that early detection systems have recently been developed for agroterrorism and deliberate spread of animal pathogens in livestock, including an agroterrorism intelligence cycle, syndromic surveillance programs, and computer-based clinical decision support systems that can be used for early detection of notifiable animal diseases. The development of DIVA-vaccines in the past 10 to 15 years has created, in principle, an excellent response instrument to counter intentional animal disease outbreaks. These developments have made our animal agriculture less vulnerable to agroterrorism. But we cannot relax; there are still many challenges, in particular with respect to integration of first line of defense, law enforcement, and early detection systems for animal diseases. PMID:23971814

  10. Ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases is highly limited due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents the entry of approximately 99% of potential therapeutic agents into the CNS. Focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubbles can lead to a transient and focal opening of the BBB, thus enabling the passage of therapeutic agents across the BBB. Mechanical ultrasound effects, such as stable and inertial cavitation, contribute to BBB opening, possibly via transient disintegration of tight junctions. Facilitation of transcellular passage through vesicle transport may also be influenced. FUS-induced BBB opening can be performed without tissue damage, given an optimal set of ultrasound parameters. However, the risk of parenchymal damage or microhaemorrhage increases with increasing acoustic energy. To date, several therapeutic substances, such as chemotherapeutics, antibodies, plasmids and viral vectors, have successfully been delivered to the CNS by FUS-induced BBB opening in animal models, including non-human primates. Translation to a clinical application is pending. PMID:25531667

  11. Diagnostic ultrasound induced inertial cavitation to non-invasively restore coronary and microvascular flow in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Gao, Shunji; Wu, Juefei; Lof, John; Radio, Stanley; Vignon, Francois; Shi, William; Powers, Jeffry; Unger, Evan; Everbach, E Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Porter, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound induced cavitation has been explored as a method of dissolving intravascular and microvascular thrombi in acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to determine the type of cavitation required for success, and whether longer pulse duration therapeutic impulses (sustaining the duration of cavitation) could restore both microvascular and epicardial flow with this technique. Accordingly, in 36 hyperlipidemic atherosclerotic pigs, thrombotic occlusions were induced in the mid-left anterior descending artery. Pigs were then randomized to either a) dose tissue plasminogen activator (0.5 mg/kg) alone; or same dose plasminogen activator and an intravenous microbubble infusion with either b) guided high mechanical index short pulse (2.0 MI; 5 usec) therapeutic ultrasound impulses; or c) guided 1.0 mechanical index long pulse (20 usec) impulses. Passive cavitation detectors indicated the high mechanical index impulses (both long and short pulse duration) induced inertial cavitation within the microvasculature. Epicardial recanalization rates following randomized treatments were highest in pigs treated with the long pulse duration therapeutic impulses (83% versus 59% for short pulse, and 49% for tissue plasminogen activator alone; p<0.05). Even without epicardial recanalization, however, early microvascular recovery occurred with both short and long pulse therapeutic impulses (p<0.005 compared to tissue plasminogen activator alone), and wall thickening improved within the risk area only in pigs treated with ultrasound and microbubbles. We conclude that although short pulse duration guided therapeutic impulses from a diagnostic transducer transiently improve microvascular flow, long pulse duration therapeutic impulses produce sustained epicardial and microvascular re-flow in acute myocardial infarction. PMID:23922797

  12. Pre-history of planet detections: Focus on transits 1620 - 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briot, D.; Schneider, J.; François, P.

    2015-10-01

    The discovery of 51 Peg b has been a wonderful scientific discovery, answering a multi-secular question and opening a extended new domain of astronomical research. We want to recall some old studies, some of them quite forgotten, which have used the same methods that those for planet detection, emphasizing transit method. In addition to an overview of planet search pre-history, some searchs for unknown planets in the Solar System since the seventeenth century will be evoked, as well as the search for exoplanet transits during the nineteenth and the twentieth century. The conclusion will be back to the future.

  13. Optimization of the Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases are limited due to the lack of a truly non-invasive, transient, and regionally selective brain drug delivery method. The brain is particularly difficult to deliver drugs to because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The impermeability of the BBB is due to the tight junctions connecting adjacent endothelial cells and highly regulatory transport systems of the endothelial cell membranes. The main function of the BBB is ion and volume regulation to ensure conditions necessary for proper synaptic and axonal signaling. However, the same permeability properties that keep the brain healthy also constitute the cause of the tremendous obstacles posed in its pharmacological treatment. The BBB prevents most neurologically active drugs from entering the brain and, as a result, has been isolated as the rate-limiting factor in brain drug delivery. Until a solution to the trans-BBB delivery problem is found, treatments of neurological diseases will remain impeded. Over the past decade, methods that combine Focused Ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles have been shown to offer the unique capability of noninvasively, locally and transiently open the BBB so as to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Four of the main challenges that have been taken on by our group and discussed in this paper are: 1) assess its safety profile, 2) unveil the mechanism by which the BBB opens and closes, 3) control and predict the opened BBB properties and duration of the opening and 4) assess its premise in brain drug delivery. All these challenges will be discussed, findings in both small (mice) and large (non-human primates) animals are shown and finally the clinical potential for this technique is shown. PMID:23382778

  14. Optimization of the ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Konofagou, Elisa E

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases are limited due to the lack of a truly non-invasive, transient, and regionally selective brain drug delivery method. The brain is particularly difficult to deliver drugs to because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The impermeability of the BBB is due to the tight junctions connecting adjacent endothelial cells and highly regulatory transport systems of the endothelial cell membranes. The main function of the BBB is ion and volume regulation to ensure conditions necessary for proper synaptic and axonal signaling. However, the same permeability properties that keep the brain healthy also constitute the cause of the tremendous obstacles posed in its pharmacological treatment. The BBB prevents most neurologically active drugs from entering the brain and, as a result, has been isolated as the rate-limiting factor in brain drug delivery. Until a solution to the trans-BBB delivery problem is found, treatments of neurological diseases will remain impeded. Over the past decade, methods that combine Focused Ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles have been shown to offer the unique capability of noninvasively, locally and transiently open the BBB so as to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Four of the main challenges that have been taken on by our group and discussed in this paper are: 1) assess its safety profile, 2) unveil the mechanism by which the BBB opens and closes, 3) control and predict the opened BBB properties and duration of the opening and 4) assess its premise in brain drug delivery. All these challenges will be discussed, findings in both small (mice) and large (non-human primates) animals are shown and finally the clinical potential for this technique is shown. PMID:23382778

  15. Ultrasound-induced DNA damage and signal transductions indicated by gammaH2AX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Yukihiro; Fujiwara, Yoshisada; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Ogawa, Ryohei; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Ichiro; Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Kondo, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been shown to induce cancer cell death via different forms including apoptosis. Here, we report the potential of low-intensity pulsed US (LIPUS) to induce genomic DNA damage and subsequent DNA damage response. Using the ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) as the positive control, we were able to observe the induction of DSBs (as neutral comet tails) and the subsequent formation of gammaH2AX-positive foci (by immunofluorescence detection) in human leukemia cells following exposure to LIPUS. The LIPUS-induced DNA damage arose most likely from the mechanical, but not sonochemical, effect of cavitation, based on our observation that the suppression of inertial cavitation abrogated the gammH2AX foci formation, whereas scavenging of free radical formation (e.g., hydroxyl radical) had no protective effect on it. Treatment with the specific kinase inhibitor of ATM or DNA-PKcs, which can phosphorylate H2AX Ser139, revealed that US-induced gammaH2AX was inhibited more effectively by the DNA-PK inhibitor than ATM kinase inhibitor. Notably, these inhibitor effects were opposite to those with radiation-induced gammH2AX. In conclusion, we report, for the first time that US can induce DNA damage and the DNA damage response as indicated by gammaH2AX was triggered by the cavitational mechanical effects. Thus, it is expected that the data shown here may provide a better understanding of the cellular responses to US.

  16. Modelling ultrasound-induced mild hyperthermia of hyperplasia in vascular grafts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) vascular grafts frequently develop occlusive neointimal hyperplasia as a result of myofibroblast over-growth, leading to graft failure. ePTFE exhibits higher ultrasound attenuation than native soft tissues. We modelled the selective absorption of ultrasound by ePTFE, and explored the feasibility of preventing hyperplasia in ePTFE grafts by ultrasound heating. Specifically, we simulated the temperature profiles of implanted grafts and nearby soft tissues and blood under ultrasound exposure. The goal was to determine whether ultrasound exposure of an ePTFE graft can generate temperatures sufficient to prevent cell growth on the graft without damaging nearby soft tissues and blood. Methods Ultrasound beams from two transducers (1.5 and 3.2 MHz) were simulated in two graft/tissue models, with and without an intra-graft cellular layer mimicking hyperplasia, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The resulting power deposition patterns were used as a heat source for the Pennes bioheat equation in a COMSOL® Multiphysics heat transfer model. 50°C is known to cause cell death and therefore the transducer powers were adjusted to produce a 13°C temperature rise from 37°C in the ePTFE. Results Simulations showed that both the frequency of the transducers and the presence of hyperplasia significantly affect the power deposition patterns and subsequent temperature profiles on the grafts and nearby tissues. While neither transducer significantly raised the temperature of the blood, the 1.5-MHz transducer was less focused and heated larger volumes of the graft and nearby soft tissues than the 3.2-MHz transducer. The presence of hyperplasia had little effect on the blood's temperature, but further increased the temperature of the graft and nearby soft tissues in response to either transducer. Skin cooling and blood flow play a significant role in preventing overheating of the native tissues. Conclusions Modelling shows that ultrasound can selectively heat ePTFE grafts and produce temperatures that cause cell death on the graft. The temperature increase in blood is negligible and that in the adjacent soft tissues may be minimized by skin cooling and using appropriate transducers. Therefore, ultrasound heating may have the potential to reduce neointimal hyperplasia and failure of ePTFE vascular grafts. PMID:22054016

  17. Ultrasound-induced thermal therapy of hyperplasia in ringed expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (eptfe) access grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Query, Michael Earl

    Hemodialysis vascular access, the interface between a dialysis patient and a dialysis machine, is quite literally the lifeblood of a patient's health. Vascular access dysfunction is the leading cause of hospitalization in hemodialysis patients. The occlusive growth of neointimal hyperplasia (NH) in expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) ringed grafts is the primary cause of failure. To further develop a proposed thermal ultrasound treatment to reduce or prevent NH in arteriovenous vascular grafts, the acoustic properties of ePTFE were studied in water and alcohol solutions. Previous reports of ePTFE acoustic properties are critiqued. It was found that the acoustic transmission and attenuation through ePTFE, and therefore the potential for an ultrasound-based therapy for NH, are heavily dependent on the medium in which the graft is immersed, suggesting that the acoustic properties of implanted grafts will change as grafts mature in vivo. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of water-soaked ePTFE were 0.478 +/- 1.43 x 10-2 MRayl and 1.78 +/- 0.111 Np/cm*MHz, respectively, while the acoustic impedance and attenuation of ePTFE in alcohol were 1.49 +/- 0.149 MRayl and 0.77 +/- 1.1 x 10-2 Np/cm*MHz, respectively. The use of focused ultrasound to heat implanted ringed ePTFE grafts was numerically modeled from 1.35- and 1.443-MHz transducers for in vitro geometries. Power deposition and heating, in turn, differed by an order of magnitude between various graft acoustic properties. Graft rings were predicted to be substantial absorbing and scattering features. In vitro phantom models were constructed: one with and one without thermocouples. At 1 W of acoustic power, the maximum temperature rise was 8˚ C. The thermocouple model containing a water-soaked graft did not experience heating in the far graft wall. The MRTI model confirmed that the graft rings are an absorbing/scattering feature. Heating was not prevented in the presence of water flow through the graft. Water was not heated significantly. Overall, results suggest ultrasound exposure can be used to generate temperature rises corresponding with the potential prevention or inhibition of NH in ringed ePTFE vascular grafts. A hybrid therapeutic/diagnostic transducer design with a therapeutic semi-annular array surrounding a diagnostic linear array is presented. Compared to a solid transducer of the same dimensions, there were only marginal aberrations in the focal plane. Numerical optimization of the element drive configuration indicated that the least distorted focal plane was produced by uniform phase and magnitude at each element.

  18. A Tsunami Detection and Warning-focused Sea Level Station Metadata Web Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, John J.; Kari, Uday S.; Weinstein, Stuart A.

    2008-12-01

    Currently information used to describe sea-level stations (such as location, collection and transmission capabilities, operator identification, etc.) is distributed among databases held by multiple agencies, institutions and organizations. Such information could be used to support detection and warning. However, the Indian Ocean Tsunami of 26 December, 2004 made it clear that such information is not readily accessible, is difficult to use, and is often incomplete. In addressing this issue, agencies within the Pacific region are collaborating to develop a web service to expose station metadata enabling various types of real-time data mining client applications that support decision-making and strategic planning at Tsunami Warning Centers. Because information about sea levels has a broad range of applications, integration of this information in a way that is comprehensive, and enhances its access and use, would have a tremendous impact on lives and livelihoods.

  19. PLLA nanofibrous paper-based plasmonic substrate with tailored hydrophilicity for focusing SERS detection.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jundong; Tong, Liping; Tang, Siying; Guo, Zhinan; Zhang, Han; Li, Penghui; Wang, Huaiyu; Du, Chang; Yu, Xue-Feng

    2015-03-11

    We report a new paper-based surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate platform contributed by a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibrous paper adsorbed with plasmonic nanostructures, which can circumvent many challenges of the existing SERS substrates. This PLLA nanofibrous paper has three-dimensional porous structure, extremely clean surface with good hydrophobicity (contact angle is as high as 133.4°), and negligible background interference under Raman laser excitation. Due to the strong electrostatic interaction between PLLA nanofiber and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) molecules, the CTAB-coated gold nanorods (GNRs) are efficiently immobilized onto the fibers. Such a hydrophobic paper substrate with locally hydrophilic SERS-active area can confine analyte molecules and prevent the random spreading of molecules. The confinement leads to focusing effect and the GNRs-PLLA SERS substrate is found to be highly sensitive (0.1 nM Rhodamine 6G and malachite green) and exhibit excellent reproducibility (∼8% relative standard deviation (RSD)) and long-term stability. Furthermore, it is also cost-efficient, with simple fabrication methodology, and demonstrates high sample collection efficiency. All of these benefits ensure that this GNRs-PLLA substrate is a really perfect choice for a variety of SERS applications. PMID:25697378

  20. Detection of measles, mumps and rubella viruses by immuno-colorimetric assay and its application in focus reduction neutralization tests.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Kumbhar, Neelakshi S; Bhide, Vandana S

    2014-12-01

    Measles, mumps and rubella are vaccine-preventable diseases; however limited epidemiological data are available from low-income or developing countries. Thus, it is important to investigate the transmission of these viruses in different geographical regions. In this context, a cell culture-based rapid and reliable immuno-colorimetric assay (ICA) was established and its utility studied. Twenty-three measles, six mumps and six rubella virus isolates and three vaccine strains were studied. Detection by ICA was compared with plaque and RT-PCR assays. In addition, ICA was used to detect viruses in throat swabs (n = 24) collected from patients with suspected measles or mumps. Similarly, ICA was used in a focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT) and the results compared with those obtained by a commercial IgG enzyme immuno assay. Measles and mumps virus were detected 2 days post-infection in Vero or Vero-human signaling lymphocytic activation molecule cells, whereas rubella virus was detected 3 days post-infection in Vero cells. The blue stained viral foci were visible by the naked eye or through a magnifying glass. In conclusion, ICA was successfully used on 35 virus isolates, three vaccine strains and clinical specimens collected from suspected cases of measles and mumps. Furthermore, an application of ICA in a neutralization test (i.e., FRNT) was documented; this may be useful for sero-epidemiological, cross-neutralization and pre/post-vaccine studies. PMID:25244651

  1. Mass spectrometry detection and imaging of inorganic and organic explosive device signatures using desorption electro-flow focusing ionization.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Sisco, Edward

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of desorption electro-flow focusing ionization (DEFFI) with in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) for the mass spectrometric (MS) detection and imaging of explosive device components, including both inorganic and organic explosives and energetic materials. We utilize in-source CID to enhance ion collisions with atmospheric gas, thereby reducing adducts and minimizing organic contaminants. Optimization of the MS signal response as a function of in-source CID potential demonstrated contrasting trends for the detection of inorganic and organic explosive device components. DEFFI-MS and in-source CID enabled isotopic and molecular speciation of inorganic components, providing further physicochemical information. The developed system facilitated the direct detection and chemical mapping of trace analytes collected with Nomex swabs and spatially resolved distributions within artificial fingerprints from forensic lift tape. The results presented here provide the forensic and security sectors a powerful tool for the detection, chemical imaging, and inorganic speciation of explosives device signatures. PMID:24968206

  2. Fibre-optic focus-detection system for non-contact, high-resolution thickness measurement of transparent tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebarth, Noël; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2005-08-01

    A low-cost, high-resolution, fibre optic system for non-contact thickness measurement of ocular tissues in cadaver eyes was developed. The optical system uses direct modulation at 100 kHz of a 670 nm laser diode delivered to a single-mode fibre coupler. The output of the fibre coupler is focused onto the tissue using a high numerical aperture aspheric lens mounted on a motorized translation stage. Light reflected from the sample is collected by the fibre coupler and sent to a photoreceiver. Peaks in the power signal are detected when the focal point of the aspheric lens coincides with the tissue boundaries. The thickness is proportional to the distance between successive peaks. The optical system has a sensitivity of 52 dB, which corresponds to a detectable change in the refractive index of 0.005 at a boundary-assuming specular reflection. With a focusing numerical aperture of 0.68, the resolution is 4.0 µm and the precision is ± 0.2 µm. The optical system was used to measure the corneal layers and lens capsule thickness of cadaver monkeys eyes. The system was able to measure the thickness of the epithelium, stroma and Descemet's membrane of the cornea, as well as the lens capsule and lens epithelial cell layer.

  3. Characterization of single ?-tracks by photoresist detection and AFM analysis-focus on biomedical science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Nadia; Myhra, Sverre; Chakalova, Radka; Hill, Mark A.; Thomson, James; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2013-11-01

    The interactions between energetic ions and biological and/or organic target materials have recently attracted theoretical and experimental attention, due to their implications for detector and device technologies, and for therapeutic applications. Most of the attention has focused on detection of the primary ionization tracks, and their effects, while recoil target atom tracks remain largely unexplored. Detection of tracks by a negative tone photoresist (SU-8), followed by standard development, in combination with analysis by atomic force microscopy, shows that both primary and recoil tracks are revealed as conical spikes, and can be characterized at high spatial resolution. The methodology has the potential to provide detailed information about single impact events, which may lead to more effective and informative detector technologies and advanced therapeutic procedures. In comparison with current characterization methods the advantageous features include: greater spatial resolution by an order of magnitude (20 nm) detection of single primary and associated recoil tracks; increased range of fluence (to 2.5 109 cm-2) sensitivity to impacts at grazing angle incidence; and better definition of the lateral interaction volume in target materials.

  4. Nanocrystalline Tin Oxide Nanofibers Deposited by a Novel Focused Electrospinning Method. Application to the Detection of TATP Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, José Pedro; Fernández, Maria Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Matatagui, Daniel; Sayago, Isabel; Horrillo, Maria Carmen; Gracia, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    A new method of depositing tin dioxide nanofibers in order to develop chemical sensors is presented. It involves an electrospinning process with in-plane electrostatic focusing over micromechanized substrates. It is a fast and reproducible method. After an annealing process, which can be performed by the substrate heaters, it is observed that the fibers are intertwined forming porous networks that are randomly distributed on the substrate. The fiber diameters oscillate from 100 nm to 200 nm and fiber lengths reach several tens of microns. Each fiber has a polycrystalline structure with multiple nano-grains. The sensors have been tested for the detection of acetone and hydrogen peroxide (precursors of the explosive triacetone triperoxide, TATP) in air in the ppm range. High and fast responses to these gases have been obtained. PMID:25521384

  5. In vitro characterization of perfluorocarbon droplets for focused ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Schad, Kelly C; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound therapy can be enhanced with microbubbles by thermal and cavitation effects. However, localization of treatment is difficult as bioeffects can occur outside of the target region. Spatial control of bubbles can be achieved by ultrasound-induced conversion of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets to gas bubbles. This study was undertaken to determine the acoustic parameters for bubble production by droplet conversion and how it depends on the acoustic conditions and droplet physical parameters. Lipid-encapsulated droplets containing dodecafluoropentane were manufactured with sizes ranging from 1.9 to 7.2 microm in diameter and diluted to a concentration of 8 x 10(6) droplets mL(-1). The droplets were sonicated in vitro with a focused ultrasound transducer and varying frequency and exposure under flow conditions through an acoustically transparent vessel. The sonications were 10 ms in duration at frequencies of 0.578, 1.736 and 2.855 MHz. The pressure threshold for droplet conversion was measured with an active transducer operating in pulse-echo mode and simultaneous measurements of broadband acoustic emissions were performed with passive acoustic detection. The results show that droplets cannot be converted at low frequency without broadband emissions occurring. However, the pressure threshold for droplet conversion decreased with increasing frequency, exposure and droplet size. The pressure threshold for broadband emissions was independent of the droplet size and was 2.9, 4.4 and 5.3 MPa for 0.578, 1736 and 2.855 MHz, respectively. In summary, we have demonstrated that droplet conversion is feasible for clinically relevant sized droplets and acoustic exposures. PMID:20693614

  6. In vitro characterization of perfluorocarbon droplets for focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Kelly C.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound therapy can be enhanced with microbubbles by thermal and cavitation effects. However, localization of treatment is difficult as bioeffects can occur outside of the target region. Spatial control of bubbles can be achieved by ultrasound-induced conversion of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets to gas bubbles. This study was undertaken to determine the acoustic parameters for bubble production by droplet conversion and how it depends on the acoustic conditions and droplet physical parameters. Lipid-encapsulated droplets containing dodecafluoropentane were manufactured with sizes ranging from 1.9 to 7.2 µm in diameter and diluted to a concentration of 8 × 106 droplets mL-1. The droplets were sonicated in vitro with a focused ultrasound transducer and varying frequency and exposure under flow conditions through an acoustically transparent vessel. The sonications were 10 ms in duration at frequencies of 0.578, 1.736 and 2.855 MHz. The pressure threshold for droplet conversion was measured with an active transducer operating in pulse-echo mode and simultaneous measurements of broadband acoustic emissions were performed with passive acoustic detection. The results show that droplets cannot be converted at low frequency without broadband emissions occurring. However, the pressure threshold for droplet conversion decreased with increasing frequency, exposure and droplet size. The pressure threshold for broadband emissions was independent of the droplet size and was 2.9, 4.4 and 5.3 MPa for 0.578, 1736 and 2.855 MHz, respectively. In summary, we have demonstrated that droplet conversion is feasible for clinically relevant sized droplets and acoustic exposures.

  7. First molecular detection of Leishmania major within naturally infected Phlebotomus salehi from a zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis focus in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Azizi, K; Fakoorziba, M R; Jalali, M; Moemenbellah-Fard, M D

    2012-03-01

    Human cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a major notifiable public health problem in many parts of Iran. It is often caused by the zooflagellate parasite Leishmania major which is mainly transmitted by the bites of female phlebotomine sandflies belonging to the genus Phlebotomus (Diptera: Psychodidae). The annual incidence of CL in Fars province, southern Iran, was about 108-144 in 2007. The leishmanial infections of wild sandflies that may act as vectors were thus investigated at an endemic focus in this province. In all 330 female Phlebotomus sandflies were screened for the detection of Leishmania-specific kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. A two stage nested PCR protocol was used to establish the identity of Leishmania major species in naturally infected sandflies. The L. major kDNA was detected in 18 (5.5%) individual sandflies which belonged to four different Phlebotomus species (Phlebotomus papatasi, Phlebotomus salehi, Phlebotomus sergenti and P. major group). For the first time, one naturally infected P. salehi specimen contained the kDNA of the protozoan parasite, L. major, with a main band of 560 base pairs identified using the nested PCR method. It seems most likely therefore that P. salehi is potentially a rare sylvatic vector of L. major parasites in parts of this province. This is the first combined morphological and molecular studies of P. salehi in Iran. PMID:22543597

  8. Rapid Focused Sequencing: A Multiplexed Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Strain Typing of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Zolotova, Anna; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Background The intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the United States in 2001 has heightened concern about the use of pathogenic microorganisms in bioterrorism attacks. Many of the deadliest bacteria, including the Class A Select Agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, are highly infectious via the pulmonary route when released in aerosolized form. Hence, rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for detection of these biothreats and characterization of their potential impact on the exposed population are of critical importance to initiate and support rapid military, public health, and clinical responses. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed microfluidic multiplexed PCR and sequencing assays based on the simultaneous interrogation of three pathogens per assay and ten loci per pathogen. Microfluidic separation of amplified fluorescently labeled fragments generated characteristic electrophoretic signatures for identification of each agent. The three sets of primers allowed significant strain typing and discrimination from non-pathogenic closely-related species and environmental background strains based on amplicon sizes alone. Furthermore, sequencing of the 10 amplicons per pathogen, termed “Rapid Focused Sequencing,” allowed an even greater degree of strain discrimination and, in some cases, can be used to determine virulence. Both amplification and sequencing assays were performed in microfluidic biochips developed for fast thermal cycling and requiring 7 µL per reaction. The 30-plex sequencing assay resulted in genotypic resolution of 84 representative strains belonging to each of the three biothreat species. Conclusions/Significance The microfluidic multiplexed assays allowed identification and strain differentiation of the biothreat agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis and clear discrimination from closely-related species and several environmental background strains. The assays may be extended to detect a large number of pathogens, are applicable to the evaluation of both environmental and clinical samples, and have the potential to be applied in military, public health, and clinical diagnostic settings. PMID:23418519

  9. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (λEX ∼ 280 nm, λEM ∼ 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  10. beta-Lactamase ragged ends detected by electrospray mass spectrometry correlates poorly with multiple banding on isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Payne, D J; Skett, P W; Aplin, R T; Robinson, C V; Knowles, D J

    1994-03-01

    Purified preparations of TEM-2, P99, Bacillus cereus I and B. cereus II beta-lactamases were examined by electrospray (ES) mass spectrometry. The ES mass spectra of the B. cereus enzymes revealed the presence of four to five components of different mass, corresponding to the loss of different numbers of N-terminal amino acids (ragged ends). The ES mass spectra of both TEM-2 and P99 consisted of a single component with no evidence of ragged ends. All four beta-lactamase preparations were visualized on isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels stained with nitrocefin to investigate a possible correlation between IEF patterns and ragged ends. Multiple banding patterns were seen with each beta-lactamase preparation. Although these may correlate with the presence of ragged ends in the two B. cereus preparations, the satellite bands seen with P99 and TEM-2 were not associated with differences detected by ES mass spectrometry. In this study we have shown for the first time that beta-lactamase satellite bands seen on IEF are not always associated with ragged ends. Furthermore, we have illustrated the use of ES mass spectrometry to characterize the extent of ragged end formation in protein samples. This is of particular significance if the sample is required for detailed biochemical or crystallography experiments. PMID:8148407

  11. The Dense Plasma Focus Opportunities in Detection of Hidden Objects by Using Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Inspection System (NINIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V.; Dubrovsky, A.; Karpiński, L.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.; StrzyŻewski, P.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2006-12-01

    Dense Plasma Focus device is proposed for use as a neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration. Our devices PF-6, recently put into operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw, Poland, and PF-10 belonging to the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia, have energy storages in its capacitor banks 7.4 kJ and 13 kJ as a maximum. Operated with the DPF chambers of a special design they have a current maximum up to ˜760 kA with a quarter period of the discharge equal to 1 microsecond. They generate circa 109 of 2.5-MeV neutrons in one pulse of ≅ 10-ns duration when working with deuterium, what permit to expect 1011 14-MeV neutrons at their operation with DT-mixture. This feature gives a principal possibility to create a "single-shot detection system" for interrogation of hidden objects. It means that all necessary information will be received during a single bright pulse of neutrons having duration in a nanosecond range by means of the time-of-flight technique with a short flight base. It might be a base for the creation of the Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Inspection System (NINIS). These characteristics of the neutron source open a number of opportunities while interrogation time in this case would now depend only on the data-processing system.

  12. Molecular pathogen detection in biosolids with a focus on quantitative PCR using propidium monoazide for viable cell enumeration.

    PubMed

    van Frankenhuyzen, Jessica K; Trevors, Jack T; Lee, Hung; Flemming, Cecily A; Habash, Marc B

    2011-12-01

    Sewage sludge is the solid, organic material remaining after wastewater is treated and discharged from a wastewater treatment plant. Sludge is treated to stabilize the organic matter and reduce the amount of human pathogens. Once government regulations are met, including material quality standards (e.g., E. coli levels and heavy metal content) sludge is termed "biosolids", which may be disposed of by land application according to regulations. Live-culture techniques have traditionally been used to enumerate select pathogens and/or indicator organisms to demonstrate compliance with regulatory requirements. However, these methods may result in underestimates of viable microorganisms due to several problems, including their inability to detect viable but non-culturable (VBNC) cells. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is currently under investigation as a fast, sensitive, and specific molecular tool for enumeration of pathogens in biosolids. Its main limitation is that it amplifies all target DNAs, including that from non-viable cells. This can be overcome by coupling qPCR with propidium monoazide (PMA), a microbial membrane-impermeant dye that binds to extracellular DNA and DNA in dead or membrane-compromised cells, inhibiting its amplification. PMA has successfully been used to monitor the presence of viable pathogens in several different matrices. In this review the use of PMA-qPCR is discussed as a suitable approach for viable microbial enumeration in biosolids. Recommendations for optimization of the method are made, with a focus on DNA extraction, dilution of sample turbidity, reagent concentration, and light exposure time. PMID:21963489

  13. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2  =  0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2  =  0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r2  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore showed great promise in predicting the BBB opening duration, enabling thus control of opening according to the drug circulation time. In addition, avoiding adverse effects in the brain and assessing the pharmacokinetics of the compounds delivered can also be achieved by monitoring and controlling the stable cavitation emissions.

  14. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r(2)  =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r(2)  =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r(2)  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore showed great promise in predicting the BBB opening duration, enabling thus control of opening according to the drug circulation time. In addition, avoiding adverse effects in the brain and assessing the pharmacokinetics of the compounds delivered can also be achieved by monitoring and controlling the stable cavitation emissions. PMID:26562661

  15. In vivo assessment of macrophage CNS infiltration during disruption of the blood-brain barrier with focused ultrasound: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Wai, Yau-Yau; Hsu, Po-Hong; Lyu, Lee-Ang; Wu, Jia-Shin; Shen, Chia-Rui; Chen, Jin-Chung; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2010-01-01

    Focused ultrasound has been discovered to locally and reversibly increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, inappropriate sonication of the BBB may cause complications, such as hemorrhage and brain tissue damage. Tissue damage may be controlled by selecting optimal sonication parameters. In this study, we sought to investigate the feasibility of labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles to assess the inflammatory response during focused-ultrasound-induced BBB opening. We show that infiltration of phagocytes does not occur using optimal parameters of sonication. Taken together, the results of our study support the usefulness and safety of focused-ultrasound-induced BBB opening for enhancing drug delivery to the brain. These findings may have implications for the optimization of sonication parameters. PMID:19724289

  16. Detection of Nitro-Based and Peroxide-Based Explosives by Fast Polarity-Switchable Ion Mobility Spectrometer with Ion Focusing in Vicinity of Faraday Detector

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qinghua; Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haiyang

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been widely deployed for on-site detection of explosives. The common nitro-based explosives are usually detected by negative IMS while the emerging peroxide-based explosives are better detected by positive IMS. In this study, a fast polarity-switchable IMS was constructed to detect these two explosive species in a single measurement. As the large traditional Faraday detector would cause a trailing reactant ion peak (RIP), a Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity was developed by reducing the detector radius to 3.3 mm and increasing the voltage difference between aperture grid and its front guard ring to 591 V, which could remove trailing peaks from RIP without loss of signal intensity. This fast polarity-switchable IMS with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector was employed to detect a mixture of 10 ng 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 50 ng hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) by polarity-switching, and the result suggested that [TNT-H]− and [HMTD+H]+ could be detected in a single measurement. Furthermore, the removal of trailing peaks from RIP by the Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity also promised the accurate identification of KClO4, KNO3 and S in common inorganic explosives, whose product ion peaks were fairly adjacent to RIP. PMID:26021282

  17. Exploring recruitment barriers and facilitators in early cancer detection trials: the use of pre-trial focus groups

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recruiting to randomized controlled trials is fraught with challenges; with less than one third recruiting to their original target. In preparation for a trial evaluating the effectiveness of a blood test to screen for lung cancer (the ECLS trial), we conducted a qualitative study to explore the potential barriers and facilitators that would impact recruitment. Methods Thirty two people recruited from community settings took part in four focus groups in Glasgow and Dundee (UK). Thematic analysis was used to code the data and develop themes. Results Three sub-themes were developed under the larger theme of recruitment strategies. The first of these themes, recruitment options, considered that participants largely felt that the invitation to participate letter should come from GPs, with postal reminders and face-to-face reminders during primary care contacts. The second theme dealt with understanding randomization and issues related to the control group (where bloods were taken but not tested). Some participants struggled with the concept or need for randomization, or for the need for a control group. Some reported that they would not consider taking part if allocated to the control group, but others were motivated to take part even if allocated to the control group by altruism. The final theme considered perceived barriers to participation and included practical barriers (such as flexible appointments and reimbursement of travel expenses) and psychosocial barriers (such as feeling stigmatized because of their smoking status and worries about being coerced into stopping smoking). Conclusions Focus groups provided useful information which resulted in numerous changes to proposed trial documentation and processes. This was in order to address participants information needs, improve comprehension of the trial documentation, enhance facilitators and remove barriers to participation. The modifications made in light of these findings may enhance trial recruitment and future trials may wish to consider use of pretrial focus groups. PMID:24678918

  18. Isoelectric focusing purity criteria and 1H NMR detectable spectroscopic heterogeneity in the major isolated monomer hemoglobins from Glycera dibranchiata.

    PubMed

    Constantinidis, I; Satterlee, J D

    1987-12-01

    Three major monomeric hemoglobins have been isolated from the erythrocytes of Glycera dibranchiata. Their importance to structure-function studies of heme proteins lies in the fact that they have been shown to possess an exceptional amino acid substitution. In these proteins, the E-7 position is occupied by leucine rather than the more common distal histidine. This substitution alters the polarity of the heme ligand binding environment compared to myoglobin. Due to this, the G. dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins are attracting much attention. However, until now no purity criterion has been developed. Here we demonstrate that, for all of the Glycera monomer hemoglobins, multiple line patterns are shown on high-voltage isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels. Most of these lines are shown to be a consequence of heme-related phenomena and can be understood on the basis of changes in oxidation and ligation state of the heme iron. The multiple line pattern does not indicate significant impurities in the monomer hemoglobin preparations. Similar behavior is also demonstrated for horse heart myoglobin. The multiple line patterns on IEF gels disappear when gels of the apoproteins alone are focused. Single bands occur in this case for all of the monomer hemoglobins except component II, which displays two bands, one major and one minor. The minor band is found to be a modified apoprotein form. It is sensitive to apoprotein handling prior to focusing and depends upon whether the IEF gel is prefocused or not. From this analysis, IEF is shown to be a valuable purity criterion, and the purity of our monomer hemoglobin component II preparation is 97% one globin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3427104

  19. A new multichannel time reversal focusing method for circumferential Lamb waves and its applications for defect detection in thick-walled pipe with large-diameter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zenghua; Xu, Qinglong; Gong, Yu; He, Cunfu; Wu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a new multichannel time reversal focusing (MTRF) method for circumferential Lamb waves which is based on modified time reversal algorithm and applies this method for detecting different kinds of defects in thick-walled pipe with large-diameter. The principle of time reversal of circumferential Lamb waves in pipe is presented along with the influence from multiple guided wave modes and propagation paths. Experimental study is carried out in a thick-walled and large-diameter pipe with three artificial defects, namely two axial notches on its inner and outer surface respectively, and a corrosion-like defect on its outer surface. By using the proposed MTRF method, the multichannel signals focus at the defects, leading to the amplitude improvement of the defect scattered signal. Besides, another energy focus arises in the direct signal due to the partial compensation of dispersion and multimode of circumferential Lamb waves, alongside the multichannel focusing, during MTRF process. By taking the direct focus as a time base, accurate defect localization is implemented. Secondly, a new phenomenon is exhibited in this paper that defect scattered wave packet appears just before the right boundary of truncation window after time reversal, and to which two feasible explanations are given. Moreover, this phenomenon can be used as the theoretical basis in the determination of defect scattered waves in time reversal response signal. At last, in order to detect defects without prior knowing their exact position, a large-range truncation window is used in the proposed method. As a result, the experimental operation of MTRF method is simplified and defect detection and localization are well accomplished. PMID:24877582

  20. In Vitro Investigation of the Individual Contributions of Ultrasound-Induced Stable and Inertial Cavitation in Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gourevich, Dana; Volovick, Alexander; Dogadkin, Osnat; Wang, Lijun; Mulvana, Helen; Medan, Yoav; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery is a therapeutic modality under development with the potential to treat cancer. Its ability to produce local hyperthermia and cell poration through cavitation non-invasively makes it a candidate to trigger drug delivery. Hyperthermia offers greater potential for control, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging temperature measurement. However, cavitation may offer reduced treatment times, with real-time measurement of ultrasonic spectra indicating drug dose and treatment success. Here, a clinical magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery system was used to study ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery in vitro. Drug uptake into breast cancer cells in the vicinity of ultrasound contrast agent was correlated with occurrence and quantity of stable and inertial cavitation, classified according to subharmonic spectra. During stable cavitation, intracellular drug uptake increased by a factor up to 3.2 compared with the control. Reported here are the value of cavitation monitoring with a clinical system and its subsequent employment for dose optimization. PMID:25887690

  1. Pharmacokinetics of BPA in gliomas with ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption as measured by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lin, Yi-Li; Chou, Fong-In; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chang, Lun-Wei; Hsieh, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles for targeted drug delivery. Previous studies have illustrated the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery across the BBB after sonication using indirect visualization techniques. In this study, we investigated the in vivo extracellular kinetics of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) in glioma-bearing rats with FUS-induced BBB disruption by microdialysis. After simultaneous intravenous administration of BPA and FUS exposure, the boron concentration in the treated brains was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With FUS, the mean peak concentration of BPA-f in the glioma dialysate was 3.6 times greater than without FUS, and the area under the concentration-time curve was 2.1 times greater. This study demonstrates that intracerebral microdialysis can be used to assess local BBB transport profiles of drugs in a sonicated site. Applying microdialysis to the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics is useful for obtaining selective information within a specific brain site after FUS-induced BBB disruption. PMID:24936788

  2. Pharmacokinetics of BPA in Gliomas with Ultrasound Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption as Measured by Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lin, Yi-Li; Chou, Fong-In; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chang, Lun-Wei; Hsieh, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles for targeted drug delivery. Previous studies have illustrated the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery across the BBB after sonication using indirect visualization techniques. In this study, we investigated the in vivo extracellular kinetics of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) in glioma-bearing rats with FUS-induced BBB disruption by microdialysis. After simultaneous intravenous administration of BPA and FUS exposure, the boron concentration in the treated brains was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With FUS, the mean peak concentration of BPA-f in the glioma dialysate was 3.6 times greater than without FUS, and the area under the concentration-time curve was 2.1 times greater. This study demonstrates that intracerebral microdialysis can be used to assess local BBB transport profiles of drugs in a sonicated site. Applying microdialysis to the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics is useful for obtaining selective information within a specific brain site after FUS-induced BBB disruption. PMID:24936788

  3. Magnetic resonance thermometry at 7T for real-time monitoring and correction of ultrasound induced mild hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Fite, Brett Z; Liu, Yu; Kruse, Dustin E; Caskey, Charles F; Walton, Jeffrey H; Lai, Chun-Yen; Mahakian, Lisa M; Larrat, Benoit; Dumont, Erik; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2012-01-01

    While Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) has been extensively utilized for non-invasive temperature measurement, there is limited data on the use of high field (≥7T) scanners for this purpose. MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a promising non-invasive method for localized hyperthermia and drug delivery. MRT based on the temperature sensitivity of the proton resonance frequency (PRF) has been implemented in both a tissue phantom and in vivo in a mouse Met-1 tumor model, using partial parallel imaging (PPI) to speed acquisition. An MRgFUS system capable of delivering a controlled 3D acoustic dose during real time MRT with proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) feedback control was developed and validated. Real-time MRT was validated in a tofu phantom with fluoroptic temperature measurements, and acoustic heating simulations were in good agreement with MR temperature maps. In an in vivo Met-1 mouse tumor, the real-time PID feedback control is capable of maintaining the desired temperature with high accuracy. We found that real time MR control of hyperthermia is feasible at high field, and k-space based PPI techniques may be implemented for increasing temporal resolution while maintaining temperature accuracy on the order of 1°C. PMID:22536396

  4. Magnetic Resonance Thermometry at 7T for Real-Time Monitoring and Correction of Ultrasound Induced Mild Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Fite, Brett Z.; Liu, Yu; Kruse, Dustin E.; Caskey, Charles F.; Walton, Jeffrey H.; Lai, Chun-Yen; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Larrat, Benoit; Dumont, Erik; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2012-01-01

    While Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) has been extensively utilized for non-invasive temperature measurement, there is limited data on the use of high field (≥7T) scanners for this purpose. MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a promising non-invasive method for localized hyperthermia and drug delivery. MRT based on the temperature sensitivity of the proton resonance frequency (PRF) has been implemented in both a tissue phantom and in vivo in a mouse Met-1 tumor model, using partial parallel imaging (PPI) to speed acquisition. An MRgFUS system capable of delivering a controlled 3D acoustic dose during real time MRT with proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) feedback control was developed and validated. Real-time MRT was validated in a tofu phantom with fluoroptic temperature measurements, and acoustic heating simulations were in good agreement with MR temperature maps. In an in vivo Met-1 mouse tumor, the real-time PID feedback control is capable of maintaining the desired temperature with high accuracy. We found that real time MR control of hyperthermia is feasible at high field, and k-space based PPI techniques may be implemented for increasing temporal resolution while maintaining temperature accuracy on the order of 1°C. PMID:22536396

  5. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  6. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Molecular Delivery Through the Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shougang; Baseri, Babak; Choi, James J.; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Morrison, Barclay; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2009-04-01

    Recent studies have proven that focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles can deliver large molecules across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) locally, transiently and non-invasively. In this study, the cellular effects, the size estimation of the opening and the amount delivered were inferred through qualitative and quantitative analysis of molecular delivery to the brain parenchyma in a murine model. The ultimate purpose was to build the foundation for future ultrasound-facilitated neurodegenerative disease treatment in humans. A bolus of microbubbles at 1 μl/g body weight concentration was intravenously injected. Pulsed FUS was applied to the left hippocampus through the intact skin and skull followed by intravenously administration of fluorescence-conjugated dextran at 3 kDa, 10 kDa and 70 kDa. The brain were either sectioned for fluorescence imaging or homogenized for quantitative analysis. The concentration of 3 kDa, 10 kDa and 70 kDa dextrans delivered to the left brain hemisphere was quantified to be 7.9±4.9 μg/g, 2.4±1.3 μg/g and 0.9±0.47 μg/g of brain weight. Smooth muscle cells engulfing the arterioles exhibited higher fluorescence in the case of 70 kDa dextran, compared to the 3 kDa dextran, demonstrating that fluorescence imaging can help with the understanding of the type of mechanism of molecular uptake by different brain cells.

  7. The Dependence of the Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening Characteristics on Microbubble Size In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, James J.; Feshitan, Jameel A.; Wang, Shougang; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Baseri, Babak; Borden, Mark A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2009-04-01

    Recent neuropharmaceutical developments have led to potent disease-modifying drugs. In spite of these advancements, most agents cannot traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and deposit in the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been shown to induce noninvasive, localized, and transient BBB opening. Although promising, safety and efficacy concerns still remain. Previously reported experiments used conventional imaging contrast agents that have a wide size distribution. In this study, we hypothesize that BBB opening characteristics are dependent on bubble diameter. A 25 μl bolus of in-house manufactured, lipid-shelled bubbles with either 1-2 or 4-5 μm diameter ranges was injected intravenously. Pulsed FUS (frequency: 1.5 MHz, peak-negative pressure: 146-607 kPa, duty cycle: 20%, duration: 1-min) was then applied to the left hippocampus of mice (n = 16) in vivo through the intact skin and skull. MRI or fluorescence microscopy was used to determine BBB opening. Contrast-enhanced (Omniscan™; 0.75 mL; molecular weight: 574 Da) MRI (9.4-T) was acquired on multiple days after sonication to determine BBB opening and closing. Fluorescence microscopy was also used to determine the feasibility of delivering large, 3 kDa dextran compounds through the BBB. The BBB opening acoustic pressure threshold for the 4-5μm bubbles was in the 146-304 kPa range while the threshold for the 1-2μm bubbles was higher. In conclusion, FUS-induced BBB opening and closing was shown to be dependent on the bubble diameter indicating the possibility of specifically designing bubbles to enhance this therapeutic application.

  8. Molecules of various pharmacologically-relevant sizes can cross the ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, James J; Wang, Shougang; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Morrison, Barclay; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is hereby shown to noninvasively and selectively deliver compounds at pharmacologically relevant molecular weights through the opened blood-brain barrier (BBB). A complete examination on the size of the FUS-induced BBB opening, the spatial distribution of the delivered agents and its dependence on the agent's molecular weight were imaged and quantified using fluorescence microscopy. BBB opening in mice (n=13) was achieved in vivo after systemic administration of microbubbles and subsequent application of pulsed FUS (frequency: 1.525MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure in situ: 570 kPa) to the left murine hippocampus through the intact skin and skull. BBB-impermeant, fluorescent-tagged dextrans at three distinct molecular weights spanning over several orders of magnitude were systemically administered and acted as model therapeutic compounds. First, dextrans of 3 and 70 kDa were delivered trans-BBB while 2000 kDa dextran was not. Second, compared with 70 kDa dextran, a higher concentration of 3 kDa dextran was delivered through the opened BBB. Third, the 3 and 70 kDa dextrans were both diffusely distributed throughout the targeted brain region. However, high concentrations of 70 kDa dextran appeared more punctated throughout the targeted region. In conclusion, FUS combined with microbubbles opened the BBB sufficiently to allow passage of compounds of at least 70 kDa, but not greater than 2000 kDa into the brain parenchyma. This noninvasive and localized BBB opening technique could, thus, provide a unique means for the delivery of compounds of several magnitudes of kDa that include agents with shown therapeutic promise in vitro but whose in vivo translation has been hampered by their associated BBB impermeability. (E-mail: ek2191@columbia.edu). PMID:19900750

  9. Distinct heterogeneity of IgG immune response in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) detected by isoelectric focusing (IEF) with extended immunofixation.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tilmann O; Damm, Thomas

    2003-08-15

    An optimized automated IEF procedure in polyacrylamide micro gels and immunofixation with 10 monospecific antibodies against some fragments of the IgG molecule and against the whole IgG isotypes IgG(1), IgG(2), IgG(3), IgG(4), respectively, detected oligoclonal bands (OBs) within acid, neutral, and alkaline ranges of the gels. Accuracy and reliability of the OB assay for detection of an intrathecal IgG synthesis proved to be higher with immunofixation than with silver staining of bands precipitated by trichloroacetic acid. CSF OBs were specified as lambda or kappa IgG subfractions, respectively, duplex IgGs precipitated with anti-lambda, anti-kappa, and anti-Fc antibodies at the same pI. Most of OBs were classified as belonging to either IgG(1), IgG(2), IgG(3), or IgG(4) isotypes in CSF. The IEF procedure additionally allowed the discrimination of both free light chains and possible "free" heavy gamma chain fragments in CSF, when immunofixation was done with monospecific antibodies against both light chains and gamma chain fragments (e.g. anti-F(ab')(2), anti-Fd, anti-Fc, anti-C(H)2). The results pointed out a distinct heterogeneity of the IgG immune response in human CSF. The IEF procedure with extended immunofixation is recommended for completion of the basic laboratory procedures used in neuroimmunology in order to discriminate inflammatory processes in human CNS. PMID:12909301

  10. Geoscientific Applications of Particle Detection and Imaging Techniques withSpecial Focus on the Monitoring Clay Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, Laurence N.; Grathoff, Georg H.

    The combined use of focused X-ray, electron, and ion beams offers a diverse range of analytical capabilities for characterizing nanoscale mineral reactions that occur in hydrous environments. Improved image and microanalytical techniques (e.g., electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), in combination with controlled sample environments, are currently leading to new advances in the understanding of fluid-mineral reactions in the Earth Sciences. One group of minerals playing a key role in the containment of radioactive waste and the underground storage of CO2 is the clay minerals: these small, expandable, and highly adsorbent hydrous phyllosilicates form important low-permeable geological barriers by which waste can be safely deposited. In this article we summarize some of the state-of-the-art particle and imaging techniques employed to predict the behavior of both engineered and natural clay mineral seals in proposed storage sites. Particular attention is given to two types of low-permeability geomaterials: engineered bentonite backfill and natural shale in the subsurface. These materials have contrasting swelling properties and degrees of chemical stability that require detailed analytical study for developing suitable disposal or storage solutions.

  11. Analysis of global Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes distribution and special focus on AGILE detections over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabró, Ferran; Montanyà, Joan; Marisaldi, Martino; van der Velde, Oscar A.; Fuschino, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Global distribution of the Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected by AGILE and RHESSI for the period from March 2009 to July 2012 has been analysed. A fourth TGF production region has been distinguished over the Pacific. It is confirmed that TGF occurrence follows the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) seasonal migration and prefers afternoons. TGF/lightning ratio appears to be lower over America than other regions suggesting that meteorological regional differences are important for the TGF production. Diurnal cycle of TGFs peaks in the afternoon suggesting that Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and convection are important for TGF production. Moreover all AGILE passages over South America in the same period have been analysed to find meteorological preferences for TGF occurrence. In each passage the analysis of Cloud Top Altitude (CTA), CAPE, number of strokes, number of storms and coverage area of clouds with temperatures below -70 °C (Cloud Top Coverage area, CTC) are computed. On average, AGILE has been exposed to 19,100 strokes between each TGF representing ∼68 h of exposure over active storms. High CAPE values, high cloud tops and high stroke occurrence suggest that meteorological conditions conducive to vigorous and electrically active storms are important for TGF production. It is shown that a high number of thunderstorms is preferable for TGF production which may be explained by a greater chance of the presence of a thunderstorm in the best development stage for TGF production. High tropopause altitude seems to be important but not primordial for TGF production.

  12. Comparative study on the effectiveness of different mosquito traps in arbovirus surveillance with a focus on WNV detection.

    PubMed

    Pezzin, Alex; Sy, Victoria; Puggioli, Arianna; Veronesi, Rodolfo; Carrieri, Marco; Maccagnani, Bettina; Bellini, Romeo

    2016-01-01

    The selection of the ideal trap for arbovirus surveillance is an issue of primary importance to increase the sensitivity of virus detection and the cost-effectiveness of the entomological surveillance. During the summer 2011, the effectiveness of five types of mosquito traps (CDC gravid trap, CO2(-)baited trap, BG-Sentinel™ and two experimental prototypes) to attract females potentially infected with West Nile virus were assessed. The study was carried out in three natural wetland sites located in the Emilia-Romagna Region (Northern Italy), using a Latin square scheme. Single night collections of adult females were performed and determination of species and physiological state (gravid, nulliparous or parous) was made upon return to the laboratory. The species most frequently collected in the gravid trap was Culex pipiens sl. L., being gravid females the large majority of the individuals. Species diversity was much higher in CO2(-)baited traps, which may therefore enable a more comprehensive description of the vector species composition and their role in arboviruses circulation. Our findings indicate that gravid traps can be a valid tool and should be integrated in the West Nile virus surveillance system in the Emilia-Romagna region, mainly based on collections made with CO2-baited traps. PMID:26466982

  13. Attention focusing in a sit-and-wait forager: a spider controls its prey-detection ability in different web sectors by adjusting thread tension

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Kensuke

    2010-01-01

    Focusing attention is a way for animals to search for and to obtain food efficiently. This study examines whether a sit-and-wait forager, the orb-web spider Cyclosa octotuberculata, focuses its attention on limited foraging areas. Video records of foraging activity revealed that the spiders detected prey trapped in the west and east sectors of their web less frequently than prey trapped in the north and south sectors. Comparison of photos of the web hub area with and without spiders present revealed that the spiders pulled radii towards the centre when waiting for prey. Radius pulling is stronger in the north and south web sectors than in the west and east sectors, possibly causing more tension in radii running vertically. Experimental manipulation indicated that the spiders responded to prey quicker when thread tension was increased. The results suggest that C. octotuberculata focus their attention on the web areas above and below the spider by adjusting the tension in web threads; and this causes higher prey detection rates in these areas. PMID:19812081

  14. New pediatric vision screener employing polarization-modulated, retinal-birefringence-scanning-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system: opto-mechanical design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L.

    2014-06-01

    Amblyopia ("lazy eye") is a major public health problem, caused by misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or defocus. If detected early in childhood, there is an excellent response to therapy, yet most children are detected too late to be treated effectively. Commercially available vision screening devices that test for amblyopia's primary causes can detect strabismus only indirectly and inaccurately via assessment of the positions of external light reflections from the cornea, but they cannot detect the anatomical feature of the eyes where fixation actually occurs (the fovea). Our laboratory has been developing technology to detect true foveal fixation, by exploiting the birefringence of the uniquely arranged Henle fibers delineating the fovea using retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), and we recently described a polarization-modulated approach to RBS that enables entirely direct and reliable detection of true foveal fixation, with greatly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and essentially independent of corneal birefringence (a confounding variable with all polarization-sensitive ophthalmic technology). Here, we describe the design and operation of a new pediatric vision screener that employs polarization-modulated, RBS-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system, and demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach.

  15. Focused ion beam-fabricated Au micro/nanostructures used as a surface enhanced Raman scattering-active substrate for trace detection of molecules and influenza virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Yi; Liao, Jiunn-Der; Ju, Yu-Hung; Chang, Chia-Wei; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2011-05-01

    The focused ion beam (FIB) technique was used to precisely fabricate patterned Au micro/nanostructures (fibAu). The effects of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on the fibAu samples were investigated by adjusting the geometrical, dimensional, and spacing factors. The SERS mechanism was evaluated using low-concentration rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, physically adsorbed or suspended on/within the micro/nanostructures. The results indicated that for detecting R6G molecules, hexagon-like micro/nanostructures induced a higher electromagnetic mechanism (EM) due to the availability of multiple edges and small curvature. By decreasing the dimensions from 300 to 150 nm, the laser-focused area contained an increasing number of micro/nanostructures and therefore intensified the excitation of SERS signals. Moreover, with an optimized geometry and dimensions of the micro/nanostructures, the relative intensity/surface area value reached a maximum as the spacing was 22 nm. An exponential decrease was found as the spacing was increased, which most probably resulted from the loss of EM. The spacing between the micro/nanostructures upon the fibAu was consequently regarded as the dominant factor for the detection of R6G molecules. By taking an optimized fibAu to detect low-concentration influenza virus, the amino acids from the outermost surface of the virus can be well distinguished through the SERS mechanism.

  16. Detection efficiency vs. cathode and anode separation in cylindrical vacuum photodiodes used for measuring x-rays from plasma focus device.

    PubMed

    Borthakur, T K; Talukdar, N; Neog, N K; Rao, C V S; Shyam, A

    2011-10-01

    A qualitative study on the performance of cylindrical vacuum photodiodes (VPDs) for x-ray detection in plasma focus device has been carried out. Various parameters of VPD such as electrode's diameter, electrode's separation, and its sensitivity are experimentally tested in plasma focus environment. For the first time it is found experimentally that the electrode-separation in the lateral direction of the two coaxial electrodes of cylindrical VPD also plays an important role to increase the efficiency of the detector. The efficiency is found to be highest for the detector with smaller cathode-anode lateral gap (1.5 mm) with smaller photo cathode diameter (10 mm). A comparison between our VPD with PIN (BPX-65) diode as an x-ray detector has also been made. PMID:22047294

  17. Detection efficiency vs. cathode and anode separation in cylindrical vacuum photodiodes used for measuring x-rays from plasma focus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthakur, T. K.; Talukdar, N.; Neog, N. K.; Rao, C. V. S.; Shyam, A.

    2011-10-01

    A qualitative study on the performance of cylindrical vacuum photodiodes (VPDs) for x-ray detection in plasma focus device has been carried out. Various parameters of VPD such as electrode's diameter, electrode's separation, and its sensitivity are experimentally tested in plasma focus environment. For the first time it is found experimentally that the electrode-separation in the lateral direction of the two coaxial electrodes of cylindrical VPD also plays an important role to increase the efficiency of the detector. The efficiency is found to be highest for the detector with smaller cathode-anode lateral gap (1.5 mm) with smaller photo cathode diameter (10 mm). A comparison between our VPD with PIN (BPX-65) diode as an x-ray detector has also been made.

  18. MRI-guided targeted blood-brain barrier disruption with focused ultrasound: histological findings in rabbits.

    PubMed

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Raymond, Scott; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-11-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a method to disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) noninvasively and reversibly at targeted locations. The purpose of this study was to test the safety of this method by searching for ischemia and apoptosis in areas with BBB disruption induced by pulsed ultrasound in the presence of preformed gas bubbles and by looking for delayed effects up to one month after sonication. Pulsed ultrasound exposures (sonications) were performed in the brains of 24 rabbits under monitoring by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (ultrasound: frequency = 1.63 MHz, burst length = 100 ms, PRF = 1 Hz, duration = 20 s, pressure amplitude 0.7 to 1.0 MPa). Before sonication, an ultrasound contrast agent (Optison, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) was injected IV. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced MR images. Whole brain histologic examination was performed using haematoxylin and eosin staining for general histology, vanadium acid fuchsin-toluidine blue staining for ischemic neurons and TUNEL staining for apoptosis. The main effects observed were tiny regions of extravasated red blood cells scattered around the sonicated locations, indicating affected capillaries. Despite these vasculature effects, only a few cells in some of the sonicated areas showed evidence for apoptosis or ischemia. No ischemic or apoptotic regions were detected that would indicate a compromised blood supply was induced by the sonications. No delayed effects were observed either by MRI or histology up to 4 wk after sonication. Ultrasound-induced BBB disruption is possible without inducing substantial vascular damage that would result in ischemic or apoptotic death to neurons. These findings indicate that this method is safe for targeted drug delivery, at least when compared with the currently available invasive methods. PMID:16286030

  19. Capillary isoelectric focusing of microorganisms in the pH range 2-5 in a dynamically modified FS capillary with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Růzicka, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2006-07-01

    The isoelectric points of many microbial cells lie within the pH range spanning from 1.5 to 4.5. In this work, we suggest a CIEF method for the separation of cells according to their isoelectric points in the pH range of 2-5. It includes the segmental injection of the sample pulse composed of the segment of the selected simple ampholytes, the segment of the bioanalytes and the segment of carrier ampholytes into fused silica capillaries dynamically modified by poly(ethylene glycole). This polymer dissolved in the catholyte, in the anolyte and in the injected sample pulse was used for a prevention of the bioanalyte adsorption on the capillary surface and for the reduction of the electroosmotic flow. Between each focusing run, the capillaries were washed with the mixture of acetone/ethanol to achieve the reproducible and efficient CIEF. In order to trace of pH gradients, low-molecular-mass pI markers were used. The mixed cultures of microorganisms, Escherichia coli CCM 3954, Candida albicans CCM 8180, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, CCM 8223, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiela pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus CCM 3953, Streptococcus agalactiae CCM 6187, Enterococcus faecalis CCM 4224 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CCM 4418, were focused and separated by the CIEF method suggested here. This CIEF method enables the separation and detection of the microbes from the mixed cultures within several minutes. The minimum detectable number of microbial cells was less than 10(3). PMID:16791563

  20. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a surrogate to on/off control the FUS exposure in stage-2 experiments, we demonstrated both excellent sensitivity (92%) and specificity (92.3%) in discriminating BBB-opening occurrence can be obtained in animal treatments, while concurrently achieving a high positive predicted value (95.8%). Wideband ESD was also highly correlated with the occurrence and level of erythrocyte extravasations (r (2)  =  0.81). The proposed system configuration and corresponding analysis based on subharmonic acoustic emissions has the potential to be implemented as a real-time feedback control structure for reliable indication of intact FUS-BBB opening for CNS brain drug delivery. PMID:26988240

  1. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a surrogate to on/off control the FUS exposure in stage-2 experiments, we demonstrated both excellent sensitivity (92%) and specificity (92.3%) in discriminating BBB-opening occurrence can be obtained in animal treatments, while concurrently achieving a high positive predicted value (95.8%). Wideband ESD was also highly correlated with the occurrence and level of erythrocyte extravasations (r 2  =  0.81). The proposed system configuration and corresponding analysis based on subharmonic acoustic emissions has the potential to be implemented as a real-time feedback control structure for reliable indication of intact FUS-BBB opening for CNS brain drug delivery.

  2. Reorganization of gap junctions after focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Angelika; Reinz, Eileen; Jenne, Jürgen W; Fatar, Marc; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Hannah; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephen

    2010-07-01

    Ultrasound-induced opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an emerging technique for targeted drug delivery to the central nervous system. Gap junctions allow transfer of information between adjacent cells and are responsible for tissue homeostasis. We examined the effect of ultrasound-induced BBB opening on the structure of gap junctions in cortical neurons, expressing Connexin 36, and astrocytes, expressing Connexin 43, after focused 1-MHz ultrasound exposure at 1.25 MPa of one hemisphere together with intravenous microbubble (Optison, Oslo, Norway) application. Quantification of immunofluorescence signals revealed that, compared with non-insonicated hemispheres, small-sized Connexin 43 and 36 gap-junctional plaques were markedly reduced in areas with BBB breakdown after 3 to 6 hours (34.02+/-6.04% versus 66.49+/-2.16%, P=0.02 for Connexin 43; 33.80+/-1.24% versus 36.77+/-3.43%, P=0.07 for Connexin 36). Complementing this finding, we found significant increases in large-sized gap-junctional plaques (5.76+/-0.96% versus 1.02+/-0.84%, P=0.05 for Connexin 43; 5.62+/-0.22% versus 4.65+/-0.80%, P=0.02 for Connexin 36). This effect was reversible at 24 hours after ultrasound exposure. Western blot analyses did not show any change in the total connexin amount. These results indicate that ultrasound-induced BBB opening leads to a reorganization of gap-junctional plaques in both neurons and astrocytes. The plaque-size increase may be a cellular response to imbalances in extracellular homeostasis after BBB leakage. PMID:20332798

  3. Detection and Differentiation of Threonine- and Tyrosine-Monophosphorylated Forms of ERK1/2 by Capillary Isoelectric Focusing-Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Inga; Besong Agbo, Daniela; Otto, Markus; Wiltfang, Jens; Klafki, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular signal regulated kinases ERK1/2 play important roles in the regulation of diverse cellular functions and have been implicated in several human diseases. In addition to the fully activated, diphosphorylated ERK1/2 protein, monophosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 have been observed, which may have distinct biological functions. We report here on the highly sensitive detection and differentiation of unphosphorylated, threonine-phosphorylated (pT), tyrosine-phosphorylated (pY) and diphosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2 by capillary isoelectric focusing followed by immunological detection (CIEF-immunoassay). Eight different phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 were resolved according to charge. The unequivocal identification and differentiation of ERK1 and ERK2 forms monophosphorylated at either threonine or tyrosine was achieved by competitive blocking with specific phospho-peptides and different phosphorylation-sensitive antibodies. The suitability of the additional pT-ERK1/2 and pY-ERK1/2 differentiation for the time-resolved in-depth study of phospho-form distribution in response to specific stimuli is demonstrated in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and monocytic THP-1 cell lines, and in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:26235103

  4. Focused Screening and Treatment (FSAT): A PCR-Based Strategy to Detect Malaria Parasite Carriers and Contain Drug Resistant P. falciparum, Pailin, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Stefan; Nguon, Sokomar; Kim, Saorin; Habib, Najibullah; Khim, Nimol; Sum, Sarorn; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Bjorge, Steven; Thomson, Andrew; Kheng, Sim; Chea, Nguon; Yok, Sovann; Top, Samphornarann; Ros, Seyha; Sophal, Uth; Thompson, Michelle M.; Mellor, Steve; Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Yeang, Chhiang; Yeung, Shunmay; Duong, Socheat; Newman, Robert D.; Menard, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in Pailin province, along the border between Thailand and Cambodia, have become resistant to artemisinin derivatives. To better define the epidemiology of P. falciparum populations and to assess the risk of the possible spread of these parasites outside Pailin, a new epidemiological tool named “Focused Screening and Treatment” (FSAT), based on active molecular detection of asymptomatic parasite carriers was introduced in 2010. Cross-sectional malariometric surveys using PCR were carried out in 20 out of 109 villages in Pailin province. Individuals detected as P. falciparum carriers were treated with atovaquone-proguanil combination plus a single dose of primaquine if the patient was non-G6PD deficient. Interviews were conducted to elicit history of cross-border travel that might contribute to the spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites. After directly observed treatment, patients were followed up and re-examined on day 7 and day 28. Among 6931 individuals screened, prevalence of P. falciparum carriers was less than 1%, of whom 96% were asymptomatic. Only 1.6% of the individuals had a travel history or plans to go outside Cambodia, with none of those tested being positive for P. falciparum. Retrospective analysis, using 2010 routine surveillance data, showed significant differences in the prevalence of asymptomatic carriers discovered by FSAT between villages classified as “high risk” and “low risk” based on malaria incidence data. All positive individuals treated and followed-up until day 28 were cured. No mutant-type allele related to atovaquone resistance was found. FSAT is a potentially useful tool to detect, treat and track clusters of asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum along with providing valuable epidemiological information regarding cross-border movements of potential malaria parasite carriers and parasite gene flow. PMID:23049687

  5. An enzyme-linked immuno focus assay for rapid detection and enumeration, and a newborn mouse model for human non-polio enteroviruses associated with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rao, C Durga; Reddy, Harikrishna; Naidu, Jagadish R; Raghavendra, A; Radhika, N S; Karande, Anjali

    2015-11-01

    We have recently reported significant association of non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) with acute and persistent diarrhea (18-21% of total diarrheal cases), and non-diarrheal Increased Frequency of Bowel Movements (IFoBM-ND) (about 29% of the NPEV infections) in children and that the NPEV-associated diarrhea was as significant as rotavirus diarrhea. However, their diarrhea-causing potential is yet to be demonstrated in an animal model system. Since the determination of virus titers by the traditional plaque assay takes 4-7 days, there is a need for development of a rapid method for virus titer determination to facilitate active clinical research on enterovirus-associated diarrhea. The goal of this study is to develop a cell-based rapid detection and enumeration method and to demonstrate the diarrhea-inducing potential of purified and characterized non-polio enteroviruses, which were isolated from diarrheic children. Here we describe generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against purified strains belonging to different serotypes, and development of an enzyme-linked immuno focus assay (ELIFA) for detection and enumeration of live NPEV particles in clinical and purified virus samples, and a newborn mouse model for NPEV diarrhea. Plaque-purified NPVEs, belonging to different serotypes, isolated from children with diarrhea, were grown in cell culture and purified by isopycnic CsCl density gradient centrifugation. By ELIFA, NPEVs could be detected and enumerated within 12h post-infection. Our results demonstrated that Coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) and CVB5 strains, isolated from diarrheic children, induced severe diarrhea in orally-inoculated 9-12 day-old mouse pups, fulfilling Koch's postulates. The methods described here would facilitate studies on NPEV-associated gastrointestinal disease. PMID:26300372

  6. Molecular detection and identification of Leishmania infection in naturally infected sand flies in a focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis in northern Morocco

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by various species of the flagellate protozoan Leishmania. During the past 20 years, cutaneous leishmaniasis has emerged as a major public health threat in Morocco. The main objective of this study was to study the occurrence of Leishmania infection in vectors and to identify sand fly blood meal sources in an endemic locality of cutaneous leishmaniasis within Sefrou province, where the vectors of leishmaniasis were still unknown. Methods 2650 sand flies were collected using CDC miniature light traps and identified morphologically. The identified sand flies were tested for Leishmania infection by nested PCR. The source of blood meal of 10 freshly engorged females: 6 Phlebotomus longicuspis and 4 Phlebotomus sergenti, was determined using the Cyt b sequence. Results The collected sand flies consisted of 10 species, seven of which belonged to the genus Phlebotomus and three to the genus Sergentomyia. The most abundant species was P. longicuspis, accounting for 72% of the total sand flies collected. In females of three P. longicuspis and four P. sergenti, Leishmania infantum and Leishmania tropica DNA was detected, respectively. The source of blood meal of engorged females showed that all sand flies tested fed on humans. Conclusions We report for the first time the natural infection of P. longicuspis with L. infantum in Morocco. The high frequency of this species in this region, in addition to its anthropophilic character make P. longicuspis the putative vector of L. infantum in this cutaneous leishmaniasis focus where L. tropica is confirmed as the causative agent of the disease and P. sergenti as its vector. The presence of L. infantum, and its presumed vector in this area, makes this a site of high risk of visceral leishmaniasis, mostly because of the proximity of a focus of human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:24990497

  7. Determination of total homocysteine in human serum by capillary gas chromatography with sulfur-specific detection by double focusing ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    de la Flor St Rèmy, R R; Montes-Bayón, M; Sanz-Medel, A

    2003-09-01

    A selective and sensitive method for determination of total homocysteine (Hcy) in human serum, by gas chromatography coupled to ICP-MS(HR), has been developed. After reduction of the sample with sodium borohydride the liberated Hcy and other aminothiols, such as cysteine (Cys) and methionine (Met), were converted to their N-trifluoroacetyl (TFA)- O-isopropyl derivatives and these were injected into a gas chromatograph equipped with an HP-5 capillary column. Detection was carried out by means of a double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (DF-ICP-MS) monitoring (32)S at m/Delta m (resolving power)=3000. The transfer line used to transport the analytes from the GC column to the ICP-MS had previously been developed in our laboratory. The different parameters affecting the derivatisation process were optimised, as were the instrumental operating conditions. This optimised GC-ICP-MS(HR) method was successfully applied to the determination of total homocysteine in human serum-values obtained were in agreement with data reported in the literature. Quantitative recoveries and good precision were obtained for spiked human serum, demonstrating the suitability of the method for quantitative determination of total homocysteine in serum. PMID:12844208

  8. Detection of metalloproteins in human liver cytosol by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence combined with gel filtration chromatography and isoelectric focusing separation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuxi; Chen, Chunying; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Jiujiang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Peiqun; Heb, a Wei; Huang, Yuying

    2002-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) spectroscopy is an advanced method of quantitative multielemental analysis with space resolution of several microm and sensitivities in the microg g(-1) range. It can be used for keeping track of trace elements after an electrophoretic separation of biological samples. In this paper, proteins in human liver cytosol were separated with gel filtration chromatography and thin layer isoelectric focusing (IEF). The contents of metal ions in protein bands were determined by SRXRF. The results showed that in the molecular weight (MW) range of 10 approximately 25 kDa, there were at least 2 Zn-containing bands with isoelectric point (pI) of 5 approximately 6 and 6.2 approximately 7, respectively and about 11 Fe-containing proteins with pI of 4.4, 4.6, 4.8, 5.0, 5.2, 5.3, 5.5, 5.6, 6.6, 6.8, and 7.2, respectively, present in human liver cytosol. The Zn-containing band with pI of 5-6 is the dominant species of zinc in this MW range. In addition, the Cu-containing bands with pI of 5.0 and below 4.8 were also detected. It is demonstrated that the procedure could be widely used in further investigations of the chemical species of trace elements in biological samples. PMID:12537382

  9. Multiple treatments with liposomal doxorubicin and ultrasound-induced disruption of blood-tumor and blood-brain barriers improves outcomes in a rat glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Park, Juyoung; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the central nervous system and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels, along with several other factors, creates additional barriers for drug treatment for brain tumors. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and the “blood-tumor barrier”. Here, we tested the impact of three weekly sessions of FUS and liposomal doxorubicin (DOX) in 9L rat glioma tumors. Animals that received FUS + DOX (N = 8) had a median survival time that was increased significantly (P < 0.001) compared to animals who received DOX only (N = 6), FUS only (N = 8), or no treatment (N = 7). Median survival for animals that received FUS + DOX was increased by 100% relative to untreated controls, whereas animals who received DOX alone had only a 16% improvement. Animals who received only FUS showed no improvement. No tumor cells were found in histology in 4/8 animals in the FUS + DOX group, and in two animals, only a few tumor cells were detected. Adverse events in the treatment group included skin toxicity, impaired activity, damage to surrounding brain tissue, and tissue loss at the tumor site. In one animal, intratumoral hemorrhage was observed. These events are largely consistent with known side effects of doxorubicin and with an extensive tumor burden. Overall this work demonstrates that multiple sessions using this FUS technique to enhance the delivery of liposomal doxorubicin has a pronounced therapeutic effect in this rat glioma model. PMID:23603615

  10. Ion focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  11. Metal distribution patterns in the mussel Mytilus edulis cytosols using size-exclusion chromatography and double focusing ICP-MS detection.

    PubMed

    Ferrarello, C N; Fernández de la Campa, M R; Sariego Muñiz, C; Sanz-Medel, A

    2000-12-01

    In order to estimate metal distribution patterns in biomolecules of different sizes and their possible relationship with environmental heavy metal contamination, multi-elemental distributions in different fractions of the cytosols of mussels were studied. To do so, samples were collected from natural populations of two coastal regions in Spain: a wild (uncontaminated) coast and an industrialised (contaminated) area in Asturias. Moreover, some commercial mussels from the Galicia coast were also investigated for comparison. Aliquots of the mussel cytosol extracts from each sample were applied to a calibrated Sephadex G-75 column (100 x 1 cm) and forty 3 ml fractions were obtained. After suitable dilution, 18 trace metals were determined by double focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS). The use of DF-ICP-MS detection allowed the resolution of several spectral interferences that cannot be resolved by quadrupole ICP-MS. Accurate results for ultratrace elements at basal levels are possible even after sample dilution to prevent matrix effects. After biomolecule-metal association pattern has been established, quantitative analysis of mussel cytosols from the three coastal areas was carried out, using external aqueous calibration plus standard additions to correct for possible matrix effects. Results showed that total metal contents increased following the expected order: wild coast < Galicia coast < industrial area coast. Speciation of Cu, Zn, Ca, U, Ni, Mo, Mn, Cr, V, Cd, Al and Sb showed a similar distribution pattern among cytosolic ligands for all the studied samples. Conversely, Fe, Pb, Sn, Co, Hg and Ag were found to exhibit different speciation patterns when samples from industrialised (contaminated) and non-industrialised areas were compared. PMID:11219056

  12. Indefinite focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurig, David Alan

    It is shown that a modulated Gaussian beam undergoes negative refraction at the interface between a positive and negative refractive index material. While the refraction of the beam is clearly negative, the modulation interference fronts are not normal to the group velocity, and thus exhibit a sideways motion relative to the beam---an effect due to the inherent frequency dispersion associated with the negative index medium. A slab of negative index media has been shown to focus both the far-field and the near-field of an electromagnetic source and form an image with resolution better than what is possible with diffraction limited, conventional optics. However, deviations from the ideal material properties, such as dissipation, limit the image resolution. A wide range of the material property parameter space is studied, demonstrating the limits of resolution with numerical results and approximate analytical formulas. The effects of a finite aperture on the imaging are also examined. Wave propagation in materials for which not all of the principle elements of the permeability and permittivity tensors have the same sign is studied. These tensors are neither positive nor negative definite. It is found that a wide variety of effects can be realized in such media, including negative refraction, near-field focusing and high impedance surface reflection. A new type of near field focusing device is analyzed that consists of a bilayer of media with indefinite electromagnetic material property tensors. The dispersion of the media supports propagating waves for any transverse wave vector, which results in a weaker dependence of spatial bandwidth on media lossiness. We show how bilayers of media with negative electromagnetic property tensor elements can be used to construct low, high and band pass spatial filters. These filters possess sharp adjustable roll offs and can operate in the near and far field regimes to select specific spatial variation components or beam angles.

  13. Electrophoretic Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoretic focusing is a new method of continuous flow electrophoresis that introduces precision flow control to achieve high resolution separations. The electric field is applied perpendicular to an incoming sample lamina and buffer but also perpendicular to the broad faces of the thin rectangular chamber. A uniform fluid cross-flow then enters and exits the separation chamber through the same broad faces which are porous. A balance is achieved by adjusting either the electric field or the cross-flow so the desired sample fraction with its specific migration velocity encounters an opposing flow of the same velocity. Applying an electric field transverse to the incoming sample lamina and opposing this field with a carefully configured buffer flow, a sample constituent can be selected and focused into a narrow stream for subsequent analysis. Monotonically changing either electric field or buffer cross-flow will yield a scan of all constituents of the sample. Stopping the scan increases the collection time for minor constituents to improve their analysis. Using the high voltage gradients and/or cross-flow to rapidly deflect extraneous sample through the porous screens and into either of the side (purge) chambers, the selected sample is focused in the center plane of the separation chamber and collected without contact or interaction with the separation chamber walls. Results will be presented on the separation of a range of materials including dyes, proteins, and monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Sources of sample dispersion inherent in other electrokinetic techniques will be shown to be negligible for a variety of sample concentrations, buffer properties and operating conditions.

  14. Evaluation of prognostic integrin α2β1 PET tracer and concurrent targeting delivery using focused ultrasound for brain glioma detection.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yi-Hsiu; Hsu, Po-Hung; Huang, Chiun-Wei; Hsieh, Wen-Chuan; Huang, Feng-Ting; Chang, Wen-Chi; Chiu, Han; Hsu, Shih-Ting; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2014-11-01

    The ability to early detect and assess the treatment response of recurrent and/or disseminated metastatic glioblastoma is critical for the effective management of this group of patients. Accumulating experimental evidence indicates that integrin α2β1 might be a prognostic biomarker for advanced phenotype of cancers. In this study, a novel (68)Ga-labeled integrin α2β1-targeted PET tracer (68)Ga-NOTA-PEG4-cyclo (GDGEAyK) ((68)Ga-A2B1) was designed and evaluated for the potential prognostic imaging of glioblastoma tumor in preclinical model. To prospectively verify the prognostic value of integrin α2β1, the in vitro Western blot and flow cytometry studies were performed to validate the integrin expression level of human glioblastoma (U87MG) cells. Extremely high expression level of integrin α2β1 justifies its role as a potential targeting marker. Thus, (68)Ga-A2B1 positron emission tomography was performed in subcutaneous U87MG tumor bearing athymic mice at 15 min postinjection after injection of 7-8MBq tracers. The receptor targeting specificity was confirmed in a competition blocking experiment. The tumor uptake of (68)Ga-A2B1 in the control and blockage groups was 1.57 ± 0.13 %ID/g (n = 3) and 0.96 ± 0.23 %ID/g** (n = 3), respectively. However, because of the quick renal washout rate and labile nature of peptide tracers in circulation conditions, the focus ultrasound (FUS) mediated delivery method was adopted to enhance tumor uptake and retention of tracers. To test the FUS delivery efficacy in vivo, three experimental arms were designed as follows: tumor bearing mice were administrated with (68)Ga-A2B1 only or microbubbles (MBs) with FUS treatment ((68)Ga-A2B1 + FUS + MBs) or embedded (68)Ga-A2B1-microbubbles ((68)Ga-A2B1-MBs + FUS) followed with FUS sonication. The average radioactivity accumulation within a tumor was quantified from the multiple region of interest volumes using the %ID/g value and was analyzed in accordance with the ex vivo autoradiographic and pathologic data. The significant tumor uptake in (68)Ga-A2B1 + FUS +MBs group (n = 6) and (68)Ga-A2B1-MBs + FUS group (n = 4) following FUS treatment were calculated as 2.25 ± 0.50 %ID/g* and 2.6 ± 0.49 %ID/g**, comparing with (68)Ga-A2B1 only group 1.48 ± 0.42 %ID/g (n = 10). These results suggest that there is significant difference in (68)Ga-A2B1 tumor uptake by FUS treatment either with or without tracer integration with microbubbles, which demonstrate a promising delivery strategy and critical multimodal setting for phenotyping imaging of aggressive glioma tumor. In conclusion, (68)Ga labeled (68)Ga-A2B1 allows noninvasive imaging of tumor-associated α2β1 expression and can be embedded in MB lipid shell for enhanced delivery and controlled release by sonoporation. PMID:25153169

  15. Noninvasive and transient blood-brain barrier opening in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's double transgenic mice using focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Choi, James J; Wang, Shougang; Brown, Truman R; Small, Scott A; Duff, Karen E K; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2008-07-01

    The spatio-temporal nature of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening as a brain drug delivery method was investigated in Alzheimer's disease model mice. The left hippocampus of transgenic (APP/PS1, n = 3) and nontransgenic (n = 3) mice was sonicated (frequency: 1.525 MHz, peak-negative pressure: 600 kPa, pulse length: 20 ms, duty cycle: 20%, duration: 1 min) in vivo, through their intact skin and skull, after intravenous injection of microbubbles (SonoVue; 25 microl). Sequential, high-field MR images (9.4 Tesla) were acquired before and after injection of gadolinium (Omniscan, 0.75 ml, molecular weight: 573.7 Da) on two separate days for each mouse. Gadolinium deposits through the ultrasound-induced BBB opening in the left hippocampus revealed significant contrast-enhancement in the MRI. On the following day, MRI revealed significant BBB closure within the same region. However, the BBB opening extent and BBB closing timeline varied in different regions within the same sonicated location. This indicates that opening and closing were dependent on the brain region targeted. No significant difference in BBB opening or closing behaviors was observed between the APP/PS1 and the nontransgenic mice. In conclusion, a BBB-impermeable molecule was noninvasively, transiently and reproducibly delivered to the hippocampus of Alzheimer's APP/PS1 mice. PMID:19149463

  16. Fast in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques using μ-MRI Gd-staining combined with ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Santin, Mathieu D; Debeir, Thomas; Bridal, S Lori; Rooney, Thomas; Dhenain, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Amyloid plaques are one of the major microscopic lesions that characterize Alzheimer's disease. Current approaches to detect amyloid plaques by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents require invasive procedures to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to deliver the contrast agent into the vicinity of amyloid plaques. Here we have developed a new protocol (US-Gd-staining) that enables the detection of amyloid plaques in the brain of an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of amyloidosis after intra-venous injection of a non-targeted, clinically approved MRI contrast agent (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem®) by transiently opening the BBB with unfocused ultrasound (1 MHz) and clinically approved microbubbles (Sonovue®, Bracco). This US-Gd-staining protocol can detect amyloid plaques with a short imaging time (32 min) and high in-plane resolution (29 μm). The sensitivity and resolution obtained is at least equal to that provided by MRI protocols using intra-cerebro-ventricular injection of contrast agents, a reference method used to penetrate the BBB. To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate the ability of MR imaging to detect amyloid plaques by using a peripheral intra-venous injection of a clinically approved NMR contrast agent. PMID:23660031

  17. A Systematic Review of Bovine Respiratory Disease Diagnosis Focused on Diagnostic Confirmation, Early Detection, and Prediction of Unfavorable Outcomes in Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Wolfger, Barbara; Timsit, Edouard; White, Brad J; Orsel, Karin

    2015-11-01

    A large proportion of newly arrived feedlot cattle are affected with bovine respiratory disease (BRD). Economic losses could be reduced by accurate, early detection. This review evaluates the available literature regarding BRD confirmatory diagnostic tests, early detection methods, and modalities to estimate post-therapeutic prognosis or predict unfavorable or fatal outcomes. Scientific evidence promotes the use of haptoglobin to confirm BRD status. Feeding behavior, infrared thermography, and reticulorumen boluses are promising methods. Retrospective analyses of routinely collected treatment and cohort data can be used to identify cattle at risk of unfavorable outcome. Other methods have been reviewed but require further study. PMID:26210764

  18. Isoelectric focusing purity criteria and /sup 1/H NMR detectable spectroscopic heterogeneity in the major isolated monomer hemoglobins from Glycera dibranchiata

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.

    1987-12-01

    Three major monomeric hemoglobins have been isolated from the erythrocytes of Glycera dibranchiata. Their importance to structure-function studies of heme proteins lies in the fact that they have been shown to possess an exceptional amino acid substitution. In these proteins, the E-7 position is occupied by leucine rather than the more common distal histidine. This substitution alters the polarity of the heme ligand binding environment compared to myoglobin. Due to this, the G. dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins are attracting much attention. However, until now no purity criterion has been developed. Here the authors demonstrate that, for all of the Glycera momomer hemoglobins, multiple line patterns are shown on high-voltage isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels. Most of these lines are shown to be a consequence of heme-related phenomena and can be understood on the basis of changes in oxidation and ligation state of the heme iron. The multiple line pattern does not indicate significant impurities in the monomer hemoglobin preparation. The multiple line patterns on IEF gels disappear when gels of the apoproteins alone are focused. Single bands occur in this case for all of the monomer hemoglobins except component II, which displays two bands, one major and one minor. The minor band is found to be a modified apoprotein form. It is sensitive to apoprotein handling prior to focusing and depends upon whether the IEF gel is prefocused or not. From this analysis, IEF is shown to be a valuable purity criterion, and the purity of our monomer hemoglobin component II preparation is 97% one globin. The NMR results show that two types of spectroscopic heterogeneity are also present in component II, and these are unrelated to the protein purity.

  19. Investigation into the use of smartphone as a machine vision device for engineering metrology and flaw detection, with focus on drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razdan, Vikram; Bateman, Richard

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the use of a Smartphone and its camera vision capabilities in Engineering metrology and flaw detection, with a view to develop a low cost alternative to Machine vision systems which are out of range for small scale manufacturers. A Smartphone has to provide a similar level of accuracy as Machine Vision devices like Smart cameras. The objective set out was to develop an App on an Android Smartphone, incorporating advanced Computer vision algorithms written in java code. The App could then be used for recording measurements of Twist Drill bits and hole geometry, and analysing the results for accuracy. A detailed literature review was carried out for in-depth study of Machine vision systems and their capabilities, including a comparison between the HTC One X Android Smartphone and the Teledyne Dalsa BOA Smart camera. A review of the existing metrology Apps in the market was also undertaken. In addition, the drilling operation was evaluated to establish key measurement parameters of a twist Drill bit, especially flank wear and diameter. The methodology covers software development of the Android App, including the use of image processing algorithms like Gaussian Blur, Sobel and Canny available from OpenCV software library, as well as designing and developing the experimental set-up for carrying out the measurements. The results obtained from the experimental set-up were analysed for geometry of Twist Drill bits and holes, including diametrical measurements and flaw detection. The results show that Smartphones like the HTC One X have the processing power and the camera capability to carry out metrological tasks, although dimensional accuracy achievable from the Smartphone App is below the level provided by Machine vision devices like Smart cameras. A Smartphone with mechanical attachments, capable of image processing and having a reasonable level of accuracy in dimensional measurement, has the potential to become a handy low-cost Machine vision system for small scale manufacturers, especially in field metrology and flaw detection.

  20. Molecular detection of Leishmania in phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from a cutaneous leishmaniasis focus atXakriabá Indigenous Reserve, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rêgo, Felipe Dutra; Rugani, Jeronimo Marteleto Nunes; Shimabukuro, Paloma Helena Fernandes; Tonelli, Gabriel Barbosa; Quaresma, Patrícia Flávia; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Autochthonous cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) have been reported since 2001 in the Xakriabá Indigenous Reserve located in the municipality of São João das Missões in northern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. In order to study the presence of Leishmania DNA in phlebotomine sand flies, six entomological collections were carried out from July 2008 through July 2009, using 40 light traps placed in peridomicile areas of 20 randomly selected houses. From October 2011 through August 2012, another six collections were carried out with 20 light traps distributed among four trails (five traps per trail) selected for a previous study of wild and synanthropic hosts of Leishmania. A total of 4,760 phlebotomine specimens were collected belonging to ten genera and twenty-three species. Single female specimens or pools with up to ten specimens of the same locality, species and date, for Leishmania detection by molecular methods. Species identification of parasites was performed with ITS1 PCR-RFLP using HaeIII enzyme and genetic sequencing for SSU rRNA target. The presence of Leishmania DNA was detected in eleven samples from peridomicile areas: Lu. longipalpis (two), Nyssomyia intermedia (four), Lu. renei (two), Lu. ischnacantha, Micropygomyia goiana and Evandromyia lenti (one pool of each specie). The presence of Leishmania DNA was detected in twelve samples from among the trails: Martinsmyia minasensis (six), Ny. intermedia (three), Mi. peresi (two) and Ev. lenti (one). The presence of Leishmania infantum DNA in Lu. longipalpis and Leishmania braziliensis DNA in Ny. intermediasupport the epidemiological importance of these species of sand flies in the cycle of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, respectively. The results also found other species associated with Leishmania DNA, such as Mt. minasensis and Ev. lenti, which may participate in a wild and/or synanthropic cycle of Leishmania transmission in the studied area. PMID:25853254

  1. Molecular Detection of Leishmania in Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from a Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Focus at Xakriabá Indigenous Reserve, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rêgo, Felipe Dutra; Rugani, Jeronimo Marteleto Nunes; Shimabukuro, Paloma Helena Fernandes; Tonelli, Gabriel Barbosa; Quaresma, Patrícia Flávia; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Autochthonous cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) have been reported since 2001 in the Xakriabá Indigenous Reserve located in the municipality of São João das Missões in northern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. In order to study the presence of Leishmania DNA in phlebotomine sand flies, six entomological collections were carried out from July 2008 through July 2009, using 40 light traps placed in peridomicile areas of 20 randomly selected houses. From October 2011 through August 2012, another six collections were carried out with 20 light traps distributed among four trails (five traps per trail) selected for a previous study of wild and synanthropic hosts of Leishmania. A total of 4,760 phlebotomine specimens were collected belonging to ten genera and twenty-three species. Single female specimens or pools with up to ten specimens of the same locality, species and date, for Leishmania detection by molecular methods. Species identification of parasites was performed with ITS1 PCR-RFLP using HaeIII enzyme and genetic sequencing for SSU rRNA target. The presence of Leishmania DNA was detected in eleven samples from peridomicile areas: Lu. longipalpis (two), Nyssomyia intermedia (four), Lu. renei (two), Lu. ischnacantha, Micropygomyia goiana and Evandromyia lenti (one pool of each specie). The presence of Leishmania DNA was detected in twelve samples from among the trails: Martinsmyia minasensis (six), Ny. intermedia (three), Mi. peresi (two) and Ev. lenti (one). The presence of Leishmania infantum DNA in Lu. longipalpis and Leishmania braziliensis DNA in Ny. intermediasupport the epidemiological importance of these species of sand flies in the cycle of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, respectively. The results also found other species associated with Leishmania DNA, such as Mt. minasensis and Ev. lenti, which may participate in a wild and/or synanthropic cycle of Leishmania transmission in the studied area. PMID:25853254

  2. Molecular detection and identification of Leishmania spp. in naturally infected Phlebotomus tobbi and Sergentomyia dentata in a focus of human and canine leishmaniasis in western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Özbel, Yusuf; Karakuş, Mehmet; Arserim, Suha K; Kalkan, Şaban Orçun; Töz, Seray

    2016-03-01

    Human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is reported from 38 provinces of Turkey and dogs are accepted as main reservoir hosts. Kuşadası town, belonging to Aydın province and located in western part of Turkey, is endemic for human and canine visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum MON1 and MON98. In this study, phlebotomine survey was conducted to determine the vector sand fly species and to identify sand fly blood meal sources. In August and September 2012, 1027 sand fly specimens were caught using CDC light traps. Eight Phlebotomus and two Sergentomyia species with the dominancy of Phlebotomus tobbi (61.34%) were detected. A total of 622 female sand flies (571 Phlebotomus; 51 Sergentomyia) were checked for Leishmania infection by direct dissection of the midgut. The half of the midgut content was inoculated into NNN culture for isolation of the parasite. Leishmania species-specific ITS1 real time PCR, conventional PCR assays of ITS1 and hsp70 genes and subsequent sequencing were performed from extracted DNAs. A region of cytochrome b (cyt-b) gene of vertebrates based PCR was used to determine the source of blood meal of sand flies. In microscopical examinations, two female specimens (0.32%) were found naturally infected with high number and different stages of promastigotes. No growth was observed in NNN culture but Leishmania DNA was obtained from both specimens. First positive specimen was identified as P. tobbi and L. infantum DNA was detected. Second specimen was Sergentomyia dentata, but Leishmania DNA could not be identified on species level. A total of 16 blood-fed female P. tobbi specimens were used for blood meal analysis and eight, three and one specimens were positive for human, dog and mouse, respectively. This is the first detection of Leishmania promastigotes using microscopical examination in P. tobbi and S. dentata in human and canine visceral leishmaniasis endemic area in western part of Turkey. Our results indicate that, (i) P. tobbi is the principal vector species and (ii) human and dogs are main blood sources. The detection of Leishmania sp. in Sergentomyia species may be an evidence for natural cycle of Sauro-leishmania agents in the area. PMID:26747008

  3. Spatiotemporal drug delivery using laser-generated-focused ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Di, Jin; Kim, Jinwook; Hu, Quanyin; Jiang, Xiaoning; Gu, Zhen

    2015-12-28

    Laser-generated-focused ultrasound (LGFU) holds promise for the high-precision ultrasound therapy owing to its tight focal spot, broad frequency band, and stable excitation with minimal ultrasound-induced heating. We here report the development of the LGFU as a stimulus for promoted drug release from microgels integrated with drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. The pulsed waves of ultrasound, generated by a carbon black/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-photoacoustic lens, were introduced to trigger the drug release from alginate microgels encapsulated with drug-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. We demonstrated the antibacterial capability of this drug delivery system against Escherichia coli by the disk diffusion method, and antitumor efficacy toward the HeLa cell-derived tumor spheroids in vitro. This novel LGFU-responsive drug delivery system provides a simple and remote approach to precisely control the release of therapeutics in a spatiotemporal manner and potentially suppress detrimental effects to the surrounding tissue, such as thermal ablation. PMID:26299506

  4. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound induces apoptosis in osteoclasts: Fish scales are a suitable model for the analysis of bone metabolism by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuo; Hanmoto, Taizo; Yano, Sachiko; Furusawa, Yukihiro; Ikegame, Mika; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Kitamura, Kei-Ichiro; Endo, Masato; Yamamoto, Toshio; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Urata, Makoto; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Hattori, Atsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Using fish scales in which osteoclasts and osteoblasts coexist on the calcified bone matrix, we examined the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. At 3h of incubation after LIPUS treatment, osteoclastic markers such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K mRNA expressions decreased significantly while mRNA expressions of osteoblastic markers, osteocalcin, distal-less homeobox 5, runt-related transcription factor 2a, and runt-related transcription factor 2b, increased significantly. At 6 and 18h of incubation, however, both osteoclastic and osteoblastic marker mRNA expression did not change at least present conditions. Using GeneChip analysis of zebrafish scales treated with LIPUS, we found that cell death-related genes were upregulated with LIPUS treatment. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the expression of apoptosis-related genes also increased significantly. To confirm the involvement of apoptosis in osteoclasts with LIPUS, osteoclasts were induced by autotransplanting scales in goldfish. Thereafter, the DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis was detected in osteoclasts using the TUNEL (TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) method. The multi-nuclei of TRAP-stained osteoclasts in the scales were labeled with TUNEL. TUNEL staining showed that the number of apoptotic osteoclasts in goldfish scales was significantly elevated by treatment with LIPUS at 3h of incubation. Thus, we are the first to demonstrate that LIPUS directly functions to osteoclasts and to conclude that LIPUS directly causes apoptosis in osteoclasts shortly after exposure. PMID:26850473

  5. Detection of Leishmania major DNA within wild caught Phlebotomus papatasi and species composition of sand flies in endemic focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, in western Iran.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, A; Rassi, Y; Oshaghi, M A; Sayyadi, M; Rafizadeh, S

    2016-03-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most important public health problem in many developing countries. The present study was conducted to determine the vector(s), the parasite and the species composition of sand flies in the Dehloran County during May-November 2012. Sand flies were collected by sticky traps and mounted in Puri's medium for species identification. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA, followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used for identification of DNA of Leishmania parasites in infected sand flies. A total of 82443 specimens comprising 15 species of sand flies (5 Phlebotomus and 10 Sergentomyia) were collected and identified. The species of Phlebotomus papatasi was dominant in outdoor and indoor resting places. Among the 280 specimens of female P. papatasi tested by PCR of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA genes of the parasite followed by RFLP, only 5 of them (1.8 %) were positive to Leishmania major parasites. This is the first molecular detection of leishmania infection of P. papatasi to L. major in this region. The results indicated that, P. papatasi was only species found infected by L. major and the principal vector of disease agent to human. PMID:27065601

  6. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Niels B.; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O.; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment. PMID:25979887

  7. Ewing sarcoma with ERG gene rearrangements: A molecular study focusing on the prevalence of FUS-ERG and common pitfalls in detecting EWSR1-ERG fusions by FISH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sonja; Deniz, Kemal; Sung, Yun-Shao; Zhang, Lei; Dry, Sarah; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-04-01

    The genetics of Ewing sarcoma (ES) are characterized by a canonical fusion involving EWSR1 gene and a member of the ETS family of transcription factors, such as FLI1 and ERG. In fact, ERG gene rearrangements represent the second most common molecular alteration, with EWSR1-ERG being identified in 5-10% of cases, while only a handful of reports document a FUS-ERG fusion. In this study, we focus on ES with ERG gene abnormalities, specifically to investigate the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of FUS-ERG fusions in a large cohort of small blue round cell tumors (SBRCTs) and compare to the eight reported FUS-positive ES. Among the 85 SBRCTs tested, seven (8.2%) cases harbored FUS gene rearrangements; six fused to ERG and one with FEV. During this investigation we came across a number of ERG-rearranged ES lacking both EWSR1 and FUS abnormalities by FISH. In one case, RNA sequencing identified an EWSR1-ERG transcript despite the negative EWSR1 rearrangements by FISH. Additional 3-color FISH fusion assay demonstrated the fusion of EWSR1 and ERG signals in all four cases negative for break-apart EWSR1 FISH. These results emphasize a potential pitfall of relying on EWSR1 FISH assay alone for diagnosis of ES. In cases with classic morphology and/or strong CD99 and ERG immunoreactivity, additional molecular testing should be applied, such as ERG FISH or RT-PCR/next generation sequencing, for a more definitive diagnosis. Although our study group is small, there were no differences noted between the clinical, morphologic features and immunoprofile of the different subsets of ERG-rearranged SBRCTs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26690869

  8. Phlebotomus sergenti in a Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Focus in Azilal Province (High Atlas, Morocco): Molecular Detection and Genotyping of Leishmania tropica, and Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ajaoud, Malika; Es-Sette, Nargys; Charrel, Rmi N; Laamrani-Idrissi, Abderahmane; Nhammi, Haddou; Riyad, Myriam; Lemrani, Meryem

    2015-01-01

    Background Phlebotomus (Paraphlebotomus) sergenti is at least one of the confirmed vectors for the transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica and distributed widely in Morocco. This form of leishmaniasis is considered largely as anthroponotic, although dogs were found infected with Leishmania tropica, suggestive of zoonosis in some rural areas. Methodology and Findings This survey aimed at (i) studying the presence of Leishmania in field caught Phlebotomus sergenti, (ii) investigating genetic diversity within Leishmania tropica and (iii) identifying the host-blood feeding preferences of Phlebotomus sergenti. A total of 4,407 sand flies were collected in three rural areas of Azilal province, using CDC miniature light traps. Samples collected were found to consist of 13 species: Phlebotomus spp. and 3 Sergentomyia spp. The most abundant species was Phlebotomus sergenti, accounting for 45.75 % of the total. 965 female Phlebotomus sergenti were screened for the presence of Leishmania by ITS1-PCR-RFLP, giving a positive rate of 5.7% (55/965), all being identified as Leishmania tropica. Nucleotide heterogeneity of PCR-amplified ITS1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS2 was noted. Analyses of 31 sequences obtained segregated them into 16 haplotypes, of which 7 contain superimposed peaks at certain nucleotide positions, suggestive of heterozygosity. Phlebotomus sergenti collected were found to feed on a large variety of vertebrate hosts, as determined by Cytochrome b sequencing of the DNA from the blood meals of 64 engorged females. Conclusion Our findings supported the notion that Phlebotomus sergenti is the primary vector of Leishmania tropica in this focus, and that the latter is genetically very heterogeneous. Furthermore, our results might be suggestive of a certain level of heterozygosity in Leishmania tropica population. This finding, as well as the feeding of the vectors on different animals are of interest for further investigation. PMID:25826399

  9. Molecular Phylogeny of the Lactuca Alliance (Cichorieae Subtribe Lactucinae, Asteraceae) with Focus on Their Chinese Centre of Diversity Detects Potential Events of Reticulation and Chloroplast Capture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Huan; Peng, Hua; Kilian, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    The first comprehensive molecular phylogenetic reconstruction of the Cichorieae subtribe Lactucinae is provided. Sequences for two datasets, one of the nuclear rDNA ITS region, the other of five concatenated non-coding chloroplast DNA markers including the petD region and the psbA-trnH, 5′trnL(UAA)-trnF, rpl32-trnL(UAG) and trnQ(UUG)-5′rps16 spacers, were, with few exceptions, newly generated for 130 samples of 78 species. The sampling spans the entire subtribe Lactucinae while focusing on its Chinese centre of diversity; more than 3/4 of the Chinese Lactucinae species are represented. The nuclear and plastid phylogenies inferred from the two independent datasets show various hard topological incongruences. They concern the internal topology of major lineages, in one case the placement of taxa in major lineages, the relationships between major lineages and even the circumscription of the subtribe, indicating potential events of ancient as well as of more recent reticulation and chloroplast capture in the evolution of the subtribe. The core of the subtribe is clearly monophyletic, consisting of the six lineages, Cicerbita, Cicerbita II, Lactuca, Melanoseris, Notoseris and Paraprenanthes. The Faberia lineage and the monospecific Prenanthes purpurea lineage are part of a monophyletic subtribe Lactucinae only in the nuclear or plastid phylogeny, respectively. Morphological and karyological support for their placement is considered. In the light of the molecular phylogenetic reconstruction and of additional morphological data, the conflicting taxonomies of the Chinese Lactuca alliance are discussed and it is concluded that the major lineages revealed are best treated at generic rank. An improved species level taxonomy of the Chinese Lactucinae is outlined; new synonymies and some new combinations are provided. PMID:24376566

  10. A dense plasma focus-based neutron source for a single-shot detection of illicit materials and explosives by a nanosecond neutron pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Latyshev, S. V.; Miklaszewski, R. A.; Chernyshova, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wiącek, U.; Tomaszewski, K.; Lemeshko, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Recent progress in a single-pulse Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Investigation System (NINIS) intended for interrogation of hidden objects by means of measuring elastically scattered neutrons is presented in this paper. The method uses very bright neutron pulses having duration of the order of 10 ns only, which are generated by dense plasma focus (DPF) devices filled with pure deuterium or DT mixture as a working gas. The small size occupied by the neutron bunch in space, number of neutrons per pulse and mono-chromaticity (ΔE/E~1%) of the neutron spectrum provides the opportunity to use a time-of-flight (TOF) technique with flying bases of about a few metres. In our researches we used DPF devices having bank energy in the range 2-7 kJ. The devices generate a neutron yield of the level of 108-109 2.45 MeV and 1010-1011 14 MeV neutrons per pulse with pulse duration ~10-20 ns. TOF base in the tests was 2.2-18.5 m. We have demonstrated the possibility of registering of neutrons scattered by the substances under investigation—1 litre bottles with methanol (CH3OH), phosphoric (H2PO4) and nitric (HNO3) acids as well as a long object—a 1 m gas tank filled with deuterium at high pressure. It is shown that the above mentioned short TOF bases and relatively low neutron yields are enough to distinguish different elements' nuclei composing the substance under interrogation and to characterize the geometry of lengthy objects in some cases. The wavelet technique was employed to 'clean' the experimental data registered. The advantages and restrictions of the proposed and tested NINIS technique in comparison with other methods are discussed.

  11. Usefulness of the rK39-Immunochromatographic Test, Direct Agglutination Test, and Leishmanin Skin Test for Detecting Asymptomatic Leishmania Infection in Children in a New Visceral Leishmaniasis Focus in Amhara State, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gadisa, Endalamaw; Custodio, Estefanía; Cañavate, Carmen; Sordo, Luis; Abebe, Zelalem; Nieto, Javier; Chicharro, Carmen; Aseffa, Abraham; Yamuah, Lawrence; Engers, Howard; Moreno, Javier; Cruz, Israel

    2012-01-01

    In areas where visceral leishmaniasis is anthroponotic, asymptomatically infected patients may play a role in transmission. Additionally, the number of asymptomatic patients in a disease-endemic area will also provide information on transmission dynamics. Libo Kemkem and Fogera districts (Amhara State, Ethiopia) are now considered newly established areas to which visceral leishmaniasis is endemic. In selected villages in these districts, we conducted a study to assess the usefulness of different approaches to estimate the asymptomatic infection rate. Of 605 participants, the rK39 immunochromatographic test was able to detect asymptomatic infection in 1.5% (9 of 605), direct agglutination test in 5.3% (32 of 605), and leishmanin skin test in 5.6% (33 of 589); the combined use of serologic methods and leishmanin skin test enabled detecting asymptomatic infection in 10.1% (61 of 605). We conclude that the best option to detect asymptomatic infection in this new visceral leishmaniasis–endemic focus is the combined use of the direct agglutination test and the leishmanin skin test. PMID:22556076

  12. Brain arterioles show more active vesicular transport of blood-borne tracer molecules than capillaries and venules after focused ultrasound-evoked opening of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Sheikov, Nickolai; McDannold, Nathan; Jolesz, Ferenc; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Tam, Karen; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-09-01

    Previously, activation of vesicular transport in the brain microvasculature was shown to be one of the mechanisms of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. In the present study, we aimed to estimate the rate of the transendothelial vesicular traffic after focused ultrasound sonication in the rabbit brain, using ultrastructural morphometry and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a tracer. In the capillaries, the mean endothelial pinocytotic densities (the number of HRP-containing vesicles per microm(2) of the cell cytoplasm) were 0.9 and 1.05 vesicles/microm(2) 1 h after sonication with ultrasound frequencies of 0.69 and 0.26 MHz, respectively. In the arterioles, these densities were 1.63 and 2.43 vesicles/microm(2), values 1.8 and 2.3 times higher. In control locations, the densities were 0.7 and 0.14 vesicles/microm(2) for capillaries and arterioles, respectively. A small number of HRP-positive vesicles were observed in the venules. Focal delivery of HRP tracer was also observed in light microscopy. The results indicate that the precapillary microvessels play an important role in macromolecular transcytoplasmic traffic through the ultrasound-induced BBB modulation, which should be considered in the future development of trans-BBB drug delivery strategies. PMID:16965980

  13. Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) enhances delivery of doxorubicin in a preclinical model of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; D’Andrea, Samantha; Starr, Frank; Chen, Hong; McCune, Jeannine S.; Risler, Linda J.; Mashadi-Hossein, Afshin; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by extensive stromal desmoplasia which decreases blood perfusion and impedes chemotherapy delivery. Breaking the stromal barrier could both increase perfusion and permeabilize the tumor, enhancing chemotherapy penetration. Mechanical disruption of the stroma can be achieved using ultrasound-induced bubble activity – cavitation. Cavitation is also known to result in microstreaming and could have the added benefit of actively enhancing diffusion into the tumors. Here, we report the ability to enhance chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (Dox) penetration using ultrasound-induced cavitation in a genetically engineered mouse model (KPC mouse) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. To induce localized inertial cavitation in pancreatic tumors, pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) was used either during or before doxorubicin administration to elucidate the mechanisms of enhanced drug delivery (active versus passive drug diffusion). For both types, the pHIFU exposures which were associated with high cavitation activity resulted in disruption of the highly fibrotic stromal matrix and enhanced the normalized Dox concentration by up to 4.5 fold compared to controls. Furthermore, normalized Dox concentration was associated with the cavitation metrics (p < 0.01), indicating that high and sustained cavitation results in increased chemotherapy penetration. No significant difference between the outcomes of the two types, i.e., Dox infusion during or after pHIFU treatment, was observed, suggesting that passive diffusion into previously permeabilized tissue is the major mechanism for the increase in drug concentration. Together, the data indicate that pHIFU treatment of pancreatic tumors when resulting in high and sustained cavitation can efficiently enhance chemotherapy delivery to pancreatic tumors. PMID:26216548

  14. Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhances Delivery of Doxorubicin in a Preclinical Model of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Tatiana D; D'Andrea, Samantha; Starr, Frank; Chen, Hong; McCune, Jeannine S; Risler, Linda J; Mashadi-Hossein, Afshin; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-09-15

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by extensive stromal desmoplasia, which decreases blood perfusion and impedes chemotherapy delivery. Breaking the stromal barrier could both increase perfusion and permeabilize the tumor, enhancing chemotherapy penetration. Mechanical disruption of the stroma can be achieved using ultrasound-induced bubble activity-cavitation. Cavitation is also known to result in microstreaming and could have the added benefit of actively enhancing diffusion into the tumors. Here, we report the ability to enhance chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin penetration using ultrasound-induced cavitation in a genetically engineered mouse model (KPC mouse) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. To induce localized inertial cavitation in pancreatic tumors, pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) was used either during or before doxorubicin administration to elucidate the mechanisms of enhanced drug delivery (active vs. passive drug diffusion). For both types, the pHIFU exposures that were associated with high cavitation activity resulted in disruption of the highly fibrotic stromal matrix and enhanced the normalized doxorubicin concentration by up to 4.5-fold compared with controls. Furthermore, normalized doxorubicin concentration was associated with the cavitation metrics (P < 0.01), indicating that high and sustained cavitation results in increased chemotherapy penetration. No significant difference between the outcomes of the two types, that is, doxorubicin infusion during or after pHIFU treatment, was observed, suggesting that passive diffusion into previously permeabilized tissue is the major mechanism for the increase in drug concentration. Together, the data indicate that pHIFU treatment of pancreatic tumors when resulting in high and sustained cavitation can efficiently enhance chemotherapy delivery to pancreatic tumors. . PMID:26216548

  15. "Only" and Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallduvi, Enric

    The relationship of the word "only," one of a class of words known as scalar particles, focus adverbs, focus inducers, or focus-sensitive particles, with the "focus" of the sentence is examined. It is suggested, based on analysis of discourse structure, that this "association with focus" is not an inherent property of this scalar particle. The…

  16. Hyperkahler metrics on focus-focus fibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie

    In this thesis, we focus on the study of hyperkahler metric in four dimensional cases, and practice GMN's construction of hyperkahler metric on focus-focus fibrations. We explicitly compute the action-angle coordinates on the local model of focus-focus fibration, and show its semi-global invariant should be harmonic to admit a compatible holomorphic 2-form. Then we study the canonical semi-flat metric on it. After the instanton correction inspired by physics, we get a family of the generalized Ooguri-Vafa metric on focus-focus fibrations, which becomes more local examples of explicit hyperkahler metric in four dimensional cases. In addition, we also make some exploration of the Ooguri-Vafa metric in the thesis. We study the potential function of the Ooguri-Vafa metric, and prove that its nodal set is a cylinder of bounded radius 1 < R < 1. As a result, we get that only on a finite neighborhood of the singular fibre the Ooguri-Vafa metric is a hyperkahler metric. Finally, we give some estimates for the diameter of the fibration under the Oogui-Vafa metric, which confirms that the Oogui-Vafa metric is not complete. The new family of metric constructed in the thesis, we think, will provide more examples to further study of Lagrangian fibrations and mirror symmetry in future.

  17. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: A combined measurement and modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24 000 W∕cm2. The inputs to a Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W∕cm2, lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields. PMID:19062878

  18. Focus Intonation in Bengali

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Md. Kamrul

    2015-01-01

    This work attempts to investigate the role of prosody in the syntax of focus in Bangla. The aim of this study is to show the intonation pattern of Bangla in emphasis and focus. In order to do that, the author has looked at the pattern of focus without-i/o as well as with the same. Do they really pose any different focus intonation pattern from…

  19. Alternating phase focused linacs

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Donald A.

    1980-01-01

    A heavy particle linear accelerator employing rf fields for transverse and ongitudinal focusing as well as acceleration. Drift tube length and gap positions in a standing wave drift tube loaded structure are arranged so that particles are subject to acceleration and succession of focusing and defocusing forces which contain the beam without additional magnetic or electric focusing fields.

  20. Exploratory Focus Monitoring Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejewski, Robert

    1996-07-01

    Determination of the focus of the FOC is difficult because of the lack of aberrations. For small focus errors, it is very difficult to determine the sign of any focus error. We propose to use the field dependent astigmatism to remove this degeneracy. We will perform a fine focus sweep by moving the DOB to -1mm, -0.5mm, 0.0, +0.5mm, +1mm from nominal, and take images of a star using the F486N filter and placing the star in newly-defined apertures that are close to the edges of the field, where the field-dependent astigmatism is greatest. The appearance of the star as a function of focus will be unique, and this will allow an unambiguous determination of the focus. Before this program can be run, new apertures must be defined with size 256x256, SAMPOFF=0 and SAMPOFF=768, and LINEOFF=384.

  1. Agreement, Shells, and Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andrew; Wu, Zoe

    2002-01-01

    Reconsiders development and licensing of agreement as a syntactic projection and argues for a productive developmental relation between agreement and the category of focus. Suggests that focus projections are initially selected by a variety of functional heads with real semantic content, then, over time decays into a simple concord shell. Upon…

  2. Focus, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus, 2001

    2001-01-01

    These three issues of 2000-2001 "Focus" present a collection of papers focusing on issues related to poverty. The first issue discusses child support enforcement policy and low-income families, highlighting such issues as fragile families and child wellbeing; low-income families and the child support enforcement system; child support enforcement…

  3. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  4. FOCUS: Sustainable Mathematics Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mireles, Selina V.; Acee, Taylor W.; Gerber, Lindsey N.

    2014-01-01

    The FOCUS (Fundamentals of Conceptual Understanding and Success) Co-Requisite Model Intervention (FOCUS Intervention) for College Algebra was developed as part of the Developmental Education Demonstration Projects (DEDP) in Texas. The program was designed to use multiple services, courses, and best practices to support student completion of a…

  5. Flat focusing mirror.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y C; Kicas, S; Trull, J; Peckus, M; Cojocaru, C; Vilaseca, R; Drazdys, R; Staliunas, K

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  6. Flat Focusing Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y. C.; Kicas, S.; Trull, J.; Peckus, M.; Cojocaru, C.; Vilaseca, R.; Drazdys, R.; Staliunas, K.

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  7. The mechanism of interaction between focused ultrasound and microbubbles in blood-brain barrier opening in mice.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Vlachos, Fotios; Feshitan, Jameel A; Borden, Mark A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-11-01

    The activation of bubbles by an acoustic field has been shown to temporarily open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but the trigger cause responsible for the physiological effects involved in the process of BBB opening remains unknown. Here, the trigger cause (i.e., physical mechanism) of the focused ultrasound-induced BBB opening with monodispersed microbubbles is identified. Sixty-seven mice were injected intravenously with bubbles of 1-2, 4-5, or 6-8 μm in diameter and the concentration of 10(7) numbers/ml. The right hippocampus of each mouse was then sonicated using focused ultrasound (1.5 MHz frequency, 100 cycles pulse length, 10 Hz pulse repetition frequency, 1 min duration). Peak-rarefactional pressures of 0.15, 0.30, 0.45, or 0.60 MPa were applied to identify the threshold of BBB opening and inertial cavitation (IC). Our results suggest that the BBB opens with nonlinear bubble oscillation when the bubble diameter is similar to the capillary diameter and with inertial cavitation when it is not. The bubble may thus have to be in contact with the capillary wall to induce BBB opening without IC. BBB opening was shown capable of being induced safely with nonlinear bubble oscillation at the pressure threshold and its volume was highly dependent on both the acoustic pressure and bubble diameter. PMID:22087933

  8. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  9. Current focusing and steering

    PubMed Central

    Bonham, Ben H.; Litvak, Leonid M.

    2008-01-01

    Current steering and current focusing are stimulation techniques designed to increase the number of distinct perceptual channels available to cochlear implant (CI) users by adjusting currents applied simultaneously to multiple CI electrodes. Previous studies exploring current steering and current focusing stimulation strategies are reviewed, including results of research using computational models, animal neurophysiology, and human psychophysics. Preliminary results of additional neurophysiological and human psychophysical studies are presented that demonstrate the success of current steering strategies in stimulating auditory nerve regions lying between physical CI electrodes, as well as current focusing strategies that excite regions narrower than those stimulated using monopolar configurations. These results are interpreted in the context of perception and speech reception by CI users. Disparities between results of physiological and psychophysical studies are discussed. The differences in stimulation used for physiological and psychophysical studies are hypothesized to contribute to these disparities. Finally, application of current steering and focusing strategies to other types of auditory prostheses is also discussed. PMID:18501539

  10. Final focus nomenclature

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.

    1986-08-08

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number. (LEW)

  11. Facility Focus: Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Hawthorn Court Community Center at Iowa State University, Ames, and the HUB-Robeson Center at Pennsylvania State University. Focuses on the food service offered in these new student-life buildings. Includes photographs. (EV)

  12. Focusing corner cube

    DOEpatents

    Monjes, J.A.

    1985-09-12

    This invention retortreflects and focuses a beam of light. The invention comprises a modified corner cube reflector wherein one reflective surface is planar, a second reflective surface is spherical, and the third reflective surface may be planar or convex cylindrical.

  13. Inertial Focusing in Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Joseph M.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future. PMID:24905880

  14. Planar-focusing cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, J. W.; Noonan, J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2005-01-01

    Conventional {pi}-mode rf photoinjectors typically use magnetic solenoids for emittance compensation. This provides independent focusing strength but can complicate rf power feed placement, introduce asymmetries (due to coil crossovers), and greatly increase the cost of the photoinjector. Cathode-region focusing can also provide for a form of emittance compensation. Typically this method strongly couples focusing strength to the field gradient on the cathode, however, and usually requires altering the longitudinal position of the cathode to change the focusing. We propose a new method for achieving cathode-region variable-strength focusing for emittance compensation. The new method reduces the coupling to the gradient on the cathode and does not require a change in the longitudinal position of the cathode. Expected performance for an S-band system is similar to conventional solenoid-based designs. This paper presents the results of rf cavity and beam dynamics simulations of the new design. We have proposed a method for performing emittance compensation using a cathode-region focusing scheme. This technique allows the focusing strength to be adjusted somewhat independently of the on-axis field strength. Beam dynamics calculations indicate performance should be comparable to presently in-use emittance compensation schemes, with a simpler configuration and fewer possibilities for emittance degradation due to the focusing optics. There are several potential difficulties with this approach, including cathode material selection, cathode heating, and peak fields in the gun. We hope to begin experimenting with a cathode of this type in the near future, and several possibilities exist for reducing the peak gradients to more acceptable levels.

  15. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasmonics FOCUS ON PLASMONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; García-Vidal, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging field in optics dealing with the so-called surface plasmons whose extraordinary properties are being both analyzed from a fundamental point of view and exploited for numerous technological applications. Surface plasmons associated with surface electron density oscillations decorating metal dielectric interfaces were discovered by Rufus Ritchie in the 1950s. Since the seventies, the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields as well as their enhancement inherent to the surface plasmon excitation has been widely used for spectroscopic purposes. Recent advances in nano-fabrication, characterization and modelling techniques have allowed unique properties of these surface electromagnetic modes to be explored with respect to subwavelength field localization and waveguiding, opening the path to truly nanoscale plasmonic optical devices. This area of investigation also has interesting links with research on photonic band gap materials and the field of optical metamaterials. Nowadays, plasmonics can be seen as a mature interdisciplinary area of research in which scientists coming from different backgrounds (chemistry, physics, optics and engineering) strive to discover and exploit new and exciting phenomena associated with surface plasmons. The already made and forthcoming discoveries will have impacts in many fields of science and technology, including not only photonics and materials science but also computation, biology and medicine, among others. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended to cover all the aforementioned capabilities of surface plasmons by presenting a current overview of state-of-the-art advances achieved by the leading groups in this field of research. Focus on Plasmonics Contents Directional coupling between dielectric and long-range plasmon waveguides Aloyse Degiron, Sang-Yeon Cho, Talmage Tyler, Nan Marie Jokerst and David R Smith Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes Reuben M Bakker, Vladimir P Drachev, Zhengtong Liu, Hsiao-Kuan Yuan, Rasmus H Pedersen, Alexandra Boltasseva, Jiji Chen, Joseph Irudayaraj, Alexander V Kildishev and Vladimir M Shalaev Confinement and propagation characteristics of subwavelength plasmonic modes R F Oulton, G Bartal, D F P Pile and X Zhang Theory on the scattering of light and surface plasmon polaritons by arrays of holes and dimples in a metal film F de León-Pérez, G Brucoli, F J García-Vidal and L Martín-Moreno Shaping and manipulation of light fields with bottom-up plasmonic structures C Girard, E Dujardin, G Baffou and R Quidant Gold nanorods and nanospheroids for enhancing spontaneous emission A Mohammadi, V Sandoghdar and M Agio Generation of surface plasmons at single subwavelength slits: from slit to ridge plasmon J-Y Laluet, A Drezet, C Genet and T W Ebbesen Mode mapping of plasmonic stars using TPL microscopy P Ghenuche, S Cherukulappurath and R Quidant Controlling optical transmission through magneto-plasmonic crystals with an external magnetic field G A Wurtz, W Hendren, R Pollard, R Atkinson, L Le Guyader, A Kirilyuk, Th Rasing, I I Smolyaninov and A V Zayats Nanoplasmonic renormalization and enhancement of Coulomb interactions M Durach, A Rusina, V I Klimov and M I Stockman Bulk and surface sensitivities of surface plasmon waveguides Pierre Berini Mapping plasmons in nanoantennas via cathodoluminescence R Gómez-Medina, N Yamamoto, M Nakano and F J García de Abajo Theoretical analysis of gold nano-strip gap plasmon resonators T Søndergaard, J Jung, S I Bozhevolnyi and G Della Valle Surface plasmon polariton-mediated enhancement of the emission of dye molecules on metallic gratings J Gómez Rivas, G Vecchi and V Giannini Nanoshells to nanoeggs to nanocups: optical properties of reduced symmetry core shell nanoparticles beyond the quasistatic limit Mark W Knight and Naomi J Halas Single emitters coupled to plasmonic nano-antennas: angular emission and collection efficiency T H Taminiau, F D Stefani and N F van Hulst Green's tensor calculations of plasmon resonances of single holes and hole pairs in thin gold films Joan Alegret, Peter Johansson and Mikael Käll Optical and terahertz near-field studies of surface plasmons in subwavelength metallic slits K J Ahn, K G Lee, H W Kihm, M A Seo, A J L Adam, P C M Planken and D S Kim Fluorescence enhancement through modified dye molecule absorption associated with the localized surface plasmon resonances of metallic dimers George Zoriniants and William L Barnes

  17. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  18. Sagittal focusing Laue monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Zhong; Zhong , Hanson; Jonathan , Hastings; Jerome , Kao; Chi-Chang , Lenhard; Anthony , Siddons; David Peter , Zhong; Hui

    2009-03-24

    An x-ray focusing device generally includes a slide pivotable about a pivot point defined at a forward end thereof, a rail unit fixed with respect to the pivotable slide, a forward crystal for focusing x-rays disposed at the forward end of the pivotable slide and a rearward crystal for focusing x-rays movably coupled to the pivotable slide and the fixed rail unit at a distance rearward from the forward crystal. The forward and rearward crystals define reciprocal angles of incidence with respect to the pivot point, wherein pivoting of the slide about the pivot point changes the incidence angles of the forward and rearward crystals while simultaneously changing the distance between the forward and rearward crystals.

  19. Deliberative Discussion Focus Groups.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca; Botkin, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    This article discusses a new approach for the conduct of focus groups in health research. Identifying ways to educate and inform participants about the topic of interest prior to the focus group discussion can promote more quality data from informed opinions. Data on this deliberative discussion approach are provided from research within three federally funded studies. As healthcare continues to improve from scientific and technological advancements, educating the research participants prior to data collection about these complexities is essential to gather quality data. PMID:26078330

  20. Quality-Focused Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needham, Robbie Lee

    1993-01-01

    Presents the quality-focused management (QFM) system and explains the departure QFM makes from established community college management practices. Describes the system's self-directed teams engaged in a continuous improvement process driven by customer demand and long-term commitment to quality and cost control. (13 references.) (MAB)

  1. An inexpensive focusing mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missira, A.

    1998-10-01

    A focusing mount with the ability to take a range of government surplus eyepieces was required for a home-made 60mm refractor. After considering machining one from brass bar/tube an almost ready-made solution was found.

  2. Theme: Focus on Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, James J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "The More Things Change..." (Connors); "Students--Bored of Education?" (Earle); "Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow" (Wesch et al.); "Attitude and the Value of Environment" (Foster); "Fins, Feathers and Fur" (Crank); "Greenhouse as a Focus for Agriscience" (Hurst); and "Agricultural and Environmental Education at Milton Hershey School"…

  3. Focus on the Presidency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindroth, Linda K.

    1996-01-01

    Uses Presidential and House of Representatives elections as basis for year-long curriculum focus on civics education, integrating print material, software, and the Internet. Describes classroom activities, Internet sites, and software described for four major areas: (1) campaigning for office; (2) moving into a new home; (3) reporting for work;…

  4. Focusing educational initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.

    1990-01-01

    The United States will soon be facing a critical shortage of aerospace scientists and engineers. To address this problem, Space Grant Colleges can assist in focusing interest in existing educational initiatives and in creating new educational opportunities, particularly for women and underrepresented minorities.

  5. Lifelong Learning. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the need for adult literacy programs, as well as recent innovations in literacy education. "Adult Literacy and Leadership: Current Innovations" (Aurelio M. Montemayor) describes an adult literacy outreach program in Texas, and discusses the importance of family literacy for parents' involvement in their children's…

  6. Immigrant Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter includes five articles on immigrant education that focus on successful school programs and educational policy issues. In "Immigrant Education from the Administrators' Perspective" (Pam McCollum, Juanita Garcia), three principals of south Texas secondary schools with successful immigrant programs discuss their views on the adequacy…

  7. Focus on Basics, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus on Basics, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Together, these four newsletters contain 36 articles devoted to adult literacy research and practice and the relationship between them. The following articles are included: "A Productive Partnership" (Richard J. Murnane, Bob Bickerton); "Welcome to 'Focus on Basics'" (Barbara Garner); "Applying Research on the Last Frontier" (Karen Backlund, Kathy…

  8. Equity. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on equity in children's literature, public funding for private schools, women in educational fields, female dropouts, and the relationship between school violence and family and community violence. "Violence in Our Schools" (Bradley Scott) explores reasons for school violence (media violence, isolation from family, racial…

  9. Focus on Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenzky, Janet; Maitland, Christine

    2001-01-01

    As a followup to a survey of distance education faculty, the National Education Association conducted two 3-hour focus groups with 12 higher education faculty members in June 2000. The purpose of the groups was to gain more understanding of the complexity of feelings and opinions expressed in a telephone survey conducted in March 2000. The…

  10. Focus on First Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Shari S.

    The result of a collaboration between the El Paso, Texas, school district and community agencies, the Focus on First Graders program provides early intervention and prevention using a comprehensive approach to providing a variety of services at the school to at-risk first graders from low income families. Teachers and parents were surveyed to…

  11. Design-Focused Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Calvin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper an approach to the writing of evaluation questions is outlined and developed which focuses attention on the question of the effectiveness of an educational design for bringing about the learning it is intended to facilitate. The approach develops from the idea that all educational designs rely on instructional alignment, implicitly…

  12. Focus on stochastic thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Broeck, Christian; Sasa, Shin-ichi; Seifert, Udo

    2016-02-01

    We introduce the thirty papers collected in this ‘focus on’ issue. The contributions explore conceptual issues within and around stochastic thermodynamics, use this framework for the theoretical modeling and experimental investigation of specific systems, and provide further perspectives on and for this active field.

  13. Instructional Technology. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on implementing instructional technology in ways that benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Cruising the Web with English Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green) presents three scenarios using the World Wide Web in…

  14. Focus on Rashomon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richie, Donald S., Ed.

    This Film Focus series is a collection of reviews, essays, and commentaries on the Japanese film Rashomon. The plot consists of an attack, a rape, and a robbery, all of which probably occurred during the Middle Ages. Each character relates his own version of what happened, or might have happened, revealing the outward and inner driving forces,…

  15. Bilingual Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on instructional practices, evaluation, and the state of bilingual education. "Effective Implementation of Bilingual Programs: Reflections from the Field" (Abelardo Villarreal, Adela Solis) describes the key characteristics of successful bilingual programs: vision and goals; program leadership; linkage to central office…

  16. Education Policy. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on educational policy in the Texas legislature in relation to student retention, Internet access, and sexual harassment. "1999 Texas Legislative Session--End of an Era?" (Albert Cortez, Maria Robledo Montecel) examines educational equity issues facing legislators: school funding, including the…

  17. [Focus: Family Communication].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Richard E., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the "Journal of the Wisconsin Communication Association" focuses on family communication and contains the following articles: "Marital Typologies: An Alternative Approach to the Study of Communication in Enduring Relations" by Mary Anne Fitzpatrick, "Intimate Communication and the Family" by Marilyn D. LaCourt, and "A Study in

  18. Focus: Economic Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCorkle, Sarapage; Meszaros, Bonnie T.; Odorzynski, Sandra J.; Schug, Mark C.; Watts, Michael

    The "Focus" series, part of the National Council on Economic Education's (NCEE) EconomicsAmerica program, uses economics to enhance learning in subjects such as history, geography, civics, and personal finance, as well as economics. Activities are interactive, reflecting the belief that students learn best through active, highly personalized…

  19. Homework. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahal, Michelle Layer

    2010-01-01

    Homework has been an integral part of the educational system for over 100 years. What likely began as simple memorization tasks has evolved into complex projects and sparked an increasingly heated debate over the purpose and value of homework assignments. This "Focus On" examines the purpose of homework, how to create homework that has value,…

  20. Curriculum Mapping. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molineaux, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This "Focus On" discusses curriculum mapping, a process that allows educators to align the curriculum both within and across grades and to ensure that the curriculum is in line with school, local, and state standards. It outlines the steps of the curriculum mapping process from planning the mapping initiative to creating and editing curriculum…

  1. Focusing on the Invisible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the question of whether or not the design and development of an educational laboratory really changes when the focus is on nanotechnology. It explores current laboratory building trends and the added considerations for building a nanotechnology laboratory. The author leaves the reader with additional points to consider…

  2. Policy Update. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the drastic revision of the Texas education code undertaken during the 1995 state legislative session. "Education Policy Reform: Key Points for Districts" (Albert Cortez, Mikki Symonds) outlines critical issues in the legislation that have an impact on educational quality: charter schools exempt from state regulations;…

  3. Youth Leadership. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on motivating young people to learn by providing leadership opportunities in school. "Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program: Assessing Progress" (Josie Danini Supik) examines the program's success. This program, which trains high-risk middle and high school students as tutors of younger children, has dramatically lowered dropout…

  4. Focus on the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Optometric Education, 1996

    1996-01-01

    In an interview, the incoming president of the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO), Thomas L. Lewis, discusses his goals for the association, the challenges facing optometric education in the next decade, cooperation between ASCO and other professional organizations in optometry, his mentors in the profession, his focus as a…

  5. Focus on the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Optometric Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    An interview with the new president of the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry, John Schoessler, considers issues the president wishes to focus on during his presidency, changes in optometry students over the years, people who influenced his educational ideas, and research currently being conducted at Ohio State University College of…

  6. Focus: International Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Gerald J.; Watts, Michael W.; Wentworth, Donald R.

    The "Focus" series, part of the National Council on Economic Education's (NCEE) EconomicsAmerica program, uses economics to enhance learning in subjects such as history, geography, civics, and personal finance, as well as economics. Activities are interactive, reflecting the belief that students learn best through active, highly personalized…

  7. Homework. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahal, Michelle Layer

    2010-01-01

    Homework has been an integral part of the educational system for over 100 years. What likely began as simple memorization tasks has evolved into complex projects and sparked an increasingly heated debate over the purpose and value of homework assignments. This "Focus On" examines the purpose of homework, how to create homework that has value,

  8. Young Children. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on educational, cognitive, and brain research with implications for early childhood educators, including those who work with limited-English-proficient, minority, and economically disadvantaged children. "Coming to Grips with Reading Instruction at the Early Grades" (Christie L. Goodman) reports…

  9. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  10. Quantum focusing conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Fisher, Zachary; Leichenauer, Stefan; Wall, Aron C.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a universal inequality that unifies the Bousso bound with the classical focusing theorem. Given a surface σ that need not lie on a horizon, we define a finite generalized entropy Sgen as the area of σ in Planck units, plus the von Neumann entropy of its exterior. Given a null congruence N orthogonal to σ , the rate of change of Sgen per unit area defines a quantum expansion. We conjecture that the quantum expansion cannot increase along N . This extends the notion of universal focusing to cases where quantum matter may violate the null energy condition. Integrating the conjecture yields a precise version of the Strominger-Thompson quantum Bousso bound. Applied to locally parallel light-rays, the conjecture implies a novel inequality, the quantum null energy condition, a lower bound on the stress tensor in terms of the second derivative of the von Neumann entropy. We sketch a proof of the latter relation in quantum field theory.

  11. Focus on quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchleitner, Andreas; Burghardt, Irene; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Scholes, Gregory D.; Schwarz, Ulrich T.; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Wellens, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Technologies which convert light into energy, and vice versa, rely on complex, microscopic transport processes in the condensed phase, which obey the laws of quantum mechanics, but hitherto lack systematic analysis and modeling. Given our much improved understanding of multicomponent, disordered, highly structured, open quantum systems, this focus on collection collects cutting-edge research on theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum transport in truly complex systems as defined, e.g., by the macromolecular functional complexes at the heart of photosynthesis, by organic quantum wires, or even photovoltaic devices. To what extent microscopic quantum coherence effects can (be made to) impact on macroscopic transport behavior is an equally challenging and controversial question, and this focus on collection provides a setting for the present state of affairs, as well as for the quantum opportunities on the horizon.

  12. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  13. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Ji, Qing; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  14. Focus issue: plant communication.

    PubMed

    Gough, Nancy R

    2006-02-14

    This week's issues of Science and Science's STKE focus on plant signaling with an emphasis on volatile organic compounds. Science emphasizes the chemistry of and information encoded by plant volatiles and how plants, plant pathogens, or humans utilize this aromatic information. Articles and resources at STKE highlight the evolution of olfactory signal transduction, describe the biosynthetic and signaling pathways of the plant hormone jasmonate, and provide an animated overview of how the plant hormone auxin regulates gene expression. PMID:16478938

  15. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  16. Focused Attention in Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Bridget M.; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Eisenberg, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined individual differences and correlates of focused attention when toddlers were approximately 18 months old (T1; n = 256) and a year later (T2; n = 230). Toddlers’ attention and negative emotionality were reported by mothers and non-parental caregivers and rated globally by observers. Toddlers’ focused attention also was observed during two mother-child interactions and an independent play task. Measures of maternal emotional support and control were obtained via self-report and observation. Some contemporaneous relations among indices of toddlers’ attention were obtained, particularly for observed measures. Moreover, all measures of attention demonstrated stability across time. Negative emotionality was negatively related to toddlers’ observed attention at both ages, whereas maternal praise had positive concurrent associations. Maternal control was negatively related to observed observed attention at T2 and also predicted longitudinally, but only for children who initially had low or moderate attention. The findings suggest that individual differences in focused attention evidence stability early in life but can be influenced by adult socialization. PMID:19112517

  17. Simultaneous Measurement of Thermophysical Properties of Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing; You, Jiang; Huang, Zhihong; Cochran, Sandy; Corner, George

    2012-03-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms, including bovine serum albumin phantoms and egg white phantoms, have been developed for, and in laboratory use for, real-time visualization of high intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal coagulative necrosis since 2001. However, until now, very few data are available concerning their thermophysical properties. In this article, a step-wise transient plane source method has been used to determine the values of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific heat capacity of egg white phantoms with elevated egg white concentrations (0 v/v% to 40 v/v%, by 10 v/v% interval) at room temperature (~20 °C). The measured thermophysical properties were close to previously reported values; the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were linearly proportional to the egg white concentration within the investigation range, while the specific heat capacity decreased as the egg white concentration increased. Taking account of large differences between real experiment and ideal model, data variations within 20 % were accepted.

  18. Modeling localized delivery of Doxorubicin to the brain following focused ultrasound enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhan, Tam; Burgess, Alison; Lilge, Lothar; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-10-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is a well-established chemotherapeutic agent, however it has limited efficacy in treating brain malignancies due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated that focused ultrasound induced BBB disruption (BBBD) enables efficient delivery of Dox to the brain. For future treatment planning of BBBD-based drug delivery, it is crucial to establish a mathematical framework to predict the effect of transient BBB permeability enhancement on the spatiotemporal distribution of Dox at the targeted area. The constructed model considers Dox concentrations within three compartments (plasma, extracellular, intracellular) that are governed by various transport processes (e.g. diffusion in interstitial space, exchange across vessel wall, clearance by cerebral spinal fluid, uptake by brain cells). By examining several clinical treatment aspects (e.g. sonication scheme, permeability enhancement, injection mode), our simulation results support the experimental findings of optimal interval delay between two consecutive sonications and therapeutically-sufficient intracellular concentration with respect to transfer constant Ktrans range of 0.01-0.03 min-1. Finally, the model suggests that infusion over a short duration (20-60 min) should be employed along with single-sonication or multiple-sonication at 10 min interval to ensure maximum delivery to the intracellular compartment while attaining minimal cardiotoxicity via suppressing peak plasma concentration.

  19. Micro-focused ultrasonic solid-liquid extraction (muFUSLE) combined with HPLC and fluorescence detection for PAHs determination in sediments: optimization and linking with the analytical minimalism concept.

    PubMed

    Capelo, J L; Galesio, M M; Felisberto, G M; Vaz, C; Pessoa, J Costa

    2005-06-15

    Analytical minimalism is a concept that deals with the optimization of all stages of an analytical procedure so that it becomes less time, cost, sample, reagent and energy consuming. The guide-lines provided in the USEPA extraction method 3550B recommend the use of focused ultrasound (FU), i.e., probe sonication, for the solid-liquid extraction of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, PAHs, but ignore the principle of analytical minimalism. The problems related with the dead sonication zones, often present when high volumes are sonicated with probe, are also not addressed. In this work, we demonstrate that successful extraction and quantification of PAHs from sediments can be done with low sample mass (0.125g), low reagent volume (4ml), short sonication time (3min) and low sonication amplitude (40%). Two variables are here particularly taken into account for total extraction: (i) the design of the extraction vessel and (ii) the solvent used to carry out the extraction. Results showed PAHs recoveries (EPA priority list) ranged between 77 and 101%, accounting for more than 95% for most of the PAHs here studied, as compared with the values obtained after soxhlet extraction. Taking into account the results reported in this work we recommend a revision of the EPA guidelines for PAHs extraction from solid matrices with focused ultrasound, so that these match the analytical minimalism concept. PMID:18970118

  20. Focus on 'Rue Legendre'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated image of PIA04196 Focus on 'Rue Legendre'

    Spirit used its microscopic imager to take this mosaic of the rock 'Haussmann' on martian day, or sol, 563 (August 3, 2005). The specific target is nicknamed 'Rue Legendre.' The rounded nature of the pebbles indicates that they were eroded on the surface before being embedded into the Haussmann rock. The size of the larger of the two pebbles is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches). The rock probably formed from impact ejecta, consistent with other rocks Spirit discovered during its climb to the summit of 'Husband Hill.'

  1. Dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device

    DOEpatents

    James, Conrad D. (Albuquerque, NM); Galambos, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Mark S. (Tijeras, NM)

    2010-05-11

    A dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device uses interdigitated microelectrodes to provide a spatially non-uniform electric field in a fluid that generates a dipole within particles in the fluid. The electric field causes the particles to either be attracted to or repelled from regions where the electric field gradient is large, depending on whether the particles are more or less polarizable than the fluid. The particles can thereby be forced into well defined stable paths along the interdigitated microelectrodes. The device can be used for flow cytometry, particle control, and other process applications, including cell counting or other types of particle counting, and for separations in material control.

  2. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  3. Focused pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Drobot, A.; Wyeth, N.C.

    1995-09-08

    A non-reactor neutron source is disclosed that allows for a pulse intense current of ions to generate neutrons that are epithermal neutrons and provide low-energy neutron energy particularly suited for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment. The present invention provides for a neutron fluence on a tumor which can be more than 10{sup 12} neutrons/cm{sup 2} and is generated into a time scale of less than 1 second. The radiation dose provided by the present invention is focused yet uniformly distributed so as to attack cancerous tissues and reduce collateral damage to healthy tissues.

  4. Digital focusing schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, Benjamin D.; Trolinger, James D.; L'Esperance, Drew

    2015-09-01

    Since its invention in the 19th century, schlieren imaging has been an essential method for studying many aerodynamic effects, particularly convection and shock waves, but the classical method using parabolic mirrors is extremely difficult to set up and very expensive for large fields of view. Focusing schlieren methods have made large- area schlieren more feasible but have tended to be difficult to align and set up, limiting their utility in many applications We recently developed an alternative approach which utilizes recent advances in digital display technology to produce simpler schlieren system that yields similar sensitivity with greater flexibility.

  5. Focused crossed Andreev reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugen, H.; Brataas, A.; Waintal, X.; Bauer, G. E. W.

    2011-03-01

    We consider non-local transport mediated by Andreev reflection in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) connected to one superconducting and two normal metal terminals. A robust scheme is presented for observing crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) between the normal metal terminals based on electron focusing by weak perpendicular magnetic fields. At slightly elevated temperatures the CAR signature can be easily distinguished from a background of quantum interference fluctuations. The CAR-induced entanglement between electrons can be switched on and off over large distances by the magnetic field.

  6. Isoelectric focusing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.; Egen, N. B.; Mosher, R. A.; Twitty, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of space electrophoresis is conditioned by the fact that all electrophoretic techniques require the suppression of gravity-caused convection. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) is a powerful variant of electrophoresis, in which amphoteric substances are separated in a pH gradient according to their isoelectric points. A new apparatus for large scale IEF, utilizing a recycling principle, has been developed. In the ground-based prototype, laminar flow is provided by a series of parallel filter elements. The operation of the apparatus is monitored by an automated array of pH and ultraviolet absorption sensors under control of a desk-top computer. The apparatus has proven to be useful for the purification of a variety of enzymes, snake venom proteins, peptide hormones, and other biologicals, including interferon produced by genetic engineering techniques. In planning for a possible space apparatus, a crucial question regarding electroosmosis needs to be addressed To solve this problem, simple focusing test modules are planned for inclusion in an early Shuttle flight.

  7. Electrostatic Focusing Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Eric; Hopkins, Demitri

    2011-10-01

    We developed an electrostatic focusing lens capable of generating DD reactions, by focusing deuterium ions generated from a pointed emitter at a frozen heavy water target. Due to difficulty with the pointed emitter, we later switched to a hollow cathode design. To model the lenses, chamber, and calculate the dimensions for the design that would maximize ion energy and density, the program SIMION was used. During stable operation, vacuum was hand adjusted around 10-13 mTorr. To keep stable beam, DC voltage generator was varied between 15-25 kV. Hand adjusting was necessary, because at points in the operation the frozen heavy water would release vapor at an increased rate. This caused the pressure to rise and the beam current to spike, creating instabilities and an arc to the lens. Three methods were used to determine successful DD production. (1) Two differently shielded Geiger counters (unshielded and UHMW-PE insulated tube), (2) Spectrophotometer comparing control peaks with heavy water tests, and (3) a calibrated bubble dosimeter specific to neutrons. Analysis of the results suggest the neutrons flux varied from 532 to 1.4 × 106 neutrons/sec, and require further tests to plot and narrow results.

  8. Flux focusing eddy current probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Clendenin, C. Gerald (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks and material loss in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. The maximum sensor output is obtained when positioned symmetrically above the crack. Hence, by obtaining the position of the maximum sensor output, it is possible to track the fault and locate the area surrounding its tip. The accuracy of tip location is enhanced by two unique features of the sensor; a very high signal-to-noise ratio of the probe's output which results in an extremely smooth signal peak across the fault, and a rapidly decaying sensor output outside a small area surrounding the crack tip which enables the region for searching to be clearly defined. Under low frequency operation, material thinning due to corrosion damage causes an incomplete shielding of the pick-up coil. The low frequency output voltage of the probe is therefore a direct indicator of the thickness of the test sample.

  9. Spatio-temporal analysis of molecular delivery through the blood brain barrier using focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. J.; Pernot, M.; Brown, T. R.; Small, S. A.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2007-09-01

    The deposition of gadolinium through ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) openings in the murine hippocampus was investigated. First, wave propagation simulations through the intact mouse skull revealed minimal beam distortion while thermal deposition simulations, at the same sonication parameters used to induce BBB opening in vivo, revealed temperature increases lower than 0.5 °C. The simulation results were validated experimentally in ex vivo skulls (m = 6) and in vitro tissue specimens. Then, in vivo mice (n = 9) were injected with microbubbles (Optison™ 25-50 µl) and sonicated (frequency: 1.525 MHz, pressure amplitudes: 0.5-1.1 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duty cycle: 20%, durations: 2-4 shots, 30 s per shot, 30 s interval) at the left hippocampus, through intact skin and skull. Sequential, high-resolution, T1-weighted MRI (9.4 Tesla, in-plane resolution: 75 µm, scan time: 45-180 min) with gadolinium (Omniscan™ 0.5 ml) injected intraperitoneally revealed a threshold of the BBB opening at 0.67 MPa and BBB closing within 28 h from opening. The contrast-enhancement area and gadolinium deposition path were monitored over time and the influence of vessel density, size and location was determined. Sonicated arteries, or their immediate surroundings, depicted greater contrast enhancement than sonicated homogeneous brain tissue regions. In conclusion, gadolinium was delivered through a transiently opened BBB and contained to a specific brain region (i.e., the hippocampus) using a single-element focused ultrasound transducer. It was also found that the amount of gadolinium deposited in the hippocampal region increased with the acoustic pressure and that the spatial distribution of the BBB opening was determined not only by the ultrasound beam, but also by the vasculature of the targeted brain region.

  10. Spatio-temporal analysis of molecular delivery through the blood-brain barrier using focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Choi, J J; Pernot, M; Brown, T R; Small, S A; Konofagou, E E

    2007-09-21

    The deposition of gadolinium through ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) openings in the murine hippocampus was investigated. First, wave propagation simulations through the intact mouse skull revealed minimal beam distortion while thermal deposition simulations, at the same sonication parameters used to induce BBB opening in vivo, revealed temperature increases lower than 0.5 degrees C. The simulation results were validated experimentally in ex vivo skulls (m = 6) and in vitro tissue specimens. Then, in vivo mice (n = 9) were injected with microbubbles (Optison; 25-50 microl) and sonicated (frequency: 1.525 MHz, pressure amplitudes: 0.5-1.1 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duty cycle: 20%, durations: 2-4 shots, 30 s per shot, 30 s interval) at the left hippocampus, through intact skin and skull. Sequential, high-resolution, T1-weighted MRI (9.4 Tesla, in-plane resolution: 75 microm, scan time: 45-180 min) with gadolinium (Omniscan; 0.5 ml) injected intraperitoneally revealed a threshold of the BBB opening at 0.67 MPa and BBB closing within 28 h from opening. The contrast-enhancement area and gadolinium deposition path were monitored over time and the influence of vessel density, size and location was determined. Sonicated arteries, or their immediate surroundings, depicted greater contrast enhancement than sonicated homogeneous brain tissue regions. In conclusion, gadolinium was delivered through a transiently opened BBB and contained to a specific brain region (i.e., the hippocampus) using a single-element focused ultrasound transducer. It was also found that the amount of gadolinium deposited in the hippocampal region increased with the acoustic pressure and that the spatial distribution of the BBB opening was determined not only by the ultrasound beam, but also by the vasculature of the targeted brain region. PMID:17804879

  11. Highly Focused Supersonic Microjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Oudalov, Nikolai; Visser, Claas Willem; Peters, Ivo R.; van der Meer, Devaraj; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the production of thin, focused microjets with velocities of up to 850m/s by the rapid vaporization of a small mass of liquid in an open liquid-filled capillary. The vaporization is caused by the absorption of a low-energy laser pulse. A likely explanation of the observed phenomenon is based on the impingement of the shock wave caused by the nearly instantaneous vaporization on the free surface of the liquid. We conduct an experimental study of the dependence of the jet velocity on several parameters and develop a semiempirical relation for its prediction. The coherence of the jets and their high velocity, good reproducibility, and controllability are unique features of the system. A possible application is to development of needle-free drug-injection systems that would be of great importance for health care worldwide.

  12. Focus on Quantum Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennen, Gavin; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Simon, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Quantum memories are essential for quantum information processing and long-distance quantum communication. The field has recently seen a lot of progress, and the present focus issue offers a glimpse of these developments, showing both experimental and theoretical results from many of the leading groups around the world. On the experimental side, it shows work on cold gases, warm vapors, rare-earth ion doped crystals and single atoms. On the theoretical side there are in-depth studies of existing memory protocols, proposals for new protocols including approaches based on quantum error correction, and proposals for new applications of quantum storage. Looking forward, we anticipate many more exciting results in this area.

  13. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural kidney stones. For the model stones, the erosion rate of the C-C waveform showed a distinct advantage with the combined high and low frequency waves over either wave alone. For optimization of the high frequency ultrasound intensity, we investigated the relationship between subharmonic emission from cavitation bubbles and stone erosion volume. For stone tracking we have also developed a non-invasive ultrasound theragnostic system (NIUTS) that compensates for kidney motion. Natural stones were eroded and most of the resulting fragments were less than 1 mm in diameter. The small fragments were small enough to pass through the urethra. The results demonstrate that, with the precise control of cavitation activity, focused ultrasound has the potential to be used to develop a less invasive and more controllable lithotripsy system. PMID:26486335

  14. Alliance-focused training.

    PubMed

    Eubanks-Carter, Catherine; Muran, J Christopher; Safran, Jeremy D

    2015-06-01

    Alliance-focused training (AFT) aims to increase therapists' ability to recognize, tolerate, and negotiate alliance ruptures by increasing the therapeutic skills of self-awareness, affect regulation, and interpersonal sensitivity. In AFT, therapists are encouraged to draw on these skills when metacommunicating about ruptures with patients. In this article, we present the 3 main supervisory tasks of AFT: videotape analysis of rupture moments, awareness-oriented role-plays, and mindfulness training. We describe the theoretical and empirical support for each supervisory task, provide examples based on actual supervision sessions, and present feedback about the usefulness of the techniques from trainees in our program. We also note some of the challenges involved in conducting AFT and the importance of maintaining a strong supervisory alliance when using this training approach. PMID:25150677

  15. Focusing on customer service.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This booklet is devoted to a consideration of how good customer service in family planning programs can generate demand for products and services, bring customers back, and reduce costs. Customer service is defined as increasing client satisfaction through continuous concern for client preferences, staff accountability to clients, and respect for the rights of clients. Issues discussed include the introduction of a customer service approach and gaining staff commitment. The experience of PROSALUD in Bolivia in recruiting appropriate staff, supervising staff, soliciting client feedback, and marketing services is offered as an example of a successful customer service approach. The key customer service functions are described as 1) establishing a welcoming atmosphere, 2) streamlining client flow, 3) personalizing client services, and 4) organizing and providing clear information to clients. The role of the manager in developing procedures is explored, and the COPE (Client-Oriented Provider-Efficient) process is presented as a good way to begin to make improvements. Techniques in staff training in customer service include brainstorming, role playing, using case studies (examples of which are provided), and engaging in practice sessions. Training also leads to the development of effective customer service attitudes, and the differences between these and organizational/staff-focused attitudes are illustrated in a chart. The use of communication skills (asking open-ended questions, helping clients express their concerns, engaging in active listening, and handling difficult situations) is considered. Good recovery skills are important when things go wrong. Gathering and using client feedback is the next topic considered. This involves identifying, recording, and discussing customer service issues as well as taking action on these issues and evaluating the results. The booklet ends by providing a sample of customer service indicators, considering the maintenance of a customer service focus, and reporting comments from the reviewers of the booklet. PMID:12320174

  16. A study on the flip angle for an optimal T1-weighted image based on the 3D-THRIVE MRI technique: Focusing on the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the optimal flip angle (FA) for a T1-weighted image in the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A 3D-T1-weighted high-resolution isotropic volume examination (THRIVE) technique was used to determine the dependence of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on the change in FA. This study targeted 40 liver cancer patients (25 men and 15 women aged 50 to 70 years with a mean age of 60.32 ± 6.2 years) who visited this hospital to undergo an abdominal MRI examination from January to June 2013. A 3.0 Tesla MRI machine (Philips, Medical System, Achieva) and a MRI receiver coil for data reception with a 16-channel multicoil were used in this study. The THRIVE (repetition time (TR): 8.1 ms, echo time (TE): 3.7 ms, matrix: 172 × 172, slice thickness: 4 mm, gap: 2 mm, field of view (FOV): 350 mm, and band width (BW): 380.1 Hz) technique was applied as a pulse sequence. The time required for the examination was 19 seconds, and the breath-hold technique was used. Axial images were obtained at five FAs: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25°. The signal intensities of the liver, the lesion and the background noise were measured based on the acquired images before the SNR and the CNR were calculated. To evaluate the image at the FA, we used SPSS for Windows ver. 17.0 to conduct a one-way ANOVA test. A Bonferroni test was conducted as a post-hoc test. The SNRs of the hemorrhagic HCC in the 3D-THRIVE technique were 35.50 ± 4.12, 97.00 ± 10.24, 66.09 ± 7.29, 53.84 ± 5.43, and 42.92 ± 5.11 for FAs of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°, respectively (p = 0.0430), whereas the corresponding CNRs were 30.50 ± 3.84, 43.00 ± 5.42, 36.54 ± 4.09, 32.30 ± 2.79, and 31.69 ± 3.21 (p = 0.0003). At a small FA of 10, the SNR and the CNR showed the highest values. As the FA was increased, the SNR and the CNR values showed a decreasing tendency. In conclusion, the optimal T1-weighted image FA should be set to 10° to detect a HCC by using the 3D-THRIVE abdominal MRI technique.

  17. Focus point supersymmetry redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jonathan L.; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Sanford, David

    2012-04-01

    Recent results from Higgs boson and supersymmetry searches at the Large Hadron Collider provide strong new motivations for supersymmetric theories with heavy superpartners. We reconsider focus point supersymmetry (FP SUSY), in which all squarks and sleptons may have multi-TeV masses without introducing fine-tuning in the weak scale with respect to variations in the fundamental SUSY-breaking parameters. We examine both FP SUSY and its familiar special case, the FP region of minimal supergravity, also known as the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (mSUGRA/CMSSM), and show that they are beautifully consistent with all particle, astroparticle, and cosmological data, including Higgs boson mass limits, null results from SUSY searches, electric dipole moments, b→sγ, Bs→μ+μ-, the thermal relic density of neutralinos, and dark matter searches. The observed deviation of the muon’s anomalous magnetic moment from its standard model value may also be explained in FP SUSY, although not in the FP region of mSUGRA/CMSSM. In light of recent data, we advocate refined searches for FP SUSY and related scenarios with heavy squarks and sleptons, and we present a simplified parameter space within mSUGRA/CMSSM to aid such analyses.

  18. COMPRENDO: Focus and Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Allera, Axel; Bachmann, Jean; Berntsson, Pia; Beresford, Nicola; Carnevali, Daniela Candia; Ciceri, Francesca; Dagnac, Thierry; Falandysz, Jerzy; Galassi, Silvana; Hala, David; Janer, Gemma; Jeannot, Roger; Jobling, Susan; King, Isabella; Klingmüller, Dietrich; Kloas, Werner; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Levada, Ramon; Lo, Susan; Lutz, Ilka; Oehlmann, Jörg; Oredsson, Stina; Porte, Cinta; Rand-Weaver, Marian; Sakkas, Vasilis; Sugni, Michela; Tyler, Charles; van Aerle, Ronny; van Ballegoy, Christoph; Wollenberger, Leah

    2006-01-01

    Tens of thousands of man-made chemicals are in regular use and discharged into the environment. Many of them are known to interfere with the hormonal systems in humans and wildlife. Given the complexity of endocrine systems, there are many ways in which endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can affect the body’s signaling system, and this makes unraveling the mechanisms of action of these chemicals difficult. A major concern is that some of these EDCs appear to be biologically active at extremely low concentrations. There is growing evidence to indicate that the guiding principle of traditional toxicology that “the dose makes the poison” may not always be the case because some EDCs do not induce the classical dose–response relationships. The European Union project COMPRENDO (Comparative Research on Endocrine Disrupters—Phylogenetic Approach and Common Principles focussing on Androgenic/Antiandrogenic Compounds) therefore aims to develop an understanding of potential health problems posed by androgenic and antiandrogenic compounds (AACs) to wildlife and humans by focusing on the commonalities and differences in responses to AACs across the animal kingdom (from invertebrates to vertebrates). PMID:16818253

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, N. M. R.; Ribeiro, Ricardo M.

    2009-09-01

    Graphene physics is currently one of the most active research areas in condensed matter physics. Countless theoretical and experimental studies have already been performed, targeting electronic, magnetic, thermal, optical, structural and vibrational properties. Also, studies that modify pristine graphene, aiming at finding new physics and possible new applications, have been considered. These include patterning nanoribbons and quantum dots, exposing graphene's surface to different chemical species, studying multilayer systems, and inducing strain and curvature (modifying in this way graphene's electronic properties). This focus issue includes many of the latest developments on graphene research. Focus on Graphene Contents Electronic properties of graphene and graphene nanoribbons with 'pseudo-Rashba' spin-orbit coupling Tobias Stauber and John Schliemann Strained graphene: tight-binding and density functional calculations R M Ribeiro, Vitor M Pereira, N M R Peres, P R Briddon and A H Castro Neto The effect of sublattice symmetry breaking on the electronic properties of doped graphene A Qaiumzadeh and R Asgari Interfaces within graphene nanoribbons J Wurm, M Wimmer, I Adagideli, K Richter and H U Baranger Weak localization and transport gap in graphene antidot lattices J Eroms and D Weiss Electronic properties of graphene antidot lattices J A Fürst, J G Pedersen, C Flindt, N A Mortensen, M Brandbyge, T G Pedersen and A-P Jauho Splitting of critical energies in the n=0 Landau level of graphene Ana L C Pereira Double-gated graphene-based devices S Russo, M F Craciun, M Yamamoto, S Tarucha and A F Morpurgo Pinning and switching of magnetic moments in bilayer graphene Eduardo V Castro, M P López-Sancho and M A H Vozmediano Electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons Katsunori Wakabayashi, Yositake Takane, Masayuki Yamamoto and Manfred Sigrist Many-body effects on out-of-plane phonons in graphene J González and E Perfetto Graphene zigzag ribbons, square lattice models and quantum spin chains Mahdi Zarea and Nancy Sandler On the universal ac optical background in graphene V P Gusynin, S G Sharapov and J P Carbotte Heat conduction in graphene: experimental study and theoretical interpretation S Ghosh, D L Nika, E P Pokatilov and A A Balandin Calculation of the Raman G peak intensity in monolayer graphene: role of Ward identities D M Basko Electronic transport in bilayer graphene Mikito Koshino Magnetic Kronig-Penney model for Dirac electrons in single-layer graphene M Ramezani Masir, P Vasilopoulos and F M Peeters Electrical transport in high-quality graphene pnp junctions Jairo Velasco Jr, Gang Liu, Wenzhong Bao and Chun Ning Lau Local density of states and scanning tunneling currents in graphene N M R Peres, Ling Yang and Shan-Wen Tsai Gaps and tails in graphene and graphane B Dóra and K Ziegler Quasi-ferromagnet spintronics in the graphene nanodisc-lead system Motohiko Ezawa Range and correlation effects in edge disordered graphene nanoribbons Alessandro Cresti and Stephan Roche Remarks on the tight-binding model of graphene Cristina Bena and Gilles Montambaux

  20. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated. PMID:26486330

  1. Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hartlein, R.A.; Hampton, R.N.

    2010-12-30

    This report summarizes an extensive effort made to understand how to effectively use the various diagnostic technologies to establish the condition of medium voltage underground cable circuits. These circuits make up an extensive portion of the electric delivery infrastructure in the United States. Much of this infrastructure is old and experiencing unacceptable failure rates. By deploying efficient diagnostic testing programs, electric utilities can replace or repair circuits that are about to fail, providing an optimal approach to improving electric system reliability. This is an intrinsically complex topic. Underground cable systems are not homogeneous. Cable circuits often contain multiple branches with different cable designs and a range of insulation materials. In addition, each insulation material ages differently as a function of time, temperature and operating environment. To complicate matters further, there are a wide variety of diagnostic technologies available for assessing the condition of cable circuits with a diversity of claims about the effectiveness of each approach. As a result, the benefits of deploying cable diagnostic testing programs have been difficult to establish, leading many utilities to avoid the their use altogether. This project was designed to help address these issues. The information provided is the result of a collaborative effort between Georgia Tech NEETRAC staff, Georgia Tech academic faculty, electric utility industry participants, as well as cable system diagnostic testing service providers and test equipment providers. Report topics include: •How cable systems age and fail, •The various technologies available for detecting potential failure sites, •The advantages and disadvantages of different diagnostic technologies, •Different approaches for utilities to employ cable system diagnostics. The primary deliverables of this project are this report, a Cable Diagnostic Handbook (a subset of this report) and an online knowledge based system (KBS) that helps utilities select the most effective diagnostic technologies for a given cable circuit and circuit conditions.

  2. Recent developments in capillary isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Silvertand, L H H; Toraño, J Sastre; van Bennekom, W P; de Jong, G J

    2008-09-19

    The developments in capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) over the period 2003-2007 are reviewed. With the focus on technological aspects, cIEF papers published in the fields of methodology, new techniques, detection, multidimensional systems, miniaturization and applications are summarized. The methodology section covers recent research in ampholytes composition, detergents and other additives, carrier ampholyte free cIEF, coatings and other capillary modifications. In the section on new systems adjustments to the technique (e.g. dynamic IEF), different applications of cIEF (e.g. as injection system) and new devices are reported. Systems focusing on whole column imaging, fluorescence and chemiluminescence detection and coupling to mass spectrometers are discussed in the section on detection. Interfacing cIEF with MS via RPLC systems and hyphenation of cIEF with capillary electrochromatography and other capillary electrophoresis modes are also summarized. Papers focusing on miniaturization are reviewed in the section on microfluidic devices. The section on applications will show analysis of biopharmaceutical compounds and isolated proteins for metabolomic studies. For the analysis of complex biological matrices, generally multidimensional systems are needed, which are mentioned throughout this review. PMID:18565533

  3. The design of aerial camera focusing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Changchang; Yang, Hongtao; Niu, Haijun

    2015-10-01

    In order to ensure the imaging resolution of aerial camera and compensating defocusing caused by the changing of atmospheric temperature, pressure, oblique photographing distance and other environmental factor [1,2], and to meeting the overall design requirements of the camera for the lower mass and smaller size , the linear focusing mechanism is designed. Through the target surface support, the target surface component is connected with focusing driving mechanism. Make use of precision ball screws, focusing mechanism transforms the input rotary motion of motor into linear motion of the focal plane assembly. Then combined with the form of linear guide restraint movement, the magnetic encoder is adopted to detect the response of displacement. And the closed loop control is adopted to realize accurate focusing. This paper illustrated the design scheme for a focusing mechanism and analyzed its error sources. It has the advantages of light friction and simple transmission chain and reducing the transmission error effectively. And this paper also analyses the target surface by finite element analysis and lightweight design. Proving that the precision of focusing mechanism can achieve higher than 3um, and the focusing range is +/-2mm.

  4. Focus control system for laser welding.

    PubMed

    Haran, F M; Hand, D P; Peters, C; Jones, J D

    1997-07-20

    We describe a focus control system for Nd:YAG laser welding based on an optical sensor incorporated into the fiber delivery system to detect light generated by the process. This broadband light is separated into two wavelength bands, and simple electronic processing gives a signal proportional to focal error as a result of chromatic aberrations in the optical delivery system. Focus control is demonstrated for bead-on-plate welds in different thicknesses of titanium alloy, aluminum alloy, mild steel, and stainless steel. The control system works for both pulsed and continuous laser radiation. PMID:18259340

  5. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  6. Quantification of the ultrasound induced sedimentation of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Molares, Alfonso; Dickson, Sandy; Hobson, Peter; Howard, Carl; Zander, Anthony; Burch, Mike

    2014-07-01

    It has been known for more than 40 years that vacuolate organisms can be induced to sediment with ultrasound. However, robust indicators are still needed to compare the efficacy of different treatments. A repeatable index is proposed that makes it possible to quantify the ultrasonic induced sedimentation. The procedure is used to monitor the long term sedimentation of Microcystis aeruginosa after sonication. Results reveal that the sedimentation process continues after gas vesicles have fully recovered, although at a slower rate. PMID:24636363

  7. Ultrasound induced green solvent extraction of oil from oleaginous seeds.

    PubMed

    Sicaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Vian, Maryline Abert; Fine, Frédéric; Carré, Patrick; Tostain, Sylvain; Chemat, Farid

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction of rapeseed oil was investigated and compared with conventional extraction for energy efficiency, throughput time, extraction yield, cleanness, processing cost and product quality. A multivariate study enabled us to define optimal parameters (7.7W/cm(2) for ultrasonic power intensity, 40°C for processing temperature, and a solid/liquid ratio of 1/15) for ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil from oilseeds to maximize lipid yield while reducing solvent consumption and extraction time using response surface methodology (RSM) with a three-variable central composite design (CCD). A significant difference in oil quality was noted under the conditions of the initial ultrasound extraction, which was later avoided using ultrasound in the absence of oxygen. Three concepts of multistage cross-current extraction were investigated and compared: conventional multistage maceration, ultrasound-assisted maceration and a combination, to assess the positive impact of using ultrasound on the seed oil extraction process. The study concludes that ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil is likely to reduce both economic and ecological impacts of the process in the fat and oil industry. PMID:26964955

  8. Ultrasound-induced acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, P. B.; Rossi, M.; Marín, Á. G.; Barnkob, R.; Augustsson, P.; Laurell, T.; Kähler, C. J.; Bruus, H.

    2013-08-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the three-dimensional (3D) acoustophoretic motion of spherical microparticles in rectangular microchannels. The motion is generated by the acoustic radiation force and the acoustic streaming-induced drag force. In contrast to the classical theory of Rayleigh streaming in shallow, infinite, parallel-plate channels, our theory does include the effect of the microchannel side walls. The resulting predictions agree well with numerics and experimental measurements of the acoustophoretic motion of polystyrene spheres with nominal diameters of 0.537 and 5.33 μm. The 3D particle motion was recorded using astigmatism particle tracking velocimetry under controlled thermal and acoustic conditions in a long, straight, rectangular microchannel actuated in one of its transverse standing ultrasound-wave resonance modes with one or two half-wavelengths. The acoustic energy density is calibrated in situ based on measurements of the radiation dominated motion of large 5-μm-diameter particles, allowing for quantitative comparison between theoretical predictions and measurements of the streaming-induced motion of small 0.5-μm-diameter particles.

  9. Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation from gas-stabilizing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, J. J.; Graham, S.; Myers, R.; Carlisle, R.; Stride, E.; Coussios, C. C.

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of cavitation from nanoparticles has been hindered by the inability to control nanobubble size. We present a method to manufacture nanoparticles with a tunable single hemispherical depression (nanocups) of mean diameter 90, 260, or 650 nm entrapping a nanobubble. A modified Rayleigh-Plesset crevice model predicts the inertial cavitation threshold as a function of cavity size and frequency, and is verified experimentally. The ability to tune cavitation nanonuclei and predict their behavior will be useful for applications ranging from cancer therapy to ultrasonic cleaning.

  10. Self-focusing of tightly focused laser beams.

    PubMed

    Efimov, Oleg M

    2015-08-01

    Laser-induced damage (LID) thresholds of pure fused silica have been measured with single-temporal-mode nanosecond pulses at 1.064 μm. The laser beam was focused by spherical lens or axicon into 2.7 μm diameter spots with identical cross-sectional distribution of the central lobe irradiances. The measurements have shown about a 30% higher threshold value for the beam focused by the axicon, which is inherently not subjected to self-focusing. This result indicates the strong influence of self-focusing on standard LID threshold measurements performed even with tightly focused beams. PMID:26368107

  11. Dual focus diffractive optical element with extended depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Isao

    2014-09-01

    A dual focus property and an extended depth of focus were verified by a new type of diffractive lens displaying on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices. This type of lens is useful to read information on multilayer optical discs and tilted discs. The radial undulation of the phase groove on the diffractive lens gave the dual focus nature. The focal extension was performed by combining the dual focus lens with the axilens that was invented for expanding the depth of focus. The number of undulations did not affect the intensity along the optical axis but the central spot of the diffraction pattern.

  12. Focusators for laser-branding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doskolovich, L. L.; Kazanskiy, N. L.; Kharitonov, S. I.; Uspleniev, G. V.

    A new method is investigated for synthesis of computer-generated optical elements: focusators that are able to focus the radial-symmetrical laser beam into complex focal contours, in particular into alphanumeric symbols. The method is based on decomposition of the focal contour into segments of straight lines and semi-circles, following corresponding spacing out of the focusator on elementary segments (concentric rings or sectors) and solution of the inverse task of focusing from focusator segments into corresponding elements of the focal contour. The results of numerical computing of the field from synthesized focusators into the letters are presented. The theoretical efficiency of the focusators discussed is no less than 85%. The amplitude masks and the results of operational studies of synthesized focusators are presented.

  13. Fast total focusing method for ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcreff, Ewen; Dao, Gavin; Braconnier, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and total focusing method (TFM) have become popular tools in the field of ultrasonic non destructive testing. In particular, they are employed for detection and characterization of flaws. From data acquired with a transducer array, those techniques aim at reconstructing an image of the inspected object from coherent summations. In this paper, we make a comparison between the standard technique and a migration approach. Using experimental data, we show that the developed approach is faster and offers a better signal to noise ratio than the standard total focusing method. Moreover, the migration is particularly effective for near-surface imaging where standard methods used to fail. On the other hand, the migration approach is only adapted to layered objects whereas the standard technique can fit complex geometries. The methods are tested on homogeneous pieces containing artificial flaws such as side drilled holes.

  14. Use of ionic liquid aggregates of 1-hexadecyl-3-butyl imidazolium bromide in a focused-microwave assisted extraction method followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and fluorescence detection to determine the 15+1 EU priority PAHs in toasted cereals ("gofios").

    PubMed

    Germán-Hernández, Mónica; Pino, Verónica; Anderson, Jared L; Afonso, Ana M

    2011-08-15

    A focused-microwave assisted extraction method using aggregates of the ionic liquid (IL) 1-hexadecyl-3-butylimidazolium bromide (HDBIm-Br) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection and single-channel fluorescence detection (FLD) has been developed for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in toasted cereals ("gofios") of different nature (wheat, barley, rye, and maize corn) from the Canary Islands, Spain. The optimized HPLC-UV-vis/single-channel FLD method takes 40 min for the chromatographic run with limits of detection varying between 0.02 and 4.01 ng mL(-1) for the fluorescent PAHs from the European Union (EU) priority list in foods, and 20.5 ng mL(-1) for the non-fluorescent PAH cyclopenta[c,d]pyrene (CPP). The optimized microwave step presented extractions recoveries ranging from 70.1 to 109% and precision values lower than 12.6% (as relative standard deviation), using an extraction time of 14 min. The extraction method also utilizes low amounts of sample (0.1g), and low amounts of IL (77 mg), avoiding completely the use of organic solvents. PMID:21726759

  15. Focus Groups Help To Focus the Marketing Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashar, Hanna; Lane, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    A university-based degree completion program for adults conducted focus group research to refine market positioning and promotion. Focus groups averaged five current students and recent graduates who reflected, demographically, the current student population. Results gave insight into reasons for selecting the university, aspects of the program…

  16. Pharmacometrics: Focus on the Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, T Pene; Fossler, MJ; Schmith, VD

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacometrics, whether using simple or complex models, has contributed to rational and efficient drug development,1–3 with the main focus on early drug development.4 This article describes why opportunities more directly focused on the patient abound in late stage development, illustrating the concept with three innovative examples which focus on benefits to patients, enabling drugs that are truly efficacious to reach the market faster in diseases with high unmet medical needs, while maintaining adequate safety. PMID:26225220

  17. Variational Depth From Focus Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Michael; Benning, Martin; Schonlieb, Carola; Cremers, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the problem of reconstructing a depth map from a sequence of differently focused images, also known as depth from focus or shape from focus. We propose to state the depth from focus problem as a variational problem including a smooth but nonconvex data fidelity term, and a convex nonsmooth regularization, which makes the method robust to noise and leads to more realistic depth maps. Additionally, we propose to solve the nonconvex minimization problem with a linearized alternating directions method of multipliers (ADMM), allowing to minimize the energy very efficiently. A numerical comparison to classical methods on simulated as well as on real data is presented.

  18. CTE's Focus on Continuous Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, John; Kelley, Patricia; Pritz, Sandy; Hodes, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Just one of the ways career and technical education (CTE) is revamping its image is through increased attention to data-driven instructional techniques as a means of improving and focusing instruction on what matters most. Accountability and data have increasingly become a core focus of research, news, and commentary about education in recent…

  19. Absolute focus lock for microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, C. D., Jr.; Loop, R. W.; Tongier, M., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanism absolutely immobilizes microscope stage at a preset focus, preserving focus indefinitely. The lock is a second-class lever consisting of a straight body having a fulcrum with a cylindrical bearing surface at one end and a thumbscrew at the other end.

  20. Ultrasonic inspection apparatus and method using a focused wave device

    DOEpatents

    Gieske, John H.; Roach, Dennis P.; Walkington, Phillip D.

    2001-01-01

    An ultrasonic pulse echo inspection apparatus and method for detecting structural failures. A focus lens is coupled to the transducer to focus the ultrasonic signal on an area to be inspected and a stop is placed in the focus lens to block selected ultrasonic waves. Other waves are not blocked and are transmitted through the structure to arrive at interfaces therein concurrently to produce an echo response with significantly less distortion.

  1. CDP: application of focus drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler, S.; Bauer, J.; Haak, U.; Schulz, K.; Old, G.; Matthus, E.

    2009-01-01

    The achievement of a depth of focus required for stable process conditions is one of the biggest challenges in modern optical photolithography. There are several ways of improving the depth of focus. For line/space layers, for instance, application of RET (Resolution Enhancement Technology) using scattering bars, phaseshift masks or optimized illumination systems have shown good results. For contact and via layers the depth of focus is limited and critical, due to the structure size of the holes, alternating pattern density and wafer topology. A well known method of improving the depth of focus for contact and via layers is called focus latitude enhancement exposure (FLEX) [1-3]. With FLEX, several focal planes are being exposed, i.e. each during a separate exposure step. The main drawback is low throughput, as the total processing time rises which each additional exposure. In this paper, we investigate Nikon's CDP (continuous depth of focus expansion procedure) [4]. The CDP option is applicable to modern scanning exposure tools [4-5]. A schematic view of the procedure is shown in Fig. 1. The CDP value or CDP amplitude defines the tilt of the wafer and thus the range of focus in the resist, as the focus plane migrates through the resist during the exposure. The main advantage of CDP, compared to FLEX, is higher throughput, since focal planes are defined within a single exposure. A non-CDP exposure may result in varying aerial images within resist thickness, therefore leading to decreased image contrast within out-of-focus planes. As shown in Fig. 1 the averaged aerial images of a CDP exposure induce better image contrast throughout the resist layer and therefore increase the focus window.

  2. Prime focus instrument of prime focus spectrograph for Subaru telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiang-Yu; Braun, David F.; Schwochert, Mark A.; Huang, Pin-Jie; Kimura, Masahiko; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Reiley, Daniel J.; Mao, Peter; Fisher, Charles D.; Tamura, Naoyuki; Chang, Yin-Chang; Hu, Yen-Sang; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Chou, Richard C.-Y.; Takato, Naruhisa; Sugai, Hajime; Ohyama, Youichi; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Ueda, Akitoshi

    2014-07-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a new optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph design for the prime focus of the 8.2m Subaru telescope. PFS will cover 1.3 degree diameter field with 2394 fibers to complement the imaging capability of Hyper SuprimeCam (HSC). The prime focus unit of PFS called Prime Focus Instrument (PFI) provides the interface with the top structure of Subaru telescope and also accommodates the optical bench in which Cobra fiber positioners are located. In addition, the acquisition and guiding (AG) cameras, the optical fiber positioner system, the cable wrapper, the fiducial fibers, illuminator, and viewer, the field element, and the telemetry system are located inside the PFI. The mechanical structure of the PFI was designed with special care such that its deflections sufficiently match those of the HSC's Wide Field Corrector (WFC) so the fibers will stay on targets over the course of the observations within the required accuracy.

  3. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-10-01

    Control of quantum phenomena has grown from a dream to a burgeoning field encompassing wide-ranging experimental and theoretical activities. Theoretical research in this area primarily concerns identification of the principles for controlling quantum phenomena, the exploration of new experimental applications and the development of associated operational algorithms to guide such experiments. Recent experiments with adaptive feedback control span many applications including selective excitation, wave packet engineering and control in the presence of complex environments. Practical procedures are also being developed to execute real-time feedback control considering the resultant back action on the quantum system. This focus issue includes papers covering many of the latest advances in the field. Focus on Quantum Control Contents Control of quantum phenomena: past, present and future Constantin Brif, Raj Chakrabarti and Herschel Rabitz Biologically inspired molecular machines driven by light. Optimal control of a unidirectional rotor Guillermo Pérez-Hernández, Adam Pelzer, Leticia González and Tamar Seideman Simulating quantum search algorithm using vibronic states of I2 manipulated by optimally designed gate pulses Yukiyoshi Ohtsuki Efficient coherent control by sequences of pulses of finite duration Götz S Uhrig and Stefano Pasini Control by decoherence: weak field control of an excited state objective Gil Katz, Mark A Ratner and Ronnie Kosloff Multi-qubit compensation sequences Y Tomita, J T Merrill and K R Brown Environment-invariant measure of distance between evolutions of an open quantum system Matthew D Grace, Jason Dominy, Robert L Kosut, Constantin Brif and Herschel Rabitz Simplified quantum process tomography M P A Branderhorst, J Nunn, I A Walmsley and R L Kosut Achieving 'perfect' molecular discrimination via coherent control and stimulated emission Stephen D Clow, Uvo C Holscher and Thomas C Weinacht A convenient method to simulate and visually represent two-photon power spectra of arbitrarily and adaptively shaped broadband laser pulses M A Montgomery and N H Damrauer Accurate and efficient implementation of the von Neumann representation for laser pulses with discrete and finite spectra Frank Dimler, Susanne Fechner, Alexander Rodenberg, Tobias Brixner and David J Tannor Coherent strong-field control of multiple states by a single chirped femtosecond laser pulse M Krug, T Bayer, M Wollenhaupt, C Sarpe-Tudoran, T Baumert, S S Ivanov and N V Vitanov Quantum-state measurement of ionic Rydberg wavepackets X Zhang and R R Jones On the paradigm of coherent control: the phase-dependent light-matter interaction in the shaping window Tiago Buckup, Jurgen Hauer and Marcus Motzkus Use of the spatial phase of a focused laser beam to yield mechanistic information about photo-induced chemical reactions V J Barge, Z Hu and R J Gordon Coherent control of multiple vibrational excitations for optimal detection S D McGrane, R J Scharff, M Greenfield and D S Moore Mode selectivity with polarization shaping in the mid-IR David B Strasfeld, Chris T Middleton and Martin T Zanni Laser-guided relativistic quantum dynamics Chengpu Liu, Markus C Kohler, Karen Z Hatsagortsyan, Carsten Muller and Christoph H Keitel Continuous quantum error correction as classical hybrid control Hideo Mabuchi Quantum filter reduction for measurement-feedback control via unsupervised manifold learning Anne E B Nielsen, Asa S Hopkins and Hideo Mabuchi Control of the temporal profile of the local electromagnetic field near metallic nanostructures Ilya Grigorenko and Anatoly Efimov Laser-assisted molecular orientation in gaseous media: new possibilities and applications Dmitry V Zhdanov and Victor N Zadkov Optimization of laser field-free orientation of a state-selected NO molecular sample Arnaud Rouzee, Arjan Gijsbertsen, Omair Ghafur, Ofer M Shir, Thomas Back, Steven Stolte and Marc J J Vrakking Controlling the sense of molecular rotation Sharly Fleischer, Yuri Khodorkovsky, Yehiam Prior and Ilya Sh Averbukh Optimal control of interacting particles: a multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach Michael Mundt and David J Tannor Exact quantum dissipative dynamics under external time-dependent driving fields Jian Xu, Rui-Xue Xu and Yi Jing Yan Pulse trains in molecular dynamics and coherent spectroscopy: a theoretical study J Voll and R de Vivie-Riedle Quantum control of electron localization in molecules driven by trains of half-cycle pulses Emil Persson, Joachim Burgdorfer and Stefanie Grafe Quantum control design by Lyapunov trajectory tracking for dipole and polarizability coupling Jean-Michel Coron, Andreea Grigoriu, Catalin Lefter and Gabriel Turinici Sliding mode control of quantum systems Daoyi Dong and Ian R Petersen Implementation of fault-tolerant quantum logic gates via optimal control R Nigmatullin and S G Schirmer Generalized filtering of laser fields in optimal control theory: application to symmetry filtering of quantum gate operations Markus Schroder and Alex Brown

  4. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  5. Computer-mediated focus groups.

    PubMed

    Walston, J T; Lissitz, R W

    2000-10-01

    This article discusses the feasibility and effectiveness of computer-mediated (CM) focus groups. The study describes technological and practical considerations the authors learned from conducting such groups and reports on a comparison of the reactions of CM and face-to-face (FTF) participants in focus groups discussing academic dishonesty. The results suggest that the CM environment, in comparison to FTF, may lessen members' concern about what the moderator thinks of them and discourage participants from withholding embarrassing information. The article concludes with a list of suggestions for this technique and a discussion of the potential advantages and limitations associated with CM focus groups. PMID:11183483

  6. Capillary electrophoretic focusing of covalently derivatized protein induced by surfactant.

    PubMed

    Oukacine, Farid; Quirino, Joselito P; Mesbah, Kiarach; Taverna, Myriam

    2016-05-01

    In this communication, we present a very simple strategy to focus covalently derivatized proteins for high sensitivity CE analysis by LIF detection. We demonstrated that the covalently tagged protein can be focused just by adding SDS at a concentration above the CMC in the derivatized sample. Under specific injection conditions, SDS concentration below the CMC is also sufficient to induce the focusing of the tagged protein. This method allows the quantification and detection of the covalently tagged protein in a narrow zone with an efficiency approaching 220 000 plates/m. Very good linearity was obtained for the ubiquitin in a concentration range of 2-25 μM. PMID:26940436

  7. Wayside Teaching: Focusing on Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sara Davis

    2011-01-01

    Wayside teaching focuses on building and maintaining positive relationships with students. Teachers can implement certain wayside teaching practices to end the year in a positive way and begin preparing for the next school year.

  8. Focusing on Contact Lens Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Focusing on Contact Lens Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... substantial consumer injury. Back to top Types of Contact Lenses General categories Soft contact lenses. These are ...

  9. Focusing light through living tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellekoop, I. M.; Aegerter, C. M.

    2010-02-01

    Tissues such as skin, fat or cuticle are non-transparent because inhomogeneities in the tissue scatter light. We demonstrate experimentally that light can be focused through turbid layers of living tissue, in spite of scattering. Our method is based on the fact that coherent light forms an interference pattern, even after hundreds of scattering events. By spatially shaping the wavefront of the incident laser beam, this interference pattern was modified to make the scattered light converge to a focus. In contrast to earlier experiments, where light was focused through solid objects, we focused light through living pupae of Drosophila melanogaster. We discuss a dynamic wavefront shaping algorithm that follows changes due to microscopic movements of scattering particles in real time. We relate the performance of the algorithm to the measured timescale of the changes in the speckle pattern and analyze our experiment in the light of Laser Doppler flowmetry. Applications in particle tracking, imaging, and optical manipulation are discussed.

  10. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  11. Wolter Optics for Neutron Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildner, D. F. R.; Gubarev, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    Focusing optics based on Wolter optical geometries developed for x-ray grazing incidence beams can be designed for neutron beams. Wolter optics are formed by grazing incidence reflections from two concentric conic sections (for example, a paraboloid and a hyperboloid). This has transformed observational X-ray astronomy by increasing the sensitivity by many orders of magnitude for research in astrophysics and cosmology. To increase the collection area, many reflecting mirrors of different diameters are nested with a common focal plane. These mirrors are fabricated using nickel-electroformed replication techniques. We apply these ideas to neutron focusing using nickel mirrors. We show an initial test of a conical mirror using a beam of cold neutrons. key words: electroformed nickel replication, focusing optics, grazing angle incidence, mirror reflection, neutron focusing, Wolter optics

  12. Nursing education: focus on flexibility.

    PubMed

    Clark, M J

    1997-03-01

    Curricular change requires input from both service and education. However, it is sometimes difficult to obtain a complete picture of nursing practice from the clinical arena. The curriculum committee of the University of San Diego Philip Y. Hahn School of Nursing conducted a study with focus groups comprised of nurses from several different areas of practice to obtain information for curriculum changes. Both the focus group process and its outcomes are reported here. Flexibility was the key theme that emerged from all of the focus group sessions. Other themes were categorized in terms of issues addressed and included professional issues, healthcare systems issues, nursing education issues, and advanced practice issues. The focus group strategy proved to be an effective means of gaining the broad spectrum of insights needed for curriculum revision. PMID:9067868

  13. Heating in vascular tissue and flow-through tissue phantoms induced by focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinlan

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to control bleeding, both from individual blood vessels as well as from gross damage to the capillary bed. This process, called acoustic hemostasis, is being studied in the hope that such a method would ultimately provide a lifesaving treatment during the so-called "golden hour", a brief grace period after a severe trauma in which prompt therapy can save the life of an injured person. Thermal effects play a major role in occlusion of small vessels and also appear to contribute to the sealing of punctures in major blood vessels. However, aggressive ultrasound-induced tissue heating can also impact healthy tissue and can lead to deleterious mechanical bioeffects. Moreover, the presence of vascularity can limit one's ability to elevate the temperature of blood vessel walls owing to convective heat transport. In an effort to better understand the heating process in tissues with vascular structure we have developed a numerical simulation that couples models for ultrasound propagation, acoustic streaming, ultrasound heating and blood cooling in Newtonian viscous media. The 3-D simulation allows for the study of complicated biological structures and insonation geometries. We have also undertaken a series of in vitro experiments, in non-uniform flow-through tissue phantoms, designed to provide a ground truth verification of the model predictions. The calculated and measured results were compared over a range of values for insonation pressure, insonation time, and flow rate; we show good agreement between predictions and measurements. We then conducted a series of simulations that address two limiting problems of interest: hemostasis in small and large vessels. We employed realistic human tissue properties and considered more complex geometries. Results show that the heating pattern in and around a blood vessel is different for different vessel sizes, flow rates and for varying beam orientations relative to the flow axis. Complete occlusion and wall-puncture sealing are both possible depending on the exposure conditions. These results concur with prior clinical observations and may prove useful for planning of a more effective procedure in HIFU treatments.

  14. Wideband focused transducer array for optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonova, V. A.; Khokhlova, T. D.; Karabutov, A. A.

    2009-11-01

    The calculation procedure of the parameters of a multielement transducer array for the optoacoustic tomography of biological objects with high spatial resolution values is proposed. A multielement transducer with given spatial resolution values in three dimensions has been developed based on the proposed procedure for the early detection of breast cancer. The transducer array consists of a set of 8 linear PVDF piezoelectric films located on a plane and a focusing cylindrical acoustic lens. A map of the transducer’s focal area and point spread function have been measured using the constructed transducer array. Spatial resolutions of the transducer array obtained experimentally are in agreement with their calculated values.

  15. An atom-focusing mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, Bodil; Allison, William

    1997-11-01

    The recent interest in atom-optics has mainly been directed at the manipulation of atomic beams by static fields or lasers. Using an alternative approach we have succeeded in focusing in two dimensions a neutral atomic helium beam at room temperature with a reflective optical element (an atom mirror). Such focusing relies on specular elastic scattering, which leaves the coherence of incoming wavepackets unchanged.

  16. A continuous plasma final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.

    1990-02-01

    Scaling laws are set down for a plasma cell used for transport, focusing and current neutralization of fine, intense, relativistic electron beams. It is found that there exists a minimum beam spot size, {sigma}{sub min} {approximately} {epsilon}{sub n}(I{sub A}/{gamma}I){sup 1/2}, in such a focusing system. Propagation issues, including channel formation, synchrotron radiation, beam ionization and instabilities, are discussed. Three numerical examples are considered. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Oculometer focus and mirror control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic focusing system designed around an ultrasonic range measurement is described. Besides maintaining the focus, subject distance is a by-product which could lighten the NOVA computational effort. An automatic head tracking unit is also discussed. It is intended to reduce the search time required when track is lost. An X-Y ultrasonic measurement is also made in this design to control the deflection mirrors.

  18. Ultrasensitive SERS Flow Detector Using Hydrodynamic Focusing

    PubMed Central

    Negri, Pierre; Jacobs, Kevin T.; Dada, Oluwatosin O.; Schultz, Zachary D.

    2013-01-01

    Label-free, chemical specific detection in flow is important for high throughput characterization of analytes in applications such as flow injection analysis, electrophoresis, and chromatography. We have developed a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) flow detector capable of ultrasensitive optical detection on the millisecond time scale. The device employs hydrodynamic focusing to improve SERS detection in a flow channel where a sheath flow confines analyte molecules eluted from a fused silica capillary over a planar SERS-active substrate. Increased analyte interactions with the SERS substrate significantly improve detection sensitivity. The performance of this flow detector was investigated using a combination of finite element simulations, fluorescence imaging, and Raman experiments. Computational fluid dynamics based on finite element analysis was used to optimize the flow conditions. The modeling indicates that a number of factors, such as the capillary dimensions and the ratio of the sheath flow to analyte flow rates, are critical for obtaining optimal results. Sample confinement resulting from the flow dynamics was confirmed using wide-field fluorescence imaging of rhodamine 6G (R6G). Raman experiments at different sheath flow rates showed increased sensitivity compared with the modeling predictions, suggesting increased adsorption. Using a 50-millisecond acquisitions, a sheath flow rate of 180 μL/min, and a sample flow rate of 5 μL/min, a linear dynamic range from nanomolar to micromolar concentrations of R6G with a LOD of 1 nM is observed. At low analyte concentrations, rapid analyte desorption is observed, enabling repeated and high-throughput SERS detection. The flow detector offers substantial advantages over conventional SERS-based assays such as minimal sample volumes and high detection efficiency. PMID:24074461

  19. AXAF SIM focus mechanism study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H. D.; Whitbeck, E.

    1994-01-01

    The design requirements and initial design concept for the AXAF-I Science Instrument Module (SIM) were reviewed at Ball on September 29, 1993. The concept design SIM focus mechanism utilizes a planetary gearset, with redundant motors, to drive a large ring (called 'main housing bearing') via a spur gearset. This large drive ring actuates three tangent bar links (called 'push rods'), which in turn actuate three levers (called 'pin levers'). Each of the three pin levers rotates an 'eccentric pin,' which in turn moves the base of a bipod flexure in both the radial (normal to optical axis) and axial (focus along optical axis) directions. Three bipod flexures are employed, equally spaced at 120 degrees apart, the base of each being translated in the two directions as described above. A focus adjustment is made by rotating the drive ring, which drives the push rods and therefore the pin levers, which in turn rotate the eccentric pins, finally imparting the two motions to the base of each of the bipod flexures. The axial translation (focus adjustment) of the focused structure is the sum of the direct axial motion plus axial motion which comes from uniformly squeezing the three bipod bases radially inward. SAO documented the following concerns regarding the focus mechanism in memo WAP-FY94-001, dated October 7, 1993: (1) The focus adjustment depends, in large part, on the structural properties (stiffnesses and end fixities) of the bipod flexures, push rods, pin levers and eccentric pins. If these properties are not matched very well, then lateral translations as well as unwanted rotations of the focussed structure will accompany focus motion. In addition, the stackup of linkage tolerances and any nonuniform wear in the linkages will result in the same unwanted motions. Thermal gradients will also affect these motions. At the review Ball did not present supporting analyses to support their choice of this design concept. (2) The proposed 'primary' method of measuring focus is by counting motor steps. The 'backup' method is by a pot mounted on the drive ring. Neither method provides for a direct measurement of the quantity desired (focus position). This is of concern because of the long and indirect relationship between focus and the sensed quantity (drive ring rotation). There are three sinusoidal relationships and structural stiffness in the path, and the resulting calibration is likely to be highly nonlinear. These methods would require an accurate ground calibration. (3) Ground calibration (and verification) of focus vs. drive position must be done in 1-g on the ground. This calibration will be complicated by both the structural characteristics of the bipods and the fact that the CG of the translating portion of the SIM is not on the optical axis (thereby causing unwated rotations and changing the focus position vs. motor step and pot readout relationships). The SIM translating weight could be offloaded, but the calibration then becomes sensitive to any errors in offloading (both magnitude and direction). There are concerns as to whether a calibration to the required accuracy can be accomplished on the ground. (4) The choice of a potentiometer as the focus position sensor is questionable in terms of reliability for a five year mission. The results of SAO's study of items 1, 2 and 3 described above are presented in this report.

  20. Focus cues affect perceived depth

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Simon J.; Akeley, Kurt; Ernst, Marc O.; Banks, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Depth information from focus cues—accommodation and the gradient of retinal blur—is typically incorrect in three-dimensional (3-D) displays because the light comes from a planar display surface. If the visual system incorporates information from focus cues into its calculation of 3-D scene parameters, this could cause distortions in perceived depth even when the 2-D retinal images are geometrically correct. In Experiment 1 we measured the direct contribution of focus cues to perceived slant by varying independently the physical slant of the display surface and the slant of a simulated surface specified by binocular disparity (binocular viewing) or perspective/texture (monocular viewing). In the binocular condition, slant estimates were unaffected by display slant. In the monocular condition, display slant had a systematic effect on slant estimates. Estimates were consistent with a weighted average of slant from focus cues and slant from disparity/texture, where the cue weights are determined by the reliability of each cue. In Experiment 2, we examined whether focus cues also have an indirect effect on perceived slant via the distance estimate used in disparity scaling. We varied independently the simulated distance and the focal distance to a disparity-defined 3-D stimulus. Perceived slant was systematically affected by changes in focal distance. Accordingly, depth constancy (with respect to simulated distance) was significantly reduced when focal distance was held constant compared to when it varied appropriately with the simulated distance to the stimulus. The results of both experiments show that focus cues can contribute to estimates of 3-D scene parameters. Inappropriate focus cues in typical 3-D displays may therefore contribute to distortions in perceived space. PMID:16441189

  1. EDITORIAL: Focus on Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2007-11-01

    Gravitational lensing emerged as an observational field following the 1979 discovery of a doubly imaged quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy. In the 1980s and '90s dozens of other multiply imaged systems were observed, as well as time delay measurements, weak and strong lensing by galaxies and galaxy clusters, and the discovery of microlensing in our galaxy. The rapid pace of advances has continued into the new century. Lensing is currently one of best techniques for finding and mapping dark matter over a wide range of scales, and also addresses broader cosmological questions such as understanding the nature of dark energy. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics presents a snapshot of current research in some of the exciting areas of lensing. It provides an occasion to look back at the advances of the last decade and ahead to the potential of the coming years. Just about a decade ago, microlensing was discovered through the magnification of stars in our galaxy by invisible objects with masses between that of Jupiter and a tenth the mass of the Sun. Thus a new component of the mass of our galaxy, dubbed MACHOs, was established (though a diffuse, cold dark matter-like component is still needed to make up most of the galaxy mass). More recently, microlensing led to another exciting discovery—of extra-solar planets with masses ranging from about five times that of Earth to that of Neptune. We can expect many more planets to be discovered through ongoing surveys. Microlensing is the best technique for finding Earth mass planets, though it is not as productive overall as other methods and does not allow for follow up observations. Beyond planet hunting, microlensing has enabled us to observe previously inaccessible systems, ranging from the surfaces of other stars to the accretion disks around the black holes powering distant quasars. Galaxies and galaxy clusters at cosmological distances can produce dramatic lensing effects: multiple images of background galaxies or quasars which are strongly magnified and sheared. In the last decade, double and quadruply imaged systems due to galactic lenses have been studied with optical and radio observations. An interesting result obtained from the flux ratio 'anomalies' of quadruply imaged systems is the statistical detection of dark sub-clumps in galaxy halos. More broadly, while we have learned a lot about the mass distribution in lens galaxies and improved time delay constraints on the Hubble constant, the limitations of cosmological studies with strong lensing due to uncertainties in lens mass models have also come to be appreciated. That said, progress will no doubt continue with qualitative advances in observations such as astrometric counterparts to the flux anomalies, clever ideas such as the use of spectroscopic signatures to assemble the SLACS lens sample, and combining optical imaging, spectroscopy and radio data to continue the quest for a set of golden lenses to measure the Hubble constant. Galaxy clusters are a fascinating arena for studying the distribution of dark and baryonic matter. Weak and strong lensing information can be combined with dynamical information from the spectroscopic measurements of member galaxies and x-ray/Sunyaev Zeldovich measurements of the hot ionized gas. Hubble Space Telescope observations have yielded spectacular images of clusters, such as Abell 1689, which has over a hundred multiply imaged arcs. Mass measurements have progressed to the level of 10 percent accuracy for several clusters. Unfortunately, it is unclear if one can do much better for individual clusters given inherent limitations such as unknown projection effects. The statistical study of clusters is likely to remain a promising way to study dark matter, gravity theories, and cosmology. Techniques to combine weak and strong lensing information to obtain the mass distribution of clusters have also advanced, and work continues on parameter-free techniques that are agnostic to the relation of cluster light and mass. An interesting twist in cluster lensing was provided by the post-merger Bullet Cluster (identified as 1E0657-558). In this and other merging clusters, the lensing mass is displaced from the baryonic center of mass, presenting a challenge to theories that attempt to explain away dark matter by positing a modification to the law of gravity. Detailed modeling and multi-wavelength data on these systems will provide interesting limits on dark matter as well as the possibility of a major surprise. Other advances may come from the gravitational telescope effect of galaxy clusters: regions with very high magnification can be used to image proto-galaxies at z ~ 10. Statistical studies of galaxy and cluster lenses and of invisible, diffuse large-scale structures via weak lensing have come into their own in recent years. A census of the mass distribution at low redshift has been made using the technique of galaxy galaxy lensing: the mean mass profiles of galaxies and clusters have been measured using the weak tangential shear imprinted on background galaxies. These can be correlated with a variety of luminous tracers to study galaxy/cluster properties at a level of detail not possible until recently. Equally impressive is the measurement of excess mass correlations out to ~30 Mpc from these halos, requiring measurements of shear signals below 0.01%. These measurements account for the total matter density inferred from the CMB plus other observations, thus providing a direct measure of dark matter in the present day universe. Cosmic shear refers to the more challenging measurement of shear shear correlations without the use of foreground objects to orient the shear. The first detections of such correlations were published in 2001; since then measurements from arcminute to degree scales have been made with much improved accuracy. Theoretical techniques of lensing tomography and advances in analysis methods to eliminate systematic errors have progressed rapidly. That cosmic shear is now regarded as a key element of major missions aimed at probing dark energy is a feat of scientific persuasion—a decade ago not many believed it was realistic to even detect this tiny shear signal, let alone measure it with the percent-level accuracy needed to advance dark energy measurements. If weak lensing measurements deliver on their promise, then, in combination with other imaging and spectroscopic probes, they may well impact fundamental physics and cosmology. For example they may find evidence for an evolving dark energy component or signatures of departures from general relativity. These exciting prospects rest on new optical surveys planned for the next five years which will image a thousand square degrees or more of the sky to redshifts ~1 (compared to about a hundred square degrees imaged currently). Further, through photometric redshifts based on galaxy colors, lensing tomography methods will be applied to learn about the three-dimensional distribution of dark matter. Lensing measurements in other wavelengths, such as planned 21-cm surveys and CMB lensing, would add valuable diversity to measurement techniques. The case for the next generation optical surveys from the ground and space is compelling as well: they will produce another order of magnitude in data quantity and deliver images with minimal distortions due to the atmosphere and telescope optics. The coming decade therefore has the potential for exciting discoveries in gravitational lensing. Focus on Gravitational Lensing Contents A Bayesian approach to strong lensing modelling of galaxy clusters E Jullo, J-P Kneib, M Limousin, Á Elíasdóttir, P J Marshall and T Verdugo Probing dark energy with cluster counts and cosmic shear power spectra: including the full covariance Masahiro Takada and Sarah Bridle How robust are the constraints on cosmology and galaxy evolution from the lens-redshift test? Pedro R Capelo and Priyamvada Natarajan Dark energy constraints from cosmic shear power spectra: impact of intrinsic alignments on photometric redshift requirements Sarah Bridle and Lindsay King An integral-field spectroscopic strong lens survey Adam S Bolton and Scott Burles Is there a quad problem among optical gravitational lenses? Masamune Oguri Cluster mass estimators from CMB temperature and polarization lensing Wayne Hu, Simon DeDeo and Chris Vale

  2. Multi-focus cluster labeling.

    PubMed

    Eikvil, Line; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Holden, Marit

    2015-06-01

    Document collections resulting from searches in the biomedical literature, for instance, in PubMed, are often so large that some organization of the returned information is necessary. Clustering is an efficient tool for organizing search results. To help the user to decide how to continue the search for relevant documents, the content of each cluster can be characterized by a set of representative keywords or cluster labels. As different users may have different interests, it can be desirable with solutions that make it possible to produce labels from a selection of different topical categories. We therefore introduce the concept of multi-focus cluster labeling to give users the possibility to get an overview of the contents through labels from multiple viewpoints. The concept for multi-focus cluster labeling has been established and has been demonstrated on three different document collections. We illustrate that multi-focus visualizations can give an overview of clusters along axes that general labels are not able to convey. The approach is generic and should be applicable to any biomedical (or other) domain with any selection of foci where appropriate focus vocabularies can be established. A user evaluation also indicates that such a multi-focus concept is useful. PMID:25869415

  3. Fast and precise continuous focusing with focus tunable lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casutt, Selina; Bueeler, Michael; Blum, Mark; Aschwanden, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Focusing in milliseconds without translational mechanics involved is possible with electrically tunable lenses. Fast shape-changing lenses enable fast imaging systems which can focus at distances from infinity to a few centimeters with a high optical quality. Furthermore, rapid laser processing in three dimensions is realized without mechanical translation of the focusing lens or the sample. With tunable lenses the entire optics can be made compact, robust and abrasion-free. Different configurations are discussed, how to integrate the tunable lens in the optical path. For machine vision applications, the achievable optical quality depends on the chosen combination of the tunable lens with a fixed focal length lens and a camera. It is recommended to use a fixed focus lens with a short distance between the stop position and the front of the lens. Furthermore, important points are presented how to achieve optimal performance in laser processing applications such as orientation and position of the tunable lens and the diameter of the beam incident on the lens. Additionally, different approaches will be discussed for monitoring the focal length of the tunable lens. The focal length of the tunable lens is sensitive to temperature changes, as the lens material is a fluid. However, in contrast to conventional lenses, the focal length of the tunable lens can be corrected electrically. For that purpose, the tunable lens exhibits an integrated temperature sensor for temperature compensation. Also optical feedback solutions will be presented for applications requiring highest precision and tracking of the absolute focal length value.

  4. EUV focus sensor: design and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Teyssier, Maureen E.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2005-05-01

    We describe performance modeling and design optimization of a prototype EUV focus sensor (FS) designed for use with existing 0.3-NA EUV projection-lithography tools. At 0.3-NA and 13.5-nm wavelength, the depth of focus shrinks to 150 nm increasing the importance of high-sensitivity focal-plane detection tools. The FS is a free-standing Ni grating structure that works in concert with a simple mask pattern of regular lines and spaces at constant pitch. The FS pitch matches that of the image-plane aerial-image intensity: it transmits the light with high efficiency when the grating is aligned with the aerial image laterally and longitudinally. Using a single-element photodetector, to detect the transmitted flux, the FS is scanned laterally and longitudinally so the plane of peak aerial-image contrast can be found. The design under consideration has a fixed image-plane pitch of 80-nm, with aperture widths of 12-40-nm (1-3 wave-lengths), and aspect ratios of 2-8. TEMPEST-3D is used to model the light transmission. Careful attention is paid to the annular, partially coherent, unpolarized illumination and to the annular pupil of the Micro-Exposure Tool (MET) optics for which the FS is designed. The system design balances the opposing needs of high sensitivity and high throughput opti-mizing the signal-to-noise ratio in the measured intensity contrast.

  5. EUV Focus Sensor: Design and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Teyssier, Maureen E.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2005-05-01

    We describe performance modeling and design optimization of a prototype EUV focus sensor (FS) designed for use with existing 0.3-NA EUV projection-lithography tools. At 0.3-NA and 13.5-nm wavelength, the depth of focus shrinks to 150 nm increasing the importance of high-sensitivity focal-plane detection tools. The FS is a free-standing Ni grating structure that works in concert with a simple mask pattern of regular lines and spaces at constant pitch. The FS pitch matches that of the image-plane aerial-image intensity: it transmits the light with high efficiency when the grating is aligned with the aerial image laterally and longitudinally. Using a single-element photodetector, to detect the transmitted flux, the FS is scanned laterally and longitudinally so the plane of peak aerial-image contrast can be found. The design under consideration has a fixed image-plane pitch of 80-nm, with aperture widths of 12-40-nm (1-3 wavelengths), and aspect ratios of 2-8. TEMPEST-3D is used to model the light transmission. Careful attention is paid to the annular, partially coherent, unpolarized illumination and to the annular pupil of the Micro-Exposure Tool (MET) optics for which the FS is designed. The system design balances the opposing needs of high sensitivity and high throughput optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio in the measured intensity contrast.

  6. New charm results from FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Stefano; /Frascati

    2004-12-01

    New results from the photoproduction experiment FOCUS are reported: Dalitz plot analysis, semileptonic form factor ratios and excited meson spectroscopy. The author reports on three new results from the photoproduction experiment FOCUS: the first Dalitz plot analysis of charm meson decays using the K-matrix approach[ 1], new measurements of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {delta}(1020) {mu}{sup +}{nu} form factor ratios [2], and new measurements on L=1 excited meson spectroscopy [3], i.e., precise measurements of the masses and widths of the D*{sub 2}{sup +} and D*{sub 2}{sup 0} mesons, and evidence for broad states decaying to D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} (the first such evidence in D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}). The data for this paper were collected in the Wideband photoproduction experiment FOCUS during the Fermilab 1996-1997 fixed-target run.

  7. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, Thomas E.; Powell, James R.; Lenard, Roger

    1986-01-01

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting rgy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  8. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.; Lenard, R.

    1984-12-10

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting energy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  9. A continuous plasma final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, D.H.

    1989-11-01

    Scaling laws are set down for a plasma cell used for transport, focusing and current neutralization of fine, intense, relativistic electron beams. It is found that there exists a minimum beam spot size, {sigma}{sub min} {approximately} {var epsilon}{sub n}(I{sub A}/{gamma}I){sup 1/2}, in such a focusing system. Propagation issues, including channel formation, synchrotron radiation, beam ionization and instabilities, are discussed. Numerical examples are given for a proof-of-principle experiment at KEK, an application for luminosity enhancement at the SLC, and a hypothetical TeV electron-positron collider. For a TeV collider, it is found that the effect of ion-motion on focusing, and the effect of Buneman instability on current neutralization must be considered. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Electrically tunable transverse magnetic focusing in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taychatanapat, Thiti; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2013-04-01

    Electrons in a periodic lattice can propagate without scattering for macroscopic distances despite the presence of the non-uniform Coulomb potential due to the nuclei. Such ballistic motion of electrons allows the use of a transverse magnetic field to focus electrons. This phenomenon, known as transverse magnetic focusing (TMF), has been used to study the Fermi surface of metals and semiconductor heterostructures, as well as to investigate Andreev reflection and spin-orbit interaction, and to detect composite fermions. Here we report on the experimental observation of TMF in high-mobility mono-, bi- and tri-layer graphene devices. The ability to tune the graphene carrier density enables us to investigate TMF continuously from the hole to the electron regime and analyse the resulting focusing fan. Moreover, by applying a transverse electric field to tri-layer graphene, we use TMF as a ballistic electron spectroscopy method to investigate controlled changes in the electronic structure of a material. Finally, we demonstrate that TMF survives in graphene up to 300 K, by far the highest temperature reported for any system, opening the door to new room-temperature applications based on electron-optics.

  11. Law-Focused Education: Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls. Malcolm Price Lab. School.

    This law-focused resource booklet is intended to help secondary level students learn about the civil law portion of Iowa's judicial system. The materials are designed to help students understand how to deal with conflict in a peaceful and orderly manner and how to cope with decision making in personal law situations as related to the family, the…

  12. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary I.; Maccagno, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  13. Focus identification in child Mandarin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Crain, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we investigated how Mandarin-speaking children and adults interpret focus structures like Zhiyou Yuehan chi-le pingguo 'Only John ate an apple' and Shi Yuehan chi-de pingguo 'It is John who ate an apple'. We found that children tended to associate focus operators zhiyou 'only' and shi 'be' with the verb phrase (VP), whereas adults uniquely associated them with the subject noun phrase (NP). To account for this difference, we propose that children initially treat focus operators as adverbials, thus ending up associating them with the VP. In order to assess our proposal, we examined children's understanding of zhiyou-constructions with negation, like Zhiyou Yuehan meiyou chi pingguo 'Only John didn't eat an apple'. It was found that children, like adults, consistently associated the focus operator with the subject NP in this construction. The findings have an important bearing on language learnability, since negation assists children in reaching the adult-like interpretation. PMID:19912672

  14. Board Focus, 1997-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    These four consecutive issues of the quarterly newsletter, "Board Focus," distributed by the Community College League of California, are dated spring, summer and fall 1997, and spring 1998. The spring 1997 issue discusses the "town vs. gown" conflict, which entails trustees balancing their obligations to operate the college on behalf of the…

  15. LBL neutralized beam focusing experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Krafft, G.A.; Kim, C.H.; Smith, L.

    1985-05-01

    An intense neutralized Cs/sup +1/ beam has been focused by an electrostatic polarization field induced by a solenoidal magnetic field of 10-25 gauss. This report describes the experiment and compares the results with the predictions of an analytic linearized fluid model and a particle-in-cell simulation which treats the motion of the warm electrons in detail.

  16. Strategy and Focus: Teaching Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The six articles in this focused journal issue are concerned with literature teaching on the secondary and college level. The titles and authors of the articles are as follows: (1) "Aesthetic Reading and Teaching: 'Candide' Revisited" (Michael G. Gauthier); (2) "Discovery: The Role of Subjective Response in Initiating the Literature Discussion"…

  17. World History. Focus on Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Jean; Clark, James; Herscher, Walter

    This book opens with an exploration of the first economic revolution, which set the stage for the dramatic unfolding of the role economics has played in world history. The lessons focus on two topics: (1) why some economies grew and prospered while others remained stagnant or declined; and (2) what causes people to make choices that help or hinder…

  18. Theme: Focus on Vocabulary Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jund, Suzanne, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    The eight articles in this journal issue focus on vocabulary skills. The topics covered are semantic feature analysis, the use of highway survival terms in a vocabulary list, making vocabulary interesting to secondary students, word lists, the use of newspapers in creating vocabulary lists, six strategies underlying effective vocabulary programs,…

  19. Focused ion beams in biology.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Kedar; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2015-11-01

    A quiet revolution is under way in technologies used for nanoscale cellular imaging. Focused ion beams, previously restricted to the materials sciences and semiconductor fields, are rapidly becoming powerful tools for ultrastructural imaging of biological samples. Cell and tissue architecture, as preserved in plastic-embedded resin or in plunge-frozen form, can be investigated in three dimensions by scanning electron microscopy imaging of freshly created surfaces that result from the progressive removal of material using a focused ion beam. The focused ion beam can also be used as a sculpting tool to create specific specimen shapes such as lamellae or needles that can be analyzed further by transmission electron microscopy or by methods that probe chemical composition. Here we provide an in-depth primer to the application of focused ion beams in biology, including a guide to the practical aspects of using the technology, as well as selected examples of its contribution to the generation of new insights into subcellular architecture and mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26513553

  20. How the Human Eye Focuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koretz, Jane F.; Handelman, George H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the decline in people's ability to focus their eyes as their age increases. Discusses probable causes of this effect including changes in the eye's geometry and biochemistry. Diagrammatically illustrates age related changes in the lens of the human eye. (CW)

  1. Focus on Young Adult Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Union, Bunni; Williams, Sheila

    1996-01-01

    Presents three library youth service programs which focus on "Pizza and Politicians," a public library pizza party which gave high school students and college-aged young adults a chance to meet and question politicians; a young adult "Reading to Seniors" program; "Making Books," a public library journal-making project for middle school students.…

  2. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  3. A shifting focus on cancer.

    PubMed

    Serb, Chris

    2002-05-01

    This installment of our quarterly series on clinical management issues focuses on trends in oncology services. Even with the threat of overbuilding in certain markets, proposed cuts to Medicare reimbursements and competition from niche facilities, hospitals are placing renewed emphasis--and spending--on cancer. PMID:12035573

  4. Standards and Assessment. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter includes three articles, two of which focus on standards for student evaluation and for admission to higher education. "A Measuring Stick for Standards and TEKS: Meeting the Needs of Second Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green, Adela Solis) examines beliefs embodied in the notion of standards; defines content, performance, and…

  5. Organizing for Schooling. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter focuses on schoolwide approaches to issues of major concern to educators, from the perspective of providing equal education for all children. "Supporting School Improvement in Reading through Professional Development" (Rogelio Lopez del Bosque, Abelardo Villarreal) describes a professional development program that empowers…

  6. Staying in School. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on issues related to high Texas dropout rates among Hispanic and other minority group students and on dropout prevention strategies. "School Finance Inequities Mean Schools Are Not Ready To Teach" (Maria Robledo Montecel) deplores the recent Texas Supreme Court ruling that state educational funding is constitutional,…

  7. Technology for Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on technology for education to benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program Students Meet Peers Via Video Conference" (Linda Cantu, Leticia Lopez-De La Garza) describes how at-risk student…

  8. World History. Focus on Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Jean; Clark, James; Herscher, Walter

    This book opens with an exploration of the first economic revolution, which set the stage for the dramatic unfolding of the role economics has played in world history. The lessons focus on two topics: (1) why some economies grew and prospered while others remained stagnant or declined; and (2) what causes people to make choices that help or hinder

  9. Teaching and Learning. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes four articles that focus on teaching and learning strategies to benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Would You Read Me a Story?: In Search of Reading Strategies That Work for the Early Childhood Classroom" (Hilaria Bauer) discusses how…

  10. Math Fair: Focus on Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokashi, Neelima A.

    2009-01-01

    This article depicts the rewarding experience of creating mathematical environments for kindergarten and elementary students by focusing on one of the most important and often difficult-to-grasp concepts (fractions) through play methods incorporated into a math fair. The basic concept of a math fair is threefold: (1) to create preplanned,…

  11. Tsunami Amplification due to Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. W.; Kanoglu, U.; Titov, V. V.; Aydin, B.; Spillane, M. C.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Tsunami runup measurements over the periphery of the Pacific Ocean after the devastating Great Japan tsunami of 11 March 2011 showed considerable variation in far-field and near-field impact. This variation of tsunami impact have been attributed to either directivity of the source or by local topographic effects. Directivity arguments alone, however, cannot explain the complexity of the radiated patterns in oceans with trenches and seamounts. Berry (2007, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 463, 3055-3071) discovered how such underwater features may concentrate tsunamis into cusped caustics and thus cause large local amplifications at specific focal points. Here, we examine focusing and local amplification, not by considering the effects of underwater diffractive lenses, but by considering the details of the dipole nature of the initial profile, and propose that certain regions of coastline are more at-risk, not simply because of directivity but because typical tsunami deformations create focal regions where abnormal tsunami wave height can be registered (Marchuk and Titov, 1989, Proc. IUGG/IOC International Tsunami Symposium, Novosibirsk, USSR). In this work, we present a new general analytical solution of the linear shallow-water wave equation for the propagation of a finite-crest-length source over a constant depth without any restriction on the initial profile. Unlike the analytical solution of Carrier and Yeh (2005, Comp. Mod. Eng. & Sci. 10(2), 113-121) which was restricted to initial conditions with Gaussian profiles and involved approximation, our solution is not only exact, but also general and allows the use of realistic initial waveform such as N-waves as defined by Tadepalli and Synolakis (1994, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 445, 99-112). We then verify our analytical solution for several typical wave profiles, both with the NOAA tsunami forecast model MOST (Titov and Synolakis, 1998, J. Waterw. Port Coast. Ocean Eng. 124(4), 157-171) which is validated and verified through (Synolakis et al., 2008, Pure Appl. Geophys. 165(11-12), 2197-2228), and with a Boussinesq model, to illustrate the role focusing can play for different initial conditions, and to show the robust nature of focusing with respect to dispersion. We also show how the focusing effect might have played a role in the 17 July 1998 Papua New Guinea and 17 July 2006 Java events, and also the 11 March 2011 Great Japan earthquake and tsunami. Our results strongly imply that focusing increases the shoreline amplification of the tsunami.; Schematic of focusing; initial displacement (upper left), wave evolution (upper right, lower left), maximum wave amplitude with focusing (lower right).

  12. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and technology and promote new research and development in this field.

  13. Algorithms for Labeling Focus Regions.

    PubMed

    Fink, M; Haunert, Jan-Henrik; Schulz, A; Spoerhase, J; Wolff, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of labeling point sites in focus regions of maps or diagrams. This problem occurs, for example, when the user of a mapping service wants to see the names of restaurants or other POIs in a crowded downtown area but keep the overview over a larger area. Our approach is to place the labels at the boundary of the focus region and connect each site with its label by a linear connection, which is called a leader. In this way, we move labels from the focus region to the less valuable context region surrounding it. In order to make the leader layout well readable, we present algorithms that rule out crossings between leaders and optimize other characteristics such as total leader length and distance between labels. This yields a new variant of the boundary labeling problem, which has been studied in the literature. Other than in traditional boundary labeling, where leaders are usually schematized polylines, we focus on leaders that are either straight-line segments or Bezier curves. Further, we present algorithms that, given the sites, find a position of the focus region that optimizes the above characteristics. We also consider a variant of the problem where we have more sites than space for labels. In this situation, we assume that the sites are prioritized by the user. Alternatively, we take a new facility-location perspective which yields a clustering of the sites. We label one representative of each cluster. If the user wishes, we apply our approach to the sites within a cluster, giving details on demand. PMID:26357167

  14. Oblique focus ICCD laboratory evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, D. G.

    1982-01-01

    An oblique focus intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) was constructed and operated in a vacuum system. Special gratings were obtained and an optical system set up to try to model a candidate UV spectrometer (Milieu Interstellaire et Intergalactique-MISIG), and to produce small enough images to test the theoretical subpixel resolution capability of the ICCD system. The efforts were only partly successful. Based on the results, a similar detector was built and flown successfully on a Princeton rocket program.

  15. Protein: A nutrient in focus.

    PubMed

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Clairmont, Stephanie; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Tremblay, Angelo; Elango, Rajavel

    2015-08-01

    Protein is an essential component of a healthy diet and is a focus of research programs seeking to optimize health at all stages of life. The focus on protein as a nutrient often centers on its thermogenic and satiating effect, and when included as part of a healthy diet, its potential to preserve lean body mass. A growing body of literature, including stable isotope based studies and longer term dietary interventions, suggests that current dietary protein recommendations may not be sufficient to promote optimal muscle health in all populations. A protein intake moderately higher than current recommendations has been widely endorsed by many experts and working groups and may provide health benefits for aging populations. Further, consuming moderate amounts of high-quality protein at each meal may optimally stimulate 24-h muscle protein synthesis and may provide a dietary platform that favors the maintenance of muscle mass and function while promoting successful weight management in overweight and obese individuals. Dietary protein has the potential to serve as a key nutrient for many health outcomes and benefits might be increased when combined with adequate physical activity. Future studies should focus on confirming these health benefits from dietary protein with long-term randomized controlled studies. PMID:26197807

  16. Focused electron beam in pyroelectric electron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Imashuku, Susumu; Imanishi, Akira; Kawai, Jun

    2013-07-15

    We report a method to focus the electron beam generated using a pyroelectric crystal. An electron beam with a spot size of 100 μm was achieved by applying an electrical field to an electroconductive needle tip set on a pyroelectric crystal. When the focused electron beam bombarded a sample, characteristic X-rays of the sample were only detected due to the production of an electric field between the needle tip and the sample.

  17. GRAVITATIONALLY FOCUSED DARK MATTER AROUND COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.

    2011-12-01

    If dark matter self-annihilates then it may produce an observable signal when its density is high. The details depend on the intrinsic properties of dark matter and how it clusters in space. For example, the density profile of some dark matter candidates may rise steeply enough toward the Galactic Center that self-annihilation may produce detectable {gamma}-ray emission. Here, we discuss the possibility that an annihilation signal arises near a compact object (e.g., neutron star or black hole) even when the density of dark matter in the neighborhood of the object is uniform. Gravitational focusing produces a local enhancement of density with a profile that falls off approximately as the inverse square-root of distance from the compact star. While geometric dilution may overwhelm the annihilation signal from this local enhancement, magnetic fields tied to the compact object can increase the signal's contrast relative to the background.

  18. The quest for customer focus.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ranjay; Oldroyd, James B

    2005-04-01

    Companies have poured enormous amounts of money into customer relationship management, but in many cases the investment hasn't really paid off. That's because getting closer to customers isn't about building an information technology system. It's a learning journey-one that unfolds over four stages, requiring people and business units to coordinate in progressively more sophisticated ways. The journey begins with the creation of a companywide repository containing each interaction a customer has with the company, organized not by product, purchase, or location, but by customer. Communal coordination is what's called for at this stage, as each group contributes its information to the data pool separately from the others and then taps into it as needed. In the second stage, one-way serial coordination from centralized IT through analytical units and out to the operating units allows companies to go beyond just assembling data to drawing inferences. In stage three, companies shift their focus from past relationships to future behavior. Through symbiotic coordination, information flows back and forth between central analytic units and various organizational units like marketing, sales, and operations, as together they seek answers to questions like "How can we prevent customers from switching to a competitor?" and "Who would be most likely to buy a new product in the future"? In stage four, firms begin to move past discrete, formal initiatives and, through integral coordination, bring an increasingly sophisticated understanding oftheir customers to bear in all day-to-day operations. Skipping stages denies organizations the sure foundation they need to build a lasting customer-focused mind-set. Those that recognize this will invest their customer relationship dollars much more wisely-and will see their customer-focusing efforts pay offon the bottom line. PMID:15807042

  19. Rotating apparatus for isoelectric focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an isoelectric focusing apparatus, wherein stabilization of the fluid containing the isolated proteins is achieved by carrying out the separation in a rotating cylinder with the separation cavity of the cylinder being segmented by means of filter elements. The filter elements are constituted of a material offering some degree of resistance to fluid convection, but allowing relatively free and unhindered passage of current and transport of proteins. The combined effect of segmentation and rotation has been found to be superior to either segmentation or rotation alone in maintaining the stability of the migrated fractions.

  20. A focused bibliography on robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergler, H. W.

    1983-08-01

    The present bibliography focuses on eight robotics-related topics believed by the author to be of special interest to researchers in the field of industrial electronics: robots, sensors, kinematics, dynamics, control systems, actuators, vision, economics, and robot applications. This literature search was conducted through the 1970-present COMPENDEX data base, which provides world-wide coverage of nearly 3500 journals, conference proceedings and reports, and the 1969-1981 INSPEC data base, which is the largest for the English language in the fields of physics, electrotechnology, computers, and control.

  1. Focus on nonlinear terahertz studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Nelson, Keith A.; Reimann, Klaus; Tanaka, Koichiro

    2014-04-01

    Resulting from the availability of improved sources, research in the terahertz (THz) spectral range has increased dramatically over the last decade, leading essentially to the disappearance of the so-called ‘THz gap’. While most work to date has been carried out with THz radiation of low field amplitude, a growing number of experiments are using THz radiation with large electric and magnetic fields that induce nonlinearities in the system under study. This ‘focus on’ collection contains a number of articles, both experimental and theoretical, in the new subfield of THz nonlinear optics and spectroscopy on various systems, among them molecular gases, superconductors, semiconductors, antiferromagnets and graphene.

  2. Line-focus sun trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R.

    1980-05-01

    Sun trackers have been a troublesome component for line-focus concentrating collector systems. The problems have included poor accuracy, component failures, false locks on clouds, and restricted tracker operating ranges. In response to these tracking difficulties, a variety of improved sun trackers have been developed. A testing program is underway at SERI to determine the tracking accuracy of this new generation of sun trackers. The three major types of trackers are defined, some recent sun tracker developments are described, and the testing that is underway is outlined.

  3. EDITORIAL Focus on Advanced Nanomaterials Focus on Advanced Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takaho; Iakoubovskii, Konstantin

    2010-10-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physics 2010 was awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov 'for groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene'. This award acknowledged the growing importance of graphene, as well as of nanomaterials and surface phenomena at the nanoscale in general. Graphene, carbon nanotubes and many other nanostructures have already demonstrated their remarkable physical properties and a wealth of quantum phenomena. However, much work has to be done to apply these properties in practical devices and technological processes. This focus issue overviews some recent advances in this direction. It includes a foreword and eight articles on nanomaterials investigation carried out at International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science. The foreword is written by Heinrich Rohrer, who received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1986 for the design of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM)—one of the most successful tools in the characterization and manipulation of various nanomaterials, including graphene. Professor Rohrer presents his perspectives on the trends in the past, present and future developments of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Graphene and carbon nanomaterials dominate the topics of this focus issue. Rao et al review the synthesis and characterization of the surface, magnetic and electrical properties of carbon structures containing one to several graphene layers. Moriyama et al present their recent results on the fabrication of electrical quantum-dot devices in a graphene-based two-dimensional system. By applying a nanofabrication process to graphene flakes, they fabricated a device comprising two lateral quantum dots coupled in series. Wakabayashi et al review the theoretical treatment of graphene nanoribbons and present their own recent achievements in this area. Graphene is closely related to carbon nanotubes, and their applications largely rely on the possibility of controllable functionalization. Gautam et al review an elegant method of such functionalization, namely the encapsulation of inorganic elements and compounds into carbon nanotubes. Functionalization of metal surfaces is another important topic of this focus issue. Nagao et al overview the fundamental properties of plasmons in materials with various dimensionalities. In particular, they consider antenna resonances of plasmon polariton in some widely used nanometer-scale structures and atomic-scale wires, along with their applications. Komeda et al present their molecule-resolved STM analysis of bonding metal-free phthalocyanine to gold surfaces. Such organic-inorganic interfaces have a variety of potential applications to catalysis and sensors. Nagasaki describes another organic nanotechnology related topic, namely engineering of poly(ethylene glycol) tethered chain surfaces for high-performance bionanoparticles. Finally, Fabbri et al review the role of interfaces in ionic conductivity in oxide hetero-structures, aimed at improving the design of micro-ionic devices. We hope that this focus issue will provide a valuable update on some topics in current nanomaterials research.

  4. Development of a Focusing DIRC

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, J.; Bedajanek, I.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Mazaheri, G.; Ratcliff, B.; Suzuki, K.; Schwiening, J.; Uher, J.; Va'vra, J.; /SLAC

    2006-12-12

    Benefiting from the recent introduction of new fast vacuum-based photon detectors with a transit time spread of {sigma}{sub TTS} {approx} 30-150 ps, we are developing a novel RICH detector capable of correcting the chromatic error through good time measurements; we believe that this is the first time such a technique has been demonstrated. We have built and successfully tested a particle identification detector called ''Focusing DIRC''. The concept of the prototype is based on the BaBar DIRC, with several important improvements: (a) much faster pixelated photon detectors based on Burle MCP-PMTs and Hamamatsu MaPMTs, (b) a focusing mirror which allows the photon detector to be smaller and less sensitive to background in future applications, (c) electronics allowing the measurement of single photon timing to better than {sigma} {approx} 100-200ps, which allows a correction of the chromatic error. The detector was tested in a SLAC 10GeV/c electron test beam. This detector concept could be used for particle identification at Super B-factory, ILC, GlueX, Panda, etc.

  5. Multiperspective Focus+Context Visualization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Lin; Popescu, Voicu

    2016-05-01

    Occlusions are a severe bottleneck for the visualization of large and complex datasets. Conventional images only show dataset elements to which there is a direct line of sight, which significantly limits the information bandwidth of the visualization. Multiperspective visualization is a powerful approach for alleviating occlusions to show more than what is visible from a single viewpoint. However, constructing and rendering multiperspective visualizations is challenging. We present a framework for designing multiperspective focus+context visualizations with great flexibility by manipulating the underlying camera model. The focus region viewpoint is adapted to alleviate occlusions. The framework supports multiperspective visualization in three scenarios. In a first scenario, the viewpoint is altered independently for individual image regions to avoid occlusions. In a second scenario, conventional input images are connected into a multiperspective image. In a third scenario, one or several data subsets of interest (i.e., targets) are visualized where they would be seen in the absence of occluders, as the user navigates or the targets move. The multiperspective images are rendered at interactive rates, leveraging the camera model's fast projection operation. We demonstrate the framework on terrain, urban, and molecular biology geometric datasets, as well as on volume rendered density datasets. PMID:27045911

  6. Future focus for professional development.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Nicole K; Coplit, Lisa D

    2013-01-01

    Professional development has evolved from individually focused sabbaticals and professional leaves to institutionally focused programs with an interest in developing faculty members' ability to teach in various environments as well as to succeed in the many endeavors they undertake. We address various issues related to professional development in the medical school arena. Professional development in medical school takes place in a context where faculty are stretched to engage in research and service not only for their own sake but also to financially support their institutions. This obligates professional developers to acknowledge and address the environments in which teaching faculty work, and to use approaches to professional development that honor the time and efforts of teaching faculty. These approaches may be brief interventions that make use of principles of education, and may include online offerings. Professional development will be most effective when professional developers acknowledge that most faculty members aspire to excellence in teaching, but they do so in an environment that pushes them to address competing concerns. Offering professional development opportunities that fit within the workplace environment, take little time, and build upon faculty's existing knowledge will assist in enhancing faculty success. PMID:24246108

  7. [Tissue ablation by focused ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Chapelon, J Y; Margonari, J; Bouvier, R; Cathignol, D; Gorry, F; Gelet, A

    1991-04-01

    Tissue lesions can be induced at the focal point of highly focused transducers with a frequency of 1 and 2.25 MHz for exposure times of less than 1 second. The energy generated by a high power amplifier (7.5 kilowatts effective at 1 MHz) is delivered in the form of series of impulses lasting between 10 and 1,000 milliseconds. The experimentation was conducted in the rat kidney (the left kidney, normally supplied by its vascular pedicle, was exteriorised during ultrasound treatment and then returned to the abdomen). The animal was sacrificed 3 days later and the lesions were studied by serial histological sections. 248 ultrasound shots were performed between January and September 1990. They allowed the definition of the time and intensity constants necessary to induce total destruction of the renal tissue at the focal point. Depending on the energy delivered, an elliptical cavity with a mean height of 1.2 to 4.6 mm and a mean diameter of 0.6 to 3 mm is observed at the focal point after a single shot. No cell structures were visible in the cavities and, in general, the cavity was prolonged by a cone-shaped region of coagulated necrosis with an inferior base. The mechanism responsible for this focused ultrasonic tissue destruction (FUTD) involves a variable combination of thermal and mechanical effects which depends on the ultrasound intensity delivered at the focal point of the transducer. PMID:1844825

  8. The paradox of moral focus.

    PubMed

    Young, Liane; Phillips, Jonathan

    2011-05-01

    When we evaluate moral agents, we consider many factors, including whether the agent acted freely, or under duress or coercion. In turn, moral evaluations have been shown to influence our (non-moral) evaluations of these same factors. For example, when we judge an agent to have acted immorally, we are subsequently more likely to judge the agent to have acted freely, not under force. Here, we investigate the cognitive signatures of this effect in interpersonal situations, in which one agent ("forcer") forces another agent ("forcee") to act either immorally or morally. The structure of this relationship allowed us to ask questions about both the "forcer" and the "forcee." Paradoxically, participants judged that the "forcer" forced the "forcee" to act immorally (i.e. X forced Y), but that the "forcee" was not forced to act immorally (i.e. Y was not forced by X). This pattern obtained only for human agents who acted intentionally. Directly changing participants' focus from one agent to another (forcer versus forcee) also changed the target of moral evaluation and therefore force attributions. The full pattern of judgments may provide a window into motivated moral reasoning and focusing bias more generally; participants may have been motivated to attribute greater force to the immoral forcer and greater freedom to the immoral forcee. PMID:21315324

  9. Focus on the Rashba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihlmayer, G.; Rader, O.; Winkler, R.

    2015-05-01

    The Rashba effect, discovered in 1959, continues to supply fertile ground for fundamental research and applications. It provided the basis for the proposal of the spin transistor by Datta and Das in 1990, which has largely inspired the broad and dynamic field of spintronics. More recent developments include new materials for the Rashba effect such as metal surfaces, interfaces and bulk materials. It has also given rise to new phenomena such as spin currents and the spin Hall effect, including its quantized version, which has led to the very active field of topological insulators. The Rashba effect plays a crucial role in yet more exotic fields of physics such as the search for Majorana fermions at semiconductor-superconductor interfaces and the interaction of ultracold atomic Bose and Fermi gases. Advances in our understanding of Rashba-type spin-orbit couplings, both qualitatively and quantitatively, can be obtained in many different ways. This focus issue brings together the wide range of research activities on Rashba physics to further promote the development of our physical pictures and concepts in this field. The present Editorial gives a brief account on the history of the Rashba effect including material that was previously not easily accessible before summarizing the key results of the present focus issue as a guidance to the reader.

  10. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

  11. Targeted therapy using nanotechnology: focus on cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Vanna; Pala, Nicolino; Sechi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology have contributed to the development of engineered nanoscale materials as innovative prototypes to be used for biomedical applications and optimized therapy. Due to their unique features, including a large surface area, structural properties, and a long circulation time in blood compared with small molecules, a plethora of nanomaterials has been developed, with the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases, in particular by improving the sensitivity and recognition ability of imaging contrast agents and by selectively directing bioactive agents to biological targets. Focusing on cancer, promising nanoprototypes have been designed to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents, as well as for early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. However, several obstacles, including difficulty in achieving the optimal combination of physicochemical parameters for tumor targeting, evading particle clearance mechanisms, and controlling drug release, prevent the translation of nanomedicines into therapy. In spite of this, recent efforts have been focused on developing functionalized nanoparticles for delivery of therapeutic agents to specific molecular targets overexpressed on different cancer cells. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has resulted in a new programmable nanotherapeutic formulation of docetaxel, namely BIND-014, which recently entered Phase II clinical testing for patients with solid tumors. BIND-014 has been developed to overcome the limitations facing delivery of nanoparticles to many neoplasms, and represents a validated example of targeted nanosystems with the optimal biophysicochemical properties needed for successful tumor eradication. PMID:24531078

  12. Rotating Apparatus for Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1986-01-01

    Remixing of separated fractions prevented. Improved isoelectric focusing apparatus helps to prevent electro-osmosis and convection, both of which cause remixing of separated fractions. Fractionating column segmented and rotated about horizontal axis: Only combined effects of both features fully effective in making good separations. Improved apparatus slowly rotated continuously or rocked (at rotational amplitude of at least 180 degrees) about its horizontal axis so average gravitational vector experienced by fluid is zero and convection is therefore suppressed. Electro-osmosis suppressed and convection further suppressed by separating column into disklike compartments along its length with filters. Experiments have shown dimensions of apparatus not critical. Typical compartment and column volumes are 2 and 40 ml, respectively. Rotation speeds lie between 3 and 30 rpm.

  13. ESPERE Project: Focus on Agronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Osa, J.; Iglesias, A.

    2003-04-01

    ESPERE (Environmental Science Published for Everybody Round the Earth) aims to bring the current scientific knowledge of the climate system and its impacts to schools. The Spanish partner (IAMZ) is responsible for: (1) delivering peer-reviewed, reliable information on the impacts, vulnerability and adaptation of agriculture to climate; (2) promoting the interactive cooperation among scientists and non-scientists in the Spanish Educational System; and (3) working in the Spanish language; and (4) revising the content of the other focus areas for their adequacy in the education system of Spain. The presentation will discuss the approach taken in each of the four actions of IAMZ based on past experience and results, present the progress on cooperation with a Pilot School District, and provide the documents produced in Spanish as initial stages of capacity building and outreach.

  14. Hormone Purification by Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1985-01-01

    Various ground-based research approaches are being applied to a more definitive evaluation of the natures and degrees of electroosmosis effects on the separation capabilities of the Isoelectric Focusing (IEF) process. A primary instrumental system for this work involves rotationally stabilized, horizontal electrophoretic columns specially adapted for the IEF process. Representative adaptations include segmentation, baffles/screens, and surface coatings. Comparative performance and development testing are pursued against the type of column or cell established as an engineering model. Previously developed computer simulation capabilities are used to predict low-gravity behavior patterns and performance for IEF apparatus geometries of direct project interest. Three existing mathematical models plus potential new routines for particular aspects of simulating instrument fluid patterns with varied wall electroosmosis influences are being exercised.

  15. Non-focusing active warhead

    DOEpatents

    Hornig, H.C.

    1998-12-22

    A non-nuclear, non-focusing, active warhead that comprises a high explosive charge contained within a casing of reactive metal is disclosed. When the high explosive is detonated, the reactive metal is dispersed and reacts with the air, which significantly increases the explosive yield of the warhead. The active warhead produces therefore much higher blast effects with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional munitions. The warhead is highly effective against such targets as aircraft which typically have thin fuselages, for example. The explosiveness of this warhead can be enhanced further by elevating the temperature and therefore the reactivity of the reactive metal before or during the explosion. New methods of enhancing the reactivity of the metal are also taught. 4 figs.

  16. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  17. NASA Budget Focuses on Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-02-01

    NASA has decided to rebalance its priorities following several years of healthy growth for science, turning its focus instead towards expanding support for manned space exploration, explained NASA Administrator Michael Griffin at a 16 February hearing before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science. The Bush Administration has requested $16.8 billion for NASA in Fiscal Year 2007, an increase of 3.2 percent over the previous year. Most of the benefit would go to the exploration program, which would get a 55 percent increase in funding-for a total of $3.9 billion-primarily for the development of the new Crew Exploration Vehicle and Crew Launch Vehicle. The science budget would grow by 1.5 percent in FY2007-to $5.3 billion-and then is projected to grow by just one percent per year in 2008-2011.

  18. Focus on integrated quantum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy; Patton, Brian; Sasaki, Masahide; Vučković, Jelena

    2013-03-01

    A key goal of research into quantum information processing is the development of technologies that are scaleable in complexity while allowing the mass manufacture of devices that promise transformative effects on information science. The demonstration that integrated photonics circuits could be made to perform operations that exploit the quantum nature of the photon has turned them into leading candidates for practical quantum information processing technologies. To fully achieve their promise, however, requires research from diverse fields. This focus issue provides a snapshot of some of the areas in which key advances have been made. We are grateful for the contributions from leading teams based around the globe and hope that the degree of progress being made in a challenging and exciting field is apparent from the papers published here.

  19. Focusing the partly polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovytsky, Volodymyr

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the mathematical technique for calculation of three dimensional intensity distribution near a focal point of an optical system in case of partly polarized light. The proposed technique considers a high aperture optical system that focuses a partly polarized parallel beam. The principal idea is based on Huygens-Fresnel principle: a spherical wave at an exit pupil of an optical system is considered as a numerous set of secondary light point sources. Each source emits a partly polarized spherical wave. The polarization orientation of each wave can be calculated using angular pupil coordinates. Modulation of amplitude, phase or polarization can be introduced depending on these pupil coordinates. The total intensity is defined as superposition of complex wave amplitudes taking into account polarization orientation, degree of polarization and orientation of detector aperture. The paper presents the intensity distributions calculated for beams with various types and degrees of polarization.

  20. Random focusing of tsunami waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Henri; Metzger, Jakob J.; Geisel, Theo; Fleischmann, Ragnar

    2016-03-01

    Tsunamis exhibit surprisingly strong height fluctuations. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that lead to these variations in wave height is a prerequisite for reliable tsunami forecasting. It is known, for example, that the presence of large underwater islands or the shape of the tsunami source can affect the wave heights. Here we show that the consecutive effect of even tiny fluctuations in the profile of the ocean floor (the bathymetry) can cause unexpectedly strong fluctuations in the wave height of tsunamis, with maxima several times higher than the average wave height. A novel approach combining stochastic caustic theory and shallow water wave dynamics allows us to determine the typical propagation distance at which the strongly focused waves appear. We demonstrate that owing to this mechanism the small errors present in bathymetry measurements can lead to drastic variations in predicted tsunami heights. Our results show that a precise knowledge of the ocean's bathymetry is absolutely indispensable for reliable tsunami forecasts.

  1. Centripetal focusing of gyrotactic phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Cencini, M; Franchino, M; Santamaria, F; Boffetta, G

    2016-06-21

    A suspension of gyrotactic microalgae Chlamydomonas augustae swimming in a cylindrical water vessel in solid-body rotation is studied. Our experiments show that swimming algae form an aggregate around the axis of rotation, whose intensity increases with the rotation speed. We explain this phenomenon by the centripetal orientation of the swimming direction towards the axis of rotation. This centripetal focusing is contrasted by diffusive fluxes due to stochastic reorientation of the cells. The competition of the two effects lead to a stationary distribution, which we analytically derive from a refined mathematical model of gyrotactic swimmers. The temporal evolution of the cell distribution, obtained via numerical simulations of the stochastic model, is in quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements in the range of parameters explored. PMID:27060672

  2. Non-focusing active warhead

    DOEpatents

    Hornig, Howard C.

    1998-01-01

    A non-nuclear, non-focusing, active warhead that comprises a high explosive charge contained within a casing of reactive metal. When the high explosive is detonated, the reactive metal is dispersed and reacts with the air, which significantly increases the explosive yield of the warhead. The active warhead produces therefore much higher blast effects with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional munitions. The warhead is highly effective against such targets as aircraft which typically have thin fuselages, for example. The explosiveness of this warhead can be enhanced further by elevating the temperature and therefore the reactivity of the reactive metal before or during the explosion. New methods of enhancing the reactivity of the metal are also taught.

  3. Focusing ecological research for conservation.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Bogdan; Boyce, Mark S

    2013-11-01

    Ecologists are increasingly actively involved in conservation. We identify five key topics from a broad sweep of ecology that merit research attention to meet conservation needs. We examine questions from landscape ecology, behavioral ecology, ecosystem dynamics, community ecology, and nutrient cycling related to key topics. Based on literature review and publication trend assessment, consultation with colleagues, and roundtable discussions at the 24th International Congress for Conservation Biology, focused research on the following topics could benefit conservation while advancing ecological understanding: 1. Carbon sequestration, requiring increased linkages to biodiversity conservation; 2. Ecological invasiveness, challenging our ability to find solutions to ecological aliens; 3. Individual variation, having applications in the conservation of rare species; 4. Movement of organisms, integrating ecological processes across landscapes and scales and addressing habitat fragmentation; and 5. Trophic-level interactions, driving ecological dynamics at the ecosystem-level. Addressing these will require cross-disciplinary research under the overarching framework of conservation ecology. PMID:23609103

  4. Recent advances in microfluidic detection systems

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher A; Duong, Cindy T; Grimley, Alix; Roper, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous detection methods available for methods are being put to use for detection on these miniaturized systems, with the analyte of interest driving the choice of detection method. In this article, we summarize microfluidic 2 years. More focus is given to unconventional approaches to detection routes and novel strategies for performing high-sensitivity detection. PMID:20414455

  5. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  6. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloud Physics FOCUS ON CLOUD PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkovich, Gregory; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2008-07-01

    Cloud physics has for a long time been an important segment of atmospheric science. It is common knowledge that clouds are crucial for our understanding of weather and climate. Clouds are also interesting by themselves (not to mention that they are beautiful). Complexity is hidden behind the common picture of these beautiful and interesting objects. The typical school textbook definition that a cloud is 'a set of droplets or particles suspended in the atmosphere' is not adequate. Clouds are complicated phenomena in which dynamics, turbulence, microphysics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer interact on a wide range of scales, from sub-micron to kilometres. Some of these interactions are subtle and others are more straightforward. Large and small-scale motions lead to activation of cloud condensation nuclei, condensational growth and collisions; small changes in composition and concentration of atmospheric aerosol lead to significant differences in radiative properties of the clouds and influence rainfall formation. It is justified to look at a cloud as a composite, nonlinear system which involves many interactions and feedback. This system is actively linked into a web of atmospheric, oceanic and even cosmic interactions. Due to the complexity of the cloud system, present-day descriptions of clouds suffer from simplifications, inadequate parameterizations, and omissions. Sometimes the most fundamental physics hidden behind these simplifications and parameterizations is not known, and a wide scope of view can sometimes prevent a 'microscopic', deep insight into the detail. Only the expertise offered by scientists focused on particular elementary processes involved in this complicated pattern of interactions allows us to shape elements of the puzzle from which a general picture of clouds can be created. To be useful, every element of the puzzle must be shaped precisely. This often creates problems in communication between the sciences responsible for shaping elements of the puzzle, and those which combine them. Scales, assumptions and the conditions used in order to describe a particular single process of interest must be consistent with the conditions in clouds. The papers in this focus issue of New Journal of Physics collectively demonstrate (i) the variation in scientific approaches towards investigating cloud processes, (ii) the various stages of shaping elements of the puzzle, and (iii) some attempts to put the pieces together. These papers present just a small subset of loosely arranged elements in an initial stage of puzzle creation. Addressed by this issue is one of the important problems in our understanding of cloud processes—the interaction between cloud particles and turbulence. There is currently a gap between the cloud physics community and scientists working in wind tunnels, on turbulence theory and particle interactions. This collection is intended to narrow this gap by bringing together work by theoreticians, modelers, laboratory experimentalists and those who measure and observe actual processes in clouds. It forms a collage of contributions showing various approaches to cloud processes including: • theoretical works with possible applications to clouds (Bistagnino and Boffetta, Gustavsson et al), • an attempt to construct a phenomenological description of clouds and rain (Lovejoy and Schertzer), • simplified models designed to parameterize turbulence micro- and macro-effects (Celani et al, Derevyanko et al), • focused theoretical research aimed at particular cloud processes (Ayala et al, parts I and II, Wang et al), • laboratory and modeling studies of complex cloud processes (Malinowski et al). This collage is far from being complete but, hopefully, should give the reader a representative impression of the current state of knowledge in the field. We hope it will be useful to all scientists whose work is inspired by cloud processes. Focus on Cloud Physics Contents The development of ice in a cumulus cloud over southwest England Yahui Huang, Alan M Blyth, Philip R A Brown, Tom W Choularton, Paul Connolly, Alan M Gadian, Hazel Jones, John Latham, Zhiqiang Cui and Ken Carslaw The equivalent size of cloud condensation nuclei Antonio Celani, Andrea Mazzino and Marco Tizzi Laboratory and modeling studies of cloud clear air interfacial mixing: anisotropy of small-scale turbulence due to evaporative cooling Szymon P Malinowski, Miroslaw Andrejczuk, Wojciech W Grabowski, Piotr Korczyk, Tomasz A Kowalewski and Piotr K Smolarkiewicz Evolution of non-uniformly seeded warm clouds in idealized turbulent conditions Stanislav Derevyanko, Gregory Falkovich and Sergei Turitsyn Lagrangian statistics in two-dimensional free turbulent convection A Bistagnino and G Boffetta Turbulence, raindrops and the l1/2 number density law S Lovejoy and D Schertzer Effects of turbulence on the geometric collision rate of sedimenting droplets. Part 2. Theory and parameterization Orlando Ayala, Bogdan Rosa and Lian-Ping Wang Effects of turbulence on the geometric collision rate of sedimenting droplets. Part 1. Results from direct numerical simulation Orlando Ayala, Bogdan Rosa, Lian-Ping Wang and Wojciech W Grabowski Collisions of particles advected in random flows K Gustavsson, B Mehlig and M Wilkinson Turbulent collision efficiency of heavy particles relevant to cloud droplets Lian-Ping Wang, Orlando Ayala, Bogdan Rosa and Wojciech W Grabowski

  7. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  8. Focus on quantum Einstein gravity Focus on quantum Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjorn, Jan; Reuter, Martin; Saueressig, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The gravitational asymptotic safety program summarizes the attempts to construct a consistent and predictive quantum theory of gravity within Wilson's generalized framework of renormalization. Its key ingredient is a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow which controls the behavior of the theory at trans-Planckian energies and renders gravity safe from unphysical divergences. Provided that the fixed point comes with a finite number of ultraviolet-attractive (relevant) directions, this construction gives rise to a consistent quantum field theory which is as predictive as an ordinary, perturbatively renormalizable one. This opens up the exciting possibility of establishing quantum Einstein gravity as a fundamental theory of gravity, without introducing supersymmetry or extra dimensions, and solely based on quantization techniques that are known to work well for the other fundamental forces of nature. While the idea of gravity being asymptotically safe was proposed by Steven Weinberg more than 30 years ago [1], the technical tools for investigating this scenario only emerged during the last decade. Here a key role is played by the exact functional renormalization group equation for gravity, which allows the construction of non-perturbative approximate solutions for the RG-flow of the gravitational couplings. Most remarkably, all solutions constructed to date exhibit a suitable non-Gaussian fixed point, lending strong support to the asymptotic safety conjecture. Moreover, the functional renormalization group also provides indications that the central idea of a non-Gaussian fixed point providing a safe ultraviolet completion also carries over to more realistic scenarios where gravity is coupled to a suitable matter sector like the standard model. These theoretical successes also triggered a wealth of studies focusing on the consequences of asymptotic safety in a wide range of phenomenological applications covering the physics of black holes, early time cosmology and the big bang, as well as TeV-scale gravity models testable at the Large Hadron Collider. On different grounds, Monte-Carlo studies of the gravitational partition function based on the discrete causal dynamical triangulations approach provide an a priori independent avenue towards unveiling the non-perturbative features of gravity. As a highlight, detailed simulations established that the phase diagram underlying causal dynamical triangulations contains a phase where the triangulations naturally give rise to four-dimensional, macroscopic universes. Moreover, there are indications for a second-order phase transition that naturally forms the discrete analog of the non-Gaussian fixed point seen in the continuum computations. Thus there is a good chance that the discrete and continuum computations will converge to the same fundamental physics. This focus issue collects a series of papers that outline the current frontiers of the gravitational asymptotic safety program. We hope that readers get an impression of the depth and variety of this research area as well as our excitement about the new and ongoing developments. References [1] Weinberg S 1979 General Relativity, an Einstein Centenary Survey ed S W Hawking and W Israel (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press)

  9. Knowledge focus via software agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henager, Donald E.

    2001-09-01

    The essence of military Command and Control (C2) is making knowledge intensive decisions in a limited amount of time using uncertain, incorrect, or outdated information. It is essential to provide tools to decision-makers that provide: * Management of friendly forces by treating the "friendly resources as a system". * Rapid assessment of effects of military actions againt the "enemy as a system". * Assessment of how an enemy should, can, and could react to friendly military activities. Software agents in the form of mission agents, target agents, maintenance agents, and logistics agents can meet this information challenge. The role of each agent is to know all the details about its assigned mission, target, maintenance, or logistics entity. The Mission Agent would fight for mission resources based on the mission priority and analyze the effect that a proposed mission's results would have on the enemy. The Target Agent (TA) communicates with other targets to determine its role in the system of targets. A system of TAs would be able to inform a planner or analyst of the status of a system of targets, the effect of that status, adn the effect of attacks on that system. The system of TAs would also be able to analyze possible enemy reactions to attack by determining ways to minimize the effect of attack, such as rerouting traffic or using deception. The Maintenance Agent would scheudle maintenance events and notify the maintenance unit. The Logistics Agent would manage shipment and delivery of supplies to maintain appropriate levels of weapons, fuel and spare parts. The central idea underlying this case of software agents is knowledge focus. Software agents are createad automatically to focus their attention on individual real-world entities (e.g., missions, targets) and view the world from that entities perspective. The agent autonomously monitors the entity, identifies problems/opportunities, formulates solutions, and informs the decision-maker. The agent must be able to communicate to receive and disseminate information and provide the decision-maker with assistance via focused knowledge. THe agent must also be able to monitor the state of its own environment and make decisions necessary to carry out its delegated tasks. Agents bring three elements to the C2 domain that offer to improve decision-making. First, they provide higher-quality feedback and provide it more often. In doing so, the feedback loop becomes nearly continuous, reducing or eliminating delays in situation updates to decision-makers. Working with the most current information possible improves the control process, thus enabling effects based operations. Second, the agents accept delegation of actions and perform those actions following an established process. Agents' consistent actions reduce the variability of human input and stabilize the control process. Third, through the delegation of actions, agents ensure 100 percent consideration of plan details.

  10. In vivo acoustic and photoacoustic focusing of circulating cells

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Viegas, Mark G.; Malinsky, Taras I.; Melerzanov, Alexander V.; Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo flow cytometry using vessels as natural tubes with native cell flows has revolutionized the study of rare circulating tumor cells in a complex blood background. However, the presence of many blood cells in the detection volume makes it difficult to count each cell in this volume. We introduce method for manipulation of circulating cells in vivo with the use of gradient acoustic forces induced by ultrasound and photoacoustic waves. In a murine model, we demonstrated cell trapping, redirecting and focusing in blood and lymph flow into a tight stream, noninvasive wall-free transportation of blood, and the potential for photoacoustic detection of sickle cells without labeling and of leukocytes targeted by functionalized nanoparticles. Integration of cell focusing with intravital imaging methods may provide a versatile biological tool for single-cell analysis in circulation, with a focus on in vivo needleless blood tests, and preclinical studies of human diseases in animal models. PMID:26979811

  11. In vivo acoustic and photoacoustic focusing of circulating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Viegas, Mark G.; Malinsky, Taras I.; Melerzanov, Alexander V.; Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    In vivo flow cytometry using vessels as natural tubes with native cell flows has revolutionized the study of rare circulating tumor cells in a complex blood background. However, the presence of many blood cells in the detection volume makes it difficult to count each cell in this volume. We introduce method for manipulation of circulating cells in vivo with the use of gradient acoustic forces induced by ultrasound and photoacoustic waves. In a murine model, we demonstrated cell trapping, redirecting and focusing in blood and lymph flow into a tight stream, noninvasive wall-free transportation of blood, and the potential for photoacoustic detection of sickle cells without labeling and of leukocytes targeted by functionalized nanoparticles. Integration of cell focusing with intravital imaging methods may provide a versatile biological tool for single-cell analysis in circulation, with a focus on in vivo needleless blood tests, and preclinical studies of human diseases in animal models.

  12. In vivo acoustic and photoacoustic focusing of circulating cells.

    PubMed

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Viegas, Mark G; Malinsky, Taras I; Melerzanov, Alexander V; Juratli, Mazen A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    In vivo flow cytometry using vessels as natural tubes with native cell flows has revolutionized the study of rare circulating tumor cells in a complex blood background. However, the presence of many blood cells in the detection volume makes it difficult to count each cell in this volume. We introduce method for manipulation of circulating cells in vivo with the use of gradient acoustic forces induced by ultrasound and photoacoustic waves. In a murine model, we demonstrated cell trapping, redirecting and focusing in blood and lymph flow into a tight stream, noninvasive wall-free transportation of blood, and the potential for photoacoustic detection of sickle cells without labeling and of leukocytes targeted by functionalized nanoparticles. Integration of cell focusing with intravital imaging methods may provide a versatile biological tool for single-cell analysis in circulation, with a focus on in vivo needleless blood tests, and preclinical studies of human diseases in animal models. PMID:26979811

  13. Tube entrance lens focus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisser, D. C.; Fifield, L. K.; Kitchen, T. F. G.; Tunningley, T. B.; Lobanov, N. R.; Muirhead, A. G.

    2013-02-01

    The entrance of the accelerator tube in a large electrostatic accelerator imposes a strong lens that dominates the beam optics. The magnification of the lens is large because of the low injection energy, the high voltage gradient of the acceleration tube and the long distance to the terminal. In the absence of the acceleration, the magnification would produce an unacceptably large beam spot at the terminal. The tyranny of the lens is especially irksome when the accelerator is required to operate at a lower terminal voltage than the one corresponding to the nominal gradient at high voltage. One way around the difficulty, used in NEC Pelletron accelerators, is to insert a series of nylon and steel rods that short together units of the acceleration structure at the terminal leaving the ones near the entrance close to the nominal gradient for optimum transmission. This operation takes time and risks the loss of insulating gas. Another alternative used in the 25URC at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is to focus the beam at the tube entrance, substantially diluting the effect of the entrance lens. The beam then diverges and so requires an additional lens part way to the terminal. This solution is only partially effective and still necessitates use of shorting rods for low voltage operation. The fact that these elaborate strategies are used is evidence that the alternative of lowering the injection energy as the terminal voltage is lowered imposes enough problems that it is not used in practice. We have modeled a solution that controls the voltage gradient at the tube entrance using an external power supply. This not only maintains the focusing effect of the lens but provides the opportunity to tune the beam by adjusting the entrance lens. A 150 kV power supply outside the pressure vessel feeds a controllable voltage through a high voltage feed-through to the fifth electrode of the accelerator tube. Thus 150 kV on this electrode creates the nominal gradient of 30 kV per gap. The beam optics simulations demonstrating the effectiveness of this will be presented along with the design of the tested high voltage feed through.

  14. Detective Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris Hills Regional School District, Rockaway, NJ.

    Intended for reluctant readers as well as for readers with a special interest in detective stories, this high school English course consists of the following eight units: the history of detective fiction, the psychology of violent crime, crime and society, the procedures of crime detection, the mind of the detective, analysis of the detective

  15. Findings: LANL outsourcing focus groups

    SciTech Connect

    Jannotta, M.J.; McCabe, V.B.

    1996-12-31

    In March 1996, a series of 24 3-hour dialog focus groups were held with randomly selected Laboratory employees and contractors to gain their perceptions regarding potentials and problems for privatization and consolidation. A secondary goal was to educate and inform the workforce about potentials and issues in privatization and consolidation. Two hundred and thirty-six participants engaged in a learning session and structured input exercises resulting in 2,768 usable comments. Comments were categorized using standard qualitative methods; resulting categories included positive and negative comments on four models (consolidation, spin offs, outsourcing, and corporate partnering) and implications for the workforce, the Laboratory, and the local economy. Categories were in the areas of increasing/decreasing jobs, expertise, opportunity/salary/benefits, quality/efficiency, and effect on the local area and economy. An additional concern was losing Laboratory culture and history. Data were gathered and categorized on employee opinion regarding elements of successful transition to the four models, and issues emerged in the areas of terms and conditions of employment; communication; involvement; sound business planning; ethics and fairness; community infrastructure. From the aggregated opinion of the participants, it is recommended that decision-makers: Plan using sound business principles and continually communicate plans to the workforce; Respect workforce investments in the Laboratory; Tell the workforce exactly what is going on at all times; Understand that economic growth in Northern New Mexico is not universally viewed as positive; and Establish dialog with stakeholders on growth issues.

  16. Patient satisfaction: focusing on "excellent".

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichiro; Waterman, Brian; Faulkner, Kelly M; Boslaugh, Sarah; Burroughs, Thomas E; Dunagan, W Claiborne

    2009-01-01

    In an emerging competitive market such as healthcare, managers should focus on achieving excellent ratings to distinguish their organization from others. When it comes to customer loyalty, "excellent" has a different meaning. Customers who are merely satisfied often do not come back. The purpose of this study was to find out what influences adult patients to rate their overall experience as "excellent." The study used patient satisfaction data collected from one major academic hospital and four community hospitals. After conducting a multiple logistic regression analysis, certain attributes were shown to be more likely than others to influence patients to rate their experiences as excellent. The study revealed that staff care is the most influential attribute, followed by nursing care. These two attributes are distinctively stronger drivers of overall satisfaction than are the other attributes studied (i.e., physician care, admission process, room, and food). Staff care and nursing care are under the control of healthcare managers. If improvements are needed, they can be accomplished through training programs such as total quality management or continuous quality improvement, through which staff employees and nurses learn to be sensitive to patients' needs. Satisfying patients' needs is the first step toward having loyal patients, so hospitals that strive to ensure their patients are completely satisfied are more likely to prosper. PMID:19413164

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end planes to stable loops caused by annealing M Endo, B J Lee, Y A Kim, Y J Kim, H Muramatsu, T Yanagisawa, T Hayashi, M Terrones and M S Dresselhaus Energetics and electronic structure of C70-peapods and one-dimensional chains of C70 Susumu Okada, Minoru Otani and Atsushi Oshiyama Theoretical characterization of several models of nanoporous carbon F Valencia, A H Romero, E Hernández, M Terrones and H Terrones First-principles molecular dynamics study of the stretching frequencies of hydrogen molecules in carbon nanotubes Gabriel Canto, Pablo Ordejón, Cheng Hansong, Alan C Cooper and Guido P Pez The geometry and the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes: beyond the ideal behaviour Jeno Kürti, Viktor Zólyomi, Miklos Kertesz and Sun Guangyu Curved nanostructured materials Humberto Terrones and Mauricio Terrones A one-dimensional Ising model for C70 molecular ordering in C70-peapods Yutaka Maniwa, Hiromichi Kataura, Kazuyuki Matsuda and Yutaka Okabe Nanoengineering of carbon nanotubes for nanotools Yoshikazu Nakayama and Seiji Akita Narrow diameter double-wall carbon nanotubes: synthesis, electron microscopy and inelastic light scattering R R Bacsa, E Flahaut, Ch Laurent, A Peigney, S Aloni, P Puech and W S Bacsa Sensitivity of single multiwalled carbon nanotubes to the environment M Krüger, I Widmer, T Nussbaumer, M Buitelaar and C Schönenberger Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonance Raman scattering A Jorio, M A Pimenta, A G Souza Filho, R Saito, G Dresselhaus and M S Dresselhaus FTIR-luminescence mapping of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes Sergei Lebedkin, Katharina Arnold, Frank Hennrich, Ralph Krupke, Burkhard Renker and Manfred M Kappes Structural properties of Haeckelite nanotubes Ph Lambin and L P Biró Structural changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes under non-hydrostatic pressures: x-ray and Raman studies Sukanta Karmakar, Surinder M Sharma, P V Teredesai, D V S Muthu, A Govindaraj, S K Sikka and A K Sood Novel properties of 0.4 nm single-walled carbon nanotubes templated in the channels of AlPO4-5 single crystals Z K Tang, N Wang, X X Zhang, J N Wang, C T Chan and Ping Sheng Lattice dynamics and symmetry of double wall carbon nanotubes M Damnjanovic, E Dobardzic, I Milosevic, T Vukovic and B Nikolic Optical characterization of single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic decomposition of alcohol Shigeo Maruyama, Yuhei Miyauchi, Yoichi Murakami and Shohei Chiashi Christian Thomsen, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany Hiromichi Kataura, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan

  18. SIAM Workshop: Focus on Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    2000-07-12

    The Fourth SlAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held on July 12, 2000 at the Westin Rio Mar Hotel in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico. The Department of Energy provided partial support for this event. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities. The meeting opened with a discussion of some data collected by the American Mathematical Society on Ph.D.'s awarded in the U.S. to citizens and non-citizens, further classified as blacks, latinos, asians and native americans. The activity continued with nine technical talks by underrepresented minority graduate students, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum chaired by Dr. Richard Tapia (Rice University) in which issues related to the participation of minorities in national meetings and proposal writing where discussed. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants. The students attended as well the three SlAM plenary talks during the day and the community lecture in the evening. The activity had a lively participation of students and representatives from various academic institutions and sponsoring agencies. In particular, we had the participation of 24 undergraduate students from the Mathematics REU program of the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao.

  19. On-chip pumping for pressure mobilization of the focused zones following microchip isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Guillo, Christelle; Karlinsey, James M; Landers, James P

    2007-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF), traditionally accomplished in slab or tube gels, has also been performed extensively in capillary and, more recently, in microchip formats. IEF separations performed in microchips typically use electroosmotic flow (EOF) or chemical treatment to mobilize the focused zones past the detection point. This report describes the development and optimization of a microchip IEF method in a hybrid PDMS-glass device capable of controlling the mobilization of the focused zones past the detector using on-chip diaphragm pumping. The microchip design consisted of a glass fluid layer (separation channels), a PDMS layer and a glass valve layer (pressure connections and valve seats). Pressure mobilization was achieved on-chip using a diaphragm pump consisting of a series of reversible elastomeric valves, where a central diaphragm valve determined the volume of solution displaced while the gate valves on either side imparted directionality. The pumping rate could be adjusted to control the mobilization flow rate by varying the actuation times and pressure applied to the PDMS to actuate the valves. In order to compare the separation obtained using the chip with that obtained in a capillary, a serpentine channel design was used to match the separation length of the capillary, thereby evaluating the effect of diaphragm pumping itself on the overall separation quality. The optimized mIEF method was applied to the separation of labeled amino acids. PMID:17180213

  20. Prime focus spectrograph: Subaru's future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Karoji, Hiroshi; Takato, Naruhisa; Tamura, Naoyuki; Shimono, Atsushi; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Vital de Arruda, Marcio; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bennett, Charles L.; Bickerton, Steve; Braun, David F.; Bruno, Robin J.; Carr, Michael A.; Batista de Carvalho Oliveira, João.; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Dekany, Richard G.; Pereira Dominici, Tania; Ellis, Richard S.; Fisher, Charles D.; Gunn, James E.; Heckman, Timothy; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hu, Yen-Shan; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer; Kimura, Masahiko; Le Fèvre, Olivier C.; Le Mignant, David; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Marrara, Lucas; Martin, Laurent; Murayama, Hitoshi; Cesar de Oliveira, Antonio; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Souza de Oliveira, Ligia; Orndorff, Joseph D.; de Paiva Vilaça, Rodrigo M. P.; Macanhan, Vanessa B. d. P.; Prieto, Eric; Bispo dos Santos, Jesulino; Seiffert, Michael; Smee, Stephen A.; Smith, Roger M.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Surace, Christian; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Yan, Chi-Hung

    2012-09-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) project has been endorsed by Japanese community as one of the main future instruments of the Subaru 8.2-meter telescope at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. This optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph targets cosmology with galaxy surveys, Galactic archaeology, and studies of galaxy/AGN evolution. Taking advantage of Subaru's wide field of view, which is further extended with the recently completed Wide Field Corrector, PFS will enable us to carry out multi-fiber spectroscopy of 2400 targets within 1.3 degree diameter. A microlens is attached at each fiber entrance for F-ratio transformation into a larger one so that difficulties of spectrograph design are eased. Fibers are accurately placed onto target positions by positioners, each of which consists of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors, through iterations by using back-illuminated fiber position measurements with a widefield metrology camera. Fibers then carry light to a set of four identical fast-Schmidt spectrographs with three color arms each: the wavelength ranges from 0.38 μm to 1.3 μm will be simultaneously observed with an average resolving power of 3000. Before and during the era of extremely large telescopes, PFS will provide the unique capability of obtaining spectra of 2400 cosmological/astrophysical targets simultaneously with an 8-10 meter class telescope. The PFS collaboration, led by IPMU, consists of USP/LNA in Brazil, Caltech/JPL, Princeton, and JHU in USA, LAM in France, ASIAA in Taiwan, and NAOJ/Subaru.

  1. Fredholm's equations for subwavelength focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez-Arcos, J. M.

    2012-10-01

    Subwavelength focusing (SF) is a very useful tool that can be carried out with the use of left hand materials for optics that involve the range of the microwaves. Many recent works have described a successful alternative procedure using time reversal methods. The advantage is that we do not need devices which require the complicated manufacture of left-hand materials; nevertheless, the theoretical mathematical bases are far from complete because before now we lacked an adequate easy-to-apply frame. In this work we give, for a broad class of discrete systems, a solid support for the theory of electromagnetic SF that can be applied to communications and nanotechnology. The very central procedure is the development of vector-matrix formalism (VMF) based on exploiting both the inhomogeneous and homogeneous Fredholm's integral equations in cases where the last two kinds of integral equations are applied to some selected discrete systems. To this end, we first establish a generalized Newmann series for the Fourier transform of the Green's function in the inhomogeneous Fredholm's equation of the problem. Then we go from an integral operator equation to a vector-matrix algebraic one. In this way we explore the inhomogeneous case and later on also the very interesting one about the homogeneous equation. Thus, on the one hand we can relate in a simple manner the arriving electromagnetic signals with those at their sources and we can use them to perform a SF. On the other hand, we analyze the homogeneous version of the equations, finding resonant solutions that have analogous properties to their counterparts in quantum mechanical scattering, that can be used in a proposed very powerful way in communications. Also we recover quantum mechanical operator relations that are identical for classical electromagnetics. Finally, we prove two theorems that formalize the relation between the theory of Fredholm's integral equations and the VMF we present here.

  2. Antipodal focusing of seismic waves observed with the USArray

    PubMed Central

    Retailleau, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; Guilbert, J.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Mw = 5.3 earthquake that occurred in the Southeast Indian Ridge on 2010 February 11 using USArray data. The epicentre of this event is antipodal to the USArray, providing us with an opportunity to observe in details the antipodal focusing of seismic waves in space and time. We compare the observed signals with synthetic seismograms computed for a spherically symmetric earth model (PREM). A beamforming analysis is performed over the different seismic phases detected at antipodal distances. Direct spatial snapshots of the signals and the beamforming results show that the focusing is well predicted for the first P-wave phases such as PKP or PP. However, converted phases (SKSP, PPS) show a deviation of the energy focusing to the south, likely caused by the Earth's heterogeneity. Focusing of multiple S-wave phases strongly deteriorates and is barely observable. PMID:26074723

  3. Ballistic Focusing of Polyenergetic Protons Driven by Petawatt Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, S.; Borghesi, M.; Zepf, M.; Markey, K.; Carroll, D. C; McKenna, P.; Quinn, M. N.; Neely, D.

    2011-06-03

    By using a thick (250 {mu}m) target with 350 {mu}m radius of curvature, the intense proton beam driven by a petawatt laser is focused at a distance of {approx}1 mm from the target for all detectable energies up to {approx}25 MeV. The thickness of the foil facilitates beam focusing as it suppresses the dynamic evolution of the beam divergence caused by peaked electron flux distribution at the target rear side. In addition, reduction in inherent beam divergence due to the target thickness relaxes the curvature requirement for short-range focusing. Energy resolved mapping of the proton beam trajectories from mesh radiographs infers the focusing and the data agree with a simple geometrical modeling based on ballistic beam propagation.

  4. EDITORIAL: Focus on Molecular Electronics FOCUS ON MOLECULAR ELECTRONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Elke; Reineker, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The notion 'molecular electronics' has been used more frequently since the 1970s and summarizes a series of physical phenomena and ideas for their application in connection with organic molecules, oligomers, polymers, organic aggregates and solids. The properties studied in this field were connected to optical and electrical phenomena, such as optical absorption, fluorescence, nonlinear optics, energy transport, charge transfer, electrical conductance, and electron and nuclear spin-resonance. The final goal was and is to build devices which can compete or surpass some aspects of inorganic semiconductor devices. For example, on the basis of organic molecules there exist rectifiers, transistors, molecular wires, organic light emitting diodes, elements for photovoltaics, and displays. With respect to applications, one aspect of the organic materials is their broad variability and the lower effort and costs for their processability. The step from microstructures to the investigation of nanostructures is a big challenge also in this field and has lead to what nowadays is called molecular electronics in its narrow sense. In this field the subjects of the studies are often single molecules, e.g. single molecule optical spectroscopy, electrical conductance, i.e. charge transport through a single molecule, the influence of vibrational degrees of freedom, etc. A challenge here is to provide the techniques for addressing in a reproducible way the molecular scale. In another approach small molecular ensembles are studied in order to avoid artefacts from particular contact situations. The recent development of the field is presented in [1 8]. In this Focus Issue we present new results in the field of 'molecular electronics', both in its broad and specialized sense. One of the basic questions is the distribution of the energy levels responsible for optical absorption on the one hand and for the transport of charge on the other. A still unanswered question is whether the Wannier exciton model applies in which the excitation is distributed over several molecules or whether a good description is given by the Frenkel exciton model with the electron and the whole being localized at the same molecular unit. In organic semiconductors the charge transport usually occurs on the basis of holes because of the presence of many defects giving rise to a localization of the electrons. It is therefore a challenge to produce materials with both positive and negative mobile charge carriers. In the 1990s V M Agranovich introduced the idea of hybrid excitons, i.e. of nanostructured materials consisting of both organic and inorganic semiconductors. At the interface between the organic and inorganic parts new excitons can appear, being a superposition of both Frenkel and Wannier excitons and having both the high oscillator strength of the Frenkel and the large optical nonlinearity of the Wannier exciton. The problem is to find optimum combinations of the organic and inorganic parts to enable the hybrid structure concept to work. Micro-cavities also play an important role in the investigation of organic materials resulting in a new state (polariton) as the superposition of a photon and an exciton because of the large exciton photon interaction. A similar excitation arises because of the interaction between plasmons and photons. A special geometrical shape of a nano-cavity increases the interaction between the electromagnetic radiation and a dipole sitting in the cavity. The interaction between vibronic degrees of freedom and electronic excitations plays an important role for various phenomena such as nonlinear processes, the question of coherence, information on the shape of a potential hypersurface, etc. With the help of femtosecond laser pulses, detailed information on such vibrations can be obtained. Also of great importance is the investigation of the energy transfer in artificial light-harvesting systems, e.g. in dendrimers. Finally the combination of experimental and theoretical investigations allows for a comparison of the spectra of two molecules with the same backbone (tetracene and rubrene). The transport of charge through a molecule occurs possibly in a stationary, but at any rate in a non-equilibrium situation. The study of dissipation in such situations requires special approaches, both in theory and in experiments. One key issue is the understanding of the role of the microscopic phenomena such as the excitation of vibrational modes and their macroscopic outcome, i.e. the dissipation. This topic is addressed in several contributions both theoretically and experimentally. From the theoretical side, for the investigation of the heat production during the electron transfer, non-equilibrium Green's functions have been utilized. In another contribution a combination of the non-equilibrium Green's function technique together with the density functional method has been developed for the calculation of the elastic and inelastic electronic transport. To calculate the transport of indistinguishable particles a path integral Monte Carlo approach has been put forward. In single-molecule transistors the gate-voltage dependence on the Kondo temperature and an accompanying strong Coulomb blockade can be explained by taking into account a strong electron vibron interaction including anharmonicities of the molecular potential surface. The transport of charges is heavily influenced by disorder. The case of static disorder is investigated for linear chains, carbon nanotubes and graphene ribbons. Finally it is shown that the charge transport through a single energy level coupled to a localized vibrational mode and two leads shows hysteretic effects which could possibly be used in a memory device. For applications the control of the current through a molecular junction is considered theoretically. Two possible mechanisms are discussed: the control via coherent destruction using predefined ultrafast laser pulses and the formation of laser pulses using optimal control theory. A group of contributions is dedicated to the study of electronic transport through molecules using various techniques ranging from scanning-tunnelling methods via controllable break-junctions to printing techniques and molecular networks. The molecules under study can be classified into two main groups. On the one hand the functionalization of aromatic or alkane molecules with thiols is used for establishing chemical binding to metal electrodes; in the other set of experiments fullerenes are used as model systems for studying the influence of orientation and heat dissipation. Molecular conducting networks are important under various aspects. Such networks are formed by an array of gold nanoparticles connected by conjugated molecular chains with one or two thiol ends and conduction investigations are performed under various conditions. A careful investigation of the experimental conditions is necessary when comparing conductance measurements using the break junction method. For example there are results demonstrating that several molecular junctions are formed in parallel between the electrodes. Other experiments use different materials for the junctions and measurements are performed at various temperatures. The transport of charge through an alkane-monolayer is investigated using micro-transfer printing to establish contacts without shorts. It is shown that both tunnelling between the electrodes and transport through the states of the molecules contribute to the conductance. C60 plays a role in various fields of molecular electronics. One aspect is the conductance through the molecule as a function of the orientation of the molecule on the surface. It is found that there is a strong orientation dependence of the transport on Au(111) surfaces and that it is almost independent on a Cu(100) surface. A further important phenomenon is the heating and cooling of C60 during charge transport depending on the surface of C60 adsorption. The differences are ascribed to the amount of charge transfer into C60 upon adsorption on different surfaces. In summary, in the field of molecular electronics new materials and structures are developed and investigated, both with respect to a basic understanding of the materials and their compositions and with respect to possible applications in electronics. While in the field of molecular electronics on the microscale the techniques are well established, they still need to be refined in the field of nano-molecular electronics. Nevertheless, both subfields share some of the most challenging questions: e.g. the problems of charge and energy transport, of excitations and the formation of new quasi-particles. Another question is the role of vibrational degrees of freedom, where on the one hand one has to cope with the unavoidable effect of heat dissipation. On the other hand, vibrational excitations are intimately connected to the individual molecule under study and thus offer the possibility to be used in functional devices based on intrinsic molecular properties. This Focus Issue represents a snapshot of the state of the art of this emerging field in the first half of 2008. We expect that the fast development which the research has undergone in recent years will even speed up in the near future. References [1] Pope M and Sweenberg Ch E 1999 Electronic Processes in Organic Crystals and Polymers 2nd edn (Oxford: Oxford University Press) [2] Silinsh E A and Capek V 1994 Organic Molecular Crystals (New York: AIP Press) [3] Agranovich V M and La Rocca G C 2002 Organic Nanostructures: Science and Applications, Proc. Int. School of Physics 'Enrico Fermi', Course CXLIX (Amsterdam: IOS Press) [4] Schwoerer M and Wolf H C 2007 Organic Molecular Solids (Weinheim: Wiley-VCH) [5] Cuniberti G, Fagas G and Richter K (ed) 2005 Introducing Molecular Electronics, Lecture Notes in Physics (Berlin: Springer) [6] Reed M and Lee T 2003 Molecular Nanoelectronics (Stevenson Ranch, CA: American Scientific Publishers) [7] Petty M C 2007 Molecular Electronics, (Weinheim: Wiley-VCH) [8] 2006 Molecular Wires and Nanoscale Conductors Faraday Discuss. 131 1 420 Focus on Molecular Electronics Contents Optical absorption and emission properties of rubrene: insight from a combined experimental and theoretical study T Petrenko, O Krylova, F Neese and M Sokolowski Rapid energy transfer in a dendrimer having π-conjugated light-harvesting antennas I Akai, K Miyanari, T Shimamoto, A Fujii, H Nakao, A Okada, K Kanemoto, T Karasawa, H Hashimoto, A Ishida, A Yamada, I Katayama, J Takeda and M Kimura Cluster-based density-functional approach to quantum transport through molecular and atomic contacts F Pauly, J K Viljas, U Huniar, M Häfner, S Wohlthat, M Bürkle, J C Cuevas and G Schön Model of mixed Frenkel and charge-transfer excitons in donor acceptor molecular crystals: investigation of vibronic spectra I J Lalov, C Warns and P Reineker Suppressing the current through molecular wires: comparison of two mechanisms GuangQi Li, Michael Schreiber and Ulrich Kleinekathöfer Charge-memory effect in a polaron model: equation-of-motion method for Green functions Pino D'Amico, Dmitry A Ryndyk, Gianaurelio Cuniberti and Klaus Richter Determination of transport levels of organic semiconductors by UPS and IPS S Krause, M B Casu, A Schöll and E Umbach Electrical characterization of alkane monolayers using micro-transfer printing: tunneling and molecular transport C Kreuter, S Bächle, E Scheer and A Erbe Correlated charge transfer along molecular chains L Mühlbacher and J Ankerhold Non-equilibrium Green's functions in density functional tight binding: method and applications A Pecchia, G Penazzi, L Salvucci and A Di Carlo Asymmetric Coulomb blockade and Kondo temperature of single-molecule transistors Florian Elste and Felix von Oppen Electron phonon scattering in molecular electronics: from inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy to heating effects Alessio Gagliardi, Giuseppe Romano, Alessandro Pecchia, Aldo Di Carlo, Thomas Frauenheim and Thomas A Niehaus Interlinking Au nanoparticles in 2D arrays via conjugated dithiolated molecules Jianhui Liao, Markus A Mangold, Sergio Grunder, Marcel Mayor, Christian Schönenberger and Michel Calame Conductance values of alkanedithiol molecular junctions M Teresa González, Jan Brunner, Roman Huber, Songmei Wu, Christian Schönenberger and Michel Calame Particularities of surface plasmon exciton strong coupling with large Rabi splitting C Symonds, C Bonnand, J C Plenet, A Bréhier, R Parashkov, J S Lauret, E Deleporte and J Bellessa Excitonic and vibrational nonlinear processes in a polydiacetylene studied by a few-cycle pulse laser T Kobayashi, I Iwakura and A Yabushita Correlations of instantaneous transition energy and intensity of absorption peaks during molecular vibration: toward potential hyper-surface Takayoshi Kobayashi and Zhuan Wang Diffusion and localization in carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons Norbert Nemec, Klaus Richter and Gianaurelio Cuniberti Molecular electronics in junctions with energy disorder Franz J Kaiser, Peter Hänggi and Sigmund Kohler Spatially resolved conductance of oriented C60 G Schull, N Néel, M Becker, J Kröger and R Berndt A design for an optical-nanocavity optimized for use with surface-bound light-emitting materials A M Adawi and D G Lidzey Electronic coupling of optical excitations in organic/inorganic semiconductor hybrid structures S Blumstengel, S Sadofev and F Henneberger The relation between the symmetry of vibrational modes and the potential curve displacement associated with electronic transition studied by using real-time vibrational spectroscopy Takayoshi Kobayashi, Zhuan Wang and Izumi Iwakura Lithographic mechanical break junctions for single-molecule measurements in vacuum: possibilities and limitations Christian A Martin, Dapeng Ding, Herre S J van der Zant and Jan M van Ruitenbeek Strong exciton photon coupling at room temperature in microcavities containing two-dimensional layered perovskite compounds G Lanty, A Bréhier, R Parashkov, J S Lauret and E Deleporte Bipolar transport in organic field-effect transistors: organic semiconductor blends versus contact modification Andreas Opitz, Michael Kraus, Markus Bronner, Julia Wagner and Wolfgang Brütting Resonant heating and substrate-mediated cooling of a single C60 molecule in a tunnel junction Gunnar Schulze, Katharina J Franke and Jose Ignacio Pascual

  5. The Unfocused Focus Group: Benefit or Bane?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    Facilitating successful focus groups requires both science and art. One element that can fully challenge focus group facilitators includes how to handle the unfocused focus group. This article describes "unfocus" and the benefits and disadvantages of unfocus in focus groups. Lessons learned from and approaches taken on this journey are shared to

  6. Focus groups reveal consumer ambivalence.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    According to qualitative research, Salvadoreans are ambivalent about the use of contraceptives. Since complete responsibility for management of the CSM project was accepted by the Association Demografica Salvadorena (ADS), the agency which operates the contraceptive social marketing project in El Salvador, in November 1980, the need for decisions in such areas as product price increases, introduction of new condom brands, promotion of the vaginal foaming tablet, and assessment of product sales performance had arisen. The ICSMP funded market research, completed during 1983, was intended to provide the data on which such decisions by ADS could be based. The qualitative research involved 8 focus groups, comprised of men and women, aged 18-45, contraceptive users and nonusers, from the middle and lower socioeconomic strata of the city of San Salvador and other suburban areas. In each group a moderator led discussion of family planning and probed respondents for specific attitudes, knowledge, and behavior regarding the use of contraceptives. To assess attitudes at a more emotional level, moderators asked respondents to "draw" their ideas on certain issues. A marked discrepancy was revealed between respondents' intellectual responses to the issues raised in group discussion, as opposed to their feelings expressed in the drawings. Intellectually, participants responded very positively to family planning practice, but when they were asked to draw their perceptions, ambivalent feelings emerged. Drawings of both the user and the nonuser convey primarily negative aspects for either choice. The user is tense and moody toward her children; the nonuser loses her attractiveness and "dies." Figures also show drawings of some of the attitudes of single and married male participants. 1 drawing shows an incomplete and a complete circle, symbolizing a sterilized man (incomplete) and a nonsterilized man (complete). Another picture depicts a chained man who has lost his freedom (sterilized) versus a world of abundance and strength enjoyed by a nonsterilized man. The results of the projective drawings are only a small part of the total market research effort in El Salvador, yet they seem to indicate that the development of a CSM project communications strategy is critically important to product sales and continued product use. New advertising messages will need to be carefully tested and much communication expertise will be required to develop a message that will contribute to resolving consumer ambivalences toward product use. PMID:12279792

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    'Plasma Healthcare' is an emerging interdisciplinary research topic of rapidly growing importance, exploring considerable opportunities at the interface of plasma physics, chemistry and engineering with life sciences. Some of the scientific discoveries reported so far have already demonstrated clear benefits for healthcare in areas of medicine, food safety, environmental hygiene, and cosmetics. Examples include ongoing studies of prion inactivation, chronic wound treatment and plasma-mediated cancer therapy. Current research ranges from basic physical processes, plasma chemical design, to the interaction of plasmas with (i) eukaryotic (mammalian) cells; (ii) prokaryotic (bacteria) cells, viruses, spores and fungi; (iii) DNA, lipids, proteins and cell membranes; and (iv) living human, animal and plant tissues in the presence of biofluids. Of diverse interests in this new field is the need for hospital disinfection, in particular with respect to the alarming increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics, the concomitant needs in private practices, nursing homes etc, the applications in personal hygiene—and the enticing possibility to 'design' plasmas as possible pharmaceutical products, employing ionic as well as molecular agents for medical treatment. The 'delivery' of the reactive plasma agents occurs at the gaseous level, which means that there is no need for a carrier medium and access to the treatment surface is optimal. This focus issue provides a close look at the current state of the art in Plasma Medicine with a number of forefront research articles as well as an introductory review. Focus on Plasma Medicine Contents Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination Helen C Baxter, Patricia R Richardson, Gaynor A Campbell, Valeri I Kovalev, Robert Maier, James S Barton, Anita C Jones, Greg DeLarge, Mark Casey and Robert L Baxter Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low-pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two-dimensional cold atmospheric plasma jet array for uniform treatment of large-area surfaces for plasma medicine QY Nie, Z Cao, C S Ren, D Z Wang and M G Kong A novel plasma source for sterilization of living tissues E Martines, M Zuin, R Cavazzana, E Gazza, G Serianni, S Spagnolo, M Spolaore, A Leonardi, V Deligianni, P Brun, M Aragona, I Castagliuolo and P Brun Designing plasmas for chronic wound disinfection T Nosenko, T Shimizu and G E Morfill Plasma medicine: an introductory review M G Kong, G Kroesen, G Morfill, T Nosenko, T Shimizu, J van Dijk and J L Zimmermann

  8. Focused electron beam induced deposition: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Porrati, Fabrizio; Schwalb, Christian; Winhold, Marcel; Sachser, Roland; Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan; Fantner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is a direct-writing technique with nanometer resolution, which has received strongly increasing attention within the last decade. In FEBID a precursor previously adsorbed on a substrate surface is dissociated in the focus of an electron beam. After 20 years of continuous development FEBID has reached a stage at which this technique is now particularly attractive for several areas in both, basic and applied research. The present topical review addresses selected examples that highlight this development in the areas of charge-transport regimes in nanogranular metals close to an insulator-to-metal transition, the use of these materials for strain- and magnetic-field sensing, and the prospect of extending FEBID to multicomponent systems, such as binary alloys and intermetallic compounds with cooperative ground states. Results: After a brief introduction to the technique, recent work concerning FEBID of Pt–Si alloys and (hard-magnetic) Co–Pt intermetallic compounds on the nanometer scale is reviewed. The growth process in the presence of two precursors, whose flux is independently controlled, is analyzed within a continuum model of FEBID that employs rate equations. Predictions are made for the tunability of the composition of the Co–Pt system by simply changing the dwell time of the electron beam during the writing process. The charge-transport regimes of nanogranular metals are reviewed next with a focus on recent theoretical advancements in the field. As a case study the transport properties of Pt–C nanogranular FEBID structures are discussed. It is shown that by means of a post-growth electron-irradiation treatment the electronic intergrain-coupling strength can be continuously tuned over a wide range. This provides unique access to the transport properties of this material close to the insulator-to-metal transition. In the last part of the review, recent developments in mechanical strain-sensing and the detection of small, inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing nanogranular FEBID structures are highlighted. Conclusion: FEBID has now reached a state of maturity that allows a shift of the focus towards the development of new application fields, be it in basic research or applied. This is shown for selected examples in the present review. At the same time, when seen from a broader perspective, FEBID still has to live up to the original idea of providing a tool for electron-controlled chemistry on the nanometer scale. This has to be understood in the sense that, by providing a suitable environment during the FEBID process, the outcome of the electron-induced reactions can be steered in a controlled way towards yielding the desired composition of the products. The development of a FEBID-specialized surface chemistry is mostly still in its infancy. Next to application development, it is this aspect that will likely be a guiding light for the future development of the field of focused electron beam induced deposition. PMID:23019557

  9. Detecting generalized synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlitz, Ulrich

    Different cases of generalized synchronization are discussed with emphasis on methods for detecting them from time series. In particular, we shall focus on synchronization resulting in complex (non-smooth and/or non-invertible) functions or relations between drive and response.

  10. EDITORIAL: Focus on Attosecond Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Krausz, Ferenc; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-02-01

    Investigations of light matter interactions and motion in the microcosm have entered a new temporal regime, the regime of attosecond physics. It is a main 'spin-off' of strong field (i.e., intense laser) physics, in which nonperturbative effects are fundamental. Attosecond pulses open up new avenues for time-domain studies of multi-electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas, and solids on their natural, quantum mechanical time scale and at dimensions shorter than molecular and even atomic scales. These capabilities promise a revolution in our microscopic knowledge and understanding of matter. The recent development of intense, phase-stabilized femtosecond (10-15 s) lasers has allowed unparalleled temporal control of electrons from ionizing atoms, permitting for the first time the generation and measurement of isolated light pulses as well as trains of pulses on the attosecond (1 as = 10-18 s) time scale, the natural time scale of the electron itself (e.g., the orbital period of an electron in the ground state of the H atom is 152 as). This development is facilitating (and even catalyzing) a new class of ultrashort time domain studies in photobiology, photochemistry, and photophysics. These new coherent, sub-fs pulses carried at frequencies in the extreme ultraviolet and soft-x-ray spectral regions, along with their intense, synchronized near-infrared driver waveforms and novel metrology based on sub-fs control of electron light interactions, are spawning the new science of attosecond physics, whose aims are to monitor, to visualize, and, ultimately, to control electrons on their own time and spatial scales, i.e., the attosecond time scale and the sub-nanometre (Ångstrom) spatial scale typical of atoms and molecules. Additional goals for experiment are to advance the enabling technologies for producing attosecond pulses at higher intensities and shorter durations. According to theoretical predictions, novel methods for intense attosecond pulse generation may in future involve using overdense plasmas. Electronic processes on sub-atomic spatio-temporal scales are the basis of chemical physics, atomic, molecular, and optical physics, materials science, and even some life science processes. Research in these areas using the new attosecond tools will advance together with the ability to control electrons themselves. Indeed, we expect that developments will advance in a way that is similar to advances that have occurred on the femtosecond time scale, in which much previous experimental and theoretical work on the interaction of coherent light sources has led to the development of means for 'coherent control' of nuclear motion in molecules. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is centered on experimental and theoretical advances in the development of new methodologies and tools for electron control on the attosecond time scale. Topics such as the efficient generation of harmonics; the generation of attosecond pulses, including those having only a few cycles and those produced from overdense plasmas; the description of various nonlinear, nonperturbative laser matter interactions, including many-electron effects and few-cycle pulse effects; the analysis of ultrashort propagation effects in atomic and molecular media; and the development of inversion methods for electron tomography, as well as many other topics, are addressed in the current focus issue dedicated to the new field of 'Attosecond Physics'. Focus on Attosecond Physics Contents Observing the attosecond dynamics of nuclear wavepackets in molecules by using high harmonic generation in mixed gases Tsuneto Kanai, Eiji J Takahashi, Yasuo Nabekawa and Katsumi Midorikawa Core-polarization effects in molecular high harmonic generation G Jordan and A Scrinzi Interferometric autocorrelation of an attosecond pulse train calculated using feasible formulae Y Nabekawa and K Midorikawa Attosecond pulse generation from aligned molecules—dynamics and propagation in H2+ E Lorin, S Chelkowski and A D Bandrauk Broadband generation in a Raman crystal driven by a pair of time-delayed linearly chirped pulses Miaochan Zhi and Alexei V Sokolov Ultrafast nanoplasmonics under coherent control Mark I Stockman Attosecond pulse carrier-envelope phase effects on ionized electron momentum and energy distributions: roles of frequency, intensity and an additional IR pulse Liang-You Peng, Evgeny A Pronin and Anthony F Starace Angular encoding in attosecond recollision Markus Kitzler, Xinhua Xie, Stefan Roither, Armin Scrinzi and Andrius Baltuska Polarization-resolved pump probe spectroscopy with high harmonics Y Mairesse, S Haessler, B Fabre, J Higuet, W Boutu, P Breger, E Constant, D Descamps, E Mével, S Petit and P Salières Macroscopic effects in attosecond pulse generation T Ruchon, C P Hauri, K Varjú, E Mansten, M Swoboda, R López-Martens and A L'Huillier Monitoring long-term evolution of molecular vibrational wave packet using high-order harmonic generation M Yu Emelin, M Yu Ryabikin and A M Sergeev Intense single attosecond pulses from surface harmonics using the polarization gating technique S G Rykovanov, M Geissler, J Meyer-ter-Vehn and G D Tsakiris Imaging of carrier-envelope phase effects in above-threshold ionization with intense few-cycle laser fields M F Kling, J Rauschenberger, A J Verhoef, E Hasović, T Uphues, D B Milošević, H G Muller and M J J Vrakking Self-compression of optical laser pulses by filamentation A Mysyrowicz, A Couairon and U Keller Towards efficient generation of attosecond pulses from overdense plasma targets N M Naumova, C P Hauri, J A Nees, I V Sokolov, R Lopez-Martens and G A Mourou Quantum-path control in high-order harmonic generation at high photon energies Xiaoshi Zhang, Amy L Lytle, Oren Cohen, Margaret M Murnane and Henry C Kapteyn Time-resolved mapping of correlated electron emission from helium atom in an intense laser pulse C Ruiz and A Becker Pump and probe ultrafast electron dynamics in LiH: a computational study M Nest, F Remacle and R D Levine Exploring intense attosecond pulses D Charalambidis, P Tzallas, E P Benis, E Skantzakis, G Maravelias, L A A Nikolopoulos, A Peralta Conde and G D Tsakiris Attosecond timescale analysis of the dynamics of two-photon double ionization of helium Emmanuel Foumouo, Philippe Antoine, Henri Bachau and Bernard Piraux Generation of tunable isolated attosecond pulses in multi-jet systems V Tosa, V S Yakovlev and F Krausz Electron wavepacket control with elliptically polarized laser light in high harmonic generation from aligned molecules Y Mairesse, N Dudovich, J Levesque, M Yu Ivanov, P B Corkum and D M Villeneuve Tracing non-equilibrium plasma dynamics on the attosecond timescale in small clusters Ulf Saalmann, Ionut Georgescu and Jan M Rost Ionization in attosecond pulses: creating atoms without nuclei? John S Briggs and Darko Dimitrovski Angular distributions in double ionization of helium under XUV sub-femtosecond radiation P Lambropoulos and L A A Nikolopoulos Potential for ultrafast dynamic chemical imaging with few-cycle infrared lasers Toru Morishita, Anh-Thu Le, Zhangjin Chen and C D Lin Attosecond electron thermalization in laser-induced nonsequential multiple ionization: hard versus glancing collisions X Liu, C Figueira de Morisson Faria and W Becker Ion-charge-state chronoscopy of cascaded atomic Auger decay Th Uphues, M Schultze, M F Kling, M Uiberacker, S Hendel, U Heinzmann, N M Kabachnik and M Drescher Measurement of electronic structure from high harmonic generation in non-adiabatically aligned polyatomic molecules N Kajumba, R Torres, Jonathan G Underwood, J S Robinson, S Baker, J W G Tisch, R de Nalda, W A Bryan, R Velotta, C Altucci, I Procino, I C E Turcu and J P Marangos Wavelength dependence of sub-laser-cycle few-electron dynamics in strong-field multiple ionization O Herrwerth, A Rudenko, M Kremer, V L B de Jesus, B Fischer, G Gademann, K Simeonidis, A Achtelik, Th Ergler, B Feuerstein, C D Schröter, R Moshammer and J Ullrich Attosecond metrology in the few-optical-cycle regime G Sansone, E Benedetti, C Vozzi, S Stagira and M Nisoli Attosecond x-ray pulses produced by ultra short transverse slicing via laser electron beam interaction A A Zholents and M S Zolotorev

  11. Robust Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Ten-Huei (Technical Monitor); Collins, Emmanuel G.; Song, Tinglun; Curry, Tramone; Selekwa, Majura

    2003-01-01

    This research used mixed structured singular value theory to develop new estimator (or observer) based approaches to fault detection for dynamic systems. The initial developments were based on minimizing the H-infinity, I-1 and H2 system norms. The resultant fault detection algorithms were each shown to be successful, but the fault detection algorithm based on the I-1 norm was best able to detect abrupt faults. This latter technique was further improved by using fuzzy logic for the fault evaluation. Based on an anomaly observed in this research and apparently ignored in the literature, current research focuses on the determination of a fault using a norm of the change in the residual (the difference between the output of the system and observer) and not simply a norm of the residual itself. This research may lead to a fundamental contribution to research in fault detection and isolation.

  12. Sensors for process control Focus Team report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    At the Semiconductor Technology Workshop, held in November 1992, the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) convened 179 semiconductor technology experts to assess the 15-year outlook for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. The output of the Workshop, a document entitled ``Semiconductor Technology: Workshop Working Group Reports,`` contained an overall roadmap for the technology characteristics envisioned in integrated circuits (ICs) for the period 1992--2007. In addition, the document contained individual roadmaps for numerous key areas in IC manufacturing, such as film deposition, thermal processing, manufacturing systems, exposure technology, etc. The SIA Report did not contain a separate roadmap for contamination free manufacturing (CFM). A key component of CFM for the next 15 years is the use of sensors for (1) defect reduction, (2) improved product quality, (3) improved yield, (4) improved tool utilization through contamination reduction, and (5) real time process control in semiconductor fabrication. The objective of this Focus Team is to generate a Sensors for Process Control Roadmap. Implicit in this objective is the identification of gaps in current sensor technology so that research and development activity in the sensor industry can be stimulated to develop sensor systems capable of meeting the projected roadmap needs. Sensor performance features of interest include detection limit, specificity, sensitivity, ease of installation and maintenance, range, response time, accuracy, precision, ease and frequency of calibration, degree of automation, and adaptability to in-line process control applications.

  13. Synthetic aperture focusing technique signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langenberg, K. J.; Berger, M.; Kreutter, Th.; Mayer, K.; Schmitz, V.

    1986-06-01

    The synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) is briefly reviewed and addressed as a heuristic digital ultrasonic imaging scheme which exploits the idea of back-propagating a set of measured and digitally stored A-scans. It is shown that for a far-field experimental set-up, i.e., for small, isolated defects remote to the transducer, SAFT reduces to the filtered back-projection imaging scheme which is well known within the framework of conventional X-ray computer tomography. Therefore, alternative data processing via Fourier transforms only, similar to the Fourier slice theorem of tomography, is possible, which sheds considerable light upon the heuristic SAFT pixel-space envelope-detection scheme. The far-field assumption is omitted yielding a Fourier-transform-SAFT algorithm (FT-SAFT) whose results are identical to back-propagation imaging with the definite advantage of fast processing capabilities based upon standard hardware and allowing immediate implementation of high resolution procedures as well as inclusion of mode-conversion effects.

  14. Dark focus measured in Navy jet tactical fighter pilots.

    PubMed

    Temme, L A; Ricks, E; Morris, A

    1988-02-01

    Visual accommodation was measured with the laser-Badal optometer in 98 U.S. Navy fighter pilots who were in a dark environment without visual stimuli. The average dark focus of the pilots was 0.25 diopters of myopia; 40% were either emmetropic or hyperopic in the dark. Only 4% had as much dark myopia as 50% of a sample of 220 college students. Although the jet fighter pilots, as a population, differed from college students in terms of dark focus, it remains to be determined whether the remarkable dark focus of the pilots was a function of training or selection. The dark focus measurements of the pilots were compared to their mean night carrier landing scores and their mean target detection slant range scores--the distance at which an adversary aircraft is first sighted during an air combat maneuver training engagement. Neither the night carrier landing scores nor the target detection slant range scores correlated significantly with dark focus measurements. PMID:3345175

  15. Closed-loop focus control system for laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Haran, F.M.; Hand, D.P.; Jones, J.D.C.; Peters, C.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the authors describe a focus control system for Nd:YAG laser welding based on an optical sensor incorporated into the fibre delivery system to detect light generated by the process. This broadband light is separated into two wavelength bands, and simple electronic processing gives a signal proportional to focal error, as a result of chromatic aberrations in the optical delivery system. Focus control is demonstrated for bead-on-plate welds in different thicknesses of titanium alloy, aluminum alloy, mild steel and stainless steel. The control system works for both pulsed and continuous laser radiation.

  16. Focus takes time: structural effects on reading.

    PubMed

    Lowder, Matthew W; Gordon, Peter C

    2015-12-01

    Previous eye-tracking work has yielded inconsistent evidence regarding whether readers spend more or less time encoding focused information compared with information that is not focused. We report the results of an eye-tracking experiment that used syntactic structure to manipulate whether a target word was linguistically defocused, neutral, or focused, while controlling for possible oculomotor differences across conditions. As the structure of the sentence made the target word increasingly more focused, reading times systematically increased. We propose that the longer reading times for linguistically focused words reflect deeper encoding, which explains previous findings showing that readers have better subsequent memory for focused versus defocused information. PMID:25962686

  17. Ultrasound-mediated Optical Imaging and Focusing in Scattering Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yuta

    Because of its non-ionizing and molecular sensing nature, light has been an attractive tool in biomedicine. Scanning an optical focus allows not only high-resolution imaging but also manipulation and therapy. However, due to multiple photon scattering events, conventional optical focusing using an ordinary lens is limited to shallow depths of one transport mean free path (lt'), which corresponds to approximately 1 mm in human tissue. To overcome this limitation, ultrasonic modulation (or encoding ) of diffuse light inside scattering media has enabled us to develop both deep-tissue optical imaging and focusing techniques, namely, ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) and time-reversed ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) optical focusing. While UOT measures the power of the encoded light to obtain an image, TRUE focusing generates a time-reversed (or phase-conjugated) copy of the encoded light, using a phase-conjugate mirror to focus light inside scattering media beyond 1 lt'. However, despite extensive progress in both UOT and TRUE focusing, the low signal-to-noise ratio in encoded-light detection remains a challenge to meeting both the speed and depth requirements for in vivo applications. This dissertation describes technological advancements of both UOT and TRUE focusing, in terms of their signal detection sensitivities, operational depths, and operational speeds. The first part of this dissertation describes sensitivity improvements of encoded-light detection in UOT, achieved by using a large area (˜5 cm x 5 cm) photorefractive polymer. The photorefractive polymer allowed us to improve the detection etendue by more than 10 times that of previous detection schemes. It has enabled us to resolve absorbing objects embedded inside diffused media thicker than 80 lt', using moderate light power and short ultrasound pulses. The second part of this dissertation describes energy enhancement and fluorescent excitation using TRUE focusing in turbid media, using photorefractive materials as the phase-conjugate mirrors. By using a large-area photorefractive polymer as the phase-conjugate mirror, we boosted the focused optical energy by ~40 times over the output of a previously used photorefractive Bi 12SiO20 crystal. Furthermore, using both a photorefractive polymer and a Bi12SiO20 crystal as the phase-conjugate mirrors, we show direct visualization and dynamic control of TRUE focus, and demonstrate fluorescence imaging in a thick turbid medium. The last part of this dissertation describes improvements in the scanning speed of a TRUE focus, using digital phase-conjugate mirrors in both transmission and reflection modes. By employing a multiplex recording of ultrasonically encoded wavefronts in transmission mode, we have accelerated the generation of multiple TRUE foci, using frequency sweeping of both ultrasound and light. With this technique, we obtained a 2-D image of a fluorescent target centered inside a turbid sample having a thickness of 2.4 lt'. Also, by gradually moving the focal position in reflection mode, we show that the TRUE focal intensity is improved, and can be continuously scanned to image fluorescent targets in a shorter time.

  18. Accurate Focus Correction for Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Sickmiller, B.; Steinhoff, N.; Williams, S.; Whiting, A.

    A ubiquitous problem in observations with large telescopes is focus control. Typical auto-focus algorithms used in commercial cameras are not effective for the astronomical application due to the long range to the typical objects and the random focus caused by atmospheric turbulence. This problem can be mitigated with an adaptive optics system. However, adaptive optics systems are typically complex and costly. This paper discusses alternative approaches that are relatively low in cost and complexity. These options include two tracker/imager based means for focus control, and a dedicated focus sensor approach. The dedicated focus sensor is a simplified form of a Hartmann sensor. The specific implementation of such a focus sensor will be shown to provide significant benefits for focus correction. The tracker/imager-based implementations have an intrinsic plus/minus focus ambiguity, due to the nature of the focus sensed on an image plane. However, this ambiguity can be overcome with careful algorithm design. Two options are considered for tracker/imager-based focus control: an auto-focus metric that has been preferred in commercial cameras, and a spot-width estimation algorithm. It is found that the spot-width estimation algorithm works as well as a dedicated focus sensor when the plus/minus ambiguity is resolved, and that this ambiguity can be resolved in most cases. In addition to performance, cost and implementation issues are also considered for generic telescope systems with apertures greater than 0.5 meters.

  19. An auto focus framework for computer vision systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabtawi, Nijad; Ferzli, Rony M.

    2015-02-01

    Capturing a clean video from a source camera is crucial for accurate results of a computer vision system. In particular, blurry images can considerably affect the detection, tracking and pattern matching algorithms. This paper presents a framework to apply quality control by monitoring captured video with the ability to detect whether the camera is out of focus or not, thus identifying blurry defective images and providing a feedback channel to the camera to adjust the focal length. The framework relies on the use of a no reference objective quality metric for the loopback channel to adjust the camera focus. The experimental results show how the framework enables reduction of unnecessary computations and thus enabling a more power efficient cameras.

  20. A focused strategic plan for outcomes evaluation.

    PubMed

    Stonestreet, J S; Prevost, S S

    1997-09-01

    This article describes how organizations devise strategic directions. The process of focused strategic or hoshin planning is introduced and reviewed. This model illustrates how a nursing department planned a focused strategic direction for outcomes evaluation. This discussion includes the dedication of resources, the focusing of research priorities and a summary of the outcomes evaluation program, and the method used for implementation of the priorities. Finally, benefits of both the focused planning process and the outcomes evaluation program are discussed. PMID:9254644

  1. AXAF VETA-I mirror ring focus measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tananbaum, H. D.; Zhao, P.

    1994-01-01

    The AXAF VETA-I mirror ring focus measurements were made with an HRI (microchannel plate) X-ray detector. The ring focus is a sharply focused ring formed by X-rays before they reach the VEAT-I focal plane. It is caused by spherical aberrations due to the finite source distance and the despace in the VETA-I test. The ring focus test reveals some aspects fo the test system distortions and the mirror surface figure which are difficult or impossible to detect at the focal plane. The test results show periodic modulations of the ring radius and width which could be caused by gravity, thermal, and/or epoxy shrinkage distortions. The strongest component of the modulation had a 12-fold symmetry, because these distortions were exerted on the mirror through 12 flexures of the VETA-I mount. Ring focus models were developed to simulate the ring image. The models were compared with the data to understand the test system distortions and the mirror glass imperfection. Further studies will be done to complete this work. The ring focus measurement is a very powerful test. We expect that a similar test for the finally assembled mirror of AXAD-I will be highly valuable.

  2. Techniques For Focusing In Zone Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Twitty, Garland E.; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    In two techniques for focusing in zone electrophoresis, force of applied electrical field in each charged particle balanced by restoring force of electro-osmosis. Two techniques: velocity-gradient focusing (VGF), suitable for rectangular electrophoresis chambers; and field-gradient focusing (FGF), suitable for step-shaped electrophoresis chambers.

  3. Probing nonperturbative QED with optimally focused laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Gonoskov, A; Gonoskov, I; Harvey, C; Ilderton, A; Kim, A; Marklund, M; Mourou, G; Sergeev, A

    2013-08-01

    We study nonperturbative pair production in intense, focused laser fields called e-dipole pulses. We address the conditions required, such as the quality of the vacuum, for reaching high intensities without initiating beam-depleting cascades, the number of pairs which can be created, and experimental detection of the created pairs. We find that e-dipole pulses offer an optimal method of investigating nonperturbative QED. PMID:23971542

  4. Sentence-Level Rewriting Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Litman, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Writers usually need iterations of revisions and edits during their writings. To better understand the process of rewriting, we need to know what has changed be-tween the revisions. Prior work mainly focuses on detecting corrections within sentences, which is at the level of words or phrases. This paper proposes to detect revision changes at the…

  5. The Development of Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, David I.; Burack, Jacob A.; Miller, Danny; Joseph, Shari; Enns, James T.

    2006-01-01

    Changes to a scene often go unnoticed if the objects of the change are unattended, making change detection an index of where attention is focused during scene perception. We measured change detection in school-age children and young adults by repeatedly alternating two versions of an image. To provide an age-fair assessment we used a bimanual…

  6. Optofluidic variable-focus lenses for light manipulation.

    PubMed

    Seow, Y C; Lim, S P; Lee, H P

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a planar optofluidic lens for light manipulation utilizing a combination of optofluidic biconvex lens with micromixer. Three light manipulation techniques including tunable optical diverging, collimating and focusing are realized by altering the refractive index of the optofluidic variable-focus lenses formed by solid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) walls and tunable liquid lens body. The optical power from the laser input can be increased or decreased with the tuning of the variable-focus lenses' refractive indexes. The optical power adjustment capabilities are demonstrated and characterized. The combinations of benefits of all lens' optical manipulation capabilities, greater mechanical stability, significant increase of optofluidic device's life time and seamless integration with other lab-on-a-chip functionalities provide a promising and versatile optofluidic compartment to integrate with lab-on-a-chip excitation and sensing applications. Optofluidic lens-including system for tunable fluorescence sensing is demonstrated showing 186% increase in detected fluorescence intensity. PMID:22885654

  7. Quantitative results from the focusing schlieren technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, S. P.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1993-01-01

    An iterative theoretical approach to obtain quantitative density data from the focusing schlieren technique is proposed. The approach is based on an approximate modeling of the focusing action in a focusing schlieren system, and an estimation of an appropriate focal plane thickness. The theoretical approach is incorporated in a computer program, and results obtained from a supersonic wind tunnel experiment evaluated by comparison with CFD data. The density distributions compared favorably with CFD predictions. However, improvements to the system are required in order to reduce noise in the data, to improve specifications of a depth of focus, and to refine the modeling of the focusing action.

  8. Technological applications of focusing optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abul'khanov, Stanislav R.

    2015-03-01

    The article analyzes a wide range of technologies generated by the application of focusators of laser radiation. I give a brief review of the methods of monitoring substrate and forming a diffraction microrelief, optical systems and devices for experimental research of focusators, laser technologies and units on their basis. In particular, I analyze using focusator into the ring for growing single-crystalline fibers in device of mini pedestal, using focusator into a set of rings for information-measuring system of three-dimensional control of grid spacers and other applications of focusators.

  9. Remote focusing of a light beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Nikolai I.

    2016-01-01

    The remote focusing of light in a graded-index medium via mode interference is demonstrated using exact analytical solutions of the wave equation. Strong focusing of a light beam occurs at extremely long distances and this repeats periodically with distance. The high efficiency transfer of a strongly focused subwavelength spot through an optical waveguide over large distances takes place with a period of revival. The simulated intensity distributions of a focused light beam and focusing efficiency (power in a central spot/total power) are presented. The far-field super-resolution imaging capabilities of a graded-index waveguide are also analyzed.

  10. Acoustic focusing by metal circular ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2015-02-01

    We report an exotic acoustic focusing effect through a simple brass circular ring structure immersed in water. The acoustic waves can be focused on a prefect point at the centre of the ring structure. This exotic acoustic focusing phenomenon arises from the intrinsic modes in the ring structure at some special eigenfrequencies, which is essentially distinct from the previous studies originating from the negative refraction. The focusing effect is closely related to the size and shape of the ring structure. Interesting applications of the focusing mechanism in black box detectors in the sea and medical ultrasound treatment are further discussed.

  11. Focused ultrasound and microbubbles for enhanced extravasation.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, M R; Chlon, C H T; Raju, B I; Chin, C T; Shevchenko, T; Klibanov, A L

    2010-11-20

    The permeability of blood vessels for albumin can be altered by using ultrasound and polymer or lipid-shelled microbubbles. The region in which the microbubbles were destroyed with focused ultrasound was quantified in gel phantoms as a function of pressure, number of cycles and type of microbubble. At 2MPa the destruction took place in a fairly wide area for a lipid-shelled agent, while for polymer-shelled agents at this setting, distinct destruction spots with a radius of only 1mm were obtained. When microbubbles with a thicker shell were used, the pressure above which the bubbles were destroyed shifts to higher values. In vivo both lipid and polymer microbubbles increased the extravasation of the albumin binding dye Evans Blue, especially in muscle leading to about 6-8% of the injected dose to extravasate per gram muscle tissue 30 min after start of the treatment, while no Evans Blue could be detected in muscle in the absence of microbubbles. Variation in the time between ultrasound treatment and Evans Blue injection, demonstrated that the time window for promoting extravasation is at least an hour at the settings used. In MC38 tumors, extravasation already occurred without ultrasound and only a trend towards enhancement with about a factor of 2 could be established with a maximum percentage injected dose per gram of 3%. Ultrasound mediated microbubble destruction especially enhances the extravasation in the highly vascularized outer part of the MC38 tumor and adjacent muscle and would, therefore, be most useful for release of, for instance, anti-angiogenic drugs. PMID:20600402

  12. Dynamic-focusing microscope objective for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja; Rolland, Jannick

    2007-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a novel optical imaging technique that has assumed significant importance in bio-medical imaging in the last two decades because it is non-invasive and provides accurate, high resolution images of three dimensional cross-sections of body tissue, exceeding the capabilities of the current predominant imaging technique - ultrasound. In this paper, the application of high resolution OCT, known as optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is investigated for in vivo detection of abnormal skin pathology for the early diagnosis of cancer. A main challenge in OCM is maintaining invariant resolution throughout the sample. The technology presented is based on a dynamic focusing microscope imaging probe conceived for skin imaging and the detection of abnormalities in the epithelium. A novel method for dynamic focusing in the biological sample is presented using variable-focus lens technology to obtain three dimensional images with invariant resolution throughout the cross-section and depth of the sample is presented and discussed. A low coherence broadband source centered at near IR wavelengths is used to illuminate the sample. The design, analysis and predicted performance of the dynamic focusing microscope objective designed for dynamic three dimensional imaging at 5μm resolution for the chosen broadband spectrum is presented.

  13. Outlier Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Gal, Irad

    Outlier detection is a primary step in many data-mining applications. We present several methods for outlier detection, while distinguishing between univariate vs. multivariate techniques and parametric vs. nonparametric procedures. In presence of outliers, special attention should be taken to assure the robustness of the used estimators. Outlier detection for Data Mining is often based on distance measures, clustering and spatial methods.

  14. Radiation Reaction in a Bent Focusing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhirong; Chen, Pisin; Ruth, Ronald D.

    1996-05-01

    We have shown that in a straight, continuous focusing channel the radiation reaction is different from that in a bending magnet. Quantum excitation to the transverse action is absent in this focusing system, and the radiation damping is faster in the transverse direction than in the longitudinal one. In this talk we study the effect of radiation in a combined-function system, where both focusing and bending fields are present. In one case where the bending dominates over the focusing, we recover the result of standard synchrotron radiation damping in storage rings. In the other case where the focusing dominates over the bending, we find that the lack of quantum excitation and the asymmetric damping found in a straight focusing channel still hold. In addition, the possibility of designing a focusing-dominated damping ring to demonstrate and apply this effect is discussed.

  15. Detection of a novel mechanism of acousto-optic modulation of incoherent light.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Christopher W; Caskey, Charles F; Gore, John C

    2014-01-01

    A novel form of acoustic modulation of light from an incoherent source has been detected in water as well as in turbid media. We demonstrate that patterns of modulated light intensity appear to propagate as the optical shadow of the density variations caused by ultrasound within an illuminated ultrasonic focal zone. This pattern differs from previous reports of acousto-optical interactions that produce diffraction effects that rely on phase shifts and changes in light directions caused by the acoustic modulation. Moreover, previous studies of acousto-optic interactions have mainly reported the effects of sound on coherent light sources via photon tagging, and/or the production of diffraction phenomena from phase effects that give rise to discrete sidebands. We aimed to assess whether the effects of ultrasound modulation of the intensity of light from an incoherent light source could be detected directly, and how the acoustically modulated (AOM) light signal depended on experimental parameters. Our observations suggest that ultrasound at moderate intensities can induce sufficiently large density variations within a uniform medium to cause measurable modulation of the intensity of an incoherent light source by absorption. Light passing through a region of high intensity ultrasound then produces a pattern that is the projection of the density variations within the region of their interaction. The patterns exhibit distinct maxima and minima that are observed at locations much different from those predicted by Raman-Nath, Bragg, or other diffraction theory. The observed patterns scaled appropriately with the geometrical magnification and sound wavelength. We conclude that these observed patterns are simple projections of the ultrasound induced density changes which cause spatial and temporal variations of the optical absorption within the illuminated sound field. These effects potentially provide a novel method for visualizing sound fields and may assist the interpretation of other hybrid imaging methods. PMID:25105880

  16. Needs of Non-Energy Focused Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Liakus, C.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the informational needs of non-energy focused contractors, including what information they need to motivate them to become energy-focused, the BARA team studied the type of information provided by the national programs, trade associations, and manufacturers that were researched for the related technical report: Effective Communication of Energy Efficiency. While that report focused on the delivery method, format, and strategy of the information, this study examines the content being put forward.

  17. Needs of Non Energy-Focused Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the informational needs of non energy-focused contractors, including what information they need to motivate them to become energy-focused, the BARA team studied the type of information provided by the national programs, trade associations, and manufacturers that were researched for the related technical report: Effective Communication of Energy Efficiency. While that report focused on the delivery method, format, and strategy of the information, this study examines the content being put forward.

  18. Low voltage operation of plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Rohit; Sharma, S. K.; Banerjee, P.; Das, R.; Deb, P.; Prabahar, T.; Das, B. K.; Adhikary, B.; Shyam, A.

    2010-08-15

    Plasma foci of compact sizes and operating with low energies (from tens of joules to few hundred joules) have found application in recent years and have attracted plasma-physics scientists and engineers for research in this direction. We are presenting a low energy and miniature plasma focus which operates from a capacitor bank of 8.4 {mu}F capacity, charged at 4.2-4.3 kV and delivering approximately 52 kA peak current at approximately 60 nH calculated circuit inductance. The total circuit inductance includes the plasma focus inductance. The reported plasma focus operates at the lowest voltage among all reported plasma foci so far. Moreover the cost of capacitor bank used for plasma focus is nearly 20 U.S. dollars making it very cheap. At low voltage operation of plasma focus, the initial breakdown mechanism becomes important for operation of plasma focus. The quartz glass tube is used as insulator and breakdown initiation is done on its surface. The total energy of the plasma focus is approximately 75 J. The plasma focus system is made compact and the switching of capacitor bank energy is done by manual operating switch. The focus is operated with hydrogen and deuterium filled at 1-2 mbar.

  19. Automatic focusing system of BSST in Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Peng-Yi; Liu, Jia-Jing; Zhang, Guang-yu; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Automatic focusing (AF) technology plays an important role in modern astronomical telescopes. Based on the focusing requirement of BSST (Bright Star Survey Telescope) in Antarctic, an AF system is set up. In this design, functions in OpenCV is used to find stars, the algorithm of area, HFD or FWHM are used to degree the focus metric by choosing. Curve fitting method is used to find focus position as the method of camera moving. All these design are suitable for unattended small telescope.

  20. FEMP Focus: 2011 Volume 20 Issue 1

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-05

    Department of Energy (DOE); Federal Energy Management Program; FEMP Focus Newsletter; December 2010; Alternative Financing, Guidance Documents, Recovery Act Technical Assistance, Training, Energy Awareness

  1. [The notion of task in focus groups].

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnol, Clarice Maria; de Magalhães, Ana Maria Müller; Mano, Gustavo Caetano de Mattos; Olschowsky, Agnes; da Silva, Flávia Pacheco

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to revisit the concept of task in light of Pichon-Riviére's referential and to discuss its application in research with focus groups. Focus groups are understood as a research technique which proposes to investigate a topic in depth, allowing the construction of new ideas and answers on the subject in focus. The presuppositions of operative groups were used to support the research practice with focus groups. In these, the notion of task has a key strategic position from which it seeks to intervene in society through dialogue and collective construction, unlike simple data collecting PMID:22737812

  2. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Schryver, Jack C; Sukumar, Sreenivas R

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  3. Best focus shift mechanism for thick masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, Martin; Raghunathan, Ananthan

    2015-03-01

    The best focus shift due to thick mask effects is well known, both in ArF, and more importantly in EUV, where the shorter wavelength is small compared to both mask openings and absorber height. While the effect is stronger in opaque features in clear field masks, the best focus shift is visible in dark field masks as well, and it becomes even more pronounced when scattering bars are added to non-dense features. This pattern dependent focus variation can be predicted in both exact EMF simulations and fast image calculations that are used for optical proximity correction (OPC). Even though this focus shift can be predicted and patterns can be corrected in OPC, we would like to understand the mechanism that causes this focus shift. This can help us understand if, in addition to best focus shift, the image quality is further deteriorated due to the thick mask effects. The best focus shift is found to be an interplay of the complex diffraction coefficient due to thick mask effects and the direction of the light that is incident on the mask, or coherence value ?. A change in focus adds a phase term to each of the complex diffraction coefficients, causing their rotation in a phasor diagram. Best focus is found when the phasors have an angle of 0 or 180 degrees to each other and depending on which diffracted orders are caught in the pupil and contribute to imaging. We investigate the effect of partial coherence, mask thickness, and assist feature placement on best focus shift. We observe a waveguide effect in the absorber gaps because of the reduced real index of refraction in the absorber layer, making vacuum the optically dense medium. We suggest ways to lessen the best focus shifts through assist feature placement or the use of alternative absorbers that are closer matched to the dielectric index of vacuum.

  4. Focus Session Keynote Presentation on Student Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunley, Charlene R.

    This address focuses upon the expected increases in enrollments of traditional college students in the first decade of the 21st Century, and the impact of this increase on community colleges is discussed. Much recent activity and research at community colleges have focused on adult education, workforce development, technological advancement and…

  5. Focus Groups: A Method of Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipping, Jane

    1998-01-01

    Focus groups provide a broader range of qualitative information useful in needs assessment and continuing education program planning. One disadvantage is a group not representative of the target audience. The effectiveness of focus groups is enhanced by combining them with quantitative methods. (SK)

  6. Teaching Focus Group Interviewing: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Focus group interviewing is widely used by academic and applied researchers. Given the popularity and strengths of this method, it is surprising how rarely focus group interviewing is taught in the undergraduate classroom and how few resources exist to support instructors who wish to train students to use this technique. This article fills the gap…

  7. Lifelong Learning and Leadership. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on programs that promote lifelong learning through literacy education, parent empowerment, or parent leadership training. "Adult Literacy Outreach Innovations: Porque Significa Tanto" (Christie L. Goodman) describes a Texas outreach project that focuses on raising public awareness about adult education and literacy,…

  8. How I Learned to Conduct Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rio-Roberts, Maribel

    2011-01-01

    The use of focus groups may provide researchers with important insights into research questions via participant discussion and interaction. As a human services practitioner and researcher, I became interested in learning how to conduct focus groups in order to apply these steps to my research and gain valuable insights about the human experience…

  9. Focused Monitoring. Alliance Action Information Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, 2005

    2005-01-01

    During this era of increased accountability and enhanced educational expectations for infants, toddlers and students with disabilities, the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) is using a new compliance and technical assistance model- focused monitoring. Focused monitoring is part of the Continuous Improvement

  10. Attentional Focus Effects in Balance Acrobats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulf, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    Performing and learning motor skills has been shown to be enhanced if the performer adopts an external relative to internal focus (or no focus) of attention (Wulf, 2007). The present study examined the generalizability of this effect to top-level performers (balance acrobats). Participants performed a balance task (standing on an inflated rubber…

  11. Conducting the Computer-Mediated Focus Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saban, Kenneth A.

    The growing popularity of focus group measurements can be traced to any one of four factors: (1) the economics associated with focus groups; (2) the speed at which data can now be collected; (3) the need to understand customer motivations; and (4) the desire to improve subsequent qualitative research activities and programs. Market researchers are…

  12. Using Focus Group Research in Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunig, Larissa A.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes a recent instance of focus group research applied to a public relations case (rather than a marketing case). Reviews the advantages and disadvantages of this qualitative method, and describes the case of a county department of mental health relying on focus group research to help plan a program aimed at reducing the stigma of mental…

  13. ION BEAM FOCUSING MEANS FOR CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1959-06-01

    An ion beam focusing arrangement for calutrons is described. It provides a virtual focus of origin for the ion beam so that the ions may be withdrawn from an arc plasma of considerable width providing greater beam current and accuracy. (T.R.H.)

  14. Inclusive Focus Particles in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sang-gu

    2011-01-01

    When discussing focus particles, it has been common practice to rely on the dichotomy of inclusive vs. exclusive particles, "a la" Konig (1991). Inclusive focus particles are often further divided into scalar particles, such as "also", "too", and "either", and non-scalar particles, such as "even". In this thesis, I advance a comparative analysis…

  15. Focused force angioplasty Theory and application

    SciTech Connect

    Solar, Ronald J.; Ischinger, Thomas A

    2003-03-01

    Focused force angioplasty is a technique in which the forces resulting from inflating an angioplasty balloon in a stenosis are concentrated and focused at one or more locations within the stenosis. While the technique has been shown to be useful in resolving resistant stenoses, its real value may be in minimizing the vascular trauma associated with balloon angioplasty and subsequently improving the outcome.

  16. Inclusive Focus Particles in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sang-gu

    2011-01-01

    When discussing focus particles, it has been common practice to rely on the dichotomy of inclusive vs. exclusive particles, "a la" Konig (1991). Inclusive focus particles are often further divided into scalar particles, such as "also", "too", and "either", and non-scalar particles, such as "even". In this thesis, I advance a comparative analysis

  17. An auto-focusing CCD camera mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbour, R. W.

    1994-08-01

    The traditional methods of focusing a CCD camera are either time consuming, difficult or, more importantly, indecisive. This paper describes a device designed to allow the observer to be confident that the camera will always be properly focused by sensing a selected star image and automatically adjusting the camera's focal position.

  18. Identifying Information Focuses in Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hong-yan

    2011-01-01

    The study explains the process of learners' listening comprehension within Halliday's information theory in functional grammar, including the skills of identifying focuses while listening in college English teaching. Identifying information focuses in listening is proved to improve the students' communicative listening ability by the means of a…

  19. Teaching Focus Group Interviewing: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Focus group interviewing is widely used by academic and applied researchers. Given the popularity and strengths of this method, it is surprising how rarely focus group interviewing is taught in the undergraduate classroom and how few resources exist to support instructors who wish to train students to use this technique. This article fills the gap

  20. On FOCUS: Photographs and Writings by Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmeyer, Beatriz; McGrail, Loren

    Project FOCUS is aimed at enhancing literacy education for non-native speakers of English through the use of photography. It was offered as an elective course within a family literacy program for Hispanic adults. This collection of writings and photographs originated in the program. The collection begins with an overview of Project FOCUS, personal…

  1. Performance Improvement of Algorithms Based on the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, P.; Sotomayor, A.; Moreno, E.

    An analysis to improve the performance of the ultrasonic synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on a PC platform is presented in this paper. Some useful processing techniques like apodization, dynamic focusing, envelope detection and image composition are used to improve the quality of the image. Finally, results of the algorithm implemented using MATLAB and C/C++ and the respective images are presented

  2. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    The final focus system of a linear collider must perform two primary functions, it must focus the two opposing beams so that their transverse dimensions at the interaction point are small enough to yield acceptable luminosity, and it must steer the beams together to maintain collisions. In addition, the final focus system must transport the outgoing beams to a location where they can be recycled or safely dumped. Elementary optical considerations for linear collider final focus systems are discussed, followed by chromatic aberrations. The design of the final focus system of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is described. Tuning and diagnostics and steering to collision are discussed. Most of the examples illustrating the concepts covered are drawn from the SLC, but the principles and conclusions are said to be generally applicable to other linear collider designs as well. 26 refs., 17 figs. (LEW)

  3. Improvement of focus accuracy on processed wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashibata, Satomi; Komine, Nobuhiro; Fukuhara, Kazuya; Koike, Takashi; Kato, Yoshimitsu; Hashimoto, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    As feature size shrinkage in semiconductor device progress, process fluctuation, especially focus strongly affects device performance. Because focus control is an ongoing challenge in optical lithography, various studies have sought for improving focus monitoring and control. Focus errors are due to wafers, exposure tools, reticles, QCs, and so on. Few studies are performed to minimize the measurement errors of auto focus (AF) sensors of exposure tool, especially when processed wafers are exposed. With current focus measurement techniques, the phase shift grating (PSG) focus monitor 1) has been already proposed and its basic principle is that the intensity of the diffraction light of the mask pattern is made asymmetric by arranging a π/2 phase shift area on a reticle. The resist pattern exposed at the defocus position is shifted on the wafer and shifted pattern can be easily measured using an overlay inspection tool. However, it is difficult to measure shifted pattern for the pattern on the processed wafer because of interruptions caused by other patterns in the underlayer. In this paper, we therefore propose "SEM-PSG" technique, where the shift of the PSG resist mark is measured by employing critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) to measure the focus error on the processed wafer. First, we evaluate the accuracy of SEM-PSG technique. Second, by applying the SEM-PSG technique and feeding the results back to the exposure, we evaluate the focus accuracy on processed wafers. By applying SEM-PSG feedback, the focus accuracy on the processed wafer was improved from 40 to 29 nm in 3σ.

  4. Focus-of-attention for human activity recognition from UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghouts, G. J.; van Eekeren, A. W. M.; Dijk, J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a system to extract metadata about human activities from full-motion video recorded from a UAV. The pipeline consists of these components: tracking, motion features, representation of the tracks in terms of their motion features, and classification of each track as one of the human activities of interest. We consider these activities: walk, run, throw, dig, wave. Our contribution is that we show how a robust system can be constructed for human activity recognition from UAVs, and that focus-of-attention is needed. We find that tracking and human detection are essential for robust human activity recognition from UAVs. Without tracking, the human activity recognition deteriorates. The combination of tracking and human detection is needed to focus the attention on the relevant tracks. The best performing system includes tracking, human detection and a per-track analysis of the five human activities. This system achieves an average accuracy of 93%. A graphical user interface is proposed to aid the operator or analyst during the task of retrieving the relevant parts of video that contain particular human activities. Our demo is available on YouTube.

  5. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Vann, C.S.

    1993-08-31

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a Cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the Cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the Cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a Cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  6. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    1993-01-01

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  7. Social anxiety and ruminative self-focus.

    PubMed

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P

    2008-06-01

    Studies of rumination have supported the differentiation of self-focus into distinct modes of self-attention with distinct functional effects. Given that self-focused attention and rumination have been implicated in the maintenance of social anxiety, the present study investigated the effects of these two distinct forms of self-focused attention on mood and cognition in social anxiety. High and low socially anxious individuals (n=29 in each group) either thought analytically about, or focused on their momentary experience of, identical symptom-focused induction items from [Nolen-Hoeksema, S., & Morrow, J. (1993). Effects of rumination and distraction on naturally occurring depressed mood. Cognition and Emotion, 7, 561-570] rumination task. As predicted, in high socially anxious individuals, the experiential (low analysis) self-focus condition decreased ratings of anxious mood pre- to post-manipulation and was associated with more positive thoughts on a thought-listing exercise, whereas the analytical (high analysis) self-focus condition resulted in no significant effects on mood and cognition. Theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:17928191

  8. Focusing on moving targets through scattering samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Edward Haojiang; Ruan, Haowen; Yang, Changhuei; Judkewitz, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Focusing light through scattering media has been a longstanding goal of biomedical optics. While wavefront shaping and optical time-reversal techniques can in principle be used to focus light across scattering media, achieving this within a scattering medium with a noninvasive and efficient reference beacon, or guide star, remains an important challenge. Here, we show optical time-reversal focusing using a new technique termed Time Reversal by Analysis of Changing wavefronts from Kinetic targets (TRACK). By taking the difference between time-varying scattering fields caused by a moving object and applying optical time reversal, light can be focused back to the location previously occupied by the object. We demonstrate this approach with discretely moved objects as well as with particles in an aqueous flow, and obtain a focal peak-to-background strength of 204 in our demonstration experiments. We further demonstrate that the generated focus can be used to noninvasively count particles in a flow-cytometry configuration—even when the particles are hidden behind a strong diffuser. By achieving optical time reversal and focusing noninvasively without any external guide stars, using just the intrinsic characteristics of the sample, this work paves the way to a range of scattering media imaging applications, including underwater and atmospheric focusing as well as noninvasive in vivo flow cytometry. PMID:25621302

  9. Deep-Focusing Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Jensen, J. M.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Birch, A. C.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much progress has been made by measuring the travel times of solar acoustic waves from a central surface location to points at equal arc distance away. Depth information is obtained from the range of arc distances examined, with the larger distances revealing the deeper layers. This method we will call surface-focusing, as the common point, or focus, is at the surface. To obtain a clearer picture of the subsurface region, it would, no doubt, be better to focus on points below the surface. Our first attempt to do this used the ray theory to pick surface location pairs that would focus on a particular subsurface point. This is not the ideal procedure, as Born approximation kernels suggest that this focus should have zero sensitivity to sound speed inhomogeneities. However, the sensitivity is concentrated below the surface in a much better way than the old surface-focusing method, and so we expect the deep-focusing method to be more sensitive. A large sunspot group was studied by both methods. Inversions based on both methods will be compared.

  10. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  11. How to focus an attosecond pulse.

    PubMed

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C; Mang, M M; Delmotte, F; Chavel, P; de Rossi, S

    2013-01-28

    Attosecond experiments involving focusing of attosecond light pulses can suffer from a spread of the attosecond radiation both in space and time due to optical aberrations. We present a detailed numerical study of the distortions induced in the most common focusing geometries that make use of parabolic, spherical, toroidal and ellipsoidal mirrors. We deduce the consequences on the pulse duration and possible issues that could arise in applications of attosecond pulses. This should serve as a guideline for setting up attosecond focusing optics. PMID:23389232

  12. A sharp-focusing schlieren optical deflectometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvi, F. S.; Settles, G. S.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    A new instrument capable of localized, nonintrusive turbulence measurements is developed by combining a focusing schlieren system with an optical deflectometer. This instrument records the fluctuating light intensity at a point in the focused schlieren image. Its capability is verified by making benchmark measurements of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices produced in a low-speed axisymmetric mixing layer. The sharp-focusing effect is demonstrated both visually and quantitatively. The results show that the instrument is capable of optical turbulence measurements within a 4 mm depth-of-field.

  13. Automated technique for optimizing stepper focus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataram, Srinath; Olejnik, Carrie; Flores, Gary E.; Tien, David

    1996-05-01

    For optimum optical lithography it is critical to maintain the wafer plane in the aerial image plane of the stepper since the aerial image plane is the stepper focus plane. There are a variety of off-line measurement techniques to independently verify the stepper focus, including short step focus, pin dot, clearing gradients and phase shift monitors. However, these techniques generally require operator inspection. This paper exploits the short step focus routine and provides an alternative technique for automated inspection and analysis. The short step focus routine involves microstepping the test image across the wafer in nine different steps of focus. The test image is comprised of a large array of resolution structures (equal lines and spaces) of various geometries in both vertical and horizontal orientations. The focus increments and exposure energies are user defined. The operator conducts a visual inspection to determine optimal focus and image tilt which can then be adjusted on the stepper as necessary. The industry's progression to smaller critical dimensions, meaning higher NA tools and smaller depth of focus, implies less tolerance for errors in the determinations of stepper focus. In general, the use of traditional operator dependent visual inspection techniques suffer from subjective interpretation and require long inspection times. An alternative technique that is readily adapted to a standard test reticle and metrology tool is introduced and will show how optimal focus and image tilt from the short step focus routine can be automatically calculated using RS1 programming language (RPL) and fed back to the stepper. In order to successfully implement the KLA 5107 optical metrology system to automate the inspection and analysis, several challenges had to be overcome: (1) pattern recognition -- because the test image pattern is staggered, (2) resolution capabilities of the optical metrology tool, and (3) the development of an algorithm for data interpretation. The sensitivity of this technique to resist thickness, top and bottom critical dimensions of the test image, side-wall angles, and exposure energies are explored. The capabilities of the optical metrology tool compared with an E-beam metrology system are discussed, and a comparison of this automated technique with other prevailing techniques is discussed.

  14. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Lykke, Keith R.; Lill, Thorsten B.

    2000-01-01

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  15. Focused video estimation from defocused video sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junlan; Schonfeld, Dan; Mohamed, Magdi

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique for estimating focused video frames captured by an out-of-focus moving camera. It relies on the idea of Depth from Defocus (DFD), however overcomes the shortage of DFD by reforming the problem in a computer vision framework. It introduces a moving-camera scenario and explores the relationship between the camera motion and the resulting blur characteristics in captured images. This knowledge leads to a successful blur estimation and focused image estimation. The performance of this algorithm is demonstrated through error analysis and computer simulated experiments.

  16. Development of the fast astigmatic auto-focus microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Yao; Lee, Chien-Shing; Chen, Po-Jui; Chen, Nien-Tsu; Chen, Fong-Zhi; Yu, Zong-Ru; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Hwang, Chi-Hung

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, a fast auto-focus microscope system was developed based on the astigmatic method. A collimated infrared laser beam was employed in the infinite-corrected microscope optical axis by the beam splitter and reflected by the sample surface. By embedding an astigmatic lens in the system, the reflected laser beam has different focal lengths in the sagittal and tangential planes. As the microscope's relative distance varies, the reflected laser beam shape also varies and can be detected by an embedded four-quadrant photodiode, i.e., the focus error signal (FES) can be found. Then, a fast auto-focus system can be realized by converting the FES to the microscope's defocus distance. We designed an astigmatic auto-focus system for a 20× objective lens with a ±50 µm working range, and this system could also be used for 10× and 5× objectives with ±200 µm and ±800 µm working ranges, respectively.

  17. Viscoelastic effects on electrokinetic particle focusing in a constricted microchannel.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinyu; DuBose, John; Joo, Sang Woo; Qian, Shizhi; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2015-01-01

    Focusing suspended particles in a fluid into a single file is often necessary prior to continuous-flow detection, analysis, and separation. Electrokinetic particle focusing has been demonstrated in constricted microchannels by the use of the constriction-induced dielectrophoresis. However, previous studies on this subject have been limited to Newtonian fluids only. We report in this paper an experimental investigation of the viscoelastic effects on electrokinetic particle focusing in non-Newtonian polyethylene oxide solutions through a constricted microchannel. The width of the focused particle stream is found NOT to decrease with the increase in DC electric field, which is different from that in Newtonian fluids. Moreover, particle aggregations are observed at relatively high electric fields to first form inside the constriction. They can then either move forward and exit the constriction in an explosive mode or roll back to the constriction entrance for further accumulations. These unexpected phenomena are distinct from the findings in our earlier paper [Lu et al., Biomicrofluidics 8, 021802 (2014)], where particles are observed to oscillate inside the constriction and not to pass through until a chain of sufficient length is formed. They are speculated to be a consequence of the fluid viscoelasticity effects. PMID:25713690

  18. Viscoelastic effects on electrokinetic particle focusing in a constricted microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinyu; DuBose, John; Joo, Sang Woo; Qian, Shizhi

    2015-01-01

    Focusing suspended particles in a fluid into a single file is often necessary prior to continuous-flow detection, analysis, and separation. Electrokinetic particle focusing has been demonstrated in constricted microchannels by the use of the constriction-induced dielectrophoresis. However, previous studies on this subject have been limited to Newtonian fluids only. We report in this paper an experimental investigation of the viscoelastic effects on electrokinetic particle focusing in non-Newtonian polyethylene oxide solutions through a constricted microchannel. The width of the focused particle stream is found NOT to decrease with the increase in DC electric field, which is different from that in Newtonian fluids. Moreover, particle aggregations are observed at relatively high electric fields to first form inside the constriction. They can then either move forward and exit the constriction in an explosive mode or roll back to the constriction entrance for further accumulations. These unexpected phenomena are distinct from the findings in our earlier paper [Lu et al., Biomicrofluidics 8, 021802 (2014)], where particles are observed to oscillate inside the constriction and not to pass through until a chain of sufficient length is formed. They are speculated to be a consequence of the fluid viscoelasticity effects. PMID:25713690

  19. Quantification of resolution for a dynamic focusing OCM microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja; Lee, Kye-Sung; Meemon, Panomsak; Kuhn, William P.; Thompson, Kevin P.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2009-02-01

    Achieving high lateral resolution still remains a challenge for in vivo Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) biological imaging. While to address this challenge, the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective in the sample arm of the OCM interferometer may be increased, it introduces trade-offs in terms of loss in the depth of focus over which lateral resolution can still be maintained. As a critical step to offset this problem, we recently presented the optical system design of a dynamic focusing (DF) optical coherence microscope with a built-in liquid lens for re-focusing through the sample depth with no moving parts at in vivo speeds. We present experimental measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF) acquired from the fabricated research prototype. The measurements were obtained though the edge detection method as a function of the voltage applied and at various positions in the field of view (FOV) within a 2mm cubic sample. Results demonstrate a resolution of 2 µm across the voltage range and the FOV, which validates the expectation by design of a quasi-invariant resolution of less than 3μm over a 2mm×2mm lateral cross-section across the 2mm depth of skin-equivalent tissue. Images of a tadpole sample acquired with the probe at different focal depths are also shown to demonstrate gain in resolution with focusing through different depth zones.

  20. Introduction to focus issue: mesoscales in complex networks.

    PubMed

    Almendral, Juan A; Criado, Regino; Leyva, Inmaculada; Buldú, Javier M; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene

    2011-03-01

    Although the functioning of real complex networks is greatly determined by modularity, the majority of articles have focused, until recently, on either their local scale structure or their macroscopical properties. However, neither of these descriptions can adequately describe the important features that complex networks exhibit due to their organization in modules. This Focus Issue precisely presents the state of the art on the study of complex networks at that intermediate level. The reader will find out why this mesoscale level has become an important topic of research through the latest advances carried out to improve our understanding of the dynamical behavior of modular networks. The contributions presented here have been chosen to cover, from different viewpoints, the many open questions in the field as different aspects of community definition and detection algorithms, moduli overlapping, dynamics on modular networks, interplay between scales, and applications to biological, social, and technological fields. PMID:21456843