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Sample records for detecting tamiflu metabolite

  1. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu((R)) (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith; Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  2. The Tamiflu fiasco and lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Meenu, Meenakshi; Mohan, Prafull

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), a neuraminidase inhibitor, was approved for seasonal flu by US Food and Drug Administration in 1999. A number of randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis emphasized a favorable efficacy and safety profile. Majority of them were funded by Roche, which also first marketed and promoted this drug. In 2005 and 2009, the looming fear of pandemic flu led to recommendation by prominent regulatory bodies such as World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, European Medicines Agency and others for its use in treatment and prophylaxis of influenza, and it's stockpiling as a measure to tide over the crisis. Serious Adverse Events, especially neuropsychiatric events associated with Tamiflu started getting reported leading to a cascade of questions on clinical utility of this drug. A recent Cochrane review and related articles have questioned the risk-benefit ratio of the drug, besides raising doubts about the regulatory decision of approving it. The recommendations for stockpiling the said drug as given by various international organizations viz WHO have also been put to scrutiny. Although many reviewers have labeled the Tamiflu saga as a "costly mistake," the episode leaves us with some important lessons. This article takes a comprehensive relook on the subject, and we proceed to suggest some ways and means to avoid a similar situation in the future. PMID:25821304

  3. The Tamiflu fiasco and lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Meenu, Meenakshi; Mohan, Prafull

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), a neuraminidase inhibitor, was approved for seasonal flu by US Food and Drug Administration in 1999. A number of randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis emphasized a favorable efficacy and safety profile. Majority of them were funded by Roche, which also first marketed and promoted this drug. In 2005 and 2009, the looming fear of pandemic flu led to recommendation by prominent regulatory bodies such as World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, European Medicines Agency and others for its use in treatment and prophylaxis of influenza, and it's stockpiling as a measure to tide over the crisis. Serious Adverse Events, especially neuropsychiatric events associated with Tamiflu started getting reported leading to a cascade of questions on clinical utility of this drug. A recent Cochrane review and related articles have questioned the risk-benefit ratio of the drug, besides raising doubts about the regulatory decision of approving it. The recommendations for stockpiling the said drug as given by various international organizations viz WHO have also been put to scrutiny. Although many reviewers have labeled the Tamiflu saga as a “costly mistake,” the episode leaves us with some important lessons. This article takes a comprehensive relook on the subject, and we proceed to suggest some ways and means to avoid a similar situation in the future. PMID:25821304

  4. Occurrence and fate of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) and amantadine in sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Gopal Chandra; Nakada, Norihide; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the occurrence and fate of the two antiviral drugs oseltamivir carboxylate (OC)-the active metabolite of Tamiflu-and amantadine (AMT) at three sewage treatment plants (STPs) during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 influenza seasons in Japan. Both compounds were detected in all samples analyzed. The concentrations in raw influents at the STPs ranged from 140 to 460 ng L(-1) OC and from 184 to 538 ng L(-1) AMT. Primary treatment gave no substantial removal of the drugs (OC, 2-9%; AMT, 7-17%). Biological nutrient-removal-based secondary treatment (anoxic-oxic-anoxic-oxic and anaerobic-anoxic-oxic) removed 20-37% of OC, whereas extended-aeration-based conventional activated sludge treatment removed <20%. STPs using primary plus biological secondary treatment removed <50% of the drugs. The incorporation of tertiary treatment by ozonation removed >90%. Ozonation after secondary treatment in STPs will be necessary during an influenza pandemic to reduce the risks associated with the widespread use of antiviral drugs. PMID:20692015

  5. Detection and characterization of clostebol sulfate metabolites in Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Georgina; Pozo, Oscar J; Garrostas, Lorena; Esquivel, Argitxu; Matabosch, Xavier; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Joglar, Jesús; Ventura, Rosa

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic testosterone derivatives which undergo extensive metabolism in man. Differences in the excretion of phase II metabolites are strongly associated with inter-individual and inter-ethnic variations. Sulfate metabolites have been described as long-term metabolites for some AAS. Clostebol is the 4-chloro derivative of testosterone and the aim of the present study was the evaluation of clostebol sulfate metabolites in Caucasian population by LC-MS/MS technology. Clostebol was orally administered to four healthy Caucasian male volunteers, and excretion study urines were collected up to 31 days. Several analytical strategies (neutral loss scan, precursor ion scan and selected reaction monitoring acquisitions modes) were applied to detect sulfate metabolites in post-administration samples. Sixteen sulfate metabolites were detected, five of them having detectability times above 10 days (S1a, S2a, S3b, S3g and S4b). Interestingly, metabolite S1a could be detected up to the last collected sample of all excretion studies and it was characterized by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS as 4ξ-chloro-5α-androst-3β-ol-17-one 3β-sulfate. Thus, monitoring of S1a improves the detection time of clostebol misuse with respect to the commonly monitored metabolites, excreted in the glucuronide fraction. Importantly, this new metabolite can be incorporated into recently developed LC-MS/MS screening methods base on the direct detection of phase II metabolites. PMID:27085012

  6. Development and validation of a rapid HPLC method for the determination of oseltamivir phosphate in Tamiflu and generic versions.

    PubMed

    Joseph-Charles, J; Geneste, C; Laborde-Kummer, E; Gheyouche, R; Boudis, H; Dubost, J-P

    2007-08-15

    Oseltamivir phosphate (OP) is an antiviral drug that is used in the treatment and prophylaxis of both influenza A and influenza B. It is effective against all known influenza viruses than can infect humans, including pandemic influenza viruses and may be the most appropriate antiviral option against avian influenza caused by H5N1 virus. Tamiflu, the registered trademark used under exclusive license by Roche laboratories with OP as active pharmaceutical ingredient, is considered the best treatment for the bird flu disease. A simple, selective, linear, accurate and precise HPLC method was developed and validated for rapid assay of OP aimed to the quality control of Tamiflu capsules and generic versions. Isocratic elution at a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min was employed on a Zorbax CN column (150 mm x 4.6mm; 5 microm) at ambient temperature. The mobile phase consisted of methanol and 0.04 M formic acid pH 3.0 (50:50, v/v). The UV detection wavelength was 226 nm and 20 microL of sample was injected. Sotalol hydrochloride was used as the internal standard (IS). The retention times for OP and IS were 3.40 and 2.25 min, respectively. The method was successfully applied to commercial pharmaceuticals, Tamiflu and generic versions. The proposed method could be applicable for routine analysis of OP and monitoring of the quality of marketed drugs as possibly counterfeit Tamiflu. PMID:17512688

  7. Efficacy of Influenza Vaccination and Tamiflu® Treatment – Comparative Studies with Eurasian Swine Influenza Viruses in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Duerrwald, Ralf; Schlegel, Michael; Bauer, Katja; Vissiennon, Théophile; Wutzler, Peter; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological developments demonstrated that gene segments of swine influenza A viruses can account for antigenic changes as well as reduced drug susceptibility of pandemic influenza A viruses. This raises questions about the efficacy of preventive measures against swine influenza A viruses. Here, the protective effect of vaccination was compared with that of prophylactic Tamiflu® treatment against two Eurasian swine influenza A viruses. 11-week-old pigs were infected by aerosol nebulisation with high doses of influenza virus A/swine/Potsdam/15/1981 (H1N1/1981, heterologous challenge to H1N1 vaccine strain) and A/swine/Bakum/1832/2000 (H1N2/2000, homologous challenge to H1N2 vaccine strain) in two independent trials. In each trial (i) 10 pigs were vaccinated twice with a trivalent vaccine (RESPIPORC® FLU3; 28 and 7 days before infection), (ii) another 10 pigs received 150 mg/day of Tamiflu® for 5 days starting 12 h before infection, and (iii) 12 virus-infected pigs were left unvaccinated and untreated and served as controls. Both viruses replicated efficiently in porcine respiratory organs causing influenza with fever, dyspnoea, and pneumonia. Tamiflu® treatment as well as vaccination prevented clinical signs and significantly reduced virus shedding. Whereas after homologous challenge with H1N2/2000 no infectious virus in lung and hardly any lung inflammation were detected, the virus titre was not and the lung pathology was only partially reduced in H1N1/1981, heterologous challenged pigs. Tamiflu® application did not affect these study parameters. In conclusion, all tested preventive measures provided protection against disease. Vaccination additionally prevented virus replication and histopathological changes in the lung of homologous challenged pigs. PMID:23630601

  8. Detection and quantification of boscalid and its metabolites in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Jabot, Claire; Daniele, Gaëlle; Giroud, Barbara; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Belzunces, Luc P; Casabianca, Hervé; Vulliet, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    Boscalid is a new-generation fungicide that has been detected in several bee matrices. The objective of this work was to characterize boscalid metabolites in honeybees based on in vivo experimentation, and next to verify the presence of theses metabolites into honeybees from colonies presenting troubles. A methodology based on complementary mass spectrometric tools, namely ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QToF) or triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ) was implemented. Honeybees were sprayed with boscalid, at field rate (to induce the metabolization process) and the parent compound with its generated metabolites were then extracted using modified EU-QuEChERS method. The mass characteristics including exact mass, isotopic profile and mass fragments allowed assuming the structure of several metabolites. Some of them were unambiguously identified by comparison with synthesized analytical standards. The metabolites were resulted from hydroxylation and dechlorination of the parent compound as well as the substitution of a chlorine atom with an hydroxyl group. The metabolites were then quantified in bee samples collected from various beehives located in France. Boscalid and three of its metabolites were present in some samples at a level ranged between 0.2 and 36.3 ng/g. PMID:27179242

  9. Metabolite

    MedlinePlus

    A metabolite is any substance produced during metabolism (digestion or other bodily chemical processes). The term metabolite may also refer to the product that remains after a drug is broken down (metabolized) by the body.

  10. Optimizing Urine Processing Protocols for Protein and Metabolite Detection

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Nazema Y; DuBois, Laura G; St John-Williams, Lisa; Will, Thompson J; Grenier, Carole; Burke, Emily; Fraser, Matthew O; Amundsen, Cindy L; Murphy, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Background In urine, factors such as timing of voids, and duration at room temperature (RT) may affect the quality of recovered protein and metabolite data. Additives may aid with detection, but can add more complexity in sample collection or analysis. We aimed to identify the optimal urine processing protocol for clinically-obtained urine samples that allows for the highest protein and metabolite yields with minimal degradation. Methods Healthy women provided multiple urine samples during the same day. Women collected their first morning (1st AM) void and another “random void”. Random voids were aliquotted with: 1) no additive; 2) boric acid (BA); 3) protease inhibitor (PI); or 4) both BA + PI. Of these aliquots, some were immediately stored at 4°C, and some were left at RT for 4 hours. Proteins and individual metabolites were quantified, normalized to creatinine concentrations, and compared across processing conditions. Sample pools corresponding to each processing condition were analyzed using mass spectrometry to assess protein degradation. Results Ten Caucasian women between 35-65 years of age provided paired 1st morning and random voided urine samples. Normalized protein concentrations were slightly higher in 1st AM compared to random “spot” voids. The addition of BA did not significantly change proteins, while PI significantly improved normalized protein concentrations, regardless of whether samples were immediately cooled or left at RT for 4 hours. In pooled samples, there were minimal differences in protein degradation under the various conditions we tested. In metabolite analyses, there were significant differences in individual amino acids based on the timing of the void. Conclusions For comparative translational research using urine, information about void timing should be collected and standardized. For urine samples processed in the same day, BA does not appear to be necessary while the addition of PI enhances protein yields, regardless of 4

  11. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  12. Detection of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in equine hair.

    PubMed

    Dunnett, Mark; Richardson, Dean W; Lees, Peter

    2004-10-01

    Hair analysis to detect drug administration has not been studied extensively in horses. This study aimed to (a) develop an analytical method for enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in mane and tail hair, (b) relate measured values to doses, routes of administration, hair colour, and (c) demonstrate long-term detectability. Samples were extracted in trifluoroacetic acid at 70 degrees C. Extracts were cleaned-up by solid-phase extraction and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-diode array detection. Analyte recoveries were > 87%. Horses were sampled after therapeutic enrofloxacin administration either orally at 7.5 mg/kg daily for 3-13 days or twice daily for 10-14 days (Group 1, n=7) or intravenously at 5.0 mg/kg daily for 12 and 15 days (Group 2, n=2). Enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were detected at concentrations up to 452 and 19 ng/mg, respectively, up to 10 months post-treatment. In vitro, enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were extensively bound to melanin (> 96%) and in vivo, their uptake was 40-fold greater in black than white hair. Enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin concentrations correlated to enrofloxacin dose (r2=0.777 and r2=0.769). Enrofloxacin:ciprofloxacin ratios were 21:1 and 13:1 following intravenous and oral administration, respectively. Longitudinal analyte distributions correlated to treatment-sampling interval. PMID:15196904

  13. Acute intoxication with aniline: detection of acetaminophen as aniline metabolite.

    PubMed

    Iwersen-Bergmann, S; Schmoldt, A

    2000-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman unwittingly ingested an unknown substance together with her breakfast coffee. She suffered effects such as strong headache, generalized cyanosis, and a burning sensation of the lips and collapsed some minutes later. After admission into hospital a methemoglobin level of 35% was determined in the blood. Treatment by administration of tolonium chloride (toluidine blue) resulted in complete recovery of the patient. The toxic agent was identified as aniline by GC with mass selective detection after organic solvent extraction and 11 h after ingestion the plasma aniline level was 0.13 mg/l. Acetanilide (0.79 mg/ml) and acetaminophen (2.3 mg/ml) were identified in plasma as metabolites of aniline. It was assumed that a high metabolic capacity for acetylation protected the victim from more severe reactions. Her husband confessed later that he had tried to poison her. PMID:10876991

  14. Simultaneous determination of tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Shurubor, Yevgeniya I; Cooper, Arthur J L; Isakova, Elena P; Deryabina, Yulia I; Beal, M Flint; Krasnikov, Boris F

    2016-06-15

    Here we describe a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the simultaneous detection and quantitation in standard solutions of 13 important metabolites of cellular energy metabolism, including 9 tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle components and 4 additional metabolites. The metabolites are detected by their absorbance at 210 nm. The procedure does not require prior derivatization, and an analysis can be carried out at ambient temperature within 15 min. The significance of the current work is that the current HPLC procedure should motivate the development of simplified TCA cycle enzyme assays, isotopomer analysis, and determination of selected TCA metabolite levels in plasma/tissues. PMID:27001310

  15. Detection of Nitrobenzodiazepines and Their 7-Amino Metabolites in Oral Fluid.

    PubMed

    Vindenes, Vigdis; Strand, Dag Helge; Koksæter, Paul; Gjerde, Hallvard

    2016-05-01

    Clonazepam, nitrazepam and flunitrazepam are frequently used benzodiazepines, both as prescribed medication and as drugs of abuse. Little is, however, known about how these drugs are excreted in oral fluid. It has been claimed that the parent drugs are more likely to be detected in oral fluid than the 7-amino metabolites. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the parent drugs or the 7-amino metabolites of the nitrobenzodiazepines were most frequently detected in authentic oral fluid samples. Oral fluid samples were collected from patients undergoing opioid maintenance treatment. Cases where clonazepam, nitrazepam, flunitrazepam and/or their metabolites were detected were included. The samples were collected using the Intercept(®)Oral Specimen Collection Device. A cutoff concentration of 1 nM (∼0.3 ng/mL) in oral fluid-buffer mixture was applied for all the substances. A total of 1,001 oral fluid samples were positive for clonazepam and/or 7-aminoclonazepam; both substances were detected in 707 samples, only the parent drug in 64 cases and only the metabolite in 230 cases. For nitrazepam, both substances were detected in 139 samples; only the parent drug in 16 cases and only the metabolite in 56 cases. Flunitrazepam only was not detected in any sample; both substances were detected in one of these cases, and only the metabolite in three cases. This study revealed that 7-amino metabolites were more likely to be detected in oral fluid than the parent drugs. PMID:27013620

  16. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography−mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO2). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO2 are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  17. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO₂). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO₂ are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  18. [Comparison of four immunoassay screening devices for detection of benzodiazepine and its metabolites in urine: mainly detection of etizolam, thienodiazepine and its metabolites].

    PubMed

    Namera, Akira; Makita, Ryosuke; Nagao, Masataka

    2011-03-01

    The immunoassay screening of benzodiazepines in urine is one of the most important methods of drug analysis in clinical and forensic laboratories. We experienced an unusual case of poisoning wherein the result of Triage DOA immunoassay screening was negative, although Depas (etizolam) was detected in the blood of the victim who had been suspected to prescribe Depas by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Depas has been widely used for the treatment of anxiety in Japan. Three immunoassay screening devices (AccuSign BZO, Monitect-3, and Fastect II) were evaluated for their specificity for etizolam, its 2 major metabolites M-III and M-VI, and other metabolites of benzodiazepines in urine. With AccuSign BZO, etizolam, M-III, and M-VI could be detected at concentrations of 1,000 ng/mL in urine; however, they could not be detected even at concentrations of 25,000 ng/mL with the other kits. In the case of etizolam poisoning, the result of AccuSign BZO was positive; however, Triage DOA, which is mainly used for the detection of drugs in urine at intensive care units (ICUs) or forensic laboratories, showed negative result for benzodiazepines. The concentrations of etizolam and its metabolites in urine were measured by the established high-performance liquid chromatographic method. The concentrations of M-III and M-V were 700 and 1,600 ng/mL, respectively. AccuSign BZO demonstrated higher specificity-than the other screening kits for the detection of etizolam and its metabolites in urine. Therefore, the types of drugs detected would be increased by combining Triage DOA with AccuSign BZO in ICUs or forensic laboratories. PMID:21485120

  19. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  20. Detection and characterization of betamethasone metabolites in human urine by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Matabosch, Xavier; Pozo, Oscar J; Monfort, Núria; Pérez-Mañá, Clara; Farré, Magí; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are prohibited in sports when administered by systemic routes and allowed using other administrations for therapeutic reasons. Therefore, markers to distinguish between routes of administration through the analysis of urine samples are needed in anti-doping control. As a first step to achieve that goal, the metabolism of betamethasone (BET) was investigated in the present work. Urine samples obtained after BET intramuscular injection were hydrolyzed with β-glucuronidase and subjected to liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate in alkaline conditions. The extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Common open screening methods for fluorine containing corticosteroids (precursor ion scan method of m/z 121, 147, 171, and neutral loss (NL) scan methods of 20 and 38 Da in positive ionization, and 46 and 76 Da in negative ionization) were applied to detect BET metabolites. Moreover, an NL method was applied to detect A-ring reduced metabolites of BET, which are ionized as [M+NH4 ](+) (NL of 55, 73, and 91 Da, corresponding to the consecutive losses of NH3 , HF and one, two and three water molecules, respectively). BET and 24 metabolites were detected. Six metabolites were identified by comparison with standards, and for ten, feasible structures were proposed based on mass spectrometric data. Eleven of the characterized metabolites had not been previously reported. Metabolites resulting from 11-oxidation, 6-hydroxylation, C20 or 4-ene-3-one reduction and combination of some of them were detected. Moreover one metabolite resulting from cleavage of the side chain with subsequent oxidation of carbon at C17 was also detected. PMID:25545348

  1. Detection, synthesis and characterization of metabolites of steroid hormones conjugated with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Marcos, Josep; Joglar, Jesús; Alfonso, Ignacio; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Pozo, Oscar J

    2013-03-01

    The occurrence of several polyunsaturated testosterone related compounds (including 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione and 4,6-androstadien-17β-ol-3-one) in urine after alkaline treatment of the sample has been recently reported. Although several experiments seem to indicate that they are testosterone metabolites, their origin is still unknown. In this study, it is demonstrated that these metabolites are produced from the degradation of cysteine conjugates. Several testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine have been synthesized and characterized by NMR techniques. Their detection in human urine has been performed by LC-MS/MS. The acquisition of several transitions in the SRM mode and the comparison between ion ratios and retention times allowed for the unequivocal confirmation of the presence of cysteine conjugates in urine. The analysis of urine samples collected after testosterone administration confirmed that synthesized cysteine conjugates are testosterone metabolites. The fact that these conjugates result in polyunsaturated compounds in urine after alkaline treatment was demonstrated by fraction collection and alkaline treatment of each fraction. Besides, the presence of these metabolites was also confirmed in human plasma. The formation of these metabolites implies an unreported metabolic biotransformation: 6,7-dehydrogenation as phase I metabolism followed by conjugation with glutathione and subsequent transformation to cysteine conjugates. Finally, the existence of similar metabolites for cortisol and progesterone was also confirmed by LC-MS/MS indicating that the presented metabolic pathway is not exclusively active in androgens, but common to progestagens and glucocorticoids. PMID:23261958

  2. Lateral flow biosensor for multiplex detection of nitrofuran metabolites based on functionalized magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuewen; Liang, Xiaoling; Dong, Jianghong; Fang, Zhiyuan; Zeng, Lingwen

    2016-09-01

    The use of potential mutagenic nitrofuran antibiotic in food animal production has been banned world-wide. Common methods for nitrofuran detection involve complex extraction procedures. In the present study, magnetic beads functionalized with antibody against nitrofuran derivative were used as both the extraction and color developing media in lateral flow biosensor. Derivatization reagent carboxybenzaldehyde is firstly modified with ractopamine. After reaction with nitrofuran metabolites, the resultant molecule has two functional groups: the metabolite moiety and the ractopamine moiety. Metabolite moiety is captured by the antibody that is coated on magnetic beads. This duplex is then loaded onto biosensor and ractopamine moiety is further captured by the antibody immobilized on the test zone of nitrocellulose membrane. Without tedious organic reagent-based extraction procedure, this biosensor was capable of visually detecting four metabolites simultaneously with a detection limit of 0.1 μg/L. No cross-reactivity was observed in the presence of 50 μg/L interferential components. Graphical abstract Derivatization of nitrofuran metabolites (AHD, AOZ, SEM, or AMOZ) and LFA detection of the derivative products. PMID:27438720

  3. Nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for in vitro detection of small molecule metabolites.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Wang, Lu; Duan, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule metabolites secreted by pathological processes can act as molecular biomarkers for clinical diagnosis. In vitro detection of the metabolites such as glucose and reactive oxygen species is of great significance for precise screening, monitoring and prognosis of metabolic disorders and relevant diseases such as cancer, and has been under intense research and development in clinical chemistry and molecular diagnostics. In this review, we summarize recent developments in nanomaterial based electrochemical (bio)sensors for in vitro detection of glucose and reactive oxygen species and the progress in utilizing lightweight and flexible electrodes and micro/nanoscale electrodes for flexible and miniaturized sensors. PMID:26845060

  4. Development of A Concise Synthesis of (−)-Oseltamivir (Tamiflu®)

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Zhang, Ting

    2011-01-01

    We report a full account of our work towards the development of an eight-step synthesis of anti-influenza drug (−)-oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) from commercially available starting material. The final synthetic route proceeds with an overall yield of 30 %. Key transformations include a novel palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation reaction (Pd-AAA) as well as a rhodium-catalyzed chemo-, regio-, and stereoselective aziridination reaction. PMID:21365707

  5. Detection of hepatotoxicity potential with metabolite profiling (metabolomics) of rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Mattes, W; Davis, K; Fabian, E; Greenhaw, J; Herold, M; Looser, R; Mellert, W; Groeters, S; Marxfeld, H; Moeller, N; Montoya-Parra, G; Prokoudine, A; van Ravenzwaay, B; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Kamp, H

    2014-11-01

    While conventional parameters used to detect hepatotoxicity in drug safety assessment studies are generally informative, the need remains for parameters that can detect the potential for hepatotoxicity at lower doses and/or at earlier time points. Previous work has shown that metabolite profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics) can detect signals of potential hepatotoxicity in rats treated with doxorubicin at doses that do not elicit hepatotoxicity as monitored with conventional parameters. The current study extended this observation to the question of whether such signals could be detected in rats treated with compounds that can elicit hepatotoxicity in humans (i.e., drug-induced liver injury, DILI) but have not been reported to do so in rats. Nine compounds were selected on the basis of their known DILI potential, with six other compounds chosen as negative for DILI potential. A database of rat plasma metabolite profiles, MetaMap(®)Tox (developed by metanomics GmbH and BASF SE) was used for both metabolite profiles and mode of action (MoA) metabolite signatures for a number of known toxicities. Eight of the nine compounds with DILI potential elicited metabolite profiles that matched with MoA patterns of various rat liver toxicities, including cholestasis, oxidative stress, acetaminophen-type toxicity and peroxisome proliferation. By contrast, only one of the six non-DILI compounds showed a weak match with rat liver toxicity. These results suggest that metabolite profiling may indeed have promise to detect signals of hepatotoxicity in rats treated with compounds having DILI potential. PMID:25086301

  6. Metabolism of boldione in humans by mass spectrometric techniques: detection of pseudoendogenous metabolites.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Xavier; Curcio, Davide; Colamonici, Cristiana; Molaioni, Francesco; Botrè, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Boldione is an anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) related to boldenone, androstenedione, and testosterone bearing two double bonds in C1 and C4 positions. Boldione is rapidly transformed to the well-known AAS boldenone, being both compounds included in the list of prohibited substances and methods published yearly by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). After the administration of boldione to a male volunteer, the already described urinary metabolites of boldenone produced after reduction in C4, oxydoreduction in C3 and C17, and hydroxylation have been detected. In addition, minor new metabolites have been detected and their structure postulated after mass spectrometric analyses. Finally, the reduction of the double bound in C1 produces metabolites identical to the endogenously produced ones. A method based on gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) after a urine sample purification by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) permitted to confirm the main synthetic like boldione/boldenone metabolite (17β-hydroxy-5β-androst-1-en-3-one) and boldenone at trace levels (< 5 ng/mL) and then to establish its synthetic or endogenous origin, and to determine the exogenous origin of metabolites with the same chemical structure of the endogenous ones. The detection of pseudoendogenous androgens of synthetic origin partially overlapped boldenone and its main metabolite detection, being an additional proof of synthetic steroids misuse. By the use of IRMS, the correct evaluation of the modifications of the steroid profile after the administration of synthetic AAS that could be converted into endogenous like ones is possible. PMID:24259377

  7. Chemoselective detection and discrimination of carbonyl-containing compounds in metabolite mixtures by 1H-detected 15N NMR

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Arumugam, Sengodagounder; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Higashi, Richard M.; Laulhé, Sébastien; Nantz, Michael H.; Moseley, Hunter N.B.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectra of mixtures of metabolites extracted from cells or tissues are extremely complex, reflecting the large number of compounds that are present over a wide range of concentrations. Although multidimensional NMR can greatly improve resolution as well as improve reliability of compound assignments, lower abundance metabolites often remain hidden. We have developed a carbonyl selective aminooxy probe that specifically reacts with free keto and aldehyde functions, but not carboxylates. By incorporating 15N in the aminooxy functional group, 15N-edited NMR was used to select exclusively those metabolites that contain a free carbonyl function while all other metabolites are rejected. Here we demonstrate that the chemical shifts of the aminooxy adducts of ketones and aldehydes are very different, which can be used to discriminate between aldoses and ketoses for example. Utilizing the 2 or 3 bond 15N-1H couplings, the 15N-edited NMR analysis was optimized first with authentic standards and then applied to an extract of the lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. More than 30 carbonyl containing compounds at NMR detectable levels, 6 of which we have assigned by reference to our database. As the aminooxy probe contains a permanently charged quaternary ammonium group, the adducts are also optimized for detection by mass spectrometry. Thus, this sample preparation technique provides a better link between the two structural determination tools, thereby paving the way to faster and more reliable identification of both known and unknown metabolites directly in crude biological extracts. PMID:25616249

  8. [Detection of fungal metabolites showing toxic activity through Artemia salina bioassay].

    PubMed

    González, Ana María; Presa, Maximiliano; Latorre, María Gabriela; Lurá, María Cristina

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to detect toxic metabolites from fungi contaminating food and medicinal herbs by applying the toxicity assay to Artemia salina. According to toxicity percentages, the extracts were classified as nontoxic (NT), slightly toxic (ST), toxic (T) and highly toxic (HT). Those classified as T and HT were assayed for mycotoxins. Only 6 out of 71 strains were found to be T (8.5%) for A. salina. Penicillium brevicompactum Dierckx, isolated from sausages, was found to be HT, mainly due to the presence of ochratoxin A and two other unidentified metabolites. PMID:17592895

  9. CEST-MRI detects metabolite levels altered by breast cancer cell aggressiveness and chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kannie W Y; Jiang, Lu; Cheng, Menglin; Wijnen, Jannie P; Liu, Guanshu; Huang, Peng; van Zijl, Peter C M; McMahon, Michael T; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-06-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an MRI contrast mechanism that detects the exchange of protons from distinct hydroxyl, amine, and amide groups to tissue water through the transfer of signal loss, with repeated exchange enhancing their effective signal. We applied CEST to detect systematically 15 common cellular metabolites in a panel of differentially aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. The highest CEST contrast was generated by creatine, myo-inositol, glutamate, and glycerophosphocholine, whose cellular concentrations decreased with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness. These decreased metabolite concentrations resulted in turn in a decreased CEST profile with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. Treatment of both breast cancer cell lines with the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin resulted in increased metabolic CEST profiles, which correlated with significant increases in creatine, phosphocreatine, and glycerophosphocholine. CEST can detect breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. The presented results help shed light on possible contributions from CEST-active metabolites to the CEST contrast produced by breast cancers. The metabolic CEST profile may improve detection sensitivity over conventional MRS, and may have the potential to assess breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy non-invasively using MRI if specialized metabolic CEST profile detection can be realized in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27100284

  10. Graphene nano-ink biosensor arrays on a microfluidic paper for multiplexed detection of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Labroo, Pratima; Cui, Yue

    2014-02-27

    The development of a miniaturized and low-cost platform for the highly sensitive, selective and rapid detection of multiplexed metabolites is of great interest for healthcare, pharmaceuticals, food science, and environmental monitoring. Graphene is a delicate single-layer, two-dimensional network of carbon atoms with extraordinary electrical sensing capability. Microfluidic paper with printing technique is a low cost matrix. Here, we demonstrated the development of graphene-ink based biosensor arrays on a microfluidic paper for the multiplexed detection of different metabolites, such as glucose, lactate, xanthine and cholesterol. Our results show that the graphene biosensor arrays can detect multiple metabolites on a microfluidic paper sensitively, rapidly and simultaneously. The device exhibits a fast measuring time of less than 2 min, a low detection limit of 0.3 μM, and a dynamic detection range of 0.3-15 μM. The process is simple and inexpensive to operate and requires a low consumption of sample volume. We anticipate that these results could open exciting opportunities for a variety of applications. PMID:24528665

  11. Separation and detection of amino acid metabolites of Escherichia coli in microbial fuel cell with CE.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Lihong; Lin, Ping; Xu, Kaixuan

    2016-07-01

    In this work, CE-LIF was employed to investigate the amino acid metabolites produced by Escherichia coli (E. coli) in microbial fuel cell (MFC). Two peptides, l-carnosine and l-alanyl-glycine, together with six amino acids, cystine, alanine, lysine, methionine, tyrosine, arginine were separated and detected in advance by a CE-LIF system coupled with a homemade spontaneous injection device. The injection device was devised to alleviate the effect of electrical discrimination for analytes during sample injection. All analytes could be completely separated within 8 min with detection limits of 20-300 nmol/L. Then this method was applied to analyze the substrate solution containing amino acid metabolites produced by E. coli. l-carnosine, l-alanyl-glycine, and cystine were used as the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur source for the E. coli culture in the MFC to investigate the amino acid metabolites during metabolism. Two MFCs were used to compare the activity of metabolism of the bacteria. In the sample collected at the running time 200 h of MFC, the amino acid methionine was discovered as the metabolite with the concentrations 23.3 μg/L. PMID:27121957

  12. Detection and identification of plasma progesterone metabolites in the female Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) using GC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tripp, K M; Dubois, M; Delahaut, P; Verstegen, J P

    2009-08-01

    Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) have relatively low peripheral concentrations of progesterone (P4). The objective of this study was to determine if these relatively low P4 concentrations are associated with a high ratio of progestin metabolites and to document metabolite concentrations from individual blood samples obtained from manatees during diestrus or pregnancy. Metabolites known to exist in elephants-terrestrial manatee relatives-were targeted. These included 5alpha-reduced progestins (5alpha-pregnane-3,20-dione [5alpha-DHP] and 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one [5alpha-P3-OH]) and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17alpha-OHP), which occurs in Asian elephants. An additional, inactive metabolite, 20alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (20alpha-OHP), indicative of P4 overproduction, was also targeted. Progesterone itself was the predominant progestin detected in pregnant and nonpregnant manatee plasma (n = 10) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with tandem quadrupole detectors (GC/MS/MS). Progesterone concentrations in pregnant females varied from early (moderate to high) through mid and late (low) pregnancy. Progesterone concentrations ranged from low to high in nonpregnant, nonlactating females. The most commonly detected metabolite was 5alpha-P3-OH (n = 7), which occurred in pregnant (lower limit of detection [LLOD] to high) and nonpregnant (trace to high) females. The 5alpha-DHP metabolite was also detected in pregnant (LLOD to moderate) and nonpregnant (low) females. The 17alpha-OHP metabolite was not detected in any tested female. The 20alpha-OHP metabolite was detected in one nonpregnant, nonlactating, captive female (LLOD). Metabolites were most prevalent during early pregnancy, concurrent with maximum P4 concentrations. Based on their concentrations in peripheral circulation, we inferred that these metabolites may have, opposite to elephants, a limited physiologic role during luteal, pregnant, and nonpregnant phases in the manatee. PMID

  13. SECONDARY METABOLITE PRODUCTION BY THE FUNGAL PATHOGEN EUTYPA LATA: ANALYSIS OF EXTRACTS FROM GRAPEVINE CULTURES AND DETECTION OF THOSE METABOLITES IN PLANTA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eutypa dieback of grapevines is caused by the fungal pathogen Eutypa lata and reduces vineyard longevity worldwide. Early detection could reduce losses due to this disease, so our aim was to identify acetylenic phenol metabolites of E. lata that could prove suitable as chemical markers in an early d...

  14. Determining zolpidem compliance: urinary metabolite detection and prevalence in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Schwope, David M; DePriest, Anne; Black, David L; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J; Heltsley, Rebecca

    2014-10-01

    Zolpidem (Ambien(®)) is the most prescribed insomnia treatment in the USA; however, little is known about zolpidem metabolite excretion in chronic pain patients. As zolpidem is extensively metabolized in vivo to zolpidem 4-phenyl carboxylic acid (ZCA), metabolite detection may provide improved accuracy for compliance determinations, thereby improving clinical decisions. Zolpidem and ZCA were extracted from 1 mL human urine by mixed-mode solid-phase extraction. Samples were analyzed by LC-MS-MS using positive electrospray ionization with multiple reaction monitoring mode employed for detection and quantification. Gradient chromatographic separation was achieved with a reversed-phase column in a rapid 1.8 min analysis. The assay was linear from 4 to 1,000 µg/L for zolpidem and 4 to 10,000 µg/L for ZCA. Interday recovery (bias) and imprecision (n = 20) were 100-107% of target and 2.4-3.7% relative standard deviation, respectively. Extraction efficiencies were 78-90%. Pain compliance samples (n = 3,142) were de-identified and analyzed for zolpidem and ZCA. Zolpidem was detected greater than limit of quantification in 720 specimens (22.9%), while ZCA was detected in 1,579 specimens (50.3%). Only five specimens contained zolpidem alone. ZCA was observed without parent zolpidem in 864 specimens, thereby increasing population detection rates by 27.5%. Addition of a zolpidem metabolite to compliance determinations substantially improved detection for zolpidem intake and also should prove useful in clinical and forensic settings. PMID:25217539

  15. Detection of rare species of volatile organic selenium metabolites in male golden hamster urine.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jae; Ohrnberger, Sarah A; Valencak, Teresa G

    2016-07-01

    Selenium has been considered as an essential trace element in mammals and its intake comes mainly from food. Mammals can metabolize both inorganic and organic species, and urinary excretion is the primary elimination route of selenium. Selenosugars and trimethylselenonium ion have been identified as major urinary metabolites. Other metabolites have been reported, but they were detected in some studies and not in others. Still, a large portion of the ingested selenium eliminated from the body is unknown. Volatile selenium species may account for a certain portion of the unknown species since they can easily be lost during sample analyses. While we analyzed male golden hamster urine in search of potential volatile pheromone(s), four volatile selenium compounds were detected. They were dimethyl selenenylsulfide, dimethyl diselenide, dimethyl bis(thio)selenide, and dimethyl selenodisulfide. When the urine samples were aged and dried for 48 h, dimethyl selenodisulfide tended to increase, while others decreased. The increase might be due to the formation of dimethyl selenodisulfide via reaction of dimethyl diselenide and dimethyl trisulfide whose concentration increased as urine aged. To our knowledge, dimethyl bis(thio)selenide and dimethyl selenodisulfide have never been demonstrated in urine. It remains to be determined whether these species are common metabolites in other animals or hamster-specific. PMID:27129975

  16. A comparative study of the interaction of Tamiflu and Oseltamivir carboxylate with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Vishkaee, Tahereh Sadigh; Mohajerani, Niloufar; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2013-02-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) is a pro-drug that is metabolized to its active form (Oseltamivir carboxylate), after oral administration. OC inhibits influenza A and B neuraminidases in vitro and OP inhibits influenza virus infection and replication in vitro. Serum albumin is the most abundant of the proteins in the circulatory system of a wide variety of organisms and plays an important role in the transport and deposition of many drugs. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of BSA with Tamiflu and Oseltamivir carboxylate in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using a constant protein concentration and various drug contents. FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopic methods were used to determine the drugs binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of drug complexation on protein secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that OP and OC bind BSA with overall binding constants of K(OP-BSA)=1.88 (±0.16)×10(4)M(-1) and K(OC-BSA)=5.7 (±0.09)×10(2)M(-1). Drug complexation alters protein conformation by major reduction of α-helix and random coil and increase of β-sheet and turn structures that indicate a partial protein destabilization. The results suggest that BSA might act as carrier proteins for OP in delivering it to target molecules. PMID:23353784

  17. Effects of oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) in human sera on results of microneutralization and hemagglutinin-inhibition tests for H5N2 avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshinao; Doy, M; Yamato, S; Kawada, Y; Ogata, T

    2008-01-01

    To determine the influence of oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) on the results of microneutralization and hemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) tests in human sera with H5N2 influenza virus, ten volunteers were administered Tamiflu and blood samples were collected. In the microneutralization test, no consistent effects were observed. However, in the HI test, specimens from all volunteers taken at 4 and 7 h after drug administration showed a higher titer as compared to 0 and 24 h after administration when mammalian cells (horse, guinea pig, and human) were used. These results suggest that the administration of Tamiflu may affect the results of HI tests for H5N2 virus. PMID:18227965

  18. Detection of Pesticides and Pesticide Metabolites Using the Cross Reactivity of Enzyme Immunoassays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Aga, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay is an important environmental analysis method that may be used to identify many pesticide analytes in water samples. Because of similarities in chemical structure between various members of a pesticide class, there often may be an unwanted response that is characterized by a percentage of cross reactivity. Also, there may be cross reactivity caused by degradation products of the target analyte that may be present in the sample. In this paper, the concept of cross reactivity caused by degradation products or by nontarget analytes is explored as a tool for identification of metabolites or structurally similar compounds not previously known to be present in water samples. Two examples are examined in this paper from various water quality studies. They are alachlor and its metabolite, alachlor ethane sulfonic acid, and atrazine and its class members, prometryn and propazine. A method for using cross reactivity for the detection of these compounds is explained in this paper.

  19. Aflatoxin metabolism in humans: detection of metabolites and nucleic acid adducts in urine by affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Groopman, J.D.; Donahue, P.R.; Zhu, J.Q.; Chen, J.S.; Wogan, G.N.

    1985-10-01

    A high-affinity IgM monoclonal antibody specific for aflatoxins was covalently bound to Sepharose 4B and used as a preparative column to isolate aflatoxin derivatives from the urine of people and experimental animals who had been exposed to the carcinogen environmentally or under laboratory conditions. Aflatoxin levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography after elution from the affinity column. In studies on rats injected with ( UC)aflatoxin B1, the authors identified the major aflatoxin-DNA adduct, 2,3-dihydro-2-(N7-guanyl)-3-hydroxy-aflatoxin B1 (AFB1-N7-Gua), and the oxidative metabolites M1 and P1 as the major aflatoxin species present in the urine. When this methodology was applied to human urine samples obtained from people from the Guangxi Province of China exposed to aflatoxin B1 through dietary contamination, the aflatoxin metabolites detected were also AFB1-N7-Gua and aflatoxins M1 and P1. Therefore, affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody represents a useful and rapid technique with which to isolate this carcinogen and its metabolites in biochemical epidemiology and for subsequent quantitative measurements, providing exposure information that can be used for risk assessment.

  20. In vivo detection of the new psychoactive substance AM-694 and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bertol, Elisabetta; Vaiano, Fabio; Di Milia, Maria Grazia; Mari, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    AM-694 or 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(2-iodobenzoyl)indole is a synthetic cannabinoid that acts as a selective and a powerful agonist for CB1 receptor, inducing cannabinoid-like effects (euphoria, sedation, hallucinations and anxiety). Its spread, like for other synthetic cannabinoids, has increased in recent years and many web sources freely supply these kinds of new drugs. It can be taken by smoking or through oral consumption. A 25-years-old man was hospitalized at the local hospital following a major trauma after ingestion of alcohol and an unknown pill. Urine and blood samples were sent to our Forensic Toxicology Division to investigate on possible substance abuse. A general unknown screening of biological samples, extracted by liquid-liquid extraction (ethylacetate and dichloromethane) in basic, acidic and neutral conditions, was achieved to verify the presence of drugs of abuse and/or their metabolites, both in gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). For the quantification of AM-694, urine was extracted by solid phase extraction (SPE) on a Bond Elut Certify cartridge; an acidic hydrolysis (HCl 30%, 95°C, 60min) was necessary before liquid-liquid extraction of metabolites. For the detection of benzodiazepines and their metabolites, an enzymatic hydrolysis was applied (β-glucuronidase, pH 4.5, 50°C, 18h). Quantification of AM-694 (internal standard AM-2201), midazolam and α-hydroxymidazolam (internal standard halazepam) were performed by LC-MS/MS analysis in multiple reaction monitoring ([M+H](+): m/z 436→190, 272, AM-694; m/z 360→155, 127, AM-2201; m/z 326→291, 223, midazolam; m/z 342→168, 203, α-hydroxymidazolam; m/z 353→241, 222, halazepam). The general unknown screening revealed the presence of AM-694 (urine sample) and benzodiazepines (urine and blood). The concentration of AM-694, obtained by LC-MS/MS, was 0.084μg/L. Midazolam and α-hydroxymidazolam were detected in urine (0

  1. Proton observed phosphorus editing (POPE) for in vivo detection of phospholipid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wijnen, Jannie P; Klomp, Dennis W J; Nabuurs, Christine I H C; de Graaf, Robin A; van Kalleveen, Irene M L; van der Kemp, Wybe J M; Luijten, Peter R; Kruit, Mark C; Webb, Andrew; Kan, Hermien E; Boer, Vincent O

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the sensitivity of proton observed phosphorus editing (POPE) with direct (31) P MRS with Ernst angle excitation for (1) H-(31) P coupled metabolites at 7 T. POPE sequences were developed for detecting phosphocholine (PC), phosphoethanolamine (PE), glycerophosphocholine (GPC), and glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE) on the (1) H channel, thereby using the enhanced sensitivity of the (1) H nuclei over (31) P detection. Five healthy volunteers were examined with POPE and (31) P-MRS. POPE editing showed a more than doubled sensitivity in an ideal phantom experiment as compared with direct (31) P MRS with Ernst angle excitation. In vivo, despite increased relaxation losses, significant gains in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 30-40% were shown for PE and GPE + PC levels in the human brain. The SNR of GPC was lower in the POPE measurement compared with the (31) P-MRS measurement. Furthermore, selective narrowband editing on the (31) P channel showed the ability to separate the overlapping GPE and PE signals in the (1) H spectrum. POPE can be used for enhanced detection of (1) H-(31) P coupled metabolites in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26601921

  2. Removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluent by aerobic biological treatment with steroidal metabolite detection.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Soledad; Vergara, Juan P; Jarpa, Mayra; Hernandez, Victor; Becerra, Jose; Vidal, Gladys

    2016-10-14

    Stigmasterol is a phytosterol contained in Kraft mill effluent that is able to increase over 100% after aerobic biological treatment. This compound can act as an endocrine disrupter as its structure is similar to that of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluents treated by a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with steroidal metabolite detection. The MBBR was operated for 145 days, with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days. Stigmasterol and steroidal metabolites were detected by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector during MBBR operation. The results show that the MBBR removed 87.4% of biological oxygen demand (BOD5), 61.5% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 24.5% of phenol and 31.5% of lignin, expressed in average values. The MBBR system successfully removed 100% of the stigmasterol contained in the influent (33 µg L(-1)) after 5 weeks of operation. In that case, the organic load rate was 0.343 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). Furthermore, different steroidal compounds (e.g., testosterone propionate, stigmast-4-en-3-one, 5α-pregnan-12-one-20α-hydroxy, 5α-pregnane-3,11,20-trione and 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstane-11,17-dione were detected in the Kraft mill effluent as potential products of phytosterol biotransformation. PMID:27399163

  3. Meat, the metabolites: an integrated metabolite profiling and lipidomics approach for the detection of the adulteration of beef with pork

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Drupad K.; Hollywood, Katherine A.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Ward, Holli; Trivedi, Dakshat K.; Greenwood, Joseph; Ellis, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Adulteration of high quality food products with sub-standard and cheaper grades is a world-wide problem taxing the global economy. Currently, many traditional tests suffer from poor specificity, highly complex outputs and a lack of high-throughput processing. Metabolomics has been successfully used as an accurate discriminatory technique in a number of applications including microbiology, cancer research and environmental studies and certain types of food fraud. In this study, we have developed metabolomics as a technique to assess the adulteration of meat as an improvement on current methods. Different grades of beef mince and pork mince, purchased from a national retail outlet were combined in a number of percentage ratios and analysed using GC-MS and UHPLC-MS. These techniques were chosen because GC-MS enables investigations of metabolites involved in primary metabolism whilst UHPLC-MS using reversed phase chromatography provides information on lipophilic species. With the application of chemometrics and statistical analyses, a panel of differential metabolites were found for identification of each of the two meat types. Additionally, correlation was observed between metabolite content and percentage of fat declared on meat products’ labelling. PMID:26911805

  4. Meat, the metabolites: an integrated metabolite profiling and lipidomics approach for the detection of the adulteration of beef with pork.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Drupad K; Hollywood, Katherine A; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Ward, Holli; Trivedi, Dakshat K; Greenwood, Joseph; Ellis, David I; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-04-01

    Adulteration of high quality food products with sub-standard and cheaper grades is a world-wide problem taxing the global economy. Currently, many traditional tests suffer from poor specificity, highly complex outputs and a lack of high-throughput processing. Metabolomics has been successfully used as an accurate discriminatory technique in a number of applications including microbiology, cancer research and environmental studies and certain types of food fraud. In this study, we have developed metabolomics as a technique to assess the adulteration of meat as an improvement on current methods. Different grades of beef mince and pork mince, purchased from a national retail outlet were combined in a number of percentage ratios and analysed using GC-MS and UHPLC-MS. These techniques were chosen because GC-MS enables investigations of metabolites involved in primary metabolism whilst UHPLC-MS using reversed phase chromatography provides information on lipophilic species. With the application of chemometrics and statistical analyses, a panel of differential metabolites were found for identification of each of the two meat types. Additionally, correlation was observed between metabolite content and percentage of fat declared on meat products' labelling. PMID:26911805

  5. Detection of Phenolic Metabolites of Styrene in Mouse Liver and Lung Microsomal IncubationsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shuijie; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Lingbo; Zeng, Su

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic activation is considered to be a critical step for styrene-induced pulmonary toxicity. Styrene-7,8-oxide is a primary oxidative metabolite generated by vinyl epoxidation of styrene. In addition, urinary 4-vinylphenol (4-VP), a phenolic metabolite formed by aromatic hydroxylation, has been detected in workers and experimental animals after exposure to styrene. In the present study, new oxidative metabolites of styrene, including 2-vinylphenol (2-VP), 3-vinylphenol (3-VP), vinyl-1,4-hydroquinone, and 2-hydroxystyrene glycol were detected in mouse liver microsomal incubations. The production rates of 2-VP, 3-VP, 4-VP, and styrene glycol were 0.0527 ± 0.0045, 0.0019 ± 0.0006, 0.0053 ± 0.0002, and 4.42 ± 0.33 nmol/(min · mg protein) in mouse liver microsomes, respectively. Both disulfiram (100 μM) and 5-phenyl-1-pentyne (5 μM) significantly inhibited the formation of the VPs and styrene glycol. 2-VP, 3-VP, and 4-VP were metabolized in mouse liver microsomes at rates of 2.50 ± 0.30, 2.63 ± 0.13, and 3.45 ± 0.11 nmol/(min · mg protein), respectively. The three VPs were further metabolized to vinylcatechols and/or vinyl-1,4-hydroquinone and the corresponding glycols. Pulmonary toxicity of 2-VP, 3-VP, and 4-VP was evaluated in CD-1 mice, and 4-VP was found to be more toxic than 2-VP and 3-VP. PMID:20724499

  6. Development and in silico evaluation of large-scale metabolite identification methods using functional group detection for metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Joshua M.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.; Lane, Andrew N.; Moseley, Hunter N. B.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale identification of metabolites is key to elucidating and modeling metabolism at the systems level. Advances in metabolomics technologies, particularly ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (MS) enable comprehensive and rapid analysis of metabolites. However, a significant barrier to meaningful data interpretation is the identification of a wide range of metabolites including unknowns and the determination of their role(s) in various metabolic networks. Chemoselective (CS) probes to tag metabolite functional groups combined with high mass accuracy provide additional structural constraints for metabolite identification and quantification. We have developed a novel algorithm, Chemically Aware Substructure Search (CASS) that efficiently detects functional groups within existing metabolite databases, allowing for combined molecular formula and functional group (from CS tagging) queries to aid in metabolite identification without a priori knowledge. Analysis of the isomeric compounds in both Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) and KEGG Ligand demonstrated a high percentage of isomeric molecular formulae (43 and 28%, respectively), indicating the necessity for techniques such as CS-tagging. Furthermore, these two databases have only moderate overlap in molecular formulae. Thus, it is prudent to use multiple databases in metabolite assignment, since each major metabolite database represents different portions of metabolism within the biosphere. In silico analysis of various CS-tagging strategies under different conditions for adduct formation demonstrate that combined FT-MS derived molecular formulae and CS-tagging can uniquely identify up to 71% of KEGG and 37% of the combined KEGG/HMDB database vs. 41 and 17%, respectively without adduct formation. This difference between database isomer disambiguation highlights the strength of CS-tagging for non-lipid metabolite identification. However, unique identification of complex lipids still needs additional

  7. Detection of "bath salt" synthetic cathinones and metabolites in urine via DART-MS and solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    LaPointe, Joseph; Musselman, Brian; O'Neill, Teresa; Shepard, Jason R E

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive method, direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) was applied to the characterization and semiquantitative analysis of synthetic cathinones and their metabolites in urine. DART-MS was capable of detecting three different cathinones and three metabolites down to sub-clinical levels directly without any sample preparations. The process produced a spectrum within seconds because no extraction or derivatization was required for analysis and the high mass accuracy of the instrumentation allowed analysis without the need for lengthy chromatographic separations. The use of solid phase microextration demonstrated a relative increase in the detectability of both drugs and metabolites, improving the detection signal on average more than an order of magnitude over direct detection, while providing cleaner spectra devoid of the major peaks associated with urine that oftentimes dominate such samples. PMID:25315459

  8. Detection of "Bath Salt" Synthetic Cathinones and Metabolites in Urine via DART-MS and Solid Phase Microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaPointe, Joseph; Musselman, Brian; O'Neill, Teresa; Shepard, Jason R. E.

    2015-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive method, direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) was applied to the characterization and semiquantitative analysis of synthetic cathinones and their metabolites in urine. DART-MS was capable of detecting three different cathinones and three metabolites down to sub-clinical levels directly without any sample preparations. The process produced a spectrum within seconds because no extraction or derivatization was required for analysis and the high mass accuracy of the instrumentation allowed analysis without the need for lengthy chromatographic separations. The use of solid phase microextration demonstrated a relative increase in the detectability of both drugs and metabolites, improving the detection signal on average more than an order of magnitude over direct detection, while providing cleaner spectra devoid of the major peaks associated with urine that oftentimes dominate such samples.

  9. Simultaneous detection of lysine metabolites by a single LC-MS/MS method: monitoring lysine degradation in mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Pena, Izabella A; Marques, Lygia A; Laranjeira, Angelo B A; Yunes, José A; Eberlin, Marcos N; Arruda, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Detection and quantification of lysine degradation metabolites in plasma is necessary for the diagnosis and follow-up of diseases such as pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy. The principal metabolites involved in the disease are related to the first steps of lysine oxidation, either through the saccharopine or the pipecolate pathways. Currently, there are three different analytical methods used to assess the content of these metabolites in urine and plasma, but they require different sample preparations and analytical equipment. Here, we describe a protocol that calls for a simple sample preparation and uses liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) that allows simultaneous detection and quantification of underivatized l-saccharopine, l-aminoadipic acid, l-pipecolic acid, piperideine-6-carboxylate, l-glutamic acid, and pyridoxal-5-phosphate in plasma samples. To validate the method we analyzed the time course degradation after intraperitoneal injection of l-lysine in C57BL/6/J mice. We observed that the degradation of lysine through the saccharopine pathway reached a maximum within the first 2 h. At this time point there was an increase in the levels of the metabolites saccharopine, aminoadipic acid, and pipecolic acid by 3-, 24- and 3.4-fold, respectively, compared to time zero levels. These metabolites returned to basal levels after 4-6 h. In conclusion, we have developed a LC-MS/MS approach, which allows simultaneous analysis of lysine degradation metabolites without the need for derivatization. PMID:27026869

  10. The production and characterisation of an antibody to detect the coccidiostat toltrazuril and its metabolite ponazuril.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Lisa; Fodey, Terence L; Crooks, Steven R H; Elliott, Christopher T

    2003-05-01

    The production of an antibody to detect toltrazuril or its metabolite ponazuril is complicated due to structural constraints of conjugating these coccidiostats to a carrier protein. Therefore a search was carried out for a compound that shared a common substructure to use as an antigen mimic. The chosen compound, trifluoraminoether, was conjugated to two carrier proteins (HSA and BTG) and used in the immunisation of six rabbits. Two immunogen doses (1 mg and 0.1 mg) were also used. All six rabbits produced an immunological response to the hapten regardless of the carrier protein or immunogen dose used. The most sensitive polyclonal antibody produced, designated R609, was subsequently characterised. This antiserum exhibited an IC50 of 18 ng ml(-1) using a competitive ELISA format. Cross reactivity studies show that this serum is specific for toltrazuril and its metabolites (toltrazuril sulfoxide and toltrazuril sulfone) but does not cross-react with other coccidiostats such as halofuginone, nitroimidazoles or nicarbazin. This is the first reported production of an antibody capable of specifically binding toltrazuril and ponazuril. PMID:12790197

  11. The Detection of Metabolite-Mediated Gene Module Co-Expression Using Multivariate Linear Models

    PubMed Central

    Padayachee, Trishanta; Khamiakova, Tatsiana; Shkedy, Ziv; Perola, Markus; Salo, Perttu; Burzykowski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Investigating whether metabolites regulate the co-expression of a predefined gene module is one of the relevant questions posed in the integrative analysis of metabolomic and transcriptomic data. This article concerns the integrative analysis of the two high-dimensional datasets by means of multivariate models and statistical tests for the dependence between metabolites and the co-expression of a gene module. The general linear model (GLM) for correlated data that we propose models the dependence between adjusted gene expression values through a block-diagonal variance-covariance structure formed by metabolic-subset specific general variance-covariance blocks. Performance of statistical tests for the inference of conditional co-expression are evaluated through a simulation study. The proposed methodology is applied to the gene expression data of the previously characterized lipid-leukocyte module. Our results show that the GLM approach improves on a previous approach by being less prone to the detection of spurious conditional co-expression. PMID:26918614

  12. Analysis of the cyanolichen Lichina pygmaea metabolites using in situ DART-MS: from detection to thermochemistry of mycosporine serinol.

    PubMed

    Le Pogam, Pierre; Legouin, Béatrice; Le Lamer, Anne-Cécile; Boustie, Joël; Rondeau, David

    2015-03-01

    Direct Analysis in Real Time DART-HRMS is here first applied to the detection of molecules from a lichen, Lichina pygmaea. The aim was to propose an innovative method of in situ detection of lichen secondary metabolites using the possibilities of elemental composition determination available when a DART source is interfaced with a TOF analyzer. Three kinds of samples have been submitted to DART ionization, i.e. an intact thallus, a powder obtained from the crushed lichen and an aqueous extract. In situ analysis of crushed lichen, yields an extensive chemical profile, comparable to what is obtained from the aqueous extract, comprising both major polar metabolites described in literature along with some other signals that could correspond to potentially unknown metabolites. One of the detected secondary metabolites, mycosporine serinol, underwent a dehydration reaction prior to its transfer in the gas-phase by DART ionization. The consideration of the thermal transfers involved in the DART ionization process and the possibility to record time-dependent mass spectra through the use of the TOF analyzer allowed establishing Arrhenius plots of this water molecule loss to obtain associated thermodynamic quantities. The low values of corresponding activation enthalpy (Δr‡Hm° of the order of 25 kJ mol(-1)) enabled formulating some assumption regarding a possible role of such metabolites in the lichen. PMID:25800181

  13. Direct Standard-Free Quantitation of Tamiflu® and Other Pharmaceutical Tablets using Clustering Agents with Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Leib, Ryan D.; Williams, Evan R.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate and rapid quantitation is advantageous to identify counterfeit and substandard pharmaceutical drugs. A standard-free electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method is used to directly determine the dosage in the prescription and over-the-counter drugs, Tamiflu®, Sudafed®, and Dramamine®. A tablet of each drug was dissolved in aqueous solution, filtered, and introduced into solutions containing a known concentration of either L-tryptophan, L-phenylalanine or prednisone as clustering agents. The active ingredient(s) incorporates statistically into large clusters of the clustering agent where effects of differential ionization/detection are substantially reduced. From the abundances of large clusters, the dosages of the active ingredients in each of the tablets were determined to typically better than 20% accuracy even when the ionization/detection efficiency of the individual components differed by over 100×. Although this unorthodox method for quantitation is not as accurate as using conventional standards, it has the advantages that it is fast, it can be applied to mixtures where the identities of the analytes are unknown, and it can be used when suitable standards may not be readily available, such as schedule I or II controlled substances or new designer drugs that have not previously been identified. PMID:20092258

  14. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Maurice Mbadinga, Serge; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition. PMID:25966798

  15. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition. PMID:25966798

  16. Detection of metabolites of trapped humans using ion mobility spectrometry coupled with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vautz, Wolfgang; Slodzynski, Rafael; Hariharan, Chandrasekhara; Seifert, Luzia; Nolte, Jürgen; Fobbe, Rita; Sielemann, Stefanie; Lao, Bolan C; Huo, Ran; Thomas, C L Paul; Hildebrand, Lars

    2013-02-19

    For the first time, ion mobility spectrometry coupled with rapid gas chromatography, using multicapillary columns, was applied for the development of a pattern of signs of life for the localization of entrapped victims after disaster events (e.g., earthquake, terroristic attack). During a simulation experiment with entrapped volunteers, 12 human metabolites could be detected in the air of the void with sufficient sensitivity to enable a valid decision on the presence of a living person. Using a basic normalized summation of the measured concentrations, all volunteers involved in the particular experiments could be recognized only few minutes after they entered the simulation void and after less than 3 min of analysis time. An additional independent validation experiment enabled the recognition of a person in a room of ∼25 m(3) after ∼30 min with sufficiently high sensitivity to detect even a person briefly leaving the room. Undoubtedly, additional work must be done on analysis time and weight of the equipment, as well as on validation during real disaster events. However, the enormous potential of the method as a significantly helpful tool for search-and-rescue operations, in addition to trained canines, could be demonstrated. PMID:23249433

  17. Detection of methamphetamine and its main metabolite in fingermarks by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Xueguo; Yang, Ruiqin; Xu, Yingjian

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive and efficient method applying liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of methamphetamine and its main metabolite in fingermark deposits was described. Using this method, good linear relationship of methamphetamine was obtained in the range of 0.005μg to 0.5μg per cotton swab, the limit of detection was 1.5ng per cotton swab, the limit of quantitation was 5.0ng per cotton swab and the average values of recovery ratios were above 70.1%. Moreover, the influence factors for the detection of methamphetamine in fingermarks, such as kinds of substrates, development methods and extraction methods, were all discussed in details. The results showed that good recovery ratios could be obtained on painted wood and smooth substrates surfaces. Development methods in commercial powder could not influence the quality of examination of exogenous drug in latent fingermark. Furthermore, the results indicated that the method mentioned here could be applied in the analysis of forensic trace evidences and samples obtained in clinically addicted cases. PMID:25576675

  18. Detection of main metabolites of XLR-11 and its thermal degradation product in human hepatoma HepaRG cells and human urine.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Kanda, Koji; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Iwata, Yuko Togawa; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    The metabolism of (1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (XLR-11), a novel synthetic cannabinoid, was studied using a HepaRG cell culture. The HepaRG cells were incubated with the drug for 48 hours and the metabolites were extracted from the culture medium by liquid-liquid extraction. The extract was analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to detect the metabolites. N-(5-Hydroxypentyl) metabolite and N-pentanoic acid metabolite were identified in the culture medium of XLR-11, and several other metabolites, presumably formed by oxidation of the first two metabolites and XLR-11, were detected. The extract of an XLR-11 user's urine was also analyzed; however, the metabolites detected in the urine were different from XLR-11 metabolites in the medium. A metabolic experiment with the thermal degradation product of XLR-11, XLR-11 degradant, using HepaRG cells revealed that the urinary metabolites were almost identical to the XLR-11 degradant metabolites. These findings suggest that most of the XLR-11 was degraded by heating when the user smoked the herbal product containing XLR-11. PMID:25600155

  19. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants.

    PubMed

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F; Mark Kao, L; Jim Proctor, S; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D; Lord, Peter G; McMillian, Michael K

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds-chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. PMID:24486436

  20. Novel Metabolite Biomarkers of Huntington's Disease As Detected by High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Graham, Stewart F; Kumar, Praveen; Bahado-Singh, Ray O; Robinson, Andrew; Mann, David; Green, Brian D

    2016-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder that affects approximately 3-10 people per 100 000 in the Western world. The median age of onset is 40 years, with death typically following 15-20 years later. In this study, we biochemically profiled post-mortem frontal lobe and striatum from HD sufferers (n = 14) and compared their profiles with controls (n = 14). LC-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS detected a total of 5579 and 5880 features for frontal lobe and striatum, respectively. An ROC curve combining two spectral features from frontal lobe had an AUC value of 0.916 (0.794 to 1.000) and following statistical cross-validation had an 83% predictive accuracy for HD. Similarly, two striatum biomarkers gave an ROC AUC of 0.935 (0.806 to 1.000) and after statistical cross-validation predicted HD with 91.8% accuracy. A range of metabolite disturbances were evident including but-2-enoic acid and uric acid, which were altered in both frontal lobe and striatum. A total of seven biochemical pathways (three in frontal lobe and four in striatum) were significantly altered as a result of HD. This study highlights the utility of high-resolution metabolomics for the study of HD. Further characterization of the brain metabolome could lead to the identification of new biomarkers and novel treatment strategies for HD. PMID:27018767

  1. Detection of urinary metabolites common to structurally related 17alpha-alkyl anabolic steroids in horses and application to doping tests in racehorses: methandienone, methandriol, and oxymetholone.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masayuki; Aramaki, Sugako; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-06-01

    Methandienone, methandriol, and oxymetholone, which are anabolic steroids possessing 17alpha-methyl and 17beta-hydroxy groups, were developed as oral formulations for therapeutic purposes. However, they have been used in racehorses to enhance racing performance. In humans, it has been reported that structurally related anabolic steroids having the 17alpha-methyl and 17beta-hydroxy groups, including 17alpha-methyltestosterone, mestanolone, methandienone, methandriol, and oxymetholone, have metabolites in common. In this study, we found that metabolites common to those of 17alpha-methyltestosterone and mestanolone were detected in horse urine after the administration of oxymetholone, methandienone, and methandriol. Based on analytical data, we confirmed these to be the common metabolites of five structurally related steroids, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, mestanolone, oxymetholone, methandienone, and methandriol. Furthermore, we detected hitherto unknown urinary metabolites of methandriol and oxymetholone in horses. The parent steroid itself was detected in horse urine after the administration of methandriol, other than metabolites common to 17alpha-methyltestosterone and mestanolone. On the other hand, the major metabolite of oxymetholone was mestanolone, aside from metabolites presumed to be the stereoisomers of 2-hydroxymethyl-17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androstan-3,17beta-diol and 2,17alpha-di(hydroxymethyl)-5alpha-androstan-3,17beta-diol. The simultaneous detection of common metabolites and other main metabolites would help us narrow down the candidate-administered steroid for the doping tests in racehorses. PMID:18544225

  2. Detection and quantification of residues and metabolites of medicinal products in environmental compartments, food commodities and workplaces. A review.

    PubMed

    Bottoni, Paola; Caroli, Sergio

    2015-03-15

    The toxicological assessment of medicinal products (MPs) and their residues and metabolites in the environment have become a challenging task worldwide. The contamination of environmental compartments, biota, workplace, foodstuff and feedstuff by residues and metabolites of these substances poses a risk to human health which is still far from being fully understood. On the other hand, existing analytical methods not always possess sufficient detection power to quantify residues of MPs at very low concentrations. This review sets forth some of the most significant contributions made in this field over the past decade with a special focus on novel fit-for-purpose analytical approaches for the detection, identification and quantification of these pollutants and the assessment of their noxious potential for human beings and the environment. PMID:25591909

  3. Measurement of lumefantrine and its metabolite in plasma by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Insaf F; Abildrup, Ulla; Alifrangis, Lene H; Maiga, Deogratius; Alifrangis, Michael; Hoegberg, Lotte; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Persson, Ola Per-Eric; Nyagonde, Nyagonde; Lemnge, Martha M; Theander, Thor G; Bygbjerg, Ib C

    2011-01-01

    Artemether-lumefantrine (ARM-LUM) has in recent years become the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in many Sub-Saharan African countries. Vigorous monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy of this treatment is needed. This requires high-quality studies following standard protocols; ideally, such studies should incorporate measurement of drug levels in the study patients to exclude the possibility that insufficient drug levels explain an observed treatment failure. Several methods for measuring lumefantrine (LUM) in plasma by HPLC are available; however, several of these methods have some limitations in terms of high costs and limited feasibility arising from large required sample volumes and demanding sample preparation. Therefore, we set out to develop a simpler reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) method based on UV detection for simultaneous measurement of LUM and its major metabolite the desbutyl LUM (DL) in plasma. Halofantrine was used as an internal standard. Liquid-liquid extraction of samples was carried out using hexane-ethyl acetate (70:30, v/v). Chromatographic separation was carried out on a Synergi Polar-RP column (250 mm × 300 mm, particle size 4 μm). The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile-0.1M ammonium acetate buffer adjusted to pH 4.9 (85:15%, v/v). Absorbance of the compounds was monitored at 335 nm using a reference wavelength of 360 nm. Absolute extraction recovery for LUM and DL were 88% and 90%, respectively. Inter- and intraday coefficients of variation for LUM and DL were ≤ 10%. The lower limits of quantification for LUM and DL were 12.5 and 6.5 ng/ml, respectively. After validation, the methodology was transferred to a local laboratory in Tanga Tanzania and samples from a small subset of malaria patients were analysed for LUM. The method appears to be applicable in settings with limited facilities. PMID:20832961

  4. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J.; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F. Mark Kao, L.; Jim Proctor, S.; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D.; Lord, Peter G.; McMillian, Michael K.

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds—chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. - Highlights: • 28 of 97 drugs gave a positive OS/RM gene expression signature in rat liver. • The specificity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 98%. • The sensitivity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 75%. • The signature can help eliminate hepatotoxicants from drug development.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection for the determination of nitrofuran metabolites in pork muscle.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Liang-Quan; Chen, Ming-Ming; Chen, Shui-Sheng; Du, Na-Na; Liu, Zhao-Di; Song, Chong-Fu; Qiao, Rui

    2013-01-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC method with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) is reported for the simultaneous determination of metabolites of four nitrofuran drugs (furazolidone, furaltadone, nitrofurantoin and nitrofurazone) in pork muscle. The method involves acid hydrolysis of the protein-bound drug metabolites and the conjugation of the released side-chains with a novel fluorescence agent 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde. After liquid-liquid extraction and effective separation of the derivatives on a YMC-Pack Polymer C18 column at 40°C under alkaline conditions, the high fluorescence intensity of these derivatives at emission wavelength λem = 463 nm enables their simultaneous determination in pork muscle at concentrations as low as 1 µg kg⁻¹. The method was validated using blank pork muscle fortified with all four metabolites at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 µg kg⁻¹. Recoveries were > 92.3% with RSDs < 8.5% for all four metabolites. The results obtained with HPLC-FLD and LC-MS/MS methods showed very good agreement for pork muscle samples. PMID:24283965

  6. Simultaneous detection of 93 conventional and emerging drugs of abuse and their metabolites in urine by UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tang, Magdalene H Y; Ching, C K; Lee, Caroline Y W; Lam, Ying-Hoo; Mak, Tony W L

    2014-10-15

    Novel psychoactive substances (NPS) are becoming increasingly popular worldwide in recent years, some of which have been reported to cause considerable harm and even fatalities. Currently, simultaneous screening for a comprehensive panel of conventional and novel drugs of abuse is not widely available in most clinical laboratories. The aim of this study was to establish a chromatography/mass spectrometry-based analytical system for the simultaneous detection of conventional drugs of abuse and NPS in urine. Sample preparation entails enzyme digestion and solid phase extraction; analytes were then detected by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with multiple reaction monitoring. Forty-seven conventional drugs (28 parent drugs, 19 metabolites) and 46 NPS analytes (44 parent drugs, two metabolites) are covered by the established method, which has been validated according to international guidelines. The method was then applied to 964 urine samples collected from drug abusers and the results revealed the presence of two NPS - TFMPP and methcathinone - as well as conventional drugs of abuse. To conclude, an LC-MS/MS method has been established that allows the simultaneous detection of over 90 conventional as well as novel psychoactive substances and metabolites in urine samples. The method was successfully applied to authentic specimens revealing the presence of conventional as well as novel drugs of abuse in the local population. PMID:25203724

  7. Abortion after deliberate Arthrotec® addition to food. Mass spectrometric detection of diclofenac, misoprostol acid, and their urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Watzer, Bernhard; Lusthof, Klaas J; Schweer, Horst

    2015-07-01

    Arthrotec(®) (AT) is a combination of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and misoprostol (MP), a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). MP is a lipophilic methyl ester prodrug. It is readily metabolized to the biologically active misoprostol acid (MPA). During the last few years, medical studies exhibited MP to be an excellent abortive. In this paper, we describe a rare criminal case of MP abortion, initiated by the expectant father. After the abortion, samples of vomit and urine were collected. Systemic exposure to MP is difficult to prove, because both MP and the active metabolite MPA are hardly excreted in urine. Therefore, in addition to routine toxicological analysis, we used slightly modified, well-established liquid and gas chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS) methods, for the direct and the indirect detection of MPA and its metabolites. In this case, we were able to demonstrate the presence of the major MP metabolites 2,3-dinor-MPA and 2,3,4,5-tetranor-MPA in the urine of the victim. We also detected paracetamol, 3-methoxyparacetamol and diclofenac-glucuronide in the urine. In the vomit of the victim, we detected diclofenac and MPA. These results, combined with the criminal investigations, showed that the accused had mixed MP into the food of his pregnant girlfriend. Finally, these investigations contributed to a confession of the accused. PMID:25524762

  8. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bellin, Daniel L.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Levine, Peter M.; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites produced by microbial biofilms, which can drastically affect colony development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. “Images” over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify, and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression. PMID:24510163

  9. A Comparison of Self-Reported Analgesic Use and Detection of Urinary Ibuprofen and Acetaminophen Metabolites by Means of Metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Ruey Leng; Chan, Queenie; Brown, Ian J.; Robertson, Claire E.; Stamler, Jeremiah; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Holmes, Elaine; Elliott, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Information on dietary supplements, medications, and other xenobiotics in epidemiologic surveys is usually obtained from questionnaires and is subject to recall and reporting biases. The authors used metabolite data obtained from hydrogen-1 (or proton) nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) analysis of human urine specimens from the International Study of Macro-/Micro-Nutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP Study) to validate self-reported analgesic use. Metabolic profiling of two 24-hour urine specimens per individual was carried out for 4,630 participants aged 40–59 years from 17 population samples in Japan, China, the United Kingdom, and the United States (data collection, 1996–1999). 1H NMR-detected acetaminophen and ibuprofen use was low (∼4%) among East Asian population samples and higher (>16%) in Western population samples. In a comparison of self-reported acetaminophen and ibuprofen use with 1H NMR-detected acetaminophen and ibuprofen metabolites among 496 participants from Chicago, Illinois, and Belfast, Northern Ireland, the overall rate of concordance was 81%–84%; the rate of underreporting was 15%–17%; and the rate of underdetection was approximately 1%. Comparison of self-reported unspecified analgesic use with 1H NMR-detected acetaminophen and ibuprofen metabolites among 2,660 Western INTERMAP participants revealed similar levels of concordance and underreporting. Screening for urinary metabolites of acetaminophen and ibuprofen improved the accuracy of exposure information. This approach has the potential to reduce recall bias and other biases in epidemiologic studies for a range of substances, including pharmaceuticals, dietary supplements, and foods. PMID:22223708

  10. An integrated approach for profiling oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts using liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection and triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guiying; Cheng, Zhongzhe; Zhang, Kerong; Jiang, Hongliang; Zhu, Mingshe

    2016-09-10

    The use of liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with triple quadrupole linear ion trap (Qtrap) mass spectrometry (MS) for both quantitative and qualitative analysis in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies is of great interest. Here, a new Qtrap-based analytical methodology for simultaneous detection, structural characterization and semi-quantitation of in vitro oxidative metabolites and glutathione trapped reactive metabolites was reported. In the current study, combined multiple ion monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring were served as surveying scans to trigger product ion spectral acquisition of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adduct, respectively. Then, detection of metabolites and recovery of their MS/MS spectra were accomplished using multiple data mining approaches. Additionally, on-line ultraviolet (UV) detection was employed to determine relative concentrations of major metabolites. Analyses of metabolites of clozapine and nomifensine in rat liver microsomes not only revealed multiple oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts, but also identified their major oxidative metabolism and bioactivation pathways. The results demonstrated that the LC/UV/MS method enabled Qtrap to perform the comprehensive profiling of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts in vitro. PMID:27497649

  11. Detoxification of Atrazine by Endophytic Streptomyces sp. Isolated from Sugarcane and Detection of Nontoxic Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Mesquini, Josiane A; Sawaya, Alexandra C H F; López, Begonã G C; Oliveira, Valéria M; Miyasaka, Natalia R S

    2015-12-01

    Atrazine is still one of the most used agricultural pesticides worldwide and it has been recognized as a major contaminant of surface and ground water. The aims of this research were to isolate an endophytic microorganism from leaves of sugarcane, evaluate its ability to degrade atrazine, and investigate the formation of metabolites. By sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the endophytic isolate atz2 was identified as Streptomyces sp. The reduction in atrazine concentration by Streptomyces sp. atz2 was 98 % and UHPLC-MS/MS analyses showed the appearance of an unknown metabolite observed as m/z 311. Ecotoxicity tests with an aquatic organism, Daphnia similis, confirmed that this metabolite was nontoxic. This mechanism of detoxification of atrazine is different from the ones of other free-living microorganisms that inhabit the soil or rhizosphere. The results show new aspects of atrazine detoxification, highlighting a new role of endophytic bacteria in plants. PMID:26467569

  12. Isoflavone metabolism in domestic cats (Felis catus): comparison of plasma metabolites detected after ingestion of two different dietary forms of genistein and daidzein.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse-Tedd, K M; Cave, N J; Ugarte, C E; Waldron, L A; Prasain, J K; Arabshahi, A; Barnes, S; Hendriks, W H; Thomas, D G

    2013-03-01

    Some felid diets contain isoflavones but the metabolic capacity of cats toward isoflavones is relatively unknown, despite the understanding that isoflavones have divergent biological potential according to their metabolite end products. The objective of this study was to determine the plasma metabolites detectable in domestic cats after exposure to 2 different dietary forms of isoflavones, either as a soy extract tablet (n = 6) or as part of a dietary matrix (n = 4). Serial blood samples were collected after isoflavone exposure to identify the plasma metabolites of each cat. Genistein was detected in its unconjugated form or as a monosulfate. Daidzein was detected as both a mono- and disulfate as well as in its unconjugated form. Other daidzein metabolites detected included equol mono- and disulfate, dihydrodaidzein, and O-desmethylangolensin. No β-glucuronide metabolites of either isoflavone were detected. Equol was produced in markedly fewer cats after ingestion of a soy extract tablet as a single oral bolus compared with cats consuming an isoflavone-containing diet. The detectable metabolites of the isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, in domestic cat plasma after dietary ingestion has been described in the present study for the first time. The metabolic capacity for isoflavones by domestic cats appears to be efficient, with only minimal proportions of the ingested amount detected in their unconjugated forms. This has implications for the potential of isoflavones to exert physiological activity in the domestic cat when consumed at concentrations representative of typical dietary intake. PMID:23307849

  13. Capillary electrophoresis with UV detection and mass spectrometry in method development for profiling metabolites of steroid hormone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sirén, Heli; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Oresic, Matej

    2008-08-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for comprehensive profiling of metabolites involved in mammalian steroid metabolism. The study was performed using the partial filling micellar electrokinetic chromatography (PF-MEKC) technique for determination of endogenous low-hydrophilic steroids. The detection techniques in capillary electrophoresis were UV absorption and electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Thirteen steroids were included in the method development, and the selected were metabolites involved in major pathways of steroid biosynthesis. Although only eight of them could be separated and detected with UV, they could be identified by ESI-MS using selected ion monitoring (SIM) technique. Tandem MS spectra were also collected. UV detection was more sensitive than MS due to better separation of compounds and the selective signal sensitivity. The lowest limits of detection were 10-100 ng/mL for cortisone, corticosterone, hydrocortisone and testosterone. The other steroids could be detected at 500-1000 ng/mL. The identification of cortisone, corticosterone, hydrocortisone, estrogen and testosterone were made in patient urine samples and their concentrations were 1-40 microg/L. PMID:18585986

  14. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometry method for the detection of busulphan and its metabolites in plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    El-Serafi, Ibrahim; Terelius, Ylva; Twelkmeyer, Brigitte; Hagbjörk, Ann-Louise; Hassan, Zuzana; Hassan, Moustapha

    2013-01-15

    Busulphan is an alkylating agent used as conditioning regimen prior to stem cell transplantation. Busulphan is metabolized in the liver and four major metabolites have been identified. The first metabolite is tetrahydrothiophene which is oxidized to tetrahydrothiophene 1-oxide, then sulfolane and finally 3-hydroxy sulfolane. Despite the low molecular weight and wide polarity range of busulphan and its four metabolites, the use of a fused silica non-polar column significantly enhanced the automated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of their detection in one simple method. The limit of quantification was 0.5μM for busulphan and all its metabolites except 3-OH sulfolane, which was 1.25μM. This method was validated for all the compounds in both human plasma and urine. Lower limits of quantifications (LLOQs) were run in pentaplicate per compound and all results were within 20% of the nominal values. The recovery was determined by comparing the peak area of two quality control (QC) samples, before and after extraction in plasma and urine, in triplicate. Acceptable precision and accuracy have been obtained; at least 3 standard curves have been run for each compound using three different QCs covering the calibration curve in triplicate. The QC values were within 15% (SD) of the nominal values. Selectivity and sensitivity of all compounds have been measured. Compounds were stable up to 50 days after extraction in -20°C and 48h at RT. Moreover, the compounds were stable for three cycles of freezing and thawing. The method was applied in a clinical case where the patient received high dose busulphan; all the compounds have been detected, identified and quantified both in plasma and urine. PMID:23286981

  15. Enzyme-DNA biocolloids for DNA adduct and reactive metabolite detection by chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bajrami, Besnik; Hvastkovs, Eli G; Jensen, Gary C; Schenkman, John B; Rusling, James F

    2008-02-15

    Silica microbead bioreactors (0.5 microm diameter) coated with DNA and enzymes were fabricated to measure reactive metabolite and DNA-adduct formation rates relevant to genotoxicity screening. Cytochrome (cyt) P450 2E1, cyt P450(cam), and myoglobin (Mb) were incorporated into thin films with DNA using the electrostatic layer-by-layer (LbL) method. The utility of these biocolloids was demonstrated by oxidation of guaiacol, styrene, and (4-methylnitrosoamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). Enzyme turnover rates for formation of reactive metabolites were monitored using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Capillary LC-MS/MS was employed to determine DNA nucleobase adducts after catalyzing the reactive metabolite formation with DNA-enzyme biocolloids and then using neutral thermal hydrolysis on the biocolloids. Dramatic improvements in surface area to volume ratio over similar films on macroscopic surfaces opens new avenues for genotoxicity screening and enabled the first use of pure cyt P450 enzymes in enzyme-DNA films to produce DNA adducts. The method makes possible identification and formation rate measurements of major and minor DNA adducts as well as the metabolites themselves in <5 min of reaction time using relevant human liver enzymes. PMID:18217727

  16. Showing Its Colors. Thin-Layer Chromatographic Detection of Cannabinoid Metabolites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonicamp, Judith M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a chemistry laboratory experiment in which thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is used to analyze urine specimens containing metabolites of the drug tetrahydro-cannabinol, which comes from the marijuana plant. The materials needed to conduct the experiment are listed, and the procedure and expected results are outlined. (TW)

  17. Mutation-induced loop opening and energetics for binding of tamiflu to influenza N8 neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-05-31

    Tamiflu, also known as oseltamivir (OTV), binds to influenza A neuraminidase (H5N1) with very high affinity (0.32 nM). However, this inhibitor binds to other neuraminidases as well. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the mechanism underlying the binding of oseltamivir to N8 neuraminidase (NA) in "open" and "closed" conformations of the 150-loop through molecular dynamics simulations and the popular and well established molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann (MM-PBSA) free energy calculation method. Whereas the closed conformation is stable for wild type N8, it transforms into the open conformation for the mutants Y252H, H274Y, and R292K, indicating that bound to oseltamivir these mutants are preferentially in the open conformation. Our calculations show that the binding of wild type oseltamivir to the closed conformation of N8 neuraminidase is energetically favored compared to the binding to the open conformation. We observe water mediated binding of oseltamivir to the N8 neuraminidase in both conformations which is not seen in the case of binding of the same drug to the H5N1 neuraminidase. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the mechanisms underlying the binding and changes in affinity due to mutations. Considering the mutant N8 variants in the open conformation adopted during the simulations, we observe a significant loss in the size of the total binding free energy for the N8(Y252H)-OTV, N8(H274Y)-OTV, and N8(R292K)-OTV complexes compared to N8(WT)-OTV, mainly due to the decrease in the size of the intermolecular electrostatic energy. For R292K, an unfavorable shift in the van der Waals interactions also contributes to the drug resistance. The mutations cause a significant expansion in the active site cavity, increasing its solvent accessible surface compared to the crystal structures of both the open and closed conformations. Our study underscores the need to consider dynamics in rationalizing the

  18. Detection and mapping of illicit drugs and their metabolites in fingermarks by MALDI MS and compatibility with forensic techniques.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, G; de Puit, M; Bleay, S; Bradshaw, R; Francese, S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the proven capabilities of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) in laboratory settings, research is still needed to integrate this technique into current forensic fingerprinting practice. Optimised protocols enabling the compatible application of MALDI to developed fingermarks will allow additional intelligence to be gathered around a suspect's lifestyle and activities prior to the deposition of their fingermarks while committing a crime. The detection and mapping of illicit drugs and metabolites in latent fingermarks would provide intelligence that is beneficial for both police investigations and court cases. This study investigated MALDI MS detection and mapping capabilities for a large range of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in fingermarks; the detection and mapping of a mixture of these drugs in marks, with and without prior development with cyanoacrylate fuming or Vacuum Metal Deposition, was also examined. Our findings indicate the versatility of MALDI technology and its ability to retrieve chemical intelligence either by detecting the compounds investigated or by using their ion signals to reconstruct 2D maps of fingermark ridge details. PMID:26118853

  19. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies for the Detection of Volatile Biomarker Metabolites in the Human Breath

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the use of electronic-nose (e-nose) devices to analyze human breath profiles for the presence of specific volatile metabolites, known as biomarkers or chemical bio-indicators of specific human diseases, metabolic disorders and the overall health status of individuals, are providing the potential for new noninvasive tools and techniques useful to point-of-care clinical disease diagnoses. This exciting new area of electronic disease detection and diagnosis promises to yield much faster and earlier detection of human diseases and disorders, allowing earlier, more effective treatments, resulting in more rapid patient recovery from various afflictions. E-nose devices are particularly suited for the field of disease diagnostics, because they are sensitive to a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and can effectively distinguish between different complex gaseous mixtures via analysis of electronic aroma sensor-array output profiles of volatile metabolites present in the human breath. This review provides a summary of some recent developments of electronic-nose technologies, particularly involving breath analysis, with the potential for providing many new diagnostic applications for the detection of specific human diseases associated with different organs in the body, detectable from e-nose analyses of aberrant disease-associated VOCs present in air expired from the lungs. PMID:25738426

  20. Detection and mapping of illicit drugs and their metabolites in fingermarks by MALDI MS and compatibility with forensic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Groeneveld, G.; de Puit, M.; Bleay, S.; Bradshaw, R.; Francese, S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the proven capabilities of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) in laboratory settings, research is still needed to integrate this technique into current forensic fingerprinting practice. Optimised protocols enabling the compatible application of MALDI to developed fingermarks will allow additional intelligence to be gathered around a suspect’s lifestyle and activities prior to the deposition of their fingermarks while committing a crime. The detection and mapping of illicit drugs and metabolites in latent fingermarks would provide intelligence that is beneficial for both police investigations and court cases. This study investigated MALDI MS detection and mapping capabilities for a large range of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in fingermarks; the detection and mapping of a mixture of these drugs in marks, with and without prior development with cyanoacrylate fuming or Vacuum Metal Deposition, was also examined. Our findings indicate the versatility of MALDI technology and its ability to retrieve chemical intelligence either by detecting the compounds investigated or by using their ion signals to reconstruct 2D maps of fingermark ridge details. PMID:26118853

  1. Detection and mapping of illicit drugs and their metabolites in fingermarks by MALDI MS and compatibility with forensic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneveld, G.; de Puit, M.; Bleay, S.; Bradshaw, R.; Francese, S.

    2015-06-01

    Despite the proven capabilities of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) in laboratory settings, research is still needed to integrate this technique into current forensic fingerprinting practice. Optimised protocols enabling the compatible application of MALDI to developed fingermarks will allow additional intelligence to be gathered around a suspect’s lifestyle and activities prior to the deposition of their fingermarks while committing a crime. The detection and mapping of illicit drugs and metabolites in latent fingermarks would provide intelligence that is beneficial for both police investigations and court cases. This study investigated MALDI MS detection and mapping capabilities for a large range of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in fingermarks; the detection and mapping of a mixture of these drugs in marks, with and without prior development with cyanoacrylate fuming or Vacuum Metal Deposition, was also examined. Our findings indicate the versatility of MALDI technology and its ability to retrieve chemical intelligence either by detecting the compounds investigated or by using their ion signals to reconstruct 2D maps of fingermark ridge details.

  2. Efficient approach for the detection and identification of new androgenic metabolites by applying SRM GC-CI-MS/MS: a methandienone case study.

    PubMed

    Polet, Michael; Van Gansbeke, Wim; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen

    2016-07-01

    Identification of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is a vital issue in doping control and toxicology, and searching for metabolites with longer detection times remains an important task. Recently, a gas chromatography chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-CI-MS/MS) method was introduced, and CI, in comparison with electron ionization (EI), proved to be capable of increasing the sensitivity significantly. In addition, correlations between AAS structure and fragmentation behavior could be revealed. This enables the search for previously unknown but expected metabolites by selection of their predicted transitions. The combination of both factors allows the setup of an efficient approach to search for new metabolites. The approach uses selected reaction monitoring which is inherently more sensitive than full scan or precursor ion scan. Additionally, structural information obtained from the structure specific CI fragmentation pattern facilitates metabolite identification. The procedure was demonstrated by a methandienone case study. Its metabolites have been studied extensively in the past, and this allowed an adequate evaluation of the efficiency of the approach. Thirty three metabolites were detected, including all relevant previously discovered metabolites. In our study, the previously reported long-term metabolite (18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl,17α-methyl-androst-1,4,13-trien-3-one) could be detected up to 26 days by using GC-CI-MS/MS. The study proves the validity of the approach to search for metabolites of new synthetic AAS and new long-term metabolites of less studied AAS and illustrates the increase in sensitivity by using CI. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27434811

  3. Production and quantification of sesquiterpenes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including extraction, detection and quantification of terpene products and key related metabolites.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Sarah; Kirby, James; Denby, Charles M; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-08-01

    The procedures described here are designed for engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce sesquiterpenes with an aim to either increase product titers or to simply generate a quantity of product sufficient for identification and/or downstream experimentation. Engineering high-level sesquiterpene production in S. cerevisiae often requires iterations of strain modifications and metabolite analysis. To address the latter, the methods described here were tailored for robust measurement of metabolites that we have found to be fundamental indicators of pathway flux, using only gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) instrumentation. Thus, by focusing on heterologous production of sesquiterpenes via the mevalonate (MEV) pathway in S. cerevisiae, we detail procedures for extraction and detection of the key pathway metabolites MEV, squalene and ergosterol, as well as the farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP)-derived side products farnesol and nerolidol. Analysis of these compounds is important for quality control, because they are possible indicators of pathway imbalance. As many of the sesquiterpene synthase (STS) genes encountered in nature are of plant origin and often not optimal for expression in yeast, we provide guidelines for designing gene expression cassettes to enable expression in S. cerevisiae. As a case study for these protocols, we have selected the sesquiterpene amorphadiene, native to Artemisia annua and related plants. The analytical steps can be completed within 1-2 working days, and a typical experiment might take 1 week. PMID:25058645

  4. Determination of spinosad and its metabolites in food and environmental matrices. 1. High-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    West, S D; Yeh, L T; Turner, L G; Schwedler, D A; Thomas, A D; Duebelbeis, D O

    2000-11-01

    Spinosad is an insect control agent that is derived from a naturally occurring soil bacterium and is effective on several classes of insects, especially Lepidoptera larvae. Spinosad is registered in many countries for use on a variety of crops, including cotton, corn, soybeans, fruits, and vegetables. Residue methods utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection have been described for determining spinosad and its metabolites in environmental and food matrices. These residue methods typically involve an extraction with organic solvents, followed by purification using liquid-liquid partitioning and/or solid phase extraction prior to measurement by HPLC-UV. The residue methods determine the active ingredients (spinosyns A and D) and up to three minor metabolites (spinosyn B, spinosyn K, and N-demethylspinosyn D). The methods have validated limits of quantitation ranging from 0.010 to 0.040 microgram/g. This paper briefly reviews the residue methodology for spinosad and metabolites in food and environmental matrices and provides a summary of method validation results for 61 different sample types, including newly published results for 37 additional crop matrices and processed commodities. PMID:11087448

  5. Analysis of mitragynine and metabolites in human urine for detecting the use of the psychoactive plant kratom.

    PubMed

    Le, David; Goggin, Melissa M; Janis, Gregory C

    2012-01-01

    The leaves of the South Asian plant kratom are described as having stimulating effects at low doses, and opiate-like analgesic and euphoric effects at high doses. A long history of use and abuse has led to the classification of kratom as a controlled substance in its native Thailand and other South Asian countries. However, kratom is not controlled in the United States, and the ready availability of kratom has led to its emergence as an herbal drug of abuse. With the growing popularity of kratom, efficient procedures are needed to detect kratom use. In the current study, both ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods have been developed and validated for monitoring the major alkaloids and metabolites found in urine following kratom use. The primary unique alkaloid mitragynine is quantified in human urine from 1.00-500.00 ng/mL using mitraphylline as an internal standard. In addition, two metabolites (5-desmethylmitragynine and 17-desmethyldihydromitragynine) and the related active, alkaloid 7-hydroxy-mitragynine, are simultaneously qualitatively monitored. The presence of analytes are confirmed by an information-dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion procedure generating full fragmentation data used to positively identify detected analytes. The validated method has been utilized for clinical and forensic analyses of urine for the detection of kratom use. PMID:23024321

  6. [Detection and identification of major metabolites of clorprenaline in swine urine using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bi, Yanfeng; Wang, Yilin; Ye, Ni; Sun, Lei; Wang, Hejia; Xu, Shixin; Xiao, Xilong

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to detect and identify the metabolites of clorprenaline in swine urine using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/Q-TOF MS), and the major metabolic pathways of clorprenaline were proposed. The swines were administered a single dose each of 10 mg/kg b. w. clorprenaline by oral gavage. The urine samples were collected before and after administration. After a simple preparation, the urine samples were analyzed using UPLC/Q-TOF MS. Combined with data processing techniques including extracted ion chromatography (EIC) and mass defect filtering (MDF), two phase I and seven phase II metabolites were detected in the urine samples collected 0-24 h after administration. The structures of detected metabolites were elucidated by comparing their characteristic product ions with those of the parent clorprenaline. Based on the identified metabolites, the metabolic pathways of clorprenaline included hydroxylation, glucuronidation and sulphate conjugates. Among those detected metabolites, hydroxylated-clorprenaline and its conjugates were responsible for over 60% of the total MS responses, much greater than those of clorprenaline, and were proposed as the primary metabolites in swine urine. This study can provide scientific basis for determining appropriate marker residues of clorprenaline, and facilitate to effectively control clorprenaline residues in animals. PMID:26672198

  7. Application of stable isotope labeled glutathione and rapid scanning mass spectrometers in detecting and characterizing reactive metabolites.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul; Lam, Wing; Atherton, Jim; Chen, Hao; Galatsis, Paul; Stolle, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    The formation of reactive metabolites from a number of compounds was studied in vitro using a mixture of non-labeled and stable isotope labeled glutathione (GSH) as a trapping agent. GSH was labeled by incorporating [1,2-(13)C(2),(15)N]glycine into the tripeptide to give an overall increase of 3 Da over the naturally occurring substance. Detection and characterization of reactive metabolites was greatly facilitated by using the data-dependent scanning features of the linear ion trap mass spectrometers to give complimentary and confirmatory data in a single analytical run. A comparison was made by analyzing the samples simultaneously on a triple-stage quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in the constant neutral loss mode. The compounds studied included 2-acetamidophenol, 3-acetamidophenol, 4-acetamidophenol (acetaminophen), and flufenamic acid. GSH adducts for each of these compounds produced a characteristic pattern of 'twin ions' separated by 3 Da in the mass spectral data. This greatly facilitated the detection and characterization of any GSH-related adducts present in the microsomal extracts. Furthermore, characterization of these adducts was greatly facilitated by the rapid scanning capability of linear ion trap instruments that provided full-scan, MS/MS and MS(3) data in one single analysis. This method of detecting and characterizing reactive metabolites generated in vitro was found to be far superior to any of the existing methods previously employed in this laboratory. The combination of two techniques, stable isotope labeled glutathione and linear ion traps, provided a very sensitive and specific method of identifying compounds capable of producing reactive metabolites in a discovery setting. The complimentary set of mass spectral data (including full-scan, MS/MS and MS(3) mass spectra), obtained rapidly in a single analysis with the linear ion trap instruments, greatly accelerated identification of metabolically bioactivated soft spots on the molecules

  8. [Cross-reactivity of Instant-View M-1 for detection of benzodiazepine-related drugs and their metabolites in urine].

    PubMed

    Torikoshi, Aiko; Namera, Akira; Arima, Yousuke; Toubou, Hirokazu; Tajima, Takashi; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Nagao, Masataka

    2014-03-01

    Immunoassays are useful methods for the determination of regulated drugs in clinical and forensic laboratories. Although the Instant-View M-1 (IV M-1) immunoassay kit is frequently used to screen drugs in laboratories in Japan, basic information about the IV M-1 such as its specificity and reactivity is not available. In this study, we determined the specificity and cross-reactivity of IV M-1 for the detection of benzodiazepine-related drugs and their metabolites in urine. The IV M-1 could detect triazolobenzodiazepines such as triazolam in urine at concentrations > or = 300 ng/mL. However, thienodiazepines such as etizolam could not be detected because of lack of cross reactivity. A correlation was observed between the structure of the metabolites and the reactivity of the kit; 4-hydroxy metabolites of alprazolam and triazolam were detectable, whereas a-hydroxy metabolites were not. Furthermore, 7-amino metabolites such as nitrazepam could not be detected at any concentration, including high concentrations. The specificity and reactivity of various kits used for detection of drugs in urine are different. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the basic features of the kit used while assessing the results obtained. PMID:24724359

  9. The detection of androstenedione abuse in sport: a mass spectrometry strategy to identify the 4-hydroxyandrostenedione metabolite.

    PubMed

    Cawley, Adam T; Trout, Graham J; Kazlauskas, Rymantas; George, Adrian V

    2008-12-01

    Studies have shown that the administration of androstenedione (ADIONE) significantly increases the urinary ratio of testosterone glucuronide to epitestosterone glucuronide (T/E) - measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) - in subjects with a normal ( approximately 1) or naturally high (>1) initial values. However, the urinary T/E ratio has been shown not to increase in subjects with naturally low (<1) initial values. Such cases then rely on the detection of C(6)-hydroxylated metabolites shown to be indicative of ADIONE administration. While these markers may be measured in the routine GC/MS steroid profile, their relatively low urinary excretion limits the use of gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) to specifically confirm ADIONE administration based on depleted (13)C content. A mass spectrometry strategy was used in this study to identify metabolites of ADIONE with the potential to provide compound-specific detection. C(4)-hydroxylation was subsequently shown to be a major metabolic pathway following ADIONE administration, thereby resulting in urinary excretion of 4-hydroxyandrostenedione (4OH-ADIONE). Complementary analysis of 4OH-ADIONE by GC/MS and GC/C/IRMS was used to confirm ADIONE administration. PMID:19025884

  10. Determination of spinosad and its metabolites in citrus crops and orange processed commodities by HPLC with UV detection.

    PubMed

    West, S D; Turner, L G

    2000-02-01

    Spinosad is an insect control agent that is derived from a naturally occurring organism and is effective on a wide variety of crops, including citrus crops. A method is described for the determination of spinosad and its metabolites in citrus crops and orange processed commodities. The method determines residues of the active ingredients (spinosyns A and D) and three minor metabolites (spinosyn B, spinosyn K, and N-demethylspinosyn D). For dried orange pulp and orange oil, the method has a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 0.02 microg/g and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.006 microg/g. For all other sample matrices (whole fruit, edible fruit, juice, and peel), the method has an LOQ of 0.01 microg/g and an LOD of 0.003 microg/g. The analytes are extracted from the various sample types using appropriate solvents, and the extracts are purified by liquid-liquid partitioning and/or solid-phase extraction. All five analytes are determined simultaneously in the purified extracts by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection at 250 nm. PMID:10691641

  11. A sensitive GC-EIMS method for simultaneous detection and quantification of JWH-018 and JWH-073 carboxylic acid and hydroxy metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Paul, Buddha D; Bosy, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073, belong to a class of aminoalkylindoles (AAIs) that are smoked to produce an effect similar to tetrahydrocannabinol. Compounds in this class are often collectively known as 'Spice'. After ingestion, these compounds are extensively metabolized to their hydroxy and carboxylic acid metabolites. During forensic analysis, detection of these metabolites in urine is an indication of past exposure to the parent compounds. The analytical process involved hydrolysis of conjugated metabolites by glucuronidase, solvent extraction, derivatization by trifluoroacetic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol and GC-EIMS detection. Identification of the unknown was based on the criteria of GC retention time within ±2% and mass spectral ion ratio within ±20% of that of a standard. Deuterated internal standards of the carboxylic acid metabolites were used for quantification. The acid (JWH-018-COOH, JWH-073-COOH) and hydroxy (JWH-018-OH, JWH-073-OH) metabolites were linear over the concentration range of 0.1-10 and 0.2-10 ng/mL, respectively, with a correlation coefficient-square, R(2) > 0.999 (N = 5). Extraction recoveries of the metabolites were within 79 and 87%. The method was applied to 17 urine specimens collected as part of a military law enforcement investigation. Nine of the specimens tested positive for one or more of the metabolites. When the procedure was extended to screen other AAI compounds, two of the specimens were found to contain JWH-210, JWH-250 (JWH-302 or JWH-201) and JWH-250 (C4 isomers). The GC-EIMS method presented here was found to be suitable for detecting JWH-018 and JWH-073 metabolites and other AAI compounds in urine. PMID:25691387

  12. Detection and structural characterization of glutathione-trapped reactive metabolites using liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry and mass defect filtering.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingshe; Ma, Li; Zhang, Haiying; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2007-11-01

    The present study was designed to apply the mass defect filter (MDF) approach to the screening and identification of reactive metabolites using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Glutathione (GSH)-trapped reactive metabolites of acetaminophen, diclofenac, carbamazepine, clozapine, p-cresol, 4-ethylphenol, and 3-methylindole in human liver microsomes (HLM) were analyzed by HPLC coupled with Orbitrap or Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Through the selective removal of all ions that fall outside of the GSH adduct MDF template windows, the processed full scan MS chromatograms displayed GSH adducts as major components with no or a few interference peaks. The accurate mass LC-MS data sets were also utilized for the elimination of false positive peaks, detection of stable oxidative metabolites with other MDF templates, and determination of metabolite molecular formulas. Compared to the neutral loss scan by a triple quadrupole instrument, the MDF approach was more sensitive and selective in screening for GSH-trapped reactive metabolites in HLM and rat bile and far more effective in detecting GSH adducts that do not afford the neutral loss of 129 Da as a significant fragmentation pathway. The GSH adduct screening capability of the MDF approach, together with the utility of accurate mass MS/MS information in structural elucidation, makes high-resolution LC-MS a useful tool for analyzing reactive metabolites. PMID:17918967

  13. Ibuprofen exposure in Lemna gibba L.: Evaluation of growth and phytotoxic indicators, detection of ibuprofen and identification of its metabolites in plant and in the medium.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, F; Di Baccio, D; Aceña, J; Pérez, S; Barceló, D; Zacchini, M

    2015-12-30

    Ibuprofen (IBU) is detected worldwide in water bodies due to the incomplete removal by wastewater treatments. Contrasting results have been reported on the toxicity of IBU on aquatic biomonitor plants such as duckweed, and no data about IBU detection and metabolism in plants has been reported. In this work, the effects of 1 mg L(-1) IBU on Lemna gibba L. were monitored in an 8-day laboratory test. In particular, an increase in frond number (+12%) and multiplication rate (+10%) while no variations in photosynthetic pigment content were observed. Moreover, UPLC-HRMS analysis of the presence of IBU and its metabolites in plants and in the growth medium was performed. The results showed that, besides IBU, 11 IBU metabolites were detected in plants. Among the IBU metabolites, hydroxyl- and dihydroxyl-IBU were found, whereas carboxyl-IBU was undetectable. Interestingly, some IBU metabolites were detected in the plant growth solution at the end of the IBU treatment, while no IBU products were found in the IBU solution without plants, suggesting a role for L. gibba in IBU metabolism. The findings of this work represent an important step for a better evaluation of the effects of IBU and its metabolites in duckweed, with notable implications for the eco-toxicological assessment of IBU in the aquatic ecosystem. PMID:26184801

  14. Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Drugs and Metabolites in Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos; Koeplinger, Kenneth A.; Vavek, Marissa; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2008-01-01

    A self-aspirating, liquid micro-junction surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter mass spectrometry system was demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of spotted and dosed drugs and their metabolites in thin tissue sections. Proof-of-principle sampling and analysis directly from tissue without the need for sample preparation was demonstrated first by raster scanning a region on a section of rat liver onto which reserpine was spotted. The mass spectral signal from selected reaction monitoring was used to develop a chemical image of the spotted drug on the tissue. The probe was also used to selectively spot sample areas of sagittal whole mouse body tissue sections that had been dosed orally (90 mg/kg) with R,S-sulforaphane 3 hrs prior to sacrifice. Sulforaphane and its glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine conjugates were monitored with selected reaction monitoring and detected in the stomach and various other tissues from the dosed mouse. No signal for these species was observed in the tissue from a control mouse. The same dosed tissue section was used to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a line scan across the whole body section. In total these results illustrate the potential for rapid screening of the distribution of drugs and metabolites in tissue sections with the micro-liquid junction surface sampling probe/electrospray mass spectrometry approach.

  15. Direct Analysis in Real Time-Mass Spectrometry for the Rapid Detection of Metabolites of Aconite Alkaloids in Intestinal Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Hou, Guangyue; Xing, Junpeng; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, direct analysis of real time ionization combined with multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (DART-MSn) was used to investigate the metabolic profile of aconite alkaloids in rat intestinal bacteria. A total of 36 metabolites from three aconite alkaloids were identified by using DART-MSn, and the feasibility of quantitative analysis of these analytes was examined. Key parameters of the DART ion source, such as helium gas temperature and pressure, the source-to-MS distance, and the speed of the autosampler, were optimized to achieve high sensitivity, enhance reproducibility, and reduce the occurrence of fragmentation. The instrument analysis time for one sample can be less than 10 s for this method. Compared with ESI-MS and UPLC-MS, the DART-MS is more efficient for directly detecting metabolic samples, and has the advantage of being a simple, high-speed, high-throughput method.

  16. Detection of benzimidazole carbamates and amino metabolites in liver by surface plasmon resonance-biosensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor screening assays were developed and validated to detect 11 benzimidazole carbamate (BZT) and four amino-benzimidazole veterinary drug residues in liver tissue. The assays used polyclonal antibodies, raised in sheep, to detect BZTs and amino-benzimidazole...

  17. Old Meets New: Using Interspecies Interactions to Detect Secondary Metabolite Production in Actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycetes, a group of filamentous, Gram-positive bacteria, have long been a remarkable source of useful therapeutics. Recent genome sequencing and transcriptomic studies have shown that these bacteria, responsible for half of the clinically used antibiotics, also harbor a large reservoir of gene clusters, which have the potential to produce novel secreted small molecules. Yet, many of these clusters are not expressed under common culture conditions. One reason why these clusters have not been linked to a secreted small molecule lies in the way that actinomycetes have typically been studied: as pure cultures in nutrient-rich media that do not mimic the complex environments in which these bacteria evolved. New methods based on multispecies culture conditions provide an alternative approach to investigating the products of these gene clusters. We have recently implemented binary interspecies interaction assays to mine for new secondary metabolites and to study the underlying biology in inter-actinomycete interactions. Here we describe the detailed biological and chemical methods comprising these studies. PMID:23084935

  18. Determination of mesotrione residues and metabolites in crops, soil, and water by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Alferness, Philip; Wiebe, Lawrence

    2002-07-01

    A method for the determination of residues of mesotrione and two metabolites in a variety of environmental matrixes has been developed. Mesotrione, a new selective herbicide for use in corn, is 2-(4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione. The metabolite 4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoic acid (MNBA) is determined with the parent compound in crops, whereas two metabolites, 2-amino-4-methylsulfonyl-benzoic acid (AMBA) and MNBA are determined with parent in soil and water. Crop samples are macerated with an acetonitrile/water mixture, and an aliquot is evaporated and acidified then centrifuged. Soil is shaken with an ammonium hydroxide solution, and an aliquot is acidified then centrifuged. For water analysis, an aliquot is acidified. Crop and soil extracts, and water, are cleaned up using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RPHPLC) with mesotrione and MNBA isolated using a fraction collector. During this clean up, AMBA is determined in soil and water samples using fluorescence detection. The collected mesotrione and MNBA fractions are converted into AMBA via oxidation followed by reduction in the case of mesotrione, or by reduction alone in the case of MNBA. Both fractions are analyzed by RPHPLC with fluorescence detection using an AMBA external reference standard. The method was tested on corn grain, fodder, and forage, as well as on sugar cane. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) for each analyte are 0.01 mg/kg for crops, 0.005 mg/kg for soil, and 0.10 microg/L for water. Method fortification recoveries from all crop commodities averaged 79% (CV = 7%, n = 37 and 82% (CV = 5%, n = 37) for mesotrione and MNBA, respectively. Soil was fortified at 0.005 and 0.05 mg/kg. Recoveries were 79% (CV = 4%, n = 12), 96% (CV = 2%, n = 12), and 89% (CV = 2%, n = 12) for mesotrione, MNBA, and AMBA, respectively. Groundwater, drinking water, seawater, and river water were fortified at 0.1 and 1.0 microg/L. Recoveries for all waters were 80% (CV = 7%, n = 51

  19. Detection of volatile metabolites of moulds isolated from a contaminated library.

    PubMed

    Micheluz, Anna; Manente, Sabrina; Rovea, Manuela; Slanzi, Debora; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Ravagnan, Giampietro; Formenton, Gianmaria

    2016-09-01

    The principal fungal species isolated from a contaminated library environment were tested for their microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) production ability. Aspergillus creber, A. penicillioides, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Eurotium chevalieri, E. halophilicum, Penicillium brevicompactum and P. chrysogenum were cultivated on suitable culture media inside sample bottles specifically designed and created for direct MVOC injection to a GC-MS instrument. The fungal emissions were monitored over several weeks to detect changes with the aging of the colonies, monitored also by respirometric tests. A total of 55 different MVOCs were detected and isopropyl alcohol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-butanone were the principal compounds in common between the selected fungal species. Moreover, 2,4-dimethylheptane, 1,4-pentadiene, styrene, ethanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, acetone, furan and 2-methylfuran were the most detected compounds. For the first time, the MVOC production for particular fungal species was detected. The species A. creber, which belongs to the recently revised group Aspergillus section Versicolores, was characterized by the production of ethanol, furan and 1,4-pentadiene. For the xerophilic fungus E. halophilicum, specific production of acetone, 2-butanone and 1,4-pentadiene was detected, supported also by respirometric data. The results demonstrated the potential use of this method for the detection of fungal contamination phenomena inside Cultural Heritage's preservation environments. PMID:27392938

  20. Prototype Systems Containing Human Cytochrome P450 for High-Throughput Real-Time Detection of DNA Damage by Compounds That Form DNA-Reactive Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Brito Palma, Bernardo; Fisher, Charles W; Rueff, José; Kranendonk, Michel

    2016-05-16

    The formation of reactive metabolites through biotransformation is the suspected cause of many adverse drug reactions. Testing for the propensity of a drug to form reactive metabolites has increasingly become an integral part of lead-optimization strategy in drug discovery. DNA reactivity is one undesirable facet of a drug or its metabolites and can lead to increased risk of cancer and reproductive toxicity. Many drugs are metabolized by cytochromes P450 in the liver and other tissues, and these reactions can generate hard electrophiles. These hard electrophilic reactive metabolites may react with DNA and may be detected in standard in vitro genotoxicity assays; however, the majority of these assays fall short due to the use of animal-derived organ extracts that inadequately represent human metabolism. The current study describes the development of bacterial systems that efficiently detect DNA-damaging electrophilic reactive metabolites generated by human P450 biotransformation. These assays use a GFP reporter system that detects DNA damage through induction of the SOS response and a GFP reporter to control for cytotoxicity. Two human CYP1A2-competent prototypes presented here have appropriate characteristics for the detection of DNA-damaging reactive metabolites in a high-throughput manner. The advantages of this approach include a short assay time (120-180 min) with real-time measurement, sensitivity to small amounts of compound, and adaptability to a microplate format. These systems are suitable for high-throughput assays and can serve as prototypes for the development of future enhanced versions. PMID:27031942

  1. Detection of the metabolites of human plasma and follicular fluid in IVF-ET with microextraction and LC-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Yao, Shun; Liang, Xin; Zuo, Tao; Zhu, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    The metabolites from human plasma and follicular fluid in IVF-ET are related with the metabolic activity of follicular cells and further with oocyte quality. With liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) and organic extraction from plasma and follicular fluid, a fast and efficient method was established for detecting the metabolites of human plasma and follicular fluid. Certain metabolites were closely related with human physiological activities, such as hormone, amino acid, estrogen and fatty acid, and estrogen fatty acyllipid lipid were successfully detected in human plasma and follicular fluid. The metabolites in follicular fluid and plasma on the day of oocyte retrieval were found to be similar. But those in the latter and basal plasma were partially different. Methyl (3α ,5β ,7α ,12α)-3,7,12-trihydroxycholan-24-oate, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and tryptophan were identified and might be potential biomarkers on oocyte quality. It demonstrates that LC-TOF-MS combined with organic extraction could be an efficient tool to investigate the metabolites of human plasma and follicular fluid. Based on this study, it is expected to provide the basis for the further steps to explore possible influential factors on oocyte quality. PMID:26410324

  2. Standardized high-performance liquid chromatography of 182 mycotoxins and other fungal metabolites based on alkylphenone retention indices and UV-VIS spectra (diode array detection).

    PubMed

    Frisvad, J C; Thrane, U

    1987-08-28

    A general standardized method for the analysis of mycotoxins and other fungal secondary metabolites has been developed, based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an alkylphenone retention index and photodiode-array detection combined with thin-layer chromatography (TLC) in two different eluents. Each fungal secondary metabolite is characterized by its bracketed alkylphenone retention time index, its UV-VIS absorption maxima and its retardation factors relative to griseofulvin in two TLC eluents. This system is effective for the comparison of chemotaxonomic data in different laboratories and for a precise identification of fungi based on organic solvent extracts of fungal cultures. All important groups of mycotoxins and other fungal secondary metabolites could be detected in the HPLC system described and data are listed for 182 metabolites. The fungal secondary metabolites separated and characterized include aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2, ochratoxin A, citrinin, penicillin acid, viomellein, penitrem A, patulin, sterigmatocystin, alternariol, tenuazonic acid, trichothecenes, roquefortines, fusarin C, zearalenone, PR-toxin, citreoviridin, viridicatumtoxin, verruculogen, rugulosin, cyclopiazonic acid, penicillin G and many other alkaloids, polyketides and terpenes. PMID:3680432

  3. In Vivo Detection of Perinatal Brain Metabolite Changes in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR)

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Rui V.; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Carbajo, Rodrigo J.; González-Tendero, Anna; Illa, Miriam; Sanz-Cortés, Magdalena; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Gratacós, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. We studied a rabbit model of IUGR by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), to assess in vivo brain structural and metabolic consequences, and identify potential metabolic biomarkers for clinical translation. Methods IUGR was induced in 3 pregnant rabbits at gestational day 25, by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn; the contralateral horn was used as control. Fetuses were delivered at day 30 and weighted. A total of 6 controls and 5 IUGR pups underwent T2-w MRI and localized proton MRS within the first 8 hours of life, at 7T. Changes in brain tissue volumes and respective contributions to each MRS voxel were estimated by semi-automated registration of MRI images with a digital atlas of the rabbit brain. MRS data were used for: (i) absolute metabolite quantifications, using linear fitting; (ii) local temperature estimations, based on the water chemical shift; and (iii) classification, using spectral pattern analysis. Results Lower birth weight was associated with (i) smaller brain sizes, (ii) slightly lower brain temperatures, and (iii) differential metabolite profile changes in specific regions of the brain parenchyma. Specifically, we found estimated lower levels of aspartate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus (suggesting neuronal impairment), and higher glycine levels in the striatum (possible marker of brain injury). Our results also suggest that the metabolic changes in cortical regions are more prevalent than those detected in hippocampus and striatum. Conclusions IUGR was associated with brain metabolic changes in vivo, which correlate well with the neurostructural changes and neurodevelopment problems described in IUGR. Metabolic parameters could constitute non invasive biomarkers for the diagnosis and abnormal neurodevelopment of perinatal origin. PMID:26208165

  4. Spectroscopic imaging and spatial localization using adiabatic pulses and applications to detect transmural metabolite distribution in the canine heart.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, P M; Merkle, H; Sublett, E; Hendrich, K; Lew, B; Path, G; From, A H; Bache, R J; Garwood, M; Uğurbil, K

    1989-04-01

    Adiabatic pulses have been employed in spectroscopic imaging and relaxation rate measurements at 4.7 T to demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining spectroscopic data from the complete sensitive volume of a surface coil using the surface coil as a transmitter and receiver. With conventional B1 sensitive pulses, spectroscopic localization or imaging techniques, such as chemical-shift imaging, yield resonance intensities that are distorted severely as a function of space, and maximal signal is detected from a small region within the complete sensitive volume of the coil. With adiabatic pulses, however, this problem is eliminated completely. In addition, a new method of spatial localization is introduced. This method, referred to as FLAX-ISIS, is a derivative of longitudinally modulated Fourier series window and ISIS approaches and utilizes adiabatic inversion and excitation pulses. The method allows construction of localized spectra for multiple regions along the surface coil axis by postacquisition data manipulation of a single set of free induction decays. These techniques were applied to the study of the myocardium using an implanted surface coil in an instrumented closed-chest canine model and in an open-chest preparation. The results demonstrate that one-dimensional techniques are adequate for transmural detection of metabolites provided signal origin is restricted to a column perpendicular to the left ventricle wall. PMID:2755331

  5. Removal of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and other selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater using a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Accinelli, Cesare; Saccà, Maria Ludovica; Batisson, Isabelle; Fick, Jerker; Mencarelli, Mariangela; Grabic, Roman

    2010-09-01

    The capacity of the ligninolytic fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade a wide variety of environmentally persistent xenobiotics has been largely reported in the literature. Beside other factors, one barrier to a wider use of this bioremediation fungus is the availability of effective formulations that ensure easy preparation, handling and application. In this series of laboratory experiments, we evaluated the efficiency of a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of P. chrysosporium for removal of four selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater samples. Addition of inoculated granules to samples of the wastewater treatment plant of Bologna significantly increased the removal of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu), and the antibiotics, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazol, and ciprofloxacin. Similar effects were also observed in effluent water. Oseltamivir was the most persistent of the four active substances. After 30d of incubation, approximately two times more oseltamivir was removed in bioremediated wastewater than controls. The highest removal efficiency of the bioplastic formulation was observed with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Microbiological DNA-based analysis showed that the bioplastic matrix supported the growth of P. chrysosporium, thus facilitating its adaptation to unusual environment such as wastewater. PMID:20673959

  6. Photocatalytic degradation of the antiviral drug Tamiflu by UV-A/TiO2: Kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Hu, Hong-Ying; Negishi, Nobuaki; Torimura, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate, OP) by TiO2 - P25, ST-01 and ATO was investigated in aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV-A) irradiation. The photocatalysis of OP is well described by pseudo-first-order kinetics with r2>98.0% for all cases. The kinetic constant of P25 with 80% anatase and 20% rutile (0.040 min(-1)) is 4 and 10 times higher than that of ATO and ST-01 with 100% purity of anatase, respectively. We examined the effects of the catalyst loading and initial OP concentration on the photodegradation of OP, and used potassium iodine, isopropanol, and calcium fluorine as radical quenchers to evaluate the contributions of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and photo hole (h+) in the photodegradation. Results confirmed that 80% of the contribution came from the OH species. Although more than 95% of the OP (21 μM) was removed after 80 min of UV-A irradiation with 20 and 100 mg L(-1) P25, the removal efficiencies of total organic carbon (TOC) were only 45.6% and 67.0%, respectively, after 360 min UV-A irradiation. Based on an intermediate analysis by HPLC coupled with a triple quadrupole spectrometer and an ion trap mass spectrometer, typical intermediate species such as hydration derivatives, hydroxyl substitutes and keto-derivatives were identified and possible degradation pathways of OP by P25 were proposed. PMID:25765262

  7. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording. PMID:27026651

  8. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  9. Screening for anabolic steroids in sports: analytical strategy based on the detection of phase I and phase II intact urinary metabolites by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Georgina; Pozo, Oscar J; Esquivel, Argitxu; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Joglar, Jesús; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa

    2015-04-10

    In order to improve the detection capabilities of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) in sports, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) screening method for the simultaneous detection of AAS phase I and phase II intact urinary metabolites (glucuronides and sulfates) was developed. A total of 36 metabolites (7 unconjugated; 19 glucuronides and 10 sulfates) corresponding to 15 of the most reported AAS were included. Analytes were extracted from urine using C18 cartridges. LC and MS conditions were studied in-depth to determine the most sensitive and selective conditions for each analyte. A selected reaction monitoring method was set up. The optimization of the experimental parameters for 13 metabolites not available as standards was performed using excretion study urines. Extraction recoveries were above 77% for all 23 validated analytes. Intra-day precision was lower than 21%, and LODs were in the range 0.25-4ng/mL for 18 of the 23 analytes. Matrix effect was evaluated using post column infusion and ranged from 92 to 147%. The method was successfully applied to excretion study urines of different exogenous AAS. The suitability of the strategy was demonstrated with methyltestosterone and stanozolol excretion study urines by achieving detection times of 22 and 21 days, respectively. The method is compliant with the World Antidoping Agency requirements for most of the studied compounds. It represents a cost-effective approach that improves the detection capabilities of AAS by increasing the sensitivity for some metabolites and by including recently described phase II long-term metabolites not detectable using the current screening strategy. PMID:25746760

  10. The detection of the urinary metabolites of 3-[(adamantan-1-yl)carbonyl]-1-pentylindole (AB-001), a novel cannabimimetic, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Andrej; Kavanagh, Pierce; Melnik, Aleksandra

    2012-06-01

    3-[(Adamantan-1-yl)carbonyl]-1-pentylindole (AB-001), a synthetic cannabimimetic, was identified in head shop products in Ireland in 2010. German authorities also reported it to the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) via the Early Warning System (EWS) in 2011. As indole-derived cannabimimetics, such as JWH-018, JWH-073, and JWH-250, undergo extensive metabolism, it was expected that AB-001 would behave similarly. To include it in our toxicological screening protocols, we have identified its urinary metabolites in humans following oral administration. The major metabolites were found to be adamantane mono-hydroxylated and adamantane mono-hydroxylated/N-dealkylated products. No parent compound was found in urine, and metabolites were detectable for up to 160 h following administration. PMID:22102533

  11. Pesticide Exposures to Migrant Farmworkers in Eastern NC: Detection of metabolites in farmworker urine associated with housing violations and camp characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Raymer, J. H.; Studabaker, W.; Gardner, M.; Talton, J.; Quandt, S.A.; Chen, H.; Michael, L. C.; McCombs, M.; Arcury, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to present and evaluate descriptively bivariate associations between urinary metabolites of pesticides and herbicides and migrant camp conditions, violations and personal worker behaviors at home for farmworkers who do not apply pesticides. Methods We studied 183 migrant farmworker camps in eastern North Carolina in 2010. Data and urine samples were collected from 371 men. Predictor measures included violations in six domains of housing regulations and nonviolation characteristics and personal behaviors that might impact urinary metabolites. Results Cockroaches and bathroom violations were predictive of increased exposure to pyrethroids and cyfluthrin/chlorpyrifos, respectively. Changing and storing clothing and shoes in sleeping rooms increased the number of detects for the diazinon metabolite. Conclusions Farmworkers had exposures to multiple chemicals. No single housing domain was identified as critical to mitigating housing-related exposure;specific attention should be paid to changing and storing soiled clothing in sleeping rooms, and insect infestations. PMID:24273087

  12. Determination of chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) were developed for the analysis of the following chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water: alachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA); alachlor oxanilic acid; acetochlor ESA; acetochlor oxanilic acid; metolachlor ESA; and metolachlor oxanilic acid. Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for both the HPLC-DAD and HPLC/MS methods in reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The average HPLC-DAD recoveries of the chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.25, 0.5 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 84 to 112%, with relative standard deviations of 18% or less. The average HPLC/MS recoveries of the metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.05, 0.2 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 81 to 118%, with relative standard deviations of 20% or less. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all metabolites using the HPLC-DAD method was 0.20 ??g/l, whereas the LOQ using the HPLC/MS method was at 0.05 ??g/l. These metabolite-determination methods are valuable for acquiring information about water quality and the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Competitive immunoassays for simultaneous detection of metabolites and proteins using micromosaic patterning.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brian M; He, Xinya; Dandy, David; Henry, Charles S

    2008-01-15

    New high-throughput immunoassay methods for rapid point-of-care diagnostic applications represent an unmet need and current focus of numerous innovative methods. We report a new micromosaic competitive immunoassay developed for the analysis of the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4), inflammation biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP), and the oxidative damage marker 3-nitrotyrosine (BSA-3NT) on a silicon nitride substrate. To demonstrate the versatility of the method, both direct and indirect format competitive immunoassays were developed and could be applied simultaneously for single samples. Signals from standard solutions were fit to a logistic equation, allowing simultaneous detection of T4 (7.7-257.2 nM), CRP (0.3-4.2 microg/mL), and BSA-3NT (0.03-22.3 microg/mL). Total assay time including sample introduction, washing, and fluorescence measurement was less than 45 min. Dissociation constants for affinity pairs in the system have been estimated using regression. This proof-of-concept experiment shows that both small and macromolecular biomarkers can be quantified from a single sample using the method and suggests that groups of clinically related analytes may be analyzed by competitive micromosaic immunoassay techniques. PMID:18092765

  14. An immunoassay for the detection of triclosan-O-glucuronide, a primary human urinary metabolite of triclosan.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Anupama; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-09-01

    Triclosan-O-glucuronide (TCSG) is one of the primary urinary metabolites of the antibacterial compound triclosan or TCS that is found in many personal care products and consumer goods. We have developed a competitive, indirect heterologous ELISA for the detection of the target TCSG in urine. Such an ELISA for TCSG could be developed as a useful tool to measure this important biomarker of human exposure to TCS. Immunogens were prepared by conjugating TCSG to thyroglobulin, via heterobifunctional cross-linkers AEDP or 3-[(2-aminoethyl)dithio] propionic acid•hydrochloride and TFCS or N-[ε-trifluoroacetylcaproyloxy]succinimide ester. The coating antigen was prepared by the direct conjugation of TCSG to bovine serum albumin. Antibodies raised in rabbits 2619, 2621 (immunogen TCSG-AEDP-Thy), and 2623 (immunogen TCSG-TFCS-Thy), and the coating antigen were screened and characterized to determine their optimal concentrations. The optimized ELISA, developed with antibody 2621, gave an IC50 value of 2.85 ng/mL, with the linear range (IC20-IC80) determined to be 2.6-24.8 ng/mL. Selectivity of the assay was assessed by measuring cross-reactivity of antibody 2621 to related congeners such as the aglycone TCS, triclosan-O-sulfate, triclocarban, a polybrominated diphenyl ether derivative, and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol glucuronide. There was virtually no recognition by antibody 2621 to any of these cross-reactants. Graphical Abstract Urinary biomarker analysis of triclosan glucuronide. PMID:26255293

  15. Detection of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in oral fluid specimens and its contribution to positive results in screening assays.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christine; Ross, Wayne; Coulter, Cynthia; Adams, Laura; Rana, Sumandeep; Vincent, Michael; Soares, James

    2006-09-01

    The detection of the marijuana metabolite 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in oral fluid specimens is described, and its contribution to an immunoassay for the detection of cannabinoids is investigated. Oral fluid specimens, screened using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent immunoassay (ELISA), were carried forward to confirmation for both tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and THC-COOH using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). One hundred and fifty-three specimens were analyzed, of which 143 screened positive for cannabinoids. Ninety-five (66.4%) of these specimens were positive for both THC and THC-COOH; 14 (9.7%) were positive for THC-COOH only, and 27 (18.8%) were positive for THC only. The GC-MS assay for the detection of THC-COOH in oral fluid was linear to 160 pg/mL with a limit of quantitation of 2 pg/mL. The detection of the marijuana metabolite, THC-COOH, in 76.2% of oral fluid specimens screening positive for cannabinoids is reported. As a potential defense against passive exposure claims, proposed SAMHSA regulations may require the simultaneous collection of a urine sample when oral fluid samples are used. The detection of the metabolite, THC-COOH, is a significant alternative to this approach because its presence in oral fluid minimizes the argument for passive exposure to marijuana in drug testing cases. PMID:16959132

  16. Sensitive and selective detection of urinary 1-nitropyrene metabolites following administration of a single intragastric dose of diesel exhaust particles (SRM 2975) to rats.

    PubMed

    van Bekkum, Y M; van den Broek, P H; Scheepers, P T; Bos, R P

    1998-11-01

    1-Nitropyrene (1-NP) has been proposed as a marker for exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Since the extent of the actual intake of 1-NP adsorbed on DEP will be relatively low, sensitive and selective methods are needed regarding human exposure assessment. Two analytical methods are presented for the assessment of 1-NP metabolites in urine of male Sprague-Dawley rats administered a single intragastric dose of native DEP (SRM 2975, 20 mg, 35.7 microgram of 1-NP/g). Enzymatically hydrolyzed urine was extracted using Blue Rayon. The extracts were analyzed directly, using HPLC with postcolumn on-line reduction and fluorescence detection (HPLC-Flu), or were processed further for GC/MS/MS analysis. Although sensitive to several metabolites, the HPLC-Flu method lacked selectivity for quantitation of some important metabolites in rat urinary extracts, and therefore seems suitable for screening purposes only. With regard to GC/MS/MS analysis, derivatization with heptafluorobutyrylimidazole (HFBI) yielded low limits of determination for hydroxy-1-aminopyrenes, hydroxy-N-acetyl-1-aminopyrenes (converted to derivatized hydroxy-1-aminopyrenes by the reagent), and 1-aminopyrene (1.8-9.2 fmol on the column). Derivatization of hydroxy-1-nitropyrenes yielded relatively high limits of determination, and therefore, hydroxy-1-nitropyrenes were reduced to hydroxy-1-aminopyrenes prior to derivatization with HFBI. Intragastric administration of DEP to rats resulted in urinary excretion of 6-hydroxy-N-acetyl-1-aminopyrene, 8-hydroxy-N-acetyl-1-aminopyrene, 6-hydroxy-1-nitropyrene, 8-hydroxy-1-nitropyrene, and 3-hydroxy-1-nitropyrene (7, 1.2, 1.6, 0.3, and 0.5% of the dose within 12 h, respectively). 1-Nitropyrene, N-acetyl-1-aminopyrene, and 3-, 6-, and 8-hydroxy-1-aminopyrene were not observed as urinary metabolites following administration of a single dose of DEP. The observed excretion pattern and urinary metabolite concentrations suggest that 1-NP present on unmodified DEP

  17. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for Determination of Amifostine and/or Its Metabolite (WR-1065) In Human Plasma Using OPA Derivatization and UV Detection

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Nasim; Foroutan, Seyed Mohsen; Shafaati, Alireza; Zarghi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and reproducible HPLC method was developed and validated for the analysis of amifostine (AMF) and/or its metabolite, WR-1065 in human plasma. The method involves the alkylation of free sulfydryl group with iodoacetic acid followed by derivatization of the drug and its metabolite with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) and UVdetection at 340 nm. The derivatized AMF and WR-1065 were eluted in less than 11 min, and in the case of the metabolite with no interferences from the endogenous plasma peaks. Cystein was used as the internal standard. Analysis was carried out on a Eurosphere Performance (RP-18e, 100 × 4.6 mm) analytical column. The mobile phase was a mixture of methanol and phosphate buffer 0.03 M pH = 2.7 at a ratio of 40: 60v/v, respectively, with a flow rate of 1.5 mLmin-1. Limit of detection was 0.5 µgmL-1. The method involved a simple extraction procedure for AMF and/or its metabolite and analytical recovery was 90 ± 0.9%.The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 1-200 µgmL-1. The coefficients of variation for intra-day and inter-day assays were less than 10%. PMID:26664371

  18. Enantioselective determination of metoprolol and its metabolites in human urine high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Baranowska, Irena; Adolf, Weronika; Magiera, Sylwia

    2015-11-01

    A sensitive, stereoselective assay using solid phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection (FLD) was developed and validated for the analysis of enantiomers of metoprolol and its metabolites (α-hydroxymetoprolol, O-desmethylmetoprolol). Chiral separation was achieved using a CHIRALCEL OD-RH column, packed with cellulose tris-(3,5-dimethylphenyl-carbamate) stationary phase, employing a mobile phase composed by a mixture of 0.2% diethylamine in water and acetonitrile in gradient elution mode. Linear calibration curves were obtained over the range of 0.025-2.0μg/mL (R(2)>0.994) in urine for both enantiomers of metoprolol and its metabolites with quantitation limit of 0.025μg/mL. Intra and inter-day precision and accuracy were below 15% for both metoprolol and metabolites enantiomers. The recovery of enantiomer of metoprolol and its metabolite was greater than 68.0%, utilizing a SPE procedure. The method was tested with urine quality control samples and human urine fractions after administration of 50mg rac-metoprolol. PMID:26451466

  19. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for Determination of Amifostine and/or Its Metabolite (WR-1065) In Human Plasma Using OPA Derivatization and UV Detection.

    PubMed

    Samiei, Nasim; Foroutan, Seyed Mohsen; Shafaati, Alireza; Zarghi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and reproducible HPLC method was developed and validated for the analysis of amifostine (AMF) and/or its metabolite, WR-1065 in human plasma. The method involves the alkylation of free sulfydryl group with iodoacetic acid followed by derivatization of the drug and its metabolite with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) and UVdetection at 340 nm. The derivatized AMF and WR-1065 were eluted in less than 11 min, and in the case of the metabolite with no interferences from the endogenous plasma peaks. Cystein was used as the internal standard. Analysis was carried out on a Eurosphere Performance (RP-18e, 100 × 4.6 mm) analytical column. The mobile phase was a mixture of methanol and phosphate buffer 0.03 M pH = 2.7 at a ratio of 40: 60v/v, respectively, with a flow rate of 1.5 mLmin(-1). Limit of detection was 0.5 µgmL(-1). The method involved a simple extraction procedure for AMF and/or its metabolite and analytical recovery was 90 ± 0.9%.The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 1-200 µgmL(-1). The coefficients of variation for intra-day and inter-day assays were less than 10%. PMID:26664371

  20. Rapid determination of letrozole, citalopram and their metabolites by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection in urine: Method validation and application to real samples.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Castañeda, G; Muñoz, L

    2013-01-15

    This work reports the validation of a high precision and accuracy method for the simultaneous determination of letrozole, citalopram and their metabolites in urine by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Dilution (urine:mobile phase, 1:2, v/v) was the only sample preparation step. The separation was carried out in a Kromasil C(18) (150mm×4.6mm) column, and the mobile phase was phosphate buffer 80mM (pH 3.0) and acetonitrile (65:35, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0mL/min. The analytes were detected at 295nm after excitation at 230nm. Linearity was observed in the range of 1.0-1000ng/mL for letrozole and its metabolite and 2.5-1000ng/mL for citalopram and their metabolites, with limits of detection and quantification between 0.09-1.0 and 0.27-1.65ng/mL, respectively. The precisions were satisfactory with RSDs between 0.17 and 5.71%. The accuracy was studied by spiking three urines from healthy female volunteers, and the recoveries were from 85 to 103%. The method was applied to urine samples from women under treatment for breast cancer and depression diseases. PMID:23262245

  1. Monitoring in Situ Anaerobic Alkylbenzene Biodegradation Based on Mass Spectrometric Detection of Unique Metabolites or Real-Time PCR Detection of a Catabolic Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Kane, S. R.

    2002-12-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) can be a cost-effective and viable approach for remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater. However, regulatory acceptance of the approach is often contingent on monitoring that can convincingly demonstrate the role of microbial degradation. Recent advances in anaerobic hydrocarbon biochemistry, analytical chemistry, and molecular biology have fostered the development of powerful new techniques that can be applied to MNA of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes). Here we report two independent methods that have been developed to monitor in situ, anaerobic biodegradation of toluene and xylenes. A method has been developed for rapid, sensitive, and highly selective detection of distinctive indicators of anaerobic alkylbenzene metabolism. The target metabolites, benzylsuccinic acid (BS) and methylbenzylsuccinic acid (MeBS) isomers, have no known sources other than anaerobic toluene or xylene degradation; thus, their mere presence in groundwater provides definitive evidence of in situ metabolism. The method, which involves small sample size (<1 mL) and no extraction/concentration steps, relies on isotope dilution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring. Detection limits for benzylsuccinates were determined to be ca. 0.3 μg/L and accuracy and precision were favorable in a groundwater matrix. The LC/MS/MS method was used to characterize geographic and temporal distributions of benzylsuccinates in an anaerobic, hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. BS was never detected and MeBS isomers were detected in the three wells with the highest concentrations of BTEX; MeBS concentrations ranged from <0.3 to 205 μg/L. A strong linear correlation was found between concentrations of total MeBS isomers and their parent compounds, xylenes. A monitoring method based on real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) analysis has been developed to specifically quantify populations of

  2. Extraction of nitrofurantoin and its toxic metabolite from urine by supercritical fluids. Quantitation by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Arancibia, Verónica; Valderrama, Mauricio; Madariaga, Andrea; Zúñiga, Marı́a Carolina; Segura, Rodrigo

    2003-11-01

    A procedure is described for the determination of nitrofurantoin and its toxic metabolite in urine from patients with urinary infection using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and liquid chromatography. The standard solution of toxic metabolite (radical anion) was obtained by electrochemical reduction of nitrofurantoin in an aprotic medium and chemical reoxidation with oxygen. In our initial SFE studies to find the adequate extraction parameters, drug solutions were impregnated onto filter paper. Quantitative extractions were achieved when the experiments were carried out under 2500 psi of pressure at a temperature of 80 degrees C (oven and restrictor) after 20 min of static extraction and 5 min of dynamic extraction. The modifier used was acetonitrile (2.0 ml in a 10 ml extraction column). Nitrofurantoin and its toxic metabolite were detected in urine samples. Both compounds were quantified in the extracts by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with detection at 310 nm. The calibration graph of these compounds in acetonitrile was linear between 10.9 and 378.0 muM (R=0.9995) for nitrofurantoin and between 3.0x10(-3) and 21.0 muM (R=0.9992) for the metabolite. The detection limits (LOD) were 12.1 and 0.9 muM, respectively. The drug was administered to two patients during 7 days, and all the urine eliminated between 1 day before and 2 days after administration was analyzed. One patient consumed the drug in the form of microcrystals and the other as macrocrystals. PMID:18969197

  3. 'Dilute-and-shoot' RSLC-MS-MS method for fast detection of nerve and vesicant chemical warfare agent metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Igor; Braun, Arcady; Stavrianidi, Andrey; Baygildiev, Timur; Shpigun, Oleg; Oreshkin, Dmitry; Rybalchenko, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive screening method based on fast liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (RSLC-MS-MS) has shown the feasibility of separation and detection of low concentration β-lyase metabolites of sulfur mustard and of nerve agent phosphonic acids in urine. The analysis of these compounds is of interest because they are specific metabolites of the chemical warfare agents (CWAs), sulfur mustard (HD), sarin (GB), soman (GD), VX and Russian VX (RVX). The 'dilute-and-shoot' RSLC-MS-MS method provides a sensitive and direct approach for determining CWA exposure in non-extracted non-derivatized samples from urine. Chromatographic separation of the metabolites was achieved using a reverse phase column with gradient mobile phases consisting of 0.5% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Identification and quantification of species were achieved using electrospray ionization-tandem mass-spectrometry monitoring two precursor-to-product ion transitions for each compound. The method demonstrates linearity over at least two orders of magnitude and had detection limits of 0.5 ng/mL in urine. PMID:25326204

  4. Comparison of Two Automated Solid Phase Extractions for the Detection of Ten Fentanyl Analogs and Metabolites in Human Urine Using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shaner, Rebecca L.; Kaplan, Pearl; Hamelin, Elizabeth I.; Bragg, William; Johnson, Rudolph C.

    2016-01-01

    Two types of automated solid phase extraction (SPE) were assessed for the determination of human exposure to fentanyls in urine. High sensitivity is required to detect these compounds following exposure because of the low dose required for therapeutic effect and the rapid clearance from the body for these compounds. To achieve this sensitivity, two acceptable methods for the detection of human exposure to seven fentanyl analogs and three metabolites were developed using either off-line 96-well plate SPE or on-line SPE. Each system offers different advantages: off-line 96-well plate SPE allows for high throughput analysis of many samples, which is needed for large sample numbers, while on-line SPE removes almost all analyst manipulation of the samples, minimizing the analyst time needed for sample preparation. Both sample preparations were coupled with reversed phase liquid chromatography and isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for analyte detection. For both methods, the resulting precision was within 15%, the accuracy within 25%, and the sensitivity was comparable with the limits of detection ranging from 0.002-0.041ng/mL. Additionally, matrix effects were substantially decreased from previous reports for both extraction protocols. The results of this comparison showed that both methods were acceptable for the detection of exposures to fentanyl analogs and metabolites in urine. PMID:24893271

  5. Combined derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection for simultaneous analysis of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite in human pancreatic juice samples.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Federico; Sulpizio, Sara; Bassi, Claudio; Carlucci, Maura; Cotellese, Roberto; Ferrone, Vincenzo; Innocenti, Paolo; Locatelli, Marcello

    2015-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method based on the combination of derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and fluorimetric detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite in human pancreatic juice samples. Parameters of the derivatization procedure affecting extraction efficiency were optimized. The developed method was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The calibration curves were linear over a range of 0.1-15 µg/mL for octreotide and 0.20-15 µg/mL for gabexate mesylate metabolite. Derivatized products of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite were separated on a Luna C18 column (4.6 × 250 mm; 5 µm particle size) using a gradient with a run time of 36 min, without further purification. The limits of detection were 0.025 and 0.05, respectively, for octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite. This paper reports the validation of a quantitative high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-fluorescence (HPLC-PDA-FL) method for the simultaneous analysis of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite in pancreatic juice by protein precipitation using zinc sulfate-methanol-acetonitrile containing the derivatizing reagent, 4-fluoro-7-nitro-[2,1,3]-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F). Derivatized products of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite were separated on a Luna C18 column (4.6 × 250 mm; 5 µm particle size) using a gradient with a run time of 36 min, without further purification. The method was validated over the concentration ranges 0.1-15 and 0.2-15 µg/mL for octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite, respectively, in human pancreatic juice. Biphalin and methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate were used as the internal standards. This method was successfully utilized to support clinical studies in humans. The results from assay validations show that the method is selective, sensitive and robust. The limit

  6. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  7. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples. PMID:25670027

  8. Determination of a metabolite of the herbicide pyridate in drinking and groundwater using high-performance liquid chromatography with amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Pachinger, A; Eisner, E; Begutter, H; Klus, H

    1991-10-11

    The main metabolite of the herbicide pyridate is 3-phenyl-4-hydroxy-6-chlorpyridazine (CL9673). A high-performance liquid chromatographic method with amperometric detection is described for determining CL9673 at residue levels in water samples. Sample preconcentration is performed by passage through a C18 extraction cartridge. A recovery study using tap water samples spiked with CL9673 at a concentration of 0.1 micrograms/l showed a recovery of 84.8% (coefficient of variation 6.2%). The method is suitable for the determination of CL9673 in drinking and groundwater. PMID:1797812

  9. The Tamiflu saga continues: will our conduct change after the publication of the latest systematic review on benefits and harms of oseltamivir?

    PubMed

    Bachelet, Vivienne C

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, we wrote about the harm, waste and deception stemming from conducts adopted by the pharmaceutical industry, by concealing raw data and Clinical Study Reports (CSRs) from the regulator’s view when requesting the marketing patent. We described the case of Tamiflu (Roche), a drug that has been widely used in our population and profusely prescribed by physicians. Health authorities, entailing a great cost for the countries in the region, have also purchased it. In this editorial, we will show how the idea of using antivirals for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza took hold, starting from the first enthusiastic recommendations up to the systematic review published last month in the BMJ. PMID:25383799

  10. Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) disables cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Leah K; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Allison, Stephanie; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to drug therapy, along with high rates of metastasis, contributes to the low survival rate in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. An alternate treatment for human pancreatic cancer involving targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) was investigated in human pancreatic cancer (PANC1) cells with acquired resistance to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Its efficacy in overcoming the intrinsic resistance of the cell to chemotherapeutics and metastasis was evaluated. Methods Microscopic imaging, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and WST-1 cell viability assays were used to evaluate cell survival, morphologic changes, and expression levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and VE-cadherin before and after treatment with oseltamivir phosphate in PANC1 cells with established resistance to cisplatin, gemcitabine, or a combination of the two agents, and in archived paraffin-embedded PANC1 tumors grown in RAGxCγ double mutant mice. Results Oseltamivir phosphate overcame the chemoresistance of PANC1 to cisplatin and gemcitabine alone or in combination in a dose-dependent manner, and disabled the cancer cell survival mechanism(s). Oseltamivir phosphate also reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition characteristic of the phenotypic E-cadherin to N-cadherin changes associated with resistance to drug therapy. Low-dose oseltamivir phosphate alone or in combination with gemcitabine in heterotopic xenografts of PANC1 tumors growing in RAGxCγ double mutant mice did not prevent metastatic spread to the liver and lung. Conclusion Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate at the growth factor receptor level disables the intrinsic signaling platform for cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance. These findings provide evidence for oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) as a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer resistant to drug therapy. PMID:24470763

  11. Rapid and sensitive detection of fipronil and its metabolites in edible oils by solid-phase extraction based on humic acid bonded silica combined with gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xi-Tian; Li, Yu-Nan; Xia, Hong; Peng, Li-Jun; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Solid-phase extraction based on humic acid bonded silica followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection was developed to determine fipronil and its metabolites in edible oil. To achieve the best extraction performance, we systematically investigated a series of solid-phase extraction parameters. Under the optimized conditions, the method was validated according to linearity, recovery, and precision. Good linearities were obtained with R(2) more than 0.9996 for all analytes. The limits of detection were between 0.3 and 0.5 ng/g, and the recoveries ranged from 83.1 to 104.0% at three spiked concentrations with intra- and interday relative standard deviation values less than 8.7%. Finally, the proposed method was applied to determine fipronil and its metabolites in 11 edible oil samples taken from Wuhan markets. Fipronil was detectable in four samples with concentrations ranging from 3.0 to 5.2 ng/g. In China, the maximum residue limits of fipronil in some vegetables and maize are 20 and 100 ng/g (GB/T 2763-2014), respectively. The residues of fipronil and its metabolites in commercial edible oils might exhibit some potential threat to human health as a result of high consumption of edible oil as part of daily intake. PMID:27280701

  12. Multi-residue enantiomeric analysis of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals and their metabolites in environmental samples by chiral liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Muñoz, Dolores; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Enantiomeric profiling of chiral pharmacologically active compounds (PACs) in the environment has hardly been investigated. This manuscript describes, for the first time, a multi-residue enantioselective method for the analysis of human and veterinary chiral PACs and their main metabolites from different therapeutic groups in complex environmental samples such as wastewater and river water. Several analytes targeted in this paper have not been analysed in the environment at enantiomeric level before. These are aminorex, carboxyibuprofen, carprofen, cephalexin, 3-N-dechloroethylifosfamide, 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine, dihydroketoprofen, fenoprofen, fexofenadine, flurbiprofen, 2-hydroxyibuprofen, ifosfamide, indoprofen, mandelic acid, 2-phenylpropionic acid, praziquantel and tetramisole. The method is based on chiral liquid chromatography utilising a chiral α1-acid glycoprotein column and tandem mass spectrometry detection. Excellent chromatographic separation of enantiomers (Rs≥1.0) was achieved for chloramphenicol, fexofenadine, ifosfamide, naproxen, tetramisole, ibuprofen and their metabolites: aminorex and dihydroketoprofen (three of four enantiomers), and partial separation (Rs = 0.7-1.0) was achieved for ketoprofen, praziquantel and the following metabolites: 3-N-dechloroethylifosfamide and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine. The overall performance of the method was satisfactory for most of the compounds targeted. Method detection limits were at low nanogram per litre for surface water and effluent wastewater. Method intra-day precision was on average under 20% and sample pre-concentration using solid phase extraction yielded recoveries >70% for most of the analytes. This novel, selective and sensitive method has been applied for the quantification of chiral PACs in surface water and effluent wastewater providing excellent enantioresolution of multicomponent mixtures in complex environmental samples. It will help with better understanding

  13. Identification of metabolites from liquid chromatography-coulometric array detection profiling: gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and refractionation provide essential information orthogonal to LC-MS/microNMR.

    PubMed

    Gathungu, Rose M; Bird, Susan S; Sheldon, Diane P; Kautz, Roger; Vouros, Paul; Matson, Wayne R; Kristal, Bruce S

    2014-06-01

    Liquid chromatography-coulometric array detection (LC-EC) is a sensitive, quantitative, and robust metabolomics profiling tool that complements the commonly used mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based approaches. However, LC-EC provides little structural information. We recently demonstrated a workflow for the structural characterization of metabolites detected by LC-EC profiling combined with LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS and microNMR. This methodology is now extended to include (i) gas chromatography (GC)-electron ionization (EI)-MS analysis to fill structural gaps left by LC-ESI-MS and NMR and (ii) secondary fractionation of LC-collected fractions containing multiple coeluting analytes. GC-EI-MS spectra have more informative fragment ions that are reproducible for database searches. Secondary fractionation provides enhanced metabolite characterization by reducing spectral overlap in NMR and ion suppression in LC-ESI-MS. The need for these additional methods in the analysis of the broad chemical classes and concentration ranges found in plasma is illustrated with discussion of four specific examples: (i) characterization of compounds for which one or more of the detectors is insensitive (e.g., positional isomers in LC-MS, the direct detection of carboxylic groups and sulfonic groups in (1)H NMR, or nonvolatile species in GC-MS), (ii) detection of labile compounds, (iii) resolution of closely eluting and/or coeluting compounds, and (iv) the capability to harness structural similarities common in many biologically related, LC-EC-detectable compounds. PMID:24657819

  14. Simultaneous analysis of acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and aspirin metabolites by hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange capillary liquid chromatography coupled to amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minmin; Wu, Yimin; Lu, Lanxiang; Ding, Kang; Tang, Fengxiang; Lin, Zian; Wu, Xiaoping

    2011-08-01

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of polar nonsteroidal pharmaceuticals and metabolites, including acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and several aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid, salicyluric acid and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), by capillary liquid chromatography with amperometric detection. Using a capillary monolithic column with mixed mode stationary phases and a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and Tris buffer, rapid separation of six polar analytes was achieved within 8 min, and a hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange separation mechanism were exhibited. Method detection limits of six analytes ranged from 10 to 50 ng/mL. In terms of precision, the intra- and interday relative standard deviation values in all analytes never exceeded 3.1% for migration time and 8.9% for peak areas, respectively. This method provided a simple, rapid and cost-effective approach for the analysis of polar pharmaceuticals. The applicability of the method in pharmacokinetics was verified by spiking human serum samples with the compounds and analyzing the recoveries. PMID:21644253

  15. Determination of herbicides and its metabolite in soil and water samples by capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection using microwave-assisted derivatization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liwei; Deng, Tao; Liang, Siliu; Tan, Xiaofang; Meng, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Methods were developed to determine glufosinate (GLUF), glyphosate (GLYP) and its metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) by capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection using 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinylamino) fluorescein (DTAF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as the derivatizing reagents. To accelerate the labeling speed, a microwave-assisted derivatization method was adopted. The derivatizing reaction time was reduced to 180 and 150 s for DTAF and FITC, whose reaction time for conventional labeling was 50 min and 5 h, respectively. The optimum separation conditions for derivatives were as follows: a back ground electrolyte (BGE) of 30 mmol L(-1) sodium tetraborate containing 15 mmol L(-1) brij-35, hydrodynamic injection 15 s and a 10 kV separation voltage. Under these conditions, the LODs (S/N = 3) for DTAF derivatives were 0.32, 0.19 and 0.15 nmol L(-1) for GLUF, GLYP, and AMPA, respectively. The LODs (S/N = 3) for FITC derivatives were 2.60, 3.88 and 2.42 nmol L(-1) for GLUF, GLYP, and AMPA, respectively. The applicability of the developed method was demonstrated by the detection of the above herbicides and metabolite in water and soil samples. PMID:25007936

  16. A sensitive and rapid ultra HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous detection of clopidogrel and its derivatized active thiol metabolite in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Peer, Cody J; Spencer, Shawn D; VanDenBerg, Dustin A H; Pacanowski, Michael A; Horenstein, Richard B; Figg, William D

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive, selective, and rapid ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (uHPLC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous quantification of clopidogrel (Plavix(®)) and its derivatized active metabolite (CAMD) in human plasma. Derivatization of the active metabolite in blood with 2-bromo-3'-methoxy acetophenone (MPB) immediately after collection ensured metabolite stability during sample handling and storage. Following addition of ticlopidine as an internal standard and simple protein precipitation, the analytes were separated on a Waters Acquity UPLC™ sub-2 μm-C(18) column via gradient elution before detection on a triple-quadrupole MS with multiple-reaction-monitoring via electrospray ionization. The method was validated across the clinically relevant concentration range of 0.01-50 ng/mL for parent clopidogrel and 0.1-150 ng/mL (r(2)=0.99) for CAMD, with a fast run time of 1.5 min to support pharmacokinetic studies using 75, 150, or 300 mg oral doses of clopidogrel. The analytical method measured concentrations of clopidogrel and CAMD with accuracy (%DEV) <±12% and precision (%CV) of <±6%. The method was successfully applied to measure the plasma concentrations of clopidogrel and CAMD in three subjects administered single oral doses of 75, 150, and 300 mg clopidogrel. It was further demonstrated that the derivatizing agent (MPB) does not affect clopidogrel levels, thus from one aliquot of blood drawn clinically, this method can simultaneously quantify both clopidogrel and CAMD with sensitivity in the picogram per mL range. PMID:22169056

  17. Analytical Methodologies for Detection of Gamma-Valerolactone, Delta-Valerolactone, Acephate and Azinphos Methyl and Their Associated Metabolites in Complex Biological Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, E.; Clark, R.; Grant, K.; Campbell, J.; Hoppe, E.

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive biomonitoring for chemicals of interest in law enforcement and similar monitoring of pesticides, together with their metabolites, can not only save money but can lead to faster medical attention for individuals exposed to these chemicals. This study describes methods developed for the analysis of gamma-valerolactone (GVL), delta-valerolactone (DVL), acephate, and azinphos methyl in saliva and serum. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) operated in the negative and positive ion mode and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were used to analyze GVL and DVL. Although both analytical techniques worked well, lower detection limits were obtained with GC/MS. The lactones and their corresponding sodium salts were spiked into both saliva and serum. The lactones were isolated from saliva or serum using newly developed extraction techniques and then subsequently analyzed using GC/MS. The sodium salts of the lactones are nonvolatile and require derivatization prior to analysis by this method. N-methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) was ultimately selected as the reagent for derivatization because the acidic conditions required for reactions with diazomethane caused the salts to undergo intramolecular cyclization to the corresponding lactones. In vitro studies were conducted using rat liver microsomes to determine other metabolites associated with these compounds. Azinphos methyl and acephate are classified as organophosphate pesticides, and are known to be cholinesterase inhibitors in humans and insects, causing neurotoxicity. For this reason they have both exposure and environmental impact implications. These compounds were spiked into serum and saliva and prepared for analysis by GC/MS. Continuation of this research would include analysis by GC/MS under positive ion mode to determine the parent ions of the unknown metabolites. Further research is planned through an in vivo analysis of the lactones and pesticides. These

  18. Analytical Methodologies for Detection of Gamma-valerolactone, Delta-valerolactone, Acephate, and Azinphos Methyl and their Associated Metabolites in Complex Biological Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, Erika M.; Clark, Ryan J.; Grant, Karen E.; Campbell, James A.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive biomonitoring for chemicals of interest in law enforcement and similar monitoring of pesticides together with their metabolites can not only save money but can lead to faster medical attention for individuals exposed to these chemicals. This study describes methods developed for the analysis of gamma-valerolactone (GVL), delta-valerolactone (DVL), acephate, and azinphos methyl in saliva and serum. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) operated in the negative ion mode and in the positive ion mode and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were used to analyze GVL and DVL. Although both analytical techniques worked well, lower detection limits were obtained with GC/MS. The lactones and their corresponding sodium salts were spiked into both saliva and serum. The lactones were isolated from saliva or serum using newly developed extraction techniques and then subsequently analyzed using GC/MS. The sodium salts of the lactones are nonvolatile and require derivatization prior to analysis by this method. N-methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) was ultimately selected as the reagent for derivatization because the acidic conditions required for reactions with diazomethane caused the salts to undergo intramolecular cyclization to the corresponding lactones. In vitro studies were conducted using rat liver microsomes to determine other metabolites associated with these compounds. Azinphos methyl and acephate are classified as organophosphate pesticides, and are known to be cholinesterase inhibitors in humans and insects, causing neurotoxicity. For this reason they have both exposure and environmental impact implications. These compounds were spiked into serum and saliva and prepared for analysis by GC/MS. Continuation of this research would include analysis by GC/MS under positive ion mode to determine the parent ions of the unknown metabolites. Further research is planned through an in vivo analysis of the lactones and

  19. MIDDAS-M: Motif-Independent De Novo Detection of Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters through the Integration of Genome Sequencing and Transcriptome Data

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Nagano, Nozomi; Ishii, Tomoko; Kawano, Jin; Yamane, Noriko; Kozone, Ikuko; Horimoto, Katsuhisa; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Asai, Kiyoshi; Yu, Jiujiang; Bennett, Joan W.; Machida, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Many bioactive natural products are produced as “secondary metabolites” by plants, bacteria, and fungi. During the middle of the 20th century, several secondary metabolites from fungi revolutionized the pharmaceutical industry, for example, penicillin, lovastatin, and cyclosporine. They are generally biosynthesized by enzymes encoded by clusters of coordinately regulated genes, and several motif-based methods have been developed to detect secondary metabolite biosynthetic (SMB) gene clusters using the sequence information of typical SMB core genes such as polyketide synthases (PKS) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). However, no detection method exists for SMB gene clusters that are functional and do not include core SMB genes at present. To advance the exploration of SMB gene clusters, especially those without known core genes, we developed MIDDAS-M, a motif-independent de novo detection algorithm for SMB gene clusters. We integrated virtual gene cluster generation in an annotated genome sequence with highly sensitive scoring of the cooperative transcriptional regulation of cluster member genes. MIDDAS-M accurately predicted 38 SMB gene clusters that have been experimentally confirmed and/or predicted by other motif-based methods in 3 fungal strains. MIDDAS-M further identified a new SMB gene cluster for ustiloxin B, which was experimentally validated. Sequence analysis of the cluster genes indicated a novel mechanism for peptide biosynthesis independent of NRPS. Because it is fully computational and independent of empirical knowledge about SMB core genes, MIDDAS-M allows a large-scale, comprehensive analysis of SMB gene clusters, including those with novel biosynthetic mechanisms that do not contain any functionally characterized genes. PMID:24391870

  20. Detection of pharmaceuticals and phytochemicals together with their metabolites in hospital effluents in Japan, and their contribution to sewage treatment plant influents.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Takashi; Arima, Natsumi; Tsukada, Ai; Hirami, Satoru; Matsuoka, Rie; Moriwake, Ryogo; Ishiuchi, Hirotaka; Inoyama, Tomomi; Teranishi, Yusuke; Yamaoka, Misato; Mino, Yoshiki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Fujita, Yoshikazu; Masada, Mikio

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of 41 pharmaceuticals and phytochemicals (PPs) including their metabolites was surveyed in hospital effluent in an urban area of Japan. A detailed survey of sewage treatment plant (STP) influent and effluent, and river water was also conducted. Finally, mass balances with mass fluxes of the target PPs through the water flow were evaluated and the degree of contribution of hospital effluent to the environmental discharge was estimated. The results indicate that 38 compounds were detectable in hospital effluent over a wide concentration range from ng/L to μg/L, with a maximum of 92μg/L. The contributions of PPs in the hospital effluent to STP influent varied widely from <0.1% to 14.8%. Although almost all of the remaining components could be removed below 1.0ng/L at STPs by the addition of ozone treatment, a number of PPs still remained above 10ng/L in STP effluent. These findings suggest the importance of applying highly developed treatments to hospital effluents and at STPs in the future to reduce the environmental risks posed by PPs. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the presence of two conjugated metabolites of acetaminophen, acetaminophen glucuronide and acetaminophen sulfate, as well as of loxoprofen and loxoprofen alcohol, in hospital effluent, STP, and river waters. PMID:26802347

  1. Selective observation of biologically important 15N-labeled metabolites in isolated rat brain and liver by 1H-detected multiple-quantum-coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.; Parivar, Farhad

    Four cerebral metabolites of importance in neurotransmission, serotonin, L-tryptophan, L-glutamine, and N-acetyl- L-aspartate, and two hepatic urea-cycle intermediates, citrulline and urea, were found to be observable by 1H- 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum-coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy in aqueous solution at physiological pH and temperature, through the protons spin-coupled to their indole, amide, or ureido nitrogen. Their 1H chemical shifts were well dispersed over a 5-10 ppm region while the 1J 15N- 1H values were 87-99 Hz. For [γ- 15N]glutamine, a 50- to 100-fold increase in sensitivity over direct 15N detection was achieved, in contrast to a 2-fold increase by the polarization-transfer method. In the isolated brain of portacaval-shunted rats, the amide protons of biologically 15N-enriched [γ- 15N]glutamine were observed in 2 min of acquisition, with suppression of proton signals from all other cerebral metabolites. In isolated liver of 15N-enriched control rats, [ 15NIurea protons were observed in 16 min. The HMQC method is likely to be effective for the in vivo study of cerebral and hepatic nitrogen metabolism.

  2. Cross validation of gas chromatography-flame photometric detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for measuring dialkylphosphate metabolites of organophosphate pesticides in human urine.

    PubMed

    Prapamontol, Tippawan; Sutan, Kunrunya; Laoyang, Sompong; Hongsibsong, Surat; Lee, Grace; Yano, Yukiko; Hunter, Ronald Elton; Ryan, P Barry; Barr, Dana Boyd; Panuwet, Parinya

    2014-01-01

    We report two analytical methods for the measurement of dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolites of organophosphate pesticides in human urine. These methods were independently developed/modified and implemented in two separate laboratories and cross validated. The aim was to develop simple, cost effective, and reliable methods that could use available resources and sample matrices in Thailand and the United States. While several methods already exist, we found that direct application of these methods required modification of sample preparation and chromatographic conditions to render accurate, reliable data. The problems encountered with existing methods were attributable to urinary matrix interferences, and differences in the pH of urine samples and reagents used during the extraction and derivatization processes. Thus, we provide information on key parameters that require attention during method modification and execution that affect the ruggedness of the methods. The methods presented here employ gas chromatography (GC) coupled with either flame photometric detection (FPD) or electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (EI-MS) with isotopic dilution quantification. The limits of detection were reported from 0.10ng/mL urine to 2.5ng/mL urine (for GC-FPD), while the limits of quantification were reported from 0.25ng/mL urine to 2.5ng/mL urine (for GC-MS), for all six common DAP metabolites (i.e., dimethylphosphate, dimethylthiophosphate, dimethyldithiophosphate, diethylphosphate, diethylthiophosphate, and diethyldithiophosphate). Each method showed a relative recovery range of 94-119% (for GC-FPD) and 92-103% (for GC-MS), and relative standard deviations (RSD) of less than 20%. Cross-validation was performed on the same set of urine samples (n=46) collected from pregnant women residing in the agricultural areas of northern Thailand. The results from split sample analysis from both laboratories agreed well for each metabolite, suggesting that each method can produce

  3. Fast detection of choline-containing metabolites in liver using 2D 1H- 14N three-bond correlation (HN3BC) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xi-an; Li, Ning; Mao, Jiezhen; Li, Qiurong; Xiao, Nan; Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Xu-xia; Liu, Maili

    2012-01-01

    Detection and quantification of total choline-containing metabolites (CCMs) in tissues by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has received considerable attention as a biomarker of cancer. Tissue CCMs are mainly choline (Cho), phosphocholine (PCho), and glycerophosphocholine (GPCho). Because the methyl 1H resonances of tissue CCMs exhibit small chemical shift differences and overlap significantly in 1D 1H MRS, quantification of individual components is precluded. Development of a MRS method capably of resolving individual components of tissue CCMs would be a significant advance. Herein, a modification of the 2D 1H- 14N HSQC technique is targeted on the two methylene 1H in the CH 2O group ( 3J1H14N = 2.7 Hz) and applied to ex vivo mouse and human liver samples at physiological temperature (37 °C). Specifically, the 1H- 14N HSQC technique is modified into a 2D 1H- 14N three-bond correlation (HN3BC) experiment, which selectively detects the 1H of CH 2O coupled to 14N in CCMs. Separate signals from Cho, PCho, and GPCho components are resolved with high detection sensitivity. A 2D HN3BC spectrum can be recorded from mouse liver in only 1.5 min and from human carcinoma liver tissue in less than 3 min with effective sample volume of 0.2 ml at 14.1 T.

  4. High-performance liquid chromatographic method with amperometric detection employing boron-doped diamond electrode for the determination of sildenafil, vardenafil and their main metabolites in plasma.

    PubMed

    Bartošová, Zdenka; Jirovský, David; Horna, Aleš

    2011-11-01

    A simple, fast and sensitive HPLC method with electrochemical detection employing boron-doped diamond electrode (BDD) for the determination of sildenafil (Viagra™), vardenafil (Levitra™) and their main metabolites, N-desmethyl sildenafil and N-desethyl vardenafil in human plasma is presented. The assay involved drug extraction by tert-butyl methyl ether and isocratic reversed-phase liquid chromatography with amperometric detection. Complete separation of all analytes was achieved within 12 min. The mobile phase consisted of 20mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate with 40 mM sodium perchlorate/acetonitrile (70:30, v/v), pH 3.5. The electrode working potential was +1520 mV (vs. Pd/H(2)). Calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 10-400 ng mL(-1). Phloretin was used as an internal standard. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) for the studied analytes were within the range of 2-4 ng mL(-1) and 7.0-13.4 ng mL(-1), respectively. The developed method was applied to human plasma samples spiked with analytes at therapeutic concentrations. The study confirms the method's suitability for both pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic monitoring. PMID:21943935

  5. [High throuput analysis of organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in animal original foods by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Li, Heli; Miao, Hong; Zeng, Fangang; Li, Ruifeng; Chen, Huijing; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2011-10-01

    A method was established for the quantitative determination of 54 organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in foods of animal origin by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection. Homogenized samples were extracted with acetone and methylene chloride, and cleaned-up by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The response of each analyte showed a good linearity with a correlation coefficient not less than 0. 99. The recovery experiments were performed by a blank sample spiked at low, medium and high fortification levels. The recoveries for beef, mutton, pork, chicken were in the range of 50. 5% -128. 1% with the relative standard deviations (n = 6) of 1. 1% -25. 5%, which demonstrated the good precision and accuracy of the present method. The limits of detection for the analytes were in the range of 0. 001 -0. 170 mg/kg, and the limits of quantification were in the range of 0. 002 -0. 455 mg/kg. Animal food samples collected from markets such as meat, liver and kidney were analyzed, and the residues of dichlorovos and disulfoton-sulfoxide were found in the some samples. The established method is sensitive and selective enough to detect organophosphorus pesticide residues in animal foods. PMID:22268359

  6. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  7. An environmental risk assessment for oseltamivir (Tamiflu) for sewage works and surface waters under seasonal-influenza- and pandemic-use conditions.

    PubMed

    Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2009-09-01

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, anti-viral medications such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) are expected to be used in high amounts over a duration of several weeks. Oseltamivir has been predicted to reach high concentrations in surface waters and sewage works. New oseltamivir environmental fate and toxicity studies permit an environmental risk assessment (ERA) under seasonal- and pandemic-use scenarios. The environmental fate data for sewage works (no removal), surface waters (no significant degradation), and water/sediment systems (>50% primary degradation in 100 days) were used for the derivation of new predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) for western Europe and the River Lee catchment in the UK. Existing worst-case PECs for western Europe, the River Lee catchment in the UK and the Lower Colorado basin in the USA under pandemic conditions (< or =98.1 microg/L for surface waters, < or =348 microg/L for sewage works) were also considered for the ERA. PECs were compared with predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) based on new chronic ecotoxicity data (no observed effect concentration for algae, daphnia, and fish > or =1 mg/L). Based on all PEC/PNEC risk ratios, no significant risk is evident to surface waters or sewage works during both regular seasonal-use and high pandemic-use of oseltamivir. PMID:19560203

  8. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  9. Time-course measurements of caffeine and its metabolites extracted from fingertips after coffee intake: a preliminary study for the detection of drugs from fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an ingested drug and its metabolites could be detected in the subject's fingerprints. Caffeine (CF) was chosen as the model drug. Three healthy subjects were asked to consume a cup of coffee (ca. 100 mL) containing 80 micro micro mg CF as the total dose, which is the normal amount in one cup of coffee. After washing hands with water to remove external contaminants, each subject pressed the index fingertip to a collecting matrix just before consuming the test cup of coffee, and then again pressed the index fingertip to the collecting matrix after 1, 3, 5, and 7 h. The time curve of the amounts of CF and its metabolites-theobromine (TB), paraxanthine (PX), and theophylline (TP)-in fingerprints and blood was determined using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS). A filter paper wetted with water (50 μL) was an efficient collecting matrix for extracting the analytes from the fingertip. With optimized sample preparation and LC/MS conditions, the total operating time, from taking the fingerprints to obtaining the analytical result, was approximately 10 min. The lower limits of quantification for CF, TB, PX, and TP were 0.5, 5, 0.5, and 5 ng/fingerprint, respectively. The amount of CF or PX determined in fingerprints obtained over 7 h after coffee intake was significantly greater than the amount determined in fingerprints taken before drinking coffee. Fingerprints were a more efficient source for drug testing than other biological samples, such as blood and sweat, because the procedures for sampling and extracting the drugs were simpler and took less time. The method could be used to prove drug intake in criminal investigations. PMID:23187828

  10. FISH BILIARY POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON METABOLITES ESTIMATED BY FIXED-WAVELENGTH FLUORESCENCE: COMPARISON WITH HPLC-FLUORESCENT DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fixed wavelength fluorescence (FF) was compared to high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-F) as an estimation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure to fish. Two excitation/emission wavelength pairs were used to measure naphthalene- an...

  11. Measuring levels of biogenic amines and their metabolites in rat brain tissue using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection.

    PubMed

    Gu, Min-Jung; Jeon, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Myung Sook; Hong, Seon-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method to detect biogenic amines and their metabolites in rat brain tissue using simultaneous high-performance liquid chromatography and a photodiode array detection. Measurements were made using a Hypersil Gold C-18 column (250 × 2.1 mm, 5 µm). The mobile phase was 5 mM perchloric acid containing 5 % acetonitrile. The correlation coefficient was 0.9995-0.9999. LODs (S/N = 3) and LOQs (S/N = 10) were as follows: dopamine 0.4 and 1.3 pg, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid 8.4 and 28.0 pg, serotonin 0.4 and 1.3 pg, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid 3.4 and 11.3 pg, and homovanillic acid 8.4 and 28.0 pg. This method does not require derivatization steps, and is more sensitive than the widely used HPLC-UV method. PMID:26463700

  12. Analytical method for the determination of atrazine and its dealkylated chlorotriazine metabolites in water using gas chromatography/mass selective detection.

    PubMed

    Yokley, R A; Cheung, M W

    2000-10-01

    A multiresidue method is reported for the determination of atrazine and its dealkylated chlorotriazine metabolites in water. Water samples are buffered to pH 10 and partitioned in ethyl acetate. Final analysis is accomplished using gas chromatography/mass selective detection (GC/MSD) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The limit of detection (LOD) is 0.050 ng and the limit of quantification (LOQ) is 0.10 ppb for 2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (atrazine), 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (G-30033), 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(ethylamino)-s-triazine (G-28279), and 2, 4-diamino-6-chloro-s-triazine (G-28273). The mean procedural recoveries were 90, 92, 98, and 85% and the standard deviations were 12, 13, 16, and 20% for atrazine, G-30033, G-28279, and G-28273, respectively (n = 30). The study was conducted under U.S. EPA FIFRA Good Laboratory Practice Guidelines 40 CFR 160 for method validation. The reported procedure accounts for residues of G-28273 in water that are not included in EPA Method 507. PMID:11052690

  13. Determination of heroin metabolites in human urine using capillary zone electrophoresis with beta-cyclodextrin and UV detection.

    PubMed

    Alnajjar, Ahmed; McCord, Bruce

    2003-10-15

    A method has been developed for the detection of a mixture of morphine, codeine, 6-acetyl morphine (6-AM) and normorphine using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The method utilized urinary 6-AM as a diagnostic indicator of heroin abuse because it is not a product of either morphine or codeine metabolism. The electrophoretic separation was achieved using an uncoated (50 microm I.D.) fused-silica capillary, 77 cm long, containing the detector window 10.0 cm from the outlet end. The running buffer (pH 6.0) contained 50 mM sodium phosphate and 0.015 M beta-cyclodextrins (beta-CD). The samples were first extracted using a mixed-mode solid-phase extraction procedure and then analyzed by CZE. The UV absorbance detection was monitored at 214 nm. It has been found that beta-CDs can improve separation efficiency due to their hydrophobic cavity. The effect of the concentration of beta-CD and pH was also evaluated. The application of electrokinetic injection with field amplified sample stacking results in low detection limits (40 ng/ml for each analyte) and the method has good reproducibility, precision, accuracy, and high recovery. PMID:14550865

  14. Simultaneous determination of Aprepitant and two metabolites in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Eng, C M; Constanzer, M L; Matuszewski, B K

    2004-09-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of Aprepitant, I (5-[[2(R)-[1(R)-(3,5-bistrifluoromethylphenyl)ethoxy]-3(S)-(4-fluorophenyl) morpholin-4-yl]methyl]-2,4-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazol-3-one) and two active metabolites (II and III) in human plasma has been developed. The method was based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric (APCI-MS-MS) detection in positive ionization mode using a heated nebulizer interface. The analytes and internal standard (IV) (Fig. 1) were isolated from basified plasma using liquid-liquid extraction. The organic extracts were dried, reconstituted in mobile phase and injected into the HPLC-MS/MS system. The analytes were chromatographed on a narrow bore (50 mm x 2.0 mm, 3 microm) Keystone Scientific's Prism R.P. analytical column, with mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile (ACN):water containing trifluoroacetic acid with pH adjusted to 3 (40:60, v/v) pumped at a flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. The MS-MS detection was performed on a Sciex API 3000 tandem mass spectrometer operated in selected reaction monitoring mode. The precursor-->product ion combinations of m/z 535-->277, 438-->180, 452-->223 and 503-->259 were used to quantify I, II, III, and IV, respectively, after chromatographic separation of the analytes. The assay was validated in the concentration range of 10-5000 ng/ml for I and II and 25-5000 ng/ml for III when 1 ml of plasma was processed. The precision of the assay (expressed as coefficient of variation, CV) was less than 10% at all concentrations within the standard curve range, with adequate assay accuracy. Matrix effect experiments were performed to demonstrate the absence of any significant change in ionization of the analytes when comparing neat standards to analytes in the presence of plasma matrix. This assay was utilized to support a clinical study where multiple oral doses of I were administered to healthy subjects to investigate the

  15. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group; determination of chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Hostetler, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) were developed for the analysis of the following chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water: acetochlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA), acetochlor oxanilic acid (OXA), alachlor ESA, alachlor OXA, metolachlor ESA, and metolachlor OXA. Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for both the HPLC-DAD and HPLC/MS methods in reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The mean HPLC-DAD recoveries of the chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.25, 0.50, and 2.0 mg/L (micrograms per liter) ranged from 84 to 112 percent, with relative standard deviations of 18 percent or less. The mean HPLC/MS recoveries of the metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.05, 0.20, and 2.0 mg/L ranged from 81 to 125 percent, with relative standard deviations of 20 percent or less. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all metabolites using the HPLC-DAD method was 0.20 mg/L, whereas the LOQ using the HPLC/MS method was 0.05 mg/L. These metabolite-determination methods are valuable for acquiring information about water quality and the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water.

  16. Detection of 3-methylmethcathinone and its metabolites 3-methylephedrine and 3-methylnorephedrine in pubic hair samples by liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frison, Giampietro; Frasson, Samuela; Zancanaro, Flavio; Tedeschi, Gianpaola; Zamengo, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Hair testing is considered to be one of the most efficient tool to investigate drug-related histories, particularly when the period of use needs to be tested back to many days or even months before sampling. High-resolution mass spectrometry represents today one of the most specific and sensitive analytical techniques to detect psychoactive substances in hair samples following single or multiple drug exposures. In this study pubic hair testing, by means of liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy Orbitrap mass spectrometry, was employed to document the potential intake of five new psychoactive substances by a drug dealer. Pubic hair samples were decontaminated and pulverized with a ball mill, and, after the addition of the internal standard 3,4-methylenedioxypropylamphetamine, extracted with methanol:trifluoroacetic acid 9:1 at 45°C for one night. The obtained extracts were analyzed on a Thermo Fisher Scientific Accela 1250 liquid chromatography system coupled to a Thermo Fisher Scientific single-stage Exactive HCD mass spectrometry system. 3-methylmethcathinone (3-MMC) was found to be present at a concentration of 25.8ng/mg in the pubic hair sample, whereas the other four designer drugs were found to be absent. 3-methylephedrines and 3-methylnorephedrines, metabolites of 3-MMC, were identified in the same sample, thereby proving the 3-MMC intake by the drug dealer. PMID:26901638

  17. Comparison of immunoassay screening tests and LC-MS-MS for urine detection of benzodiazepines and their metabolites: results of a national proficiency test.

    PubMed

    Bertol, Elisabetta; Vaiano, Fabio; Borsotti, Maurizio; Quercioli, Massimo; Mari, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    For most diverse purposes, different immunoassay (IA) screening methods are usually used to detect benzodiazepines and their metabolites in urine. In this study, we compared the main IAs used in forensic toxicology (Cloned Enzyme Donor Immunoassay, CEDIA®; Enzyme-Multiplied Immunoassay Technique, EMIT®; Fluorescent Polarization ImmunoAssay, FPIA®; Kinetic Interaction of Microparticles in Solution, KIMS® and Immunochromatographic Techniques, IMC) with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Twelve urine specimens were analyzed by 178 laboratories in Italy that participated in a National Proficiency Test, providing both qualitative and semi-quantitative results. Each IA was evaluated by the parameters: true positive, true negative, false positive (FP), false negative (FN), sensitivity (SENS), specificity (SPEC), positive predictive value, negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy. SPEC was affected by a high FP rate for all IAs. The lowest SENS and NPV were provided by FPIA due to a high number of FN cases. Comparing IA semi-quantitative data with LC-MS-MS results, an overestimation of benzodiazepine amount is noted. This paper draws attention to the problem of the careless use of IA tests for forensic purposes as they may provide FP and/or FN results that can lead to errors of great severity. PMID:23943436

  18. Gas chromatographic method using nitrogen-phosphorus detection for the measurement of tramadol and its O-desmethyl metabolite in plasma and brain tissue of mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Tao, Q; Stone, D J; Borenstein, M R; Jean-Bart, V; Codd, E E; Coogan, T P; Desai-Krieger, D; Liao, S; Raffa, R B

    2001-11-01

    A method that allows the measurement of plasma and brain levels of the centrally-acting analgesic tramadol and its major metabolite (O-desmethyl tramadol) in mice and rats was developed using gas chromatography equipped with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (GC-NPD). Plasma samples were extracted with methyl tert.-butyl ether (MTBE) and were injected directly into the GC system. Brain tissue homogenates were precipitated with methanol, the resulting supernatant was dried then acidified with hydrochloric acid. The aqueous solution was washed with MTBE twice, alkalinized, and extracted with MTBE. The MTBE layer was dried, reconstituted and injected into the GC system. The GC assay used a DB-1 capillary column with an oven temperature ramp (135 to 179 degrees C at 4 degrees C/min). Dextromethorphan was used as the internal standard. The calibration curves for tramadol and O-desmethyl tramadol in plasma and brain tissue were linear in the range of 10 to 10000 ng/ml (plasma) and ng/g (brain). Assay accuracy and precision of back calculated standards were within +/- 15%. PMID:11710575

  19. Detection of Pancreatic Cancer-Induced Cachexia Using a Fluorescent Myoblast Reporter System and Analysis of Metabolite Abundance.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Bharti, Santosh K; Penet, Marie-France; Marik, Radharani; Mironchik, Yelena; Wildes, Flonne; Maitra, Anirban; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-03-15

    The dire effects of cancer-induced cachexia undermine treatment and contribute to decreased survival rates. Therapeutic options for this syndrome are limited, and therefore efforts to identify signs of precachexia in cancer patients are necessary for early intervention. The applications of molecular and functional imaging that would enable a whole-body "holistic" approach to this problem may lead to new insights and advances for diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. Here we have developed a myoblast optical reporter system with the purpose of identifying early cachectic events. We generated a myoblast cell line expressing a dual tdTomato:GFP construct that was grafted onto the muscle of mice-bearing human pancreatic cancer xenografts to provide noninvasive live imaging of events associated with cancer-induced cachexia (i.e., weight loss). Real-time optical imaging detected a strong tdTomato fluorescent signal from skeletal muscle grafts in mice with weight losses of only 1.2% to 2.7% and tumor burdens of only approximately 79 to 170 mm(3). Weight loss in cachectic animals was also associated with a depletion of lipid, cholesterol, valine, and alanine levels, which may provide informative biomarkers of cachexia. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the utility of a reporter system that is capable of tracking tumor-induced weight loss, an early marker of cachexia. Future studies incorporating resected tissue from human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma into a reporter-carrying mouse may be able to provide a risk assessment of cachexia, with possible implications for therapeutic development. PMID:26719527

  20. Identification and determination of phase II nabumetone metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Nobilis, M; Holcapek, M; Kolárová, L; Kopecký, J; Kunes, M; Svoboda, Z; Kvetina, J

    2004-03-26

    Chromatographic analyses play an important role in the identification and determination of phase I and phase II drug metabolites. While the chemical standards of phase I metabolites are usually available from commercial sources or by various synthetic, degradation or isolation methods, the phase II drug metabolites have usually more complicated structures, their standards are in general inaccessible and their identification and determination require a comprehensive analytical approach involving the use of xenobiochemical methods and the employment of hyphenated analytical techniques. In this work, various high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods were employed in the evaluation of xenobiochemical experiments leading to the identification and determination of phase II nabumetone metabolites. Optimal conditions for the quantitative enzymatic deconjugation of phase II metabolites were found for the samples of minipig bile, small intestine contents and urine. Comparative HPLC analyses of the samples of above-mentioned biomatrices and of the same biomatrices after their enzymatic treatment using beta-glucuronidase and arylsulfatase afforded the qualitative and quantitative information about phase II nabumetone metabolites. Hereby, three principal phase II nabumetone metabolites (ether glucuronides) were discovered in minipig's body fluids and their structures were confirmed using liquid chromatography (LC)-electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (MS) analyses. PMID:15058587

  1. Automated analysis of oxidative metabolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automated system for the study of drug metabolism is described. The system monitors the oxidative metabolites of aromatic amines and of compounds which produce formaldehyde on oxidative dealkylation. It includes color developing compositions suitable for detecting hyroxylated aromatic amines and formaldehyde.

  2. High-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous detection of ochratoxin A and relative metabolites in Aspergillus species and dried vine fruits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Li, Jingming; Cheng, Zhan; Zhou, Ziying; Ma, Liyan

    2016-08-01

    A simple, sensitive and reliable quantification and identification method was developed for simultaneous analysis of ochratoxin A (OTA) and its related metabolites ochratoxin alpha (OTα), ochratoxin B (OTB) and mellein. The method was assessed by spiking analytes into blank culture media and dried vine fruits. Performance was tested in terms of accuracy, selectivity and repeatability. The method involves an ultrasonic extraction step for culture samples using methanol aqueous solution (7:3, v/v); the mycotoxin is quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The recoveries were 74.5-108.8%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.4-8.4% for fungal culture. The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0.03-0.87 μg l(-)(1), and the limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 0.07 to 2.90 μg l(-)(1). In addition, the extraction solutions and clean-up columns were optimised specifically for dried vine fruit samples to improve the performance of the method. Methanol-1% sodium bicarbonate extraction solution (6:4, v/v) was determined to be the most efficient. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was performed as a clean-up step prior to HPLC-MS/MS analysis to reduce matrix effects. Recoveries ranged from 80.1% to 110.8%. RSDs ranged from 0.1% to 3.6%. LODs and LOQs ranged from 0.06 to 0.40 μg kg(-)(1) and from 0.19 to 1.20 μg kg(-)(1), respectively. The analytical method was established and used to identify and quantify OTA and related compounds from Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus in cultures and dried vine fruits. The results showed that A. carbonarius produced OTα, OTB and OTA, whereas A. ochraceus produced OTB, OTA and mellein after 7 days of cultivation. Of 30 commercial samples analysed, 10 were contaminated with ochratoxins; OTB, OTα and mellein were also detected in different samples. PMID:27442910

  3. Metabolite profiling of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) from different locations using comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to diode array and tandem mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Montero, Lidia; Ibáñez, Elena; Russo, Mariateresa; di Sanzo, Rosa; Rastrelli, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Celano, Rita; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Herrero, Miguel

    2016-03-24

    Profiling of the main metabolites from several licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) samples collected at different locations is carried out in this work by using comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC × LC) coupled to diode array (DAD) and mass spectrometry (MS) detectors. The optimized method was based on the application of a HILIC-based separation in the first dimension combined with fast RP-based second dimension separation. This set-up was shown to possess powerful separation capabilities allowing separating as much as 89 different metabolites in a single sample. Identification and grouping of metabolites according to their chemical class were achieved using the DAD, MS and MS/MS data. Triterpene saponins were the most abundant metabolites followed by glycosylated flavanones and chalcones, whereas glycyrrhizic acid, as expected, was confirmed as the main component in all the studied samples. LC × LC-DAD-MS/MS was able to resolve these complex licorice samples providing with specific metabolite profiles to the different licorice samples depending on their geographical origin. Namely, from 19 to 50 specific compounds were exclusively determined in the 2D-chromatograms from the different licorice samples depending on their geographical origin, which can be used as a typical pattern that could potentially be related to their geographical location and authentication. PMID:26944999

  4. The metabolism of 4-trifluoromethoxyaniline and [13C]-4-trifluoromethoxyacetanilide in the rat: detection and identification of metabolites excreted in the urine by NMR and HPLC-NMR.

    PubMed

    Tugnait, M; Lenz, E M; Phillips, P; Hofmann, M; Spraul, M; Lindon, J C; Nicholson, J K; Wilson, I D

    2002-06-01

    A combination of 19F, 1H NMR and HPLC-NMR spectroscopic approaches have been used to quantify and identify the urinary-excreted metabolites of 4-trifluoromethoxyaniline (4-TFMeA) and its [13C]-labelled acetanilide following i.p. administration at 50 mg/kg to rats. The major metabolite excreted in the urine for both compounds was a sulphated ring-hydroxylated metabolite (either 2- or 3-trifluoromethyl-5-aminosulphate) which accounted for approximately 32.3% of the dose following the administration of 4-TFMeA and approximately 29.9% following dosing of the acetanilide. The trifluoromethoxy-substituent appeared to be metabolically stable, with no evidence of O-detrifluoromethylation. There was no evidence of the excretion of N-oxanilic acids in urine, of the type seen with 4-trifluoromethylaniline. PMID:12039629

  5. Detection of ketamine and its metabolites in human hair using an integrated nanoflow liquid chromatography column and electrospray emitter fritted with a single porous 10 μm bead.

    PubMed

    Parkin, Mark C; Longmoore, Alana M; Turfus, Sophie C; Braithwaite, Robin A; Cowan, David A; Elliott, Simon; Kicman, Andrew T

    2013-02-15

    Targeting metabolites incorporated into hair following drug administration is useful for evidential purposes as this approach can aid in differentiating between administration and passive exposure. Greater analytical sensitivity is required than for targeting the parent drug alone. A 20 μm i.d. fused silica capillary column with an integrated electrospray emitter fritted with a single porous 10 μm polymeric bead has been successfully fabricated to facilitate this purpose. The sensitivity gains through the use of these integrated single fritted columns coupled to a nanoelectrospray source (nanoflow-LC nanoESI) over conventional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) columns was explored by their application to the detection of ketamine and its phase I metabolites in human hair. Hair was collected from 4 volunteers following the administration of a small oral dose of ketamine (50 mg) and subsequently analysed by the capillary-LC nanoESI approach. The drug and its metabolites were extracted from hair using solid phase extraction following a methanolic wash, pulverisation with a ball mill and acid digestion. From a 50 μL extract, 1 μL was injected and the method provided a limit of detection estimated to be 5 fg on column for ketamine and norketamine and 10 fg for dehydronorketamine. The single porous frit minimises extra column band broadening and offers an alternative fritting approach which reduces the blocking of the electrospray emitter, in comparison with other approaches such as sintering and polymerisation. PMID:23332304

  6. An approach for quantitative analysis of vitamins D and B9 and their metabolites in human biofluids by on-line orthogonal sample preparation and sequential mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro-Vera, Carlos; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María Dolores

    2013-04-01

    An approach for quantitative analysis of two vitamins with different polarities (vitamins D and B9) and their metabolites is presented here. The approach is based on an experimental setup based on hyphenation of an automated workstation for preparation of liquid samples and an LC-MS/MS system with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. This configuration enabled development of an orthogonal protocol for sequential SPE retention of analytes with different polarities for subsequent elution and chromatographic separation prior to detection. The resulting method was validated by application to three human biofluids. Estimation of recovery factors in the SPE step led to values from 85.2 to 100% for vitamin D and metabolites and from 93.1 to 100% for vitamin B9 and metabolites (folic acid and folates). The influence of sample matrix variability by analysis of human serum, urine and breast milk was minimized with a complete optimization of the SPE step. The utility of the proposed configuration is shown by the sensitivity and precision of the method, expressed as limits of detection (between 0.2 and 0.30 ng mL(-1) or 4 and 60 pg on-column) and within-laboratory reproducibility (lower than 6.7%, as relative standard deviation). The present application represents an example of determination methods involving targeted analysis of compounds with different polarities using a single aliquot of the sample. PMID:23435066

  7. Secondary metabolite profiles of leaves of healthy and huanglongbing-infected orange (Citrus sinensis L.) seedlings measured by HPLC-fluorescence detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaves of greenhouse-grown ‘Hamlin’ and ‘Valencia’ orange (Citrus sinensis L.) seedlings were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography in a study of the progression of changes in secondary metabolite profiles resulting from infection by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the Huanglo...

  8. Analysis and detection of the chemical constituents of Radix Polygalae and their metabolites in rats after oral administration by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yun; Li, Zhixiong; Chen, Mingcang; Sun, Zhaolin; Fan, Mingsong; Huang, Chenggang

    2013-11-01

    Radix Polygalae (RP), the dried root of Polygala tenuifolia Willd., is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine to mediate sedative, antipsychotic, cognitive improving, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory therapeutic effects on the central nervous system. In this work, ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC/ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) was established for the separation and characterization of the chemical constituents in Radix Polygalae and their metabolites in rat plasma and urine after oral administration. Samples were separated on an Agilent Zorbax Eclipse Plus-C18 column (100mm×2.1mm, 1.8μm) with 0.1% formic acid aqueous solution and acetonitrile as the mobile phase under gradient conditions. Overall, 50 compounds were characterized from the RP, 9 of which are to our knowledge reported for the first time. In vivo, 10 components and 2 metabolites were observed in rat plasma, and 27 components and 7 metabolites were detected in rat urine. The results from this work improve our understanding on the chemical constituents of RP and their metabolic profiling. PMID:23860503

  9. A simple HPLC method with fluorescence detection for simultaneous determination of 10-methoxycamptothecin and its metabolite 10-hydroxycamptothecin in rat liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Shao, C; Fan, B; Li, S; Wang, Y; Zheng, J

    2015-03-01

    A simple HPLC method to determine the amount of 10-methoxycamptothecin (MCPT) and its major metabolite 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) in rat liver tissue was developed in the present study. Camptothecin (CPT) was used as internal standard (IS). A piecewise linear function was used over lower and higher concentrations, respectively. The calibration curves were linear (r (2) >0.99) over concentrations from 2.5 to 20 ng/mL and 20 to 320 ng/mL for both MCPT and HCPT. The method had an accuracy of 92.74% to 112.76%, and the intra- and inter-day precision (RSD%) were 11.85% or less for MCPT and HCPT. The stability data showed no significant degradation occurred under the experimental conditions. This method was successfully applied to the tissue distribution study of MCPT and its metabolite HCPT in liver tissue samples after intravenous administration. PMID:24782285

  10. Characterization of flavonoid metabolites in rat plasma, urine, and feces after oral administration of Semen Ziziphi Spinosae extract by HPLC-diode-array detection (DAD) and ion-trap mass spectrometry (MS(n)).

    PubMed

    Bao, Kang-De; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen; Li, Hui-Jun; Yi, Ling; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ya-Qiong

    2009-02-01

    A highly specific and sensitive method using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection and ion-trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS(n)) was developed for study of the constituents of flavonoid extract of jujube seeds and the metabolites in rat plasma, urine, and feces samples after oral administration of flavonoid extract of jujube seeds. Two major flavonoids (spinosin and 6'''-feruloylspinosin) with content >60% in the flavonoid extract of jujube seeds were detected and confirmed by comparison with the reference standards. Furthermore, five metabolic components in plasma, seven in urine, and four in feces were detected and elucidated. The scientific and plausible biotransformation pathways of the main components in flavonoid extract of jujube seeds were also proposed, together with presentation of clues for potential bioactive mechanisms. This convenient HPLC-DAD-MS(n) method could be used to identify the chemical components of flavonoid extract of jujube seeds as well as their metabolites, and to reveal their possible metabolic mechanism of action in vivo. PMID:19182403

  11. A wood preservative metabolite in river water.

    PubMed

    Khoroshko, Larisa O; Petrova, Varvara N; Viktorovskii, Igor V; Lahtiperä, Mirja; Sinkkonen, Seija; Paasivirta, Jaakko

    2005-01-01

    A previously unknown pollutant in river water was identified to be 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2-MBT) by interpretation and simulation of its GC/LRMS spectrum. Further GC/HRMS measurement of the isotope composition of the molecular ion verified this structure. 2-MBT is a well-known agent for corrosion inhibition and a stable metabolite of several other benzothiazoles. The present 2-MBT trace was most probably a metabolite of the wood preservative TCMTB which leaked from an upstream sawmill. The metabolite had been detected earlier in urine of the sawmill workers, but now was identified in the recipient water environment for the first time. PMID:15768735

  12. Novel and sensitive reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography method with electrochemical detection for the simultaneous and fast determination of eight biogenic amines and metabolites in human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, Debby; Vermeiren, Yannick; Aerts, Tony; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2014-08-01

    A fast and simple RP-HPLC method with electrochemical detection (ECD) and ion pair chromatography was developed, optimized and validated in order to simultaneously determine eight different biogenic amines and metabolites in post-mortem human brain tissue in a single-run analytical approach. The compounds of interest are the indolamine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), the catecholamines dopamine (DA) and (nor)epinephrine ((N)E), as well as their respective metabolites, i.e. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG). A two-level fractional factorial experimental design was applied to study the effect of five experimental factors (i.e. the ion-pair counter concentration, the level of organic modifier, the pH of the mobile phase, the temperature of the column, and the voltage setting of the detector) on the chromatographic behaviour. The cross effect between the five quantitative factors and the capacity and separation factors of the analytes were then analysed using a Standard Least Squares model. The optimized method was fully validated according to the requirements of SFSTP (Société Française des Sciences et Techniques Pharmaceutiques). Our human brain tissue sample preparation procedure is straightforward and relatively short, which allows samples to be loaded onto the HPLC system within approximately 4h. Additionally, a high sample throughput was achieved after optimization due to a total runtime of maximally 40min per sample. The conditions and settings of the HPLC system were found to be accurate with high intra and inter-assay repeatability, recovery and accuracy rates. The robust analytical method results in very low detection limits and good separation for all of the eight biogenic amines and metabolites in this complex mixture of biological analytes. PMID:24857034

  13. Urinary metabolites of diisodecyl phthalate in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kayoko; Silva, Manori J; Wolf, Cynthia; Gray, L Earl; Needham, Larry L; Calafat, Antonia M

    2007-07-01

    Diisodecyl phthalate (DiDP) is an isomeric mixture of phthalates with predominantly 10-carbon branched-dialkyl chains, widely used as a plasticizer for polyvinyl chloride. The extent of human exposure to DiDP is unknown in part because adequate biomarkers of exposure to DiDP are not available. We identified several major metabolites of DiDP in urine of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats after a single oral administration of DiDP (300 mg/kg). These metabolites can potentially be used as biomarkers of exposure to DiDP. The metabolites extracted from urine were chromatographically resolved and identified by their chromatographic behavior and full scan negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrum. The identity of metabolites with similar molecular weights was further examined in accurate mass mode. For some metabolites, unequivocal identification was done using authentic standards. Among these were the hydrolytic monoester of DiDP, monoisodecyl phthalate (MiDP), detected as a minor metabolite, and one omega oxidation product of MiDP, mono(carboxy-isononyl) phthalate (MCiNP), which was the most abundant urinary metabolite. We also tentatively identified other secondary metabolites of MiDP, mono(hydroxy-isodecyl) phthalate, mono(oxo-isodecyl) phthalate, mono(carboxy-isoheptyl) phthalate, mono(carboxy-isohexyl) phthalate, mono(carboxy-isopentyl) phthalate, mono(carboxy-isobutyl) phthalate, and mono(carboxy-ethyl) phthalate. Oxidative metabolites of diisoundecyl phthalate (DiUdP) and diisononyl phthalate (DiNP) were also detected suggesting the presence of DiUdP and DiNP in the DiDP formulation. The urinary concentrations of all these metabolites gradually decreased in the 4 days following the administration of DiDP. MCiNP and other DiDP secondary metabolites are more abundant in urine than MiDP, suggesting that these oxidative products are better biomarkers for DiDP exposure assessment than MiDP. Additional research on the toxicokinetics of these metabolites is needed

  14. Validation of a novel in vitro assay using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) to detect and quantify hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-99 in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio A; Szeitz, András; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) method to investigate the hepatic oxidative metabolism of 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99), a widely used flame retardant and ubiquitous environmental contaminant. Hydroxylated metabolites were extracted using liquid-to-liquid extraction, resolved on a C18 column with gradient elution and detected by mass spectrometry in single ion recording mode using electrospray negative ionization. The assay was validated for linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of quantification, range and recovery. Calibration curves were linear (R2 > or = 0.98) over a concentration range of 0.010-1.0 microM for 4-OH-2,2',3,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-90), 5'-OH-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (5'-OH-BDE-99) and 6'-OH-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (6'-OH-BDE-99), and a concentration range of 0.0625-12.5 microM for 2,4,5-tribromophenol (2,4,5-TBP). Inter- and intra-day accuracy values ranged from -2.0% to 6.0% and from -7.7% to 7.3%, respectively, and inter- and intra-day precision values ranged from 2.0% to 8.5% and from 2.2% to 8.6% (n=6), respectively. The limits of quantification were 0.010 microM for 4-OH-BDE-90, 5'-OH-BDE-99 and 6'-OH-BDE-99, and 0.0625 microM for 2,4,5-TBP. Recovery values ranged between 85 and 100% for the four analytes. The validated analytical method was applied to identify and quantify hydroxy BDE-99 metabolites formed in vitro. Incubation of BDE-99 with rat liver microsomes yielded 4-OH-BDE-90 and 6'-OH-BDE-99 as major metabolites and 5'-OH-BDE-99 and 2,4,5-TBP as minor metabolites. To our knowledge, this is the first validated UPLC/MS method to quantify hydroxylated metabolites of PBDEs without the need of derivatization. PMID:20451473

  15. Identification of Epoxide-Derived Metabolite(s) of Benzbromarone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Hui; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Benzbromarone (BBR) is a benzofuran derivative that has been quite useful for the treatment of gout; however, it was withdrawn from European markets in 2003 because of reported serious incidents of drug-induced liver injury. BBR-induced hepatotoxicity has been suggested to be associated with the formation of a quinone intermediate. The present study reported epoxide-derived intermediate(s) of BBR. An N-acetylcysteine (NAC) conjugate derived from epoxide metabolite(s) was detected in both microsomal incubations of BBR and urine samples of mice treated with BBR. The NAC conjugate was identified as 6-NAC BBR. Ketoconazole suppressed the bioactivation of BBR to the epoxide intermediate(s), and the CYP3A subfamily was the primary enzyme responsible for the formation of the epoxide(s). The present study provided new information on metabolic activation of BBR. PMID:26792818

  16. Rapid determination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its main metabolites in aqueous samples by one-step microwave-assisted headspace controlled-temperature liquid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Vinoth Kumar, Ponnusamy; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2011-03-01

    A rapid and sensitive analytical method for the determination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its main metabolites in environmental aqueous samples has been developed using one-step microwave-assisted headspace controlled-temperature liquid-phase micro-extraction (MA-HS-CT-LPME) technique coupled with gas chromatography-electron-capture detection (GC-ECD). In this study, the one-step extraction of DDT and its main metabolites was achieved by using microwave heating to accelerate the evaporation of analytes into the controlled-temperature headspace to form a cloudy mist vapor zone for LPME sampling. Parameters influencing extraction efficiency were thoroughly optimized, and the best extraction for DDT and its main metabolites from 10-mL aqueous sample at pH 6.0 was achieved by using 1-octanol (4-μL) as the LPME solvent, sampling at 34°C for 6.5 min under 249W of microwave irradiation. Under optimum conditions, excellent linear relationship was obtained in the range of 0.05-1.0 μg/L for 1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p'-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), 0.1-2.0 μg/L for o,p'-DDT, 0.15-3.0 μg/L for 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(p'-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDD) and p,p'-DDT, with detection limits of 20 ng/L for p,p'-DDE, and 30 ng/L for o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDT. Precision was in the range of 3.2-11.3% RSD. The proposed method was validated with environmental water samples. The spiked recovery was between 95.5% and 101.3% for agricultural-field water, between 94% and 99.7% for sea water and between 93.5% and 98% for river water. Thus the established method has been proved to be a simple, rapid, sensitive, inexpensive and eco-friendly procedure for the determination of DDT and its main metabolites in environmental water samples. PMID:21251695

  17. Reactive metabolites and agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Uetrecht, J P

    1996-01-01

    Central to most hypotheses of the mechanism of idiosyncratic drug-induced blood dyscrasias is the involvement of reactive metabolites. In view of the reactive nature of the majority of such metabolites, it is likely that they are formed by, or in close proximity to the blood cells affected. The major oxidative system of neutrophils generates hypochlorous acid. We have demonstrated that the drugs associated with the highest incidence of agranulocytosis are oxidized to reactive metabolites by hypochlorous acid and/or activated neutrophils. There are many mechanisms by which such reactive metabolites could induce agranulocytosis. In the case of aminopyrine-induced agranulocytosis, most cases appear to involve drug-dependent anti-neutrophil antibodies, and these are likely to be induced by cell membrane antigens modified by the reactive metabolite of aminopyrine. The target of agranulocytosis associated with many other drugs is usually neutrophil precursors and may involve cytotoxicity or a cell-mediated immune reaction induced by a reactive metabolite. In the case of aplastic anaemia, there is evidence in some cases for involvement of cytotoxic T cells, which could either be induced by metabolites generated by neutrophils, or more likely, by reactive metabolites generated by stem cells. PMID:8987247

  18. Advances in metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Wishart, David S

    2011-08-01

    One of the central challenges to metabolomics is metabolite identification. Regardless of whether one uses so-called 'targeted' or 'untargeted' metabolomics, eventually all paths lead to the requirement of identifying (and quantifying) certain key metabolites. Indeed, without metabolite identification, the results of any metabolomic analysis are biologically and chemically uninterpretable. Given the chemical diversity of most metabolomes and the character of most metabolomic data, metabolite identification is intrinsically difficult. Consequently a great deal of effort in metabolomics over the past decade has been focused on making metabolite identification better, faster and cheaper. This review describes some of the newly emerging techniques or technologies in metabolomics that are making metabolite identification easier and more robust. In particular, it focuses on advances in metabolite identification that have occurred over the past 2 to 3 years concerning the technologies, methodologies and software as applied to NMR, MS and separation science. The strengths and limitations of some of these approaches are discussed along with some of the important trends in metabolite identification. PMID:21827274

  19. Blood styrene and urinary metabolites in styrene polymerisation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, M S; Lorimer, W V; Lilis, R; Selikoff, I J

    1978-01-01

    The results of the analysis of blood and urine samples for styrene and its metabolites in 491 workers in a styrene polymerisation plant in the United States are reported. The levels of exposure to styrene were estimated to be less than 10 ppm, but nevertheless styrene and metabolites were detectable in more than 50% of workers in polymerisation jobs, within 4 h of exposure. Workers involved in the manufacture and purification of styrene from ethyl benzene also had detectable blood styrene and urinary metabolites in 83% of recently exposed subjects. The relationship between styrene in blood and in subcutaneous fat and urinary metabolites as pharmacokinetic variables is discussed. PMID:737139

  20. Using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as solid phase extraction adsorbents to determine dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites at trace level in water samples by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Xiao, Junping; Wang, Weidong

    2006-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a kind of new carbon-based nano-materials which have drawn great attention in many application fields. The potential of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbents for the preconcentration of environmental pollutants has been investigated in recent years. The goal of this work was to investigate the feasibility of MWNTs used as SPE adsorbents to enrich dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites including 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(4'-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDD) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis-(4'-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDE) at trace level which are typical persistent organic pollutants in environment. Parameters that maybe influence the extraction efficiency such as the eluent volume, sample flow rate, sample pH and the sample volume were optimized in detail. The experimental results showed the excellent linear relationship between peak area and the concentration of DDT and its metabolites over the range of 0.2-60 microg L(-1), and the precisions (RSD) were 2.3-2.5% under the optimal conditions. The detection limits of proposed method could reach 4-13 ng L(-1) based on the ratio of chromatographic signal to base line noise (S/N = 3). Satisfied results were achieved when the proposed method was applied to determine the four target compounds in realworld water samples with spiked recoveries over the range of 89.7-115.5%. All these facts indicated that MWCNTs as SPE packing materials coupled to HPLC was an excellent alternative for the routine analysis of DDT and its metabolites at trace level in environment. PMID:16797570

  1. Familial resemblance for serum metabolite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Draisma, Harmen H M; Beekman, Marian; Pool, René; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Adamski, Jerzy; Prehn, Cornelia; Vaarhorst, Anika A M; de Craen, Anton J M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-10-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of metabolites, which are the substrates, intermediate, and end products of cellular metabolism. The heritability of the concentrations of circulating metabolites bears relevance for evaluating their suitability as biomarkers for disease. We report aspects of familial resemblance for the concentrations in human serum of more than 100 metabolites, measured using a targeted metabolomics platform. Age- and sex-corrected monozygotic twin correlations, midparent-offspring regression coefficients, and spouse correlations in subjects from two independent cohorts (Netherlands Twin Register and Leiden Longevity Study) were estimated for each metabolite. In the Netherlands Twin Register subjects, who were largely fasting, we found significant monozygotic twin correlations for 121 out of 123 metabolites. Heritability was confirmed by midparent-offspring regression. For most detected metabolites, the correlations between spouses were considerably lower than those between twins, indicating a contribution of genetic effects to familial resemblance. Remarkably high heritability was observed for free carnitine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.66), for the amino acids serine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77) and threonine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.64), and for phosphatidylcholine acyl-alkyl C40:3 (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77). For octenoylcarnitine, a consistent point estimate of approximately 0.50 was found for the spouse correlations in the two cohorts as well as for the monozygotic twin correlation, suggesting that familiality for this metabolite is explained by shared environment. We conclude that for the majority of metabolites targeted by the used metabolomics platform, the familial resemblance of serum concentrations is largely genetic. Our results contribute to the knowledge of the heritability of fasting serum metabolite concentrations, which is relevant for biomarker research. PMID:23985338

  2. The profiling and identification of the metabolites of 8-prenylkaempferol and a study on their distribution in rats by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection combined with electrospray ionization ion trap time-of-flight multistage mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Man; Xu, Feng; Li, Feng-Chun; Wang, Jing-Zhe; Shang, Ming-Ying; Liu, Guang-Xue; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2016-02-01

    8-Prenylkaempferol is a prenylflavonoid that has various bioactivities and benefits for human health. A high-performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector combined with electrospray ionization ion trap time-of-flight multistage mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n) ) method was established to profile and identify the metabolites of 8-prenylkaempferol in rat in vivo and in vitro, and to study the distribution of these metabolites in rats for the first time. A total of 38 metabolites were detected and tentatively identified, 30 of which were identified as new compounds. The new in vivo metabolic reactions in rats of prenylflavonoids of isomerization, polymerization, sulfation, amino acid conjugation, vitamin C conjugation and other known metabolic reactions were found in the metabolism of 8-prenylkaempferol. The numbers of detected metabolites in feces, urine, plasma, small intestine, stomach, kidneys, liver, heart, lungs, spleen and hepatic S9 fraction were 31, 19, 1, 20, 13, 8, 7, 3, 3, 1 and 11, respectively. This indicated that small intestine and stomach were the major organs in which the 8-prenylkaempferol metabolites were distributed. Furthermore, 16 metabolites were determined to have bioactivities based on the literature and 'PharmMapper' analysis. These findings are useful for better comprehension of the effective forms, target organs and pharmacological actions of 8-prenylkaempferol. Moreover, they provide a reference for the study of the metabolism and distribution of prenylflavonoid aglycone compounds. PMID:26058713

  3. Enhanced metabolite generation

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  4. Transplacental transport of netobimin metabolites in ewes.

    PubMed

    Cristofol, C; Carretero, A; Fernandez, M; Navarro, M; Sautet, J; Ruberte, J; Arboix, M

    1995-01-01

    Neither netobimin (NTB) nor its metabolite albendazole (ABZ) were found in plasma after an oral administration of 20 mg/kg of NTB to pregnant ewes during the last third of gestation. ABZ metabolites, albendazole sulphoxide (ABZSO) and albendazole sulphone (ABZSO2) were found in plasma 30 min and 2 h, respectively, after administration. The maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) of ABZSO was detected at 11.6 +/- 1.0 h and for ABZSO2 at 16.5 +/- 2.3 h. The plasma levels of the latter remained constant for 36 h, and decreased as ABZSO was removed from the blood. Jugular plasma levels of both metabolites did not differ significantly from those observed in the ovarian vein, suggesting that there were no exchanges between foetal and placental tissues. Both metabolite concentrations were similar in the umbilical vein and artery and in the amniotic and allantoic fluids, their values were half the maternal plasma concentration, leading to the conclusion that there was transplacental movement of metabolites. Both metabolites reached the foetus and could be responsible for the teratogenicity of NTB in sheep. PMID:8751036

  5. Determination of 49 organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in fish, egg, and milk by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection with gel permeation chromatography cleanup.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Li, Heli; Zeng, Fangang; Liu, Yinping; Li, Ruifeng; Chen, Huijing; Zhao, Yunfeng; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2012-02-29

    A new method for the quantitative determination of 49 kinds of organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in fish, egg, and milk by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection was developed. Homogenized samples were extracted with acetone and methylene chloride (1 + 1, v/v), and then the extracts were cleaned up by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The response of each organophosphorus pesticide showed a good linearity with its concentration; the linearity correlation was not less than 0.99. The detection limits (S/N = 3) of pesticides were in the range of 0.001-0.025 mg kg⁻¹. The recovery experiments were performed by blank sample spiked at low, medium, and high fortification levels. The recoveries for fish, egg, and milk were 50.9-142.2, 53.3-137.2, and 50.3-139.4% with relative standard deviations (RSD, n = 6) of 2.3-24.9, 4.3-26.7, and 2.8-32.2%, respectively. The method was applied to detect organophosphorus pesticides in samples collected from the market, and satisfactory results were obtained. This quantitative method was highly sensitive and exact and could be applied to the accurate determination of organophosphorus contaminants in fish, egg, and milk. PMID:22300587

  6. Detection of Reactive Metabolites Using Isotope-Labeled Glutathione Trapping and Simultaneous Neutral Loss and Precursor Ion Scanning with Ultra-High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ke; Huang, Lingyi; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic activation of drugs to electrophilic species is responsible for over 60% of black box warnings and drug withdrawals from the market place in United States. Reactive metabolite trapping using glutathione (GSH) and analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) or HPLC with high resolution mass spectrometry (mass defect filtering) have enabled screening for metabolic activation to become routine during drug development. However, current MS-based approaches cannot detect all GSH conjugates present in complex mixtures, especially those present in extracts of botanical dietary supplements. To overcome these limitations, a fast triple quadrupole mass spectrometer-based approach was developed that can detect positively and negatively charged GSH conjugates in a single analysis without the need for advance knowledge of the elemental compositions of potential conjugates and while avoiding false positives. This approach utilized UHPLC instead of HPLC to shorten separation time and enhance sensitivity, incorporated stable-isotope labeled GSH to avoid false positives, and used fast polarity switching electrospray MS/MS to detect GSH conjugates that form positive and/or negative ions. The general new method was then used to test the licorice dietary supplement Glycyrrhiza glabra which was found to form multiple GSH conjugates upon metabolic activation. Among the GSH conjugates found in the licorice assay were conjugates with isoliquiritigenin and glabridin, which is an irreversible inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzymes. PMID:25774910

  7. Detection of reactive metabolites using isotope-labeled glutathione trapping and simultaneous neutral loss and precursor ion scanning with ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Huang, Lingyi; van Breemen, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic activation of drugs to electrophilic species is responsible for over 60% of black box warnings and drug withdrawals from the market place in the United States. Reactive metabolite trapping using glutathione (GSH) and analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) or HPLC with high resolution mass spectrometry (mass defect filtering) have enabled screening for metabolic activation to become routine during drug development. However, current MS-based approaches cannot detect all GSH conjugates present in complex mixtures, especially those present in extracts of botanical dietary supplements. To overcome these limitations, a fast triple quadrupole mass spectrometer-based approach was developed that can detect positively and negatively charged GSH conjugates in a single analysis without the need for advanced knowledge of the elemental compositions of potential conjugates and while avoiding false positives. This approach utilized UHPLC instead of HPLC to shorten separation time and enhance sensitivity, incorporated stable-isotope labeled GSH to avoid false positives, and used fast polarity switching electrospray MS/MS to detect GSH conjugates that form positive and/or negative ions. The general new method was then used to test the licorice dietary supplement Glycyrrhiza glabra, which was found to form multiple GSH conjugates upon metabolic activation. Among the GSH conjugates found in the licorice assay were conjugates with isoliquiritigenin and glabridin, which is an irreversible inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzymes. PMID:25774910

  8. Quantification of free mycophenolic acid and its glucuronide metabolite in human plasma by liquid-chromatography using mass spectrometric and ultraviolet absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Atcheson, Bronwyn; Taylor, Paul J; Mudge, David W; Johnson, David W; Pillans, Peter I; Tett, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug mycophenolic acid (MPA) and its major metabolite, mycophenolic acid glucuronide (MPAG), are highly bound to albumin. An HPLC-tandem-MS (HPLC/MS/MS) and an HPLC-UV assay were developed to measure free (unbound) concentrations of MPA and MPAG, respectively. Ultrafiltrate was prepared from plasma (500 microl) by ultrafiltration at 3000 x g for 20 min (20 degrees C). Both MPA and MPAG were isolated from ultrafiltrate (100 microl) by acidification and C18 solid-phase extraction. Free MPA was measured by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry using selected reactant monitoring (MPA: m/z 338.2--> 206.9) in positive ionisation mode. Chromatography was performed on a PFPP column (50 mm x 2 mm, 5 microm). Total analysis time was 7 min. The assay was linear over the range 1-200 microg/l with a limit of quantification of 1 microg/l. The inter-day accuracy and imprecision of quality controls (7.5, 40, 150 microg/l) were 94-99% and < 7%, respectively. Free MPAG was chromatographed on a C18 Nova-Pak column (150 mm x 3.9 mm, 5 microm) using a binary gradient over 20 min. The eluent was monitored at 254 nm. The assay was linear over the range 1-50 mg/l with the limit of quantification at 2.5 mg/l. The inter-day accuracy and imprecision of quality controls (5, 20, 45 mg/l) was 101-107% and < 8% (n = 4), respectively. For both methods no interfering substances were found in ultrafiltrate from patients not receiving MPA. The methods described have a suitable dynamic linear range to facilitate the investigation of free MPA and MPAG pharmacokinetics in transplant patients. Further, this is the first reported HPLC-UV method to determine free MPAG concentrations. PMID:14659448

  9. Molecular modeling of swine influenza A/H1N1, Spanish H1N1, and avian H5N1 flu N1 neuraminidases bound to Tamiflu and Relenza

    PubMed Central

    Le, Ly; Lee, Eric; Schulten, Klaus; Truong, Thanh N.

    2011-01-01

    A molecular model of the swine influenza A/H1N1 ( also called H1N1pdm) type-I neuraminidase was built using the pathogenic avian H5N1 type-I neuraminidase as a basis, due to the higher sequence identity between A/H1N1 and H5N1 (91.47%) compared to Spanish H1N1 (88.37%) neuraminidase. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of all three neuraminidases were performed, either as apo-structures or with commercial antiviral drugs Tamiflu or Relenza separately bound; the simulations allowed for the identification of both conserved and unique drug-protein interactions across all three proteins. Specifically, conserved networks of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the drugs in the sialic acid binding site of the simulated neuraminidases are analyzed, providing insight into how disruption due to mutations may lead to increased drug resistance. In addition, a possible mechanism through which the residue 294 mutation acquires drug resistance is proposed by mapping the mutation site onto an electrostatic pathway which may play a role in controlling drug access to the binding pocket of neuraminidase, establishing a starting point for further investigations of neuraminidase drug resistance. PMID:20029609

  10. Molecular modeling of swine influenza A/H1N1, Spanish H1N1, and avian H5N1 flu N1 neuraminidases bound to Tamiflu and Relenza.

    PubMed

    Le, Ly; Lee, Eric; Schulten, Klaus; Truong, Thanh N

    2009-01-01

    A molecular model of the swine influenza A/H1N1 ( also called H1N1pdm) type-I neuraminidase was built using the pathogenic avian H5N1 type-I neuraminidase as a basis, due to the higher sequence identity between A/H1N1 and H5N1 (91.47%) compared to Spanish H1N1 (88.37%) neuraminidase. All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of all three neuraminidases were performed, either as apo-structures or with commercial antiviral drugs Tamiflu or Relenza separately bound; the simulations allowed for the identification of both conserved and unique drug-protein interactions across all three proteins. Specifically, conserved networks of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the drugs in the sialic acid binding site of the simulated neuraminidases are analyzed, providing insight into how disruption due to mutations may lead to increased drug resistance. In addition, a possible mechanism through which the residue 294 mutation acquires drug resistance is proposed by mapping the mutation site onto an electrostatic pathway which may play a role in controlling drug access to the binding pocket of neuraminidase, establishing a starting point for further investigations of neuraminidase drug resistance. PMID:20029609

  11. Maternal and Infant Urinary Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations: Are They Related?

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana, S; Calafat, Antonia Maria; Liu, Fan; Swan, Shanna Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Phthalates are synthetic chemicals that are ubiquitous in our society and may have adverse health effects in humans. Detectable concentrations of phthalate metabolites have been found in adults and children, but no studies have examined the relationship between maternal and infant phthalate metabolite concentrations. Objective We investigated the relationship between maternal and infant urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations. Methods We measured nine phthalate metabolites in urine samples from 210 mother/infant pairs collected on the same study visit day (1999–2005) and obtained demographic history from questionnaires. Using multivariate linear regression analyses, we examined the degree to which maternal urine phthalate metabolite concentration predicted infant phthalate metabolite concentration. All analyses were adjusted for infant age, creatinine concentration, and race. Results Correlation coefficients between phthalate metabolite concentrations in the urine of mothers and their infants were generally low but increased with decreasing age of infant. In multivariate analyses, mother’s phthalate metabolite concentrations were significantly associated with infants’ concentrations for six phthalate metabolites: monobenzyl phthalate, monoethyl phthalate, monoisobutyl phthalate, and three metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate: mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxy-hexyl) phthalate and mono(2-ethyl-5-oxo-hexyl) phthalate (p-values for all coefficients <0.05). Discussion Mother’s urine phthalate metabolite concentration is significantly associated with infant urine phthalate metabolite concentration for six phthalate metabolites. It is plausible that shared exposures to phthalates in the immediate surrounding environment accounted for these relationships, but other unidentified sources may also contribute to infants’ phthalate exposures. This study indicates the importance of further identifying infant phthalate exposures

  12. Sensitive determination of three aconitum alkaloids and their metabolites in human plasma by matrix solid-phase dispersion with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and HPLC with diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhong; Li, Xuwen; Li, Lanjie; Li, Min; Liu, Ying; Wu, Qian; Li, Peng; Jin, Yongri

    2016-05-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of three aconitum alkaloids and their metabolites in human plasma was developed using matrix solid-phase dispersion combined with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The plasma sample was directly purified by matrix solid-phase dispersion and the eluate obtained was concentrated and further clarified by vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Some important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, such as type and amount of dispersing sorbent, type and volume of elution solvent, type and volume of extraction solvent, salt concentration as well as sample solution pH, were investigated in detail. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method has good repeatability and reproducibility with intraday and interday relative standard deviations lower than 5.44 and 5.75%, respectively. The recoveries of the aconitum alkaloids ranged from 73.81 to 101.82%, and the detection limits were achieved within the range of 1.6-2.1 ng/mL. The proposed method offered the advantages of good applicability, sensitivity, simplicity, and feasibility, which makes it suitable for the determination of trace amounts of aconitum alkaloids in human plasma samples. PMID:27005409

  13. Determination of two oxy-pyrimidine metabolites of diazinon in urine by gas chromatography/mass selective detection and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yokley, R A; Shen, N; Cheung, M W

    2000-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for the determination in urine of 2 metabolites of diazinon: 6-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-4(1H)-pyrimidinone (G-27550) and 2-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-6-methyl-4(1H)-pyrimidinone (GS-31144). Two of the urine sample preparation procedures presented rely on gas chromatography/mass selective detection (GC/MSD) in the selected ion monitoring mode for determination of G-27550. For fast sample preparation and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 1.0 ppb, urine samples were purified by using ENV+ solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns. For analyte confirmation at an LOQ of 0.50 ppb, classical liquid/liquid partitioning was used before further purification in a silica SPE column. An SPE sample preparation procedure and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS/MS) were used for both G-27550 and GS-31144. The limit of detection was 0.01 ng for G-27550 with GC/MSD, and 0.016 ng when LC/ESI/MS/MS was used for both G-27550 and GS-31144. The LOQ was 0.50 ppb for G-27550 when GC/MSD and the partitioning/SPE sample preparation procedure were used, and 1.0 ppb for the SPE only sample preparation procedure. The LOQ was 1.0 ppb for both analytes when LC/ESI/MS/MS was used. PMID:11048865

  14. Characterizing protein modifications by reactive metabolites using magnetic bead bioreactors and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Fu, You-Jun; Rusling, James F

    2015-03-18

    We report here label-free metabolite-protein adduct detection and identification employing magnetic beads coated with metabolic enzymes as bioreactors to generate metabolites and possible metabolite-protein adducts for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:25693065

  15. Characterizing Protein Modifications by Reactive Metabolites using Magnetic Bead Bioreactors and LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dandan; Fu, You-Jun; Rusling, James F.

    2015-01-01

    We report here label-free metabolite-protein adduct detection and identification employing magnetic beads coated with metabolic enzymes as bioreactors to generate metabolites and possible metabolite-protein adducts for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:25693065

  16. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    PubMed

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites. PMID:25975187

  17. Metabolite profiling of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) phloem exudate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biofortification of staple crops with essential micronutrients relies on the efficient, long distance transport of nutrients to the developing seed. The main route of this transport in common wheat (Triticum aestivum) is via the phloem, but due to the reactive nature of some essential micronutrients (specifically Fe and Zn), they need to form ligands with metabolites for transport within the phloem. Current methods available in collecting phloem exudate allows for small volumes (μL or nL) to be collected which limits the breadth of metabolite analysis. We present a technical advance in the measurement of 79 metabolites in as little as 19.5 nL of phloem exudate. This was achieved by using mass spectrometry based, metabolomic techniques. Results Using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS), 79 metabolites were detected in wheat phloem. Of these, 53 were identified with respect to their chemistry and 26 were classified as unknowns. Using the ratio of ion area for each metabolite to the total ion area for all metabolites, 39 showed significant changes in metabolite profile with a change in wheat reproductive maturity, from 8–12 to 17–21 days after anthesis. Of these, 21 were shown to increase and 18 decreased as the plant matured. An amine group derivitisation method coupled with liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS) based metabolomics was able to quantify 26 metabolites and semi-quantitative data was available for a further 3 metabolites. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it is possible to determine metabolite profiles from extremely small volumes of phloem exudate and that this method can be used to determine variability within the metabolite profile of phloem that has occurred with changes in maturity. This is also believed to be the first report of the presence of the important metal complexing metabolite, nicotianamine in the phloem of wheat. PMID:25143779

  18. High fat diet leads to changes in metabolite patterns in pig plasma, fecal, and urine samples detected by a ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem with high resolution mass spectrometry metabolomic study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-targeted metabolite profiling can identify robust biological markers of dietary exposure that can lead to a better understanding of causal interactions between diet and health. In this study, pigs were used as an animal model to develop an efficient procedure to discover metabolites in biolog...

  19. Analysis of selected herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Geological Survey (USGS) Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, is to develop analytical methods for the analysis of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water that are vital to the study of herbicide fate and degradation pathways in the environment. Methods to measure metabolite concentrations from three major classes of herbicides - triazine, chloroacetanilide and phenyl-urea - have been developed. Methods for triazine metabolite detection cover nine compounds: six compounds are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; one is detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection; and eight are detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides - ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid - are detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Alachlor ethane sulfonic acid also has been detected by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Six phenylurea metabolites are all detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; four of the six metabolites also are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Additionally, surveys of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water, ground water, lakes, reservoirs, and rainfall have been conducted through the USGS laboratory in Lawrence. These surveys have been useful in determining herbicide and metabolite occurrence and temporal distribution and have shown that metabolites may be useful in evaluation of non-point-source contamination. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  20. Understanding and Classifying Metabolite Space and Metabolite-Likeness

    PubMed Central

    Peironcely, Julio E.; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Bender, Andreas; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    While the entirety of ‘Chemical Space’ is huge (and assumed to contain between 1063 and 10200 ‘small molecules’), distinct subsets of this space can nonetheless be defined according to certain structural parameters. An example of such a subspace is the chemical space spanned by endogenous metabolites, defined as ‘naturally occurring’ products of an organisms' metabolism. In order to understand this part of chemical space in more detail, we analyzed the chemical space populated by human metabolites in two ways. Firstly, in order to understand metabolite space better, we performed Principal Component Analysis (PCA), hierarchical clustering and scaffold analysis of metabolites and non-metabolites in order to analyze which chemical features are characteristic for both classes of compounds. Here we found that heteroatom (both oxygen and nitrogen) content, as well as the presence of particular ring systems was able to distinguish both groups of compounds. Secondly, we established which molecular descriptors and classifiers are capable of distinguishing metabolites from non-metabolites, by assigning a ‘metabolite-likeness’ score. It was found that the combination of MDL Public Keys and Random Forest exhibited best overall classification performance with an AUC value of 99.13%, a specificity of 99.84% and a selectivity of 88.79%. This performance is slightly better than previous classifiers; and interestingly we found that drugs occupy two distinct areas of metabolite-likeness, the one being more ‘synthetic’ and the other being more ‘metabolite-like’. Also, on a truly prospective dataset of 457 compounds, 95.84% correct classification was achieved. Overall, we are confident that we contributed to the tasks of classifying metabolites, as well as to understanding metabolite chemical space better. This knowledge can now be used in the development of new drugs that need to resemble metabolites, and in our work particularly for assessing the metabolite

  1. Detection of T-2 mycotoxin metabolites in urines of exposed rats. Comparison of a potentially fieldable kit with a laboratory assay. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewetson, J.F.; Wannemacher, R.W.; Hawley, R.J.

    1988-03-09

    Rapid methods to detect toxin exposure have been a concern of the Army since the reported use of T-2 mycotoxin as a biological warfare agent in Southeast Asia and Afghanistan. T-2 toxin was included in an exploratory development program of rapid identification systems for biological agents sponsored by the United States Army Medical Materiel Development Activity. Reported here is evidence of T-2W exposure in urines collected up to 2 weeks after rats were exposed to a sublethal dose of T-2 toxin. A laboratory radioimmunoassay (RIA) using polyclonal antibody was used to assay the urines for HT-2 or T-2 tetraol. The sensitivity of the RIA for HT-2 was 5 ng/ml and 50 ng/ml for T-2 tetraol. Some of the urines were assayed in parallel with a potentially fieldable enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) developed for T-2 with a monoclonal antibody that cross reacts with HT-2.

  2. The quantitative spectrum of inositol phosphate metabolites in avian erythrocytes, analysed by proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. with direct isomer detection.

    PubMed Central

    Radenberg, T; Scholz, P; Bergmann, G; Mayr, G W

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of inositol phosphate isomers present in avian erythrocytes was investigated in qualitative and quantitative terms. Inositol phosphates were isolated in micromolar quantities from turkey blood by anion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and subjected to proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. analysis. We employed a h.p.l.c. technique with a novel, recently described complexometric post-column detection system, called 'metal-dye detection' [Mayr (1988) Biochem. J. 254, 585-591], which enabled us to identify non-radioactively labelled inositol phosphate isomers and to determine their masses. The results indicate that avian erythrocytes contain the same inositol phosphate isomers as mammalian cells. Denoted by the 'lowest-locant rule' [NC-IUB Recommendations (1988) Biochem. J. 258, 1-2] irrespective of true enantiomerism, these are Ins(1,4)P2, Ins(1,6)P2, Ins(1,3,4)P3, Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, Ins(1,3,4,6)P4, Ins(1,4,5,6)P4, Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5, and InsP6. Furthermore, we identified two inositol trisphosphate isomers hitherto not described for mammalian cells, namely Ins(1,5,6)P3 and Ins(2,4,5)P3. The possible position of these two isomers in inositol phosphate metabolism and implications resulting from absolute abundances of inositol phosphates are discussed. PMID:2604720

  3. Sample preparation methods for LC-MS-based global aqueous metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Antoni; Samino, Sara; Yanes, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Metabolite extraction is a key step in metabolomic analyses, particularly for untargeted studies. The extraction determines the types of metabolites that will be detected and the analytical platform to be used. In this chapter we describe two protocols aimed at detecting polar metabolites from biological samples; the first is aimed at detecting reduced species by LC/MS, and the second satisfies the requirements for both NMR and LC/MS analysis simultaneously. PMID:25270923

  4. Microalgal metabolites: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Occurrence of secondary metabolites in microalgae (protoctista) is discussed with respect to the phylogenic or taxonomic relationships of organisms. Biosynthetic mechanisms of certain metabolites such as paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins and polyether toxins are also discussed, and genetic aspects of the secondary metabolite production as well. PMID:8905087

  5. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  6. Ex vivo studies for the passive transdermal delivery of low-dose naltrexone from a cream; detection of naltrexone and its active metabolite, 6β-naltrexol, using a novel LC Q-ToF MS assay.

    PubMed

    Dodou, Kalliopi; Armstrong, Andrew; Kelly, Ivan; Wilkinson, Simon; Carr, Kevin; Shattock, Paul; Whiteley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Naltrexone (NTX) is a long-acting opiate antagonist. Low-dose naltrexone (LDN) therapy has shown promising results in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders. Our aim was to formulate NTX into a cream for the delivery of LDN and develop an analytical technique for the quantification of NTX and its active metabolite 6-β-naltrexol (NTXol) during transdermal diffusion cell permeation studies. A 1% w/w NTX cream was formulated and drug permeation was examined over 24 h using static Franz diffusion cells mounted with pig skin. A Liquid Chromatography Quadrupole-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS Q-ToF) method was developed for the detection of NTX and NTXol in the receptor solution, skin membrane and residual cream on the donor chamber after completion of the diffusion studies. The cream formulation exhibited steady state release of NTX over 24 h after an initial lag time of 2.74 h. The bioconversion of NTX to NTXol in the skin membrane was 1.1%. It was concluded that the cream may be an effective formulation for the sustained transdermal delivery of LDN. The novel LC Q-ToF MS method allowed the accurate measurement of NTX and NTXol levels across the diffusion cell assemblies and the quantification of NTX metabolism in the skin. PMID:24785567

  7. The syntheses of [(14) C]BMS-823778 for use in a human ADME clinical study and of [(13) CD3 (13) CD2 ]BMT-094817, a stable-isotope labeled standard of a newly detected human metabolite.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Brad D; Tran, Scott B; Lago, Michael; Li, Jun; Bonacorsi, Samuel J

    2016-05-30

    Type 2 diabetes is a significant worldwide health problem. To support the development of BMS-823778 as an inhibitor of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 for type 2 diabetes, the synthesis of carbon-14-labeled material was required for use in a human adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) study. The HCl salt form of [(14) C]BMS-823778 was synthesized in two steps from commercially available [2-(14) C]acetone. The radiochemical purity of the synthesized [(14) C]BMS-823778 after dilution with unlabeled clinical-grade BMS-823778 was 99.5% having a specific activity of 7.379 μCi/mg. One result of the human ADME study was the detection of a new human metabolite, BMT-094817. To support the quantification of BMT-094817 in clinical samples, it was necessary to synthesize [(13) CD3 (13) CD2 ]BMT-094817 for use as a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry standard. [(13) CD3 (13) CD2 ]BMT-094817 was prepared in five labeled steps from [(13) CD3 ]iodomethane. PMID:27169762

  8. Pressurized liquid extraction for the determination of cannabinoids and metabolites in hair: Detection of cut-off values by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Camilla; Simeoni, Maria Chiara; Vannutelli, Gabriele; Gregori, Adolfo; Ripani, Luigi; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Curini, Roberta

    2015-08-01

    Hair analysis has become a routine procedure in most forensic laboratories since this alternative matrix presents clear advantages over classical matrices; particularly wider time window, non-invasive sampling and good stability of the analytes over time. There are, however, some major challenges for the analysis of cannabinoids in hair, mainly related to the low concentrations of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), that is the major metabolite. In this study a fast, accurate and sensitive method for the determination of cannabinol, cannabidiol, THC and THC-COOH in hair has been developed. The extraction of analytes from hair (50mg) is based on an automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) using water modified with the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate as eluent phase. PLE extract is then cleaned up by SPE using polymeric reversed phase cartridges Strata XL before the injection in the HPLC-HRMS/MS system. Chromatographic conditions obtained with a fused-core column allowed a good separation of the analytes in less than 4min. The whole procedure has been validated according to SWGTOX guidelines. The LLOQs obtained for THC-COOH and the other analytes were respectively 0.1 and 2pg/mg. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first LC-MS/MS based method that allows the detection of THC-COOH in hair at values lower than the cut-off. PMID:26118805

  9. Development and validation of a multiresidue method for the simultaneous determination of organophosphorus insecticides and their toxic metabolites in sugarcane juice and refined sugar by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, Thirumalaiandi; Paramasivam, Mariappan

    2016-06-01

    A multiresidue method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of organophosphorus insecticides and their toxic metabolites in sugarcane juice and refined sugar by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Limits of quantification of the method varied between 0.007 and 0.01 μg/g. Ethyl acetate based extraction followed by dispersive solid-phase extraction cleanup with primary secondary amine yielded internationally acceptable recoveries of acephate, chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos, monocrotophos, malathion, malaoxon, phorate, phorate-sulfoxide, phorate-oxon, phorate-sulfone, and quinalphos from selected matrices. The recoveries of target analytes from cane juice were 75.55 ± 0.5-102.57 ± 4.2, 77.45 ± 4.7-103.33 ± 3.3, and 80.55 ± 6.6-105.82 ± 9.8% at 0.01, 0.02, and 0.1 μg/g levels of fortification, respectively. The recoveries from cane sugar were 73.24 ± 3.5-104.47 ± 1.9, 75.23 ± 1.5-116.10 ± 3.7, and 70.75 ± 5.7-110.15 ± 2.7%, respectively at 0.01, 0.02, and 0.1 μg/g levels of fortification. Matrix effect and measurement uncertainty were within the permissible limit (less than 20%) as prescribed for pesticide residue analysis. PMID:27061678

  10. Detection of three herbicide, and one metabolite, residues in brown rice and rice straw using various versions of the QuEChERS method and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jun; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Abd El-Aty, A M; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Chung, Hyung Suk; Kim, Sung-Woo; Abdel-Aty, Azza M; Shin, Ho-Chul; Shim, Jae-Han

    2016-11-01

    A single-run analytical method was developed to analyze the three herbicides azimsulfuron, bensulfuron-methyl, and mesotrione and its metabolite (4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoic acid (MNBA)) in brown rice and rice straw using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Samples extracted using various versions of Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe "QuEChERS" (original unbuffered, acetate (AOAC), and citrate (EN) buffered) methods gave poor recoveries of all the tested analytes in both matrices. The extraction efficiency was improved when primary-secondary amine (PSA) sorbent was removed from the purification step, with the best recovery being achieved for EN-QuEChERS, which was subsequently used throughout the study. Overall, a determination coefficients (R(2))⩾0.995 was achieved at matrix-matched calibration curves at various concentration ranges. The recovery rates at three fortification levels (limit of quantification (LOQ), 1/2 maximum residue limit (1/2MRL), and MRL) ranged from 78 to 114.5, with relative standard deviations (RSDs)<18% for all the tested analytes in both matrices. The LOQs for all herbicides were lower than the MRL set by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS), Republic of Korea. Field trials with the recommended, or double the recommended dose, revealed that the herbicides can safely be applied to rice, as no residues were detected in the harvested samples at 110days. PMID:27211669

  11. Metabolic activation of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane to mutagenic metabolites: detection and mechanism of formation of (Z)- and (E)-2-chloro-3-(bromomethyl)oxirane.

    PubMed

    Pearson, P G; Omichinski, J G; Myers, T G; Søderlund, E J; Dybing, E; Nelson, S D

    1990-01-01

    1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP), a haloalkane nematocide and soil fumigant, is metabolically activated to chemically reactive species that are direct-acting mutagens in a Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 test system. Studies in vitro with rat liver microsomes indicated that oxidation at carbon 3 resulted in the formation of an unstable gem-chlorohydrin that rearranged with elimination of hydrogen bromide to form (Z)-2-chloro-3-(bromomethyl)oxirane [(Z)-CBPO] and (E)-2-chloro-3-(bromomethyl)oxirane [(E)-CBPO]. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with positive ion chemical ionization (CI) was employed to identify (Z)-CBPO and (E)-CBPO by comparison of characteristic fragment ions in their CI mass spectra with those observed for authentic standards. Quantitative GC-MS methodology was exploited to quantitate the rate of formation of (Z)-CBPO and (E)-CBPO from DBCP and analogues of DBCP specifically deuterated at carbon 1 and carbon 3. The rate of formation of Z- and E-isomers of CBPO was 31 and 33 pmol/(min.mg of protein), respectively, from DBCP; substitution with deuterium at carbon 1 increased the rate of epoxide formation by 50%, whereas CBPO formation could not be detected from a substrate labeled with deuterium at carbon 3. Both epoxides were directly acting mutagens to S. typhimurium TA 100. (Z)-CBPO caused approximately twice as many his+ revertants/nmol compared to (E)-CBPO. Oxidation at carbon 2 of DBCP resulted in the formation of a bifunctional alkylating agent, 1-bromo-3-chloroacetone, presumably via the intermediacy of an unstable gem-bromohydrin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2133097

  12. Urinary pesticide metabolites in school students from northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Panuwet, Parinya; Prapamontol, Tippawan; Chantara, Somporn; Barr, Dana B

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated exposure to pesticides among secondary school students aged 12-13 years old in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. Pesticide-specific urinary metabolites were used as biomarkers of exposure for a variety of pesticides, including organophosphorus insecticides, synthetic pyrethroid insecticides and selected herbicides. We employed a simple solid-phase extraction with analysis using isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). A total of 207 urine samples from Thai students were analyzed for 18 specific pesticide metabolites. We found 14 metabolites in the urine samples tested; seven of them were detected with a frequency > or=17%. The most frequently detected metabolites were 2-[(dimethoxyphosphorothioyl) sulfanyl] succinic acid (malathion dicarboxylic acid), para-nitrophenol (PNP), 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TPCY; metabolite of chlorpyrifos), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), cis- and trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acids (c-DCCA and t-DCCA; metabolite of permethrin) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; metabolite of pyrethroids). The students were classified into 4 groups according to their parental occupations: farmers (N=60), merchants and traders (N=39), government and company employees (N=52), and laborers (N=56). Children of farmers had significantly higher urinary concentrations of pyrethroid insecticide metabolites than did other children (p<0.05). Similarly, children of agricultural families had significantly higher pyrethroid metabolite concentrations. Males had significantly higher values of PNP (Mann-Whitney test, p=0.009); however, no other sex-related differences were observed. Because parental occupation and agricultural activities seemed to have little influence on pesticide levels, dietary sources were the likely contributors to the metabolite levels observed. PMID:18760967

  13. Profiling Reactive Metabolites via Chemical Trapping and Targeted Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jae Won; Lee, Gihoon; Coukos, John S; Moellering, Raymond E

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomic profiling studies aim to provide a comprehensive, quantitative, and dynamic portrait of the endogenous metabolites in a biological system. While contemporary technologies permit routine profiling of many metabolites, intrinsically labile metabolites are often improperly measured or omitted from studies due to unwanted chemical transformations that occur during sample preparation or mass spectrometric analysis. The primary glycolytic metabolite 1,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid (1,3-BPG) typifies this class of metabolites, and, despite its central position in metabolism, has largely eluded analysis in profiling studies. Here we take advantage of the reactive acylphosphate group in 1,3-BPG to chemically trap the metabolite with hydroxylamine during metabolite isolation, enabling quantitative analysis by targeted LC-MS/MS. This approach is compatible with complex cellular metabolome, permits specific detection of the reactive (1,3-) instead of nonreactive (2,3-) BPG isomer, and has enabled direct analysis of dynamic 1,3-BPG levels resulting from perturbations to glucose processing. These studies confirmed that standard metabolomic methods misrepresent cellular 1,3-BPG levels in response to altered glucose metabolism and underscore the potential for chemical trapping to be used for other classes of reactive metabolites. PMID:27314642

  14. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J.; Girard, Frederic C.; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (˜60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  15. Variability of Non-Polar Secondary Metabolites in the Red Alga Portieria

    PubMed Central

    Payo, Dioli Ann; Colo, Joannamel; Calumpong, Hilconida; de Clerck, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Possible sources of variation in non-polar secondary metabolites of Portieria hornemannii, sampled from two distinct regions in the Philippines (Batanes and Visayas), resulting from different life-history stages, presence of cryptic species, and/or spatiotemporal factors, were investigated. PCA analyses demonstrated secondary metabolite variation between, as well as within, five cryptic Batanes species. Intraspecific variation was even more pronounced in the three cryptic Visayas species, which included samples from six sites. Neither species groupings, nor spatial or temporal based patterns, were observed in the PCA analysis, however, intraspecific variation in secondary metabolites was detected between life-history stages. Male gametophytes (102 metabolites detected) were strongly discriminated from the two other stages, whilst female gametophyte (202 metabolites detected) and tetrasporophyte (106 metabolites detected) samples were partially discriminated. These results suggest that life-history driven variations, and possibly other microscale factors, may influence the variation within Portieria species. PMID:22163195

  16. Characterization and tissue distribution of conjugated metabolites of pyrene in the rat

    PubMed Central

    SAENGTIENCHAI, Aksorn; IKENAKA, Yoshinori; DARWISH, Wageh Sobhy; NAKAYAMA, Shouta M.M.; MIZUKAWA, Hazuki; ISHIZUKA, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Pyrene (PY) is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that is often used as a biomarker for human and wildlife exposure to PAHs. As the metabolites of PAHs, similar to their parent compounds, pose public health risks, it is necessary to study their characteristics and tissue-specific distribution. The present study was performed to experimentally characterize PY metabolites and analyze the tissue-specific distribution of the conjugated metabolites after oral administration of PY to rats. PY metabolites, such as pyrenediol-disulfate (PYdiol-diS), pyrenediol-sulfate (PYdiol-S), pyrene-1-sufate (PYOS), pyrene-1-glucuronide (PYOG) and 1-hydroxypyrene (PYOH), were detected in rat urine. Although glucuronide conjugate was the predominant metabolite, the metabolite composition varied among tissues. Interestingly, the proportion of PYOH was high in the large intestine. Furthermore, PYOH was the only PY metabolite detected in feces. PMID:26028020

  17. Functional Genomics of Novel Secondary Metabolites from Diverse Cyanobacteria Using Untargeted Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Richard; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Jose, Nick; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Gugger, Muriel; Northen, Trent R.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has become a powerful tool for the detection of metabolites in complex biological systems and for the identification of novel metabolites. We previously identified a number of unexpected metabolites in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, such as histidine betaine, its derivatives and several unusual oligosaccharides. To test for the presence of these compounds and to assess the diversity of small polar metabolites in other cyanobacteria, we profiled cell extracts of nine strains representing much of the morphological and evolutionary diversification of this phylum. Spectral features in raw metabolite profiles obtained by normal phase liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) were manually curated so that chemical formulae of metabolites could be assigned. For putative identification, retention times and MS/MS spectra were cross-referenced with those of standards or available sprectral library records. Overall, we detected 264 distinct metabolites. These included indeed different betaines, oligosaccharides as well as additional unidentified metabolites with chemical formulae not present in databases of metabolism. Some of these metabolites were detected only in a single strain, but some were present in more than one. Genomic interrogation of the strains revealed that generally, presence of a given metabolite corresponded well with the presence of its biosynthetic genes, if known. Our results show the potential of combining metabolite profiling and genomics for the identification of novel biosynthetic genes. PMID:24084783

  18. [Antiviral properties of basidiomycetes metabolites].

    PubMed

    Avtonomova, A V; Krasnopolskaya, L M

    2014-01-01

    The data on the antiviral action of the Ganoderma lucidum, Lentinus edodes, Grifola frondosa, Agaricus brasiliensis and other basidiomycetes metabolites are summurized. The metabolites of these species of basidiomycetes exhibit a direct antiviral effect on herpes simplex virus types I and II, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and others. Moreover, metabolites of basidiomycetes increased antiviral immunity. PMID:25975107

  19. Pryogalloloestrogens -- a new group of oestrogen metabolites.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, G; Gelbke, H P; Knuppen, R

    1976-01-01

    After incubation of radioactive catecholoestrogen monomethyl ethers with rat liver slices the following well known metabolic pathways were observed: 1) demethylation, 2) 16alpha-hydroxylation, 3) oxidoreduction at C-atom 17, and 4) conjugation with glutathione, sulphuric acid and glucuronic acid. In addition, for the first time a further aromatic ortho-hydroxylation, leading to pyrogalloloestrogen derivatives, was detected. Thus, the incubation of 2-methoxyoestrone yielded 2,4-dihydroxyoestrone 2-methyl ether as the main metabolite of the lipophile fraction. Under the same conditions, 4-methoxyoestrone was converted to 2,4-dihydroxyoestrone 4-methyl ether and 2,4-dihydroxyoestradiol-17beta 4-methyl ether; these compounds were the quantitatively most important metabolites not only in the lipophile but also in the sulphate and glucuronide fractions. The identity of these new metabolic products was established by chromatography, microchemical reactions and recrystallisation to constant specific radioactivity. PMID:1248801

  20. Sun, shade, and secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    My research program focuses on understanding plant primary and secondary metabolites. Grape secondary metabolites, such as phenolics, have long been valuable for the organoleptic properties they impart to fruit and wine, and, more recently, for their possible health benefits. These compounds develop...

  1. Gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detection multiresidue method for organophosphate pesticide and metabolite residues at the parts-per-billion level in representatives commodities of fruits and vegetable crop groups.

    PubMed

    Podhorniak, L V; Negron, J F; Griffith, F D

    2001-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method with a pulsed flame photometric detector (P-FPD) is presented for the analysis of 28 parent organophosphate (OP) pesticides and their OP metabolites. A total of 57 organophosphates were analyzed in 10 representative fruit and vegetable crop groups. The method is based on a judicious selection of known procedures from FDA sources such as the Pesticide Analytical Manual and Laboratory Information Bulletins, combined in a manner to recover the OPs and their metabolite(s) at the part-per-billion (ppb) level. The method uses an acetone extraction with either miniaturized Hydromatrix column partitioning or alternately a miniaturized methylene dichloride liquid-liquid partitioning, followed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup with graphitized carbon black (GCB) and PSA cartridges. Determination of residues is by programmed temperature capillary column gas chromatography fitted with a P-FPD set in the phosphorus mode. The method is designed so that a set of samples can be prepared in 1 working day for overnight instrumental analysis. The recovery data indicates that a daily column-cutting procedure used in combination with the SPE extract cleanup effectively reduces matrix enhancement at the ppb level for many organophosphates. The OPs most susceptible to elevated recoveries around or greater than 150%, based on peak area calculations, were trichlorfon, phosmet, and the metabolites of dimethoate, fenamiphos, fenthion, and phorate. PMID:11417651

  2. Spatio-temporal distribution and natural variation of metabolites in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouchuang; Tu, Hong; Wan, Jian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xianqing; Luo, Jie; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Hongyan

    2016-05-15

    To study the natural variation and spatio-temporal accumulation of citrus metabolites, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based metabolome analysis was performed on four fruit tissues (flavedo, albedo, segment membrane and juice sacs) and different Citrus species (lemon, pummelo and grapefruit, sweet orange and mandarin). Using a non-targeted metabolomics approach, more than 2000 metabolite signals were detected, from which more than 54 metabolites, including amino acids, flavonoids and limonoids, were identified/annotated. Differential accumulation patterns of both primary metabolites and secondary metabolites in various tissues and species were revealed by our study. Further investigation indicated that flavedo accumulates more flavonoids while juice sacs contain more amino acids. Besides this, cluster analysis based on the levels of metabolites detected in 47 individual Citrus accessions clearly grouped them into four distinct clusters: pummelos and grapefruits, lemons, sweet oranges and mandarins, while the cluster of pummelos and grapefruits lay distinctly apart from the other three species. PMID:26775938

  3. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  4. Structural transformation of lignan compounds in rat gastrointestinal tract; II. Serum concentration of lignans and their metabolites.

    PubMed

    Nose, M; Fujimoto, T; Nishibe, S; Ogihara, Y

    1993-04-01

    Serum concentrations of arctiin, tracheloside, and their metabolites formed in the gastrointestinal tract were investigated in the rat. Arctiin or tracheloside was not detected in the serum after oral administration (200 mg/kg). In regard to their metabolites, each metabolite 1 (AM1, TM1), their genuine genins, appeared in the serum, and the serum concentration of arctiin metabolite 1 (AM1) reached its peak at 4 h and that of tracheloside metabolite 1 (TM1) reached its peak at 8 h. On the other hand, both metabolites 2 (AM2, TM2), which each possess a catechol moiety as reported previously, were not found in the serum. Now, we have studied the detection of their metabolites in the rat large intestinal contents after oral administration. It was revealed that all metabolites reported previously were certainly formed in rat gastrointestinal tract in vivo. Thus, we presumed a possibility that metabolite 2 was converted into metabolite 1 through C-3" methylation by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) in rat liver. Each metabolite 2 was incubated with rat liver cytosol in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine. It was proved that metabolite 2 was rapidly converted into metabolite 1 within 3 min. We suggest that arctiin or tracheloside was transformed to at least two metabolites in the gastrointestinal tract, and after absorption from the intestine, metabolite 2 was converted into metabolite 1 through methylation by COMT in the liver, and arctiin and tracheloside existed as metabolite 1, the genuine genin, in the blood stream. PMID:8387675

  5. The metabolite profiling of coastal coccolithophorid species Pleurochrysis carterae (Haptophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengxu; Luo, Jie; Ye, Yangfang; Yan, Xiaojun; Liu, Baoning; Wen, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Pleurochrysis carterae is a calcified coccolithophorid species that usually blooms in the coastal area and causes aquaculture losses. The cellular calcification, blooming and many other critical species specific eco-physiological processes are closely related to various metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study is to apply the unbiased and non-destructive method of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to detect the unknown holistic metabolite of P. carterae. The results show that NMR spectroscopic method is practical in the analysis of metabolites of phytoplankton. The metabolome of P. carterae was dominated by 26 metabolites involved in a number of different primary and secondary metabolic pathways. Organic acids and their derivatives, amino acids, sugars, nucleic aides were mainly detected. The abundant metabolites are that closely related to the process of cellular osmotic adjustment, which possibly reflect the active ability of P. carterae to adapt to the versatile coastal niche. DMSP (dimethylsulphoniopropionate) was the most dominant metabolite in P. carterae, up to 2.065±0.278 mg/g lyophilized cells, followed by glutamate and lactose, the contents were 0.349±0.035 and 0.301±0.073 mg/g lyophilized cells respectively. Other metabolites that had the content ranged between 0.1-0.2 mg/g lyophilized cells were alanine, isethionate and arabinose. Amino acid (valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, tyrosine), organic acid salts (lactate, succinate), scyllitol and uracil had content ranged from 0.01 to below 0.1 mg/g lyophilized cells. Trigonelline, fumarate and formate were detected in very low content (only thousandths of 1 mg per gram of lyophilized cells or below). Our results of the holistic metabolites of P. carterae are the basic references for the further studies when multiple problems will be addressed to this notorious blooming calcifying species.

  6. The metabolite profiling of coastal coccolithophorid species Pleurochrysis carterae (Haptophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengxu; Luo, Jie; Ye, Yangfang; Yan, Xiaojun; Liu, Baoning; Wen, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Pleurochrysis carterae is a calcified coccolithophorid species that usually blooms in the coastal area and causes aquaculture losses. The cellular calcification, blooming and many other critical species specific eco-physiological processes are closely related to various metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study is to apply the unbiased and non-destructive method of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to detect the unknown holistic metabolite of P. carterae. The results show that NMR spectroscopic method is practical in the analysis of metabolites of phytoplankton. The metabolome of P. carterae was dominated by 26 metabolites involved in a number of different primary and secondary metabolic pathways. Organic acids and their derivatives, amino acids, sugars, nucleic aides were mainly detected. The abundant metabolites are that closely related to the process of cellular osmotic adjustment, which possibly reflect the active ability of P. carterae to adapt to the versatile coastal niche. DMSP (dimethylsulphoniopropionate) was the most dominant metabolite in P. carterae, up to 2.065±0.278 mg/g lyophilized cells, followed by glutamate and lactose, the contents were 0.349±0.035 and 0.301±0.073 mg/g lyophilized cells respectively. Other metabolites that had the content ranged between 0.1-0.2 mg/g lyophilized cells were alanine, isethionate and arabinose. Amino acid (valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, tyrosine), organic acid salts (lactate, succinate), scyllitol and uracil had content ranged from 0.01 to below 0.1 mg/g lyophilized cells. Trigonelline, fumarate and formate were detected in very low content (only thousandths of 1 mg per gram of lyophilized cells or below). Our results of the holistic metabolites of P. carterae are the basic references for the further studies when multiple problems will be addressed to this notorious blooming calcifying species.

  7. Identification of novel metoclopramide metabolites in humans: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Argikar, Upendra A; Gomez, Javier; Ung, Din; Parkman, Henry P; Nagar, Swati

    2010-08-01

    Metoclopramide (MCP) is frequently used to treat gastroparesis. Previous studies have documented MCP metabolism, but systematic structural identification of metabolites has not been performed. The aim of this study was to better understand MCP metabolism in humans. For examination of in vivo metabolism, a single oral 20-mg MCP dose was administered to eight healthy male volunteers, followed by complete urine collection over 24 h. In vitro incubations were performed in human liver microsomes (HLM) to characterize metabolism via cytochromes P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and in human liver cytosol for metabolism via sulfotransferases. Urine and subcellular incubations were analyzed for MCP metabolites on a mass spectrometer with accurate mass measurement capability. Five MCP metabolites were detected in vivo, and five additional metabolites were detected in vitro. The five metabolites of MCP identified both in vitro and in vivo were an N-O-glucuronide (M1), an N-sulfate (M2), a des-ethyl metabolite (M3), a hydroxylated metabolite (M4), and an oxidative deaminated metabolite (M5). To our knowledge, metabolites M1 and M4 have not been reported previously. M2 urinary levels varied 22-fold and M3 levels varied 16-fold among eight subjects. In vitro studies in HLM revealed the following additional metabolites: two ether glucuronides (M6 and M8), possibly on the phenyl ring after oxidation, an N-glucuronide (M7), a carbamic acid (M9), and a nitro metabolite (M10). Metabolites M6 to M10 have not been reported previously. In conclusion, this study describes the identification of MCP metabolites in vivo and in vitro in humans. PMID:20423954

  8. Exploring antagonistic metabolites of established biocontrol agent of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Rane, Makarand Ramesh; Sarode, Prashant Diwakar; Chaudhari, Bhushan Liladhar; Chincholkar, Sudhir Bhaskarrao

    2008-12-01

    Biocontrol ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ID 4365, a biocontrol agent of groundnut phytopathogens from marine origin, was previously attributed to the production of pyoverdin type of siderophores. However, pyoverdin-rich supernatants of this organism showed better antifungal activity compared to equivalent amount of purified pyoverdin indicating presence of undetected metabolite(s) in pyoverdin rich supernatants. On the basis of observation that antagonistic activity was iron-dependent and iron-independent, an attempt was made to detect the presence of additional metabolites. In addition to pyoverdin, strain produced additional siderophores, viz. pyochelin and salicylic acid. Two broad spectrum antifungal compounds, viz. pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, were detected, characterized, and activity against phytopathogens was demonstrated. Iron- and phosphate-dependent co-production of siderophores and phenazines was confirmed. Strain showed additional features like production of hydrogen cyanide, indol-3-acetic acid, and phosphate solubilization. PMID:18626581

  9. Development of a new high-performance liquid chromatography method with diode array and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry detection for the metabolite fingerprinting of bioactive compounds in Humulus lupulus L.

    PubMed

    Prencipe, Francesco Pio; Brighenti, Virginia; Rodolfi, Margherita; Mongelli, Andrea; dall'Asta, Chiara; Ganino, Tommaso; Bruni, Renato; Pellati, Federica

    2014-07-01

    The study was aimed at developing a new analytical method for the metabolite fingerprinting of bioactive compounds in Humulus lupulus L. (hop), together with a simple extraction procedure. Different extraction techniques, including maceration, heat reflux extraction (HRE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), were compared in order to obtain a high yield of the target analytes. Dynamic maceration for 30min with MeOH-HCOOH (99:1, v/v) as the extraction solvent provided the best result in terms of recovery of secondary metabolites. The analysis of hop constituents, including prenylflavonoids and prenylphloroglucinols (bitter acids), was carried out by means of HPLC-UV/DAD, HPLC-ESI-MS and MS(2), using an ion trap mass analyzer. An Ascentis Express C18 column (150mm×3.0mm I.D., 2.7μm) was used for the HPLC analysis, with a mobile phase composed of 0.25% formic acid in both water and acetonitrile, under gradient elution. The method validation was performed to show compliance with ICH guidelines. The validated technique was successfully applied to the phytochemical analysis of ten commercial cultivars and twenty-three wild Italian hop genotypes, thus demonstrating to be a reliable and useful tool for the comprehensive multi-component analysis of hop secondary metabolites. PMID:24857039

  10. Identification of flurochloridone metabolites in rat urine using liquid chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dasheng; Zhang, Suhui; Wang, Dongli; Feng, Chao; Liu, Shihong; Jin, Yu 'e; Xu, Qian; Lin, Yuanjie; Wu, Chunhua; Tang, Liming; She, Jianwen; Wang, Guoquan; Zhou, Zhijun

    2016-05-01

    It is of great interest to develop strategic methods to enable chemicals' metabolites to be accurately and rapidly screened and identified. To screen and identify a category of metabolites with distinct isotopic distribution, this study proposed a generic strategy using in silico metabolite prediction plus accurate-mass-based isotopic pattern recognition (AMBIPR) and library identification on the data acquired via the data dependent MS/MS scan of LC-Q Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The proposed method was evaluated by the analysis of flurochloridone (FLC) metabolites in rat urine sample collected from toxicity tests. Different from the traditional isotopic pattern recognition (IPR) approach, AMBIPR here was performed based on the potential metabolites predicted via in silico metabolite prediction tools. Thus, the AMBIPR treated FLC data was only associated with FLC metabolites, consequently not only avoiding great efforts made to remove FLC-unrelated information and reveal FLC metabolites, but also increasing the percent of positive hits. Among the FLC metabolite peaks screened using AMBIPR, 87% of them (corresponding 97 metabolites and 49 biotransformation) were successfully identified via multiple MS identification techniques packaged in an established FLC's metabolites library based on Mass Frontier. Noteworthy, 34 metabolites (89%) were identified without distinct naturally isotopic distribution. The universal strategic approach based on background subtraction (BS) and mass defect filtering (MDF) was used to evaluate the AMBIPR and no more false positive and negative metabolites were detected. Furthermore, our results revealed that AMBIPR is very effective, inherently sensitive and accurate, and is easily automated for the rapidly screening and profiling chemicals related metabolites. PMID:27063369

  11. Analysis of purine metabolites in maternal serum for evaluating the risk of gestosis.

    PubMed

    Senyavina, N V; Khaustova, S A; Grebennik, T K; Pavlovich, S V

    2013-09-01

    Metabolome analysis of the serum from pregnant patients aimed at detection of low-molecular-weight biomarkers of gestation process disorders indicated a relationship between the metabolic profile of maternal serum and risk of gestosis. In women with pre-eclampsia or preterm delivery, analysis of serum purine metabolites revealed changes in the metabolite concentrations, associated with pregnancy complications. PMID:24288739

  12. Investigating associations between milk metabolite profiles and milk traits of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Melzer, N; Wittenburg, D; Hartwig, S; Jakubowski, S; Kesting, U; Willmitzer, L; Lisec, J; Reinsch, N; Repsilber, D

    2013-03-01

    In the field of dairy cattle research, it is of great interest to improve the detection and prevention of diseases (e.g., mastitis and ketosis) and monitor specific traits related to the state of health and management. During the standard milk performance test, traditional milk traits are monitored, and quality and quantity are screened. In addition to the standard test, it is also now possible to analyze milk metabolites in a high-throughput manner and to consider them in connection with milk traits to identify functionally important metabolites that can also serve as biomarker candidates. We present a study in which 190 milk metabolites and 14 milk traits of 1,305 Holstein cows on 18 commercial farms were investigated to characterize interrelations of milk metabolites between each other, to milk traits from the milk standard performance test, and to influencing factors such as farm and sire effect (half-sib structure). The effect of influencing factors (e.g., farm) varied among metabolites and traditional milk traits. The investigations of associations between metabolites and milk traits revealed groups of metabolites that show, for example, positive correlations to protein and casein, and negative correlations to lactose and pH. On the other hand, groups of metabolites jointly associated with the investigated milk traits can be identified and functionally discussed. To enable a multivariate investigation, 2 machine learning methods were applied to detect important metabolites that are highly correlated with the investigated traditional milk traits. For somatic cell score, uracil, lactic acid, and 9 other important metabolites were detected. Lactic acid has already been proposed as a biomarker candidate for mastitis in the recent literature. In conclusion, we found sets of metabolites eligible to predict milk traits, enabling the analysis of milk traits from a metabolic perspective and discussion of the possible functional background for some of the detected

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  14. Metabolite identification and quantitation in LC-MS/MS-based metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jun Feng; Zhou, Bin; Ressom, Habtom W.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics aims at detection and quantitation of all metabolites in biological samples. The presence of metabolites with a wide variety of physicochemical properties and different levels of abundance challenges existing analytical platforms used for identification and quantitation of metabolites. Significant efforts have been made to improve analytical and computational methods for metabolomics studies. This review focuses on the use of liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for quantitative and qualitative metabolomics studies. It illustrates recent developments in computational methods for metabolite identification, including ion annotation, spectral interpretation and spectral matching. We also review selected reaction monitoring and high-resolution MS for metabolite quantitation. We discuss current challenges in metabolite identification and quantitation as well as potential solutions. PMID:22345829

  15. A Carbonyl Capture Approach for Profiling Oxidized Metabolites in Cell Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, Stephanie J.; Xu, Tao; Nantz, Michael H.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) detection of oxidized cellular metabolites is described using isotopologic, carbonyl-selective derivatizing agents that integrate aminooxy functionality for carbonyl capture, quaternary nitrogen for electrospray enhancement, and a hydrophobic domain for sample cleanup. These modular structural features enable rapid, sensitive analysis of complex mixtures of metabolite-derivatives by FT-ICR-MS via continuous nanoelectrospray infusion. Specifically, this approach can be used to globally assess levels of low abundance and labile aldehyde and ketone metabolites quantitatively and in high throughput manner. These metabolites are often key and unique indicators of various biochemical pathways and their perturbations. Analysis of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells established a profile of carbonyl metabolites spanning multiple structural classes. We also demonstrate a procedure for metabolite quantification using pyruvate as a model analyte. PMID:23175637

  16. Determination of XLR-11 and its metabolites in hair by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Meejung; Yeon, Seonghoon; Lee, Jaesin; In, Sangwhan

    2015-10-10

    Analysis of drugs in hair is often used as a routine method to obtain detailed information about drug ingestion. However, few studies have been conducted on disposition of synthetic cannabinoids including cyclopropylindoles (UR-144 and XLR-11) and their metabolites in hair. XLR-11 has been widely abused in South Korea recently. Identification of metabolites in hair can be an important proof of synthetic cannabinoids use because it can exclude the possibility of passive smoke exposure. In this study, we described a quantitative analytical method of XLR-11 and its metabolites (UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite and XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite) in hair by liquid chromatography with ESI-MS/MS. The target analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were evaporated, filtered and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in positive-ionization mode. JWH-018-d9 and JWH-018 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite-d5 were used as internal standards. Chromatographic separation was completed within 15 min. No interferences were detected in 10 blank hair samples. In intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy study, CV (%) and bias (%) were below 12. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1∼2 pg/mg and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.2-2 pg/mg, respectively. The validation results proved that the method was selective, accurate and precise with acceptable linearity within calibration range. No significant variation was observed by different sources of matrices. This method was applied to hair samples from 14 individual suspects of XLR-11 use. In this result, XLR-11, UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite, XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite were detected. The concentration of XLR-11 as a parent drug was much higher than other metabolites. UR-144 N-5-hydroxy metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid

  17. High-resolution mass spectrometry elucidates metabonate (false metabolite) formation from alkylamine drugs during in vitro metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Joanna E; Kazmi, Faraz; Muranjan, Seema; Toren, Paul C; Parkinson, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    In vitro metabolite profiling and characterization experiments are widely employed in early drug development to support safety studies. Samples from incubations of investigational drugs with liver microsomes or hepatocytes are commonly analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for detection and structural elucidation of metabolites. Advanced mass spectrometers with accurate mass capabilities are becoming increasingly popular for characterization of drugs and metabolites, spurring changes in the routine workflows applied. In the present study, using a generic full-scan high-resolution data acquisition approach with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with postacquisition data mining, we detected and characterized metabonates (false metabolites) in microsomal incubations of several alkylamine drugs. If a targeted approach to mass spectrometric detection (without full-scan acquisition and appropriate data mining) were employed, the metabonates may not have been detected, hence their formation underappreciated. In the absence of accurate mass data, the metabonate formation would have been incorrectly characterized because the detected metabonates manifested as direct cyanide-trapped conjugates or as cyanide-trapped metabolites formed from the parent drugs by the addition of 14 Da, the mass shift commonly associated with oxidation to yield a carbonyl. This study demonstrates that high-resolution mass spectrometry and the associated workflow is very useful for the detection and characterization of unpredicted sample components and that accurate mass data were critical to assignment of the correct metabonate structures. In addition, for drugs containing an alkylamine moiety, the results suggest that multiple negative controls and chemical trapping agents may be necessary to correctly interpret the results of in vitro experiments. PMID:22798552

  18. Toxicological significance of dihydrodiol metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrodiols are often found as the major organic-extractable metabolites of various olefinic or aromatic xenobiotics in many biological samples. Studies on the chemistry of dihydrodiol metabolites have provided insight into the pharmacokinetic behavior and the mode of action of the parent compound. The toxicology of dihydrodiol is more complex than what can be deduced solely on the basis of diminished bioavailability of the epoxide precursor, and the increased hydrophilicity associated with the dihydrodiol moiety. Dihydrodiols can be intrinsically toxic and may even represent metabolically activated species. Some of the dihydrodiol metabolites may still retain sufficient lipophilic character to serve again as substrates for microsomal oxygenases. Because of the tremendous chemical and biological diversity that existed among the various dihydrodiols, more mechanistic studies are needed to examine the toxicological properties of these compounds. It may be premature to conclude dihydrodiol formation as purely a detoxification route for xenobioties.

  19. Deleterious effects of reactive metabolites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A number of drugs have been withdrawn from the market or severely restricted in their use because of unexpected toxicities that become apparent only after the launch of new drug entities. Circumstantial evidence suggests that, in most cases, reactive metabolites are responsible for these unexpected toxicities. In this review, a general overview of the types of reactive metabolites and the consequences of their formation are presented. The current approaches to evaluate bioactivation potential of new compounds with particular emphasis on the advantages and limitation of these procedures will be discussed. Reasonable reasons for the excellent safety record of certain drugs susceptible to bioactivation will also be explored and should provide valuable guidance in the use of reactive-metabolite assessments when nominating drug candidates for development. This will, in turn, help us to design and bring safer drugs to the market. PMID:20972370

  20. Sphingolipid metabolites in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Maceyka, Michael; Spiegel, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are ubiquitous building blocks of eukaryotic cell membranes. Progress in our understanding of sphingolipid metabolism, state-of-the-art sphingolipidomic approaches and animal models have generated a large body of evidence demonstrating that sphingolipid metabolites, particularly ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate, are signalling molecules that regulate a diverse range of cellular processes that are important in immunity, inflammation and inflammatory disorders. Recent insights into the molecular mechanisms of action of sphingolipid metabolites and new perspectives on their roles in regulating chronic inflammation have been reported. The knowledge gained in this emerging field will aid in the development of new therapeutic options for inflammatory disorders. PMID:24899305

  1. Microbial production of primary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demain, Arnold L.

    1980-12-01

    Microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon sources can produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids, and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavor or increase its nutritive value. The contribution of microorganisms will go well beyond the food industry with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum-derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. The role of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance.

  2. Multiresidue determination of pesticides and pesticide metabolites in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mogadati, P.S.; Rosen, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    Methods for the multiresidue extraction, cleanup and GC/MS determination of 142 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in soil have been developed. The use of solid phase extraction cartridges makes it possible to clean up the soil sufficiently so that the equivalent of 40 mg. soil may be injected onto the GC capillary column without overloading or harming the column. Combining this clean-up method with chemical ionization ion trap detection allowed for very low limits of detection.

  3. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Sara A.; McGettrick, Julie R.; Hansen, Warren K.; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  4. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers.

    PubMed

    Berk, Sara A; McGettrick, Julie R; Hansen, Warren K; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  5. Reactive Arrays of Colorimetric Sensors for Metabolite and Steroid Identification.

    PubMed

    Batres, Gary; Jones, Talia; Johnke, Hannah; Wilson, Mark; Holmes, Andrea E; Sikich, Sharmin

    2014-12-31

    The work described herein examines a rapid mix-and-measure method called DETECHIP suitable for screening of steroids and metabolites. The addition of steroids and metabolites to reactive arrays of colorimetric sensors generated characteristic color "fingerprints" that were used to identify the analyte. A color analysis tool was used to identify the analyte pool that now includes biologically relevant analytes. The mix-and-measure arrays allowed the detection of disease metabolites, orotic acid and argininosuccinic acid; and the steroids androsterone, 1,4-androstadiene, testosterone, stanozolol, and estrone. The steroid 1,4-androstadiene was also detected by this method while dissolved in synthetic urine. Some of the steroids, such as androstadiene, stanozolol, and androsterone were co-dissolved with (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin in order to increase solubility in aqueous buffered solutions. The colorimetric arrays do not intend to eliminate ELISA or mass spectroscopy based screening, but to possibly provide an alternative analytical detection method for steroids and metabolites. PMID:25019034

  6. Pesticides in ground water: Do atrazine metabolites matter?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, S.; Yen, S.T.; Kolpin, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    Atrazine and atrazine-residue (atrazine + two metabolites - deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine) concentrations were examined to determine if consideration of these atrazine metabolites substantially adds to our understanding of the distribution of this pesticide in groundwater of the midcontinental United States. The mean of atrazine.residue concentrations was 53 percent greater than that of atrazine alone for those observations above the detection limit (> 0.05 μg/l). Furthermore, a censored regression analysis using atrazine-residue concentrations revealed significant factors not identified when only atrazine concentrations were used. Thus, knowledge of concentrations of these atrazine metabolites is required to obtain a true estimation of risk of using these aquifers as sources for drinking water, and such knowledge also provides information that ultimately may be important for future management policies designed to reduce atrazine concentrations in ground water.

  7. Nontargeted Modification-Specific Metabolomics Investigation of Glycosylated Secondary Metabolites in Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) Based on Liquid Chromatography-High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weidong; Tan, Junfeng; Lu, Meiling; Xie, Dongchao; Li, Pengliang; Lv, Haipeng; Zhu, Yin; Guo, Li; Zhang, Yue; Peng, Qunhua; Lin, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Glycosylation on small molecular metabolites modulates a series of biological events in plants. However, a large number of glycosides have not been discovered and investigated using -omics approaches. Here, a general strategy named "nontargeted modification-specific metabolomics" was applied to map the glycosylation of metabolites. The key aspect of this method is to adopt in-source collision-induced dissociation to dissociate the glycosylated metabolite, causing a characteristic neutral loss pattern, which acts as an indicator for the glycosylation identification. In an exemplary application in green teas, 120 glucosylated/galactosylated, 38 rhamnosylated, 21 rutinosylated, and 23 primeverosylated metabolites were detected simultaneously. Among them, 61 glycosylated metabolites were putatively identified according to current tea metabolite databases. Thanks to the annotations of glycosyl moieties in advance, the method aids metabolite identifications. An additional 40 novel glycosylated metabolites were tentatively elucidated. This work provides a feasible strategy to discover and identify novel glycosylated metabolites in plants. PMID:27541009

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  9. Concurrent quantification of tryptophan and its major metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Lesniak, Wojciech G.; Jyoti, Amar; Mishra, Manoj K.; Louissaint, Nicolette; Romero, Roberto; Chugani, Diane C.; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2014-01-01

    An imbalance in tryptophan (TRP) metabolites is associated with several neurological and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, analytical methods allowing for simultaneous quantification of TRP and its major metabolites would be highly desirable, and may be valuable as potential biomarkers. We have developed a HPLC method for concurrent quantitative determination of tryptophan, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid in tissue and fluids. The method utilizes the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of TRP and its metabolites that enable UV absorbance and fluorescence detection by HPLC, without additional labeling. The origin of the peaks related to analytes of interest was confirmed by UV–Vis spectral patterns using a PDA detector and mass spectrometry. The developed methods were validated in rabbit fetal brain and amniotic fluid at gestational day 29. Results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature for the same regions. This method allows for rapid quantification of tryptophan and four of its major metabolites concurrently. A change in the relative ratios of these metabolites can provide important insights in predicting the presence and progression of neuroinflammation in disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:24036037

  10. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant secondary metabolites (e.g., phenolics) are important for human health, in addition to the organoleptic properties they impart to fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions. Thorough identification of phenolic com...