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Sample records for detection emission tomography

  1. [TUBERCULOUS CONSTRICTIVE PERICARDITIS DETECTED ON POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY].

    PubMed

    Takakura, Hiroki; Sunada, Kouichi; Shimizu, Kunihiko

    2016-02-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with fever, dyspnea, and weight loss. He was referred to our hospital for further examination of the cause of the pleural effusions. Chest computed tomography showed pleural effusions, a pericardial effusion, and enlarged lymph nodes in the carina tracheae. We administered treatment for heart failure and conducted analyses for a malignant tumor. The pericardial effusion improved, but the pericardium was thickened. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) showed fluorine-18 deoxyglucose accumulation at the superior fovea of the right clavicle, carina tracheae, superior mediastinum lymph nodes, and a thickened pericardium. Because these findings did not suggest malignancy, we assumed this was a tuberculous lesion. Echocardiography confirmed this finding as constrictive pericarditis; therefore, pericardiolysis was performed. Pathological examination showed features of caseous necrosis and granulomatous changes. Hence, the patient was diagnosed with tuberculous constrictive pericarditis. PET-CT serves as a useful tool for the diagnosis of tuberculous pericarditis. PMID:27263228

  2. Detection of lung cancer in patients with pneumoconiosis by fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography: four cases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Yanli; Cui, Xinjian; Han, Jiankui

    2013-01-01

    We report 4 cases of lung cancer in patients with pneumoconiosis detected by F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT), which could differentiate lung cancer and pneumoconiosis. FDG-PET/CT may be useful in cancer screening for patients with pneumoconiosis. PMID:23369632

  3. Detecting Metastatic Bladder Cancer Using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron-Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to retrospectively investigate the contribution of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) to detection of metastatic bladder cancer. Materials and Methods The present study included 79 patients (69 men and 10 women) undergoing 18F-FDG-PET/CT upon suspicion of metastatic bladder cancer between July 2007 and April 2013. The mean age was 66.1 years with a standard deviation of 10.7 years (range, 21 to 85 years). Patients were required to fast for 6 hours prior to scanning, and whole-body PET scanning from the skull base to the upper thighs was performed approximately 1 hour after intravenous injection of 555 MBq of 18F-FDG. Whole body CT scanning was performed in the cranio-caudal direction. FDG-PET images were reconstructed using CT data for attenuation correction. Suspicious recurrent or metastatic lesions were confirmed by histopathology or clinical follow-up. Results The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of 18F-FDG-PET/CT were 89%, 78%, 90%, 75%, and 86%, respectively. Conclusion 18F-FDG-PET/CT can detect metastases with high sensitivity and positive predictive values in patients with metastatic bladder carcinoma. PMID:25687863

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET during preclinical stages of Alzheimer’s disease. We included 437 non-demented subjects from the prospective, longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) study. All underwent 18F-florbetapir positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 analysis at baseline and at least one additional positron emission tomography after a mean follow-up of 2.1 years (range 1.1–4.4 years). Group classifications were based on normal and abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography results at baseline. We found that cases with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β and normal positron emission tomography at baseline accumulated amyloid with a mean rate of 1.2%/year, which was similar to the rate in cases with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (1.2%/year, P = 0.86). The mean accumulation rate of those with isolated abnormal cerebrospinal fluid was more than three times that of those with both normal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography (0.35%/year, P = 0.018). The group differences were similar when analysing yearly change in standardized uptake value ratio of florbetapir instead of percentage change. Those with both abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and positron emission tomography deteriorated more in memory and hippocampal volume compared with the other groups (P < 0.001), indicating that they were closer to Alzheimer’s disease dementia. The results were replicated after

  5. Positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E J; Phelps, M E

    1979-01-01

    Conventional nuclear imaging techniques utilizing lead collimation rely on radioactive tracers with little role in human physiology. The principles of imaging based on coincidence detection of the annihilation radiation produced in positron decay indicate that this mode of detection is uniquely suited for use in emission computed tomography. The only gamma-ray-emitting isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are positron emitters, which yield energies too high for conventional imaging techniques. Thus development of positron emitters in nuclear medicine imaging would make possible the use of a new class of physiologically active, positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The application of these principles is described in the use of a physiologically active compound labeled with a positron emitter and positron-emission computed tomography to measure the local cerebral metabolic rate in humans. PMID:440173

  6. [Inflammatory activity in Takayasu arteritis. Detection through positron emission tomography (PET)].

    PubMed

    Alexánderson, Erick; Soto, María Elena; Ricalde, Alejandro; Meave, Aloha; Reyes, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a chronic disease that affects mainly the aorta. Its etiology is still unknown, nevertheless it predominates in women and initiates primarily in the youth. This disease seems to have two different stages, an early stage that is characterized by an inflammatory process and a later stage characterized by vascular occlusion. Unitl now, diagnosis and classification of TA are made clinically, based on ACR; criteria and imaging studies as computed tomography and aorta angiographies. Currently, new imaging, non invasive studies, such as magnetic resonance (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) are being used. PET technique could be helpful in the diagnosis and detection of inflammatory activity in patients with TA because of its capacity to detect increased metabolism. We present the case of a female patient with TA diagnosis, which demonstrated clinical inflammatory activity that was corroborated by laboratory studies, MRI and PET. PMID:15909745

  7. Evaluation of focal thyroid lesions incidentally detected in fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Yaylali, O; Kirac, F S; Yuksel, D; Marangoz, E

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Increased uptake in the thyroid gland (TG) is often identified as an incidental finding on the whole body fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) in non-thyroid cancer patients. Currently, there is no consensus on the appropriate approach for the management of these cases. Thyroid ultrasound, scintigraphy and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) are suggested to exclude malignant thyroid lesions. Our aim is to determine the importance of increased F-18-FDG uptake in the TG on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans in patients who are being screened for various forms of non-thyroid cancer. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 2000 cases undergoing whole body PET/CT scanning between April 2011 and October 2012. The age, sex, type of primary cancer, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), size of the thyroid nodules and cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) on 18 F-FDG PET/CT images and if available, the biopsy results were evaluated. Results: In total, 57 patients (23 men, 34 women, mean age ± standard deviation (SD), 60.89 ± 14 years) showed an increased fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) uptake by the TG (average SUV max : 4.07 ± 3.7). The CLNs were detected in 19/57 patients (33%). Only 20 cases (35%) received FNAB. The final histopathological diagnosis was papillary thyroid carcinoma in seven patients (mean SUV max ± SD: 6.0 ± 5.43) and benign thyroid disease in seven patients (mean SUV max ± SD: 2.36 ± 0.63). The FNAB results were undetermined for six patients. Conclusion: Focal high 18 F-FDG uptake in the TG may be associated with an increased risk of malignancy, but the clinical significance is unclear. More data are needed to elucidate the role of the SUV in the differentiation of benign and malign thyroid lesions. If a focal increase in 18 F-FDG uptake in the TG on PET/CT is present, a prompt histopathological evaluation should be suggested

  8. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune

    2013-09-15

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because {sup 134}Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as {sup 40}K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from {sup 134}Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  9. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune

    2013-09-01

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because (134)Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as (40)K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from (134)Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium. PMID:24089828

  10. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune

    2013-09-01

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because 134Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as 40K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from 134Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  11. Importance of Defect Detectability in Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Abdominal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Yamamoto, Haruki; Nakaichi, Tetsu; Tsuji, Shiro; Nakajima, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): This study was designed to assess defect detectability in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of abdominal lesions. Methods: A National Electrical Manufactures Association International Electrotechnical Commission phantom was used. The simulated abdominal lesion was scanned for 10 min using dynamic list-mode acquisition method. Images, acquired with scan duration of 1-10 min, were reconstructed using VUE point HD and a 4.7 mm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) Gaussian filter. Iteration-subset combinations of 2-16 and 2-32 were used. Visual and physical analyses were performed using the acquired images. To sequentially evaluate defect detectability in clinical settings, we examined two middle-aged male subjects. One had a liver cyst (approximately 10 mm in diameter) and the other suffered from pancreatic cancer with an inner defect region (approximately 9 mm in diameter). Results: In the phantom study, at least 6 and 3 min acquisition durations were required to visualize 10 and 13 mm defect spheres, respectively. On the other hand, spheres with diameters ≥17 mm could be detected even if the acquisition duration was only 1 min. The visual scores were significantly correlated with background (BG) variability. In clinical settings, the liver cyst could be slightly visualized with an acquisition duration of 6 min, although image quality was suboptimal. For pancreatic cancer, the acquisition duration of 3 min was insufficient to clearly describe the defect region. Conclusion: The improvement of BG variability is the most important factor for enhancing lesion detection. Our clinical scan duration (3 min/bed) may not be suitable for the detection of small lesions or accurate tumor delineation since an acquisition duration of at least 6 min is required to visualize 10 mm lesions, regardless of reconstruction parameters. Improvements in defect detectability are important for radiation treatment planning and accurate PET-based diagnosis. PMID:27408887

  12. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.

    1985-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a new technique for noninvasively assessing myocardial metabolism and perfusion. It has provided new insight into the dynamics of myocardial fatty acid and glucose metabolism in normal subjects, patients with ischemic heart disease and those with cardiomyopathies, documenting regionally depressed fatty acid metabolism during myocardial ischemia and infarction and spatial heterogeneity of fatty acid metabolism in patients with cardiomyopathy. Regional myocardial perfusion has been studied with PET using water, ammonia and rubidium labeled with positron emitters, permitting the noninvasive detection of hypoperfused zones at rest and during vasodilator stress. With these techniques the relationship between perfusion and the metabolism of a variety of substrates has been studied. The great strides that have been made in developing faster high-resolution instruments and producing new labeled intermediates indicate the promise of this technique for facilitating an increase in the understanding of regional metabolism and blood flow under normal and pathophysiologic conditions. 16 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Detection of neuronal damage in degenerative brain disease with cobalt-55 and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, H.M.L.; Pruim, J.; Paans, A.M.J.

    1994-05-01

    We suggest Cobalt-55 (Co) as a Calcium (Ca)-marker to visualize Ca transport across the neuronal membrane. Elevation of intracellular Ca is closely linked with the process of neuronal cell-decay. Co-uptake is correlated with Ca-accumulation through divalent cation-permeable kainate (KA)-activated receptor-operated channels in the neuronal membrane. This hypothesis was studied with position emission tomography (PET) both in patients with a ischemic cerebro-vascular accident (CVA) and in patients with relapsing progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Co-PET studies were performed in a dynamic mode (6 frames of 10 minutes) 20-25 hours after iv.-administration of 1-2 mCi Co. Regional specific accumulation irrespective of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity in the (clinically appropriate) affected cerebral region could be demonstrated in CVA-patients, thus suggesting neuronal decay in (the early phase of) infarction. In MS, inhomogeneous cerebral distribution of Co was detected, in contrast to healthy volunteers. This suggests focal accumulation of Co in multiple spots of neuronal decay, possibly related to MS-lesions on MRI. In conclusion, Co-PET may prove to be a valuable tool for the early detection of neuronal decay not only in CVA and MS, but in other brain-pathology as well. The usefulness of Co-PET in imaging brain-tumors and myocardial ischemia has already been established.

  14. Development of a dedicated positron emission tomography system for the detection and biopsy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Proffitt, James; Smith, Mark F; Weisenberger, Andrew G; Wojcik, Randolph

    2006-12-01

    Dedicated positron emission mammography breast imaging systems have shown great promise for the detection of small, radiotracer-avid lesions. Our group (a collaboration consisting of West Virginia University, Jefferson Lab and the University of Washington) is extending this work by developing a positron emission mammography-tomography (PEM-PET) system for imaging and biopsy of breast lesions. The system will have four planar detector heads that will rotate about the breast to acquire multi-view data suitable for tomographic reconstruction. Each detector head will consist of a 96x72 array of 2x2x15 mm{sup 3} LYSO detector elements (pitch=2.1 mm) mounted on a 3x4 array of 5x5 cm{sup 2} flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. PEM-PET is expected to have approximately two-millimeter resolution and possess the ability to guide the needle biopsy of suspicious lesions seen on the PET images. Initial tests of the scintillator arrays yielded excellent results. Pixel maps for all four scintillator arrays demonstrated that separation of the LYSO elements was very good; all of the LYSO array elements were observed, even in areas between individual PSPMTs. System energy resolution was measured to be 25% FWHM at 511 keV. Future work includes the use of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to replace the current VME-based data acquisition system, a PSPMT gain normalization procedure to help improve response uniformity and energy resolution, and the addition of an x-ray source and detector to produce multi-modality PEM-PET-CT images of the breast.

  15. Positron emission tomography detects tissue metabolic activity in myocardial segments with persistent thallium perfusion defects

    SciTech Connect

    Brunken, R.; Schwaiger, M.; Grover-McKay, M.; Phelps, M.E.; Tillisch, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1987-09-01

    Positron emission tomography with /sup 13/N-ammonia and /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose was used to assess myocardial perfusion and glucose utilization in 51 myocardial segments with a stress thallium defect in 12 patients. Myocardial infarction was defined by a concordant reduction in segmental perfusion and glucose utilization, and myocardial ischemia was identified by preservation of glucose utilization in segments with rest hypoperfusion. Of the 51 segments studied, 36 had a fixed thallium defect, 11 had a partially reversible defect and 4 had a completely reversible defect. Only 15 (42%) of the 36 segments with a fixed defect and 4 (36%) of the 11 segments with a partially reversible defect exhibited myocardial infarction on study with positron tomography. In contrast, residual myocardial glucose utilization was identified in the majority of segments with a fixed (58%) or a partially reversible (64%) thallium defect. All of the segments with a completely reversible defect appeared normal on positron tomography. Apparent improvement in the thallium defect on delayed images did not distinguish segments with ischemia from infarction. Thus, positron emission tomography reveals evidence of persistent tissue metabolism in the majority of segments with a fixed or partially resolving stress thallium defect, implying that markers of perfusion alone may underestimate the extent of viable tissue in hypoperfused myocardial segments.

  16. Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration of hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes detected on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Daisuke; Takigawa, Nagio; Oda, Naohiro; Ninomiya, Takashi; Kubo, Toshio; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Sato, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Kaji, Mitsumasa; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration is of diagnostic value in hilar/mediastinal (N1/N2) lymph node staging. We assessed the utility of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in lung cancer patients with N1/N2 lymph nodes detected on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Methods Fifty lung cancer patients with N1/N2 disease on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography underwent endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for pathological lymph nodes between November 2012 and April 2015. The diagnostic performance of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, lymph node site and size, number of needle passes and complications were evaluated retrospectively from patients' medical records. Malignancy was defined as a maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) >2.5. Results The median longest diameter of the 61 lymph nodes (29 subcarinal, 21 right lower paratracheal, 6 left lower paratracheal, 4 right hilar and 1 upper paratracheal) was 23.4 mm (range: 10.4–45.7); the median number of needle passes was 2 (range: 1–5). There were no severe complications. A definitive diagnosis was made by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in 39 patients (31 adenocarcinomas, 3 small-cell carcinomas, 2 squamous-cell carcinomas, 3 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas). In the remaining 11 patients, the diagnosis was indefinite: insufficient endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration material was collected in two patients and non-specific lymphadenopathy was confirmed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration or thoracotomy in the other nine patients. The mean lymph node SUVmax was 7.09 (range: 2.90–26.9) and was significantly higher in true-positive than in false-positive nodes (P < 0.05, t-test). Non-specific lymphadenopathy was

  17. Forced diuresis 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/contrast enhanced in detection of carcinoma of urinary bladder diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Ramya; Singh, Harmandeep; Arora, Saurabh; Nayak, Brusabhanu; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder diverticular carcinomas are uncommon with a lesser incidence of 0.8–10% and its diagnosis still remains a challenge. Cystoscopy is the most reliable method, but evaluating diverticulum with narrow orifices is difficult. Before the initiation of appropriate treatment, proper detection of bladder diverticular carcinoma and its locoregional and distant sites of involvement is necessary. Here, we present a case of 48-year-old male with urinary bladder diverticular carcinoma detected by forced diuretic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT). This case also highlights the significance of forced diuretic 18F-FDG PET/CT in the detection, staging, and response evaluation of bladder diverticular carcinoma. PMID:25589819

  18. Positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y. Lucas; Thompson, Christopher J.; Diksic, Mirko; Meyer, Ernest; Feindel, William H.

    One of the most exciting new technologies introduced in the last 10 yr is positron emission tomography (PET). PET provides quantitative, three-dimensional images for the study of specific biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. This approach is analogous to quantitative in-vivo autoradiography but has the added advantage of permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. PET scanning requires a small cyclotron to produce short-lived positron emitting isotopes such as oxygen-15, carbon-11, nitrogen-13 and fluorine-18. Proper radiochemical facilities and advanced computer equipment are also needed. Most important, PET requires a multidisciplinary scientific team of physicists, radiochemists, mathematicians, biochemists and physicians. This review analyzes the most recent trends in the imaging technology, radiochemistry, methodology and clinical applications of positron emission tomography.

  19. Emission tomography of the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Teates, C.D.; Croft, B.Y.; Brenbridge, N.A.; Bray, S.T.; Williamson, B.R.

    1983-12-01

    Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was done on two patients with suspected renal masses. Nuclear scintigraphy was equivocal on two tumors readily identified by SPECT. Single photon tomography is cost effective and increases the reliability of nuclear scintigraphy.

  20. Applications of Beta Particle Detection for Synthesis and Usage of Radiotracers Developed for Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooraghi, Alex Abreu

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a noninvasive molecular imaging tool that requires the use of a radioactive compound or radiotracer which targets a molecular pathway of interest. We have developed and employed three beta particle radiation detection systems to advance PET. Specifically, the goals of these systems are to: 1. Automate dispensing of solutions containing a positron emitting isotope. 2. Monitor radioactivity on-chip during synthesis of a positron emitting radiotracer. 3. Assay cellular uptake on-chip of a positron emitting radiotracer. Automated protocols for measuring and dispensing solutions containing radioisotopes are essential not only for providing an optimum environment for radiation workers, but also to ensure a quantitatively accurate workflow. For the first project, we describe the development and performance of a system for automated radioactivity distribution of beta particle emitting radioisotopes such as fluorine-18 (F-18). Key to the system is a radiation detector in-line with a peristaltic pump. The system demonstrates volume accuracy within 5 % for volumes of 20 muL or greater. When considering volumes of 20 muL or greater, delivered radioactivity is in agreement with the requested radioactivity as measured with the dose calibrator. The integration of the detector and pump leads to a flexible system that can accurately dispense solutions containing F-18 in radioactivity concentrations directly produced from a cyclotron (~ 0.1-1 mCi/muL), to low activity concentrations intended for preclinical mouse scans (~ 1-10 muCi/muL), and anywhere in between. Electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) is an attractive microfluidic platform for batch synthesis of PET radiotracers. Visualization of radioisotopes on-chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. For the second project, we describe the development and performance of a Cerenkov/real-time imaging system for PET radiotracer synthesis on EWOD. We also investigate

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  3. The role of positron emission tomography in the detection of pancreatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrota, A.; Duquesnoy, N.; Paraf, A.; Kellershohn, C.

    1982-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to assess possible pancreatic disease in 100 patients. Following injection of 10-15 mCi (370-740 MBq) of /sup 11/C-L-methionine, 4-12 transverse sections 2 cm thick were obtained. In 85 patients with a definite diagnosis (45 normal, 9 acute pancreatitis, 18 chronic pancreatitis, and 13 cancer), PET showed a sensitivity of 85.0%, a specificity of 97.8%, and an accuracy of 91.8%, higher than with transmission computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography, despite relatively low spatial resolution; this can be explained by the fact that exocrine pancreatic function was altered prior to morphological change. In 22 normal subjects, 0.011 +/- 0.003% (mean +/- S.D.) of injected /sup 11/C was found in 1 ml of liver tissue and 0.015 +/- 0.005% in 1 ml of pancreatic tissue; the pancreas-to-liver concentration ratio was 1.3 +/- 0.4. Hepatic /sup 11/C concentration was identical in the four groups of patients. Pancreatic uptake of /sup 11/C-L-methionine was significantly lower in patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 13) and pancreatic carcinoma (n = 10) (p <0.001); however, it was not possible to distinguish cancer from chronic pancreatitis because the same functional alteration occurred in both.

  4. The role of positron emission tomography in the detection of pancreatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrota, A.; Duquesnoy, N.; Paraf, A.; Kellershohn, C.

    1982-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to assess possible pancreatic disease in 100 patients. Following injection of 10-15 mCi (370-740 MBq) of 11C-L-methionine, 4-12 transverse sections 2 cm thick were obtained. In 85 patients with a definite diagnosis (45 normal, 9 acute pancreatitis, 18 chronic pancreatitis, and 13 cancer), PET showed a sensitivity of 85.0%, a specificity of 97.8%, and an accuracy of 91.8%, higher than with transmission computed tomography (CT) or ultrasonography, despite relatively low spatial resolution; this can be explained by the fact that exocrine pancreatic function was altered prior to morphological change. In 22 normal subjects, 0.011 +/- 0.003% (mean +/- S.D). of injected 11C was found in 1 ml of liver tissue and 0.015 +/- 0.005% in 1 ml of pancreatic tissue; the pancreas-to-liver concentration ratio was 1.3 +/- 0.4. Hepatic 11C concentration was identical in the four groups of patients. Pancreatic uptake of 11C-L-methionine was significantly lower in patients with chronic pancreatitis (n . 13) and pancreatic carcinoma (n . 10) (p less than 0.001); however, it was not possible to distinguish cancer from chronic pancreatitis because the same functional alteration occurred in both.

  5. Detection of avascular necrosis in adults by single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Johnston, R.P.; Carrera, G.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-one adult patients with the clinical diagnosis of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head were examined with planar bone scintigraphy (high resolution collimator) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The duration of hip pain ranged from 1 day to 18 months. Risk factors (including steroids, renal transplantation, alcoholism, and trauma) were present in 17 cases. A final diagnosis of AVN (20 hips), osteochondral facture, or stress fracture, was established for 17 patients. The 4 remaining patients, who were radiographically normal and did not complain of pain 3 months later, were thought to have no significant bone pathology. SPECT and planar bone scintigraphy were reported as positive for AVN only if a photopenic bony defect could be identified. In particular, uniformly increased activity throughout the femoral head was not considered to be diagnostic of AVN. The authors conclude that by identifying a photopenic defect which is not evident on planar bone scintigraphy, SPECT can contribute to accurate diagnosis of AVN.

  6. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  7. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed tomography system. (a) Identification. An emission computed tomography system is a device intended to detect...

  8. A follow-up analysis of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in detecting hidden malignancies at the time of diagnosis of membranous nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhonglin; Wang, Shuxia; Huang, Yanlin; Liang, Xinling; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is the most common kidney disease reported in a variety of malignant diseases. Search for an occult malignancy in MN has presented special challenges. 124 MN patients with a physical examination not suspicious for cancer underwent screening for an occult malignancy with either 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scanning (n = 49) or conventional screening (n = 75) at the time of diagnosis of MN, and were followed up (median,28 months). 154 patients who refused to undergo any screening were followed up (median, 30 months). In FDG-PET/CT cohort, 5 (10.20%) patients were screened and confirmed as malignancy, in contrast, 1 (1.33%) patient in conventional screening cohort. During follow-up, none of malignancy was detected in FDG-PET/CT cohort, 3(4.05%) patients in conventional screening cohort, and 8(5.19%) patients in no-screening cohort. All 6 cases of cancer were detected at early stages and underwent curative resection, and after the resection, proteinuria decreased. In contrast, 11 cases of cancer detected during follow-up died without any remission of proteinuria. These preliminary data provide the first evidence for a potential cancer surveillance that the malignancy screening either through conventional or by PET-CT at the diagnosis of MN led to an early diagnosis and curative treatment. PMID:27009881

  9. Detection of bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography versus bone marrow biopsy.

    PubMed

    Gheysens, Olivier; Thielemans, Sanne; Morscio, Julie; Boeckx, Nancy; Goffin, Karolien E; Deroose, Christophe M; Sagaert, Xavier; Wlodarska, Iwona; Verhoef, Gregor; Dierickx, Daan; Tousseyn, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Detecting bone marrow involvement (BMI) in lymphoma is important as it adversely affects stage. Bone marrow biopsy (BMB) remains the standard to detect BMI but is prone to sampling error. We retrospectively investigated whether (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET/CT) could identify BMI in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) with sufficient accuracy in comparison with staging BMB. Twenty-five patients diagnosed with PTLD who underwent (18)F-FDG-PET/CT and BMB within one month were evaluated. Based on our criteria, six patients (24%) were considered positive for BMI on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to one by BMB. Although we cannot completely exclude false positive results on (18)F-FDG-PET/CT, our data indicate a significantly higher sensitivity of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT compared to BMB (100% vs 17%) but similar specificity. These data confirm the high diagnostic performance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT for detecting BMI, but prospective studies are needed to determine whether (18)F-FDG-PET/CT could indeed replace staging BMB in PTLD. PMID:26854937

  10. Instrumentation in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a three-dimensional medical imaging technique that noninvasively measures the concentration of radiopharmaceuticals in the body that are labeled with positron emitters. With the proper compounds, PET can be used to measure metabolism, blood flow, or other physiological values in vivo. The technique is based on the physics of positron annihilation and detection and the mathematical formulations developed for x-ray computed tomography. Modern PET systems can provide three-dimensional images of the brain, the heart, and other internal organs with resolutions on the order of 4 to 6 mm. With the selectivity provided by a choice of injected compounds, PET has the power to provide unique diagnostic information that is not available with any other imaging modality. This is the first five reports on the nature and uses of PET that have been prepared for the American Medical Association's Council on Scientific Affairs by an authoritative panel.

  11. Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lameka, Katherine; Farwell, Michael D; Ichise, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a minimally invasive imaging procedure with a wide range of clinical and research applications. PET allows for the three-dimensional mapping of administered positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (for imaging glucose metabolism). PET enables the study of biologic function in both health and disease, in contrast to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), that are more suited to study a body's morphologic changes, although functional MRI can also be used to study certain brain functions by measuring blood flow changes during task performance. This chapter first provides an overview of the basic physics principles and instrumentation behind PET methodology, with an introduction to the merits of merging functional PET imaging with anatomic CT or MRI imaging. We then focus on clinical neurologic disorders, and reference research on relevant PET radiopharmaceuticals when applicable. We then provide an overview of PET scan interpretation and findings in several specific neurologic disorders such as dementias, epilepsy, movement disorders, infection, cerebrovascular disorders, and brain tumors. PMID:27432667

  12. Detection rate of recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Treglia, Giorgio; Villani, Maria Felicia; Giordano, Alessandro; Rufini, Vittoria

    2012-12-01

    Several studies evaluated the diagnostic performance of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in detecting recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) with conflicting results. Aim of our study is to meta-analyze published data about this topic. A comprehensive computer literature search of studies published in PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Embase databases through December 2011 and regarding FDG PET or PET/CT in patients with suspected recurrent MTC was carried out. Pooled detection rate (DR) on a per patient-based analysis was calculated to measure the diagnostic performance of FDG PET and PET/CT in this setting. A sub-analysis considering PET device used, serum calcitonin, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), calcitonin doubling time (CTDT), and CEA doubling time (CEADT) values was also performed. Twenty-four studies comprising 538 patients with suspected recurrent MTC were included. DR of FDG PET or PET/CT in suspected recurrent MTC on a per patient-based analysis was 59 % (95 % confidence interval: 54-63 %). Heterogeneity between the studies was revealed. DR increased in patients with serum calcitonin ≥ 1,000 ng/L (75 %), CEA ≥ 5 ng/ml (69 %), CTDT <12 months (76 %), and CEADT <24 months (91 %). In patients with suspected recurrent MTC FDG PET and PET/CT are associated with a non-optimal DR since about 40 % of suspected recurrent MTC remain usually unidentified. However, FDG PET and PET/CT could modify the patient management in a certain number of recurrent MTC because these methods are often performed after negative conventional imaging studies. DR of FDG PET and PET/CT increases in patients with higher calcitonin and CEA values and lower CTDT and CEADT values, suggesting that these imaging methods could be very helpful in patients with more aggressive disease. PMID:22527889

  13. 68Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan in the detection of bone metastases in pediatric neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Reema; Shukla, Jaya; Bansal, Deepak; Sodhi, Kushaljit; Bhattacharya, Anish; Marwaha, Ram Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of 68Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan for the detection of bone metastases in pediatric neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and to compare it with CT scan. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients (18 were males and 12 were females; age range: 1-18 years; mean age 7.6 years) with histologically confirmed NETs referred to our department were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT scan at the time of diagnosis for primary staging. Contrast enhanced CT (CECT) performed at the time of PET scan acquisition was used for comparison with PET data. Imaging results were analyzed on a per-patient and on a per-lesion basis. Clinical follow-up of all patients and repeat PET/CT imaging (n = 10) was taken as the reference standard. Results: Out of the 30 patients, 17 had no evidence of bone metastases on any imaging modality or on clinical follow-up while the rest of 13 patients showed evidence of bone metastases (nine showing positivity both on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET and CT scan while four showing positivity only on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET). Compared with CT scan, 68Ga-DOTATATE PET detected bone metastases at a significantly higher rate (P = 0.0039). On a per lesion analysis, out of a total of 225 lesions detected by 68Ga-DOTATATE PET, only 84 lesions could be detected by CT scan. Conclusion: 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT scan is more useful than CECT scan for the early detection of bone metastases in pediatric NETs. PMID:24591776

  14. Endothelial Dysfunction is Associated with Occult Coronary Artery Disease Detected by Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kulshreshtha, Ambar; Zheng, Yan; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Veledar, Emir; Votaw, John; Uphoff, Irina; Bremner, Douglas J.; Goldberg, Jack; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Objective Silent myocardial ischemia is common in asymptomatic subjects without a prior history of coronary artery disease (CAD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Our objective was to determine whether endothelial dysfunction is associated with silent myocardial ischemia and whether the association is independent of genetic and familial factors. Material and methods We examined 416 male monozygotic and dizygotic twins aged 47 to 63 years, free of symptomatic CAD. Subclinical ischemia was diagnosed by [13N] ammonia positron emission tomography at rest and after adenosine stress. Endothelial function was measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Generalized estimating equations were used for analysis. Results Fixed perfusion defects were found in 24 (6%) twins and reversible perfusion defects in 90 (22%) twins, indicating subclinical ischemia. There was an inverse correlation between FMD and the reversible perfusion defect score (r = - 0.14, p=0.01) but not the fixed defect score (r= -0.017, p=0.73). From the lowest to the highest quartile of FMD, the prevalence of reversible defects decreased 28% to 14%, p=0.008. In multivariable analysis, reversible defects were significantly associated with each quartile of decreasing FMD (OR =1.3; 95% 1.1, 2.5). In 54 twin pairs discordant for endothelial dysfunction (FMD ≤ 7% dilation from baseline), twins with endothelial dysfunction had 9% higher likelihood of having perfusion defects than their co-twins without endothelial dysfunction (p=0.041). Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction is independently associated with silent ischemia and this association is not confounded by genetic or other shared familial factors. PMID:25414815

  15. Added Value of Using a Cocktail of F-18 Sodium Fluoride and F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose in Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Detecting Bony Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hung-Pin; Hu, Chin; Yu, Chang-Ching; Huang, Tsung-Chi; Peng, Nan-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current nuclear imaging of the skeletal system is achieved using technetium-99m (Tc-99m) methylene diphosphonate (MDP), F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF), or F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). However, comparisons of these are rare in the literature. We present a case of a 51-year-old female with suspicious lung cancer due to main symptoms of dyspnea, nonproductive cough, and pleural pain. Tc-99m MDP whole-body bone scan (WBBS) showed multiple bony metastases. Five days later, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images using both F-18 NaF and a cocktail of F-18 NaF and F-18 FDG were obtained on the same day 2 hours apart. The former showed more foci and precisely showed bony lesions compared to those obtained using Tc-99m MDP WBBS. However, the latter demonstrated more extensive radiotracer uptake, especially in osteolytic lesions, and additional soft tissue lesions in the left axillary and surpraclavicular nodes as well as the left pleura. Surgical biopsy was performed in left axillary nodes, and the metastatic carcinoma was found to be of breast origin. This case demonstrated that a cocktail of F-18 NaF and F-18 FDG could be useful in PET/CT for not only detecting more skeletal lesions but also guiding biopsies accurately to the affected tissue. PMID:25837761

  16. Positron emission tomography wrist detector

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois

    2006-08-15

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal representing a time-of-occurrence of an annihilation event, generating an address signal representing a channel detecting the annihilation event, and generating a channel signal including the time and address signals. The method also includes generating a composite signal including the channel signal and another similarly generated channel signal concerning another annihilation event. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information includes a time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator. The time signal is asynchronous and the address signal is synchronous to a clock signal. A PET scanner includes a scintillation array, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoders include the time signal generator, address signal generator, channel signal generator, and composite signal generator.

  17. Detecting primary bladder cancer using delayed 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging after forced diuresis

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Laura S; Fioole-Bruining, Annemarie; Vegt, Erik; Vogel, Wouter V; van Rhijn, Bas WG; Horenblas, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of delayed pelvic 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography combined with the computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging, according to a standardized protocol including, pre-hydration and forced diuresis, for the detection of primary bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 38 consecutive patients with primary cT1-4 bladder cancer. They underwent standard FDG-PET/CT followed by delayed pelvic imaging after administration of 20 mg furosemide intravenously and extra oral water intake of 0.5 L. Two observers, blinded for patient data, scored both image sets for tumor visibility using a 3-point ordinal scale: (1) negative; (2) indeterminate; (3) positive. FDG-PET/CT findings were compared with histopathology and/or follow-up imaging. Results: The procedure was completed successfully in 37/38 patients and the reference standard revealed a bladder tumor in 26/37 patients. Delayed PET/CT images showed reduction of urinary bladder activity to (near) background levels in 17 of 37 cases (45.9%). Standard PET/CT detected hyper-metabolic bladder lesions in 15/37 patients (40.5%) of which 8 were indeterminate. Delayed FDG-PET/CT showed hyper-metabolic bladder lesions in 30/37 (81.1%) patients, of which 5 were indeterminate. When indeterminate lesions were considered positive, the sensitivity of standard and delayed PET/CT was 46% versus 88%, respectively. The specificity was 72% versus 36%. When indeterminate lesions were considered negative, the sensitivity of standard and delayed PET/CT was 23% and 85%. The specificity was 93% versus 73%. Conclusions: Our data suggest that delayed pelvic FDG-PET/CT imaging after forced detects more primary bladder tumors than standard FDG-PET/CT protocols. However, indeterminate bladder lesions on delayed PET/CT remain a problem and should be interpreted cautiously in order to avoid false positive results. PMID:23919066

  18. Skeletal muscle metastases as the initial manifestation of an unknown primary lung cancer detected on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Navneet; Harisankar, Chidambaram Natarajan Balasubramanian; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle metastasis as the initial presentation of the unknown primary lung cancer is unusual. A 65-year-old male patient presented with pain and swelling of the right forearm. Fine needle aspiration of the swelling revealed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent whole body F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to identify the site of the primary malignancy. The authors present PET/CT images showing FDG-avid metastases to the skeletal muscles along with a previously unknown primary tumor in the right lung, in a patient presenting with initial muscular symptoms without any pulmonary manifestations. PMID:24019675

  19. Detection of submicron scale cracks and other surface anomalies using positron emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Thomas E.; Howell, Richard H.; Colmenares, Carlos A.

    2004-02-17

    Detection of submicron scale cracks and other mechanical and chemical surface anomalies using PET. This surface technique has sufficient sensitivity to detect single voids or pits of sub-millimeter size and single cracks or fissures of millimeter size; and single cracks or fissures of millimeter-scale length, micrometer-scale depth, and nanometer-scale length, micrometer-scale depth, and nanometer-scale width. This technique can also be applied to detect surface regions of differing chemical reactivity. It may be utilized in a scanning or survey mode to simultaneously detect such mechanical or chemical features over large interior or exterior surface areas of parts as large as about 50 cm in diameter. The technique involves exposing a surface to short-lived radioactive gas for a time period, removing the excess gas to leave a partial monolayer, determining the location and shape of the cracks, voids, porous regions, etc., and calculating the width, depth, and length thereof. Detection of 0.01 mm deep cracks using a 3 mm detector resolution has been accomplished using this technique.

  20. Detection of pion-induced radioactivity by autoradiography and positron emission tomography (PET)

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, H.; Harrison, R.; Kornelsen, R. O.; Lam, G. K. Y.; Gaffney, C. C.; Goodman, G. B.; Grochowski, E.; Pate, B.

    1989-05-01

    An autoradiographic technique incorporating a new imaging system was used to detect pion-induced radioactivity in Plexiglass and the results were compared with aluminium activation and PET imaging. The activity distribution in the region of the pion-stopping peak was similar in all three cases. Another large signal in the entrance region due to in-flight interactions (/sup 12/C(..pi../minus/,..pi../minus//ital n/)/sup 11/C) was detected by autoradiography and by PET but was not reflected in the aluminium activation measurements. This new technique is capable of defining the stopping region in phantoms with a better resolution than PET scanning and is useful as a complementary technique to other methods of pion dosimetry.

  1. 64Cu-ATSM Hypoxia Positron Emission Tomography for Detection of Conduit Ischemia in an Experimental Rat Esophagectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong Yong; Kang, Won Jun; Cho, Arthur; Chae, Ju Ri; Cho, Ye Lim; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Ji Woong; Chung, Kyung Young

    2015-01-01

    Background We designed a hypoxia-imaging modality to detect ischemia of the gastric conduit after esophagectomy. Materials and Methods A rat esophagectomy model was created using 12-16-week-old, 300-350 g male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the operation group (n=6), partial gastric devascularization was performed by ligating the left gastric artery and the short gastric arteries and an esophagogastric anastomosis was performed. In the control group (n=6), the esophageal-gastric junction was incised and suturing was performed without gastric devascularization. Positron emission tomography (PET) images were taken using a microPET rodent model scanner, 24 h after the initial operation, after injection of 200 μCi 64Cu-diacetyl-bis (N4-methylsemicarbazone) (64Cu-ATSM) and pimonidazole 120 mg/kg. After microPET imaging, autoradiography and immunohistochemistry were performed. Results The PET image revealed 64Cu-ATSM uptake at the fundus in the operation group 3 h after 64Cu-ATSM injection. The maximum percentage of the injected dose per gram of tissue was higher in the operation group (0.047±0.015 vs. 0.026±0.006, p=0.021). The fundus/liver ratio was also higher in the operation group (0.541±0.126 vs. 0.278±0.049, p=0.002). Upon autoradiography, 64Cu-ATSM uptake was observed in the fundus in the operation group, and was well-correlated to that observed on the PET image. Upon immunohistochemistry, expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a and pimonidazole were significantly increased at the fundus and lesser curvature compared to the greater curvature in the operation group. Conclusion Hypoxia PET imaging with 64Cu-ATSM can detect ischemia in a rat esophagectomy model. Further clinical studies are needed to verify whether hypoxia imaging may be useful in humans. PMID:26098420

  2. Bone scintigraphy and the added value of SPECT (single photon emission tomography) in detecting skeletal lesions.

    PubMed

    Savelli, G; Maffioli, L; Maccauro, M; De Deckere, E; Bombardieri, E

    2001-03-01

    Skeletal metastases are one of the major clinical problems for the oncologist. Over the last several decades bone scintigraphy has been used extensively in detecting bone involvement since it can provide information about disease location, prognosis and the effectiveness of treatment. Bone scan offers the advantage of total body examination, and images bone lesions earlier than other techniques. In this paper the main clinical problems related to the most common applications of bone scan in breast, prostate, lung cancer and other tumours are discussed. The experience carried out at the National Cancer Institute of Milan by using bone SPECT to detect single bone metastases is reported. One hundred and eighteen patients with bone metastases (from different tumour types: breast, lung, prostate, lymphomas, etc.) were studied by planar scintigraphy, SPECT and other radiological modalities (CT, MRI or X-rays). The overall performances of bone SPECT were sensitivity: 90.5% (19/21), specificity 92.8% (90/97), positive predictive value 73% (19/26), negative predictive value 97.8% (90/92), accuracy 92.4% (109/118). Considering breast cancer, the most frequent pathology in our series, and the lumbar spinal tract, the most common skeletal segment involved, the figures of merit of SPECT were: sensitivity 100% (4/4), specificity 95.3% (41/43), positive predictive value 66.7% (4/6), negative predictive value 100% (41/41), accuracy 95.7% (45/47). In conclusion bone SPECT showed very good performances, in particular improving the predictive value of planar scan in the diagnosis of vertebral metastases. PMID:11456373

  3. Instrumentation for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Budinger, T F; Derenzo, S E; Huesman, R H

    1984-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with a spatial resolution of 2 mm full width at half maximum for quantitation in regions of interest 4 mm in diameter will become possible with the development of detectors that achieve ultrahigh resolution. Improved resolution will be possible using solid-state photodetectors for crystal identification or photomultiplier tubes with many small electron multipliers . Temporal resolution of 2 seconds and gating of cyclic events can be accomplished if statistical requirements are met. The major physical considerations in achieving high-resolution positron emission tomography are the degradation in resolution resulting from positron range, emission angle, parallax error, detector sampling density, the sensitivity of various detector materials and packing schemes, and the trade off between temporal resolution and statistical accuracy. The accuracy of data required for physiological models depends primarily on the fidelity of spatial sampling independent of statistical constraints. PMID:6611124

  4. A Peptide-Based Positron Emission Tomography Probe for In Vivo Detection of Caspase Activity in Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hight, Matthew R.; Cheung, Yiu-Yin; Nickels, Michael L.; Dawson, Eric S.; Zhao, Ping; Saleh, Samir; Buck, Jason R.; Tang, Dewei; Washington, M. Kay; Coffey, Robert J.; Manning, H. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, can be leveraged as a surrogate measure of response to therapeutic interventions in medicine. Cysteine aspartic acid-specific proteases, or caspases, are essential determinants of apoptosis signaling cascades and represent promising targets for molecular imaging. Here, we report development and in vivo validation of [18F]4-fluorobenzylcarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone ([18F]FB-VAD-FMK), a novel peptide-based molecular probe suitable for quantification of caspase activity in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET). Experimental Design Supported by molecular modeling studies and subsequent in vitro assays suggesting probe feasibility the labeled pan-caspase inhibitory peptide, [18F]FB-VAD-FMK, was produced in high radiochemical yield and purity using a simple two-step, radiofluorination. The biodistribution of [18F]FB-VAD-FMK in normal tissue and its efficacy to predict response to molecularly targeted therapy in tumors was evaluated using microPET imaging of mouse models of human colorectal cancer (CRC). Results Accumulation of [18F]FB-VAD-FMK was found to agree with elevated caspase-3 activity in response to Aurora B kinase inhibition as well as a multi-drug regimen that combined an inhibitor of mutant BRAF and a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor in V600EBRAF colon cancer. In the latter setting, [18F]FB-VAD-FMK PET was also elevated in the tumors of cohorts that exhibited reduction in size. Conclusions These studies illuminate [18F]FB-VAD-FMK as a promising PET imaging probe to detect apoptosis in tumors and as a novel, potentially translatable biomarker for predicting response to personalized medicine. PMID:24573549

  5. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  6. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Townsend, David W

    2008-05-01

    Accurate anatomical localization of functional abnormalities obtained with the use of positron emission tomography (PET) is known to be problematic. Although tracers such as (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) visualize certain normal anatomical structures, the spatial resolution is generally inadequate for accurate anatomic localization of pathology. Combining PET with a high-resolution anatomical imaging modality such as computed tomography (CT) can resolve the localization issue as long as the images from the two modalities are accurately coregistered. However, software-based registration techniques have difficulty accounting for differences in patient positioning and involuntary movement of internal organs, often necessitating labor-intensive nonlinear mapping that may not converge to a satisfactory result. Acquiring both CT and PET images in the same scanner obviates the need for software registration and routinely provides accurately aligned images of anatomy and function in a single scan. A CT scanner positioned in line with a PET scanner and with a common patient couch and operating console has provided a practical solution to anatomical and functional image registration. Axial translation of the couch between the 2 modalities enables both CT and PET data to be acquired during a single imaging session. In addition, the CT images can be used to generate essentially noiseless attenuation correction factors for the PET emission data. By minimizing patient movement between the CT and PET scans and accounting for the axial separation of the two modalities, accurately registered anatomical and functional images can be obtained. Since the introduction of the first PET/CT prototype more than 6 years ago, numerous patients with cancer have been scanned on commercial PET/CT devices worldwide. The commercial designs feature multidetector spiral CT and high-performance PET components. Experience has demonstrated an increased level of accuracy and confidence in the

  7. Positron emission tomography and autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazziotta, J.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This a text on cerebral and myocardial imaging using positron emission tomography and autoradiography. Authorities in nuclear medicine and biophysics define the central principles of these complex and rapidly evolving imagine technologies-their theoretical foundations, the nature of the biochemical events being measured, the basis for constructing tracer kinetic models, the criteria governing radiopharmaceutical design, and the rationale for PET in the clinical setting. After reviewing the characteristics of cerebral and myocardial hemodynamics, transport, and metabolism, the contributors detail the theory of PET and autoradiography, the instrumentation required, and the procedures involved.

  8. [Fundamentals of positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Ostertag, H

    1989-07-01

    Positron emission tomography is a modern radionuclide method of measuring physiological quantities or metabolic parameters in vivo. The method is based on: (1) radioactive labelling with positron emitters; (2) the coincidence technique for the measurement of the annihilation radiation following positron decay; (3) analysis of the data measured using biological models. The basic aspects and problems of the method are discussed. The main fields of future research are the synthesis of new labelled compounds and the development of mathematical models of the biological processes to be investigated. PMID:2667029

  9. Compartmental Modeling in Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammertsma, Adriaan A.

    This chapter provides an overview of the basic principles of compartmental modeling as it is being applied to the quantitative analysis of positron emission tomography (PET) studies. Measurement of blood flow (perfusion) is used as an example of a single tissue compartment model and receptor studies are discussed in relation to a two tissue compartment model. Emphasis is placed on the accurate measurement of both arterial whole blood and metabolite-corrected plasma input functions. Reference tissue models are introduced as a noninvasive tool to investigate neuroreceptor studies. Finally, parametric methods are introduced in which calculations are performed at a voxel level.

  10. Single-photon emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Goffin, Karolien; van Laere, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a functional nuclear imaging technique that allows visualization and quantification of different in vivo physiologic and pathologic features of brain neurobiology. It has been used for many years in diagnosis of several neurologic and psychiatric disorders. In this chapter, we discuss the current state-of-the-art of SPECT imaging of brain perfusion and dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging. Brain perfusion SPECT imaging plays an important role in the localization of the seizure onset zone in patients with refractory epilepsy. In cerebrovascular disease, it can be useful in determining the cerebrovascular reserve. After traumatic brain injury, SPECT has shown perfusion abnormalities despite normal morphology. In the context of organ donation, the diagnosis of brain death can be made with high accuracy. In neurodegeneration, while amyloid or (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are the nuclear diagnostic tools of preference for early and differential diagnosis of dementia, perfusion SPECT imaging can be useful, albeit with slightly lower accuracy. SPECT imaging of the dopamine transporter system is widely available in Europe and Asia, but since recently also in the USA, and has been accepted as an important diagnostic tool in the early and differential diagnosis of parkinsonism in patients with unclear clinical features. The combination of perfusion SPECT (or FDG-PET) and DAT imaging provides differential diagnosis between idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Parkinson-plus syndromes, dementia with Lewy bodies, and essential tremor. PMID:27432669

  11. Development of novel emission tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Geng

    In recent years, small animals, such as mice and rats, have been widely used as subjects of study in biomedical research while molecular biology and imaging techniques open new opportunities to investigate disease model. With the help of medical imaging techniques, researchers can investigate underlying mechanisms inside the small animal, which are useful for both early diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Based on tracer principle single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has increased popularity in small animal imaging due to its higher spatial resolution and variety of single-photon emitting radionuclides. Since the image quality strongly depends on the detector properties, both scintillation and semiconductor detectors are under active investigation for high resolution X-ray and gamma ray photon detection. The desired detector properties include high intrinsic spatial resolution, high energy resolution, and high detection efficiency. In this thesis study, we have made extensive efforts to develop novel emission tomography system, and evaluate the use of both semiconductor and ultra-high resolution scintillation detectors for small animal imaging. This thesis work includes the following three areas. Firstly, we have developed a novel energy-resolved photon counting (ERPC) detector. With the benefits of high energy resolution, high spatial resolution, flexible detection area, and a wide dynamic range of 27--200keV, ERPC detector is well-suited for small animal SPECT applications. For prototype ERPC detector excellent imaging (˜350microm) and spectroscopic performance (4keV Co-57 122keV) has been demonstrated in preliminary study. Secondly, to further improve spatial resolution to hundred-micron level, an ultra-high resolution Intensified EMCCD (I-EMCCD) detector has been designed and evaluated. This detector consists of the newly developed electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) sensor, columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, and an electrostatic de-magnifier (DM) tube

  12. Single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Piez, C.W. Jr.; Holman, B.L.

    1985-07-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is becoming an increasingly important part of routine clinical nuclear medicine. By providing tomographic reconstructions in multiple planes through the patient, SPECT expands the clinical applications in nuclear medicine as well as providing better contrast, edge definition and separation of target from background activities. Imaging techniques have been developed for the evaluation of regional cerebral blood flow using radiolabeled amines. Thus, cerebral functional imaging can be used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction, cerebral vascular disease, dementia and epilepsy. SPECT plays a complementary role in the evaluation of coronary artery disease, particularly when it is coupled with thallium-201 and exercise testing. SPECT extends our diagnostic capabilities in additional areas, such as liver and bone scintigraphy as well as tumor imaging with gallium-67.

  13. Fan Beam Emission Tomography for Laminar Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivathanu, Yudaya; Lim, Jongmook; Feikema, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining information on the instantaneous structure of turbulent and transient flames is important in a wide variety of applications such as fire safety, pollution reduction, flame spread studies, and model validation. Durao et al. has reviewed the different methods of obtaining structure information in reacting flows. These include Tunable Laser Absorption Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Emission Spectroscopy to mention a few. Most flames emit significant radiation signatures that are used in various applications such as fire detection, light-off detection, flame diagnostics, etc. Radiation signatures can be utilized to maximum advantage for determining structural information in turbulent flows. Emission spectroscopy is most advantageous in the infrared regions of the spectra, principally because these emission lines arise from transitions in the fundamental bands of stable species such as CO2 and H2O. Based on the above, the objective of this work was to develop a fan beam emission tomography system to obtain the local scalar properties such as temperature and mole fractions of major gas species from path integrated multi-wavelength infrared radiation measurements.

  14. [Value of positron emission tomography and computer tomography (PET/CT) for urologic malignancies].

    PubMed

    Boujelbene, N; Prior, J O; Boubaker, A; Azria, D; Schaffer, M; Gez, E; Jichlinski, P; Meuwly, J-Y; Mirimanoff, R O; Ozsahin, M; Zouhair, A

    2011-07-01

    Positron emission tomography is a functional imaging technique that allows the detection of the regional metabolic rate, and is often coupled with other morphological imaging technique such as computed tomography. The rationale for its use is based on the clearly demonstrated fact that functional changes in tumor processes happen before morphological changes. Its introduction to the clinical practice added a new dimension in conventional imaging techniques. This review presents the current and proposed indications of the use of positron emission/computed tomography for prostate, bladder and testes, and the potential role of this exam in radiotherapy planning. PMID:21507695

  15. Compact conscious animal positron emission tomography scanner

    DOEpatents

    Schyler, David J.; O'Connor, Paul; Woody, Craig; Junnarkar, Sachin Shrirang; Radeka, Veljko; Vaska, Paul; Pratte, Jean-Francois; Volkow, Nora

    2006-10-24

    A method of serially transferring annihilation information in a compact positron emission tomography (PET) scanner includes generating a time signal for an event, generating an address signal representing a detecting channel, generating a detector channel signal including the time and address signals, and generating a composite signal including the channel signal and similarly generated signals. The composite signal includes events from detectors in a block and is serially output. An apparatus that serially transfers annihilation information from a block includes time signal generators for detectors in a block and an address and channel signal generator. The PET scanner includes a ring tomograph that mounts onto a portion of an animal, which includes opposing block pairs. Each of the blocks in a block pair includes a scintillator layer, detection array, front-end array, and a serial encoder. The serial encoder includes time signal generators and an address signal and channel signal generator.

  16. Imaging tumour hypoxia with positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, I N; Manavaki, R; Blower, P J; West, C; Williams, K J; Harris, A L; Domarkas, J; Lord, S; Baldry, C; Gilbert, F J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia, a hallmark of most solid tumours, is a negative prognostic factor due to its association with an aggressive tumour phenotype and therapeutic resistance. Given its prominent role in oncology, accurate detection of hypoxia is important, as it impacts on prognosis and could influence treatment planning. A variety of approaches have been explored over the years for detecting and monitoring changes in hypoxia in tumours, including biological markers and noninvasive imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the preferred method for imaging tumour hypoxia due to its high specificity and sensitivity to probe physiological processes in vivo, as well as the ability to provide information about intracellular oxygenation levels. This review provides an overview of imaging hypoxia with PET, with an emphasis on the advantages and limitations of the currently available hypoxia radiotracers. PMID:25514380

  17. Estimation of linear functionals in emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruc, A.

    1995-08-01

    In emission tomography, the spatial distribution of a radioactive tracer is estimated from a finite sample of externally-detected photons. We present an algorithm-independent theory of statistical accuracy attainable in emission tomography that makes minimal assumptions about the underlying image. Let f denote the tracer density as a function of position (i.e., f is the image being estimated). We consider the problem of estimating the linear functional {Phi}(f) {triple_bond} {integral}{phi}(x)f(x) dx, where {phi} is a smooth function, from n independent observations identically distributed according to the Radon transform of f. Assuming only that f is bounded above and below away from 0, we construct statistically efficient estimators for {Phi}(f). By definition, the variance of the efficient estimator is a best-possible lower bound (depending on and f) on the variance of unbiased estimators of {Phi}(f). Our results show that, in general, the efficient estimator will have a smaller variance than the standard estimator based on the filtered-backprojection reconstruction algorithm. The improvement in performance is obtained by exploiting the range properties of the Radon transform.

  18. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Updated:Sep 11,2015 ... Persantine) or dobutamine. The tests may take between 2 and 2 1/2 hours. What happens after ...

  19. Tumor Quantification in Clinical Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Bading, James; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used extensively in clinical oncology for tumor detection, staging and therapy response assessment. Quantitative measurements of tumor uptake, usually in the form of standardized uptake values (SUVs), have enhanced or replaced qualitative interpretation. In this paper we review the current status of tumor quantification methods and their applications to clinical oncology. Factors that impede quantitative assessment and limit its accuracy and reproducibility are summarized, with special emphasis on SUV analysis. We describe current efforts to improve the accuracy of tumor uptake measurements, characterize overall metabolic tumor burden and heterogeneity of tumor uptake, and account for the effects of image noise. We also summarize recent developments in PET instrumentation and image reconstruction and their impact on tumor quantification. Finally, we offer our assessment of the current development needs in PET tumor quantification, including practical techniques for fully quantitative, pharmacokinetic measurements. PMID:24312151

  20. A BGO/GSO position sensitive block detector for a high resolution positron emission tomography with depth of interaction detection capability

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.

    1996-12-31

    We developed a position sensitive block detector with depth of interaction detection capability for positron emission tomography (PET). The detector consists of 6 x 8 array of GSO scintillators, 6 x 8 array of BGO scintillators and two dual photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The GSO scintillators are optically coupled to front surface of the BGO scintillators. The position of 6 x 8 scintillators are determined by the Anger principle and depth of interaction position is determined by using the pulse shape analysis of GSOs and BGOs. Performance of the block detector was measured. Position distribution of the developed BGO/GSO block detector was little distorted. However the separation of the spots was still enough to distinguish the scintillators in transaxial and axial directions. Since pulse shape distribution using a developed simple pulse shape analyzer had two peaks, it is possible to separate the GSOs and BGOs for depth of interaction detection. With these results, a high resolution PET with depth of interaction detection capability will be possible using the developed BGO/GSO block detectors.

  1. Recent Developments in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Instrumentation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors.

  2. Probable Syphilitic Aortitis Documented by Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Joseph Davey, Dvora; Acosta, Lourdes Del Rocio Carrera; Gupta, Pawan; Konda, Kelika A; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to aid in diagnosis of inflammatory and infectious disease. We describe the case of a patient with early latent syphilis with increased metabolic activity along the aorta detected via PET, suggesting probable aortitis. Three months after treatment, the PET showed apparent resolution of the aortitis. PMID:26859808

  3. Detection of vulnerable atherosclerosis plaques with a dual-modal single-photon-emission computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging probe targeting apoptotic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dengfeng; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Chunfu; Tan, Hui; Wang, Cong; Pang, Lifang; Shi, Hongcheng

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS), especially the vulnerable AS plaque rupture-induced acute obstructive vascular disease, is a leading cause of death. Accordingly, there is a need for an effective method to draw accurate predictions about AS progression and plaque vulnerability. Herein we report on an approach to constructing a hybrid nanoparticle system using a single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) multimodal probe, aiming for a comprehensive evaluation of AS progression by achieving high sensitivity along with high resolution. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) was covered by aminated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and carboxylated PEG simultaneously and then functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentacetate acid for (99m)Tc coordination and subsequently Annexin V for targeting apoptotic macrophages abundant in vulnerable plaques. The in vivo accumulations of imaging probe reflected by SPECT and MRI were consistent and accurate in highlighting lesions. Intense radioactive signals detected by SPECT facilitated focus recognization and quantification, while USPIO-based T2-weighted MRI improved the focal localization and volumetry of AS plaques. For subsequent ex vivo planar images, targeting effects were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry, including CD-68 and TUNEL staining; meanwhile, the degree of concentration was proven to be statistically correlated with the Oil Red O staining results. In conclusion, these results indicated that the Annexin V-modified hybrid nanoparticle system specifically targeted the vulnerable AS plaques containing apoptotic macrophages and could be of great value in the invasively accurate detection of vulnerable plaques. PMID:25569777

  4. Comparison of Positron Emission Tomography Scanning and Sentinel Node Biopsy in the Detection of Inguinal Node Metastases in Patients With Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena; Castellano, Isabella; Cassoni, Paola; Ricardi, Umberto; Munoz, Fernando; Racca, Patrizia; Contu, Viviana; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Morino, Mario; Mussa, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Background: Inguinal lymph node metastases in patients with anal cancer are an independent prognostic factor for local failure and overall mortality. Inguinal lymph node status can be adequately assessed with sentinel node biopsy, and the radiotherapy strategy can subsequently be changed. We compared this technique vs. dedicated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) to determine which was the better tool for staging inguinal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: In our department, 27 patients (9 men and 18 women) underwent both inguinal sentinel node biopsy and PET-CT. PET-CT was performed before treatment and then at 1 and 3 months after treatment. Results: PET-CT scans detected no inguinal metastases in 20 of 27 patients and metastases in the remaining 7. Histologic analysis of the sentinel lymph node detected metastases in only three patients (four PET-CT false positives). HIV status was not found to influence the results. None of the patients negative at sentinel node biopsy developed metastases during the follow-up period. PET-CT had a sensitivity of 100%, with a negative predictive value of 100%. Owing to the high number of false positives, PET-CT specificity was 83%, and positive predictive value was 43%. Conclusions: In this series of patients with anal cancer, inguinal sentinel node biopsy was superior to PET-CT for staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  5. Comparison of computed tomographic angiography versus rubidium-82 positron emission tomography for the detection of patients with anatomical coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Benjamin JW; Dennie, Carole; Hoffmann, Udo; So, Derek; deKemp, Robert A; Ruddy, Terrence D; Beanlands, Rob S

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The present study compared computed tomo-graphic coronary angiography (CTA) and positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection of significant anatomical coronary artery stenosis as defined by conventional invasive coronary angiography (CICA). METHODS: The study protocol was approved by the local ethics board, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Of the 26 patients (mean age 57±9 years, 18 men) who prospectively underwent CTA and rubidium-82 PET before CICA, 24 patients had a history of chest pain. Images were interpreted by expert readers and assessed for the presence of anatomically significant coronary stenosis (50% luminal diameter stenosis or greater) or myocardial perfusion defects. Diagnostic test characteristics were analyzed using patient-based, territory-based, vessel-based and segment-based analyses. RESULTS: In the 24 patients referred for chest pain, CTA had similar sensitivity to PET, but was more specific (sensitivity 95% [95% CI 72% to 100%] versus 95% [95% CI 72% to 100%], respectively; specificity 100% [95% CI 46% to 100%] versus 60% [95% CI 17% to 93%], respectively) in the detection of patients with anatomical coronary artery stenosis of 50% or greater. On a per-segment basis of all 26 patients, CTA had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 72%, 99%, 91% and 95%, respectively, in all coronary segments. CONCLUSIONS: Coronary CTA has a similar sensitivity and specificity to rubidium-82 PET for the identification of patients with significant anatomical coronary artery disease. PMID:17703259

  6. Neural networks combined with region growing techniques for tumor detection in [18F]-fluorothymidine dynamic positron emission tomography breast cancer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cseh, Zoltan; Kenny, Laura; Swingland, James; Bose, Subrata; Turheimer, Federico E.

    2013-03-01

    Early detection and precise localization of malignant tumors has been a primary challenge in medical imaging in recent years. Functional modalities play a continuously increasing role in these efforts. Image segmentation algorithms which enable automatic, accurate tumor visualization and quantification on noisy positron emission tomography (PET) images would significantly improve the quality of treatment planning processes and in turn, the success of treatments. In this work a novel multistep method has been applied in order to identify tumor regions in 4D dynamic [18F] fluorothymidine (FLT) PET studies of patients with locally advanced breast cancer. In order to eliminate the effect of inherently detectable high inhomogeneity inside tumors, specific voxel-kinetic classes were initially introduced by finding characteristic FLT-uptake curves with K-means algorithm on a set of voxels collected from each tumor. Image voxel sets were then split based on voxel time-activity curve (TAC) similarities, and models were generated separately on each voxel set. At first, artificial neural networks, in comparison with linear classification algorithms were applied to distinguish tumor and healthy regions relying on the characteristics of TACs of the individual voxels. The outputs of the best model with very high specificity were then used as input seeds for region shrinking and growing techniques, the application of which considerably enhanced the sensitivity and specificity (78.65% +/- 0.65% and 98.98% +/- 0.03%, respectively) of the final image segmentation model.

  7. Diagnostic Performance of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Using Fluorine-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose in Detecting Locoregional Nodal Involvement in Patients with Anal Canal Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Annunziata, Salvatore; Treglia, Giorgio; Sadeghi, Ramin; Ayati, Narjes; Giovanella, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in detecting nodal involvement in patients with anal canal cancer (ACC) has been investigated by several studies with conflicting results. The aim of our study is to systematically review and meta-analyze published data about this topic. Methods. A comprehensive computer literature search of PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Embase databases was carried out on July 10 to find relevant articles concerning the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET in detecting locoregional nodal involvement in patients with ACC. No language restriction was used. Pooled diagnostic performance on a lesion-based analysis was calculated. Results. Seven retrospective and five prospective studies have been reviewed. Six studies allowed assessing pooled sensitivity; five studies allowed assessing pooled specificity. Sensitivity and specificity values of FDG-PET/CT on a lesion-based analysis ranged from 31 to 100% and from 53 to 98%, with pooled estimates of 56% (95% CI: 45–67%) and 90% (95% CI: 86–93%), respectively. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis demonstrates that FDG-PET is a specific diagnostic tool in detecting locoregional lymph node involvement in patients with ACC. Low sensitivity is a major concern; however, higher sensitivity could be reached combining FDG-PET with MR scan. PMID:24672298

  8. Deformable template models for emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Amit, Y. . Dept. of Statistics); Manbeck, K.M. . Div. of Applied Mathematics)

    1993-06-01

    The reconstruction of emission tomography data is an ill-posed inverse problem and, as such, requires some form of regularization. Previous efforts to regularize the restoration process have incorporated rather general assumptions about the isotope distribution within a patient's body. Here, the authors present a theoretical and algorithmic framework in which the notion of a deformable template can be used to identify and quantify brain tumors in pediatric patients. Patient data and computer simulation experiments are presented which illustrate the performance of the deformable template approach to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  9. Can Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography Be a Substitute for Bone Marrow Biopsy in Detection of Bone Marrow Involvement in Patients with Hodgkin’s or Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma?

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, Güven; Çıkrıkçıoğlu, M. Ali; Özkan, Tuba; Karatoprak, Cumali; Ar, M. Cem; Eşkazan, Ahmet Emre; Ayer, Mesut; Cerit, Abdullah; Gözübenli, Kübra; Börkü Uysal, Betül; Erdem, Simge; Ergül, Nurhan; Tatar, Gamze; Çermik, T. Fikret

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) has become an important part of staging and treatment evaluation algorithms of lymphoma. We aimed to compare the results of PET/CT with bone marrow biopsy (BMB) with respect to bone marrow involvement (BMI) in patients with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) and aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (aNHL). Materials and Methods: The medical files of a total of 297 patients diagnosed with HL or aNHL and followed at the hematology clinics of 3 major hospitals in İstanbul between 2008 and 2012 were screened retrospectively and 161 patients with classical HL and aNHL were included in the study. The patients were referred for PET/CT and BMB at the initial staging. BMB was performed as the reference standard for the evaluation of BMI. Results: There were 61 (38%) HL and 100 (62%) aNHL patients. Concordant results were revealed between PET/CT and BMB in 126 patients (78%) (52 HL, 74 aNHL), 20 with positive PET/CT and BMB results and 106 with negative PET/CT and BMB results. There were discordant results in 35 patients (9 HL, 26 aNHL), 16 of them with positive BMB and negative PET/CT results and 19 of them with negative BMB and positive PET/CT results. Conclusion: We observed that PET/CT is effective to detect BMI, despite it alone not being sufficient to evaluate BMI in HL and aNHL. Bone marrow trephine biopsy and PET/CT should be considered as mutually complementary methods for detection of BMI in patients with lymphoma. In suspected focal involvement, combining biopsy and PET/CT might improve staging results. PMID:25912844

  10. [F-18]-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography as a tool for early detection of immunotherapy response in a murine B cell lymphoma model

    PubMed Central

    Chaise, Coralie; Itti, Emmanuel; Petegnief, Yolande; Wirquin, Evelyne; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Farcet, Jean-Pierre; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Meignan, Michel; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Molinier-Frenkel, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique which has recently been validated for the assessment of therapy response in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Our objective was to determine its value for the evaluation of immunotherapy efficacy in immunocompetent Balb/c mice injected with the A20 syngeneic B lymphoma cell line. The high level of in vitro FDG uptake by A20 cells validated the model for further imaging studies. When injected intravenously, the tumour developed as nodular lesions mostly in liver and spleen, thus mimicking the natural course of an aggressive human lymphoma. FDG-PET provided three-dimensionnal images of tumour extension including non palpable lesions, in good correlation with ex-vivo macroscopic examination. When mice were pre-immunized with an A20 cell lysate in adjuvant before tumour challenge, their significantly longer survival, compared to control mice, was associated with a lower incidence of lymphoma visualized by PET at different time points. Estimation of tumour growth and metabolism using the calculated tumour volumes and maximum standardized uptake values respectively, also demonstrated delayed lymphoma development and lower activity in the vaccinated mice. Thus, FDG-PET is a sensitive tool relevant for early detection and follow-up of internal tumours, allowing discrimination between treated and non-treated small animal cohorts without invasive intervention. PMID:17171356

  11. Advanced Instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography [PET

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1985-04-01

    This paper summarizes the physical processes and medical science goals that underlay modern instrumentation design for Positron Emission Tomography. The paper discusses design factors such as detector material, crystalphototube coupling, shielding geometry, sampling motion, electronics design, time-of-flight, and the interrelationships with quantitative accuracy, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, maximum data rates, and cost.

  12. Fasting 2-Deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose Positron Emission Tomography to Detect Metabolic Changes in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Hearts over 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Lundgrin, Erika L.; Park, Margaret M.; Sharp, Jacqueline; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Thomas, James D.; Asosingh, Kewal; Comhair, Suzy A.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Neumann, Donald R.; Davis, Laura; Graham, Brian B.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Dostanic, Iva

    2013-01-01

    Background: The development of tools to monitor the right ventricle in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is of clinical importance. PAH is associated with pathologic expression of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, which induces glycolytic metabolism and mobilization of proangiogenic progenitor (CD34+CD133+) cells. We hypothesized that PAH cardiac myocytes have a HIF-related switch to glycolytic metabolism that can be detected with fasting 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and that glucose uptake is informative for cardiac function. Methods: Six healthy control subjects and 14 patients with PAH underwent fasting FDG-PET and echocardiogram. Blood CD34+CD133+ cells and erythropoietin were measured as indicators of HIF activation. Twelve subjects in the PAH cohort underwent repeat studies 1 year later to determine if changes in FDG uptake were related to changes in echocardiographic parameters or to measures of HIF activation. Measurements and Results: FDG uptake in the right ventricle was higher in patients with PAH than in healthy control subjects and correlated with echocardiographic measures of cardiac dysfunction and circulating CD34+CD133+ cells but not erythropoietin. Among patients with PAH, FDG uptake was lower in those receiving β-adrenergic receptor blockers. Changes in FDG uptake over time were related to changes in echocardiographic parameters and CD34+CD133+ cell numbers. Immunohistochemistry of explanted PAH hearts of patients undergoing transplantation revealed that HIF-1α was present in myocyte nuclei but was weakly detectable in control hearts. Conclusions: PAH hearts have pathologic glycolytic metabolism that is quantitatively related to cardiac dysfunction over time, suggesting that metabolic imaging may be useful in therapeutic monitoring of patients. PMID:23509326

  13. 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Andrew J.; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2014-11-01

    An overview of the theory of 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography is given along with a review of the current state of the art, covering both positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). By viewing 4D image reconstruction as a matter of either linear or non-linear parameter estimation for a set of spatiotemporal functions chosen to approximately represent the radiotracer distribution, the areas of so-called ‘fully 4D’ image reconstruction and ‘direct kinetic parameter estimation’ are unified within a common framework. Many choices of linear and non-linear parameterization of these functions are considered (including the important case where the parameters have direct biological meaning), along with a review of the algorithms which are able to estimate these often non-linear parameters from emission tomography data. The other crucial components to image reconstruction (the objective function, the system model and the raw data format) are also covered, but in less detail due to the relatively straightforward extension from their corresponding components in conventional 3D image reconstruction. The key unifying concept is that maximum likelihood or maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of either linear or non-linear model parameters can be achieved in image space after carrying out a conventional expectation maximization (EM) update of the dynamic image series, using a Kullback-Leibler distance metric (comparing the modeled image values with the EM image values), to optimize the desired parameters. For MAP, an image-space penalty for regularization purposes is required. The benefits of 4D and direct reconstruction reported in the literature are reviewed, and furthermore demonstrated with simple simulation examples. It is clear that the future of reconstructing dynamic or functional emission tomography images, which often exhibit high levels of spatially correlated noise, should ideally exploit these 4D

  14. Detection and Assessment Using Positron Emission Tomography of Genetically Determined Defects in Myocardial Fatty Acid Utilization. Final report, 8/1/93-6/30/97

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Steven R.

    2000-04-09

    An approach using positron emission tomography (PET) was developed, validated and used to measure myocardial fatty acid metabolism in patients with inherited forms of heart failure. Abnormalities were correlated with the severity of the clinical illness. The approach developed was also shown to identify abnormalities in myocardial fatty acid metabolism in some patients with acquired forms of heart failure. The PET technique thus permits identification of abnormal fatty acid metabolism and provides an approach to evaluate the efficacy of interventional strategies.

  15. Positron emission tomography - a new approach to brain chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, H.G.

    1988-11-11

    Positron emission tomography permits examination of the chemistry of the brain in living beings. Until recently, positron emission tomography had been considered a research tool, but it is rapidly moving into clinical practice. This report describes the uses and applications of positron emission tomography in examinations of patients with strokes, epilepsy, malignancies, dementias, and schizophrenia and in basic studies of synaptic neurotransmission.

  16. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  17. Using GPU for Seismic Emission Tomography processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dricker, I. G.; Cooke, A. J.; Friberg, P. A.; Hellman, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic Emission Tomography (SET) is an emerging technique which is rapidly gaining popularity in both earthquake seismology and the oil and gas industry. Stacking seismic records from multiple channels of a surface seismic array with moveout correction dramatically increases the signal-to-noise ratio and allows monitoring of fine-scale microseismicity. Using SET to detect active seismic locations within the study volume requires time-shifting and stacking the trace for each seismic recording channel and node in the 3D Earth grid. Algorithmically, this implies five nested loops over space coordinates, channel lists and time. Even the most powerful PC CPUs proved impractical for this task; only rough models could be built in a reasonable period of time. Fortunately the SET computational kernel is easy to parallelize, because computations for each grid node and recording channel are independent, so we could achieve significant (of order x100) speedups on Nvidia GPUs with OpenCL. In this case study we show how progressive optimization, from Matlab to C, and on to OpenCL, improved performance. We discuss various problems encountered, give practical guidance on refactoring, and include benchmarks on several GPUs.

  18. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  19. Positron emission tomography tracers for imaging angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Ambros J.; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    Position emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis may provide non-invasive insights into the corresponding molecular processes and may be applied for individualized treatment planning of antiangiogenic therapies. At the moment, most strategies are focusing on the development of radiolabelled proteins and antibody formats targeting VEGF and its receptor or the ED-B domain of a fibronectin isoform as well as radiolabelled matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or αvβ3 integrin antagonists. Great efforts are being made to develop suitable tracers for different target structures. All of the major strategies focusing on the development of radiolabelled compounds for use with positron emission tomography are summarized in this review. However, because the most intensive work is concentrated on the development of radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging αvβ3 expression, which has successfully made its way from bench to bedside, these developments are especially emphasized. PMID:20559632

  20. A wavelet phase filter for emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, E.T.; Lin, B.

    1995-07-01

    The presence of a high level of noise is a characteristic in some tomographic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Wavelet methods can smooth out noise while preserving significant features of images. Mallat et al. proposed a wavelet based denoising scheme exploiting wavelet modulus maxima, but the scheme is sensitive to noise. In this study, the authors explore the properties of wavelet phase, with a focus on reconstruction of emission tomography images. Specifically, they show that the wavelet phase of regular Poisson noise under a Haar-type wavelet transform converges in distribution to a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 2{pi}). They then propose three wavelet-phase-based denoising schemes which exploit this property: edge tracking, local phase variance thresholding, and scale phase variation thresholding. Some numerical results are also presented. The numerical experiments indicate that wavelet phase techniques show promise for wavelet based denoising methods.

  1. Positron Emission Tomography: Principles, Technology, and Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Sibylle I.

    2005-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technique for quantitative measurement of physiologic parameters in vivo (an overview of principles and applications can be found in [P.E. Valk, et al., eds. Positron Emission Tomography. Basic Science and Clinical Practice. 2003, Springer: Heidelberg]), based on the detection of small amounts of posi-tron-emitter-labelled biologic molecules. Various radiotracers are available for neuro-logical, cardiological, and oncological applications in the clinic and in research proto-cols. This overview describes the basic principles, technology, and recent develop-ments in PET, followed by a section on the development of a tomograph with ava-lanche photodiodes dedicated for small animal imaging as an example of efforts in the domain of high resolution tomographs.

  2. Single photon emission computed tomography-guided Cerenkov luminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Qu, Xiaochao; Chen, Duofang; Yang, Weidong; Wang, Jing; Cao, Feng; Tian, Jie

    2012-07-01

    Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT) has become a valuable tool for preclinical imaging because of its ability of reconstructing the three-dimensional distribution and activity of the radiopharmaceuticals. However, it is still far from a mature technology and suffers from relatively low spatial resolution due to the ill-posed inverse problem for the tomographic reconstruction. In this paper, we presented a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-guided reconstruction method for CLT, in which a priori information of the permissible source region (PSR) from SPECT imaging results was incorporated to effectively reduce the ill-posedness of the inverse reconstruction problem. The performance of the method was first validated with the experimental reconstruction of an adult athymic nude mouse implanted with a Na131I radioactive source and an adult athymic nude mouse received an intravenous tail injection of Na131I. A tissue-mimic phantom based experiment was then conducted to illustrate the ability of the proposed method in resolving double sources. Compared with the traditional PSR strategy in which the PSR was determined by the surface flux distribution, the proposed method obtained much more accurate and encouraging localization and resolution results. Preliminary results showed that the proposed SPECT-guided reconstruction method was insensitive to the regularization methods and ignored the heterogeneity of tissues which can avoid the segmentation procedure of the organs.

  3. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT): Applications and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, B.L.; Tumeh, S.S. )

    1990-01-26

    Single-photon emission computed tomography has received increasing attention as radiopharmaceuticals that reflect perfusion, metabolism, and receptor and cellular function have become widely available. Perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain provides functional information useful for the diagnosis and management of stroke, dementia, and epilepsy. Single-photon emission computed tomography has been applied to myocardial, skeletal, hepatic, and tumor scintigraphy, resulting in increased diagnostic accuracy over planar imaging because background activity and overlapping tissues interfere far less with activity from the target structure when tomographic techniques are used. Single-photon emission computed tomography is substantially less expensive and far more accessible than positron emission tomography and will become an increasingly attractive alternative for transferring the positron emission tomography technology to routine clinical use.

  4. Positron emission tomography imaging of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Alastair J; Adamson, Philip D; Newby, David E; Dweck, Marc R

    2016-07-01

    Inflammation has a central role in the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. Recent developments in cardiovascular imaging with the advent of hybrid positron emission tomography have provided a window into the molecular pathophysiology underlying coronary plaque inflammation. Using novel radiotracers targeted at specific cellular pathways, the potential exists to observe inflammation, apoptosis, cellular hypoxia, microcalcification and angiogenesis in vivo. Several clinical studies are now underway assessing the ability of this hybrid imaging modality to inform about atherosclerotic disease activity and the prediction of future cardiovascular risk. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing coronary atherosclerosis may be the first step toward offering patients a more stratified, personalized approach to treatment. PMID:27322032

  5. Positron Emission Tomography: Its 65 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.

    2016-04-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a well-established imaging technique for in vivo molecular imaging. In this review after a brief history of PET there are presented its physical principles and the technology that has been developed for bringing PET from a bench experiment to a clinical indispensable instrument. The limitations and performance of the PET tomographs are discussed, both as for the hardware and software aspects. The status of art of clinical, pre-clinical and hybrid scanners (, PET/CT and PET/MR) is reported. Finally the actual trend and the recent and future technological developments are fully illustrated.

  6. Neurologic applications of positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, G L; Pantano, P

    1984-11-01

    The impact of computerized neuroimaging in the neurologic sciences has been so dramatic that it has completely changed our approach to the individual patient. Further changes may be expected from the newborn positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in order to help the reader digest a large bulk of data and fully realize the present state of the art of PET, the authors have shaped this review mainly on results rather than on methods and on published reports rather than on future potential. PMID:6335222

  7. [Basic principles of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Standke, R

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography uses photons to receive regional information about dynamic, physiologic, and biochemical processes in the living body. A positron decay is measured indirectly by the simultaneous registration of both gamma rays created by the annihilation. The event is counted, if two directly opposite located detectors register gamma rays in coincidence. Unfortunately the detectors of a positron emission tomography system do not register only true coincident events. There are also scattered and random coincidences. Different types of positron tomographs are presented and scintillation crystals, which are in use for positron emission tomography are discussed. The 2D- and 3D-acquisition methods are described as well as preprocessing methods, such as correction for attenuation, scatter and dead time. For quantification the relative parameter standard uptake value (SUV) is explained. Finally hybrid systems, such as combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography scanners and the use of computed tomography data for attenuation correction are introduced. PMID:12506765

  8. Imaging local brain function with emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1984-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to map local cerebral glucose utilization in the study of local cerebral function. This information differs fundamentally from structural assessment by means of computed tomography (CT). In normal human volunteers, the FDG scan was used to determine the cerebral metabolic response to conrolled sensory stimulation and the effects of aging. Cerebral metabolic patterns are distinctive among depressed and demented elderly patients. The FDG scan appears normal in the depressed patient, studded with multiple metabolic defects in patients with multiple infarct dementia, and in the patients with Alzheimer disease, metabolism is particularly reduced in the parietal cortex, but only slightly reduced in the caudate and thalamus. The interictal FDG scan effectively detects hypometabolic brain zones that are sites of onset for seizures in patients with partial epilepsy, even though these zones usually appear normal on CT scans. The future prospects of PET are discussed.

  9. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1200 Emission computed tomography system. (a) Identification. An...

  10. Imaging Tumor Metabolism Using Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David Y.; Soloviev, Dmitry; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an extraordinarily sensitive clinical imaging modality for interrogating tumor metabolism. Radiolabelled PET substrates can be traced at sub-physiological concentrations, allowing non-invasive imaging of metabolism and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in systems ranging from advanced cancer models to cancer patients in the clinic. There are a wide range of novel and more established PET radiotracers, which can be used to investigate various aspects of tumor metabolism, including carbohydrate, amino acid and fatty acid metabolism. In this review we will briefly discuss the more established metabolic tracers and describe recent work on the development of new tracers. Some of the unanswered questions in tumor metabolism will be considered alongside new technical developments, such as combined PET/MRI machines, that could provide new imaging solutions to some of the outstanding diagnostic challenges facing modern cancer medicine. PMID:25815854

  11. Positron Emission Tomography of the Heart

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schelbert, H. R.; Phelps, M. E.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PCT) represents an important new tool for the noninvasive evaluation and, more importantly, quantification of myocardial performance. Most currently available techniques permit assessment of only one aspect of cardiac function, i.e., myocardial perfusion by gamma scintillation camera imaging with Thallium-201 or left ventricular function by echocardiography or radionuclide angiocardiography. With PCT it may become possible to study all three major segments of myocardial performance, i.e., regional blood flow, mechanical function and, most importantly, myocardial metabolism. Each of these segments can either be evaluated separately or in combination. This report briefly describes the principles and technological advantages of the imaging device, reviews currently available radioactive tracers and how they can be employed for the assessment of flow, function and metabolism; and, lastly, discusses possible applications of PCT for the study of cardiac physiology or its potential role in the diagnosis of cardiac disease.

  12. Imaging tumor metabolism using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David Y; Soloviev, Dmitry; Brindle, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an extraordinarily sensitive clinical imaging modality for interrogating tumor metabolism. Radiolabeled PET substrates can be traced at subphysiological concentrations, allowing noninvasive imaging of metabolism and intratumoral heterogeneity in systems ranging from advanced cancer models to patients in the clinic. There are a wide range of novel and more established PET radiotracers, which can be used to investigate various aspects of the tumor, including carbohydrate, amino acid, and fatty acid metabolism. In this review, we briefly discuss the more established metabolic tracers and describe recent work on the development of new tracers. Some of the unanswered questions in tumor metabolism are considered alongside new technical developments, such as combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging scanners, which could provide new imaging solutions to some of the outstanding diagnostic challenges facing modern cancer medicine. PMID:25815854

  13. Bayesian image reconstruction: Application to emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, J.; Llacer, J.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we propose a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) method of image reconstruction in the Bayesian framework for the Poisson noise case. We use entropy to define the prior probability and likelihood to define the conditional probability. The method uses sharpness parameters which can be theoretically computed or adjusted, allowing us to obtain MAP reconstructions without the problem of the grey'' reconstructions associated with the pre Bayesian reconstructions. We have developed several ways to solve the reconstruction problem and propose a new iterative algorithm which is stable, maintains positivity and converges to feasible images faster than the Maximum Likelihood Estimate method. We have successfully applied the new method to the case of Emission Tomography, both with simulated and real data. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Positron emission tomography and radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, PhD, Gary D.; Fox, MD, Peter; Phillips, MD, William T.

    2001-10-01

    Medical physics research is providing new avenues for addressing the fundamental problem of radiation therapy-how to provide a tumor-killing dose while reducing the dose to a non-lethal level for critical organs in adjacent portions of the patient anatomy. This talk reviews the revolutionary impact of Positron Emission Tomography on the practice of radiation oncology. The concepts of PET imaging and the development of "tumor" imaging methods using 18F-DG flouro-deoxyglucose are presented to provide the foundation for contemporary research and application to therapy. PET imaging influences radiation therapy decisions in multiple ways. Imaging of occult but viable tumor metastases eliminates misguided therapy attempts. The ability to distinguish viable tumor from scar tissue and necroses allows reduction of treatment portals and more selective treatments. Much research remains before the clinical benefits of these advances are fully realized.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography with improved spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Drukier, A.K.

    1990-04-01

    Applied Research Corporation (ARC) proposed the development of a new class of solid state detectors called Superconducting Granular Detectors (SGD). These new detectors permit considerable improvements in medical imaging, e.g. Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The biggest impact of this technique will be in imaging of the brain. It should permit better clinical diagnosis of such important diseases as Altzheimer's or schizophrenia. More specifically, we will develop an improved PET-imager; a spatial resolution 2 mm may be achievable with SGD. A time-of-flight capability(t {approx} 100 psec) will permit better contrast and facilitate 3D imaging. In the following, we describe the results of the first 9 months of the development.

  16. Calorimetry in Medical Applications: Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-T.

    2006-10-27

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), two nuclear medicine imaging modalities broadly used in clinics and research, share many common instrumentation, detector, and electronics technology platforms with calorimetry in high-energy physics, astronomy, and other physics sciences. Historically, advances made in calorimetry had played major roles in the development of novel approaches and critical technologies essential to the evolution of PET and SPECT. There have also been examples in which PET/SPECT developments had led to new techniques in calorimetry for other application areas. In recent years, several innovations have propelled advances in both calorimetry in general and PET/SPECT in particular. Examples include time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), etc.

  17. Association Between Pulmonary Uptake of Fluorodeoxyglucose Detected by Positron Emission Tomography Scanning After Radiation Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Radiation Pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Mac Manus, Michael P.; Ding Zhe; Hogg, Annette; Herschtal, Alan; Binns, David; Ball, David L.; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To study the relationship between fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in pulmonary tissue after radical radiation therapy (RT) and the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: In 88 consecutive patients, {sup 18}F-FDG-positron emission tomography was performed at a median of 70 days after completion of RT. Patients received 60 Gy in 30 fractions, and all but 15 had concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy. RT-induced pulmonary inflammatory changes occurring within the radiation treatment volume were scored, using a visual (0 to 3) radiotoxicity grading scale, by an observer blinded to the presence or absence of clinical radiation pneumonitis. Radiation pneumonitis was retrospectively graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale by an observer blinded to the PET radiotoxicity score. Results: There was a significant association between the worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring at any time after RT and the positron emission tomograph (PET) radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.033). The worst RTOG pneumonitis grade occurring after the PET scan was also associated with the PET radiotoxicity grade (one-sided p = 0.035). For every one-level increase in the PET toxicity scale, the risk of a higher RTOG radiation pneumonitis score increased by approximately 40%. The PET radiotoxicity score showed no significant correlation with the duration of radiation pneumonitis. Conclusions: The intensity of FDG uptake in pulmonary tissue after RT determined using a simple visual scoring system showed significant correlation with the presence and severity of radiation pneumonitis. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET may be useful in the prediction, diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of radiation pneumonitis.

  18. Concurrent Ultrasonic Tomography and Acoustic Emission in Solid Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Thomas M.

    A series of experiments were performed to detect stress induced changes in the elastic properties of various solid materials. A technique was developed where these changes were monitored concurrently by two methods, ultrasonic tomography and acoustic emission monitoring. This thesis discusses some experiments in which acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic tomography were performed on various samples of solid materials including rocks, concrete, metals, and fibre reinforced composites. Three separate techniques were used to induce stress in these samples. Disk shaped samples were subject to stress via diametral loading using an indirect tensile test geometry. Cylindrical samples of rocks and concrete were subject to hydraulic fracture tests, and rectangular samples of fibre reinforced composite were subject to direct tensile loading. The majority of the samples were elastically anisotropic. Full waveform acoustic emission and tomographic data were collected while these samples were under load to give information concerning changes in the structure of the material as it was undergoing stress change and/or failure. Analysis of this data indicates that AE and tomographic techniques mutually compliment each other to give a view of the stress induced elastic changes in the tested samples.

  19. Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Goh, Vicky; Prezzi, Davide; Mallia, Andrew; Bashir, Usman; Stirling, J James; John, Joemon; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; MacKewn, Jane; Cook, Gary

    2016-08-01

    As an integrated system, hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) is able to provide simultaneously complementary high-resolution anatomic, molecular, and functional information, allowing comprehensive cancer phenotyping in a single imaging examination. In addition to an improved patient experience by combining 2 separate imaging examinations and streamlining the patient pathway, the superior soft tissue contrast resolution of MRI and the ability to acquire multiparametric MRI data is advantageous over computed tomography. For gastrointestinal cancers, this would improve tumor staging, assessment of neoadjuvant response, and of the likelihood of a complete (R0) resection in comparison with positron emission tomography or computed tomography. PMID:27342899

  20. Positron emission tomography detects greater blood flow and less blood flow heterogeneity in the exercising skeletal muscles of old compared with young men during fatiguing contractions

    PubMed Central

    Rudroff, Thorsten; Weissman, Jessica A; Bucci, Marco; Seppänen, Marko; Kaskinoro, Kimmo; Heinonen, Ilkka; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate blood flow and its heterogeneity within and among the knee muscles in five young (26 ± 6 years) and five old (77 ± 6 years) healthy men with similar levels of physical activity while they performed two types of submaximal fatiguing isometric contraction that required either force or position control. Positron emission tomography (PET) and [15O]-H2O were used to determine blood flow at 2 min (beginning) and 12 min (end) after the start of the tasks. Young and old men had similar maximal forces and endurance times for the fatiguing tasks. Although muscle volumes were lower in the older subjects, total muscle blood flow was similar in both groups (young men: 25.8 ± 12.6 ml min−1; old men: 25.1 ± 15.4 ml min−1; age main effect, P = 0.77) as blood flow per unit mass of muscle in the exercising knee extensors was greater in the older (12.5 ± 6.2 ml min−1 (100 g)−1) than the younger (8.6 ± 3.6 ml min−1 (100 g)−1) men (age main effect, P = 0.001). Further, blood flow heterogeneity in the exercising knee extensors was significantly lower in the older (56 ± 27%) than the younger (67 ± 34%) men. Together, these data show that although skeletal muscles are smaller in older subjects, based on the intact neural drive to the muscle and the greater, less heterogeneous blood flow per gram of muscle, old fit muscle achieves adequate exercise hyperaemia. Key points The results of previous studies that attempted to demonstrate the effects of ageing on skeletal muscle blood flow are controversial because these studies used indirect assessments of skeletal muscle blood flow obtained via whole limb blood flow measurements that provide no information on the distribution of blood flow within particular muscles. We used positron emission tomography to measure blood flow per gram of muscle in old and young men with similar levels of physical activity

  1. Detection of Local, Regional, and Distant Recurrence in Patients With PSA Relapse After External-Beam Radiotherapy Using {sup 11}C-Choline Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Pruim, Jan; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Leliveld, Anna M.; Nijman, Rien J.M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Jong, Igle J. de

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: An elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level cannot distinguish between local-regional recurrences and the presence of distant metastases after treatment with curative intent for prostate cancer. With the advent of salvage treatment such as cryotherapy, it has become important to localize the site of recurrence (local or distant). In this study, the potential of {sup 11}C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) to identify site of recurrence was investigated in patients with rising PSA after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy patients with histologically proven prostate cancer treated with EBRT and showing biochemical recurrence as defined by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus statement and 10 patients without recurrence underwent a PET scan using 400 MBq {sup 11}C-choline intravenously. Biopsy-proven histology from the site of suspicion, findings with other imaging modalities, clinical follow-up and/or response to adjuvant therapy were used as comparative references. Results: None of the 10 patients without biochemical recurrence had a positive PET scan. Fifty-seven of 70 patients with biochemical recurrence (median PSA 9.1 ng/mL; mean PSA 12.3 ng/mL) showed an abnormal uptake pattern (sensitivity 81%). The site of recurrence was only local in 41 of 57 patients (mean PSA 11.1 ng/mL at scan), locoregionally and/or distant in 16 of 57 patients (mean PSA 17.7 ng/mL). Overall the positive predictive value and negative predictive value for {sup 11}C-choline PET scan were 1.0 and 0.44 respectively. Accuracy was 84%. Conclusions: {sup 11}C-choline PET scan is a sensitive technique to identify the site of recurrence in patients with PSA relapse after EBRT for prostate cancer.

  2. A Review on Segmentation of Positron Emission Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Brent; Bagci, Ulas; Mansoor, Awais; Xu, Ziyue; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a non-invasive functional imaging method at the molecular level, images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity. PET imaging provides detailed quantitative information about many diseases and is often used to evaluate inflammation, infection, and cancer by detecting emitted photons from a radiotracer localized to abnormal cells. In order to differentiate abnormal tissue from surrounding areas in PET images, image segmentation methods play a vital role; therefore, accurate image segmentation is often necessary for proper disease detection, diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-ups. In this review paper, we present state-of-the-art PET image segmentation methods, as well as the recent advances in image segmentation techniques. In order to make this manuscript self-contained, we also briefly explain the fundamentals of PET imaging, the challenges of diagnostic PET image analysis, and the effects of these challenges on the segmentation results. PMID:24845019

  3. Resistive plate chambers in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Paulo; Blanco, Alberto; Couceiro, Miguel; Ferreira, Nuno C.; Lopes, Luís; Martins, Paulo; Ferreira Marques, Rui; Fonte, Paulo

    2013-07-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) were originally deployed for high energy physics. Realizing how their properties match the needs of nuclear medicine, a LIP team proposed applying RPCs to both preclinical and clinical positron emission tomography (RPC-PET). We show a large-area RPC-PET simulated scanner covering an axial length of 2.4m —slightly superior to the height of the human body— allowing for whole-body, single-bed RPC-PET acquisitions. Simulations following NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association, USA) protocols yield a system sensitivity at least one order of magnitude larger than present-day, commercial PET systems. Reconstruction of whole-body simulated data is feasible by using a dedicated, direct time-of-flight-based algorithm implemented onto an ordered subsets estimation maximization parallelized strategy. Whole-body RPC-PET patient images following the injection of only 2mCi of 18-fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) are expected to be ready 7 minutes after the 6 minutes necessary for data acquisition. This compares to the 10-20mCi FDG presently injected for a PET scan, and to the uncomfortable 20-30minutes necessary for its data acquisition. In the preclinical field, two fully instrumented detector heads have been assembled aiming at a four-head-based, small-animal RPC-PET system. Images of a disk-shaped and a needle-like 22Na source show unprecedented sub-millimeter spatial resolution.

  4. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-02-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures.

  5. Utility of positron emission tomography in schwannomatosis.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Bryan; Han, ByoungJun; Allen, Jeffrey; Fatterpekar, Girish; Agarwal, Nitin; Kazemi, Noojan; Zagzag, David

    2016-08-01

    Schwannomatosis is characterized by multiple non-intradermal schwannomas with patients often presenting with a painful mass in their extremities. In this syndrome malignant transformation of schwannomas is rare in spite of their large size at presentation. Non-invasive measures of assessing the biological behavior of plexiform neurofibromas in neurofibromatosis type 1 such as positron emission tomography (PET), CT scanning and MRI are well characterized but little information has been published on the use of PET imaging in schwannomatosis. We report a unique clinical presentation portraying the use of PET imaging in schwannomatosis. A 27-year-old woman presented with multiple, rapidly growing, large and painful schwannomas confirmed to be related to a constitutional mutation in the SMARCB1 complex. Whole body PET/MRI revealed numerous PET-avid tumors suggestive of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Surgery was performed on multiple tumors and none of them had histologic evidence of malignant transformation. Overall, PET imaging may not be a reliable predictor of malignant transformation in schwannomatosis, tempering enthusiasm for surgical interventions for tumors not producing significant clinical signs or symptoms. PMID:26960263

  6. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Hakan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular events are the leading causes of death in the industrialized world. Atherosclerosis develops insidiously and the initial manifestation is usually sudden cardiac death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. Molecular imaging is a valuable tool to identify the disease at an early stage before fatal manifestations occur. Among the various molecular imaging techniques, this review mainly focuses on positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of atherosclerosis. The targets and pathways that have been investigated to date for PET imaging of atherosclerosis include: glycolysis, cell membrane metabolism (phosphatidylcholine synthesis), integrin αvβ3, low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors (LDLr), natriuretic peptide clearance receptors (NPCRs), fatty acid synthesis, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), macrophages, platelets, etc. Many PET tracers have been investigated clinically for imaging of atherosclerosis. Early diagnosis of atherosclerotic lesions by PET imaging can help to prevent the premature death caused by atherosclerosis, and smooth translation of promising PET tracers into the clinic is critical to the benefit of patients. PMID:24312158

  7. Single photon emission tomography imaging in parkinsonian disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Acton, P D; Mozley, P D

    2000-01-01

    Parkinsonian symptoms are associated with a number of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy. Pathological evidence has shown clearly that these disorders are associated with a loss of neurons, particularly in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) now are able to visualise and quantify changes in cerebral blood flow, glucose metabolism, and dopaminergic function produced by parkinsonian disorders. Both PET and SPECT have become important tools in the differential diagnosis of these diseases, and may have sufficient sensitivity to detect neuronal changes before the onset of clinical symptoms. Imaging is now being utilised to elucidate the genetic contribution to Parkinson's disease, and in longitudinal studies to assess the efficacy and mode of action of neuroprotective drug and surgical treatments. This review summarises recent applications of SPECT imaging in the study of parkinsonian disorders, with particular reference to the increasing role it is playing in the understanding, diagnosis and management of these diseases. PMID:11455039

  8. The Role of Chemistry in Positron Emission Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feliu, Anthony L.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates use of positron emission tomography (PET) to study in-vivo metabolic processes. Discusses methodology of PET and medical uses. Outlines the production of different radioisotopes used in PET radiotracers. Includes selected bibliography. (ML)

  9. Positron emission tomography and bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Fogelman, Ignac; Cook, Gary; Israel, Ora; Van der Wall, Hans

    2005-04-01

    The use of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the evaluation and management of patients with malignancy continues to increase. However, its role in the identification of bone metastases is far from clear. FDG has the advantage of demonstrating all metastatic sites, and in the skeleton it is assumed that its uptake is directly into tumor cells. It is probable that for breast and lung carcinoma, FDG-PET has similar sensitivity, although poorer specificity, when compared with the isotope bone scan, although there is conflicting evidence, with several articles suggesting that it is less sensitive than conventional imaging in breast cancer. There is convincing evidence that for prostate cancer, FDG-PET is less sensitive than the bone scan and this may be tumor specific. There is very little data relating to lymphoma, but FDG-PET seems to perform better than the bone scan. There is an increasing body of evidence relating to the valuable role of FDG-PET in myeloma, where it is clearly better than the bone scan, presumably because FDG is identifying marrow-based disease at an early stage. There are, however, several other important variables that should be considered. The morphology of the metastasis itself appears to be relevant. At least in breast cancer, different patterns of FDG uptake have been shown in sclerotic, lytic, or lesions with a mixed pattern, Furthermore, the precise localization of a metastasis in the skeleton may be important with regard to the extent of the metabolic response induced. Previous treatment is highly relevant and it has been found that although the majority of untreated bone metastases are positive on PET scans and have a lytic pattern on computed tomography (CT), after treatment, incongruent CT-positive/PET-negative lesions are significantly more prevalent and generally are blastic, which presumably reflects a direct effect of treatment. Finally, the aggressiveness of the tumor itself may be relevant

  10. Diffuse nesidioblastosis diagnosed on a Ga-68 DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Arun, Sasikumar; Rai Mittal, Bhagwant; Shukla, Jaya; Bhattacharya, Anish; Kumar, Praveen

    2013-07-01

    The authors describe a 50 days old pre-term infant with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy in whom Ga-68 DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computerized tomography scan showed diffusely increased tracer uptake in the entire pancreas with no abnormal tracer uptake anywhere else in the body, suggestive of a diffuse variant of nesidioblastosis. PMID:24250024

  11. Fuzzy-rule-based image reconstruction for positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Partha P.; Rajan, K.

    2005-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography have revolutionized the field of medicine and biology. Penalized iterative algorithms based on maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation eliminate noisy artifacts by utilizing available prior information in the reconstruction process but often result in a blurring effect. MAP-based algorithms fail to determine the density class in the reconstructed image and hence penalize the pixels irrespective of the density class. Reconstruction with better edge information is often difficult because prior knowledge is not taken into account. The recently introduced median-root-prior (MRP)-based algorithm preserves the edges, but a steplike streaking effect is observed in the reconstructed image, which is undesirable. A fuzzy approach is proposed for modeling the nature of interpixel interaction in order to build an artifact-free edge-preserving reconstruction. The proposed algorithm consists of two elementary steps: (1) edge detection, in which fuzzy-rule-based derivatives are used for the detection of edges in the nearest neighborhood window (which is equivalent to recognizing nearby density classes), and (2) fuzzy smoothing, in which penalization is performed only for those pixels for which no edge is detected in the nearest neighborhood. Both of these operations are carried out iteratively until the image converges. Analysis shows that the proposed fuzzy-rule-based reconstruction algorithm is capable of producing qualitatively better reconstructed images than those reconstructed by MAP and MRP algorithms. The reconstructed images are sharper, with small features being better resolved owing to the nature of the fuzzy potential function.

  12. Future direction of renal positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Zsolt; Xia, Jinsong; Mathews, William B; Brown, Phillip R

    2006-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is perfectly suited for quantitative imaging of the kidneys, and the recent improvements in detector technology, computer hardware, and image processing software add to its appeal. Multiple positron emitting radioisotopes can be used for renal imaging. Some, including carbon-11, nitrogen-13, and oxygen-15, can be used at institutions with an on-site cyclotron. Other radioisotopes that may be even more useful in a clinical setting are those that either can be obtained from radionuclide generators (rubidium-82, copper-62) or have a sufficiently long half-life for transportation (fluorine-18). The clinical use of functional renal PET studies (blood flow, glomerular filtration rate) has been slow, in part because of the success of concurrent technologies, including single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and planar gamma camera imaging. Renal blood flow studies can be performed with O-15-labeled water, N-13-labeled ammonia, rubidium-82, and copper-labeled PTSM. With these tracers, renal blood flow can be quantified using a modified microsphere kinetic model. Glomerular filtration can be imaged and quantified with gallium-68 EDTA or cobalt-55 EDTA. Measurements of renal blood flow with PET have potential applications in renovascular disease, in transplant rejection or acute tubular necrosis, in drug-induced nephropathies, ureteral obstruction, before and after revascularization, and before and after the placement of ureteral stents. The most important clinical application for imaging glomerular function with PET would be renovascular hypertension. Molecular imaging of the kidneys with PET is rather limited. At present, research is focused on the investigation of metabolism (acetate), membrane transporters (organic cation and anion transporters, pepT1 and pepT2, GLUT, SGLT), enzymes (ACE), and receptors (AT1R). Because many nephrological and urological disorders are initiated at the molecular and organelle levels and may

  13. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in lung cancer and malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio

    2006-10-01

    In nuclear oncology, despite the fast-growing diffusion of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies can still play an useful clinical role in several applications. The main limitation of SPECT imaging with tumor-seeking agents is the lack of the structural delineation of the pathologic processes they detect; this drawback sometimes renders SPECT interpretation difficult and can diminish its diagnostic accuracy. Fusion with morphological studies can overcome this limitation by giving an anatomical map to scintigraphic data. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT images proved to be time-consuming and impractical for routine use. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems that provide functional (SPECT) and anatomical (CT) images in the same scanning session, with the acquired images coregistered by means of the hardware, has opened a new era in this field. The first reports indicate that SPECT/CT is very useful in cancer imaging because it is able to provide further information of clinical value in several cases. In SPECT, studies of lung cancer and malignant lymphomas using different radiopharmaceutical, hybrid images are of value in providing the correct localization of tumor sites, with a precise detection of the involved organs, and the definition of their functional status, and in allowing the exclusion of disease in sites of physiologic tracer uptake. Therefore, in lung cancer and lymphomas, hybrid SPECT/CT can play a role in the diagnosis of the primary tumor, in the staging of the disease, in the follow-up, in the monitoring of therapy, in the detection of recurrence, and in dosimetric estimations for target radionuclide therapy. PMID:16950145

  14. Characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction by positron-emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M.; Biello, D.; Welch, M.J.; Ter-Pogossian, M.M.; Roberts, R.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-04-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether positron emission tomography (PET) performed after i.v. 11C-palmitate permits detection and characterization of nontransmural myocardial infarction. PET was performed after the i.v. injection of 11C-palmitate in 10 normal subjects, 24 patients with initial nontransmural myocardial infarction (defined electrocardiographically), and 22 patients with transmural infarction. Depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate was detected with sagittal, coronal and transverse reconstructions, and quantified based on 14 contiguous transaxial reconstructions. Defects with homogeneously intense depression of accumulation of tracer were detected in all 22 patients with transmural infarction (100%). Abnormalities of the distribution of 11C-palmitate in the myocardium were detected in 23 patients with nontransmural infarction (96%). Thallium scintigrams were abnormal in only 11 of 18 patients with nontransmural infarction (61%). Tomographically estimated infarct size was greater among patients with transmural infarction (50.4 +/- 7.8 PET-g-Eq/m2 (+/- SEM SEM)) compared with those with nontransmural infarction (19 +/- 4 PET-g-Eq, p less than 0.01). Residual accumulation of 11C-palmitate within regions of infarction was more intensely depressed among patients with transmural compared to nontransmural infarction (33 +/- 1 vs 39 +/- 1% maximal myocardial radioactivity, p less than 0.01). Thus, PET and metabolic imaging with 11C-palmitate is a sensitive means of detecting, quantifying and characterizing nontransmural and transmural myocardial infarction.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography: state of the art and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzichemi, M.

    2016-08-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays a fundamental role in medical imaging, with a wide range of applications covering, among the others, oncology, neurology and cardiology. PET has undergone a steady technological evolution since its introduction in mid 20th century, from the development of 3D PET in the late 1980s, to the invention of PET/CT in the 1990s and more recently with the introduction of PET/MR scanners. The current research topics aiming to develop the next generation of PET scanners are summarized in this paper, focusing on the efforts to increase the sensitivity of the detectors, as long as improving their timing, spatial and energy resolutions, with the final goal of reducing the amount of radioactive dose received by the patients and the duration of the exams while improving at the same time the detectability of lesions.

  16. Ultrasonic guided wave tomography for ice detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Rose, Joseph L

    2016-04-01

    Of great concern for many structures, particularly critical sections of rotary and fixed wing aircrafts, is the ability to detect ice either on grounded or in-flight vehicles. As a consequence, some work is reported here that could be useful for a variety of different industries where ice formation is an important problem. This paper presents experimental validations of a probability-based reconstruction algorithm (PRA) on ice detection of plate-like structures. The ice detection tests are performed for three different specimens: a single layer aluminum plate with a circular ice sensing array, a titanium plate with a sparse rectangular ice sensing array, and a carbon-fiber-reinforced titanium plate with an embedded ice sensing array mounted on a carbon fiber back plate. Cases from the simple to the more challenging exemplify that special modes can be used to differentiate ice from water, a sparse rectangular array could also be used for ice detection, and an ice sensing array could be further used to detect the ice on the sensor free side, a very useful application of ice sensing for aircraft wings, for example. Ice detection images for the respective cases are reconstructed to investigate the feasibility of ice sensing with ultrasonic guided wave tomography technology. The results show that the PRA based ultrasonic guided wave tomography method successfully detected and showed ice spots correctly for all three cases. This corroborates the fact that ultrasonic guided wave imaging technology could be a potential useful ice sensing tool in plate-like structures. PMID:26746159

  17. C-Arm Computed Tomography Compared With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Treatment Planning Before Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Christoph Waggershauser, Tobias; Tiling, Reinhold; Weckbach, Sabine; Johnson, Thorsten; Meissner, Oliver; Klingenbeck-Regn, Klaus; Reiser, Maximilian; Hoffmann, Ralf Thorsten

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether rotational C-arm computed tomography (CT) allows visualization of liver metastases and adds relevant information for radioembolization (RE) treatment planning. Technetium angiography, together with C-arm CT, was performed in 47 patients to determine the feasibility for RE. C-arm CT images were compared with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT images for the detection of liver tumors. The images were also rated according one of the following three categories: (1) images that provide no additional information compared with DSA alone; (2) images that do provide additional information compared with DSA; and (2) images that had an impact on eligibility determination for and planning of the RE procedure. In all patients, 283 FDG-positive liver lesions were detected by PET. In venous contrast-phase CT, 221 (78.1%) and 15 (5.3%) of these lesions were either hypodense or hyperdense, respectively. In C-arm CT, 103 (36.4%) liver lesions were not detectable because they were outside of either the field of view or the contrast-enhanced liver segment. Another 25 (8.8%) and 98 (34.6%) of the liver lesions were either hyperdense or presented primarily as hypodense lesions with a rim enhancement, respectively. With PET/CT as the standard of reference, venous CT and C-arm CT failed to detect 47 (16.6%) and 57 (20.1%) of all liver lesions, respectively. For RE planning, C-arm CT provided no further information, provide some additional information, or had an impact on the procedure in 20 (42.5%), 15 (31.9%) and 12 (25.6%) of patients, respectively. We conclude that C-arm CT may add decisive information in patients scheduled for RE.

  18. Positron emission tomography in patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed Central

    McGeer, P L; Kamo, H; Harrop, R; Li, D K; Tuokko, H; McGeer, E G; Adam, M J; Ammann, W; Beattie, B L; Calne, D B

    1986-01-01

    Fourteen patients who had clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease with mild to severe dementia (mean age 69.1 years) were evaluated by calculation of local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (LCMR-gl) based on uptake of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) detected with positron emission tomography (PET). PET scanning showed that the patients had significantly lower LCMR-gl values than 11 age-matched neurologically normal volunteers (mean age 66.3 years). The differences were most marked in the temporal cortex, followed by the frontal, parietal and occipital cortex. In each case the LCMR-gl value was below the lowest control value in at least one cortical area and usually in several; the reduction in LCMR-gl and the number of regions involved in the patients increased with the severity of the dementia. Deficits noted in neuropsychologic testing generally correlated with those predicted from loss of regional cortical metabolism. The patients with Alzheimer's disease were also examined with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography or both; the degree of atrophy found showed only a poor correlation with the neuropsychologic deficit. Significant atrophy was also noted in some of the controls. A detailed analysis of LCMR-gl values in selected cerebral regions of various sizes refuted the hypothesis that the reduction in cortical glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease is due to the filling by metabolically inert cerebrospinal fluid of space created by tissue atrophy. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:3512063

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation of Emission Tomography and other Medical Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    As an introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of emission tomography, this paper reviews the history and principles of Monte Carlo simulation, then applies these principles to emission tomography using the public domain simulation package SimSET (a Simulation System for Emission Tomography) as an example. Finally, the paper discusses how the methods are modified for X-ray computed tomography and radiotherapy simulations.

  20. Assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Pianou, Nikoletta; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2013-09-01

    An important evolution has taken place recently in the field of cardiovascular Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging. Being originally a highly versatile research tool that has contributed significantly to advance our understanding of cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology, PET has gradually been incorporated into the clinical cardiac imaging portfolio contributing to diagnosis and management of patients investigated for coronary artery disease (CAD). PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has an average sensitivity and specificity around 90% for the detection of angiographically significant CAD and it is also a very accurate technique for prognostication of patients with suspected or known CAD. In clinical practice, Rubidium-82 ((82)Rb) is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical for MPI that affords also accurate and reproducible quantification in absolute terms (ml/min/g) comparable to that obtained by cyclotron produced tracers such as Nitrogen-13 ammonia ((13)N-ammonia) and Oxygen-15 labeled water ((15)O-water). Quantification increases sensitivity for detection of multivessel CAD and it may also be helpful for detection of early stages of atherosclerosis or microvascular dysfunction. PET imaging combining perfusion with myocardial metabolism using (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F FDG), a glucose analog, is an accurate standard for assessment of myocardial hibernation and risk stratification of patients with left ventricular dysfunction of ischemic etiology. It is helpful for guiding management decisions regarding revascularization or medical treatment and predicting improvement of symptoms, exercise capacity and quality of life post-revascularization. The strengths of PET can be increased further with the introduction of hybrid scanners, which combine PET with computed tomography (PET/CT) or with magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) offering integrated morphological, biological and physiological information and hence, comprehensive evaluation of

  1. False-positive Uptake on Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Immediately After Lung Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Min; Lee, Ho Yun; Choi, Joon Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET) is an evolving tool in the field of oncology. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, however, is not a specific tool for malignant tumor that it may also accumulate in benign processes. To avoid false-positive interpretation of 18F-FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT), having knowledge of the potential pitfalls is important. The authors present a case of a patient with a lung mass who underwent fluoroscopy-guided transthoracic lung biopsy followed by 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan with a 4-hour interval between biopsy and scanning. Abnormally increased FDG uptake in the mass and pleural effusion was detected. Pathologic examination of the specimen, however, revealed only fibrous tissues with chronic inflammatory cells. On performing CT imaging, 1 month later, the mass and effusion had spontaneously resolved without treatment. Our findings suggest that PET/CT performed immediately following invasive procedures can result in false-positive results and thus mislead diagnosis. Therefore, the interval and order, in which PET/CT and invasive procedures are performed, should be carefully considered in oncologic work-up. PMID:26554786

  2. Management of urological malignancies: Has positron emission tomography/computed tomography made a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Nirmal, Thampi John; Kekre, Nitin S.

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) technology has been a significant, but expensive addition to the oncologist's armamentarium. The aim of this review was to determine the clinical utility of PET/CT in urological oncology, its impact on disease outcome and cost-effectiveness. We searched MedLine and peer reviewed journals for all relevant literature available online from the year 2000 until January 2014 regarding the use of PET/CT in the management of urological malignancies. 11C-choline PET/CT has emerged as a powerful tool for assessment of biochemical relapse in prostate cancer. Use of novel radiotracers like 124I-girentuximab has shown promise in the diagnosis of clear cell renal carcinoma. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET has a proven role in seminoma for the evaluation of postchemotherapy residual masses and has shown encouraging results when used for detection of metastasis in renal, bladder, and penile cancer. Introduction of novel radiotracers and advanced technology has led to a wider application of PET/CT in urological oncology. However, testicular seminoma aside, its impact on disease outcome and cost-effectiveness still needs to be established. PMID:25624571

  3. Diagnosis of dementia with single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Reed, B.R.

    1987-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography is a practical modality for the study of physiologic cerebral activity in vivo. We utilized single photon emission computed tomography and N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine iodine 123 to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in nine patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), five healthy elderly control subjects, and two patients with multi-infarct dementia. We found that all subjects with AD demonstrated flow deficits in temporoparietal cortex bilaterally, and that the ratio of activity in bilateral temporoparietal cortex to activity in the whole slice allowed the differentiation of all patients with AD from both the controls and from the patients with multi-infarct dementia. Furthermore, this ratio showed a strong correlation with disease severity in the AD group. Single photon emission computed tomography appears to be useful in the differential diagnosis of dementia and reflects clinical features of the disease.

  4. Pigmented villonodular synovitis mimics metastases on fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Elumogo, Comfort O.; Kochenderfer, James N.; Civelek, A. Cahid

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign joint disease best characterized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The role of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) position emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in the diagnosis or characterization remains unclear. PVNS displays as a focal FDG avid lesion, which can masquerade as a metastatic lesion, on PET-CET. We present a case of PVNS found on surveillance imaging of a lymphoma patient. PMID:27190776

  5. Endocrine radionuclide scintigraphy with fusion single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Kit; Gandhi, Arpit; Viglianti, Benjamin L; Fig, Lorraine M; Rubello, Domenico; Gross, Milton D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) hybrid imaging for diagnosis of various endocrine disorders. METHODS: We performed MEDLINE and PubMed searches using the terms: “SPECT/CT”; “functional anatomic mapping”; “transmission emission tomography”; “parathyroid adenoma”; “thyroid cancer”; “neuroendocrine tumor”; “adrenal”; “pheochromocytoma”; “paraganglioma”; in order to identify relevant articles published in English during the years 2003 to 2015. Reference lists from the articles were reviewed to identify additional pertinent articles. Retrieved manuscripts (case reports, reviews, meta-analyses and abstracts) concerning the application of SPECT/CT to endocrine imaging were analyzed to provide a descriptive synthesis of the utility of this technology. RESULTS: The emergence of hybrid SPECT/CT camera technology now allows simultaneous acquisition of combined multi-modality imaging, with seamless fusion of three-dimensional volume datasets. The usefulness of combining functional information to depict the bio-distribution of radiotracers that map cellular processes of the endocrine system and tumors of endocrine origin, with anatomy derived from CT, has improved the diagnostic capability of scintigraphy for a range of disorders of endocrine gland function. The literature describes benefits of SPECT/CT for 99mTc-sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy and 99mTc-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy, 123I- or 131I-radioiodine for staging of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 111In- and 99mTc- labeled somatostatin receptor analogues for detection of neuroendocrine tumors, 131I-norcholesterol (NP-59) scans for assessment of adrenal cortical hyperfunction, and 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging for evaluation of pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. CONCLUSION: SPECT/CT exploits the synergism between the functional information from radiopharmaceutical imaging and anatomy

  6. Single Photon Emission Local Tomography (SPELT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, G.L.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1996-12-31

    Local tomography uses truncated projection data to reconstruct a region of interest, and is important in medical imaging and industrial non-destructive evaluation using micro X-ray CT. The popular filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm does not reconstruct a reliable image, which varies with the degree and location of truncation due to its global convolution kernel. A typical local tomography method uses a second derivative local operator to replace the global convolution kernel in the filtered backprojection algorithm (LFBP). By using a local filter, the reconstructed region depends only on the local projections. The singularities (edges) are preserved, but the exact image value cannot be recovered. This paper, using the data consistency conditions, developed a pre-processing technique that uses the FBP algorithm, which outperforms direct FBP and LFBP.

  7. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography in oncology.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gerwin P; Kramer, Harald; Reiser, Maximilian F; Glaser, Christian

    2007-06-01

    The advent of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has introduced tumor imaging with a systemic and functional approach compared with established sequential, multimodal diagnostic algorithms.Whole-body PET with [18F]-fluoro-2-desoxy-glucose is a useful imaging procedure for tumor staging and monitoring that can visualize active tumor tissue by detecting pathological glucose metabolism. The combination of PET with the detailed anatomical information of multislice computed tomography as dual-modality scanners has markedly increased lesion localization and diagnostic accuracy compared with both modalities as standalone applications.Hardware innovations, such as the introduction of multi-receiver channel whole-body MRI scanners at 1.5 and, recently, 3 T, combined with acquisition acceleration techniques, have made high-resolution WB-MRI clinically feasible. Now, a dedicated assessment of individual organs with various soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and contrast media dynamics can be combined with whole-body anatomical coverage in a multiplanar imaging approach. More flexible protocols (eg, T1-weighted turbo spin-echo and short inversion recovery imaging, dedicated lung imaging or dynamic contrast-enhanced studies of the abdomen) can be performed within 45 minutes.Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging has recently been proposed for tumor screening of asymptomatic individuals, and potentially life-changing diagnoses, such as formerly unknown malignancy, have been reported. However, larger patient cohort studies will have to show the cost efficiency and the clinical effectiveness of such an approach.For initial tumor staging, PET-CT has proved more accurate for the definition of T-stage and lymph node assessment, mainly because of the missing metabolic information in WB-MRI. However, new applications, such as magnetic resonance whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging or lymphotropic contrast

  8. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner. PMID:18319342

  9. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J.; Jacobs, Russell E.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner. PMID:18319342

  10. Multiphoton tomography to detect chemo- and biohazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    In vivo high-resolution multiphoton/CARS tomography provides optical biopsies with 300 nm lateral resolution with chemical fingerprints. Thousands of volunteers and patients have been investigated for early cancer diagnosis, evaluation of anti-ageing cosmetic products, and changes of cellular metabolism by UV exposure and decreased oxygen supply. The skin as the outermost and largest organ is also the major target of CB agents. Current UV-based sensors are useful for bio-aerosol sensing but not for evaluating exposed in vivo skin. Here we evaluate the use of 4D multiphoton/CARS tomographs based on near infrared femtosecond laser radiation, time-correlated single photon counting (FLIM) and white light generation by photonic crystal fibers to detect bio- and chemohazards in human in vivo skin using twophoton fluorescence, SHG, and Raman signals.

  11. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Joanna Fowler

    2008-10-13

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  12. Addiction Studies with Positron Emission Tomography

    ScienceCinema

    Joanna Fowler

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven scientist Joanna Fowler describes Positron Emission Technology (PET) research at BNL which for the past 30 years has focused in the integration of basic research in radiotracer chemistry with the tools of neuroscience to develop new scientific

  13. Positron Emission Tomography: Current Challenges and Opportunities for Technological Advances in Clinical and Preclinical Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, Juan José; Kinahan, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is based on detecting two time-coincident high-energy photons from the emission of a positron-emitting radioisotope. The physics of the emission, and the detection of the coincident photons, give PET imaging unique capabilities for both very high sensitivity and accurate estimation of the in vivo concentration of the radiotracer. PET imaging has been widely adopted as an important clinical modality for oncological, cardiovascular, and neurological applications. PET imaging has also become an important tool in preclinical studies, particularly for investigating murine models of disease and other small-animal models. However, there are several challenges to using PET imaging systems. These include the fundamental trade-offs between resolution and noise, the quantitative accuracy of the measurements, and integration with X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we review how researchers and industry are addressing these challenges. PMID:26643024

  14. Tumor Hypoxia Detected by Positron Emission Tomography with 60Cu-ATSM as a Predictor of Response and Survival in Patients Undergoing Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Carcinoma: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, David W.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Grigsby, Perry W.; Malyapa, Robert S.; Myerson, Robert J.; Picus, Joel; Ritter, Jon; Lewis, Jason S.; Welch, Michael J.; Siegel, Barry A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The response of rectal cancers to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is variable. Tumor hypoxia reduces the effectiveness of both radiation therapy and chemotherapy and is a well-known risk factor for tumor radioresistence. We hypothesized that imaging with the novel hypoxia-detecting agent, 60Cu-diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (60Cu-ATSM), previously validated in cervical and lung cancers, would predict the response of rectal cancers to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and prognosis. METHODS Patients with locally invasive (T2–4) primary or node-positive rectal cancer located <12 cm from the anal verge were recruited for this pilot study. Pretreatment tumor size and stage were determined by endorectal ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance imaging. Eleven patients also underwent clinical positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose at the discretion of the treating clinician. The primary tumor was imaged by positron emission tomography with 60Cu-ATSM, and accumulation of the tracer was measured semiquantitatively by determining the tumor-to-muscle activity ratio. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was then administered (within 2 weeks of 60Cu-ATSM-positron emission tomography) and consisted of 45 Gy given in 25 fractions to the pelvis with continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (225 mg/m2/day). Proctectomy was performed six to eight weeks after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and the tumor submitted to pathology for size measurement and staging. Tumor-to-muscle activity ratios were compared with tumor 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake, tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and with patient survival. RESULTS Nineteen patients were enrolled in the study, two of whom were excluded from final analysis (1 death during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and 1 tumor perforation during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy requiring emergent surgery). Of the 17 remaining patients, 14 had a reduction in tumor size and 13 were downstaged. The

  15. Shape threat detection via adaptive computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Ahmad; Thamvichai, Ratchaneekorn; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is used widely for screening purposes. Conventional x-ray threat detection systems employ image reconstruction and segmentation algorithms prior to making threat/no-threat decisions. We find that in many cases these pre-processing steps can degrade detection performance. Therefore in this work we will investigate methods that operate directly on the CT measurements. We analyze a fixed-gantry system containing 25 x-ray sources and 2200 photon counting detectors. We present a new method for improving threat detection performance. This new method is a so-called greedy adaptive algorithm which at each time step uses information from previous measurements to design the next measurement. We utilize sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) in order to derive both the optimal "next measurement" and the stopping criterion to insure a target probability of error Pe. We find that selecting the next x-ray source according to such a greedy adaptive algorithm, we can reduce Pe by a factor of 42.4× relative to the conventional measurement sequence employing all 25 sources in sequence.

  16. Single photon emission computed tomography and other selected computer topics

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.R.; Gilday, D.L.; Croft, B.Y.

    1980-01-01

    This volume includes an overview of single photon emission computed tomography and numerous papers that describe and evaluate specific systems and techniques. Papers cover such topics as Auger cameras; seven-pinhole and slant-hole collimators; brain; cardiac; and gated blood-pool studies; and the BICLET and SPECT systems.

  17. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... location and distribution of gamma ray- and positron-emitting radionuclides in the body and produce...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... location and distribution of gamma ray- and positron-emitting radionuclides in the body and produce...

  19. 21 CFR 892.1200 - Emission computed tomography system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Emission computed tomography system. 892.1200 Section 892.1200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... location and distribution of gamma ray- and positron-emitting radionuclides in the body and produce...

  20. Positron Emission Tomography: Human Brain Function and Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Michael E.; Mazziotta, John C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the method, present status, and application of positron emission tomography (PET), an analytical imaging technique for "in vivo" measurements of the anatomical distribution and rates of specific biochemical reactions. Measurements and image dynamic biochemistry link basic and clinical neurosciences with clinical findings suggesting…

  1. Prostate cancer nodal oligometastasis accurately assessed using prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography and confirmed histologically following robotic-assisted lymph node dissection

    PubMed Central

    O’Kane, Dermot B.; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M.

    2016-01-01

    We herein present a case of a 76-year-old gentleman, where prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PSMA PET-CT) was used to accurately detect prostate cancer (PCa), pelvic lymph node (LN) metastasis in the setting of biochemical recurrence following definitive treatment for PCa. The positive PSMA PET-CT result was confirmed with histological examination of the involved pelvic LNs following pelvic LN dissection. PMID:27141207

  2. Bone metabolism induced by denture insertion in positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, H; Chen, J; Yamaguchi, K; Sugazaki, M; Li, W; Swain, M; Li, Q; Sasaki, K

    2016-03-01

    18F-fluoride positron emission tomogra-phy (PET) can identify subtle functional variation prior to the major structural change detectable by X-ray. This study aims to investigate the mechanobiological bone reaction around the abutment tooth and in the residual ridge, induced by insertion of removable partial denture (RPD) within two different groups of patients: patients without denture experience (Group 1) and patients with denture experience before (Group 2), using 18F-fluoride PET imaging technique. 18F-fluoride PET/computerised tomography (CT) scan was performed to examine the bone metabolic change in mandible before and after the RPD treatment. Region of interests (ROIs) were placed in alveolar bone around abutment tooth and in residual bone beneath the RPD. Standardised uptake value (SUV), reflecting the accumulation of 18F-fluoride, was measured for each ROI. In all subjects of Group 1, SUVs after insertion were higher than before in both alveolar bone and residual bone, while there was less significant change in SUV in subjects of Group 2. This study demonstrated using longitudinal 18F-fluoride PET scans to effectively examine the bone metabolic change in mandible induced by occlusal loading after RPD insertion. Using this technique, within the six subjects in this study, it was shown that bone metabolism around abutment tooth and residual ridge increased after RPD insertion in case of first-time denture user, while there was no big change in the patient with experience of denture before. This study revealed the effectiveness of applying PET to evaluate bone metabolic activity as mechanobiolo-gical reaction. PMID:26431672

  3. Positron-emission tomography pitfalls related to oral prosthesis.

    PubMed

    More, Yogesh; Dusing, Reginald; Counts, Shaheen; Bond, Justin; Tsue, Terrance; Girod, Douglas

    2013-02-01

    This case report describes false-positive positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) findings related to oral prostheses and its implications in cancer surveillance. In head and neck cancer management, F18-flurodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT is widely accepted for evaluating treatment response and detecting recurrence. Interpretation of FDG PET/CT images in this setting is often challenging due to various prostheses and reconstruction methods. Following surgery for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary alveolus, a 61-year-old female had a FDG PET/CT scan on a 7-month follow-up that showed high FDG uptake along the resection site. Clinical examination showed no signs of inflammation or recurrence. Repeat FDG PET/CT without the prosthesis was normal. The PET/CT attenuation-corrected images demonstrated high FDG uptake (standardized uptake value: 11.6) along the resection site corresponding to contrast-enhanced CT images of the lesion. PET/CT nonattenuation-corrected images also confirmed increased activity. Repeat PET/CT without the prosthesis was normal. FDG is not tumor specific; it can accumulate in inflammation, infection, and post-therapy settings. Metallic and high-density prostheses show radial artifacts on CT and falsely elevated FDG uptake on PET/ CT in adjacent areas. Salivary pooling may concentrate FDG. The presence of oral prostheses has not been described as a cause of this high level of activity. PET/CT images that demonstrate intense activity corresponding to dense structures should be viewed with caution. A detailed history and physical exam as well as knowledge of artifacts are pertinent for the managing physician. Laryngoscope, 2012. PMID:22778055

  4. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, M J; Sathyam, U S; Colston, B W; DaSilva, L B; Fried, D; Ragadio, J N; Featherstone, J D B

    1999-05-12

    This study demonstrates the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for non-invasive in vivo detection and characterization of early, incipient caries lesions. PS-OCT generates cross-sectional images of biological tissue while measuring the effect of the tissue on the polarization state of incident light. Clear discrimination between regions of normal and demineralized enamel is first shown in PS-OCT images of bovine enamel blocks containing well-characterized artificial lesions. High-resolution, cross-sectional images of extracted human teeth are then generated that clearly discriminate between the normal and carious regions on both the smooth and occlusal surfaces. Regions of the teeth that appeared to be demineralized in the PS-OCT images were verified using histological thin sections examined under polarized light microscopy. The PS-OCT system discriminates between normal and carious regions by measuring the polarization state of the back-scattered 1310 nm light, which is affected by the state of demineralization of the enamel. Demineralization of enamel increases the scattereing coefficient, thus depolarizing the incident light. This study shows that PS-OCT has great potential for the detection, characterization, and monitoring of incipient caries lesions.

  5. Atlas of positron emission tomography of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, W.; Beil, C.; Herholz, K.; Pavlik, G.; Wagner, R.; Weinhard, K.

    1985-01-01

    The aim and scope of this atlas are expressed in its title. The text and legends of the book are presented in both German and English. The book contains 12 high-quality color illustrations culled from nine tomography centers across Europe and North America. Almost two-thirds of the book is devoted to the measurement of regional cerebral glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow. The remainder manages to cover all of the other cerebral applications of positron emission tomography (PET). The authors discuss that PET is being used principally in research and that its future, although theoretically unlimited, depends on the development of ''further labeled compounds.''

  6. Silicon as an unconventional detector in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinthorne, Neal; Brzezinski, Karol; Chesi, Enrico; Cochran, Eric; Grkovski, Milan; Grošičar, Borut; Honscheid, Klaus; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Lacasta, Carlos; Linhart, Vladimir; Mikuž, Marko; Smith, D. Shane; Stankova, Vera; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Žontar, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a widely used technique in medical imaging and in studying small animal models of human disease. In the conventional approach, the 511 keV annihilation photons emitted from a patient or small animal are detected by a ring of scintillators such as LYSO read out by arrays of photodetectors. Although this has been successful in achieving ˜5 mm FWHM spatial resolution in human studies and ˜1 mm resolution in dedicated small animal instruments, there is interest in significantly improving these figures. Silicon, although its stopping power is modest for 511 keV photons, offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional approaches including the potential for high intrinsic spatial resolution in 3D. To evaluate silicon in a variety of PET "magnifying glass" configurations, an instrument was constructed that consists of an outer partial-ring of PET scintillation detectors into which various arrangements of silicon detectors are inserted to emulate dual-ring or imaging probe geometries. Measurements using the test instrument demonstrated the capability of clearly resolving point sources of 22Na having a 1.5 mm center-to-center spacing as well as the 1.2 mm rods of a 18F-filled resolution phantom. Although many challenges remain, silicon has potential to become the PET detector of choice when spatial resolution is the primary consideration.

  7. Role of Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography in the Management of Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Pelosi, Ettore; Bello, Marilena; Ricardi, Umberto; Milanesi, Enrica; Cassoni, Paola; Baccega, Massimo; Filippini, Claudia; Racca, Patrizia; Lesca, Adriana; Munoz, Fernando H.; Fora, Gianluca; Skanjeti, Andrea; Cravero, Francesca; Morino, Mario

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Pre- and post-treatment staging of anal cancer are often inaccurate. The role of positron emission tomograpy-computed tomography (PET-CT) in anal cancer is yet to be defined. The aim of the study was to compare PET-CT with CT scan, sentinel node biopsy results of inguinal lymph nodes, and anal biopsy results in staging and in follow-up of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three consecutive patients diagnosed with anal cancer underwent PET-CT. Results were compared with computed tomography (CT), performed in 40 patients, and with sentinel node biopsy (SNB) (41 patients) at pretreatment workup. Early follow-up consisted of a digital rectal examination, an anoscopy, a PET-CT scan, and anal biopsies performed at 1 and 3 months after the end of treatment. Data sets were then compared. Results: At pretreatment assessment, anal cancer was identified by PET-CT in 47 patients (88.7%) and by CT in 30 patients (75%). The detection rates rose to 97.9% with PET-CT and to 82.9% with CT (P=.042) when the 5 patients who had undergone surgery prior to this assessment and whose margins were positive at histological examination were censored. Perirectal and/or pelvic nodes were considered metastatic by PET-CT in 14 of 53 patients (26.4%) and by CT in 7 of 40 patients (17.5%). SNB was superior to both PET-CT and CT in detecting inguinal lymph nodes. PET-CT upstaged 37.5% of patients and downstaged 25% of patients. Radiation fields were changed in 12.6% of patients. PET-CT at 3 months was more accurate than PET-CT at 1 month in evaluating outcomes after chemoradiation therapy treatment: sensitivity was 100% vs 66.6%, and specificity was 97.4% vs 92.5%, respectively. Median follow-up was 20.3 months. Conclusions: In this series, PET-CT detected the primary tumor more often than CT. Staging of perirectal/pelvic or inguinal lymph nodes was better with PET-CT. SNB was more accurate in staging inguinal lymph nodes.

  8. Flip-flop phenomenon in systemic sclerosis on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oksuzoglu, Kevser; Ozen, Gulsen; Inanir, Sabahat; Direskeneli, Rafi Haner

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disease, which may affect multiple organ systems. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can demonstrate the degree and anatomical extent of involvement in the entire body and coexisting malignancies in connective tissue diseases. We present a case of SSc with an increased 18F-FDG uptake in the cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues even higher than the neighboring skeletal muscles ("flip-flop phenomenon," that is, an increased 18F-FDG uptake in the skin but a decreased 18F-FDG uptake in the skeletal muscles). PMID:26430324

  9. Spectrum of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography findings in patients with parathyroid adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Dhritiman; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Harisankar, Chidambaram Natrajan Balasubramanian; Bhattacharya, Anish; Bhadada, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism results from excessive parathyroid hormone secretion. Approximately 85% of all cases of primary hyperparathyroidism are caused by a single parathyroid adenoma; 10–15% of the cases are caused by parathyroid hyperplasia. Parathyroid carcinoma accounts for approximately 3–4% of cases of primary disease. Technetium-99m-sestamibi (MIBI), the current scintigraphic procedure of choice for preoperative parathyroid localization, can be performed in various ways. The “single-isotope, double-phase technique” is based on the fact that MIBI washes out more rapidly from the thyroid than from abnormal parathyroid tissue. However, not all parathyroid lesions retain MIBI and not all thyroid tissue washes out quickly, and subtraction imaging is helpful. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides information for localizing parathyroid lesions, differentiating thyroid from parathyroid lesions, and detecting and localizing ectopic parathyroid lesions. Addition of CT with SPECT improves the sensitivity. This pictorial assay demonstrates various SPECT/CT patterns observed in parathyroid scintigraphy. PMID:21969785

  10. Utility of 18F-choline photon emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Tripathi, Madhavi; Behera, Abhishek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Aggarwal, Shipra; Aggarwal, Vivek; Kandasamy, Devasenathipathi; Taywade, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the role of 18F-choline in the detection of parathyroid adenomas has been reported. At our institution, we are currently studying the role of this tracer in comparison to the standard methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile.(MIBI) scan with single photon emission tomography/computed tomography. Our initial results show that 18F-choline is at least as good as 99mTc-MIBI scan. We present here a representative case of a 45-year-old woman with multiple skeletal lytic lesions and a high parathyroid hormone.(PTH) who underwent both these imaging techniques with concordant results, further confirmed by histopathology and postoperative fall in serum PTH levels. PMID:27385893

  11. Utility of (18)F-choline photon emission tomography/computed tomography in the diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma.

    PubMed

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Tripathi, Madhavi; Behera, Abhishek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Aggarwal, Shipra; Aggarwal, Vivek; Kandasamy, Devasenathipathi; Taywade, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the role of (18)F-choline in the detection of parathyroid adenomas has been reported. At our institution, we are currently studying the role of this tracer in comparison to the standard methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile.(MIBI) scan with single photon emission tomography/computed tomography. Our initial results show that (18)F-choline is at least as good as 99mTc-MIBI scan. We present here a representative case of a 45-year-old woman with multiple skeletal lytic lesions and a high parathyroid hormone.(PTH) who underwent both these imaging techniques with concordant results, further confirmed by histopathology and postoperative fall in serum PTH levels. PMID:27385893

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Gallamini, Andrea; Zwarthoed, Colette; Borra, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction in the early nineties as a promising functional imaging technique in the management of neoplastic disorders, FDG-PET, and subsequently FDG-PET/CT, has become a cornerstone in several oncologic procedures such as tumor staging and restaging, treatment efficacy assessment during or after treatment end and radiotherapy planning. Moreover, the continuous technological progress of image generation and the introduction of sophisticated software to use PET scan as a biomarker paved the way to calculate new prognostic markers such as the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the total amount of tumor glycolysis (TLG). FDG-PET/CT proved more sensitive than contrast-enhanced CT scan in staging of several type of lymphoma or in detecting widespread tumor dissemination in several solid cancers, such as breast, lung, colon, ovary and head and neck carcinoma. As a consequence the stage of patients was upgraded, with a change of treatment in 10%–15% of them. One of the most evident advantages of FDG-PET was its ability to detect, very early during treatment, significant changes in glucose metabolism or even complete shutoff of the neoplastic cell metabolism as a surrogate of tumor chemosensitivity assessment. This could enable clinicians to detect much earlier the effectiveness of a given antineoplastic treatment, as compared to the traditional radiological detection of tumor shrinkage, which usually takes time and occurs much later. PMID:25268160

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation Of Emission Tomography And Other Medical Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of emission tomography. This paper reviews the history and principles of Monte Carlo simulation, then applies these principles to emission tomography using the public domain simulation package SimSET (a Simulation System for Emission Tomography) as an example. Finally, the paper discusses how the methods are modified for X-ray computed tomography and radiotherapy simulations. PMID:20733931

  14. Performance of Positron Emission Tomography and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Using Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose for the Diagnosis, Staging, and Recurrence Assessment of Bone Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanxiao; Zhang, Qingyu; Zhu, Dezhi; Li, Zhenfeng; Li, Jianmin; Wang, Boim; Zhou, Dongsheng; Dong, Jinlei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the performance of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis, staging, restaging, and recurrence surveillance of bone sarcoma by systematically reviewing and meta-analyzing the published literature. To retrieve eligible studies, we searched the MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Central library databases using combinations of following Keywords: “positron emission tomography” or “PET,” and “bone tumor” or “bone sarcoma” or “sarcoma.” Bibliographies from relevant articles were also screened manually. Data were extracted and the pooled sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), on an examination-based or lesion-based level, were calculated to appraise the diagnostic accuracy of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT. All statistical analyses were performed using Meta-Disc 1.4. Forty-two trials were eligible. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET/CT to differentiate primary bone sarcomas from benign lesions were 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93–98) and 79% (95% CI, 63–90), respectively. For detecting recurrence, the pooled results on an examination-based level were sensitivity 92% (95% CI, 85–97), specificity 93% (95% CI, 88–96), positive likelihood ratio (PLR) 10.26 (95% CI, 5.99–17.60), and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) 0.11 (95% CI, 0.05–0.22). For detecting distant metastasis, the pooled results on a lesion-based level were sensitivity 90% (95% CI, 86–93), specificity 85% (95% CI, 81–87), PLR 5.16 (95% CI, 2.37–11.25), and NLR 0.15 (95% CI, 0.11–0.20). The accuracies of PET/CT for detecting local recurrence, lung metastasis, and bone metastasis were satisfactory. Pooled outcome estimates of 18F-FDG PET were less complete compared with those of PET/CT. 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT showed a high sensitivity for diagnosing primary bone sarcoma. Moreover, PET/CT demonstrated excellent accuracy for the staging

  15. High uptake in schneiderian papillomas of the maxillary sinus on positron-emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose.

    PubMed

    Lin, F Y; Genden, E M; Lawson, W L; Som, P; Kostakoglu, L

    2009-02-01

    Schneiderian papillomas are benign tumors of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses often asymptomatic in their early stages. We report a case of a maxillary sinus oncocytic schneiderian papilloma first detected by positron-emission tomography by using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Schneiderian papillomas demonstrate increased FDG uptake, similar to that of other oncocytic tumors, making it important for otolaryngologists and radiologists to realize that high uptake of FDG does not necessarily indicate a malignant lesion. PMID:18768722

  16. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in abdominal diseases.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Filippi, Luca; Danieli, Roberta; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies of the abdominal region are established in conventional nuclear medicine because of their easy and large availability, even in the most peripheral hospitals. It is well known that SPECT imaging demonstrates function, rather than anatomy. It is useful in the diagnosis of various disorders because of its ability to detect changes caused by disease before identifiable anatomic correlates and clinical manifestations exist. However, SPECT data frequently need anatomic landmarks to precisely depict the site of a focus of abnormal tracer uptake and the structures containing normal activity; the fusion with morphological studies can furnish an anatomical map to scintigraphic findings. In the past, software-based fusion of independently performed SPECT and CT or magnetic resonance images have been demonstrated to be time consuming and not useful for routine clinical employment. The recent development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems, which provide SPECT and CT images in the same scanning session, with the acquired images co-registered by means of the hardware, has created a new scenario. The first data have been mainly reported in oncology patients and indicate that SPECT/CT is very useful because it is able to provide further information of clinical value in several cases. In SPECT studies of abdominal diseases, hybrid SPECT/CT can play a role in the differential diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas located near vascular structures, in precisely detecting and localizing active splenic tissue caused by splenosis in splenectomy patients, in providing important information for therapy optimization in patients submitted to hepatic arterial perfusion scintigraphy, in accurately identifying the involved bowel segments in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, and in correctly localizing the bleeding sites in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:17161039

  17. Application of Computer Tomography for Life Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A.; Nealson, K.

    2001-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most fundamentally difficult challenges facing those who would search for life is that of scale determination. Spatial scales of life on Earth range over more than 15 orders of magnitude in mass and volume, and more than 8 orders of magnitude in 2 dimensional space. If the distribution of life is sparse in comparison to the background on which it is found, then the choice of the right scale is critical to finding that life. But how does one identify the proper scale? To put this in other words, how does one recognize the "haystacks" in which the needles (biosignatures and evidence of life) might be most profitably searched for? The problem is further exacerbated when conditions get extreme because much of the life moves from the clement surface environment into the pores and more clement environments inside of rocks, minerals and soils. Once encased in their lithic homes, these microbes become nearly impossible to study by standard techniques because of the opacity of the rocks. It is this problem that we propose to address in the work proposed here. Computer Tomography (CT) has been a very valuable tool in medicine, where the best resolution available has typically been of the order of about 0.5 mm. However, to adapt the approach for life detection of microbial endoliths, the resolution needs to be moved to the micrometer and even submicrometer levels. Thus for the studies proposed here, we begin with a commercially available instrument that can yield resolution of approximately 10 micrometers. The rational for this is twofold: first, this is the "state of the art" in laboratory instruments; and second, that while the usual size of a microbial cell is about 1 micron, microorganisms tend to live in communities that usually exceed the 10 micrometer size range. The resolution also depends on the sample size itself, so having a small lab instrument into which small samples can be placed will be beneficial to the resolution. We have now used several

  18. Positron Emission Tomography in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vercher-Conejero, Jose Luis; Pelegrí-Martinez, Laura; Lopez-Aznar, Diego; Cózar-Santiago, María del Puig

    2015-01-01

    Gradually, FDG-PET/CT has been strengthening within the diagnostic algorithms of oncological diseases. In many of these, PET/CT has shown to be useful at different stages of the disease: diagnosis, staging or re-staging, treatment response assessment, and recurrence. Some of the advantages of this imaging modality versus CT, MRI, bone scan, mammography, or ultrasound, are based on its great diagnostic capacity since, according to the radiopharmaceutical used, it reflects metabolic changes that often occur before morphological changes and therefore allows us to stage at diagnosis. Moreover, another advantage of this technique is that it allows us to evaluate the whole body so it can be very useful for the detection of distant disease. With regard to breast cancer, FDG-PET/CT has proven to be important when recurrence is suspected or in the evaluation of treatment response. The technological advancement of PET equipment through the development of new detectors and equipment designed specifically for breast imaging, and the development of more specific radiopharmaceuticals for the study of the different biological processes of breast cancer, will allow progress not only in making the diagnosis of the disease at an early stage but also in enabling personalized therapy for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26854143

  19. Noninvasive imaging of islet grafts using positron-emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuxin; Dang, Hoa; Middleton, Blake; Zhang, Zesong; Washburn, Lorraine; Stout, David B.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Atkinson, Mark A.; Phelps, Michael; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Tian, Jide; Kaufman, Daniel L.

    2006-07-01

    Islet transplantation offers a potential therapy to restore glucose homeostasis in type 1 diabetes patients. However, islet transplantation is not routinely successful because most islet recipients gradually lose graft function. Furthermore, serological markers of islet function are insensitive to islet loss until the latter stages of islet graft rejection. A noninvasive method of monitoring islet grafts would aid in the assessment of islet graft survival and the evaluation of interventions designed to prolong graft survival. Here, we show that recombinant adenovirus can engineer isolated islets to express a positron-emission tomography (PET) reporter gene and that these islets can be repeatedly imaged by using microPET after transplantation into mice. The magnitude of signal from engineered islets implanted into the axillary cavity was directly related to the implanted islet mass. PET signals attenuated over the following weeks because of the transient nature of adenovirus-mediated gene expression. Because the liver is the preferred site for islet implantation in humans, we also tested whether islets could be imaged after transfusion into the mouse liver. Control studies revealed that both intrahepatic islet transplantation and hyperglycemia altered the biodistribution kinetics of the PET probe systemically. Although transplanted islets were dispersed throughout the liver, clear signals from the liver region of mice receiving PET reporter-expressing islets were detectable for several weeks. Viral transduction, PET reporter expression, and repeated microPET imaging had no apparent deleterious effects on islet function after implantation. These studies lay a foundation for noninvasive quantitative assessments of islet graft survival using PET. diabetes | transplantation

  20. [Positron emission tomography to study central pain integration].

    PubMed

    Laurent, B; Peyron, R; Garcia Larrea, L; Mauguière, F

    2000-04-01

    The study of pain integration, in vivo, within the human brain has been largely improved by the functional neuro-imaging techniques available for about 10 years. Positron Emission Tomography (PET), complemented by laser evoked potentials (LEP) and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) can nowadays generate maps of physiological or neuropathic pain-related brain activity. LEP and fMRI complement PET by their better temporal resolution and the possibility of individual subject analyze. Recent advances in our knowledge of pain mechanisms concern physiological acute pain, neuropathic pain and investigation of analgesic mechanisms. The sixteen studies using PET have demonstrated pain-related activations in thalamus, insula/SII, anterior cingulate and posterior parietal cortices Activity in right pre-frontal and posterior parietal cortices, anterior cingulate and thalami can be modulated by attention (hypnosis, chronic pain, diversion, selective attention to pain) and probably subserve attentional processes rather than pain analysis. Responses in insula/SII cortex presumably subserve discriminative aspects of pain perception while SI cortex is particularly involved in particular aspects of pain discrimination (movement, contact.) In patients, neuropathic pain, angina and atypical facial pain result in PET abnormalities whose significance remain obscure but which are localized in thalamus and anterior cingulate cortices suggesting their distribution is not random while discriminative responses remain detectable in insula/SII. Drug or stimulation induced analgesia are associated with normalization of basal thalamic abnormalities associated with many chronic pains. The need to investigate the significance of these responses, their neuro-chemical correlates (PET), their time course, the individual strategies by which they have been generated by correlating PET data with LEP and fMRI results, are the challenges that remain to be addressed in the next few years by

  1. 18F-FDG positron emission tomography in oncology: main indications.

    PubMed

    Vercher-Conejero, J L; Gámez Cenzano, C

    2016-01-01

    The development of molecular and functional imaging with new imaging techniques such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET) among others, has greatly improved the detection of tumors, tumor staging, and the detection of possible recurrences. Furthermore, the combination of these different imaging modalities and the continual development of radiotracers for PET have advanced our understanding and knowledge of the different pathophysiological processes in cancer, thereby helping to make treatment more efficacious, improving patients' quality of life, and increasing survival. PET is one of the imaging techniques that has attracted the most interest in recent years for its diagnostic capabilities. Its ability to anatomically locate pathologic foci of metabolic activity has revolutionized the detection and staging of many tumors, exponentially broadening its potential indications not only in oncology but also in other fields such as cardiology, neurology, and inflammatory and infectious diseases. PMID:27184919

  2. Extramedullary Pulmonary Hematopoiesis Causing Pulmonary Hypertension and Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation Detected by Technetium-99m Sulfur Colloid Bone Marrow Scan and Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/CT

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Michael John; Kannivelu, Anbalagan; Chinchure, Dinesh; Srinivasan, Sivasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary pulmonary hematopoiesis is a rare entity with a limited number of case reports in the available literature only. We report the case of a 66-year-old man with known primary myelofibrosis, in whom a Technetium-99m sulfur colloid bone marrow scan with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT revealed a pulmonary hematopoiesis as the cause of pulmonary hypertension and severe tricuspid regurgitation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid SPECT/CT imaging in this rare condition. PMID:24843243

  3. Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography: a Monte Carlo simulation approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A C; Harrawood, B P; Bender, J E; Tourassi, G D; Kapadia, A J

    2007-10-21

    A Monte Carlo simulation has been developed for neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) using the GEANT4 toolkit. NSECT is a new approach to biomedical imaging that allows spectral analysis of the elements present within the sample. In NSECT, a beam of high-energy neutrons interrogates a sample and the nuclei in the sample are stimulated to an excited state by inelastic scattering of the neutrons. The characteristic gammas emitted by the excited nuclei are captured in a spectrometer to form multi-energy spectra. Currently, a tomographic image is formed using a collimated neutron beam to define the line integral paths for the tomographic projections. These projection data are reconstructed to form a representation of the distribution of individual elements in the sample. To facilitate the development of this technique, a Monte Carlo simulation model has been constructed from the GEANT4 toolkit. This simulation includes modeling of the neutron beam source and collimation, the samples, the neutron interactions within the samples, the emission of characteristic gammas, and the detection of these gammas in a Germanium crystal. In addition, the model allows the absorbed radiation dose to be calculated for internal components of the sample. NSECT presents challenges not typically addressed in Monte Carlo modeling of high-energy physics applications. In order to address issues critical to the clinical development of NSECT, this paper will describe the GEANT4 simulation environment and three separate simulations performed to accomplish three specific aims. First, comparison of a simulation to a tomographic experiment will verify the accuracy of both the gamma energy spectra produced and the positioning of the beam relative to the sample. Second, parametric analysis of simulations performed with different user-defined variables will determine the best way to effectively model low energy neutrons in tissue, which is a concern with the high hydrogen content in

  4. Cardiac emission tomography in patients using 201thallium. A new technique for perfusion scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Dymond, D S; Stone, D L; Elliott, A T; Britton, K E; Spurrell, R A

    1979-06-01

    The distribution of 201thallium (Tl) in the myocardium has been studied by the new technique of emission tomography, and compared with standard gamma camera images in 5 patients. Tomographic imaging was carried out using a dual-detector scanner operated under the single-photon technique. Initial results have been promising, with visualisation of resting perfusion defects in patients with recent infarction and those with ventricular aneurysms. Emission tomography has also been performed at exercise, and has shown tracer deficits in the distribution of significant coronary stenoses. This new approach to myocardial perfusion scintigraphy may lead to improved sensitivity for detecting apical and inferior wall abnormalities by providing depth information not available from a conventional two-dimensional image. PMID:315854

  5. Single photon emission computed tomography in Alzheimer's disease. Abnormal iofetamine I 123 uptake reflects dementia severity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Holman, B.L.; Mueller, S.P.; Rosen, T.J.; English, R.; Nagel, J.S.; Growdon, J.H.

    1988-04-01

    To determine whether abnormalities in regional cerebral functional activity estimated by iofetamine hydrochloride I 123 and single photon emission computed tomography can be detected in mild or moderate as well as severe cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we performed iofetamine I 123-single photon emission computed tomography in 37 patients with probable AD (nine patients with mild, 18 patients with moderate, and ten patients with severe dementia) and nine age-matched control subjects. Iofetamine I 123 uptake was measured in right and left frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital cortices. Mean (right and left) iofetamine I 123 activity was lowest in the parietal region of patients with AD and was significantly reduced in the other three regions compared with control subjects. Only in the parietal region was lower relative iofetamine I 123 activity associated with an impaired level of patient function and with cognitive deficit.

  6. Brain single photon emission computed tomography: Newer activation and intervention studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikofsky, R.S.; Hellman, R.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings using non-xenon 133 tracers in combination with activation and intervention techniques are reviewed. Examination of the currently available data indicates that it is possible to detect the effects of a variety of activations and interventional procedures using SPECT rCBF with non-xenon 133 tracers. There are still many issues to be resolved before SPECT can reach the level of sophistication attained by xenon 133 and positron emission tomography in studying rCBF during activation or intervention. However, research to date indicates that SPECT rCBF studied with tracers other than xenon 133 has an excellent potential for increasing the ability to differentiate normal and pathological states. 97 refs.

  7. Single photon emission computed tomography in AIDS dementia complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, P.; Vogl, G.; Fill, H.; Roessler, H.Z.; Zangerle, R.; Gerstenbrand, F.

    1988-08-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies were performed in AIDS dementia complex using IMP in 12 patients (and HM-PAO in four of these same patients). In all patients, SPECT revealed either multiple or focal uptake defects, the latter corresponding with focal signs or symptoms in all but one case. Computerized tomography showed a diffuse cerebral atrophy in eight of 12 patients, magnetic resonance imaging exhibited changes like atrophy and/or leukoencephalopathy in two of five cases. Our data indicate that both disturbance of cerebral amine metabolism and alteration of local perfusion share in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia complex. SPECT is an important aid in the diagnosis of AIDS dementia complex and contributes to the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of this disorder.

  8. Newer positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has changed cancer imaging in the last decade, for better. It can be employed for radiation treatment planning of different cancers with improved accuracy and outcomes as compared to conventional imaging methods. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose remains the most widely used though relatively non-specific cancer imaging PET tracer. A wide array of newer PET radiopharmaceuticals has been developed for targeted imaging of different cancers. PET-CT with such new PET radiopharmaceuticals has also been used for radiotherapy planning with encouraging results. In the present review we have briefly outlined the role of PET-CT with newer radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning and briefly reviewed the available literature in this regard. PMID:26904575

  9. Multiparametric [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose/ [18F]Fluoromisonidazole Positron Emission Tomography/ Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer for the Non-Invasive Detection of Tumor Heterogeneity: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewski, Piotr; Baltzer, Pascal; Polanec, Stephan H.; Sturdza, Alina; Georg, Dietmar; Helbich, Thomas H.; Karanikas, Georgios; Grimm, Christoph; Polterauer, Stephan; Poetter, Richard; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Mitterhauser, Markus; Georg, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate fused multiparametric positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (MP PET/MRI) at 3T in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, using high-resolution T2-weighted, contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and the radiotracers [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) and [18F]fluoromisonidazol ([18F]FMISO) for the non-invasive detection of tumor heterogeneity for an improved planning of chemo-radiation therapy (CRT). Materials and Methods Sixteen patients with locally advanced cervix were enrolled in this IRB approved and were examined with fused MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI and in eleven patients complete data sets were acquired. MP PET/MRI was assessed for tumor volume, enhancement (EH)-kinetics, diffusivity, and [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO-avidity. Descriptive statistics and voxel-by-voxel analysis of MRI and PET parameters were performed. Correlations were assessed using multiple correlation analysis. Results All tumors displayed imaging parameters concordant with cervix cancer, i.e. type II/III EH-kinetics, restricted diffusivity (median ADC 0.80x10-3mm2/sec), [18F]FDG- (median SUVmax16.2) and [18F]FMISO-avidity (median SUVmax3.1). In all patients, [18F]FMISO PET identified the hypoxic tumor subvolume, which was independent of tumor volume. A voxel-by-voxel analysis revealed only weak correlations between the MRI and PET parameters (0.05–0.22), indicating that each individual parameter yields independent information and the presence of tumor heterogeneity. Conclusion MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI in patients with cervical cancer facilitates the acquisition of independent predictive and prognostic imaging parameters. MP [18F]FDG/ [18F]FMISO PET/MRI enables insights into tumor biology on multiple levels and provides information on tumor heterogeneity, which has the potential to improve the planning of CRT. PMID:27167829

  10. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Win, Aung Zaw

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT) showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results. PMID:27625897

  11. Acute Calculous Cholecystitis Missed on Computed Tomography and Ultrasound but Diagnosed with Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Win, Aung Zaw

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 69-year-old patient who underwent ascending aortic aneurysm repair with aortic valve replacement. On postsurgical day 12, he developed leukocytosis and low-grade fevers. The chest computed tomography (CT) showed a periaortic hematoma which represents a postsurgical change from aortic aneurysm repair, and a small pericardial effusion. The abdominal ultrasound showed cholelithiasis without any sign of cholecystitis. Finally, a fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT examination was ordered to find the cause of fever of unknown origin, and it showed increased FDG uptake in the gallbladder wall, with no uptake in the lumen. FDG-PET/CT can diagnose acute cholecystitis in patients with nonspecific clinical symptoms and laboratory results. PMID:27625897

  12. Combined positron emission tomography and computed tomography to visualize and quantify fluid flow in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernø, M. A.; Gauteplass, J.; Hauge, L. P.; Abell, G. E.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Graue, A.

    2015-09-01

    Here we show for the first time the combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) imaging of flow processes within porous rocks to quantify the development in local fluid saturations. The coupling between local rock structure and displacement fronts is demonstrated in exploratory experiments using this novel approach. We also compare quantification of 3-D temporal and spatial water saturations in two similar CO2 storage tests in sandstone imaged separately with PET and CT. The applicability of each visualization technique is evaluated for a range of displacement processes, and the favorable implementation of combining PET/CT for laboratory core analysis is discussed. We learn that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is over an order of magnitude higher for PET compared with CT for the studied processes.

  13. Unusual case of infantile fibrosarcoma evaluated on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bedmutha, Akshay; Singh, Natasha; Shivdasani, Divya; Gupta, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma (IFS) is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma originating from extremities and occasionally from axial soft tissue. The prognosis is good with favorable long-term survival. It is rarely metastasizing tumor, the chances being lesser with IFS originating from extremities. Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) as a treatment regime further reduces the chances of local relapse and distant metastasis. The organs commonly affected in metastatic IFS are lungs and lymph nodes. We report an unusual case of an IFS originating from extremity, which received NACT, yet presented with an early metastatic disease involving soft tissues and sparing lungs and lymph nodes, as demonstrated on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. PMID:27385891

  14. Unusual case of infantile fibrosarcoma evaluated on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bedmutha, Akshay; Singh, Natasha; Shivdasani, Divya; Gupta, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Infantile fibrosarcoma (IFS) is a rare soft-tissue sarcoma originating from extremities and occasionally from axial soft tissue. The prognosis is good with favorable long-term survival. It is rarely metastasizing tumor, the chances being lesser with IFS originating from extremities. Use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) as a treatment regime further reduces the chances of local relapse and distant metastasis. The organs commonly affected in metastatic IFS are lungs and lymph nodes. We report an unusual case of an IFS originating from extremity, which received NACT, yet presented with an early metastatic disease involving soft tissues and sparing lungs and lymph nodes, as demonstrated on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography. PMID:27385891

  15. A case of sarcoidosis diagnosed by positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Sabire Yilmaz; Özdemir, Elif; Sentürk, Aysegül; Türkölmez, Seyda

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown cause which may affect any organ or system but primarily involve the lungs and the lymphatic system. Extrapulmonary sarcoidosis represents approximately 30-50% of patients. We report the case of a 51-year-old female who presented with increasing complaints of a cough, weakness, weight loss, and chest pain and who was found to have a suspicious lesion on thorax computed tomography(CT). Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT performed for diagnostic purposes demonstrated increased FDG accumulation at the bilateral enlarged parotid and lacrimal gland and in the reticulonodular infiltration area located in the left lung as well as multiple lymphadenopathies with increased FDG accumulation. There were also hepatosplenomegaly and splenic uptake. Skin biopsy showed noncaseating granulomas, and the patient was diagnosed as stage 2 sarcoidosis. PMID:27385890

  16. Depiction of ventriculoperitoneal shunt obstruction with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Sabire Yılmaz; Vatankulu, Betül; Uslu, Lebriz; Halac, Metin

    2016-01-01

    An 83-year-old male patient with ventriculoperitoneal shunt underwent radionuclide shunt study using single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) to evaluate the shunt patency. The planar images showed activity at the cranial region and spinal canal but no significant activity at the peritoneal cavity. However, SPECT/CT images clearly demonstrated accumulation of activity at the superior part of bifurcation level with no activity at the distal end of shunt as well as no spilling of radiotracer into the peritoneal cavity indicating shunt obstruction. SPECT/CT makes the interpretation of radionuclide shunt study more accurate and easier as compared with traditional planar images. PMID:27385906

  17. A case of sarcoidosis diagnosed by positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Sabire Yilmaz; Özdemir, Elif; Sentürk, Aysegül; Türkölmez, Seyda

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder of unknown cause which may affect any organ or system but primarily involve the lungs and the lymphatic system. Extrapulmonary sarcoidosis represents approximately 30-50% of patients. We report the case of a 51-year-old female who presented with increasing complaints of a cough, weakness, weight loss, and chest pain and who was found to have a suspicious lesion on thorax computed tomography(CT). Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT performed for diagnostic purposes demonstrated increased FDG accumulation at the bilateral enlarged parotid and lacrimal gland and in the reticulonodular infiltration area located in the left lung as well as multiple lymphadenopathies with increased FDG accumulation. There were also hepatosplenomegaly and splenic uptake. Skin biopsy showed noncaseating granulomas, and the patient was diagnosed as stage 2 sarcoidosis. PMID:27385890

  18. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier permeability changes in rhesus monkeys and man using 82Rb and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, C.K.; Budinger, T.F.

    1981-12-01

    Dynamic positron tomography of the brain with /sup 82/Rb, obtained from a portable generator (/sup 82/Sr (25 days) - /sup 82/Rb (76 sec)), provides a means of studying blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in physiological and clinical investigations. The BBB in rhesus monkeys was opened unilaterally be intracarotid infusion of 3 M urea. This osmotic barrier opening allowed entry into the brain of intravenously administered rubidium chloride. The BBB opening was demonstrated noninvasively using /sup 82/Rb and positron emission tomography and corroborated by the accumulation of /sup 86/Rb in tissue samples. Positron emission tomography studies can be repeated every 5 min and indicate that dynamic tomography or static imaging can be used to study BBB permeability changes induced by a wide variety of noxious stimuli. Brain tumors in human subjects are readily detected because of the usual BBB permeability disruption in and around the tumors.

  19. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  20. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G; Kolnick, Aleksandra L; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-10-01

    Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  1. Efficient photon transport in positron emission tomography simulations using VMC++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawrakow, I.; Mitev, K.; Gerganov, G.; Madzhunkov, J.; Kirov, A.

    2008-02-01

    vmcPET, a VMC++ based fast code for simulating photon transport through the patient geometry for use in positron emission tomography related calculations, is presented. vmcPET is shown to be between 250 and 425 times faster than GATE in completely analog mode and up to 50000 times faster when using advanced variance reduction techniques. Excellent agreement between vmcPET and EGSnrc and GATE benchmarks is found. vmcPET is coupled to GATE via phase-space files of particles emerging from the patient geometry.

  2. Spatial emission tomography reconstruction using Pitman-Yor process

    SciTech Connect

    Fall, Mame Diarra; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali; Barat, Eric; Comtat, Claude

    2009-12-08

    In this paper, we address the problem of emission tomography spatial reconstruction in three dimensions following a Bayesian nonparametric approach. Our model makes use of a generalization of the Dirichlet process called Pitman-Yor process. The problem in this approach is to deal with the infinite representation of the distribution in the inference. So we propose an efficient Markov Chain Monte-Carlo sampling scheme which is able to generate samples from the posterior distribution of the activity distribution. An application to 3D-PET reconstruction is presented.

  3. Studying the pulmonary circulation with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, D.P.; Mintun, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    Positron emission tomography and appropriately labeled, short-lived radiopharmaceuticals can be used to study a variety of physiologic processes within the lung. Recently, methods have been developed to measure regional pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary vascular permeability to protein macromolecules. The advantages of these techniques include accurate quantitation, regional data available in an image format, noninvasiveness, and repeatability. These methods have recently been applied to studies of hypoxic vasoconstriction, pulmonary edema, and chronic obstructive lung disease in man and large experimental animals. Although the technology is complex and requires the integration of people from a variety of disciplines, these methods offer a unique opportunity to study in vivo lung physiology.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography Findings in Atypical Polypoid Adenomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Fukami, Tatsuya; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Tohyama, Atsushi; Sorano, Sumire; Matsuoka, Sakiko; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Nakamura, Sumie; Goto, Maki; Matsuoka, Ryoei; Oya, Masafumi; Torii, Yoshikuni; Eguchi, Fuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Atypical polypoid adenomyoma (APAM) is a rare polypoid tumor of the uterus composed of atypical endometrial glands surrounded by smooth muscle. A 29-year-old nulligravida, was clinically diagnosed with endocervical myoma and underwent trans-uterine cervical resection with hysteroscope. The histopathological diagnosis of specimens was APAM. Eight months later, she diagnosed recurrent uterine tumor. The positron emission tomography (PET-CT) imaging showed an increased fluorodeoxyglucose uptake. She has performed hysterectomy and was diagnosed APAM. Therapy for APAM depends on multiple factors such as age at presentation and desire for childbearing among others. This is the first report of PET-CT findings in APAM. PMID:27134711

  5. Flow visualization in porous media via Positron Emission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, A.; Basu, A. J.; Pietrzyk, U.

    1998-04-01

    We demonstrate here the use of a non-invasive technique based on Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in visualizing and in making quantitative measurements of scalar transport through natural opaque permeable sediments. Along with various other possibilities, this technique has the potential to help improve the understanding of processes that take place at the seabeds between the porewater and the overlying water, which result in exchange of nutrients, toxins and solute. Unlike many other methods, PET is able to produce full three-dimensional pictures of the percolation of fluid through not only "constructed" but also natural porous media.

  6. Importance of assessing nonattenuation-corrected positron emission tomography images in treatment response evaluation of primary cutaneous lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Piyush; Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown previously that nonattenuated corrected (AC) positron emission tomography (PET) images improve detection of superficial lesions when compared to AC images. We present a case of cutaneous lymphoma to demonstrate the importance of assessing nonattenuation-corrected PET images in treatment response evaluation. PMID:27385905

  7. Pure hemidystonia with basal ganglion abnormalities on positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, J.S.; Raichle, M.E.

    1984-03-01

    We present a patient with hemidystonia and an abnormality of the contralateral basal ganglion seen only with positron emission tomography. A 50-year-old sinistral man suffered minor trauma to the right side of his head and neck. Within 20 minutes he developed paroxysmal intermittent dystonic posturing of his right face, forearm, hand, and foot, with weaker contractions of the left foot, lasting several seconds and recurring every few minutes. Neurological findings between spells were normal. The following were also normal: electrolyte, calcium, magnesium, and arterial blood gas levels, and findings of drug screen, cerebrospinal fluid examination, electroencephalography with nasopharyngeal leads, computed tomographic scanning (initially and four weeks later), and cerebral angiography. Positron emission tomographic scanning revealed abnormalities in the left basal ganglion region, including decreased oxygen metabolism, decreased oxygen extraction, increased blood volume, and increased blood flow.

  8. The role of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in benign and malignant bone disease.

    PubMed

    Horger, Marius; Bares, Roland

    2006-10-01

    Radiological (plain radiographs, computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) and nuclear medicine methods (bone scan, leukocyte scan) both provide unique information about the status of the skeleton. Both have typical strengths and weaknesses, which often lead to the sequential use of different procedures in daily routine. This use causes the unnecessary loss of time and sometimes money, if redundant information is obtained without establishing a final diagnosis. Recently, new devices for hybrid imaging (single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography [SPECT/CT], positron emission tomography/computed tomography [PET/CT]) were introduced, which allow for direct fusion of morphological (CT) and functional (SPECT, PET) data sets. With regard to skeletal abnormalities, this approach appears to be extremely useful because it combines the advantages of both techniques (high-resolution imaging of bone morphology and high sensitivity imaging of bone metabolism). By the accurate correlation of both, a new quality of bone imaging has now become accessible. Although researchers undertaking the initial studies exclusively used low-dose CT equipment, a new generation of SPECT/CT devices has emerged recently. By integrating high-resolution spiral CT, quality of bone imaging may improve once more. Ongoing prospective studies will have to show whether completely new diagnostic algorithms will come up for classification of bone disease as a consequence of this development. Besides, the role of ultrasonography and MRI for bone and soft-tissue imaging also will have to be re-evaluated. Looking at the final aim of all imaging techniques--to achieve correct diagnosis in a fast, noninvasive, comprehensive, and inexpensive way--we are now on the edge of a new era of multimodality imaging that will probably change the paths and structure of medicine in many ways. Presently, hybrid imaging using SPECT/CT has been proven to increase sensitivity and specificity

  9. Potential role of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging in patients presenting with generalized lymphadenopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karunanithi, Sellam; Kumar, Ganesh; Sharma, Punit; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Generalized lymphadenopathy is a common and often vexing clinical problem caused by various inflammatory, infective and malignant diseases. We aimed to review briefly and highlight the potential role of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in such patients. 18F-FDG PET/CT can play an important role in the management of generalized lymphadenopathy. It can help in making an etiological diagnosis; can detect extranodal sites of involvement and employed for monitoring response to therapy. PMID:25589803

  10. Dynamic Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Renal Clearable Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Goel, Shreya; Hernandez, Reinier; Graves, Stephen A; Shi, Sixiang; Nickles, Robert J; Cai, Weibo

    2016-05-01

    Optical imaging has been the primary imaging modality for nearly all of the renal clearable nanoparticles since 2007. Due to the tissue depth penetration limitation, providing accurate organ kinetics non-invasively has long been a huge challenge. Although a more quantitative imaging technique has been developed by labeling nanoparticles with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) isotopes, the low temporal resolution of SPECT still limits its potential for visualizing the rapid dynamic process of renal clearable nanoparticles in vivo. The dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of renal clearable gold (Au) nanoparticles by labeling them with copper-64 ((64) Cu) to form (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is reported. Systematic nanoparticle synthesis and characterizations are performed to demonstrate the efficient renal clearance of as-prepared nanoparticles. A rapid renal clearance of (64) Cu-NOTA-Au-GSH is observed (>75%ID at 24 h post-injection) with its elimination half-life calculated to be less than 6 min, over 130 times shorter than previously reported similar nanoparticles. Dynamic PET imaging not only addresses the current challenges in accurately and non-invasively acquiring the organ kinetics, but also potentially provides a highly useful tool for studying renal clearance mechanism of other ultra-small nanoparticles, as well as the diagnosis of kidney diseases in the near future. PMID:27062146

  11. Positron emission tomography: physics, instrumentation, and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Porenta, G

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that permits reconstruction of cross-sectional images of the human body which depict the biodistribution of PET tracer substances. A large variety of physiological PET tracers, mostly based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine is available and allows the in vivo investigation of organ perfusion, metabolic pathways and biomolecular processes in normal and diseased states. PET cameras utilize the physical characteristics of positron decay to derive quantitative measurements of tracer concentrations, a capability that has so far been elusive for conventional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging techniques. Due to the short half lives of most PET isotopes, an on-site cyclotron and a radiochemistry unit are necessary to provide an adequate supply of PET tracers. While operating a PET center in the past was a complex procedure restricted to few academic centers with ample resources, PET technology has rapidly advanced in recent years and has entered the commercial nuclear medicine market. To date, the availability of compact cyclotrons with remote computer control, automated synthesis units for PET radiochemistry, high-performance PET cameras, and user-friendly analysis workstations permits installation of a clinical PET center within most nuclear medicine facilities. This review provides simple descriptions of important aspects concerning physics, instrumentation, and image analysis in PET imaging which should be understood by medical personnel involved in the clinical operation of a PET imaging center. PMID:7941595

  12. Reconstruction in emission tomography via a Bayesian multiscale statistical framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolaczyk, Eric D.; Nowak, Robert D.

    2000-12-01

    Recently the authors introduced a general Bayesian statistical method for modeling and analysis in linear inverse problems involving certain types of count data. Emission-based tomography is medical imaging is a particularly important and common examples of this type of proem. In this paper we provide an overview of the methodology and illustrate its application to problems in emission tomography through a series of simulated and real- data examples. The framework rests on the special manner in which a multiscale representation of recursive dyadic partitions interacts with the statistical likelihood of data with Poisson noise characteristics. In particular, the likelihood function permits a factorization, with respect to location-scale indexing, analogous to the manner in which, say, an arbitrary signal allows a wavelet transform. Recovery of an object from tomographic data is the posed as a problem involving the statistical estimation of a multiscale parameter vector. A type of statistical shrinkage estimation is used, induced by careful choice of a Bayesian prior probability structure for the parameters. Finally, the ill-posedness of the tomographic imaging problem is accounted for by embedding the above-described framework within a larger, but simpler statistical algorithm problem, via the so-called Expectation-Maximization approach. The resulting image reconstruction algorithm is iterative in nature, entailing the calculation of two closed-form algebraic expression at each iteration. Convergence of the algorithm to a unique solution, under appropriate choice of Bayesian prior, can be assured.

  13. Is there any role of positron emission tomography computed tomography for predicting resectability of gallbladder cancer?

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaihwan; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Chulhan; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2014-05-01

    The role of integrated (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) is uncertain in gallbladder cancer. The aim of this study was to show the role of PET-CT in gallbladder cancer patients. Fifty-three patients with gallbladder cancer underwent preoperative computed tomography (CT) and PET-CT scans. Their medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-six patients underwent resection. Based on the final outcomes, PET-CT was in good agreement (0.61 to 0.80) with resectability whereas CT was in acceptable agreement (0.41 to 0.60) with resectability. When the diagnostic accuracy of the predictions for resectability was calculated with the ROC curve, the accuracy of PET-CT was higher than that of CT in patients who underwent surgical resection (P=0.03), however, there was no difference with all patients (P=0.12). CT and PET-CT had a discrepancy in assessing curative resection in nine patients. These consisted of two false negative and four false positive CT results (11.3%) and three false negative PET-CT results (5.1%). PET-CT was in good agreement with the final outcomes compared to CT. As a complementary role of PEC-CT to CT, PET-CT tended to show better prediction about resectability than CT, especially due to unexpected distant metastasis. PMID:24851025

  14. Detecting correlated errors in state-preparation-and-measurement tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Christopher; van Enk, S. J.

    2015-10-01

    Whereas in standard quantum-state tomography one estimates an unknown state by performing various measurements with known devices, and whereas in detector tomography one estimates the positive-operator-valued-measurement elements of a measurement device by subjecting to it various known states, we consider here the case of SPAM (state preparation and measurement) tomography where neither the states nor the measurement device are assumed known. For d -dimensional systems measured by d -outcome detectors, we find there are at most d2(d2-1 ) "gauge" parameters that can never be determined by any such experiment, irrespective of the number of unknown states and unknown devices. For the case d =2 we find gauge-invariant quantities that can be accessed directly experimentally and that can be used to detect and describe SPAM errors. In particular, we identify conditions whose violations detect the presence of correlations between SPAM errors. From the perspective of SPAM tomography, standard quantum-state tomography and detector tomography are protocols that fix the gauge parameters through the assumption that some set of fiducial measurements is known or that some set of fiducial states is known, respectively.

  15. Simulation study of respiratory-induced errors in cardiac positron emission tomography/computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, Gianna M.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2006-08-15

    Heart disease is a leading killer in Canada and positron emission tomography (PET) provides clinicians with in vivo metabolic information for diagnosing heart disease. Transmission data are usually acquired with {sup 68}Ge, although the advent of PET/CT scanners has made computed tomography (CT) an alternative option. The fast data acquisition of CT compared to PET may cause potential misregistration problems, leading to inaccurate attenuation correction (AC). Using Monte Carlo simulations and an anthropomorphic dynamic computer phantom, this study determines the magnitude and location of respiratory-induced errors in radioactivity uptake measured in cardiac PET/CT. A homogeneous tracer distribution in the heart was considered. The AC was based on (1) a time-averaged attenuation map (2) CT maps from a single phase of the respiratory cycle, and (3) CT maps phase matched to the emission data. Circumferential profiles of the heart uptake were compared and differences of up to 24% were found between the single-phase CT-AC method and the true phantom values. Simulation results were supported by a PET/CT canine study which showed differences of up to 10% in the heart uptake in the lung-heart boundary region when comparing {sup 68}Ge- to CT-based AC with the CT map acquired at end inhalation.

  16. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Miura, You; Seto, Akira; Kanazawa, Minoru; Nagata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires' disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires' disease. PMID:27478660

  17. Noise reduction in muon tomography for detecting high density objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettoni, M.; Bettella, G.; Bonomi, G.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Cortelazzo, G.; Cossutta, L.; Donzella, A.; Furlan, M.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Rigoni Garola, A.; Ronchese, P.; Squarcia, S.; Subieta, M.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zanuttigh, P.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2013-12-01

    The muon tomography technique, based on multiple Coulomb scattering of cosmic ray muons, has been proposed as a tool to detect the presence of high density objects inside closed volumes. In this paper a new and innovative method is presented to handle the density fluctuations (noise) of reconstructed images, a well known problem of this technique. The effectiveness of our method is evaluated using experimental data obtained with a muon tomography prototype located at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The results reported in this paper, obtained with real cosmic ray data, show that with appropriate image filtering and muon momentum classification, the muon tomography technique can detect high density materials, such as lead, albeit surrounded by light or medium density material, in short times. A comparison with algorithms published in literature is also presented.

  18. Painful spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis studied by radiography and single-photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Johnson, R.P.; Carrera, G.F.; Meyer, G.A.; Schwab, J.P.; Flatley, T.J.; Isitman, A.T.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.; Knobel, J.

    1985-01-01

    Planar bone scintigraphy (PBS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) were compared in 19 adults with radiographic evidence of spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis. SPECT was more sensitive than PBS when used to identify symptomatic patients and sites of painful defects in the pars interarticularis. In addition, SPECT allowed more accurate localization than PBS. In 6 patients, spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis was unrealted to low back pain, and SPECT images of the posterior neural arch were normal. The authors conclude that when spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis is the cause of low back pain, pars defects are frequently heralded by increased scintigraphic activity which is best detected and localized by SPECT.

  19. 77 FR 71802 - Guidance on Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... announced in the Federal Register on February 14, 2012 (77 FR 8262), and Docket No. FDA-2012-D- 0081 was... Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... ``Investigational New Drug Applications for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Drugs.'' The guidance is intended...

  20. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  1. Sooting flame thermometry using emission/absorption tomography.

    PubMed

    Hall, R J; Bonczyk, P A

    1990-11-01

    A sooting flame temperature measurement technique has been demonstrated based on emission-absorption tomography. The approach applies the algorithms of Fourier transform tomography to deconvolve local soot absorption coefficient and Planck function (temperature) from sets of parallel line-of-sight measurements. The technique has the advantage that it is experimentally simple and does not require involved data reduction. For small particles, there is also no sensitivity of the inferred temperature to possibly uncertain medium parameters. Its main limitation seems to be that it will not work well for vanishingly small absorption, but this could be overcome in practice by seeding and then performing all work at the wavelength of a seed resonance. While in principle limited to optically thin flames, accurate corrections for moderate optical thickness can often be made. A self-consistent comparison of measured global radiation from a sooting ethylene flame with a radiative transfer calculation based on measured temperature and soot absorption parameters has been performed. PMID:20577438

  2. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, R.F.

    1991-12-31

    Epilepsy is a common neurologic disorder which has just begun to be studied with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). Epilepsy usually is studied with electroencephalographic (EEG) techniques that demonstrate the physiologic changes that occur during seizures, and with neuroimaging techniques that show the brain structures where seizures originate. Neither method alone has been adequate to describe the pathophysiology of the patient with epilepsy. EEG techniques lack anatomic sensitivity, and there are no structural abnormalities shown by neuroimaging which are specific for epilepsy. Functional imaging (FI) has developed as a physiologic tool with anatomic sensitivity, and SPECT has been promoted as a FI technique because of its potentially wide availability. However, SPECT is early in its development and its clinical utility for epilepsy still has to be demonstrated. To understand this role of SPECT, consideration must be given to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, brain physiology, types of seizure, epileptic syndromes, and the SPECT technique itself. 44 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  4. Simulation of Medical Imaging Systems: Emission and Transmission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Robert L.

    Simulation is an important tool in medical imaging research. In patient scans the true underlying anatomy and physiology is unknown. We have no way of knowing in a given scan how various factors are confounding the data: statistical noise; biological variability; patient motion; scattered radiation, dead time, and other data contaminants. Simulation allows us to isolate a single factor of interest, for instance when researchers perform multiple simulations of the same imaging situation to determine the effect of statistical noise or biological variability. Simulations are also increasingly used as a design optimization tool for tomographic scanners. This article gives an overview of the mechanics of emission and transmission tomography simulation, reviews some of the publicly available simulation tools, and discusses trade-offs between the accuracy and efficiency of simulations.

  5. Current good manufacturing practice for positron emission tomography drugs.

    PubMed

    2009-12-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing regulations on current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) for positron emission tomography (PET) drugs. The regulations are intended to ensure that PET drugs meet the requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) regarding safety, identity, strength, quality, and purity. In this final rule, we are establishing CGMP regulations for approved PET drugs. For investigational and research PET drugs, the final rule states that the requirement to follow CGMP may be met by complying with these regulations or by producing PET drugs in accordance with the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) general chapter on compounding PET radiopharmaceuticals. We are establishing these CGMP requirements for PET drugs under the provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, we are announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP)." PMID:20169678

  6. FDG positron emission computed tomography in a study of aphasia

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Kuhl, D.E.; Hanson, W.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1981-08-01

    Positron emission computed tomography (PECT) using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) was used to investigate the correlations between clinical status, anatomy (as described by CT), and metabolism in five patients with stable aphasia resulting from ischemic cerebral infarction. Local cerebral metabolic activity was diminished in an area larger than the area of infarction demonstrated by CT. In one patient, FDG PECT revealed a metabolic lesion that probably caused the aphasic syndrome and was not apparent by CT. The data suggest that reliance on CT in delineating the extent of the brain lesion in aphasia or other neuropsychological defects can be misleading; FDG PECT may provide important additional information. Two patients with similar metabolic lesions had very different clinical syndromes, showing that even when currently available methods are combined, major gaps remain in clinicoanatomical correlations in aphasia.

  7. Temporoparietal cortex in aphasia. Evidence from positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.; Jackson, C.A.; Kempler, D.; van Lancker, D.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E. )

    1990-11-01

    Forty-four aphasic patients were examined with (F18)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in a resting state to determine whether consistent glucose metabolic abnormalities were present. Ninety-seven percent of subjects showed metabolic abnormalities in the angular gyrus, 89% in the supramarginal gyrus, and 87% in the lateral and transverse superior temporal gyrus. Pearson product moment correlations were calculated between regional metabolic measures and performance on the Western Aphasia Battery. No significant correlations were found between the Western Aphasia Battery scores and right hemisphere metabolic measures. Most left hemisphere regions correlated with more than one score from the Western Aphasia Battery. Temporal but not frontal regions had significant correlations to the comprehension score. The left temporoparietal region was consistently affected in these subjects, suggesting that common features in the aphasias were caused by left temporoparietal dysfunction, while behavioral differences resulted from (1) the extent of temporoparietal changes, and (2) dysfunction elsewhere in the brain, particularly the left frontal and subcortical areas.

  8. Central Nervous System Drug Evaluation Using Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Jun; Shimada, Hitoshi; Nogami, Tsuyoshi; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Takano, Harumasa; Higuchi, Makoto; Ito, Hiroshi; Okubo, Yoshiro; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    In conventional pharmacological research in the field of mental disorders, pharmacological effect and dose have been estimated by ethological approach and in vitro data of affinity to the site of action. In addition, the frequency of administration has been estimated from drug kinetics in blood. However, there is a problem regarding an objective index of drug effects in the living body. Furthermore, the possibility that the concentration of drug in blood does not necessarily reflect the drug kinetics in target organs has been pointed out. Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques have made progress for more than 20 years, and made it possible to measure the distribution and kinetics of small molecule components in living brain. In this article, we focused on rational drug dosing using receptor occupancy and proof-of-concept of drugs in the drug development process using PET. PMID:23431048

  9. Differential diagnosis of depression: relevance of positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.M.; Baxter, L.R. Jr.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Gerner, R.H.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-09-11

    The proper differential diagnosis of depression is important. A large body of research supports the division of depressive illness into bipolar and unipolar subtypes with respect to demographics, genetics, treatment response, and neurochemical mechanisms. Optimal treatment is different for unipolar and bipolar depressions. Treating a patient with bipolar depression as one would a unipolar patient may precipitate a serious manic episode or possibly even permanent rapid cycling disorder. The clinical distinction between these disorders, while sometimes difficult, can often be achieved through an increased diagnostic suspicion concerning a personal or family history of mania. Positron emission tomography and the FDG method, which allow in vivo study of the glucose metabolic rates for discrete cerebral structures, provide new evidence that bipolar and unipolar depression are two different disorders.

  10. Wilson's disease studied with FDG and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, R.A.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-11-01

    Four patients with Wilson's disease and eight normal controls were studied with 2-deoxy-2-(/sup 18/F)fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET). The patients had diffusely reduced glucose metabolism in all brain regions evaluated compared with controls, with the exception of the thalamus. The ratio of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose in the lenticular nuclei to hemispheres declined from 1.23 (+/- 0.14 SD) in controls to 1.03 (+/- 0.06) (p less than 0.025) in Wilson's disease patients. Compared with Huntington's disease, the PET FDG results in Wilson's disease indicate relatively less focal involvement of the caudate nucleus, more severe focal changes in the lenticular nuclei, and more significant global changes in glucose metabolism.

  11. Chelators for copper radionuclides in positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals†

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhengxin; Anderson, Carolyn J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of chelating agents for copper radionuclides in positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals has been a highly active and important area of study in recent years. The rapid evolution of chelators has resulted in highly specific copper chelators that can be readily conjugated to biomolecules and efficiently radiolabeled to form stable complexes in vivo. Chelators are not only designed for conjugation to monovalent biomolecules but also for incorporation into multivalent targeting ligands such as theranostic nanoparticles. These advancements have strengthened the role of copper radionuclides in the fields of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging. This review emphasizes developments of new copper chelators that have most greatly advanced the field of copper-based radiopharmaceuticals over the past 5 years. PMID:24347474

  12. Application of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in radiation treatment planning for head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Musaddiq J; Siddiqui, Farzan; Schwartz, David; Yuan, Jiankui; Machtay, Mitchell; Yao, Min

    2015-01-01

    18-fluorodeoxygluocose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18FDG-PET/CT) provides significant information in multiple settings in the management of head and neck cancers (HNC). This article seeks to define the additional benefit of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning for squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the head and neck through a review of relevant literature. By helping further define both primary and nodal volumes, radiation treatment planning can be improved using PET/CT. Special attention is paid to the independent benefit of PET/CT in targeting mucosal primaries as well as in detecting nodal metastases. The utility of PET/CT is also explored for treatment planning in the setting of SCC of unknown primary as PET/CT may help define a mucosal target volume by guiding biopsies for examination under anesthesia thus changing the treatment paradigm and limiting the extent of therapy. Implications of the use of PET/CT for proper target delineation in patients with artifact from dental procedures are discussed and the impact of dental artifact on CT-based PET attenuation correction is assessed. Finally, comment is made upon the role of PET/CT in the high-risk post-operative setting, particularly in the context of radiation dose escalation. Real case examples are used in these settings to elucidate the practical benefits of PET/CT as related to radiation treatment planning in HNCs. PMID:26644824

  13. Integrated telemedicine applications and services for oncological positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Kontaxakis, George; Visvikis, Dimitris; Ohl, Roland; Sachpazidis, Ilias; Suarez, Juan Pablo; Selby, Peter; Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine; Santos, Andres; Ortega, Fernando; Diaz, Javier; Pan, Leyun; Strauss, Ludwig; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Sakas, Georgios; Pozo, Miguel Angel

    2006-01-01

    TENPET (Trans European Network for Positron Emission Tomography) aims to evaluate the provision of integrated teleconsultation and intelligent computer supported cooperative work services for clinical positron emission tomography (PET) in Europe at its current stage, as it is a multi-centre project financially supported by the European Commission (Information Society, eTEN Program). It addresses technological challenges by linking PET centres and developing supporting services that permit remote consultation between professionals in the field. The technological platform (CE-marked) runs on Win2000/NT/XP systems and incorporates advanced techniques for image visualization, analysis and fusion, as well as for interactive communication and message handling for off-line communications. Four PET Centres from Spain, France and Germany participate to the pilot system trials. The performance evaluation of the system is carried out via log files and user-filled questionnaires on the frequency of the teleconsultations, their duration and efficacy, quality of the images received, user satisfaction, as well as on privacy, ethical and security issues. TENPET promotes the co-operation and improved communication between PET practitioners that are miles away from their peers or on mobile units, offering options for second opinion and training and permitting physicians to remotely consult patient data if they are away from their centre. It is expected that TENPET will have a significant impact in the development of new skills by PET professionals and will support the establishment of peripheral PET units. To our knowledge, TENPET is the first telemedicine service specifically designed for oncological PET. This report presents the technical innovations incorporated in the TENPET platform and the initial pilot studies at real and diverse clinical environments in the field of oncology. PMID:16525707

  14. Role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-03-26

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma are the main histological subtypes and constitutes around 85% and 15% of all lung cancer respectively. Multimodality treatment plays a key role in the successful management of lung cancer depending upon the histological subtype, stage of disease, and performance status. Imaging modalities play an important role in the diagnosis and accurate staging of the disease, in assessing the response to neoadjuvant therapy, and in the follow-up of the patients. Last decade has witnessed voluminous upsurge in the use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT); role of PET-CT has widened exponentially in the management of lung cancer. The present article reviews the role of 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET-CT in the management of non small cell lung cancer with emphasis on staging of the disease and the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy based on available literature. PMID:27018223

  15. Mycosis fungoides: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography in staging and monitoring the effect of therapy

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Maria Mathew; D’Souza, Paschal; Sharma, Rajnish; Jaimini, Abhinav; Mondal, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman, diagnosed as a case of mycosis fungoides (MF), underwent [18F]-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) examination. The study revealed intense FDG uptake in a large ulceroproliferative right thigh lesion, indurated plaques in the chest wall and left thigh, along with multiple sites of cutaneous involvement, axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. The patient underwent chemotherapy with CHOP regimen, radiotherapy for the right thigh lesion, along with topical corticosteroids and emollients for the disseminated cutaneous involvement. Repeat [18F]-FDG PET/CT study performed a year later, showed near complete disease regression specifically of the ulceroproliferative lesion and indurated cutaneous plaques, no change in lymphadenopathy, and a subtle diffuse progression of the remaining cutaneous lesions. A multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, staging and treatment of MF has long been suggested for optimizing outcomes from management of patients with this disease. This case highlights the potential role of incorporating PET/CT as a single modality imaging technique in the staging and assessment of response to therapy. PMID:25829740

  16. High-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging of the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Greco, Adelaide; Fiumara, Giovanni; Gargiulo, Sara; Gramanzini, Matteo; Brunetti, Arturo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2013-03-01

    Different animal models have been used to reproduce coronary heart disease, but in recent years mice have become the animals of choice, because of their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Various techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including high-resolution ultrasound, X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear medicine procedures. In particular, molecular imaging with cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) allows non-invasive evaluation of changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation and gene expression or measurement of changes in left ventricular functional parameters. With technological advances, dedicated small laboratory PET/CT imaging has emerged in cardiovascular research, providing in vivo a non-invasive, serial and quantitative assessment of left ventricular function, myocardial perfusion and metabolism at a molecular level. This non-invasive methodology might be useful in longitudinal studies to monitor cardiac biochemical parameters and might facilitate studies to assess the effect of different interventions after acute myocardial ischaemia. PMID:23118016

  17. Quality Assurance of Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Lei

    2008-05-01

    Recent advances in radiation delivery techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, provide unprecedented ability to exquisitely control three-dimensional dose distribution. Development of on-board imaging and other image-guidance methods significantly improved our ability to better target a radiation beam to the tumor volume. However, in reality, accurate definition of the location and boundary of the tumor target is still problematic. Biologic and physiologic imaging promises to solve the problem in a fundamental way and has a more and more important role in patient staging, treatment planning, and therapeutic assessment in radiation therapy clinics. The last decade witnessed a dramatic increase in the use of positron emission tomography and computed tomography in radiotherapy practice. To ensure safe and effective use of nuclide imaging, a rigorous quality assurance (QA) protocol of the imaging tools and integration of the imaging data must be in place. The application of nuclide imaging in radiation oncology occurs at different levels of sophistication. Quantitative use of the imaging data in treatment planning through image registration and standardized uptake value calculation is often involved. Thus, QA should not be limited to the performance of the scanner, but should also include the process of implementing image data in treatment planning, such as data transfer, image registration, and quantitation of data for delineation of tumors and sensitive structures. This presentation discusses various aspects of nuclide imaging as applied to radiotherapy and describes the QA procedures necessary for the success of biologic image-guided radiation therapy.

  18. Role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma are the main histological subtypes and constitutes around 85% and 15% of all lung cancer respectively. Multimodality treatment plays a key role in the successful management of lung cancer depending upon the histological subtype, stage of disease, and performance status. Imaging modalities play an important role in the diagnosis and accurate staging of the disease, in assessing the response to neoadjuvant therapy, and in the follow-up of the patients. Last decade has witnessed voluminous upsurge in the use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT); role of PET-CT has widened exponentially in the management of lung cancer. The present article reviews the role of 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET-CT in the management of non small cell lung cancer with emphasis on staging of the disease and the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy based on available literature. PMID:27018223

  19. Pulmonary malignant melanoma with distant metastasis assessed by positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Ri; Yoon, Ha-Yong; Jin, Gong Yong; Choe, Yeong Hun; Park, Seung Yong; Lee, Yong Chul

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is a cutaneous malignant neoplasm of melanocytes. Primary malignant melanoma (MM) of the lung is very rare. Although previous reports have described the radiologic features of pulmonary MM, its rarity means that many factors are unknown. Thus, radiologic diagnosis is very difficult. Furthermore, there is little information regarding diagnostic application and/or the usefulness of [(18)F]-fluorine-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET-CT) for primary pulmonary MM. A 69-year-old patient with a productive cough lasting three weeks was admitted to our hospital. Chest CT showed a large single mass with a multi-lobulated margin and homogeneous enhancement in the right upper lobe, which was subsequently diagnosed as a primary pulmonary MM with multiple metastases. On PET-CT images, the pulmonary mass and multiple bone lesions showed very increased uptakes of FDG. Considering that pulmonary metastasis from a mucocutaneous melanoma is the main differential diagnosis of primary pulmonary MM, systemic assessment of the whole body is more important than for other types of lung malignancies. This report introduces PET-CT as a useful diagnostic modality for pulmonary MM, especially in cases of distant multiple metastases. PMID:27385996

  20. EEG, transmission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose /sup 18/F. Their use in adults with gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, M.E.; Theodore, W.H.; Sato, S.; De La Paz, R.; Patronas, N.; Brooks, R.; Jabbari, B.; Di Chiro, G.

    1983-10-01

    We evaluated the relationship between findings from EEG, transmission computed tomography (CT), and positron emission tomography in 23 adults with gliomas. The cortical metabolic rate was suppressed in patients with and without focal slowing. Focal delta activity was not related to involvement of gray or white matter. Rhythmic delta activity and focal attenuation of background amplitude on EEG, however, were correlated with involvement of the thalamus.

  1. Utility of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a child with chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, Gunjan; DaSilva, Raphaella; Bhalakia, Avni; Milstein, David M

    2016-01-01

    We report the fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG - PET/CT) findings in an 11-month-old boy with suspected milk protein allergy, presented to the hospital with 2-month history of fever of unknown origin and failure to thrive. It showed FDG avid lymphadenopathy above and below the diaphragm and splenic focus, which could represent diffuse inflammatory process or lymphoma. Subsequent jejunal biopsy showed non-necrotizing granulomas. PMID:26917900

  2. F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a patient with corticobasal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marti, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that often eludes clinical diagnosis. The present case shows the F-18 fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) of a 62-year-old man with a progressive movement disorder with asymmetric features. PET/CT examination showed a markedly right-brain hemispheric hypometabolism also involving basal ganglia. PMID:25829747

  3. Utility of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in a child with chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Gunjan; DaSilva, Raphaella; Bhalakia, Avni; Milstein, David M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG - PET/CT) findings in an 11-month-old boy with suspected milk protein allergy, presented to the hospital with 2-month history of fever of unknown origin and failure to thrive. It showed FDG avid lymphadenopathy above and below the diaphragm and splenic focus, which could represent diffuse inflammatory process or lymphoma. Subsequent jejunal biopsy showed non-necrotizing granulomas. PMID:26917900

  4. Attenuation correction in emission tomography using the emission data—A review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    The problem of attenuation correction (AC) for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) had been considered solved to a large extent after the commercial availability of devices combining PET with computed tomography (CT) in 2001; single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has seen a similar development. However, stimulated in particular by technical advances toward clinical systems combining PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), research interest in alternative approaches for PET AC has grown substantially in the last years. In this comprehensive literature review, the authors first present theoretical results with relevance to simultaneous reconstruction of attenuation and activity. The authors then look back at the early history of this research area especially in PET; since this history is closely interwoven with that of similar approaches in SPECT, these will also be covered. We then review algorithmic advances in PET, including analytic and iterative algorithms. The analytic approaches are either based on the Helgason–Ludwig data consistency conditions of the Radon transform, or generalizations of John’s partial differential equation; with respect to iterative methods, we discuss maximum likelihood reconstruction of attenuation and activity (MLAA), the maximum likelihood attenuation correction factors (MLACF) algorithm, and their offspring. The description of methods is followed by a structured account of applications for simultaneous reconstruction techniques: this discussion covers organ-specific applications, applications specific to PET/MRI, applications using supplemental transmission information, and motion-aware applications. After briefly summarizing SPECT applications, we consider recent developments using emission data other than unscattered photons. In summary, developments using time-of-flight (TOF) PET emission data for AC have shown promising advances and open a wide range of applications. These techniques may both remedy

  5. Computed tomography and positron emission tomography/computed tomography surveillance after combined modality treatment of supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma: a clinical and economic perspective.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vatsal; Buckstein, Michael; Perini, Rodolfo; Hill-Kayser, Christine; Svoboda, Jakub; Plastaras, John P

    2013-10-01

    We studied the clinical benefits of radiological imaging, in the follow-up of patients after combined modality treatment for stage I/II classical supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Imaging data were collected for 78 adults treated during 1996-2008. Median follow-up was 4.6 years. Six of the nine relapses were detected clinically. On average, 31 imaging studies/patient were performed, with an estimated cost of $12 608/patient. Chest computed tomography (CT) scans accounted for 25%, abdominopelvic CT scans 41% and positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/CT scans 22% of this expense. Only one patient recurred infradiaphragmatically. The estimated radiation dose from imaging was 399 mSv and 229 mSv per patient, in relapse and non-relapse groups, respectively. CT scans contributed over 80% of the imaging radiation exposure. The routine use of CT scans in the surveillance of patients with HL after curative treatment adds to healthcare costs and total body radiation exposure with a low yield. History and physical examination remain effective tools for the follow-up of patients. PMID:23331161

  6. Positron Emission Tomography for the Assessment of Myocardial Viability

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective was to update the 2001 systematic review conducted by the Institute For Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) on the use of positron emission tomography (PET) in assessing myocardial viability. The update consisted of a review and analysis of the research evidence published since the 2001 ICES review to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of PET in detecting left ventricular (LV) viability and predicting patient outcomes after revascularization in comparison with other noninvasive techniques. Background Left Ventricular Viability Heart failure is a complex syndrome that impairs the contractile ability of the heart to maintain adequate blood circulation, resulting in poor functional capacity and increased risk of morbidity and mortality. It is the leading cause of hospitalization in elderly Canadians. In more than two-thirds of cases, heart failure is secondary to coronary heart disease. It has been shown that dysfunctional myocardium resulting from coronary heart disease (CAD) may recover contractile function (i.e. considered viable). Dysfunctional but viable myocardium may have been stunned by a brief episode of ischemia, followed by restoration of perfusion, and may regain function spontaneously. It is believed that repetitive stunning results in hibernating myocardium that will only regain contractile function upon revascularization. For people with CAD and severe LV dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] <35%) refractory to medical therapy, coronary artery bypass and heart transplantation are the only treatment options. The opportunity for a heart transplant is limited by scarcityof donor hearts. Coronary artery bypass in these patients is associated with high perioperative complications; however, there is evidence that revascularization in the presence of dysfunctional but viable myocardium is associated with survival benefits and lower rates of cardiac events. The assessment of left

  7. Routine radiopharmaceutical production for positron emission tomography in a clinical setting

    SciTech Connect

    Barrio, J.R.; Bida, G.T.; Satyamurthy, N.; Phelps, M.E.

    1985-11-01

    With the development of positron emission tomography (PET), many cellular processes can now be investigated in humans. To perform this task, positron-emitting radioisotopes, which decay by emission of coincidence photons externally detected after positron annihilation, are used in PET. Thus, biochemically and pharmacologically active compounds can be labeled with cyclotron-produced positron-emitting radioisotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine to probe enzyme reaction rates, membrane transport, metabolism, synthesis processes, and various pharmacological parameters. The development of PET technology for clinical applications requires not only the development of a minicyclotron technology, but also the targetry and reliable synthetic procedures for labeled compounds, all of which must be finally integrated into automated delivery systems. Although an integrated unit (cyclotron, chemistry, imaging device) specially designed for PET in clinical settings has never been developed, the work in progress in this area indicates that its implementation is immediately possible.

  8. Role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Evaluation of Cytologically Indeterminate Thyroid Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Buyukdereli, Gulgun; Aktar, Yasemin; Kara, Ertan; Uguz, Aysun; Sonmez, Husnu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyroid nodules with indeterminate fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) results remain a diagnostic dilemma, because 70 - 85% of these nodules have been found to be benign after thyroid surgery. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the preoperative diagnosis of cytologically indeterminate nodules. Patients and Methods: Forty-six patients were included in this study. These individuals had undergone FDG PET/CTs for the preoperative evaluation of thyroid nodules with indeterminate FNAB results. The results of the preoperative PET/CT scans were compared with the postoperative pathological results and statistically analyzed. Results: Of the 46 patients included in our study, the histopathology of the surgical specimens revealed thyroid cancer in 17 individuals (37%, 17/46). The PET/CT scan showed a positive result in 27 patients. Of these, 16 patients (59.3%) were found to have thyroid carcinomas. In addition, the PET/CT scan was considered to be negative in 19 patients, 18 (94.7%) of whom had benign lesions. For the detection of malignant lesions, the values for the sensitivity and specificity, and the positive predictive and negative predictive values were 94%, 62%, 59%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusion: The FDG PET/CT showed a high sensitivity and a high negative predictive value for identifying malignancies in thyroid nodules with indeterminate FNAB results. Therefore, the FDG PET/CT may be a helpful tool in the clinical management of these nodules. When an FDG positive lesion is detected, further examination is recommended. PMID:27110335

  9. Fingerprint fake detection by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Sven; Breithaupt, Ralph; Koch, Edmund

    2013-03-01

    The most established technique for the identification at biometric access control systems is the human fingerprint. While every human fingerprint is unique, fingerprints can be faked very easily by using thin layer fakes. Because commercial fingerprint scanners use only a two-dimensional image acquisition of the finger surface, they can only hardly differentiate between real fingerprints and fingerprint fakes applied on thin layer materials. A Swept Source OCT system with an A-line rate of 20 kHz and a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 13 μm, a centre wavelength of 1320 nm and a band width of 120 nm (FWHM) was used to acquire fingerprints and finger tips with overlying fakes. Three-dimensional volume stacks with dimensions of 4.5 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm were acquired. The layering arrangement of the imaged finger tips and faked finger tips was analyzed and subsequently classified into real and faked fingerprints. Additionally, sweat gland ducts were detected and consulted for the classification. The manual classification between real fingerprints and faked fingerprints results in almost 100 % correctness. The outer as well as the internal fingerprint can be recognized in all real human fingers, whereby this was not possible in the image stacks of the faked fingerprints. Furthermore, in all image stacks of real human fingers the sweat gland ducts were detected. The number of sweat gland ducts differs between the test persons. The typical helix shape of the ducts was observed. In contrast, in images of faked fingerprints we observe abnormal layer arrangements and no sweat gland ducts connecting the papillae of the outer fingerprint and the internal fingerprint. We demonstrated that OCT is a very useful tool to enhance the performance of biometric control systems concerning attacks by thin layer fingerprint fakes.

  10. RF Tomography for Tunnel Detection: Principles and Inversion Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Monte, L.; Erricolo, D.; Inan, U. S.; Wicks, M. C.

    2008-12-01

    We propose a novel way to detect underground tunnels based on classical seismic tomography, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), inverse scattering principles, and the deployment of distributed sensors, which we call "Distributed RF Tomography". Tunnel detection has been a critical problem that cannot be considered fully solved. Presently, tunnel detection is performed by methods that include seismic sensors, electrical impedance, microgravity, boreholes, and GPR. All of these methods have drawbacks that make them not applicable for use in unfriendly environments, such as battlefields. Specifically, they do not cover wide surface areas, they are generally shallow, they are limited to vertical prospecting, and require the user to be in situ, which may jeopardize one's safety. Additional application of the proposed distributed RF tomography include monitoring sensitive areas, (e.g. banks, power plants, military bases, prisons, national borders) and civil applications (e.g. environmental engineering, mine safety, search and rescue, speleology, archaeology and geophysics). The novelty of a Distributed RF tomography system consists of the following. 1) Sensors are scattered randomly above the ground, thus saving time and money compared to the use of boreholes. 2) The use of lower operating frequency (around HF), which allows for deeper penetration. 3) The use of CW diffraction tomography, which increases the resolution to sub-wavelength values, independently from the sensor displacement, and increases the SNR. 4) Use of linear inversion schemes that are suited for tunnel detection. 5) The use of modulation schemes and signal processing algorithms to mitigate interferences and noise. This presentation will cover: 1. Current physical limits of existing techniques for tunnel detection. 2. Concept of Distributed RF Tomography. 3. Inversion theories and strategies a. Proper forward model for voids buried into an homogeneous medium b. Extended matched filtering inversion c. Near

  11. Detecting small scale CO2 emission structures using OCO-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Eldering, Annmarie; Verhulst, Kristal R.; Miller, Charles E.; Nguyen, Hai M.; Oda, Tomohiro; O'Dell, Christopher; Rao, Preeti; Kahn, Brian; Crisp, David; Gunson, Michael R.; Sanchez, Robert M.; Ashok, Manasa; Pieri, David; Linick, Justin P.; Yuen, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emission structures cover spatial domains of less than 50 km diameter and include cities and transportation networks, as well as fossil fuel production, upgrading and distribution infra-structure. Anthropogenic sources increasingly upset the natural balance between natural carbon sources and sinks. Mitigation of resulting climate change impacts requires management of emissions, and emissions management requires monitoring, reporting and verification. Space-borne measurements provide a unique opportunity to detect, quantify, and analyze small scale and point source emissions on a global scale. NASA's first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the July 2014 launched Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2), now leads the afternoon constellation of satellites (A-Train). Its continuous swath of 2 to 10 km in width and eight footprints across can slice through coincident emission plumes and may provide momentary cross sections. First OCO-2 results demonstrate that we can detect localized source signals in the form of urban total column averaged CO2 enhancements of ~2 ppm against suburban and rural backgrounds. OCO-2's multi-sounding swath observing geometry reveals intra-urban spatial structures reflected in XCO2 data, previously unobserved from space. The transition from single-shot GOSAT soundings detecting urban/rural differences (Kort et al., 2012) to hundreds of soundings per OCO-2 swath opens up the path to future capabilities enabling urban tomography of greenhouse gases. For singular point sources like coal fired power plants, we have developed proxy detections of plumes using bands of imaging spectrometers with sensitivity to SO2 in the thermal infrared (ASTER). This approach provides a means to automate plume detection with subsequent matching and mining of OCO-2 data for enhanced detection efficiency and validation. © California Institute of Technology

  12. The role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis and follow up of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Caers, Jo; Withofs, Nadia; Hillengass, Jens; Simoni, Paolo; Zamagni, Elena; Hustinx, Roland; Beguin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy and occurs most commonly in elderly patients. Almost all multiple myeloma patients develop bone lesions in the course of their disease or have evidence of bone loss at initial diagnosis. Whole-body conventional radiography remains the gold standard in the diagnostic evaluation, but computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography are increasingly used as complementary techniques in the detection of bone lesions. Moreover, the number of lesions detected and the presence of extramedullary disease give strong prognostic information. These new techniques may help to assess treatment response in solitary plasmacytoma or in multiple myeloma. In this article, we review recent data on the different imaging techniques used at diagnosis and in the assessment of treatment response, and discuss some current issues. PMID:24688111

  13. Relationship of computed tomography perfusion and positron emission tomography to tumour progression in malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Timothy P C; Yartsev, Slav; Lee, Ting-Yim; Wong, Eugene; He, Wenqing; Fisher, Barbara; VanderSpek, Lauren L; Macdonald, David; Bauman, Glenn

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This study aimed to explore the potential for computed tomography (CT) perfusion and 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in predicting sites of future progressive tumour on a voxel-by-voxel basis after radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Methods: Ten patients underwent pre-radiotherapy magnetic resonance (MR), FDG-PET and CT perfusion near the end of radiotherapy and repeated post-radiotherapy follow-up MR scans. The relationships between these images and tumour progression were assessed using logistic regression. Cross-validation with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the value of these images in predicting sites of tumour progression. Results: Pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour; near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion; CT perfusion blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and permeability-surface area (PS) product; FDG-PET standard uptake value (SUV); and SUV:BF showed significant associations with tumour progression on follow-up MR imaging (P < 0.0001). The mean sensitivity (±standard deviation), specificity and area under the ROC curve (AUC) of PS were 0.64 ± 0.15, 0.74 ± 0.07 and 0.72 ± 0.12 respectively. This mean AUC was higher than that of the pre-radiotherapy MR-defined gross tumour and near-end-of-radiotherapy CT-defined enhancing lesion (both AUCs = 0.6 ± 0.1, P ≤ 0.03). The multivariate model using BF, BV, PS and SUV had a mean AUC of 0.8 ± 0.1, but this was not significantly higher than the PS only model. Conclusion: PS is the single best predictor of tumour progression when compared to other parameters, but voxel-based prediction based on logistic regression had modest sensitivity and specificity.

  14. Enhancement of positron emission tomography-computed tomography image quality using the principle of stochastic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Patel, Chetan; Sarkar, Kaushik; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandra Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Acquisition of higher counts improves visual perception of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) image. Larger radiopharmaceutical doses (implies more radiation dose) are administered to acquire this count in a short time period. However, diagnostic information does not increase after a certain threshold of counts. This study was conducted to develop a post processing method based on principle of “stochastic resonance” to improve visual perception of the PET-CT image having a required threshold counts. Materials and Methods: PET-CT images (JPEG file format) with low, medium, and high counts in the image were included in this study. The image was corrupted with the addition of Poisson noise. The amplitude of the Poisson noise was adjusted by dividing each pixel by a constant 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32. The best amplitude of the noise that gave best images quality was selected based on high value of entropy of the output image, high value of structural similarity index and feature similarity index. Visual perception of the image was evaluated by two nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The variation in structural and feature similarity of the image was not appreciable visually, but statistically images deteriorated as the noise amplitude increases although maintaining structural (above 70%) and feature (above 80%) similarity of input images in all cases. We obtained the best image quality at noise amplitude “4” in which 88% structural and 95% feature similarity of the input images was retained. Conclusion: This method of stochastic resonance can be used to improve the visual perception of the PET-CT image. This can indirectly lead to reduction of radiation dose. PMID:25400362

  15. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography--imaging protocols, artifacts, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Antoch, Gerald; Freudenberg, Lutz S; Kühl, Hilmar; Debatin, Jörg F; Müller, Stefan P

    2004-01-01

    There has been a longstanding interest in fused images of anatomical information, such as that provided by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, with biological information obtainable by positron emission tomography (PET). The near-simultaneous data acquisition in a fixed combination of a PET and a CT scanner in a combined PET/CT imaging system minimizes spatial and temporal mismatches between the modalities by eliminating the need to move the patient in between exams. In addition, using the fast CT scan for PET attenuation correction, the duration of the examination is significantly reduced compared to standalone PET imaging with standard rod-transmission sources. The main source of artifacts arises from the use of the CT-data for scatter and attenuation correction of the PET images. Today, CT reconstruction algorithms cannot account for the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings or prostheses, properly, thus resulting in streak artifacts, which are propagated into the PET image by the attenuation correction. The transformation of attenuation coefficients at X-ray energies to those at 511 keV works well for soft tissues, bone, and air, but again is insufficient for dense CT contrast agents, such as iodine or barium. Finally, mismatches, for example, due to uncoordinated respiration result in incorrect attenuation-corrected PET images. These artifacts, however, can be minimized or avoided prospectively by careful acquisition protocol considerations. In doubt, the uncorrected images almost always allow discrimination between true and artificial finding. PET/CT has to be integrated into the diagnostic workflow for harvesting the full potential of the new modality. In particular, the diagnostic power of both, the CT and the PET within the combination must not be underestimated. By combining multiple diagnostic studies within a single examination, significant logistic advantages can be expected if the combined PET

  16. Trends in radiation protection of positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, A; Soliman, K

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, the number of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging procedures has increased substantially. This imaging technique provides accurate functional and anatomical information, particularly for oncological applications. Separately, both PET and CT are considered as high-dose imaging modalities. With the increased use of PET/CT, one could expect an increase in radiation doses to staff and patients. As such, major efforts have been made to reduce radiation dose in PET/CT facilities. Variations in working techniques have made it difficult to compare published results. This study aimed to review the literature on proposed methods to reduce patient and staff dose in clinical PET/CT imaging. A brief overview of some published information on staff and patient doses will be analysed and presented. Recent trends regarding radiation protection in PET/CT imaging will be discussed, and practical recommendations for reducing radiation doses to staff and patients will be discussed and summarised. Generally, the CT dose component is often higher in magnitude than the dose from PET alone; as such, focusing on CT dose reduction will decrease the overall patient dose in PET/CT imaging studies. The following factors should be considered in order to reduce the patient's dose from CT alone: proper justification for ordering contrast-enhanced CT; use of automatic exposure control features; use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms; and optimisation of scan parameters, especially scan length. The PET dose component can be reduced by administration of lower activity to the patient, optimisation of the workflow, and appropriate use of protective devices and engineered systems. At the international level, there is wide variation in work practices among institutions. The current observed trends are such that the annual dose limits for radiation workers in PET/CT imaging are unlikely to be exceeded. PMID:25915553

  17. Clinical Utility of Thallium-201 Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Cerebrospinal Fluid Epstein-Barr Virus Detection Using Polymerase Chain Reaction in the Diagnosis of AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Fadilah S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic efficiency of thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the differentiation of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) from other central nervous system processes in patients with HIV/AIDS. Design/Methods: Over 10 years, 68 thallium-201 SPECT scans were performed on neurologically symptomatic HIV+ patients with focal lesions on CT or MRI at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Diagnoses were then established by either autopsy, biopsy, or clinical response to anti-toxoplasmosis therapy. Patients were categorized prior to a prospective clinical reading of the SPECT scans by nuclear medicine physicians. Results: In our patient sample overall, the diagnostic efficiency of thallium-201 SPECT was 79%. The diagnostic accuracy of EBV PCR testing alone in a subset of 22 patients in our study that had CSF analyzed was 73%. However, when both positive EBV PCR and positive thallium-201 SPECT results were used together, the diagnostic accuracy improved to 100% based on a sample of 13 patients where EBV PCR and SPECT imaging results were concordant.  Conclusion: Thallium-201 SPECT has a relatively high positive predictive value with regards to the diagnosis of PCNSL, which suggests that patients with positive results could undergo empiric radiation treatment without resorting to brain biopsy. However, the predictive value can be increased by testing for CSF EBV using PCR. Alternatively, if CSF cannot be safely obtained because of mass effect, we believe that these data still suggest that empiric radiation treatment should be considered when discussing treatment options with patients with a positive thallium-201 SPECT. PMID:27330874

  18. The use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for imaging human motor neuronal activation in the brain

    PubMed Central

    PAHK, KISOO; PARK, KUN-WOO; PYUN, SUNG BOM; LEE, JAE SUNG; KIM, SUNGEUN; CHOE, JAE GOL

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to visualize human motor neuronal activation in the brain using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), and to develop an FDG-PET procedure for imaging neuronal activation. A male volunteer underwent 20 min periods of rest and motor activation, whilst being assessed using FDG-PET on two consecutive days. The motor task, which involved repetitively grasping and releasing the right hand, was performed during the initial 5 min of the activation period. Subtraction of the rest period signal from the activation PET images was performed using the subtraction ictal single-photon emission computed tomography co-registered to magnetic resonance imaging method. The subtracted image detected activation of the contralateral (left) primary motor cortex, supplementary motor area, and ipsilateral (right) cerebellum. In the present study, FDG-PET detected significantly increased motor-associated activation of the brain in a subject performing a motor task. PMID:26668604

  19. Segmentation and analysis of emission-computed-tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Valen E.; Bowsher, James E.; Qian, Jiang; Jaszczak, Ronald J.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes a statistical model for reconstruction of emission computed tomography (ECT) images. A distinguishing feature of this model is that it is parameterized in terms of quantities of direct physiological significance, rather than only in terms of grey-level voxel values. Specifically, parameters representing regions, region means, and region volumes are included in the model formulation and are estimated directly from projection data. The model is specified hierarchically within the Bayesian paradigm. At the lowest level of the hierarchy, a Gibbs distribution is employed to specify a probability distribution on the space of all possible partitions of the discretized image scene. A novel feature of this distribution is that the number of partitioning elements, or image regions, is not assumed known a priori. In contrast, any other segmentation models (e.g., Liang et al., 1991, Amit et al., 1991) require that the number of regions be specified prior to image reconstruction. Since the number of regions in a source distribution is seldom known a priori, allowing the number of regions to vary within the model framework is an important practical feature of this model. In the second level of the model hierarchy, random variables representing emission intensity are associated with each partitioning element or region. Individual voxel intensities are assumed to be drawn from a gamma distribution with mean equal to the region mean in the third stage, and in the final stage of the hierarchy projection data are assumed to be generated from Poisson distributions with means equal to weighted sums of voxel intensities.

  20. Multidimensional characterization of an entangled photon-pair source via stimulated emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Fang, B; Liscidini, M; Sipe, J E; Lorenz, V O

    2016-05-01

    Using stimulated emission tomography, we characterize an entangled photon-pair source in the energy and polarization degrees of freedom, with a precision far exceeding what could be obtained by quantum state tomography. Through this multidimensional tomography we find that energy-polarization correlations are a cause of polarization-entanglement degradation, demonstrating that this technique provides useful information for source engineering and can accelerate the development of quantum information processing systems dependent on many degrees of freedom. PMID:27137611

  1. The methodology of TSPO imaging with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Rizzo, Gaia; Bloomfield, Peter S; Howes, Oliver; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Veronese, Mattia

    2015-08-01

    The 18-kDA translocator protein (TSPO) is consistently elevated in activated microglia of the central nervous system (CNS) in response to a variety of insults as well as neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. It is therefore a target of interest for molecular strategies aimed at imaging neuroinflammation in vivo. For more than 20 years, positron emission tomography (PET) has allowed the imaging of TSPO density in brain using [(11)C]-(R)-PK11195, a radiolabelled-specific antagonist of the TSPO that has demonstrated microglial activation in a large number pathological cohorts. The significant clinical interest in brain immunity as a primary or comorbid factor in illness has sparked great interest in the TSPO as a biomarker and a surprising number of second generation TSPO radiotracers have been developed aimed at improving the quality of TSPO imaging through novel radioligands with higher affinity. However, such major investment has not yet resulted in the expected improvement in image quality. We here review the main methodological aspects of TSPO PET imaging with particular attention to TSPO genetics, cellular heterogeneity of TSPO in brain tissue and TSPO distribution in blood and plasma that need to be considered in the quantification of PET data to avoid spurious results as well as ineffective development and use of these radiotracers. PMID:26551697

  2. Automated identification of the lung contours in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nery, F.; Silvestre Silva, J.; Ferreira, N. C.; Caramelo, F. J.; Faustino, R.

    2013-03-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique that permits to analyze, in three dimensions, the physiological processes in vivo. One of the areas where PET has demonstrated its advantages is in the staging of lung cancer, where it offers better sensitivity and specificity than other techniques such as CT. On the other hand, accurate segmentation, an important procedure for Computer Aided Diagnostics (CAD) and automated image analysis, is a challenging task given the low spatial resolution and the high noise that are intrinsic characteristics of PET images. This work presents an algorithm for the segmentation of lungs in PET images, to be used in CAD and group analysis in a large patient database. The lung boundaries are automatically extracted from a PET volume through the application of a marker-driven watershed segmentation procedure which is robust to the noise. In order to test the effectiveness of the proposed method, we compared the segmentation results in several slices using our approach with the results obtained from manual delineation. The manual delineation was performed by nuclear medicine physicians that used a software routine that we developed specifically for this task. To quantify the similarity between the contours obtained from the two methods, we used figures of merit based on region and also on contour definitions. Results show that the performance of the algorithm was similar to the performance of human physicians. Additionally, we found that the algorithm-physician agreement is similar (statistically significant) to the inter-physician agreement.

  3. Microfluidics for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging Probe Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Wei; Lin, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kan; Masterman-Smith, Michael; Shen, Clifton Kwang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Due to increased needs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanning, high demands for a wide variety of radiolabeled compounds will have to be met by exploiting novel radiochemistry and engineering technologies to improve the production and development of PET probes. The application of microfluidic reactors to perform radiosyntheses is currently attracting a great deal of interest because of their potential to deliver many advantages over conventional labeling systems. Microfluidic-based radiochemistry can lead to the use of smaller quantities of precursors, accelerated reaction rates and easier purification processes with greater yield and higher specific activity of desired probes. Several ‘proof-of-principle’ examples, along with basics of device architecture and operation, and potential limitations of each design are discussed here. Along with the concept of radioisotope distribution from centralized cyclotron facilities to individual imaging centers and laboratories (“decentralized model”), an easy-to-use, standalone, flexible, fully-automated radiochemical microfluidic platform can open up to simpler and more cost-effective procedures for molecular imaging using PET. PMID:20643021

  4. The methodology of TSPO imaging with positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Turkheimer, Federico E.; Rizzo, Gaia; Bloomfield, Peter S.; Howes, Oliver; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Veronese, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    The 18-kDA translocator protein (TSPO) is consistently elevated in activated microglia of the central nervous system (CNS) in response to a variety of insults as well as neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. It is therefore a target of interest for molecular strategies aimed at imaging neuroinflammation in vivo. For more than 20 years, positron emission tomography (PET) has allowed the imaging of TSPO density in brain using [11C]-(R)-PK11195, a radiolabelled-specific antagonist of the TSPO that has demonstrated microglial activation in a large number pathological cohorts. The significant clinical interest in brain immunity as a primary or comorbid factor in illness has sparked great interest in the TSPO as a biomarker and a surprising number of second generation TSPO radiotracers have been developed aimed at improving the quality of TSPO imaging through novel radioligands with higher affinity. However, such major investment has not yet resulted in the expected improvement in image quality. We here review the main methodological aspects of TSPO PET imaging with particular attention to TSPO genetics, cellular heterogeneity of TSPO in brain tissue and TSPO distribution in blood and plasma that need to be considered in the quantification of PET data to avoid spurious results as well as ineffective development and use of these radiotracers. PMID:26551697

  5. Proceedings of clinical SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    It has been five years since the last in-depth American College of Nuclear Physicians/Society of Nuclear Medicine Symposium on the subject of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was held. Because this subject was nominated as the single most desired topic we have selected SPECT imaging as the basis for this year's program. The objectives of this symposium are to survey the progress of SPECT clinical applications that have taken place over the last five years and to provide practical and timely guidelines to users of SPECT so that this exciting imaging modality can be fully integrated into the evaluation of pathologic processes. The first half was devoted to a consideration of technical factors important in SPECT acquisition and the second half was devoted to those organ systems about which sufficient clinical SPECT imaging data are available. With respect to the technical aspect of the program we have selected the key areas which demand awareness and attention in order to make SPECT operational in clinical practice. These include selection of equipment, details of uniformity correction, utilization of phantoms for equipment acceptance and quality assurance, the major aspect of algorithms, an understanding of filtered back projection and appropriate choice of filters and an awareness of the most commonly generated artifacts and how to recognize them. With respect to the acquisition and interpretation of organ images, the faculty will present information on the major aspects of hepatic, brain, cardiac, skeletal, and immunologic imaging techniques. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  6. European health telematics networks for positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontaxakis, George; Pozo, Miguel Angel; Ohl, Roland; Visvikis, Dimitris; Sachpazidis, Ilias; Ortega, Fernando; Guerra, Pedro; Cheze-Le Rest, Catherine; Selby, Peter; Pan, Leyun; Diaz, Javier; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Santos, Andres; Strauss, Ludwig; Sakas, Georgios

    2006-12-01

    A pilot network of positron emission tomography centers across Europe has been setup employing telemedicine services. The primary aim is to bring all PET centers in Europe (and beyond) closer, by integrating advanced medical imaging technology and health telematics networks applications into a single, easy to operate health telematics platform, which allows secure transmission of medical data via a variety of telecommunications channels and fosters the cooperation between professionals in the field. The platform runs on PCs with Windows 2000/XP and incorporates advanced techniques for image visualization, analysis and fusion. The communication between two connected workstations is based on a TCP/IP connection secured by secure socket layers and virtual private network or jabber protocols. A teleconsultation can be online (with both physicians physically present) or offline (via transmission of messages which contain image data and other information). An interface sharing protocol enables online teleconsultations even over low bandwidth connections. This initiative promotes the cooperation and improved communication between nuclear medicine professionals, offering options for second opinion and training. It permits physicians to remotely consult patient data, even if they are away from the physical examination site.

  7. Variation in Positron Emission Tomography Use After Colon Cancer Resection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Christina E.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; You, Y. Nancy; Kaur, Harmeet; Ernst, Randy D.; Chang, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colon cancer surveillance guidelines do not routinely include positron emission tomography (PET) imaging; however, its use after surgical resection has been increasing. We evaluated the secular patterns of PET use after surgical resection of colon cancer among elderly patients and identified factors associated with its increasing use. Patients and Methods: We used the SEER-linked Medicare database (July 2001 through December 2009) to establish a retrospective cohort of patients age ≥ 66 years who had undergone surgical resection for colon cancer. Postoperative PET use was assessed with the test for trends. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results: Of the 39,221 patients with colon cancer, 6,326 (16.1%) had undergone a PET scan within 2 years after surgery. The use rate steadily increased over time. The majority of PET scans had been performed within 2 months after surgery. Among patients who had undergone a PET scan, 3,644 (57.6%) had also undergone preoperative imaging, and 1,977 (54.3%) of these patients had undergone reimaging with PET within 2 months after surgery. Marriage, year of diagnosis, tumor stage, preoperative imaging, postoperative visit to a medical oncologist, and adjuvant chemotherapy were significantly associated with increased PET use. Conclusion: PET use after colon cancer resection is steadily increasing, and further study is needed to understand the clinical value and effectiveness of PET scans and the reasons for this departure from guideline-concordant care. PMID:25852143

  8. Anaesthesia for positron emission tomography scanning of animal brains.

    PubMed

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Smith, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a means of studying physiological and pharmacological processes as they occur in the living brain. Mice, rats, dogs, cats, pigs and non-human primates are often used in studies using PET. They are commonly anaesthetized with ketamine, propofol or isoflurane in order to prevent them from moving during the imaging procedure. The use of anaesthesia in PET studies suffers, however, from the drawback of possibly altering central neuromolecular mechanisms. As a result, PET findings obtained in anaesthetized animals may fail to correctly represent normal properties of the awake brain. Here, we review findings of PET studies carried out either in both awake and anaesthetized animals or in animals given at least two different anaesthetics. Such studies provide a means of estimating the extent to which anaesthesia affects the outcome of PET neuroimaging in animals. While no final conclusion can be drawn concerning the 'best' general anaesthetic for PET neuroimaging in laboratory animals, such studies provide findings that can enhance an understanding of neurobiological mechanisms in the living brain. PMID:23349451

  9. Brain single photon emission computed tomography in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Denays, R.; Van Pachterbeke, T.; Tondeur, M.; Spehl, M.; Toppet, V.; Ham, H.; Piepsz, A.; Rubinstein, M.; Nol, P.H.; Haumont, D. )

    1989-08-01

    This study was designed to rate the clinical value of ({sup 123}I)iodoamphetamine (IMP) or ({sup 99m}Tc) hexamethyl propylene amine oxyme (HM-PAO) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in neonates, especially in those likely to develop cerebral palsy. The results showed that SPECT abnormalities were congruent in most cases with structural lesions demonstrated by ultrasonography. However, mild bilateral ventricular dilatation and bilateral subependymal porencephalic cysts diagnosed by ultrasound were not associated with an abnormal SPECT finding. In contrast, some cortical periventricular and sylvian lesions and all the parasagittal lesions well visualized in SPECT studies were not diagnosed by ultrasound scans. In neonates with subependymal and/or intraventricular hemorrhage the existence of a parenchymal abnormality was only diagnosed by SPECT. These results indicate that ({sup 123}I)IMP or ({sup 99m}Tc)HM-PAO brain SPECT shows a potential clinical value as the neurodevelopmental outcome is clearly related to the site, the extent, and the number of cerebral lesions. Long-term clinical follow-up is, however, mandatory in order to define which SPECT abnormality is associated with neurologic deficit.

  10. Application of silicon photomultipliers to positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Roncali, Emilie; Cherry, Simon R

    2011-04-01

    Historically, positron emission tomography (PET) systems have been based on scintillation crystals coupled to photomultipliers tubes (PMTs). However, the limited quantum efficiency, bulkiness, and relatively high cost per unit surface area of PMTs, along with the growth of new applications for PET, offers opportunities for other photodetectors. Among these, small-animal scanners, hybrid PET/MRI systems, and incorporation of time-of-flight information are of particular interest and require low-cost, compact, fast, and magnetic field compatible photodetectors. With high quantum efficiency and compact structure, avalanche photodiodes (APDs) overcome several of the drawbacks of PMTs, but this is offset by degraded signal-to-noise and timing properties. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer an alternative solution, combining many of the advantages of PMTs and APDs. They have high gain, excellent timing properties and are insensitive to magnetic fields. At the present time, SiPM technology is rapidly developing and therefore an investigation into optimal design and operating conditions is underway together with detailed characterization of SiPM-based PET detectors. Published data are extremely promising and show good energy and timing resolution, as well as the ability to decode small scintillator arrays. SiPMs clearly have the potential to be the photodetector of choice for some, or even perhaps most, PET systems. PMID:21321792