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Sample records for detector alignment algorithm

  1. Advanced alignment of the ATLAS inner detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahlman, Jonathan M.; Atlas Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The primary goal of the ATLAS inner detector (ID) is to accurately measure the trajectories of charged particles in the high particle density environment of the large hadron collider (LHC) collisions. This is achieved using a combination of different technologies, including silicon pixels, silicon microstrips, and gaseous drift-tubes, all immersed in a 2 Tesla magnetic field. With nearly 750 k alignable degrees of freedom, it is crucial that an accurate model of the detector positions be produced using an automated and robust algorithm in order to achieve good tracking performance. This has been accomplished using a variety of alignment techniques resulting in near optimal hit and momentum resolutions.

  2. Internal Alignment of the SLD Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.J.; Wickens, F.J.; Su, D.; /SLAC

    2007-12-03

    The tracking resolution and vertex finding capabilities of the SLD experiment depended upon a precise knowledge of the location and orientation of the elements of the SLD pixel vertex detector (VXD3) in 3D space. At the heart of the procedure described here to align the 96 CCDs is the matrix inversion technique of singular value decomposition (SVD). This tool was employed to unfold the detector geometry corrections from the track data in the VXD3. The algorithm was adapted to perform an optimal {chi}{sup 2} minimization by careful treatment of the track hit residual measurement errors. The tracking resolution obtained with the aligned geometry achieved the design performance. Comments are given on how this method could be used for other trackers.

  3. New Attitude Sensor Alignment Calibration Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.; Sedlak, Joseph E.; Harman, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Accurate spacecraft attitudes may only be obtained if the primary attitude sensors are well calibrated. Launch shock, relaxation of gravitational stresses and similar effects often produce large enough alignment shifts so that on-orbit alignment calibration is necessary if attitude accuracy requirements are to be met. A variety of attitude sensor alignment algorithms have been developed to meet the need for on-orbit calibration. Two new algorithms are presented here: ALICAL and ALIQUEST. Each of these has advantages in particular circumstances. ALICAL is an attitude independent algorithm that uses near simultaneous measurements from two or more sensors to produce accurate sensor alignments. For each set of simultaneous observations the attitude is overdetermined. The information content of the extra degrees of freedom can be combined over numerous sets to provide the sensor alignments. ALIQUEST is an attitude dependent algorithm that combines sensor and attitude data into a loss function that has the same mathematical form as the Wahba problem. Alignments can then be determined using any of the algorithms (such as the QUEST quaternion estimator) that have been developed to solve the Wahba problem for attitude. Results from the use of these methods on active missions are presented.

  4. Algorithms for Automatic Alignment of Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Oliker, Leonid; Schreiber, Robert; Sheffler, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    Aggregate data objects (such as arrays) are distributed across the processor memories when compiling a data-parallel language for a distributed-memory machine. The mapping determines the amount of communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. A common approach is to break the mapping into two stages: an alignment that maps all the objects to an abstract template, followed by a distribution that maps the template to the processors. This paper describes algorithms for solving the various facets of the alignment problem: axis and stride alignment, static and mobile offset alignment, and replication labeling. We show that optimal axis and stride alignment is NP-complete for general program graphs, and give a heuristic method that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. We also show how local graph contractions can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. We show how to model the static offset alignment problem using linear programming, and we show that loop-dependent mobile offset alignment is sometimes necessary for optimum performance. We describe an algorithm with for determining mobile alignments for objects within do loops. We also identify situations in which replicated alignment is either required by the program itself or can be used to improve performance. We describe an algorithm based on network flow that replicates objects so as to minimize the total amount of broadcast communication in replication.

  5. Comparison of Beam-Based Alignment Algorithms for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Gibbons, L.; Patterson, J.R.; Rubin, D.L.; Sagan, D.; Tenenbaum, P.; /SLAC

    2006-03-15

    The main linac of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires more sophisticated alignment techniques than those provided by survey alone. Various Beam-Based Alignment (BBA) algorithms have been proposed to achieve the desired low emittance preservation. Dispersion Free Steering, Ballistic Alignment and the Kubo method are compared. Alignment algorithms are also tested in the presence of an Earth-like stray field.

  6. An Improved Inertial Frame Alignment Algorithm Based on Horizontal Alignment Information for Marine SINS.

    PubMed

    Che, Yanting; Wang, Qiuying; Gao, Wei; Yu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved inertial frame alignment algorithm for a marine SINS under mooring conditions is proposed, which significantly improves accuracy. Since the horizontal alignment is easy to complete, and a characteristic of gravity is that its component in the horizontal plane is zero, we use a clever method to improve the conventional inertial alignment algorithm. Firstly, a large misalignment angle model and a dimensionality reduction Gauss-Hermite filter are employed to establish the fine horizontal reference frame. Based on this, the projection of the gravity in the body inertial coordinate frame can be calculated easily. Then, the initial alignment algorithm is accomplished through an inertial frame alignment algorithm. The simulation and experiment results show that the improved initial alignment algorithm performs better than the conventional inertial alignment algorithm, and meets the accuracy requirements of a medium-accuracy marine SINS. PMID:26445048

  7. An Improved Inertial Frame Alignment Algorithm Based on Horizontal Alignment Information for Marine SINS

    PubMed Central

    Che, Yanting; Wang, Qiuying; Gao, Wei; Yu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an improved inertial frame alignment algorithm for a marine SINS under mooring conditions is proposed, which significantly improves accuracy. Since the horizontal alignment is easy to complete, and a characteristic of gravity is that its component in the horizontal plane is zero, we use a clever method to improve the conventional inertial alignment algorithm. Firstly, a large misalignment angle model and a dimensionality reduction Gauss-Hermite filter are employed to establish the fine horizontal reference frame. Based on this, the projection of the gravity in the body inertial coordinate frame can be calculated easily. Then, the initial alignment algorithm is accomplished through an inertial frame alignment algorithm. The simulation and experiment results show that the improved initial alignment algorithm performs better than the conventional inertial alignment algorithm, and meets the accuracy requirements of a medium-accuracy marine SINS. PMID:26445048

  8. SPA: A Probabilistic Algorithm for Spliced Alignment

    PubMed Central

    van Nimwegen, Erik; Paul, Nicodeme; Sheridan, Robert; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2006-01-01

    Recent large-scale cDNA sequencing efforts show that elaborate patterns of splice variation are responsible for much of the proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes. To obtain an accurate account of the repertoire of splice variants, and to gain insight into the mechanisms of alternative splicing, it is essential that cDNAs are very accurately mapped to their respective genomes. Currently available algorithms for cDNA-to-genome alignment do not reach the necessary level of accuracy because they use ad hoc scoring models that cannot correctly trade off the likelihoods of various sequencing errors against the probabilities of different gene structures. Here we develop a Bayesian probabilistic approach to cDNA-to-genome alignment. Gene structures are assigned prior probabilities based on the lengths of their introns and exons, and based on the sequences at their splice boundaries. A likelihood model for sequencing errors takes into account the rates at which misincorporation, as well as insertions and deletions of different lengths, occurs during sequencing. The parameters of both the prior and likelihood model can be automatically estimated from a set of cDNAs, thus enabling our method to adapt itself to different organisms and experimental procedures. We implemented our method in a fast cDNA-to-genome alignment program, SPA, and applied it to the FANTOM3 dataset of over 100,000 full-length mouse cDNAs and a dataset of over 20,000 full-length human cDNAs. Comparison with the results of four other mapping programs shows that SPA produces alignments of significantly higher quality. In particular, the quality of the SPA alignments near splice boundaries and SPA's mapping of the 5′ and 3′ ends of the cDNAs are highly improved, allowing for more accurate identification of transcript starts and ends, and accurate identification of subtle splice variations. Finally, our splice boundary analysis on the human dataset suggests the existence of a novel non-canonical splice

  9. Cover song identification by sequence alignment algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Li; Zhong, Qian; Wang, Szu-Ying; Roychowdhury, Vwani

    2011-10-01

    Content-based music analysis has drawn much attention due to the rapidly growing digital music market. This paper describes a method that can be used to effectively identify cover songs. A cover song is a song that preserves only the crucial melody of its reference song but different in some other acoustic properties. Hence, the beat/chroma-synchronous chromagram, which is insensitive to the variation of the timber or rhythm of songs but sensitive to the melody, is chosen. The key transposition is achieved by cyclically shifting the chromatic domain of the chromagram. By using the Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to obtain the time sequences of songs, the system is made even more robust. Similar structure or length between the cover songs and its reference are not necessary by the Smith-Waterman Alignment Algorithm.

  10. On Quantum Algorithm for Multiple Alignment of Amino Acid Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriyama, Satoshi; Ohya, Masanori

    2009-02-01

    The alignment of genome sequences or amino acid sequences is one of fundamental operations for the study of life. Usual computational complexity for the multiple alignment of N sequences with common length L by dynamic programming is O(LN). This alignment is considered as one of the NP problems, so that it is desirable to find a nice algorithm of the multiple alignment. Thus in this paper we propose the quantum algorithm for the multiple alignment based on the works12,1,2 in which the NP complete problem was shown to be the P problem by means of quantum algorithm and chaos information dynamics.

  11. CSA: An efficient algorithm to improve circular DNA multiple alignment

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Francisco; Pereira, Luísa; Freitas, Ana T

    2009-01-01

    Background The comparison of homologous sequences from different species is an essential approach to reconstruct the evolutionary history of species and of the genes they harbour in their genomes. Several complete mitochondrial and nuclear genomes are now available, increasing the importance of using multiple sequence alignment algorithms in comparative genomics. MtDNA has long been used in phylogenetic analysis and errors in the alignments can lead to errors in the interpretation of evolutionary information. Although a large number of multiple sequence alignment algorithms have been proposed to date, they all deal with linear DNA and cannot handle directly circular DNA. Researchers interested in aligning circular DNA sequences must first rotate them to the "right" place using an essentially manual process, before they can use multiple sequence alignment tools. Results In this paper we propose an efficient algorithm that identifies the most interesting region to cut circular genomes in order to improve phylogenetic analysis when using standard multiple sequence alignment algorithms. This algorithm identifies the largest chain of non-repeated longest subsequences common to a set of circular mitochondrial DNA sequences. All the sequences are then rotated and made linear for multiple alignment purposes. To evaluate the effectiveness of this new tool, three different sets of mitochondrial DNA sequences were considered. Other tests considering randomly rotated sequences were also performed. The software package Arlequin was used to evaluate the standard genetic measures of the alignments obtained with and without the use of the CSA algorithm with two well known multiple alignment algorithms, the CLUSTALW and the MAVID tools, and also the visualization tool SinicView. Conclusion The results show that a circularization and rotation pre-processing step significantly improves the efficiency of public available multiple sequence alignment algorithms when used in the

  12. Protein multiple sequence alignment by hybrid bio-inspired algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cutello, Vincenzo; Nicosia, Giuseppe; Pavone, Mario; Prizzi, Igor

    2011-03-01

    This article presents an immune inspired algorithm to tackle the Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) problem. MSA is one of the most important tasks in biological sequence analysis. Although this paper focuses on protein alignments, most of the discussion and methodology may also be applied to DNA alignments. The problem of finding the multiple alignment was investigated in the study by Bonizzoni and Vedova and Wang and Jiang, and proved to be a NP-hard (non-deterministic polynomial-time hard) problem. The presented algorithm, called Immunological Multiple Sequence Alignment Algorithm (IMSA), incorporates two new strategies to create the initial population and specific ad hoc mutation operators. It is based on the 'weighted sum of pairs' as objective function, to evaluate a given candidate alignment. IMSA was tested using both classical benchmarks of BAliBASE (versions 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0), and experimental results indicate that it is comparable with state-of-the-art multiple alignment algorithms, in terms of quality of alignments, weighted Sums-of-Pairs (SP) and Column Score (CS) values. The main novelty of IMSA is its ability to generate more than a single suboptimal alignment, for every MSA instance; this behaviour is due to the stochastic nature of the algorithm and of the populations evolved during the convergence process. This feature will help the decision maker to assess and select a biologically relevant multiple sequence alignment. Finally, the designed algorithm can be used as a local search procedure to properly explore promising alignments of the search space. PMID:21071394

  13. Algorithms, applications, and challenges of protein structure alignment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianzhu; Wang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    As a fundamental problem in computational structure biology, protein structure alignment has attracted the focus of the community for more than 20 years. While the pairwise structure alignment could be applied to measure the similarity between two proteins, which is a first step for homology search and fold space construction, the multiple structure alignment could be used to understand evolutionary conservation and divergence from a family of protein structures. Structure alignment is an NP-hard problem, which is only computationally tractable by using heuristics. Three levels of heuristics for pairwise structure alignment have been proposed, from the representations of protein structure, the perspectives of viewing protein as a rigid-body or flexible, to the scoring functions as well as the search algorithms for the alignment. For multiple structure alignment, the fourth level of heuristics is applied on how to merge all input structures to a multiple structure alignment. In this review, we first present a small survey of current methods for protein pairwise and multiple alignment, focusing on those that are publicly available as web servers. In more detail, we also discuss the advancements on the development of the new approaches to increase the pairwise alignment accuracy, to efficiently and reliably merge input structures to the multiple structure alignment. Finally, besides broadening the spectrum of the applications of structure alignment for protein template-based prediction, we also list several open problems that need to be solved in the future, such as the large complex alignment and the fast database search. PMID:24629187

  14. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  15. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  16. An Adaptive Hybrid Algorithm for Global Network Alignment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiang; Xiang, Chaojuan; Ma, Jin; Tan, Jun; Wen, Tieqiao; Lei, Jinzhi; Nie, Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to obtain reliable and optimal mapping between networks for alignment algorithms when both nodal and topological structures are taken into consideration due to the underlying NP-hard problem. Here, we introduce an adaptive hybrid algorithm that combines the classical Hungarian algorithm and the Greedy algorithm (HGA) for the global alignment of biomolecular networks. With this hybrid algorithm, every pair of nodes with one in each network is first aligned based on node information (e.g., their sequence attributes) and then followed by an adaptive and convergent iteration procedure for aligning the topological connections in the networks. For four well-studied protein interaction networks, i.e., C.elegans, yeast, D.melanogaster, and human, applications of HGA lead to improved alignments in acceptable running time. The mapping between yeast and human PINs obtained by the new algorithm has the largest value of common gene ontology (GO) terms compared to those obtained by other existing algorithms, while it still has lower Mean normalized entropy (MNE) and good performances on several other measures. Overall, the adaptive HGA is effective and capable of providing good mappings between aligned networks in which the biological properties of both the nodes and the connections are important. PMID:27295633

  17. Robust algorithm for aligning two-dimensional chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Gros, Jonas; Nabi, Deedar; Dimitriou-Christidis, Petros; Rutler, Rebecca; Arey, J Samuel

    2012-11-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) chromatograms typically exhibit run-to-run retention time variability. Chromatogram alignment is often a desirable step prior to further analysis of the data, for example, in studies of environmental forensics or weathering of complex mixtures. We present a new algorithm for aligning whole GC × GC chromatograms. This technique is based on alignment points that have locations indicated by the user both in a target chromatogram and in a reference chromatogram. We applied the algorithm to two sets of samples. First, we aligned the chromatograms of twelve compositionally distinct oil spill samples, all analyzed using the same instrument parameters. Second, we applied the algorithm to two compositionally distinct wastewater extracts analyzed using two different instrument temperature programs, thus involving larger retention time shifts than the first sample set. For both sample sets, the new algorithm performed favorably compared to two other available alignment algorithms: that of Pierce, K. M.; Wood, Lianna F.; Wright, B. W.; Synovec, R. E. Anal. Chem.2005, 77, 7735-7743 and 2-D COW from Zhang, D.; Huang, X.; Regnier, F. E.; Zhang, M. Anal. Chem.2008, 80, 2664-2671. The new algorithm achieves the best matches of retention times for test analytes, avoids some artifacts which result from the other alignment algorithms, and incurs the least modification of quantitative signal information. PMID:23082816

  18. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Gayde, J. Ch.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Panzieri, D.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rocco, E.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.

    2014-12-01

    The gaseous COMPASS RICH-1 detector uses two spherical mirror surfaces, segmented into 116 individual mirrors, to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the detector plane. Any mirror misalignment directly affects the detector resolution. The on-line Continuous Line Alignment and Monitoring (CLAM) photogrammetry-based method has been implemented to measure the alignment of individual mirrors which can be characterized by the center of curvature. The mirror wall reflects a regular grid of retroreflective strips placed inside the detector vessel. Then, the position of each mirror is determined from the image of the grid reflection. The images are collected by four cameras. Any small mirror misalignment results in changes of the grid lines' positions in the image. The accuracy limits of the CLAM method were checked by laser interferometry and are below 0.1 mrad.

  19. Remote alignment of large mirror array for RICH detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Torre, S.; Levorato, S.; Menon, G.; Polak, J.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Tessarotto, F.

    2008-09-01

    Image focusing in large RICH detectors is obtained by composite systems of mirror elements. Monitoring and adjusting the alignment of the mirror elements during data taking are important handles to improve the detector resolution. Mirror adjustment via piezoelectric actuators can combine unprecedented accuracy and match some fundamental requirements: the detector material budget can be kept low and the high purity of the gas radiator can be preserved, a prerequisite when UV photons are detected. A system based on this principle, well suited for COMPASS RICH-1 mirrors, is proposed.

  20. Evaluation of mathematical algorithms for automatic patient alignment in radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kenneth M; Schulte, Reinhard W; Schubert, Keith E; Wroe, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Image registration techniques based on anatomical features can serve to automate patient alignment for intracranial radiosurgery procedures in an effort to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the alignment process as well as potentially eliminate the need for implanted fiducial markers. To explore this option, four two-dimensional (2D) image registration algorithms were analyzed: the phase correlation technique, mutual information (MI) maximization, enhanced correlation coefficient (ECC) maximization, and the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. Digitally reconstructed radiographs from the treatment planning computed tomography scan of a human skull were used as the reference images, while orthogonal digital x-ray images taken in the treatment room were used as the captured images to be aligned. The accuracy of aligning the skull with each algorithm was compared to the alignment of the currently practiced procedure, which is based on a manual process of selecting common landmarks, including implanted fiducials and anatomical skull features. Of the four algorithms, three (phase correlation, MI maximization, and ECC maximization) demonstrated clinically adequate (ie, comparable to the standard alignment technique) translational accuracy and improvements in speed compared to the interactive, user-guided technique; however, the ICP algorithm failed to give clinically acceptable results. The results of this work suggest that a combination of different algorithms may provide the best registration results. This research serves as the initial groundwork for the translation of automated, anatomy-based 2D algorithms into a real-world system for 2D-to-2D image registration and alignment for intracranial radiosurgery. This may obviate the need for invasive implantation of fiducial markers into the skull and may improve treatment room efficiency and accuracy. PMID:25782189

  1. Autonomous beam alignment for coherent Doppler lidar with multielement detectors.

    PubMed

    Frehlich, R

    1999-11-20

    Autonomous beam alignment for coherent Doppler lidar requires accurate information about optical misalignment and optical aberrations. A multielement heterodyne detector provides the required information without a loss in overall system performance. The effects of statistical variations from the random backscattered field (speckle field) are determined with computer simulations for both ground-based operation with a fixed calibration target and for space-based operation with random target backscatter. PMID:18324236

  2. Radar Image and Rain-gauge Alignment using the Multi-resolution Viscous Alignment (MVA) Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatdarong, V.

    2007-12-01

    Rainfall is a complex environmental variable that is difficult to describe either deterministically or statistically. To understand rainfall behaviors, many types of instruments are employed to detect and collect rainfall information. Among them, radar seems to provide the most comprehensive rainfall measurement at fine spatial and temporal resolution and over a relatively wide area. Nevertheless, it does not detects surface rainfall directly like what rain-gauge does. The accuracy radar rainfall, therefore, depends greatly on the Z-R relationship which convert radar reflectivity (Z) to surface rainrate (R). This calibration is usually done by fitting the rain-gauge data with the corresponding radar reflectivity using the regression analysis. To best fit the data, the radar reflectivity at neighbor pixels are usually used to best match the rain-gauge data. However, when applying the Z-R relationship to the radar image, there is no position adjustment despite the calibration technique. Hence, it is desirable to adjust the position of the radar reflectivity images prior to applying the Z-R relationship to improve the accuracy of the rainfall estimation. In this research, the Multi-resolution Viscous Alignment (MVA) algorithm is applied to best align radar reflectivity images to rain-gauge data in order to improve rainfall estimation from the Z-R relationship. The MVA algorithm solves the motion estimation problems using a Bayesian formulation to minimize misfits between two data sets. In general, the problem are ill-posed; therefore, some regularizations and constraints based on smoothness and non-divergence assumptions are employed. This algorithm is superior to the conventional techniques and correlation based techniques. It is fast, robust, easy to implement, and does not require data training. In addition, it can handle higher-order, missing data, and small-scale deformations. The algorithm provides spatially dense, consistency, and smooth transition vector. The

  3. Multiple sequence alignment algorithm based on a dispersion graph and ant colony algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Liao, Bo; Zhu, Wen; Xiang, Xuyu

    2009-10-01

    In this article, we describe a representation for the processes of multiple sequences alignment (MSA) and used it to solve the problem of MSA. By this representation, we took every possible aligning result into account by defining the representation of gap insertion, the value of heuristic information in every optional path and scoring rule. On the basis of the proposed multidimensional graph, we used the ant colony algorithm to find the better path that denotes a better aligning result. In our article, we proposed the instance of three-dimensional graph and four-dimensional graph and advanced a special ichnographic representation to analyze MSA. It is yet only an experimental software, and we gave an example for finding the best aligning result by three-dimensional graph and ant colony algorithm. Experimental results show that our method can improve the solution quality on MSA benchmarks. PMID:19130503

  4. Linac Alignment Algorithm: Analysis on 1-to-1 Steering

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In a linear accelerator, it is important to achieve a good alignment between all of its components (such as quadrupoles, RF cavities, beam position monitors et al.), in order to better preserve the beam quality during acceleration. After the survey of the main linac components, there are several beam-based alignment (BBA) techniques to be applied, to further optimize the beam trajectory and calculate the corresponding steering magnets strength. Among these techniques the most simple and straightforward one is the one-to-one (1-to-1) steering technique, which steers the beam from quad center to center, and removes the betatron oscillation from quad focusing. For a future linear collider such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), the initial beam emittance is very small in the vertical plane (flat beam with {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 20-40nm), which means the alignment requirement is very tight. In this note, we evaluate the emittance growth with one-to-one correction algorithm employed, both analytically and numerically. Then the ILC main linac accelerator is taken as an example to compare the vertical emittance growth after 1-to-1 steering, both from analytical formulae and multi-particle tracking simulation. It is demonstrated that the estimated emittance growth from the derived formulae agrees well with the results from numerical simulation, with and without acceleration, respectively.

  5. Algorithm for Aligning an Array of Receiving Radio Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogstad, David

    2006-01-01

    A digital-signal-processing algorithm (somewhat arbitrarily) called SUMPLE has been devised as a means of aligning the outputs of multiple receiving radio antennas in a large array for the purpose of receiving a weak signal transmitted by a single distant source. As used here, aligning signifies adjusting the delays and phases of the outputs from the various antennas so that their relatively weak replicas of the desired signal can be added coherently to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for improved reception, as though one had a single larger antenna. The method was devised to enhance spacecraft-tracking and telemetry operations in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN); the method could also be useful in such other applications as both satellite and terrestrial radio communications and radio astronomy. Heretofore, most commonly, alignment has been effected by a process that involves correlation of signals in pairs. This approach necessitates the use of a large amount of hardware most notably, the N(N - 1)/2 correlators needed to process signals from all possible pairs of N antennas. Moreover, because the incoming signals typically have low SNRs, the delay and phase adjustments are poorly determined from the pairwise correlations. SUMPLE also involves correlations, but the correlations are not performed in pairs. Instead, in a partly iterative process, each signal is appropriately weighted and then correlated with a composite signal equal to the sum of the other signals (see Figure 1). One benefit of this approach is that only N correlators are needed; in an array of N much greater than 1 antennas, this results in a significant reduction of the amount of hardware. Another benefit is that once the array achieves coherence, the correlation SNR is N - 1 times that of a pair of antennas.

  6. Terahertz detectors arrays based on orderly aligned InN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuechen; Liu, Huiqiang; Li, Qiuguo; Chen, Hao; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Sheng; Cheng, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured terahertz detectors employing a single semiconducting nanowire or graphene sheet have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to existing THz technologies, for their merit on the ease of fabrication and above-room-temperature operation. However, the lack of alignment in nanostructure device hindered their potential toward practical applications. The present work reports ordered terahertz detectors arrays based on neatly aligned InN nanowires. The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a “transfer-printing” method. Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose. The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level. Besides, dense arrays of such detectors were also fabricated, which rendered a peak responsivity of 1.1 V/W from 7 detectors connected in series. PMID:26289498

  7. A comprehensive evaluation of alignment algorithms in the context of RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Friedel, Caroline C

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) overcomes limitations of previously used RNA quantification methods and provides one experimental framework for both high-throughput characterization and quantification of transcripts at the nucleotide level. The first step and a major challenge in the analysis of such experiments is the mapping of sequencing reads to a transcriptomic origin including the identification of splicing events. In recent years, a large number of such mapping algorithms have been developed, all of which have in common that they require algorithms for aligning a vast number of reads to genomic or transcriptomic sequences. Although the FM-index based aligner Bowtie has become a de facto standard within mapping pipelines, a much larger number of possible alignment algorithms have been developed also including other variants of FM-index based aligners. Accordingly, developers and users of RNA-seq mapping pipelines have the choice among a large number of available alignment algorithms. To provide guidance in the choice of alignment algorithms for these purposes, we evaluated the performance of 14 widely used alignment programs from three different algorithmic classes: algorithms using either hashing of the reference transcriptome, hashing of reads, or a compressed FM-index representation of the genome. Here, special emphasis was placed on both precision and recall and the performance for different read lengths and numbers of mismatches and indels in a read. Our results clearly showed the significant reduction in memory footprint and runtime provided by FM-index based aligners at a precision and recall comparable to the best hash table based aligners. Furthermore, the recently developed Bowtie 2 alignment algorithm shows a remarkable tolerance to both sequencing errors and indels, thus, essentially making hash-based aligners obsolete. PMID:23300661

  8. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Tobin, , M.

    2016-07-01

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  9. A rapid protein structure alignment algorithm based on a text modeling technique

    PubMed Central

    Razmara, Jafar; Deris, Safaai; Parvizpour, Sepideh

    2011-01-01

    Structural alignment of proteins is widely used in various fields of structural biology. In order to further improve the quality of alignment, we describe an algorithm for structural alignment based on text modelling techniques. The technique firstly superimposes secondary structure elements of two proteins and then, models the 3D-structure of the protein in a sequence of alphabets. These sequences are utilized by a step-by-step sequence alignment procedure to align two protein structures. A benchmark test was organized on a set of 200 non-homologous proteins to evaluate the program and compare it to state of the art programs, e.g. CE, SAL, TM-align and 3D-BLAST. On average, the results of all-against-all structure comparison by the program have a competitive accuracy with CE and TM-align where the algorithm has a high running speed like 3D-BLAST. PMID:21814392

  10. Unsupervised parameter optimization for automated retention time alignment of severely shifted gas chromatographic data using the piecewise alignment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Karisa M; Wright, Bob W; Synovec, Robert E

    2007-02-01

    Simulated chromatographic separations were used to study the performance of piecewise retention time alignment and to demonstrate automated unsupervised (without a training set) parameter optimization. The average correlation coefficient between the target chromatogram and all remaining chromatograms in the data set was used to optimize the alignment parameters. This approach frees the user from providing class information and makes the alignment algorithm applicable to classifying completely unknown data sets. The average peak in the raw simulated data set was shifted up to two peak-widths-at-base (average relative shift=2.0) and after alignment the average relative shift was improved to 0.3. Piecewise alignment was applied to severely shifted GC separations of gasolines and reformate distillation fraction samples. The average relative shifts in the raw gasolines and reformates data were 4.7 and 1.5, respectively, but after alignment improved to 0.5 and 0.4, respectively. The effect of piecewise alignment on peak heights and peak areas is also reported. The average relative difference in peak height was -0.20%. The average absolute relative difference in area was 0.15%. PMID:17174960

  11. Unsupervised parameter optimization for automated retention time alignment of severely shifted gas chromatographic data using the piecework alignment algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2007-02-02

    First, simulated chromatographic separations with declining retention time precision were used to study the performance of the piecewise retention time alignment algorithm and to demonstrate an unsupervised parameter optimization method. The average correlation coefficient between the first chromatogram and every other chromatogram in the data set was used to optimize the alignment parameters. This correlation method does not require a training set, so it is unsupervised and automated. This frees the user from needing to provide class information and makes the alignment algorithm more generally applicable to classifying completely unknown data sets. For a data set of simulated chromatograms where the average chromatographic peak was shifted past two neighboring peaks between runs, the average correlation coefficient of the raw data was 0.46 ± 0.25. After automated, optimized piecewise alignment, the average correlation coefficient was 0.93 ± 0.02. Additionally, a relative shift metric and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to independently quantify and categorize the alignment performance, respectively. The relative shift metric was defined as four times the standard deviation of a given peak’s retention time in all of the chromatograms, divided by the peak-width-at-base. The raw simulated data sets that were studied contained peaks with average relative shifts ranging between 0.3 and 3.0. Second, a “real” data set of gasoline separations was gathered using three different GC methods to induce severe retention time shifting. In these gasoline separations, retention time precision improved ~8 fold following alignment. Finally, piecewise alignment and the unsupervised correlation optimization method were applied to severely shifted GC separations of reformate distillation fractions. The effect of piecewise alignment on peak heights and peak areas is also reported. Piecewise alignment either did not change the peak height, or caused it to slightly

  12. An Accurate Scalable Template-based Alignment Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gardner, David P; Xu, Weijia; Miranker, Daniel P; Ozer, Stuart; Cannone, Jamie J; Gutell, Robin R

    2012-12-31

    The rapid determination of nucleic acid sequences is increasing the number of sequences that are available. Inherent in a template or seed alignment is the culmination of structural and functional constraints that are selecting those mutations that are viable during the evolution of the RNA. While we might not understand these structural and functional, template-based alignment programs utilize the patterns of sequence conservation to encapsulate the characteristics of viable RNA sequences that are aligned properly. We have developed a program that utilizes the different dimensions of information in rCAD, a large RNA informatics resource, to establish a profile for each position in an alignment. The most significant include sequence identity and column composition in different phylogenetic taxa. We have compared our methods with a maximum of eight alternative alignment methods on different sets of 16S and 23S rRNA sequences with sequence percent identities ranging from 50% to 100%. The results showed that CRWAlign outperformed the other alignment methods in both speed and accuracy. A web-based alignment server is available at http://www.rna.ccbb.utexas.edu/SAE/2F/CRWAlign. PMID:24772376

  13. Real-time alignment and cali bration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujany, Giulio; Storaci, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  14. Divergence detectors for multitarget tracking algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    Single-target tracking filters will typically diverge when their internal measurement or motion models deviate too much from the actual models. Niu, Varshney, Alford, Bubalo, Jones, and Scalzo have proposed a metric-- the normalized innovation squared (NIS)--that recursively estimates the degree of nonlinearity in a single-target tracking problem by detecting filter divergence. This paper establishes the following: (1) NIS can be extended to generalized NIS (GNIS), which addresses more general nonlinearities; (2) NIS and GNIS are actually anomaly detectors, rather than filter-divergence detectors; (3) NIS can be heuristically generalized to a multitarget NIS (MNIS) metric; (4) GNIS also can be rigorously extended to multitarget problems via the multitarget GNIS (MGNIS); (5) explicit, computationally tractable formulas for MGNIS can be derived for use with CPHD and PHD filters; and thus (6) these formulas can be employed as anomaly detectors for use with these filters.

  15. Alignment algorithms and per-particle CTF correction for single particle cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Galaz-Montoya, Jesús G; Hecksel, Corey W; Baldwin, Philip R; Wang, Eryu; Weaver, Scott C; Schmid, Michael F; Ludtke, Steven J; Chiu, Wah

    2016-06-01

    Single particle cryo-electron tomography (cryoSPT) extracts features from cryo-electron tomograms, followed by 3D classification, alignment and averaging to generate improved 3D density maps of such features. Robust methods to correct for the contrast transfer function (CTF) of the electron microscope are necessary for cryoSPT to reach its resolution potential. Many factors can make CTF correction for cryoSPT challenging, such as lack of eucentricity of the specimen stage, inherent low dose per image, specimen charging, beam-induced specimen motions, and defocus gradients resulting both from specimen tilting and from unpredictable ice thickness variations. Current CTF correction methods for cryoET make at least one of the following assumptions: that the defocus at the center of the image is the same across the images of a tiltseries, that the particles all lie at the same Z-height in the embedding ice, and/or that the specimen, the cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) grid and/or the carbon support are flat. These experimental conditions are not always met. We have developed a CTF correction algorithm for cryoSPT without making any of the aforementioned assumptions. We also introduce speed and accuracy improvements and a higher degree of automation to the subtomogram averaging algorithms available in EMAN2. Using motion-corrected images of isolated virus particles as a benchmark specimen, recorded with a DE20 direct detection camera, we show that our CTF correction and subtomogram alignment routines can yield subtomogram averages close to 4/5 Nyquist frequency of the detector under our experimental conditions. PMID:27016284

  16. Study on the technology of mutual alignment based on the four-quadrant photo electric detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ya-bin; Wang, Miao

    2015-11-01

    Panoramic stereo cameras and laser radars have their own coordinate system in the dynamic spatial sensing area and they have to determine the position relationship between each other through joint calibration. As using the traditional technology of mutual alignment based on the telescope cross wire is tedious and requires high operating skills, a new method of mutual alignment using lasers and four-quadrant photo electric detectors is provided after analyzing the working principle of four-quadrant photo electric detectors. Firstly make the laser beam irradiate the active area of the four-quadrant photo electric detector through coarse aiming. Then the center of a light spot offset relative to the center of the active area can be obtained according to the output voltage of four quadrants. The pose of two instruments can be adjusted properly to realize mutual alignment. The experimental results indicate that the alignment accuracy of four-quadrant detectors can meet the requirements of mutual alignment, which provides a new idea for joint calibration.

  17. Alignment of the Near Detector scintillator modules using cosmic ray muons

    SciTech Connect

    Ospanov, Rustem; Lang, Karol; /Texas U.

    2008-05-01

    The authors describe the procedures and the results of the first alignment of the Near Detector. Using 15.5 million cosmic ray muon tracks, collected from October, 2004 through early january, 2005, they derive the effective transverse positions of the calorimeter scintillator modules. The residuals from straight line fits indicate that the current alignment has achieved better than 1 mm precision. They estimate the size of the remaining misalignment and using tracks recorded with a magnetic field test the effect of the magnetic field on the alignment.

  18. Photon counting detector array algorithms for deep space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Meera; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Farr, William H.; Wong, Andre

    2016-03-01

    For deep-space optical communications systems utilizing an uplink optical beacon, a single-photon-counting detector array on the flight terminal can be used to simultaneously perform uplink tracking and communications as well as accurate downlink pointing at photon-starved (pW=m2) power levels. In this paper, we discuss concepts and algorithms for uplink signal acquisition, tracking, and parameter estimation using a photon-counting camera. Statistical models of detector output data and signal processing algorithms are presented, incorporating realistic effects such as Earth background and detector/readout blocking. Analysis and simulation results are validated against measured laboratory data using state-of-the-art commercial photon-counting detector arrays, demonstrating sub-microradian tracking errors under channel conditions representative of deep space optical links.

  19. Node Handprinting: A Scalable and Accurate Algorithm for Aligning Multiple Biological Networks.

    PubMed

    Radu, Alex; Charleston, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Due to recent advancements in high-throughput sequencing technologies, progressively more protein-protein interactions have been identified for a growing number of species. Subsequently, the protein-protein interaction networks for these species have been further refined. The increase in the quality and availability of these networks has in turn brought a demand for efficient methods to analyze such networks. The pairwise alignment of these networks has been moderately investigated, with numerous algorithms available, but there is very little progress in the field of multiple network alignment. Multiple alignment of networks from different organisms is ideal at finding abnormally conserved or disparate subnetworks. We present a fast and accurate algorithmic approach, Node Handprinting (NH), based on our previous work with Node Fingerprinting, which enables quick and accurate alignment of multiple networks. We also propose two new metrics for the analysis of multiple alignments, as the current metrics are not as sophisticated as their pairwise alignment counterparts. To assess the performance of NH, we use previously aligned datasets as well as protein interaction networks generated from the public database BioGRID. Our results indicate that NH compares favorably with current methodologies and is the only algorithm capable of performing the more complex alignments. PMID:25695597

  20. A Self-Alignment Algorithm for SINS Based on Gravitational Apparent Motion and Sensor Data Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiting; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Xixiang; Yao, Yiqing; Wu, Liang; Sun, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Initial alignment is always a key topic and difficult to achieve in an inertial navigation system (INS). In this paper a novel self-initial alignment algorithm is proposed using gravitational apparent motion vectors at three different moments and vector-operation. Simulation and analysis showed that this method easily suffers from the random noise contained in accelerometer measurements which are used to construct apparent motion directly. Aiming to resolve this problem, an online sensor data denoising method based on a Kalman filter is proposed and a novel reconstruction method for apparent motion is designed to avoid the collinearity among vectors participating in the alignment solution. Simulation, turntable tests and vehicle tests indicate that the proposed alignment algorithm can fulfill initial alignment of strapdown INS (SINS) under both static and swinging conditions. The accuracy can either reach or approach the theoretical values determined by sensor precision under static or swinging conditions. PMID:25923932

  1. A Self-Alignment Algorithm for SINS Based on Gravitational Apparent Motion and Sensor Data Denoising.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiting; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Xixiang; Yao, Yiqing; Wu, Liang; Sun, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Initial alignment is always a key topic and difficult to achieve in an inertial navigation system (INS). In this paper a novel self-initial alignment algorithm is proposed using gravitational apparent motion vectors at three different moments and vector-operation. Simulation and analysis showed that this method easily suffers from the random noise contained in accelerometer measurements which are used to construct apparent motion directly. Aiming to resolve this problem, an online sensor data denoising method based on a Kalman filter is proposed and a novel reconstruction method for apparent motion is designed to avoid the collinearity among vectors participating in the alignment solution. Simulation, turntable tests and vehicle tests indicate that the proposed alignment algorithm can fulfill initial alignment of strapdown INS (SINS) under both static and swinging conditions. The accuracy can either reach or approach the theoretical values determined by sensor precision under static or swinging conditions. PMID:25923932

  2. Algorithm Implementation for a Prototype Time-Encoded Signature Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, Theresa M.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Morris, Scott J.; Seifert, Allen; Wyatt, Cory R.

    2007-12-31

    The authors constructed a prototype Time-Encoded Signature (TES) system, complete with automated detection algorithms, useful for the detection of point-like, gamma-ray sources in search applications where detectors observe large variability in background count rates beyond statistical (Poisson) noise. The person-carried TES instrument consists of two Cesium Iodide scintillators placed on opposite sides of a Tungsten shield. This geometry mitigates systematic background variation, and induces a unique signature upon encountering point-like sources. This manuscript focuses on the development of detection algorithms that both identify point-source signatures and are computationally simple. The latter constraint derives from the instrument’s mobile (and thus low power) operation. The authors evaluated algorithms on both simulated and field data. The results of this analysis demonstrate the ability to detect sources at a wide range of source-detector distances using computationally simple algorithms.

  3. A polarized infrared thermal detector made from super-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Zhang, Yuying; Wang, Yang; Liu, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Li, Tianyi; Jiang, Zhe; Shi, Junpeng; Liu, Liang; Li, QunQing; Zhao, Yonggang; Feng, Zhenghe; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2011-01-14

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films, easily drawn from super-aligned CNT arrays with a large area and a good compatibility with semiconductor technology, have been used as light sensitive materials for infrared (IR) detection. A bolometric CNT detector made from one layer of super-aligned CNT film shows a 15.4% resistance change under 10 mW mm(-2) of IR illumination and a fast characteristic response time of 4.4 ms due to its ultra-small heat capacity per unit area in vacuum at room temperature. Besides the power intensity detection, the anisotropic property of the super-aligned CNT films makes them ideal materials to detect the polarization of IR light simultaneously, which provides great potential in infrared imaging polarimetry. Theoretical analyses have been carried out to investigate the influences of CNT film properties on the responsivity and response time of the detector. PMID:21135478

  4. Alignment of sources and detectors on breast surface for noncontact diffuse correlation tomography of breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chong; Lin, Yu; He, Lian; Irwin, Daniel; Szabunio, Margaret M.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) is an emerging technology for 3D imaging of deep tissue blood flow distribution without distorting hemodynamic properties. To adapt the ncDCT for imaging in vivo breast tumors, we designed a motorized ncDCT probe to scan over the breast surface. A computer-aided design (CAD)-based approach was proposed to create solid volume mesh from arbitrary breast surface obtained by a commercial 3D camera. The sources and detectors of ncDCT were aligned on the breast surface through ray tracing to mimic the ncDCT scanning with CAD software. The generated breast volume mesh along with the boundary data of ncDCT at the aligned source and detector pairs were used for finite-element-method-based flow image reconstruction. We evaluated the accuracy of source alignments on mannequin and human breasts; largest alignment errors were less than 10% in both tangential and radial directions of scanning. The impact of alignment errors (assigned 10%) on the tumor reconstruction was estimated using computer simulations. The deviations of simulated tumor location and blood flow contrast resulted from the alignment errors were 0.77 mm (less than the node distance of 1 mm) and 1%, respectively, which result in minor impact on flow image reconstruction. Finally, a case study on a human breast tumor was conducted and a tumor-to-normal flow contrast was reconstructed, demonstrating the feasibility of ncDCT in clinical application. PMID:26479823

  5. Deriving non-homogeneous DNA Markov chain models by cluster analysis algorithm minimizing multiple alignment entropy.

    PubMed

    Borodovsky, M; Peresetsky, A

    1994-09-01

    Non-homogeneous Markov chain models can represent biologically important regions of DNA sequences. The statistical pattern that is described by these models is usually weak and was found primarily because of strong biological indications. The general method for extracting similar patterns is presented in the current paper. The algorithm incorporates cluster analysis, multiple alignment and entropy minimization. The method was first tested using the set of DNA sequences produced by Markov chain generators. It was shown that artificial gene sequences, which initially have been randomly set up along the multiple alignment panels, are aligned according to the hidden triplet phase. Then the method was applied to real protein-coding sequences and the resulting alignment clearly indicated the triplet phase and produced the parameters of the optimal 3-periodic non-homogeneous Markov chain model. These Markov models were already employed in the GeneMark gene prediction algorithm, which is used in genome sequencing projects. The algorithm can also handle the case in which the sequences to be aligned reveal different statistical patterns, such as Escherichia coli protein-coding sequences belonging to Class II and Class III. The algorithm accepts a random mix of sequences from different classes, and is able to separate them into two groups (clusters), align each cluster separately, and define a non-homogeneous Markov chain model for each sequence cluster. PMID:7952897

  6. Hohlraum target alignment from x-ray detector images using starburst design patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard R., Jr.; Conder, Alan; Edwards, Oliver; Kroll, Jeremy; Kozioziemski, Bernard; Mapoles, Evan; McGuigan, Dave; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2011-03-01

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  7. Hohlraum Target Alignment from X-ray Detector Images using Starburst Design Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Conder, A; Edwards, O; Kroll, J; Kozioziemski, B; Mapoles, E; McGuigan, D; Wilhelmsen, K

    2010-12-14

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  8. Experiences and evolutions of the ALICE DAQ Detector Algorithms framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, Sylvain; Carena, Franco; Carena, Wisla; Chibante Barroso, Vasco; Costa, Filippo; Denes, Ervin; Divia, Roberto; Fuchs, Ulrich; Grigore, Alexandru; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Soos, Csaba; Telesca, Adriana; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; von Haller, Barthelemy

    2012-12-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector studying the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The 18 ALICE sub-detectors are regularly calibrated in order to achieve most accurate physics measurements. Some of these procedures are done online in the DAQ (Data Acquisition System) so that calibration results can be directly used for detector electronics configuration before physics data taking, at run time for online event monitoring, and offline for data analysis. A framework was designed to collect statistics and compute calibration parameters, and has been used in production since 2008. This paper focuses on the recent features developed to benefit from the multi-cores architecture of CPUs, and to optimize the processing power available for the calibration tasks. It involves some C++ base classes to effectively implement detector specific code, with independent processing of events in parallel threads and aggregation of partial results. The Detector Algorithm (DA) framework provides utility interfaces for handling of input and output (configuration, monitored physics data, results, logging), and self-documentation of the produced executable. New algorithms are created quickly by inheritance of base functionality and implementation of few ad-hoc virtual members, while the framework features are kept expandable thanks to the isolation of the detector calibration code. The DA control system also handles unexpected processes behaviour, logs execution status, and collects performance statistics.

  9. A Peak Alignment Algorithm with Novel Improvements In Application to Electropherogram Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karabiber, Fethullah

    2013-01-01

    Alignment of peaks in electropherograms or chromatograms obtained from experimental techniques such capillary electrophoresis remains a significant challenge. Accurate alignment is critical for accurate interpretation of various classes of nucleic acid analysis technologies, including conventional DNA sequencing and new RNA structure probing technologies. We have developed an automated alignment algorithm based on dynamic programming to align multiple-peak time-series data both globally and locally. This algorithm relies on a new peak similarity measure and other features such as time penalties, global constraints, and minimum-similarity scores and results in rapid, highly accurate comparisons of complex time-series datasets. As a demonstrative case study, the developed algorithm was applied to analysis of capillary electrophoresis data from a Selective 2′-Hydroxyl Acylation analyzed by Primer Extension (SHAPE) evaluation of RNA secondary structure. The algorithm yielded robust analysis of challenging SHAPE probing data. Experimental results show that the peak alignment algorithm corrects retention time variation efficiently due to the presence of fluorescent tags on fragments and differences in capillaries. The tools can be readily adapted for the analysis other biological datasets in which peak retention times vary. PMID:24131055

  10. A Multithreaded Algorithm for Network Alignment Via Approximate Matching

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arif; Gleich, David F.; Pothen, Alex; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2012-11-16

    Network alignment is an optimization problem to find the best one-to-one map between the vertices of a pair of graphs that overlaps in as many edges as possible. It is a relaxation of the graph isomorphism problem and is closely related to the subgraph isomorphism problem. The best current approaches are entirely heuristic, and are iterative in nature. They generate real-valued heuristic approximations that must be rounded to find integer solutions. This rounding requires solving a bipartite maximum weight matching problem at each step in order to avoid missing high quality solutions. We investigate substituting a parallel, half-approximation for maximum weight matching instead of an exact computation. Our experiments show that the resulting difference in solution quality is negligible. We demonstrate almost a 20-fold speedup using 40 threads on an 8 processor Intel Xeon E7-8870 system (from 10 minutes to 36 seconds).

  11. Low complexity interference alignment algorithms for desired signal power maximization problem of MIMO channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cong; Yang, Yunchuan; Yuan, Yaxiang

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we investigate the interference alignment (IA) solution for a K-user MIMO interference channel. Proper users' precoders and decoders are designed through a desired signal power maximization model with IA conditions as constraints, which forms a complex matrix optimization problem. We propose two low complexity algorithms, both of which apply the Courant penalty function technique to combine the leakage interference and the desired signal power together as the new objective function. The first proposed algorithm is the modified alternating minimization algorithm (MAMA), where each subproblem has closed-form solution with an eigenvalue decomposition. To further reduce algorithm complexity, we propose a hybrid algorithm which consists of two parts. As the first part, the algorithm iterates with Householder transformation to preserve the orthogonality of precoders and decoders. In each iteration, the matrix optimization problem is considered in a sequence of 2D subspaces, which leads to one dimensional optimization subproblems. From any initial point, this algorithm obtains precoders and decoders with low leakage interference in short time. In the second part, to exploit the advantage of MAMA, it continues to iterate to perfectly align the interference from the output point of the first part. Analysis shows that in one iteration generally both proposed two algorithms have lower computational complexity than the existed maximum signal power (MSP) algorithm, and the hybrid algorithm enjoys lower complexity than MAMA. Simulations reveal that both proposed algorithms achieve similar performances as the MSP algorithm with less executing time, and show better performances than the existed alternating minimization algorithm in terms of sum rate. Besides, from the view of convergence rate, simulation results show that the MAMA enjoys fastest speed with respect to a certain sum rate value, while hybrid algorithm converges fastest to eliminate interference.

  12. Reconstruction algorithms for optoacoustic imaging based on fiber optic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamela, Horacio; Díaz-Tendero, Gonzalo; Gutiérrez, Rebeca; Gallego, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Optoacoustic Imaging (OAI), a novel hybrid imaging technology, offers high contrast, molecular specificity and excellent resolution to overcome limitations of the current clinical modalities for detection of solid tumors. The exact time-domain reconstruction formula produces images with excellent resolution but poor contrast. Some approximate time-domain filtered back-projection reconstruction algorithms have also been reported to solve this problem. A wavelet transform implementation filtering can be used to sharpen object boundaries while simultaneously preserving high contrast of the reconstructed objects. In this paper, several algorithms, based on Back Projection (BP) techniques, have been suggested to process OA images in conjunction with signal filtering for ultrasonic point detectors and integral detectors. We apply these techniques first directly to a numerical generated sample image and then to the laserdigitalized image of a tissue phantom, obtaining in both cases the best results in resolution and contrast for a waveletbased filter.

  13. Fast Probabilistic Particle Identification algorithm using silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fino, L.; Zaconte, V.; Ciccotelli, A.; Larosa, M.; Narici, L.

    2012-08-01

    Active detectors used as radiation monitors in space are not usually able to perform Particle Identification (PID). Common techniques need energy loss spectra with high statistics to estimate ion abundances. The ALTEA-space detector system is a set of silicon strip particle telescopes monitoring the radiation environment on board the International Space Station since July 2006 with real-time telemetry capabilities. Its large geometrical factor due to the concurrent use of six detectors permits the acquisition of good energy loss spectra even in a short period of observation. In this paper we present a novel Fast Probabilistic Particle Identification (FPPI) algorithm developed for the ALTEA data analysis in order to perform nuclear identification with low statistics and, with some limitations, also in real time.

  14. Assessing Activity Pattern Similarity with Multidimensional Sequence Alignment based on a Multiobjective Optimization Evolutionary Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Mei-Po; Xiao, Ningchuan; Ding, Guoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Due to the complexity and multidimensional characteristics of human activities, assessing the similarity of human activity patterns and classifying individuals with similar patterns remains highly challenging. This paper presents a new and unique methodology for evaluating the similarity among individual activity patterns. It conceptualizes multidimensional sequence alignment (MDSA) as a multiobjective optimization problem, and solves this problem with an evolutionary algorithm. The study utilizes sequence alignment to code multiple facets of human activities into multidimensional sequences, and to treat similarity assessment as a multiobjective optimization problem that aims to minimize the alignment cost for all dimensions simultaneously. A multiobjective optimization evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) is used to generate a diverse set of optimal or near-optimal alignment solutions. Evolutionary operators are specifically designed for this problem, and a local search method also is incorporated to improve the search ability of the algorithm. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by comparing it with a popular existing method called ClustalG using a set of 50 sequences. The results indicate that our method outperforms the existing method for most of our selected cases. The multiobjective evolutionary algorithm presented in this paper provides an effective approach for assessing activity pattern similarity, and a foundation for identifying distinctive groups of individuals with similar activity patterns. PMID:26190858

  15. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James; Taylor, Jaime

    2003-01-01

    A reduced surrogate, one point crossover genetic algorithm with random rank-based selection was used successfully to estimate the multiple phases of a segmented optical system modeled on the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment testbed located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. A tabu search algorithm for post-processing multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Tariq; Yi, Wang; Li, Kuo-Bin

    2005-02-01

    Tabu search is a meta-heuristic approach that is proven to be useful in solving combinatorial optimization problems. We implement the adaptive memory features of tabu search to refine a multiple sequence alignment. Adaptive memory helps the search process to avoid local optima and explores the solution space economically and effectively without getting trapped into cycles. The algorithm is further enhanced by introducing extended tabu search features such as intensification and diversification. The neighborhoods of a solution are generated stochastically and a consistency-based objective function is employed to measure its quality. The algorithm is tested with the datasets from BAliBASE benchmarking database. We have observed through experiments that tabu search is able to improve the quality of multiple alignments generated by other software such as ClustalW and T-Coffee. The source code of our algorithm is available at http://www.bii.a-star.edu.sg/~tariq/tabu/. PMID:15751117

  17. A Rapid Convergent Low Complexity Interference Alignment Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lihui; Wu, Zhilu; Ren, Guanghui; Wang, Gangyi; Zhao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Interference alignment (IA) is a novel technique that can effectively eliminate the interference and approach the sum capacity of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is high, by casting the desired signal and interference into different signal subspaces. The traditional alternating minimization interference leakage (AMIL) algorithm for IA shows good performance in high SNR regimes, however, the complexity of the AMIL algorithm increases dramatically as the number of users and antennas increases, posing limits to its applications in the practical systems. In this paper, a novel IA algorithm, called directional quartic optimal (DQO) algorithm, is proposed to minimize the interference leakage with rapid convergence and low complexity. The properties of the AMIL algorithm are investigated, and it is discovered that the difference between the two consecutive iteration results of the AMIL algorithm will approximately point to the convergence solution when the precoding and decoding matrices obtained from the intermediate iterations are sufficiently close to their convergence values. Based on this important property, the proposed DQO algorithm employs the line search procedure so that it can converge to the destination directly. In addition, the optimal step size can be determined analytically by optimizing a quartic function. Numerical results show that the proposed DQO algorithm can suppress the interference leakage more rapidly than the traditional AMIL algorithm, and can achieve the same level of sum rate as that of AMIL algorithm with far less iterations and execution time. PMID:26230697

  18. Centroid Detector Assembly for the AXAF-I Alignment Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (imaging) (AXAF-I) consists of four nested paraboloids and four nested hyperboloids, all of meter-class size, and all of which are to be assembled and aligned in a special 15 meter tower at Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, NY. The goals of the alignment are (1) to make the images of the four telescopes coincident; (2) to remove coma from each image individually; and (3) to control and determine the final position of the composite focus. This will be accomplished by the HRMA Aligment Test System (HATS) which is essentially a scanning Hartmann test system. The scanning laser source and the focal plane of the HATS are part of the Centroid Detector Assembly (CDA) which also includes processing electronics and software. In this paper we discuss the design and the measured performance of the CDA.

  19. A distributed Canny edge detector: algorithm and FPGA implementation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Varadarajan, Srenivas; Chakrabarti, Chaitali; Karam, Lina J

    2014-07-01

    The Canny edge detector is one of the most widely used edge detection algorithms due to its superior performance. Unfortunately, not only is it computationally more intensive as compared with other edge detection algorithms, but it also has a higher latency because it is based on frame-level statistics. In this paper, we propose a mechanism to implement the Canny algorithm at the block level without any loss in edge detection performance compared with the original frame-level Canny algorithm. Directly applying the original Canny algorithm at the block-level leads to excessive edges in smooth regions and to loss of significant edges in high-detailed regions since the original Canny computes the high and low thresholds based on the frame-level statistics. To solve this problem, we present a distributed Canny edge detection algorithm that adaptively computes the edge detection thresholds based on the block type and the local distribution of the gradients in the image block. In addition, the new algorithm uses a nonuniform gradient magnitude histogram to compute block-based hysteresis thresholds. The resulting block-based algorithm has a significantly reduced latency and can be easily integrated with other block-based image codecs. It is capable of supporting fast edge detection of images and videos with high resolutions, including full-HD since the latency is now a function of the block size instead of the frame size. In addition, quantitative conformance evaluations and subjective tests show that the edge detection performance of the proposed algorithm is better than the original frame-based algorithm, especially when noise is present in the images. Finally, this algorithm is implemented using a 32 computing engine architecture and is synthesized on the Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA. The synthesized architecture takes only 0.721 ms (including the SRAM READ/WRITE time and the computation time) to detect edges of 512 × 512 images in the USC SIPI database when clocked at 100

  20. Multiple sequence alignment based on combining genetic algorithm with chaotic sequences.

    PubMed

    Gao, C; Wang, B; Zhou, C J; Zhang, Q

    2016-01-01

    In bioinformatics, sequence alignment is one of the most common problems. Multiple sequence alignment is an NP (nondeterministic polynomial time) problem, which requires further study and exploration. The chaos optimization algorithm is a type of chaos theory, and a procedure for combining the genetic algorithm (GA), which uses ergodicity, and inherent randomness of chaotic iteration. It is an efficient method to solve the basic premature phenomenon of the GA. Applying the Logistic map to the GA and using chaotic sequences to carry out the chaotic perturbation can improve the convergence of the basic GA. In addition, the random tournament selection and optimal preservation strategy are used in the GA. Experimental evidence indicates good results for this process. PMID:27420977

  1. Phase Retrieval Using a Genetic Algorithm on the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center s Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbed was developed to test phase retrieval algorithms and hardware techniques. Individuals working with the facility developed the idea of implementing phase retrieval by breaking the determination of the tip/tilt of each mirror apart from the piston motion (or translation) of each mirror. Presented in this report is an algorithm that determines the optimal phase correction associated only with the piston motion of the mirrors. A description of the Phase Retrieval problem is first presented. The Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbeb is then described. A Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) is necessary to transfer the incoming wavefront (or estimate of phase error) into the spatial frequency domain to compare it with the image. A method for reducing the DFT to seven scalar/matrix multiplications is presented. A genetic algorithm is then used to search for the phase error. The results of this new algorithm on a test problem are presented.

  2. Evaluation of GMI and PMI diffeomorphic-based demons algorithms for aligning PET and CT Images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Wang, Hongjun; Zhang, You; Yin, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of anatomic information in computed tomography (CT) and functional information in 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for accurate differentiation of tumor from benign masses, designing radiotherapy treatment plan and staging of cancer. Although current PET and CT images can be acquired from combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner, the two acquisitions are scanned separately and take a long time, which may induce potential positional errors in global and local caused by respiratory motion or organ peristalsis. So registration (alignment) of whole-body PET and CT images is a prerequisite for their meaningful fusion. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of two multimodal registration algorithms for aligning PET and CT images. The proposed gradient of mutual information (GMI)-based demons algorithm, which incorporated the GMI between two images as an external force to facilitate the alignment, was compared with the point-wise mutual information (PMI) diffeomorphic-based demons algorithm whose external force was modified by replacing the image intensity difference in diffeomorphic demons algorithm with the PMI to make it appropriate for multimodal image registration. Eight patients with esophageal cancer(s) were enrolled in this IRB-approved study. Whole-body PET and CT images were acquired from a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner for each patient. The modified Hausdorff distance (d(MH)) was used to evaluate the registration accuracy of the two algorithms. Of all patients, the mean values and standard deviations (SDs) of d(MH) were 6.65 (± 1.90) voxels and 6.01 (± 1.90) after the GMI-based demons and the PMI diffeomorphic-based demons registration algorithms respectively. Preliminary results on oncological patients showed that the respiratory motion and organ peristalsis in PET/CT esophageal images could not be neglected, although a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner was used for image acquisition. The PMI diffeomorphic-based demons

  3. Experimental Results in the Comparison of Search Algorithms Used with Room Temperature Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P., Yuan, D., Cutler, M., Beller, D.

    2010-11-01

    Analysis of time sequence data was run for several higher resolution scintillation detectors using a variety of search algorithms, and results were obtained in predicting the relative performance for these detectors, which included a slightly superior performance by CeBr{sub 3}. Analysis of several search algorithms shows that inclusion of the RSPRT methodology can improve sensitivity.

  4. Successive approximation algorithm for beam-position-monitor-based LHC collimator alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Nosych, Andriy A.; Bruce, Roderik; Gasior, Marek; Mirarchi, Daniele; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Wollmann, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Collimators with embedded beam position monitor (BPM) button electrodes will be installed in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the current long shutdown period. For the subsequent operation, BPMs will allow the collimator jaws to be kept centered around the beam orbit. In this manner, a better beam cleaning efficiency and machine protection can be provided at unprecedented higher beam energies and intensities. A collimator alignment algorithm is proposed to center the jaws automatically around the beam. The algorithm is based on successive approximation and takes into account a correction of the nonlinear BPM sensitivity to beam displacement and an asymmetry of the electronic channels processing the BPM electrode signals. A software implementation was tested with a prototype collimator in the Super Proton Synchrotron. This paper presents results of the tests along with some considerations for eventual operation in the LHC.

  5. Performance assessment of an algorithm for the alignment of fMRI time series.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, Carlo; Deek, Fadi P

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on performance assessment of an algorithm developed to align functional Magnetic Resonance Image (fMRI) time series. The algorithm is based on the assumption that the human brain is subject to rigid-body motion and has been devised by pipelining fiducial markers and tensor based registration methodologies. Feature extraction is performed on each fMRI volume to determine tensors of inertia and gradient image of the brain. A head coordinate system is determined on the basis of three fiducial markers found automatically at the head boundary by means of the tensors and is used to compute a point-based rigid matching transformation. Intensity correction is performed with sub-voxel accuracy by trilinear interpolation. Performance of the algorithm was preliminarily assessed by fMR brain images in which controlled motion has been simulated. Further experimentation has been conducted with real fMRI time series. Rigid-body transformations were retrieved automatically and the value of motion parameters compared to those obtained with the Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM99) and the Automatic Image Registration (AIR 3.08). Results indicate that the algorithm offers sub-voxel accuracy in performing both misalignment and intensity correction of fMRI time series. PMID:12137364

  6. Iterative most-likely point registration (IMLP): a robust algorithm for computing optimal shape alignment.

    PubMed

    Billings, Seth D; Boctor, Emad M; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-01-01

    We present a probabilistic registration algorithm that robustly solves the problem of rigid-body alignment between two shapes with high accuracy, by aptly modeling measurement noise in each shape, whether isotropic or anisotropic. For point-cloud shapes, the probabilistic framework additionally enables modeling locally-linear surface regions in the vicinity of each point to further improve registration accuracy. The proposed Iterative Most-Likely Point (IMLP) algorithm is formed as a variant of the popular Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, which iterates between point-correspondence and point-registration steps. IMLP's probabilistic framework is used to incorporate a generalized noise model into both the correspondence and the registration phases of the algorithm, hence its name as a most-likely point method rather than a closest-point method. To efficiently compute the most-likely correspondences, we devise a novel search strategy based on a principal direction (PD)-tree search. We also propose a new approach to solve the generalized total-least-squares (GTLS) sub-problem of the registration phase, wherein the point correspondences are registered under a generalized noise model. Our GTLS approach has improved accuracy, efficiency, and stability compared to prior methods presented for this problem and offers a straightforward implementation using standard least squares. We evaluate the performance of IMLP relative to a large number of prior algorithms including ICP, a robust variant on ICP, Generalized ICP (GICP), and Coherent Point Drift (CPD), as well as drawing close comparison with the prior anisotropic registration methods of GTLS-ICP and A-ICP. The performance of IMLP is shown to be superior with respect to these algorithms over a wide range of noise conditions, outliers, and misalignments using both mesh and point-cloud representations of various shapes. PMID:25748700

  7. Iterative Most-Likely Point Registration (IMLP): A Robust Algorithm for Computing Optimal Shape Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Seth D.; Boctor, Emad M.; Taylor, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a probabilistic registration algorithm that robustly solves the problem of rigid-body alignment between two shapes with high accuracy, by aptly modeling measurement noise in each shape, whether isotropic or anisotropic. For point-cloud shapes, the probabilistic framework additionally enables modeling locally-linear surface regions in the vicinity of each point to further improve registration accuracy. The proposed Iterative Most-Likely Point (IMLP) algorithm is formed as a variant of the popular Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, which iterates between point-correspondence and point-registration steps. IMLP’s probabilistic framework is used to incorporate a generalized noise model into both the correspondence and the registration phases of the algorithm, hence its name as a most-likely point method rather than a closest-point method. To efficiently compute the most-likely correspondences, we devise a novel search strategy based on a principal direction (PD)-tree search. We also propose a new approach to solve the generalized total-least-squares (GTLS) sub-problem of the registration phase, wherein the point correspondences are registered under a generalized noise model. Our GTLS approach has improved accuracy, efficiency, and stability compared to prior methods presented for this problem and offers a straightforward implementation using standard least squares. We evaluate the performance of IMLP relative to a large number of prior algorithms including ICP, a robust variant on ICP, Generalized ICP (GICP), and Coherent Point Drift (CPD), as well as drawing close comparison with the prior anisotropic registration methods of GTLS-ICP and A-ICP. The performance of IMLP is shown to be superior with respect to these algorithms over a wide range of noise conditions, outliers, and misalignments using both mesh and point-cloud representations of various shapes. PMID:25748700

  8. Genetic algorithm based fast alignment method for strap-down inertial navigation system with large azimuth misalignment.

    PubMed

    He, Hongyang; Xu, Jiangning; Qin, Fangjun; Li, Feng

    2015-11-01

    In order to shorten the alignment time and eliminate the small initial misalignment limit for compass alignment of strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS), which is sometimes not easy to satisfy when the ship is moored or anchored, an optimal model based time-varying parameter compass alignment algorithm is proposed in this paper. The contributions of the work presented here are twofold. First, the optimization of compass alignment parameters, which involves a lot of trial-and-error traditionally, is achieved based on genetic algorithm. On this basis, second, the optimal parameter varying model is established by least-square polynomial fitting. Experiments are performed with a navigational grade fiber optical gyroscope SINS, which validate the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:26628165

  9. Genetic algorithm based fast alignment method for strap-down inertial navigation system with large azimuth misalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongyang; Xu, Jiangning; Qin, Fangjun; Li, Feng

    2015-11-01

    In order to shorten the alignment time and eliminate the small initial misalignment limit for compass alignment of strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS), which is sometimes not easy to satisfy when the ship is moored or anchored, an optimal model based time-varying parameter compass alignment algorithm is proposed in this paper. The contributions of the work presented here are twofold. First, the optimization of compass alignment parameters, which involves a lot of trial-and-error traditionally, is achieved based on genetic algorithm. On this basis, second, the optimal parameter varying model is established by least-square polynomial fitting. Experiments are performed with a navigational grade fiber optical gyroscope SINS, which validate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  10. An Adaptive Alignment Algorithm for Quality-controlled Label-free LC-MS*

    PubMed Central

    Sandin, Marianne; Ali, Ashfaq; Hansson, Karin; Månsson, Olle; Andreasson, Erik; Resjö, Svante; Levander, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Label-free quantification using precursor-based intensities is a versatile workflow for large-scale proteomics studies. The method however requires extensive computational analysis and is therefore in need of robust quality control during the data mining stage. We present a new label-free data analysis workflow integrated into a multiuser software platform. A novel adaptive alignment algorithm has been developed to minimize the possible systematic bias introduced into the analysis. Parameters are estimated on the fly from the data at hand, producing a user-friendly analysis suite. Quality metrics are output in every step of the analysis as well as actively incorporated into the parameter estimation. We furthermore show the improvement of this system by comprehensive comparison to classical label-free analysis methodology as well as current state-of-the-art software. PMID:23306530

  11. A Fast and Scalable Kymograph Alignment Algorithm for Nanochannel-Based Optical DNA Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Charleston; Nilsson, Adam N.; Freitag, Camilla; Beech, Jason P.; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Optical mapping by direct visualization of individual DNA molecules, stretched in nanochannels with sequence-specific fluorescent labeling, represents a promising tool for disease diagnostics and genomics. An important challenge for this technique is thermal motion of the DNA as it undergoes imaging; this blurs fluorescent patterns along the DNA and results in information loss. Correcting for this effect (a process referred to as kymograph alignment) is a common preprocessing step in nanochannel-based optical mapping workflows, and we present here a highly efficient algorithm to accomplish this via pattern recognition. We compare our method with the one previous approach, and we find that our method is orders of magnitude faster while producing data of similar quality. We demonstrate proof of principle of our approach on experimental data consisting of melt mapped bacteriophage DNA. PMID:25875920

  12. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime; Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James

    2003-01-01

    Phase retrieval requires calculation of the real-valued phase of the pupil fimction from the image intensity distribution and characteristics of an optical system. Genetic 'algorithms were used to solve two one-dimensional phase retrieval problem. A GA successfully estimated the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the phase when the number of coefficients was correctly specified. A GA also successfully estimated the multiple p h e s of a segmented optical system analogous to the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) testbed located at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The SIBOA testbed was developed to investigate phase retrieval techniques. Tiphilt and piston motions of the mirrors accomplish phase corrections. A constant phase over each mirror can be achieved by an independent tip/tilt correction: the phase Conection term can then be factored out of the Discrete Fourier Tranform (DFT), greatly reducing computations.

  13. An algorithm for automatic crystal identification in pixelated scintillation detectors using thin plate splines and Gaussian mixture models.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Graham; Stortz, Greg; Goertzen, Andrew L

    2016-02-01

    A typical positron emission tomography detector is comprised of a scintillator crystal array coupled to a photodetector array or other position sensitive detector. Such detectors using light sharing to read out crystal elements require the creation of a crystal lookup table (CLUT) that maps the detector response to the crystal of interaction based on the x-y position of the event calculated through Anger-type logic. It is vital for system performance that these CLUTs be accurate so that the location of events can be accurately identified and so that crystal-specific corrections, such as energy windowing or time alignment, can be applied. While using manual segmentation of the flood image to create the CLUT is a simple and reliable approach, it is both tedious and time consuming for systems with large numbers of crystal elements. In this work we describe the development of an automated algorithm for CLUT generation that uses a Gaussian mixture model paired with thin plate splines (TPS) to iteratively fit a crystal layout template that includes the crystal numbering pattern. Starting from a region of stability, Gaussians are individually fit to data corresponding to crystal locations while simultaneously updating a TPS for predicting future Gaussian locations at the edge of a region of interest that grows as individual Gaussians converge to crystal locations. The algorithm was tested with flood image data collected from 16 detector modules, each consisting of a 409 crystal dual-layer offset LYSO crystal array readout by a 32 pixel SiPM array. For these detector flood images, depending on user defined input parameters, the algorithm runtime ranged between 17.5-82.5 s per detector on a single core of an Intel i7 processor. The method maintained an accuracy above 99.8% across all tests, with the majority of errors being localized to error prone corner regions. This method can be easily extended for use with other detector types through adjustment of the initial

  14. An algorithm for automatic crystal identification in pixelated scintillation detectors using thin plate splines and Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, Graham; Stortz, Greg; Goertzen, Andrew L.

    2016-02-01

    A typical positron emission tomography detector is comprised of a scintillator crystal array coupled to a photodetector array or other position sensitive detector. Such detectors using light sharing to read out crystal elements require the creation of a crystal lookup table (CLUT) that maps the detector response to the crystal of interaction based on the x-y position of the event calculated through Anger-type logic. It is vital for system performance that these CLUTs be accurate so that the location of events can be accurately identified and so that crystal-specific corrections, such as energy windowing or time alignment, can be applied. While using manual segmentation of the flood image to create the CLUT is a simple and reliable approach, it is both tedious and time consuming for systems with large numbers of crystal elements. In this work we describe the development of an automated algorithm for CLUT generation that uses a Gaussian mixture model paired with thin plate splines (TPS) to iteratively fit a crystal layout template that includes the crystal numbering pattern. Starting from a region of stability, Gaussians are individually fit to data corresponding to crystal locations while simultaneously updating a TPS for predicting future Gaussian locations at the edge of a region of interest that grows as individual Gaussians converge to crystal locations. The algorithm was tested with flood image data collected from 16 detector modules, each consisting of a 409 crystal dual-layer offset LYSO crystal array readout by a 32 pixel SiPM array. For these detector flood images, depending on user defined input parameters, the algorithm runtime ranged between 17.5-82.5 s per detector on a single core of an Intel i7 processor. The method maintained an accuracy above 99.8% across all tests, with the majority of errors being localized to error prone corner regions. This method can be easily extended for use with other detector types through adjustment of the initial

  15. Assembly and evaluation of a pyroelectric detector bonded to vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes over thin silicon.

    PubMed

    Theocharous, E; Theocharous, S P; Lehman, J H

    2013-11-20

    A novel pyroelectric detector consisting of a vertically aligned nanotube array on thin silicon (VANTA/Si) bonded to a 60 μm thick crystal of LiTaO₃ has been fabricated. The performance of the VANTA/Si-coated pyroelectric detector was evaluated using National Physical Laboratory's (NPL's) detector-characterization facilities. The relative spectral responsivity of the detector was found to be spectrally flat in the 0.8-24 μm wavelength range, in agreement with directional-hemispherical reflectance measurements of witness samples of the VANTA. The spatial uniformity of response of the test detector exhibited good uniformity, although the nonuniformity increased with increasing modulation frequency. The nonuniformity may be assigned either to the dimensions of the VANTA or the continuity of the bond between the VANTA/Si coating and the pyroelectric crystal substrate. The test detector exhibited a small superlinear response, which is similar to that of pyroelectric detectors coated with good quality gold-black coatings. PMID:24513757

  16. Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ringdal, F; Harris, D B; Dodge, D; Gibbons, S J

    2009-07-23

    Waveform correlation detectors compare a signal template with successive windows of a continuous data stream and report a detection when the correlation coefficient, or some comparable detection statistic, exceeds a specified threshold. Since correlation detectors exploit the fine structure of the full waveform, they are exquisitely sensitive when compared to power (STA/LTA) detectors. The drawback of correlation detectors is that they require complete knowledge of the signal to be detected, which limits such methods to instances of seismicity in which a very similar signal has already been observed by every station used. Such instances include earthquake swarms, aftershock sequences, repeating industrial seismicity, and many other forms of controlled explosions. The reduction in the detection threshold is even greater when the techniques are applied to arrays since stacking can be performed on the individual channel correlation traces to achieve significant array gain. In previous years we have characterized the decrease in detection threshold afforded by correlation detection across an array or network when observations of a previous event provide an adequate template for signals from subsequent events located near the calibration event. Last year we examined two related issues: (1) the size of the source region calibration footprint afforded by a master event, and (2) the use of temporally incoherent detectors designed to detect the gross envelope structure of the signal to extend the footprint. In Case 1, results from the PETROBAR-1 marine refraction profile indicated that array correlation gain was usable at inter-source separations out to one or two wavelengths. In Case 2, we found that incoherent detectors developed from a magnitude 6 event near Svalbard were successful at detecting aftershocks where correlation detectors derived from individual aftershocks were not. Incoherent detectors might provide 'seed' events for correlation detectors that then could

  17. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L

    2016-05-01

    Three high-resolution positioning methods based on the FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S. B. Andersson, Opt. Express 16, 18714 (2008)] are proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function, the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. After taking the super-Poissonian photon noise into account, the proposed algorithms give an average of 0.03-0.08 pixel position error much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. These improvements will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis. PMID:27250410

  18. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-17

    On the basis of FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S.B. Andersson, Opt. Exp. 16, 18714 (2008)] three highly-resolved positioning methodswere proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function (LRF), the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. The proposed algorithms give an average 0.03-0.08 pixel position error, much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. Moreover,more » these characters will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.« less

  19. Alignment of distantly related protein structures: algorithm, bound and implications to homology modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Xu, Jinbo

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Building an accurate alignment of a large set of distantly related protein structures is still very challenging. Results: This article presents a novel method 3DCOMB that can generate a multiple structure alignment (MSA) with not only as many conserved cores as possible, but also high-quality pairwise alignments. 3DCOMB is unique in that it makes use of both local and global structure environments, combined by a statistical learning method, to accurately identify highly similar fragment blocks (HSFBs) among all proteins to be aligned. By extending the alignments of these HSFBs, 3DCOMB can quickly generate an accurate MSA without using progressive alignment. 3DCOMB significantly excels others in aligning distantly related proteins. 3DCOMB can also generate correct alignments for functionally similar regions among proteins of very different structures while many other MSA tools fail. 3DCOMB is useful for many real-world applications. In particular, it enables us to find out that there is still large improvement room for multiple template homology modeling while several other MSA tools fail to do so. Availability: 3DCOMB is available at http://ttic.uchicago.edu/~jinbo/software.htm. Contact: jinboxu@gmail.com Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21791532

  20. Human emotion detector based on genetic algorithm using lip features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Terrence; Fetanat, Gholamreza; Homaifar, Abdollah; Tsou, Brian; Mendoza-Schrock, Olga

    2010-04-01

    We predicted human emotion using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) based lip feature extractor from facial images to classify all seven universal emotions of fear, happiness, dislike, surprise, anger, sadness and neutrality. First, we isolated the mouth from the input images using special methods, such as Region of Interest (ROI) acquisition, grayscaling, histogram equalization, filtering, and edge detection. Next, the GA determined the optimal or near optimal ellipse parameters that circumvent and separate the mouth into upper and lower lips. The two ellipses then went through fitness calculation and were followed by training using a database of Japanese women's faces expressing all seven emotions. Finally, our proposed algorithm was tested using a published database consisting of emotions from several persons. The final results were then presented in confusion matrices. Our results showed an accuracy that varies from 20% to 60% for each of the seven emotions. The errors were mainly due to inaccuracies in the classification, and also due to the different expressions in the given emotion database. Detailed analysis of these errors pointed to the limitation of detecting emotion based on the lip features alone. Similar work [1] has been done in the literature for emotion detection in only one person, we have successfully extended our GA based solution to include several subjects.

  1. Alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector Upgraded for the LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Peña, J.

    2015-12-01

    ATLAS is equipped with a tracking system built using different technologies, silicon planar sensors (pixel and micro-strip) and gaseous drift-tubes, all embedded in a 2T axial magnetic field. For the LHC Run II, the tracking system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable Barrel Layer (IBL). An outline of the track based alignment approach and its implementation within the ATLAS software will be presented. Special attention will be paid to integration in the alignment framework of the IBL, which plays a key role in precise reconstruction of the collider luminous region, interaction vertices and identification of long-lived heavy flavour states. In order to detect as soon as possible deformations and misalignments of the tracking system that may affect the data taking, a fast alignment chain was implemented at the Tier-0 at CERN. Latest upgrades and tests of this fast chain will be discussed, as well as the performance from the Cosmic Ray commissioning run.

  2. A multiuser detector based on artificial bee colony algorithm for DS-UWB systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhendong; Liu, Xiaohui; Wu, Zhilu

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent behavior of honey bee swarm. The ABC algorithm was developed to solve optimizing numerical problems and revealed premising results in processing time and solution quality. In ABC, a colony of artificial bees search for rich artificial food sources; the optimizing numerical problems are converted to the problem of finding the best parameter which minimizes an objective function. Then, the artificial bees randomly discover a population of initial solutions and then iteratively improve them by employing the behavior: moving towards better solutions by means of a neighbor search mechanism while abandoning poor solutions. In this paper, an efficient multiuser detector based on a suboptimal code mapping multiuser detector and artificial bee colony algorithm (SCM-ABC-MUD) is proposed and implemented in direct-sequence ultra-wideband (DS-UWB) systems under the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The simulation results demonstrate that the BER and the near-far effect resistance performances of this proposed algorithm are quite close to those of the optimum multiuser detector (OMD) while its computational complexity is much lower than that of OMD. Furthermore, the BER performance of SCM-ABC-MUD is not sensitive to the number of active users and can obtain a large system capacity. PMID:23983638

  3. Quadrupole Alignment and Trajectory Correction for Future Linear Colliders: SLC Tests of a Dispersion-Free Steering Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R

    2004-06-08

    The feasibility of future linear colliders depends on achieving very tight alignment and steering tolerances. All proposals (NLC, JLC, CLIC, TESLA and S-BAND) currently require a total emittance growth in the main linac of less than 30-100% [1]. This should be compared with a 100% emittance growth in the much smaller SLC linac [2]. Major advances in alignment and beam steering techniques beyond those used in the SLC are necessary for the next generation of linear colliders. In this paper, we present an experimental study of quadrupole alignment with a dispersion-free steering algorithm. A closely related method (wakefield-free steering) takes into account wakefield effects [3]. However, this method can not be studied at the SLC. The requirements for future linear colliders lead to new and unconventional ideas about alignment and beam steering. For example, no dipole correctors are foreseen for the standard trajectory correction in the NLC [4]; beam steering will be done by moving the quadrupole positions with magnet movers. This illustrates the close symbiosis between alignment, beam steering and beam dynamics that will emerge. It is no longer possible to consider the accelerator alignment as static with only a few surveys and realignments per year. The alignment in future linear colliders will be a dynamic process in which the whole linac, with thousands of beam-line elements, is aligned in a few hours or minutes, while the required accuracy of about 5 pm for the NLC quadrupole alignment [4] is a factor of 20 higher than in existing accelerators. The major task in alignment and steering is the accurate determination of the optimum beam-line position. Ideally one would like all elements to be aligned along a straight line. However, this is not practical. Instead a ''smooth curve'' is acceptable as long as its wavelength is much longer than the betatron wavelength of the accelerated beam. Conventional alignment methods are limited in accuracy by errors in the survey

  4. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  5. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  6. A New Event Reconstruction Algorithm for Super-Kamiokande Water Cherenkov Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobayama, Shimpei

    2012-10-01

    Super-Kamiokande is the world's largest water Cherenkov particle detector located underground in Kamioka-mine, Gifu, Japan. The detector has been used for proton decay search, and observation of atmospheric, solar and supernova neutrinos. It also serves as the far detector for T2K long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The detector consists of a cylindrical tank filled with 50kt of ultra-pure water, and an array of 11,000 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) installed on the tank's inner wall record the time and intensity of the Cherenkov light emitted by charged particles traveling in the water. Using the information from the PMTs, particle type, interaction vertex, direction and momentum can be reconstructed. A new reconstruction algorithm is being developed which performs a simultaneous maximum likelihood determination of such parameters. Through Monte Carlo studies, it was found that the new algorithm has a significantly better particle identification performance and vertex/momentum resolutions, compared to the existing reconstruction software. In this talk, an outline of the new algorithm, its performance and implications on physics analyses will be presented.

  7. Research on infrared-image denoising algorithm based on the noise analysis of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songtao; Zhou, Xiaodong; Shen, Tongsheng; Han, Yanli

    2005-01-01

    Since the conventional denoising algorithms have not considered the influence of certain concrete detector, they are not very effective to remove various noises contained in the low signal-to-noise ration infrared image. In this paper, a new thinking for infrared image denoising is proposed, which is based on the noise analyses of detector with an example of L model infrared multi-element detector. According to the noise analyses of this detector, the emphasis is placed on how to filter white noise and fractal noise in the preprocessing phase. Wavelet analysis is a good tool for analyzing 1/f process. 1/f process can be viewed as white noise approximately since its wavelet coefficients are stationary and uncorrelated. So if wavelet transform is adopted, the problem of removing white noise and fraction noise is simplified as the only one problem, i.e., removing white noise. To address this problem, a new wavelet domain adaptive wiener filtering algorithm is presented. From the viewpoint of quantitative and qualitative analyses, the filtering effect of our method is compared with those of traditional median filter, mean filter and wavelet thresholding algorithm in detail. The results show that our method can reduce various noises effectively and raise the ratio of signal-to-noise evidently.

  8. Prediction of Antimicrobial Peptides Based on Sequence Alignment and Support Vector Machine-Pairwise Algorithm Utilizing LZ-Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Shahrudin, Shahriza

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns an attempt to establish a new method for predicting antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which are important to the immune system. Recently, researchers are interested in designing alternative drugs based on AMPs because they have found that a large number of bacterial strains have become resistant to available antibiotics. However, researchers have encountered obstacles in the AMPs designing process as experiments to extract AMPs from protein sequences are costly and require a long set-up time. Therefore, a computational tool for AMPs prediction is needed to resolve this problem. In this study, an integrated algorithm is newly introduced to predict AMPs by integrating sequence alignment and support vector machine- (SVM-) LZ complexity pairwise algorithm. It was observed that, when all sequences in the training set are used, the sensitivity of the proposed algorithm is 95.28% in jackknife test and 87.59% in independent test, while the sensitivity obtained for jackknife test and independent test is 88.74% and 78.70%, respectively, when only the sequences that has less than 70% similarity are used. Applying the proposed algorithm may allow researchers to effectively predict AMPs from unknown protein peptide sequences with higher sensitivity. PMID:25802839

  9. Analysis of full charge reconstruction algorithms for x-ray pixelated detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Carini, G.; Deptuch, G.; Grybos, P.; Hoff, J.; Siddons, P., Maj.; Szczygiel, R.; Trimpl, M.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Existence of the natural diffusive spread of charge carriers on the course of their drift towards collecting electrodes in planar, segmented detectors results in a division of the original cloud of carriers between neighboring channels. This paper presents the analysis of algorithms, implementable with reasonable circuit resources, whose task is to prevent degradation of the detective quantum efficiency in highly granular, digital pixel detectors. The immediate motivation of the work is a photon science application requesting simultaneous timing spectroscopy and 2D position sensitivity. Leading edge discrimination, provided it can be freed from uncertainties associated with the charge sharing, is used for timing the events. Analyzed solutions can naturally be extended to the amplitude spectroscopy with pixel detectors.

  10. Analysis of Full Charge Reconstruction Algorithms for X-Ray Pixelated Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Carini, G.; Deptuch, G.; Grybos, P.; Hoff, J.; Siddons, P., Maj.; Szczygiel, R.; Trimpl, M.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-21

    Existence of the natural diffusive spread of charge carriers on the course of their drift towards collecting electrodes in planar, segmented detectors results in a division of the original cloud of carriers between neighboring channels. This paper presents the analysis of algorithms, implementable with reasonable circuit resources, whose task is to prevent degradation of the detective quantum efficiency in highly granular, digital pixel detectors. The immediate motivation of the work is a photon science application requesting simultaneous timing spectroscopy and 2D position sensitivity. Leading edge discrimination, provided it can be freed from uncertainties associated with the charge sharing, is used for timing the events. Analyzed solutions can naturally be extended to the amplitude spectroscopy with pixel detectors.

  11. NORSAR Final Scientific Report Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2009-04-16

    Correlation detection is a relatively new approach in seismology that offers significant advantages in increased sensitivity and event screening over standard energy detection algorithms. The basic concept is that a representative event waveform is used as a template (i.e. matched filter) that is correlated against a continuous, possibly multichannel, data stream to detect new occurrences of that same signal. These algorithms are therefore effective at detecting repeating events, such as explosions and aftershocks at a specific location. This final report summarizes the results of a three-year cooperative project undertaken by NORSAR and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The overall objective has been to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection using waveform correlation. The principal goal is to develop an adaptive processing algorithm. By this we mean that the detector is initiated using a basic set of reference ('master') events to be used in the correlation process, and then an automatic algorithm is applied successively to provide improved performance by extending the set of master events selectively and strategically. These additional master events are generated by an independent, conventional detection system. A periodic analyst review will then be applied to verify the performance and, if necessary, adjust and consolidate the master event set. A primary focus of this project has been the application of waveform correlation techniques to seismic arrays. The basic procedure is to perform correlation on the individual channels, and then stack the correlation traces using zero-delay beam forming. Array methods such as frequency-wavenumber analysis can be applied to this set of correlation traces to help guarantee the validity of detections and lower the detection threshold. In principle, the deployment of correlation detectors against seismically active regions could involve very large numbers of very specific detectors. To

  12. Clustering and Differential Alignment Algorithm: Identification of Early Stage Regulators in the Arabidopsis thaliana Iron Deficiency Response

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Durreshahwar; Foret, Jessica; Brady, Siobhan M.; Ducoste, Joel J.; Tuck, James; Long, Terri A.; Williams, Cranos

    2015-01-01

    Time course transcriptome datasets are commonly used to predict key gene regulators associated with stress responses and to explore gene functionality. Techniques developed to extract causal relationships between genes from high throughput time course expression data are limited by low signal levels coupled with noise and sparseness in time points. We deal with these limitations by proposing the Cluster and Differential Alignment Algorithm (CDAA). This algorithm was designed to process transcriptome data by first grouping genes based on stages of activity and then using similarities in gene expression to predict influential connections between individual genes. Regulatory relationships are assigned based on pairwise alignment scores generated using the expression patterns of two genes and some inferred delay between the regulator and the observed activity of the target. We applied the CDAA to an iron deficiency time course microarray dataset to identify regulators that influence 7 target transcription factors known to participate in the Arabidopsis thaliana iron deficiency response. The algorithm predicted that 7 regulators previously unlinked to iron homeostasis influence the expression of these known transcription factors. We validated over half of predicted influential relationships using qRT-PCR expression analysis in mutant backgrounds. One predicted regulator-target relationship was shown to be a direct binding interaction according to yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) analysis. These results serve as a proof of concept emphasizing the utility of the CDAA for identifying unknown or missing nodes in regulatory cascades, providing the fundamental knowledge needed for constructing predictive gene regulatory networks. We propose that this tool can be used successfully for similar time course datasets to extract additional information and infer reliable regulatory connections for individual genes. PMID:26317202

  13. Clustering and Differential Alignment Algorithm: Identification of Early Stage Regulators in the Arabidopsis thaliana Iron Deficiency Response.

    PubMed

    Koryachko, Alexandr; Matthiadis, Anna; Muhammad, Durreshahwar; Foret, Jessica; Brady, Siobhan M; Ducoste, Joel J; Tuck, James; Long, Terri A; Williams, Cranos

    2015-01-01

    Time course transcriptome datasets are commonly used to predict key gene regulators associated with stress responses and to explore gene functionality. Techniques developed to extract causal relationships between genes from high throughput time course expression data are limited by low signal levels coupled with noise and sparseness in time points. We deal with these limitations by proposing the Cluster and Differential Alignment Algorithm (CDAA). This algorithm was designed to process transcriptome data by first grouping genes based on stages of activity and then using similarities in gene expression to predict influential connections between individual genes. Regulatory relationships are assigned based on pairwise alignment scores generated using the expression patterns of two genes and some inferred delay between the regulator and the observed activity of the target. We applied the CDAA to an iron deficiency time course microarray dataset to identify regulators that influence 7 target transcription factors known to participate in the Arabidopsis thaliana iron deficiency response. The algorithm predicted that 7 regulators previously unlinked to iron homeostasis influence the expression of these known transcription factors. We validated over half of predicted influential relationships using qRT-PCR expression analysis in mutant backgrounds. One predicted regulator-target relationship was shown to be a direct binding interaction according to yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) analysis. These results serve as a proof of concept emphasizing the utility of the CDAA for identifying unknown or missing nodes in regulatory cascades, providing the fundamental knowledge needed for constructing predictive gene regulatory networks. We propose that this tool can be used successfully for similar time course datasets to extract additional information and infer reliable regulatory connections for individual genes. PMID:26317202

  14. MeV Gamma Ray Detection Algorithms for Stacked Silicon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMurray, Robert E. Jr.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Wercinski, Paul F.; Keller, Robert G.

    1993-01-01

    By making use of the signature of a gamma ray event as it appears in N = 5 to 20 lithium-drifted silicon detectors and applying smart selection algorithms, gamma rays in the energy range of 1 to 8 MeV can be detected with good efficiency and selectivity. Examples of the types of algorithms used for different energy regions include the simple sum mode, the sum-coincidence mode used in segmented detectors, unique variations on sum-coincidence for an N-dimensional vector event, and a new and extremely useful mode for double escape peak spectroscopy at pair-production energies. The latter algorithm yields a spectrum similar to that of the pair spectrometer, but without the need of the dual external segments for double escape coincidence, and without the large loss in efficiency of double escape events. Background events due to Compton scattering are largely suppressed. Monte Carlo calculations were used to model the gamma ray interactions in the silicon, in order to enable testing of a wide array of different algorithms on the event N-vectors for a large-N stack.

  15. Simple algorithms for digital pulse-shape discrimination with liquid scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharbi, T.

    2015-01-01

    The development of compact, battery-powered digital liquid scintillation neutron detection systems for field applications requires digital pulse processing (DPP) algorithms with minimum computational overhead. To meet this demand, two DPP algorithms for the discrimination of neutron and γ-rays with liquid scintillation detectors were developed and examined by using a NE213 liquid scintillation detector in a mixed radiation field. The first algorithm is based on the relation between the amplitude of a current pulse at the output of a photomultiplier tube and the amount of charge contained in the pulse. A figure-of-merit (FOM) value of 0.98 with 450 keVee (electron equivalent energy) energy threshold was achieved with this method when pulses were sampled at 250 MSample/s and with 8-bit resolution. Compared to the similar method of charge-comparison this method requires only a single integration window, thereby reducing the amount of computations by approximately 40%. The second approach is a digital version of the trailing-edge constant-fraction discrimination method. A FOM value of 0.84 with an energy threshold of 450 keVee was achieved with this method. In comparison with the similar method of rise-time discrimination this method requires a single time pick-off, thereby reducing the amount of computations by approximately 50%. The algorithms described in this work are useful for developing portable detection systems for applications such as homeland security, radiation dosimetry and environmental monitoring.

  16. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  17. Library Event Matching event classification algorithm for electron neutrino interactions in the NOνA detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhouse, C.; Patterson, R. B.

    2015-04-01

    We describe the Library Event Matching classification algorithm implemented for use in the NOνA νμ →νe oscillation measurement. Library Event Matching, developed in a different form by the earlier MINOS experiment, is a powerful approach in which input trial events are compared to a large library of simulated events to find those that best match the input event. A key feature of the algorithm is that the comparisons are based on all the information available in the event, as opposed to higher-level derived quantities. The final event classifier is formed by examining the details of the best-matched library events. We discuss the concept, definition, optimization, and broader applications of the algorithm as implemented here. Library Event Matching is well-suited to the monolithic, segmented detectors of NOνA and thus provides a powerful technique for event discrimination.

  18. Quantitative analysis of live-cell growth at the shoot apex of Arabidopsis thaliana: algorithms for feature measurement and temporal alignment.

    PubMed

    Tataw, Oben M; Reddy, G Venugopala; Keogh, Eamonn J; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K

    2013-01-01

    Study of the molecular control of organ growth requires establishment of the causal relationship between gene expression and cell behaviors. We seek to understand this relationship at the shoot apical meristem (SAM) of model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. This requires the spatial mapping and temporal alignment of different functional domains into a single template. Live-cell imaging techniques allow us to observe real-time organ primordia growth and gene expression dynamics at cellular resolution. In this paper, we propose a framework for the measurement of growth features at the 3D reconstructed surface of organ primordia, as well as algorithms for robust time alignment of primordia. We computed areas and deformation values from reconstructed 3D surfaces of individual primordia from live-cell imaging data. Based on these growth measurements, we applied a multiple feature landscape matching (LAM-M) algorithm to ensure a reliable temporal alignment of multiple primordia. Although the original landscape matching (LAM) algorithm motivated our alignment approach, it sometimes fails to properly align growth curves in the presence of high noise/distortion. To overcome this shortcoming, we modified the cost function to consider the landscape of the corresponding growth features. We also present an alternate parameter-free growth alignment algorithm which performs as well as LAM-M for high-quality data, but is more robust to the presence of outliers or noise. Results on primordia and guppy evolutionary growth data show that the proposed alignment framework performs at least as well as the LAM algorithm in the general case, and significantly better in the case of increased noise. PMID:24384704

  19. A novel alignment repulsion algorithm for flocking of multi-agent systems based on the number of neighbours per agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahani, R.; Sedigh, A. K.; Mahjani, M. Gh.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an energy-based control methodology is proposed to satisfy the Reynolds three rules in a flock of multiple agents. First, a control law is provided that is directly derived from the passivity theorem. In the next step, the Number of Neighbours Alignment/Repulsion algorithm is introduced for a flock of agents which loses the cohesion ability and uniformly joint connectivity condition. With this method, each agent tries to follow the agents which escape its neighbourhood by considering the velocity of escape time and number of neighbours. It is mathematically proved that the motion of multiple agents converges to a rigid and uncrowded flock if the group is jointly connected just for an instant. Moreover, the conditions for collision avoidance are guaranteed during the entire process. Finally, simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  20. Robust Algorithm for Alignment of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses in an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Data Analysis Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has become a standard technique for analyzing complex peptide mixtures to determine composition and relative quantity. Several high-throughput proteomics techniques attempt to combine complementary results from multiple LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses to provide more comprehensive and accurate results. To effectively collate results from these techniques, variations in mass and elution time measurements between related analyses are corrected by using algorithms designed to align the various types of results: LC-MS/MS vs. LC-MS/MS, LC-MS vs. LC-MS/MS, and LC-MS vs. LC-MS. Described herein are new algorithms referred to collectively as Liquid Chromatography based Mass Spectrometric Warping and Alignment of Retention times of Peptides (LCMSWARP) which use a dynamic elution time warping approach similar to traditional algorithms that correct variation in elution time using piecewise linear functions. LCMSWARP is compared to a linear alignment algorithm that assumes a linear transformation of elution time between analyses. LCMSWARP also corrects for drift in mass measurement accuracies that are often seen in an LC-MS analysis due to factors such as analyzer drift. We also describe the alignment of LC-MS results and provide examples of alignment of analyses from different chromatographic systems to demonstrate more complex transformation functions.

  1. SATI algorithm — the calculation of stress aligned HTI stiffness tensor for sandstone reservoir from wireline data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brajanovski, Miroslav

    2011-11-01

    I present an algorithm that uses cross-dipole wireline data only in order to estimate the HTI stiffness tensor for sandstone formations under in-situ asymmetric lateral (azimuthal) stress conditions. The algorithm is based on the generalization of terms "excess compliance" and "fracture weakness" developed within the linear slip interface theory for fractured rocks and is applied here to describe the effect of grain contacts in loose sandstones. I introduce the term "plane of weakness" being oriented (aligned) orthogonal to the minimal horizontal principal stress direction in order to describe the overall effective weakness of sandstone caused by the different principal stresses. For the quantification of this phenomenon I use the anisotropic Gassmann model. As a result I am able to calculate a HTI stiffness tensor for the interval length of a saturated sandstone formation and the respective Thomsen's parameters. The input data required for these calculations have to be provided by wireline logging and will consist of porosity, density, P-wave velocity, fast and slow shear wave velocities and oil-water saturation ratio. The algorithm in its current form is applicable to sandstone reservoirs only. Its limitation is based on two assumptions, which state that all the measured anisotropy is induced by the present stress in sandstone and that the unstressed sandstone would be nearly isotropic. From a technical viewpoint this algorithm can be implemented fairly easily in data acquisition and interpretation software relying on correct estimation of anisotropy parameters. It is also cheap because it does not require any additional measurements apart from the cross-dipole logging.

  2. Extracting the Position from a Silicon Resistive Strip Detector using Digital Shaping Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Harrison; Lonsdale, Sarah; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Pain, Steven; Cizewski, Jolie

    2015-10-01

    Transfer reactions can be used to study single-particle structure of radioactive nuclei which are important for energy generation and nucleosynthesis in explosive astrophysical environments. The resolution of such measurements performed in inverse kinematics are dependent on the position resolution of the detected ejectile. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of Silicon Resistive Strip Detectors (SRSD) was developed to measure light-ion products from transfer reactions in inverse kinematics with radioactive ion beams. The rise times of signals from resistive detectors are dependent upon the position of the incident charged particle; using analog electronics, the shaping time must be matched to the average response. By using a digital data acquisition system, event-by-event rise time information can be recorded, allowing for better optimized readout of resistive strip detectors. Investigations were made into the effectiveness of different shaping algorithms, such as smoothing filters and derivative filters, on the position resolution. Preliminary results demonstrate that improved position resolution can be obtained from the fast rise slope of the signals. Preliminary results and the first in-beam tests with the Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detector for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS). This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  3. Development of a SiPM-based PET detector using a digital positioning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Lee, Seung-Jae; An, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun-Il; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2016-05-01

    A decreased number of readout method is investigated here to provide precise pixel information for small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Small-animal PET consists of eight modules, each being composed of a 3 × 3 array of 2 mm × 2 mm × 20 mm lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals optically coupled to a 2 × 2 array of 3 mm × 3 mm silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). The number of readout channels is reduced by one-quarter that of the conventional method by applying a simplified pixel-determination algorithm. The performances of the PET system and detector module were evaluated with experimental verifications. In the results, all pixels of the 3 × 3 LYSO array were decoded well, and the performances of the PET detector module were measured.

  4. Centroiding algorithms for high speed crossed strip readout of microchannel plate detectors.

    PubMed

    Vallerga, John; Tremsin, Anton; Raffanti, Rick; Siegmund, Oswald

    2011-05-01

    Imaging microchannel plate (MCP) detectors with cross strip (XS) readout anodes require centroiding algorithms to determine the location of the amplified charge cloud from the incident radiation, be it photon or particle. We have developed a massively parallel XS readout electronic system that employs an amplifier and ADC for each strip and uses this digital data to calculate the centroid of each event in real time using a field programmable gate array (FPGA). Doing the calculations in real time in the front end electronics using an FPGA enables a much higher input event rate, nearly two orders of magnitude faster, by avoiding the bandwidth limitations of the raw data transfer to a computer. We report on our detailed efforts to optimize the algorithms used on both an 18 mm and 40 mm diameter XS MCP detector with strip pitch of 640 microns and read out with multiple 32 channel "Preshape32" ASIC amplifiers (developed at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory). Each strip electrode is continuously digitized to 12 bits at 50 MHz with all 64 digital channels (128 for the 40 mm detector) transferred to a Xilinx Virtex 5 FPGA. We describe how events are detected in the continuous data stream and then multiplexed into firmware modules that spatially and temporally filter and weight the input after applying offset and gain corrections. We will contrast a windowed "center of gravity" algorithm to a convolution with a special centroiding kernel in terms of resolution and distortion and show results with < 20 microns FWHM resolution at input rates > 1 MHz. PMID:21918588

  5. ANL CT Image Reconstruction Algorithm for Utilizing Digital X-ray Detector Array

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-08-05

    Reconstructs X-ray computed tomographic images from large data sets known as 16-bit binary sinograms. The algorithm uses the concept of generation of an image from carefully obtained multiple l-D or 2-0 X-ray projections. The individual projections are filtered using a digital Fast Fourier Transform. The literature refers to this as filtered back projection. The software is capable of processing a large file for reconstructing single images or volumetnc (3-D) images from large area high resolutionmore » digital X-ray detectors.« less

  6. Performance Assessment of the Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. Part 2; Clustering Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Christian, Hugh J.; Blakeslee, Richard; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Goodman, Steve J.; Boeck, William

    2006-01-01

    We describe the clustering algorithm used by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) for combining the lightning pulse data into events, groups, flashes, and areas. Events are single pixels that exceed the LIS/OTD background level during a single frame (2 ms). Groups are clusters of events that occur within the same frame and in adjacent pixels. Flashes are clusters of groups that occur within 330 ms and either 5.5 km (for LIS) or 16.5 km (for OTD) of each other. Areas are clusters of flashes that occur within 16.5 km of each other. Many investigators are utilizing the LIS/OTD flash data; therefore, we test how variations in the algorithms for the event group and group-flash clustering affect the flash count for a subset of the LIS data. We divided the subset into areas with low (1-3), medium (4-15), high (16-63), and very high (64+) flashes to see how changes in the clustering parameters affect the flash rates in these different sizes of areas. We found that as long as the cluster parameters are within about a factor of two of the current values, the flash counts do not change by more than about 20%. Therefore, the flash clustering algorithm used by the LIS and OTD sensors create flash rates that are relatively insensitive to reasonable variations in the clustering algorithms.

  7. Robust algorithm to locate heart beats from multiple physiological waveforms by individual signal detector voting.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Loriano; Scully, Christopher G; Vicente, Jose; Johannesen, Lars; Strauss, David G

    2015-08-01

    Alarm fatigue is a top medical device hazard in patient monitoring that could be reduced by merging physiological information from multiple sensors, minimizing the impact of a single sensor failing. We developed a heart beat detection algorithm that utilizes multi-modal physiological signals (e.g. electrocardiogram, blood pressure, stroke volume, photoplethysmogram and electro-encephalogram) by merging the heart beats obtained from signal-specific detectors. We used the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 training set to develop the algorithm, and we refined it with a mix of signals from the multiparameter intelligent monitoring in intensive care (MIMIC II) database and artificially disrupted waveforms. The algorithm had an average sensitivity of 95.67% and positive predictive value (PPV) of 92.28% when applied to the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 200 record training set. On a refined dataset obtained by removing 5 records with arrhythmias and inconsistent reference annotations we obtained an average sensitivity of 97.43% and PPV of 94.17%. Algorithm performance was assessed with the Physionet Challenge 2014 test set that consisted of 200 records (each up to 10 min length) containing multiple physiological signals and reference annotations verified by the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 organizers. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 92.74% and PPV of 87.37% computed over all annotated beats, and a record average sensitivity of 91.08%, PPV of 86.96% and an overall score (average of all 4 measures) of 89.53%. Our algorithm is an example of a data fusion approach that can improve patient monitoring and reduce false alarms by reducing the effect of individual signal failures. PMID:26218439

  8. Infrared detectors and lasers operating in the 3-12 μm range using band-gap engineered structures with type II band-gap alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Venkataraman; Little, John W.; Tober, Richard L.

    2006-02-01

    The Type II broken band-gap alignment in semiconductor structures wherein the conduction band minimum is in one semiconductor (e.g., InAs) and the valence band maximum is in another (e.g., GaInSb) offers certain unique advantages which can be utilized to realize band-gap engineered novel quantum electro-optic devices such as lasers and detectors. The advantages of the type II structures include reduced Auger recombination, extending the effective band-gap energy of materials wherein type I band-gap alignment would give rise to difficulties such as miscibility gap. In this paper we describe the work carried out at the Army Research Laboratory on type II semiconductor quantum electro-optic devices such as IR lasers and detectors operating in the 3-12 μm range. Specifically we will cover the progress made in GaSb based type II strained layer superlattice IR detectors and Interband Cascade IR Lasers. We will also present our recent work in self-assembled quantum dots which have type II band-gap alignment with the matrix material in which the dots are embedded.

  9. Remote Evaluation of Rotational Velocity Using a Quadrant Photo-Detector and a DSC Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiangkai; Zhu, Zhixiong; Chen, Yang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to remotely evaluate the rotational velocity of a measured object by using a quadrant photo-detector and a differential subtraction correlation (DSC) algorithm. The rotational velocity of a rotating object is determined by two temporal-delay numbers at the minima of two DSCs that are derived from the four output signals of the quadrant photo-detector, and the sign of the calculated rotational velocity directly represents the rotational direction. The DSC algorithm does not require any multiplication operations. Experimental calculations were performed to confirm the proposed evaluation method. The calculated rotational velocity, including its amplitude and direction, showed good agreement with the given one, which had an amplitude error of ~0.3%, and had over 1100 times the efficiency of the traditional cross-correlation method in the case of data number N > 4800. The confirmations have shown that the remote evaluation of rotational velocity can be done without any circular division disk, and that it has much fewer error sources, making it simple, accurate and effective for remotely evaluating rotational velocity. PMID:27120607

  10. A region segmentation based algorithm for building a crystal position lookup table in a scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-Peng; Yun, Ming-Kai; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Fan, Xin; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chai, Pei; Shan, Bao-Ci

    2015-03-01

    In a scintillation detector, scintillation crystals are typically made into a 2-dimensional modular array. The location of incident gamma-ray needs be calibrated due to spatial response nonlinearity. Generally, position histograms-the characteristic flood response of scintillation detectors-are used for position calibration. In this paper, a position calibration method based on a crystal position lookup table which maps the inaccurate location calculated by Anger logic to the exact hitting crystal position has been proposed. Firstly, the position histogram is preprocessed, such as noise reduction and image enhancement. Then the processed position histogram is segmented into disconnected regions, and crystal marking points are labeled by finding the centroids of regions. Finally, crystal boundaries are determined and the crystal position lookup table is generated. The scheme is evaluated by the whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) scanner and breast dedicated single photon emission computed tomography scanner developed by the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The results demonstrate that the algorithm is accurate, efficient, robust and applicable to any configurations of scintillation detector. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (81101175) and XIE Jia-Lin Foundation of Institute of High Energy Physics (Y3546360U2)

  11. Statistically significant performance results of a mine detector and fusion algorithm from an x-band high-resolution SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Arnold C.; Pachowicz, Peter W.

    2004-09-01

    Current mine detection research indicates that no single sensor or single look from a sensor will detect mines/minefields in a real-time manner at a performance level suitable for a forward maneuver unit. Hence, the integrated development of detectors and fusion algorithms are of primary importance. A problem in this development process has been the evaluation of these algorithms with relatively small data sets, leading to anecdotal and frequently over trained results. These anecdotal results are often unreliable and conflicting among various sensors and algorithms. Consequently, the physical phenomena that ought to be exploited and the performance benefits of this exploitation are often ambiguous. The Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision Laboratory and Electron Sensors Directorate has collected large amounts of multisensor data such that statistically significant evaluations of detection and fusion algorithms can be obtained. Even with these large data sets care must be taken in algorithm design and data processing to achieve statistically significant performance results for combined detectors and fusion algorithms. This paper discusses statistically significant detection and combined multilook fusion results for the Ellipse Detector (ED) and the Piecewise Level Fusion Algorithm (PLFA). These statistically significant performance results are characterized by ROC curves that have been obtained through processing this multilook data for the high resolution SAR data of the Veridian X-Band radar. We discuss the implications of these results on mine detection and the importance of statistical significance, sample size, ground truth, and algorithm design in performance evaluation.

  12. Nearest Alignment Space Termination

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-07-13

    Near Alignment Space Termination (NAST) is the Greengenes algorithm that matches up submitted sequences with the Greengenes database to look for similarities and align the submitted sequences based on those similarities.

  13. Improved event positioning in a gamma ray detector using an iterative position-weighted centre-of-gravity algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Yi; Goertzen, Andrew L

    2013-07-21

    An iterative position-weighted centre-of-gravity algorithm was developed and tested for positioning events in a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based scintillation detector for positron emission tomography. The algorithm used a Gaussian-based weighting function centred at the current estimate of the event location. The algorithm was applied to the signals from a 4 × 4 array of SiPM detectors that used individual channel readout and a LYSO:Ce scintillator array. Three scintillator array configurations were tested: single layer with 3.17 mm crystal pitch, matched to the SiPM size; single layer with 1.5 mm crystal pitch; and dual layer with 1.67 mm crystal pitch and a ½ crystal offset in the X and Y directions between the two layers. The flood histograms generated by this algorithm were shown to be superior to those generated by the standard centre of gravity. The width of the Gaussian weighting function of the algorithm was optimized for different scintillator array setups. The optimal width of the Gaussian curve was found to depend on the amount of light spread. The algorithm required less than 20 iterations to calculate the position of an event. The rapid convergence of this algorithm will readily allow for implementation on a front-end detector processing field programmable gate array for use in improved real-time event positioning and identification. PMID:23798644

  14. SHARAKU: an algorithm for aligning and clustering read mapping profiles of deep sequencing in non-coding RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Mariko; Amano, Kojiro; Abe, Masaya; Seki, Misato; Hase, Sumitaka; Sato, Kengo; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Deep sequencing of the transcripts of regulatory non-coding RNA generates footprints of post-transcriptional processes. After obtaining sequence reads, the short reads are mapped to a reference genome, and specific mapping patterns can be detected called read mapping profiles, which are distinct from random non-functional degradation patterns. These patterns reflect the maturation processes that lead to the production of shorter RNA sequences. Recent next-generation sequencing studies have revealed not only the typical maturation process of miRNAs but also the various processing mechanisms of small RNAs derived from tRNAs and snoRNAs. Results: We developed an algorithm termed SHARAKU to align two read mapping profiles of next-generation sequencing outputs for non-coding RNAs. In contrast with previous work, SHARAKU incorporates the primary and secondary sequence structures into an alignment of read mapping profiles to allow for the detection of common processing patterns. Using a benchmark simulated dataset, SHARAKU exhibited superior performance to previous methods for correctly clustering the read mapping profiles with respect to 5′-end processing and 3′-end processing from degradation patterns and in detecting similar processing patterns in deriving the shorter RNAs. Further, using experimental data of small RNA sequencing for the common marmoset brain, SHARAKU succeeded in identifying the significant clusters of read mapping profiles for similar processing patterns of small derived RNA families expressed in the brain. Availability and Implementation: The source code of our program SHARAKU is available at http://www.dna.bio.keio.ac.jp/sharaku/, and the simulated dataset used in this work is available at the same link. Accession code: The sequence data from the whole RNA transcripts in the hippocampus of the left brain used in this work is available from the DNA DataBank of Japan (DDBJ) Sequence Read Archive (DRA) under the accession number DRA

  15. GSTAMIDS pulsed magnetic induction metal detector: hardware description and data processing algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sower, Gary D.; Kilgore, Roger; Eberly, John

    2001-10-01

    into the GSTAMIDS sensor modules. This is a time-domain, transient signal metal detector that gives target signal response information of a different nature than that from more conventional continuous-wave (CW) metal detectors. The magnetic design of the GSTAMIDS PMI has very broad-band radiation properties that allow for the required transient eddy current responses in the metallic targets. The design of this detector is unique in that it allows processing of the received signals from targets to begin at the very start of the eddy current decays (t = 0). This then gives the ability to measure and quantify up to three decay terms in the target response, which features unambiguously identify the particular threat target. The results of the data processing algorithms that are used to extract the features used for mine detection are included herein to more clearly show the mine signals.

  16. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  17. Adaptive algorithms of position and energy reconstruction in Anger-camera type detectors: experimental data processing in ANTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Defendi, I.; Engels, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Gongadze, A.; Guerard, B.; Jurkovic, M.; Kemmerling, G.; Manzin, G.; Margato, L. M. S.; Niko, H.; Pereira, L.; Petrillo, C.; Peyaud, A.; Piscitelli, F.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N. J.; Sacchetti, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Solovov, V.; Van Esch, P.; Zeitelhack, K.

    2013-05-01

    The software package ANTS (Anger-camera type Neutron detector: Toolkit for Simulations), developed for simulation of Anger-type gaseous detectors for thermal neutron imaging was extended to include a module for experimental data processing. Data recorded with a sensor array containing up to 100 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) in a custom configuration can be loaded and the positions and energies of the events can be reconstructed using the Center-of-Gravity, Maximum Likelihood or Least Squares algorithm. A particular strength of the new module is the ability to reconstruct the light response functions and relative gains of the photomultipliers from flood field illumination data using adaptive algorithms. The performance of the module is demonstrated with simulated data generated in ANTS and experimental data recorded with a 19 PMT neutron detector. The package executables are publicly available at http://coimbra.lip.pt/~andrei/

  18. Two Simple and Efficient Algorithms to Compute the SP-Score Objective Function of a Multiple Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Ranwez, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a crucial step in many molecular analyses and many MSA tools have been developed. Most of them use a greedy approach to construct a first alignment that is then refined by optimizing the sum of pair score (SP-score). The SP-score estimation is thus a bottleneck for most MSA tools since it is repeatedly required and is time consuming. Results Given an alignment of n sequences and L sites, I introduce here optimized solutions reaching O(nL) time complexity for affine gap cost, instead of O(n2L), which are easy to implement. PMID:27505054

  19. Data Retrieval Algorithms for Validating the Optical Transient Detector and the Lightning Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing, and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no earth curvature) are provided that implement all of these measurements. The accuracy of the retrieval method is tested using computer-simulated datasets, and the relative influence of bearing and arrival time data an the outcome of the final solution is formally demonstrated. The algorithm is sufficiently accurate to validate NASA:s Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. A quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available is also introduced. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in sc)iirce location, Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. For arbitrary noncollinear network geometries and in the absence of measurement errors, it is shown that the two quadratic roots are equivalent (no source location ambiguity) on the outer sensor baselines. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer-generated datasets, and the results are generally better than those obtained from the three-station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg.

  20. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, R.; Finck, Ch.; Juliani, D.; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Tropea, S.; Vanstalle, M.; Younis, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different methods are implemented. The algorithm performances and the accuracy on reconstructed observables are evaluated on the basis of simulated and experimental data.

  1. CUDA ClustalW: An efficient parallel algorithm for progressive multiple sequence alignment on Multi-GPUs.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yu-Shiang; Lin, Chun-Yuan; Chung, Yeh-Ching; Chung, Yi-Fang

    2015-10-01

    For biological applications, sequence alignment is an important strategy to analyze DNA and protein sequences. Multiple sequence alignment is an essential methodology to study biological data, such as homology modeling, phylogenetic reconstruction and etc. However, multiple sequence alignment is a NP-hard problem. In the past decades, progressive approach has been proposed to successfully align multiple sequences by adopting iterative pairwise alignments. Due to rapid growth of the next generation sequencing technologies, a large number of sequences can be produced in a short period of time. When the problem instance is large, progressive alignment will be time consuming. Parallel computing is a suitable solution for such applications, and GPU is one of the important architectures for contemporary parallel computing researches. Therefore, we proposed a GPU version of ClustalW v2.0.11, called CUDA ClustalW v1.0, in this work. From the experiment results, it can be seen that the CUDA ClustalW v1.0 can achieve more than 33× speedups for overall execution time by comparing to ClustalW v2.0.11. PMID:26052076

  2. Design of an advanced positron emission tomography detector system and algorithms for imaging small animal models of human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foudray, Angela Marie Klohs

    Detecting, quantifying and visualizing biochemical mechanism in a living system without perturbing function is the goal of the instrument and algorithms designed in this thesis. Biochemical mechanisms of cells have long been known to be dependent on the signals they receive from their environment. Studying biological processes of cells in-vitro can vastly distort their function, since you are removing them from their natural chemical signaling environment. Mice have become the biological system of choice for various areas of biomedical research due to their genetic and physiological similarities with humans, the relatively low cost of their care, and their quick breeding cycle. Drug development and efficacy assessment along with disease detection, management, and mechanism research all have benefited from the use of small animal models of human disease. A high resolution, high sensitivity, three-dimensional (3D) positioning positron emission tomography (PET) detector system was designed through device characterization and Monte Carlo simulation. Position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) were characterized in various packaging configurations; coupled to various configurations of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystals. Forty novelly packaged final design devices were constructed and characterized, each providing characteristics superior to commercially available scintillation detectors used in small animal imaging systems: ˜1mm crystal identification, 14-15% of 511 keV energy resolution, and averaging 1.9 to 5.6 ns coincidence time resolution. A closed-cornered box-shaped detector configuration was found to provide optimal photon sensitivity (˜10.5% in the central plane) using dual LSO-PSAPD scintillation detector modules and Monte Carlo simulation. Standard figures of merit were used to determine optimal system acquisition parameters. A realistic model for constituent devices was developed for understanding the signals reported by the

  3. Study and optimization of positioning algorithms for monolithic PET detectors blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Acilu, P.; Sarasola, I.; Canadas, M.; Cuerdo, R.; Rato Mendes, P.; Romero, L.; Willmott, C.

    2012-06-01

    We are developing a PET insert for existing MRI equipment to be used in clinical PET/MR studies of the human brain. The proposed scanner is based on annihilation gamma detection with monolithic blocks of cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) coupled to magnetically-compatible avalanche photodiodes (APD) matrices. The light distribution generated on the LYSO:Ce block provides the impinging position of the 511 keV photons by means of a positioning algorithm. Several positioning methods, from the simplest Anger Logic to more sophisticate supervised-learning Neural Networks (NN), can be implemented to extract the incidence position of gammas directly from the APD signals. Finally, an optimal method based on a two-step Feed-Forward Neural Network has been selected. It allows us to reach a resolution at detector level of 2 mm, and acquire images of point sources using a first BrainPET prototype consisting of two monolithic blocks working in coincidence. Neural networks provide a straightforward positioning of the acquired data once they have been trained, however the training process is usually time-consuming. In order to obtain an efficient positioning method for the complete scanner it was necessary to find a training procedure that reduces the data acquisition and processing time without introducing a noticeable degradation of the spatial resolution. A grouping process and posterior selection of the training data have been done regarding the similitude of the light distribution of events which have one common incident coordinate (transversal or longitudinal). By doing this, the amount of training data can be reduced to about 5% of the initial number with a degradation of spatial resolution lower than 10%.

  4. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ye; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2015-10-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr3 detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R2=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible.

  5. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  6. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  7. A simple methodology for characterization of germanium coaxial detectors by using Monte Carlo simulation and evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Guerra, J G; Rubiano, J G; Winter, G; Guerra, A G; Alonso, H; Arnedo, M A; Tejera, A; Gil, J M; Rodríguez, R; Martel, P; Bolivar, J P

    2015-11-01

    The determination in a sample of the activity concentration of a specific radionuclide by gamma spectrometry needs to know the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) for the energy of interest. The difficulties related to the experimental calibration make it advisable to have alternative methods for FEPE determination, such as the simulation of the transport of photons in the crystal by the Monte Carlo method, which requires an accurate knowledge of the characteristics and geometry of the detector. The characterization process is mainly carried out by Canberra Industries Inc. using proprietary techniques and methodologies developed by that company. It is a costly procedure (due to shipping and to the cost of the process itself) and for some research laboratories an alternative in situ procedure can be very useful. The main goal of this paper is to find an alternative to this costly characterization process, by establishing a method for optimizing the parameters of characterizing the detector, through a computational procedure which could be reproduced at a standard research lab. This method consists in the determination of the detector geometric parameters by using Monte Carlo simulation in parallel with an optimization process, based on evolutionary algorithms, starting from a set of reference FEPEs determined experimentally or computationally. The proposed method has proven to be effective and simple to implement. It provides a set of characterization parameters which it has been successfully validated for different source-detector geometries, and also for a wide range of environmental samples and certified materials. PMID:26188622

  8. Fast statistical alignment.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Robert K; Roberts, Adam; Smoot, Michael; Juvekar, Sudeep; Do, Jaeyoung; Dewey, Colin; Holmes, Ian; Pachter, Lior

    2009-05-01

    We describe a new program for the alignment of multiple biological sequences that is both statistically motivated and fast enough for problem sizes that arise in practice. Our Fast Statistical Alignment program is based on pair hidden Markov models which approximate an insertion/deletion process on a tree and uses a sequence annealing algorithm to combine the posterior probabilities estimated from these models into a multiple alignment. FSA uses its explicit statistical model to produce multiple alignments which are accompanied by estimates of the alignment accuracy and uncertainty for every column and character of the alignment--previously available only with alignment programs which use computationally-expensive Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches--yet can align thousands of long sequences. Moreover, FSA utilizes an unsupervised query-specific learning procedure for parameter estimation which leads to improved accuracy on benchmark reference alignments in comparison to existing programs. The centroid alignment approach taken by FSA, in combination with its learning procedure, drastically reduces the amount of false-positive alignment on biological data in comparison to that given by other methods. The FSA program and a companion visualization tool for exploring uncertainty in alignments can be used via a web interface at http://orangutan.math.berkeley.edu/fsa/, and the source code is available at http://fsa.sourceforge.net/. PMID:19478997

  9. The performance and development for the Inner Detector Trigger algorithms at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penc, Ondrej

    2015-05-01

    A redesign of the tracking algorithms for the ATLAS trigger for LHC's Run 2 starting in 2015 is in progress. The ATLAS HLT software has been restructured to run as a more flexible single stage HLT, instead of two separate stages (Level 2 and Event Filter) as in Run 1. The new tracking strategy employed for Run 2 will use a Fast Track Finder (FTF) algorithm to seed subsequent Precision Tracking, and will result in improved track parameter resolution and faster execution times than achieved during Run 1. The performance of the new algorithms has been evaluated to identify those aspects where code optimisation would be most beneficial. The performance and timing of the algorithms for electron and muon reconstruction in the trigger are presented. The profiling infrastructure, constructed to provide prompt feedback from the optimisation, is described, including the methods used to monitor the relative performance improvements as the code evolves.

  10. Robust and exact structural variation detection with paired-end and soft-clipped alignments: SoftSV compared with eight algorithms.

    PubMed

    Bartenhagen, Christoph; Dugas, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Structural variation (SV) plays an important role in genetic diversity among the population in general and specifically in diseases such as cancer. Modern next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provide paired-end sequencing data at high depth with increasing read lengths. This development enabled the analysis of split-reads to detect SV breakpoints with single-nucleotide resolution. But ambiguous mappings and breakpoint sequences with further co-occurring mutations hamper split-read alignments against a reference sequence. The trade-off between high sensitivity and low false-positive rate is problematic and often requires a lot of fine-tuning of the analysis method based on knowledge about its algorithm and the characteristics of the data set. We present SoftSV, a method for exact breakpoint detection for small and large deletions, inversions, tandem duplications and inter-chromosomal translocations, which relies solely on the mutual alignment of soft-clipped reads within the neighborhood of discordantly mapped paired-end reads. Unlike other SV detection algorithms, our approach does not require thresholds regarding sequencing coverage or mapping quality. We evaluate SoftSV together with eight approaches (Breakdancer, Clever, CREST, Delly, GASVPro, Pindel, Socrates and SoftSearch) on simulated and real data sets. Our results show that sensitive and reliable SV detection is subject to many different factors like read length, sequence coverage and SV type. While most programs have their individual drawbacks, our greedy approach turns out to be the most robust and sensitive on many experimental setups. Sensitivities above 85% and positive predictive values between 80 and 100% could be achieved consistently for all SV types on simulated data sets starting at relatively short 75 bp reads and low 10-15× sequence coverage. PMID:25998133

  11. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  12. Measurement based simulation of microscope deviations for evaluation of stitching algorithms for the extension of Fourier-based alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelke, Florian; Kästner, Markus; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2013-05-01

    Image stitching is a technique used to measure large surface areas with high resolution while maintaining a large field of view. We work on improving data fusion by stitching in the field of microscopic analysis of technical surfaces for structures and roughness. Guidance errors and imaging errors such as noise cause problems for seamless image fusion of technical surfaces. The optical imaging errors of 3D Microscopes, such as confocal microscopes and white light interferometers, as well as the guidance errors of their automated positioning systems have been measured to create a software to simulate automated measurements of known surfaces with specific deviations to test new stitching algorithms. We measured and incorporated radial image distortion, interferometer reference mirror shape deviations, statistical noise, drift of the positional axis, on-axis-accuracy and repeatability of the used positioning stages and misalignment of the CCD-Chip with respect to the axes of motion. We used the resulting simulation of the measurement process to test a new image registration technique that allows for the use of correlation of images by fast fourier transform for small overlaps between single measurements.

  13. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprintmore » that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.« less

  14. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  15. Extended algorithm for simulation of light transport in single crystal scintillation detectors for S(T)EM.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Petr

    2007-01-01

    The new extended Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method for photon transport in S(T)EM back scattered electron (BSE) scintillation detection systems of various shapes is presented in this paper. The method makes use of the random generation of photon emission from a scintillator luminescent centre and describes the trajectory of photons and the efficiency of their transport toward the photocathode of the photomultiplier tube. The paper explains a new algorithm for determining the position of interaction of the photon with the surface of the single crystal scintillator or of the light guide with nearly arbitrary shapes. Some examples of the utilization of the simulation method are also included, and conclusions for very simple edge-guided signal (EGS) scintillation detection systems made. The computer optimized design of the BSE scintillation detector for the S 4000 Hitachi SEM was chosen to demonstrate the capability of this MC simulation method. PMID:17957744

  16. Fast parallel tracking algorithm for the muon detector of the CBM experiment at fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A.; Höhne, C.; Kisel, I.; Ososkov, G.

    2010-07-01

    Particle trajectory recognition is an important and challenging task in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR accelerator at Darmstadt. The tracking algorithms have to process terabytes of input data produced in particle collisions. Therefore, the speed of the tracking software is extremely important for data analysis. In this contribution, a fast parallel track reconstruction algorithm which uses available features of modern processors is presented. These features comprise a SIMD instruction set (SSE) and multithreading. The first allows one to pack several data items into one register and to operate on all of them in parallel thus achieving more operations per cycle. The second feature enables the routines to exploit all available CPU cores and hardware threads. This parallel version of the tracking algorithm has been compared to the initial serial scalar version which uses a similar approach for tracking. A speed-up factor of 487 was achieved (from 730 to 1.5 ms/event) for a computer with 2 × Intel Core i7 processors at 2.66 GHz.

  17. Performance and development plans for the Inner Detector trigger algorithms at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Haugh, Stewart

    2015-12-01

    A description of the design and performance of the newly re-implemented tracking algorithms for the ATLAS trigger for LHC Run 2, to commence in spring 2015, is presented. The ATLAS High Level Trigger (HLT) has been restructured to run as a more flexible single stage process, rather than the two separate Level 2 and Event Filter stages used during Run 1. To make optimal use of this new scenario, a new tracking strategy has been implemented for Run 2. This new strategy will use a FastTrackFinder algorithm to directly seed the subsequent Precision Tracking, and will result in improved track parameter resolution and significantly faster execution times than achieved during Run 1 and with better efficiency. The timings of the algorithms for electron and tau track triggers are presented. The profiling infrastructure, constructed to provide prompt feedback from the optimisation, is described, including the methods used to monitor the relative performance improvements as the code evolves. The online deployment and commissioning are also discussed.

  18. 'Fixed-axis' magnetic orientation by an amphibian: non-shoreward-directed compass orientation, misdirected homing or positioning a magnetite-based map detector in a consistent alignment relative to the magnetic field?

    PubMed

    Phillips, John B; Borland, S Chris; Freake, Michael J; Brassart, Jacques; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2002-12-01

    suggestion that homing newts use the light-dependent magnetic compass to align a magnetite-based 'map detector' when obtaining the precise measurements necessary to derive map information from the magnetic field. However, aligning the putative map detector does not explain the fixed-axis response of newts tested under long-wavelength light. Preliminary evidence suggests that, in the absence of reliable directional information from the magnetic compass (caused by the 90 degrees rotation of the response of the magnetic compass under long-wavelength light), newts may resort to a systematic sampling strategy to identify alignment(s) of the map detector that yields reliable magnetic field measurements. PMID:12432012

  19. Monte Carlo simulation using the PENELOPE code with an ant colony algorithm to study MOSFET detectors.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, M A; García-Pareja, S; Guirado, D; Vilches, M; Anguiano, M; Palma, A J; Lallena, A M

    2009-10-21

    In this work we have developed a simulation tool, based on the PENELOPE code, to study the response of MOSFET devices to irradiation with high-energy photons. The energy deposited in the extremely thin silicon dioxide layer has been calculated. To reduce the statistical uncertainties, an ant colony algorithm has been implemented to drive the application of splitting and Russian roulette as variance reduction techniques. In this way, the uncertainty has been reduced by a factor of approximately 5, while the efficiency is increased by a factor of above 20. As an application, we have studied the dependence of the response of the pMOS transistor 3N163, used as a dosimeter, with the incidence angle of the radiation for three common photons sources used in radiotherapy: a (60)Co Theratron-780 and the 6 and 18 MV beams produced by a Mevatron KDS LINAC. Experimental and simulated results have been obtained for gantry angles of 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees and 75 degrees. The agreement obtained has permitted validation of the simulation tool. We have studied how to reduce the angular dependence of the MOSFET response by using an additional encapsulation made of brass in the case of the two LINAC qualities considered. PMID:19794247

  20. Conditional alignment random fields for multiple motion sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minyoung

    2013-11-01

    We consider the multiple time-series alignment problem, typically focusing on the task of synchronizing multiple motion videos of the same kind of human activity. Finding an optimal global alignment of multiple sequences is infeasible, while there have been several approximate solutions, including iterative pairwise warping algorithms and variants of hidden Markov models. In this paper, we propose a novel probabilistic model that represents the conditional densities of the latent target sequences which are aligned with the given observed sequences through the hidden alignment variables. By imposing certain constraints on the target sequences at the learning stage, we have a sensible model for multiple alignments that can be learned very efficiently by the EM algorithm. Compared to existing methods, our approach yields more accurate alignment while being more robust to local optima and initial configurations. We demonstrate its efficacy on both synthetic and real-world motion videos including facial emotions and human activities. PMID:24051737

  1. ALDF Data Retrieval Algorithms for Validating the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from in Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing, and arrival time of lightning radio emissions and solutions for the plane (i.e.. no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of these measurements. The accuracy of the retrieval method is tested using computer-simulated data sets and the relative influence of bearing and arrival time data on the outcome of the final solution is formally demonstrated. The algorithm is sufficiently accurate to validate NASA's Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging System (LIS). We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. For arbitrary noncollinear network geometries and in the absence of measurement errors, it is shown that the two quadratic roots are equivalent (no source location ambiguity) on the outer sensor baselines. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer-generated data sets and the results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 degrees.

  2. Quantitative Features of Liver Lesions, Lung Nodules, and Renal Stones at Multi-Detector Row CT Examinations: Dependency on Radiation Dose and Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Nelson, Rendon C; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    Purpose To determine if radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm affect the computer-based extraction and analysis of quantitative imaging features in lung nodules, liver lesions, and renal stones at multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, multicenter, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved clinical trial was performed by extracting 23 quantitative imaging features (size, shape, attenuation, edge sharpness, pixel value distribution, and texture) of lesions on multi-detector row CT images of 20 adult patients (14 men, six women; mean age, 63 years; range, 38-72 years) referred for known or suspected focal liver lesions, lung nodules, or kidney stones. Data were acquired between September 2011 and April 2012. All multi-detector row CT scans were performed at two different radiation dose levels; images were reconstructed with filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess the effect of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on extracted features. Results Among the 23 imaging features assessed, radiation dose had a significant effect on five, three, and four of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction had a significant effect on three, one, and one of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). MBIR reconstruction had a significant effect on nine, 11, and 15 of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Of note, the measured size of lung nodules and renal stones with MBIR was significantly different than those for the other two algorithms (P < .002 for all comparisons). Although lesion texture was

  3. Alignments of RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Blin, Guillaume; Denise, Alain; Dulucq, Serge; Herrbach, Claire; Touzet, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    We describe a theoretical unifying framework to express the comparison of RNA structures, which we call alignment hierarchy. This framework relies on the definition of common supersequences for arc-annotated sequences and encompasses the main existing models for RNA structure comparison based on trees and arc-annotated sequences with a variety of edit operations. It also gives rise to edit models that have not been studied yet. We provide a thorough analysis of the alignment hierarchy, including a new polynomial-time algorithm and an NP-completeness proof. The polynomial-time algorithm involves biologically relevant edit operations such as pairing or unpairing nucleotides. It has been implemented in a software, called gardenia, which is available at the Web server http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/RNA/gardenia. PMID:20431150

  4. Classification of gasoline data obtained by gas chromatography using a piecewise alignment algorithm combined with feature selection and principal component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Hope, Janiece L.; Johnson, Kevin J.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2005-11-25

    A fast and objective chemometric classification method is developed and applied to the analysis of gas chromatography (GC) data from five commercial gasoline samples. The gasoline samples serve as model mixtures, whereas the focus is on the development and demonstration of the classification method. The method is based on objective retention time alignment (referred to as piecewise alignment) coupled with analysis of variance (ANOVA) feature selection prior to classification by principal component analysis (PCA) using optimal parameters. The degree-of-class-separation is used as a metric to objectively optimize the alignment and feature selection parameters using a suitable training set thereby reducing user subjectivity, as well as to indicate the success of the PCA clustering and classification. The degree-of-class-separation is calculated using Euclidean distances between the PCA scores of a subset of the replicate runs from two of the five fuel types, i.e., the training set. The unaligned training set that was directly submitted to PCA had a low degree-of-class-separation (0.4), and the PCA scores plot for the raw training set combined with the raw test set failed to correctly cluster the five sample types. After submitting the training set to piecewise alignment, the degree-of-class-separation increased (1.2), but when the same alignment parameters were applied to the training set combined with the test set, the scores plot clustering still did not yield five distinct groups. Applying feature selection to the unaligned training set increased the degree-of-class-separation (4.8), but chemical variations were still obscured by retention time variation and when the same feature selection conditions were used for the training set combined with the test set, only one of the five fuels was clustered correctly. However, piecewise alignment coupled with feature selection yielded a reasonably optimal degree-of-class-separation for the training set (9.2), and when the

  5. Lord-Wingersky Algorithm Version 2.0 for Hierarchical Item Factor Models with Applications in Test Scoring, Scale Alignment, and Model Fit Testing. CRESST Report 830

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lord and Wingersky's (1984) recursive algorithm for creating summed score based likelihoods and posteriors has a proven track record in unidimensional item response theory (IRT) applications. Extending the recursive algorithm to handle multidimensionality is relatively simple, especially with fixed quadrature because the recursions can be defined…

  6. Implementation of a parallel protein structure alignment service on cloud.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yaw-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment has become an important strategy by which to identify evolutionary relationships between protein sequences. Several alignment tools are currently available for online comparison of protein structures. In this paper, we propose a parallel protein structure alignment service based on the Hadoop distribution framework. This service includes a protein structure alignment algorithm, a refinement algorithm, and a MapReduce programming model. The refinement algorithm refines the result of alignment. To process vast numbers of protein structures in parallel, the alignment and refinement algorithms are implemented using MapReduce. We analyzed and compared the structure alignments produced by different methods using a dataset randomly selected from the PDB database. The experimental results verify that the proposed algorithm refines the resulting alignments more accurately than existing algorithms. Meanwhile, the computational performance of the proposed service is proportional to the number of processors used in our cloud platform. PMID:23671842

  7. Implementation of a Parallel Protein Structure Alignment Service on Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yaw-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment has become an important strategy by which to identify evolutionary relationships between protein sequences. Several alignment tools are currently available for online comparison of protein structures. In this paper, we propose a parallel protein structure alignment service based on the Hadoop distribution framework. This service includes a protein structure alignment algorithm, a refinement algorithm, and a MapReduce programming model. The refinement algorithm refines the result of alignment. To process vast numbers of protein structures in parallel, the alignment and refinement algorithms are implemented using MapReduce. We analyzed and compared the structure alignments produced by different methods using a dataset randomly selected from the PDB database. The experimental results verify that the proposed algorithm refines the resulting alignments more accurately than existing algorithms. Meanwhile, the computational performance of the proposed service is proportional to the number of processors used in our cloud platform. PMID:23671842

  8. ARYANA: Aligning Reads by Yet Another Approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Motivation Although there are many different algorithms and software tools for aligning sequencing reads, fast gapped sequence search is far from solved. Strong interest in fast alignment is best reflected in the $106 prize for the Innocentive competition on aligning a collection of reads to a given database of reference genomes. In addition, de novo assembly of next-generation sequencing long reads requires fast overlap-layout-concensus algorithms which depend on fast and accurate alignment. Contribution We introduce ARYANA, a fast gapped read aligner, developed on the base of BWA indexing infrastructure with a completely new alignment engine that makes it significantly faster than three other aligners: Bowtie2, BWA and SeqAlto, with comparable generality and accuracy. Instead of the time-consuming backtracking procedures for handling mismatches, ARYANA comes with the seed-and-extend algorithmic framework and a significantly improved efficiency by integrating novel algorithmic techniques including dynamic seed selection, bidirectional seed extension, reset-free hash tables, and gap-filling dynamic programming. As the read length increases ARYANA's superiority in terms of speed and alignment rate becomes more evident. This is in perfect harmony with the read length trend as the sequencing technologies evolve. The algorithmic platform of ARYANA makes it easy to develop mission-specific aligners for other applications using ARYANA engine. Availability ARYANA with complete source code can be obtained from http://github.com/aryana-aligner PMID:25252881

  9. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  10. Commissioning of the ATLAS inner detector with cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, H.

    2008-07-01

    The inner detector of the ATLAS experiment is in the process of being commissioned using cosmic ray events. First tests were performed in the SR1 assembly hall at CERN with both barrel and endcaps for all different detector technologies (pixels and microstrips silicon detectors as well as straw tubes with additional transition radiation detection). Integration with the rest of the ATLAS sub-detectors is now being done in the ATLAS cavern. The full software chain has been set up in order to reconstruct and analyse this kind of events. Final detector decoders have been developed, different pattern recognition algorithms and track fitters have been validated as well as the various alignment and calibration methods. The infrastructure to deal with conditions data coming from the data acquisition, detector control system and calibration runs has been put in place, allowing also to apply alignment and calibration constants. The software has also been essential to monitor the detector performance during data taking. Detector efficiencies, noise occupancies and resolutions have been studied in detail and compared with those obtained from simulation.

  11. Support Vector Training of Protein Alignment Models

    PubMed Central

    Joachims, Thorsten; Elber, Ron; Pillardy, Jaroslaw

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Sequence to structure alignment is an important step in homology modeling of protein structures. Incorporation of features such as secondary structure, solvent accessibility, or evolutionary information improve sequence to structure alignment accuracy, but conventional generative estimation techniques for alignment models impose independence assumptions that make these features difficult to include in a principled way. In this paper, we overcome this problem using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) method that provides a well-founded way of estimating complex alignment models with hundred of thousands of parameters. Furthermore, we show that the method can be trained using a variety of loss functions. In a rigorous empirical evaluation, the SVM algorithm outperforms the generative alignment method SSALN, a highly accurate generative alignment model that incorporates structural information. The alignment model learned by the SVM aligns 50% of the residues correctly and aligns over 70% of the residues within a shift of four positions. PMID:18707536

  12. Alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Grover C.; Gibson, O. Theodore

    1980-01-01

    A part alignment fixture is provided which may be used for precise variable lateral and tilt alignment relative to the fixture base of various shaped parts. The fixture may be used as a part holder for machining or inspection of parts or alignment of parts during assembly and the like. The fixture includes a precisely machined diameter disc-shaped hub adapted to receive the part to be aligned. The hub is nested in a guide plate which is adapted to carry two oppositely disposed pairs of positioning wedges so that the wedges may be reciprocatively positioned by means of respective micrometer screws. The sloping faces of the wedges contact the hub at respective quadrants of the hub periphery. The lateral position of the hub relative to the guide plate is adjusted by positioning the wedges with the associated micrometer screws. The tilt of the part is adjusted relative to a base plate, to which the guide plate is pivotally connected by means of a holding plate. Two pairs of oppositely disposed wedges are mounted for reciprocative lateral positioning by means of separate micrometer screws between flanges of the guide plate and the base plate. Once the wedges are positioned to achieve the proper tilt of the part or hub on which the part is mounted relative to the base plate, the fixture may be bolted to a machining, inspection, or assembly device.

  13. Adaptive control of molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, C.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Krug, M.; Baumert, T.; Nalda, R. de; Banares, L.

    2006-03-15

    We demonstrate control on nonadiabatic molecular alignment by using a spectrally phase-shaped laser pulse. An evolutionary algorithm in a closed feedback loop has been used in order to find pulse shapes that maximize a given effect. In particular, this scheme has been applied to the optimization of total alignment, and to the control of the temporal structure of the alignment transient within a revival. Asymmetric temporal pulse shapes have been found to be very effective for the latter and have been studied separately in a single-parameter control scheme. Our experimental results are supported by numerical simulations.

  14. Aligning Greek-English parallel texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiotou, Eleni; Koronakis, George; Lazari, Vassiliki

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss issues concerning the alignment of parallel texts written in languages with different alphabets based on an experiment of aligning texts from the proceedings of the European Parliament in Greek and English. First, we describe our implementation of the k-vec algorithm and its application to the bilingual corpus. Then the output of the algorithm is used as a starting point for an alignment procedure at a sentence level which also takes into account mark-ups of meta-information. The results of the implementation are compared to those of the application of the Church and Gale alignment algorithm on the Europarl corpus. The conclusions of this comparison can give useful insights as for the efficiency of alignment algorithms when applied to the particular bilingual corpus.

  15. A theoretical model for whole genome alignment.

    PubMed

    Belal, Nahla A; Heath, Lenwood S

    2011-05-01

    We present a graph-based model for representing two aligned genomic sequences. An alignment graph is a mixed graph consisting of two sets of vertices, each representing one of the input sequences, and three sets of edges. These edges allow the model to represent a number of evolutionary events. This model is used to perform sequence alignment at the level of nucleotides. We define a scoring function for alignment graphs. We show that minimizing the score is NP-complete. However, we present a dynamic programming algorithm that solves the minimization problem optimally for a certain class of alignments, called breakable arrangements. Algorithms for analyzing breakable arrangements are presented. We also present a greedy algorithm that is capable of representing reversals. We present a dynamic programming algorithm that optimally aligns two genomic sequences, when one of the input sequences is a breakable arrangement of the other. Comparing what we define as breakable arrangements to alignments generated by other algorithms, it is seen that many already aligned genomes fall into the category of being breakable. Moreover, the greedy algorithm is shown to represent reversals, besides rearrangements, mutations, and other evolutionary events. PMID:21210739

  16. Development of adaptive noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body images in a multi-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Okita, Izumi; Ninomiya, Yuuji; Tomoshige, Yukihiro; Kurokawa, Takehiro; Ono, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    Recently, several kinds of post-processing image filters which reduce the noise of computed tomography (CT) images have been proposed. However, these image filters are mostly for adults. Because these are not very effective in small (< 20 cm) display fields of view (FOV), we cannot use them for pediatric body images (e.g., premature babies and infant children). We have developed a new noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body CT images. This algorithm is based on a 3D post-processing in which the output pixel values are calculated by nonlinear interpolation in z-directions on original volumetric-data-sets. This algorithm does not need the in-plane (axial plane) processing, so the spatial resolution does not change. From the phantom studies, our algorithm could reduce SD up to 40% without affecting the spatial resolution of x-y plane and z-axis, and improved the CNR up to 30%. This newly developed filter algorithm will be useful for the diagnosis and radiation dose reduction of the pediatric body CT images.

  17. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  18. Image alignment

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  19. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  20. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Henstock, Peter V.; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  1. Reliable automatic alignment of tomographic projection data by passive auto-focus

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, A.; Sakellariou, A.; Varslot, T.; Myers, G.; Sheppard, A.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The authors present a robust algorithm that removes the blurring and double-edge artifacts in high-resolution computed tomography (CT) images that are caused by misaligned scanner components. This alleviates the time-consuming process of physically aligning hardware, which is of particular benefit if components are moved or swapped frequently. Methods: The proposed method uses the experimental data itself for calibration. A parameterized model of the scanner geometry is constructed and the parameters are varied until the sharpest 3D reconstruction is found. The concept is similar to passive auto-focus algorithms of digital optical instruments. The parameters are used to remap the projection data from the physical detector to a virtual aligned detector. This is followed by a standard reconstruction algorithm, namely the Feldkamp algorithm. Feldkamp et al.[J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 1, 612-619 (1984)]. Results: An example implementation is given for a rabbit liver specimen that was collected with a circular trajectory. The optimal parameters were determined in less computation time than that for a full reconstruction. The example serves to demonstrate that (a) sharpness is an appropriate measure for projection alignment, (b) our parameterization is sufficient to characterize misalignments for cone-beam CT, and (c) the procedure determines parameter values with sufficient precision to remove the associated artifacts. Conclusions: The algorithm is fully tested and implemented for regular use at The Australian National University micro-CT facility for both circular and helical trajectories. It can in principle be applied to more general imaging geometries and modalities. It is as robust as manual alignment but more precise since we have quantified the effect of misalignment.

  2. Alignment strategy for the ATLAS tracker

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS; Golling, T.

    2007-09-23

    The ATLAS experiment is a multi-purpose particle detector that will study high-energy particle collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider. For the reconstruction of charged particles, and their production and their decay vertices, ATLAS is equipped with a sophisticated tracking system, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the Inner Detector and the muon spectrometer requires an accurate alignment. The challenge of aligning the ATLAS tracking devices is discussed, and the ATLAS alignment strategy is presented and illustrated with both data and Monte Carlo results.

  3. Blasting and Zipping: Sequence Alignment and Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Orion; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2009-03-01

    Alignment of biological sequences such as DNA, RNA or proteins is one of the most widely used tools in computational bioscience. While the accomplishments of sequence alignment algorithms are undeniable the fact remains that these algorithms are based upon heuristic scoring schemes. Therefore, these algorithms do not provide model independent and objective measures for how similar two (or more) sequences actually are. Although information theory provides such a similarity measure - the mutual information (MI) - numerous previous attempts to connect sequence alignment and information have not produced realistic estimates for the MI from a given alignment. We report on a simple and flexible approach to get robust estimates of MI from global alignments. The presented results may help establish MI as a reliable tool for evaluating the quality of global alignments, judging the relative merits of different alignment algorithms, and estimating the significance of specific alignments.

  4. Projection-Based Volume Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lingbo; Snapp, Robert R.; Ruiz, Teresa; Radermacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    When heterogeneous samples of macromolecular assemblies are being examined by 3D electron microscopy (3DEM), often multiple reconstructions are obtained. For example, subtomograms of individual particles can be acquired from tomography, or volumes of multiple 2D classes can be obtained by random conical tilt reconstruction. Of these, similar volumes can be averaged to achieve higher resolution. Volume alignment is an essential step before 3D classification and averaging. Here we present a projection-based volume alignment (PBVA) algorithm. We select a set of projections to represent the reference volume and align them to a second volume. Projection alignment is achieved by maximizing the cross-correlation function with respect to rotation and translation parameters. If data are missing, the cross-correlation functions are normalized accordingly. Accurate alignments are obtained by averaging and quadratic interpolation of the cross-correlation maximum. Comparisons of the computation time between PBVA and traditional 3D cross-correlation methods demonstrate that PBVA outperforms the traditional methods. Performance tests were carried out with different signal-to-noise ratios using modeled noise and with different percentages of missing data using a cryo-EM dataset. All tests show that the algorithm is robust and highly accurate. PBVA was applied to align the reconstructions of a subcomplex of the NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, followed by classification and averaging. PMID:23410725

  5. BinAligner: a heuristic method to align biological networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jialiang; Li, Jun; Grünewald, Stefan; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The advances in high throughput omics technologies have made it possible to characterize molecular interactions within and across various species. Alignments and comparison of molecular networks across species will help detect orthologs and conserved functional modules and provide insights on the evolutionary relationships of the compared species. However, such analyses are not trivial due to the complexity of network and high computational cost. Here we develop a mixture of global and local algorithm, BinAligner, for network alignments. Based on the hypotheses that the similarity between two vertices across networks would be context dependent and that the information from the edges and the structures of subnetworks can be more informative than vertices alone, two scoring schema, 1-neighborhood subnetwork and graphlet, were introduced to derive the scoring matrices between networks, besides the commonly used scoring scheme from vertices. Then the alignment problem is formulated as an assignment problem, which is solved by the combinatorial optimization algorithm, such as the Hungarian method. The proposed algorithm was applied and validated in aligning the protein-protein interaction network of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and that of varicella zoster virus (VZV). Interestingly, we identified several putative functional orthologous proteins with similar functions but very low sequence similarity between the two viruses. For example, KSHV open reading frame 56 (ORF56) and VZV ORF55 are helicase-primase subunits with sequence identity 14.6%, and KSHV ORF75 and VZV ORF44 are tegument proteins with sequence identity 15.3%. These functional pairs can not be identified if one restricts the alignment into orthologous protein pairs. In addition, BinAligner identified a conserved pathway between two viruses, which consists of 7 orthologous protein pairs and these proteins are connected by conserved links. This pathway might be crucial for virus packing and

  6. Drift Chamber Alignment using Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Hays, Christopher P.

    2014-05-07

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a general-purpose experimental apparatus with an inner tracking detector for measuring charged particles, surrounded by a calorimeter for measurements of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, and a muon detector system. We present a technique for, and results of, a precise relative alignment of the drift chamber wires of the CDF tracker. This alignment has been an important component of the track momentum calibration, which is the basis for the charged-lepton calibration for the measurement of the W boson mass at CDF.

  7. Triangular Alignment (TAME). A Tensor-based Approach for Higher-order Network Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, Shahin; Gleich, David F.; Kolda, Tamara G.; Grama, Ananth

    2015-11-01

    Network alignment is an important tool with extensive applications in comparative interactomics. Traditional approaches aim to simultaneously maximize the number of conserved edges and the underlying similarity of aligned entities. We propose a novel formulation of the network alignment problem that extends topological similarity to higher-order structures and provide a new objective function that maximizes the number of aligned substructures. This objective function corresponds to an integer programming problem, which is NP-hard. Consequently, we approximate this objective function as a surrogate function whose maximization results in a tensor eigenvalue problem. Based on this formulation, we present an algorithm called Triangular AlignMEnt (TAME), which attempts to maximize the number of aligned triangles across networks. We focus on alignment of triangles because of their enrichment in complex networks; however, our formulation and resulting algorithms can be applied to general motifs. Using a case study on the NAPABench dataset, we show that TAME is capable of producing alignments with up to 99% accuracy in terms of aligned nodes. We further evaluate our method by aligning yeast and human interactomes. Our results indicate that TAME outperforms the state-of-art alignment methods both in terms of biological and topological quality of the alignments.

  8. MUSE alignment onto VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dupuy, Christophe; Jarno, Aurélien; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Migniau, Jean-Emmanuel; Nicklas, Harald; Piqueras, Laure

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It combines a 1' x 1' field of view sampled at 0.2 arcsec for its Wide Field Mode (WFM) and a 7.5"x7.5" field of view for its Narrow Field Mode (NFM). Both modes will operate with the improved spatial resolution provided by GALACSI (Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive Optics for Spectroscopic Imaging), that will use the VLT deformable secondary mirror and 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS) foreseen in 2015. MUSE operates in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transported, fully aligned and without any optomechanical dismounting, onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame the 7th of February, 2014. This paper describes the alignment procedure of the whole MUSE instrument with respect to the Very Large Telescope (VLT). It describes how 6 tons could be move with accuracy better than 0.025mm and less than 0.25 arcmin in order to reach alignment requirements. The success

  9. IUS prerelease alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Space shuttle orbiter/IUS alignment transfer was evaluated. Although the orbiter alignment accuracy was originally believed to be the major contributor to the overall alignment transfer error, it was shown that orbiter alignment accuracy is not a factor affecting IUS alignment accuracy, if certain procedures are followed. Results are reported of alignment transfer accuracy analysis.

  10. Antares beam-alignment-system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Appert, Q.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    The beam alignment system for the 24-beam-sector Antares CO/sub 2/ fusion laser automatically aligns more than 200 optical elements. A visible-wavelength alignment technique is employed which uses a telescope/TV system to view point-light sources appropriately located down the beamline. The centroids of the light spots are determined by a video tracker, which generates error signals used by the computer control system to move appropriate mirrors in a closed-loop system. Final touch-up alignment is accomplished by projecting a CO/sub 2/ alignment laser beam through the system and sensing its position at the target location. The techniques and control algorithms employed have resulted in alignment accuracies exceeding design requirements. By employing video processing to determine the centroids of diffraction images and by averaging over multiple TV frames, we achieve alignment accuracies better than 0.1 times system diffraction limits in the presence of air turbulence.

  11. Algorithm and implementation of muon trigger and data transmission system for barrel-endcap overlap region of the CMS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotny, W. M.; Byszuk, A.

    2016-03-01

    The CMS experiment Level-1 trigger system is undergoing an upgrade. In the barrel-endcap transition region, it is necessary to merge data from 3 types of muon detectors—RPC, DT and CSC. The Overlap Muon Track Finder (OMTF) uses the novel approach to concentrate and process those data in a uniform manner to identify muons and their transversal momentum. The paper presents the algorithm and FPGA firmware implementation of the OMTF and its data transmission system in CMS. It is foreseen that the OMTF will be subject to significant changes resulting from optimization which will be done with the aid of physics simulations. Therefore, a special, high-level, parameterized HDL implementation is necessary.

  12. Space dosimetry with the application of a 3D silicon detector telescope: response function and inverse algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pázmándi, Tamás; Deme, Sándor; Láng, Edit

    2006-01-01

    One of the many risks of long-duration space flights is the excessive exposure to cosmic radiation, which has great importance particularly during solar flares and higher sun activity. Monitoring of the cosmic radiation on board space vehicles is carried out on the basis of wide international co-operation. Since space radiation consists mainly of charged heavy particles (protons, alpha and heavier particles), the equivalent dose differs significantly from the absorbed dose. A radiation weighting factor (w(R)) is used to convert absorbed dose (Gy) to equivalent dose (Sv). w(R) is a function of the linear energy transfer of the radiation. Recently used equipment is suitable for measuring certain radiation field parameters changing in space and over time, so a combination of different measurements and calculations is required to characterise the radiation field in terms of dose equivalent. The objectives of this project are to develop and manufacture a three-axis silicon detector telescope, called Tritel, and to develop software for data evaluation of the measured energy deposition spectra. The device will be able to determine absorbed dose and dose equivalent of the space radiation. PMID:16581928

  13. R3D Align: global pairwise alignment of RNA 3D structures using local superpositions

    PubMed Central

    Rahrig, Ryan R.; Leontis, Neocles B.; Zirbel, Craig L.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Comparing 3D structures of homologous RNA molecules yields information about sequence and structural variability. To compare large RNA 3D structures, accurate automatic comparison tools are needed. In this article, we introduce a new algorithm and web server to align large homologous RNA structures nucleotide by nucleotide using local superpositions that accommodate the flexibility of RNA molecules. Local alignments are merged to form a global alignment by employing a maximum clique algorithm on a specially defined graph that we call the ‘local alignment’ graph. Results: The algorithm is implemented in a program suite and web server called ‘R3D Align’. The R3D Align alignment of homologous 3D structures of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA was compared to a high-quality hand alignment. A full comparison of the 16S alignment with the other state-of-the-art methods is also provided. The R3D Align program suite includes new diagnostic tools for the structural evaluation of RNA alignments. The R3D Align alignments were compared to those produced by other programs and were found to be the most accurate, in comparison with a high quality hand-crafted alignment and in conjunction with a series of other diagnostics presented. The number of aligned base pairs as well as measures of geometric similarity are used to evaluate the accuracy of the alignments. Availability: R3D Align is freely available through a web server http://rna.bgsu.edu/R3DAlign. The MATLAB source code of the program suite is also freely available for download at that location. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: r-rahrig@onu.edu PMID:20929913

  14. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  15. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment-distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  16. Multiple Whole Genome Alignments Without a Reference Organism

    SciTech Connect

    Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexander; Kislyuk, Andrey; Brudno, Michael

    2009-01-16

    Multiple sequence alignments have become one of the most commonly used resources in genomics research. Most algorithms for multiple alignment of whole genomes rely either on a reference genome, against which all of the other sequences are laid out, or require a one-to-one mapping between the nucleotides of the genomes, preventing the alignment of recently duplicated regions. Both approaches have drawbacks for whole-genome comparisons. In this paper we present a novel symmetric alignment algorithm. The resulting alignments not only represent all of the genomes equally well, but also include all relevant duplications that occurred since the divergence from the last common ancestor. Our algorithm, implemented as a part of the VISTA Genome Pipeline (VGP), was used to align seven vertebrate and sixDrosophila genomes. The resulting whole-genome alignments demonstrate a higher sensitivity and specificity than the pairwise alignments previously available through the VGP and have higher exon alignment accuracy than comparable public whole-genome alignments. Of the multiple alignment methods tested, ours performed the best at aligning genes from multigene families?perhaps the most challenging test for whole-genome alignments. Our whole-genome multiple alignments are available through the VISTA Browser at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/index.shtml.

  17. Probabilistic sequence alignment of stratigraphic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Luan; Khider, Deborah; Lisiecki, Lorraine E.; Lawrence, Charles E.

    2014-10-01

    The assessment of age uncertainty in stratigraphically aligned records is a pressing need in paleoceanographic research. The alignment of ocean sediment cores is used to develop mutually consistent age models for climate proxies and is often based on the δ18O of calcite from benthic foraminifera, which records a global ice volume and deep water temperature signal. To date, δ18O alignment has been performed by manual, qualitative comparison or by deterministic algorithms. Here we present a hidden Markov model (HMM) probabilistic algorithm to find 95% confidence bands for δ18O alignment. This model considers the probability of every possible alignment based on its fit to the δ18O data and transition probabilities for sedimentation rate changes obtained from radiocarbon-based estimates for 37 cores. Uncertainty is assessed using a stochastic back trace recursion to sample alignments in exact proportion to their probability. We applied the algorithm to align 35 late Pleistocene records to a global benthic δ18O stack and found that the mean width of 95% confidence intervals varies between 3 and 23 kyr depending on the resolution and noisiness of the record's δ18O signal. Confidence bands within individual cores also vary greatly, ranging from ~0 to >40 kyr. These alignment uncertainty estimates will allow researchers to examine the robustness of their conclusions, including the statistical evaluation of lead-lag relationships between events observed in different cores.

  18. Enhancement of initial equivalency for protein structure alignment based on encoded local structures.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kenneth; Wang, Jui-Chih; Chen, Cheng-Wei; Chuang, Cheng-Long; Tsai, Kun-Nan; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2012-11-01

    Most alignment algorithms find an initial equivalent residue pair followed by an iterative optimization process to explore better near-optimal alignments in the surrounding solution space of the initial alignment. It plays a decisive role in determining the alignment quality since a poor initial alignment may make the final alignment trapped in an undesirable local optimum even with an iterative optimization. We proposed a vector-based alignment algorithm with a new initial alignment approach accounting for local structure features called MIRAGE-align. The new idea is to enhance the quality of the initial alignment based on encoded local structural alphabets to identify the protein structure pair whose sequence identity falls in or below twilight zone. The statistical analysis of alignment quality based on Match Index (MI) and computation time demonstrated that MIRAGE-align algorithm outperformed four previously published algorithms, i.e., the residue-based algorithm (CE), the vector-based algorithm (SSM), TM-align, and Fr-TM-align. MIRAGE-align yields a better estimate of initial solution to enhance the quality of initial alignment and enable the employment of a non-iterative optimization process to achieve a better alignment. PMID:22717522

  19. Statistical significance of normalized global alignment.

    PubMed

    Peris, Guillermo; Marzal, Andrés

    2014-03-01

    The comparison of homologous proteins from different species is a first step toward a function assignment and a reconstruction of the species evolution. Though local alignment is mostly used for this purpose, global alignment is important for constructing multiple alignments or phylogenetic trees. However, statistical significance of global alignments is not completely clear, lacking a specific statistical model to describe alignments or depending on computationally expensive methods like Z-score. Recently we presented a normalized global alignment, defined as the best compromise between global alignment cost and length, and showed that this new technique led to better classification results than Z-score at a much lower computational cost. However, it is necessary to analyze the statistical significance of the normalized global alignment in order to be considered a completely functional algorithm for protein alignment. Experiments with unrelated proteins extracted from the SCOP ASTRAL database showed that normalized global alignment scores can be fitted to a log-normal distribution. This fact, obtained without any theoretical support, can be used to derive statistical significance of normalized global alignments. Results are summarized in a table with fitted parameters for different scoring schemes. PMID:24400820

  20. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    PubMed Central

    Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  1. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W. Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  2. DNA Align Editor: DNA Alignment Editor Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SNPAlignEditor is a DNA sequence alignment editor that runs on Windows platforms. The purpose of the program is to provide an intuitive, user-friendly tool for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments by providing functions for input, editing, and output of nucleotide sequence alignments....

  3. SUMONA: A supervised method for optimizing network alignment.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Erhun Giray; Can, Tolga

    2016-08-01

    This study focuses on improving the multi-objective memetic algorithm for protein-protein interaction (PPI) network alignment, Optimizing Network Aligner - OptNetAlign, via integration with other existing network alignment methods such as SPINAL, NETAL and HubAlign. The output of this algorithm is an elite set of aligned networks all of which are optimal with respect to multiple user-defined criteria. However, OptNetAlign is an unsupervised genetic algorithm that initiates its search with completely random solutions and it requires substantial running times to generate an elite set of solutions that have high scores with respect to the given criteria. In order to improve running time, the search space of the algorithm can be narrowed down by focusing on remarkably qualified alignments and trying to optimize the most desired criteria on a more limited set of solutions. The method presented in this study improves OptNetAlign in a supervised fashion by utilizing the alignment results of different network alignment algorithms with varying parameters that depend upon user preferences. Therefore, the user can prioritize certain objectives upon others and achieve better running time performance while optimizing the secondary objectives. PMID:27177812

  4. An Accurate Timing Alignment Method with Time-to-Digital Converter Linearity Calibration for High-Resolution TOF PET

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongdi; Wang, Chao; An, Shaohui; Lu, Xingyu; Dong, Yun; Liu, Shitao; Baghaei, Hossain; Zhang, Yuxuan; Ramirez, Rocio; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Accurate PET system timing alignment minimizes the coincidence time window and therefore reduces random events and improves image quality. It is also critical for time-of-flight (TOF) image reconstruction. Here, we use a thin annular cylinder (shell) phantom filled with a radioactive source and located axially and centrally in a PET camera for the timing alignment of a TOF PET system. This timing alignment method involves measuring the time differences between the selected coincidence detector pairs, calibrating the differential and integral nonlinearity of the time-to-digital converter (TDC) with the same raw data and deriving the intrinsic time biases for each detector using an iterative algorithm. The raw time bias for each detector is downloaded to the front-end electronics and the residual fine time bias can be applied during the TOF list-mode reconstruction. Our results showed that a timing alignment accuracy of better than ±25 ps can be achieved, and a preliminary timing resolution of 473 ps (full width at half maximum) was measured in our prototype TOF PET/CT system. PMID:26543243

  5. Constructing Aligned Assessments Using Automated Test Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew; Polikoff, Morgan S.; Barghaus, Katherine M.; Yang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative automated test construction algorithm for building aligned achievement tests. By incorporating the algorithm into the test construction process, along with other test construction procedures for building reliable and unbiased assessments, the result is much more valid tests than result from current test construction…

  6. Imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase alpha (PI3Kα): 3D-QSAR analysis utilizing the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm to refine receptor-ligand complexes for molecular alignment.

    PubMed

    Chadha, N; Jasuja, H; Kaur, M; Singh Bahia, M; Silakari, O

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinase alpha (PI3Kα) is a lipid kinase involved in several cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival, and its anomalous regulation leads to cancerous conditions. PI3Kα inhibition completely blocks the cancer signalling pathway, hence it can be explored as an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In the present study, docking analysis of 49 selective imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazine inhibitors of PI3Kα was carried out using the QM-Polarized ligand docking (QPLD) program of the Schrödinger software, followed by the refinement of receptor-ligand conformations using the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm in the Liaison program, and alignment of refined conformations of inhibitors was utilized for the development of an atom-based 3D-QSAR model in the PHASE program. Among the five generated models, the best model was selected corresponding to PLS factor 2, displaying the highest value of Q(2)test (0.650). The selected model also displayed high values of r(2)train (0.917), F-value (166.5) and Pearson-r (0.877) and a low value of SD (0.265). The contour plots generated for the selected 3D-QSAR model were correlated with the results of docking simulations. Finally, this combined information generated from 3D-QSAR and docking analysis was used to design new congeners. PMID:24601789

  7. Investigation of an Immunoassay with Broad Specificity to Quinolone Drugs by Genetic Algorithm with Linear Assignment of Hypermolecular Alignment of Data Sets and Advanced Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiahong; Lu, Ning; Shen, Xing; Tang, Qiushi; Zhang, Chijian; Xu, Jun; Sun, Yuanming; Huang, Xin-An; Xu, Zhenlin; Lei, Hongtao

    2016-04-01

    A polyclonal antibody against the quinolone drug pazufloxacin (PAZ) but with surprisingly broad specificity was raised to simultaneously detect 24 quinolones (QNs). The developed competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) exhibited limits of detection (LODs) for the 24 QNs ranging from 0.45 to 15.16 ng/mL, below the maximum residue levels (MRLs). To better understand the obtained broad specificity, a genetic algorithm with linear assignment of hypermolecular alignment of data sets (GALAHAD) was used to generate the desired pharmacophore model and superimpose the QNs, and then advanced comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and advanced comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models were employed to study the three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) between QNs and the antibody. It was found that the QNs could interact with the antibody with different binding poses, and cross-reactivity was mainly positively correlated with the bulky substructure containing electronegative atom at the 7-position, while it was negatively associated with the large bulky substructure at the 1-position of QNs. PMID:26982746

  8. Innovative optical alignment technique for CMP wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugaya, Ayako; Kanaya, Yuho; Nakajima, Shinichi; Nagayama, Tadashi; Shiraishi, Naomasa

    2002-07-01

    Detecting position of the wafers such as after CMP process is critical theme of current and forthcoming IC manufacturing. The alignment system must be with high accuracy for any process. To satisfy such requirements, we have studied and analyzed factors that have made alignment difficult. From the result of the studies, we have developed new optical alignment techniques which improve the accuracy of FIA (alignment sensor of Nikon's NSR series) and examined them. The approaches are optimizing the focus position, developing an advanced algorithm for position detection, and selecting a suitable mark design. For experiment, we have developed the special wafers that make it possible to evaluate the influence of CMP processes. The experimental results show that the overlay errors decrease dramatically with the new alignment techniques. FIA with these new techniques will be much accurate and suitable alignment sensor for CMP and other processes of future generation ULSI production.

  9. Multiple alignment using hidden Markov models

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    A simulated annealing method is described for training hidden Markov models and producing multiple sequence alignments from initially unaligned protein or DNA sequences. Simulated annealing in turn uses a dynamic programming algorithm for correctly sampling suboptimal multiple alignments according to their probability and a Boltzmann temperature factor. The quality of simulated annealing alignments is evaluated on structural alignments of ten different protein families, and compared to the performance of other HMM training methods and the ClustalW program. Simulated annealing is better able to find near-global optima in the multiple alignment probability landscape than the other tested HMM training methods. Neither ClustalW nor simulated annealing produce consistently better alignments compared to each other. Examination of the specific cases in which ClustalW outperforms simulated annealing, and vice versa, provides insight into the strengths and weaknesses of current hidden Maxkov model approaches.

  10. A novel approach to multiple sequence alignment using hadoop data grids.

    PubMed

    Sudha Sadasivam, G; Baktavatchalam, G

    2010-01-01

    Multiple alignment of protein sequences helps to determine evolutionary linkage and to predict molecular structures. The factors to be considered while aligning multiple sequences are speed and accuracy of alignment. Although dynamic programming algorithms produce accurate alignments, they are computation intensive. In this paper we propose a time efficient approach to sequence alignment that also produces quality alignment. The dynamic nature of the algorithm coupled with data and computational parallelism of hadoop data grids improves the accuracy and speed of sequence alignment. The principle of block splitting in hadoop coupled with its scalability facilitates alignment of very large sequences. PMID:21224205

  11. Computing posterior probabilities for score-based alignments using ppALIGN.

    PubMed

    Wolfsheimer, Stefan; Hartmann, Alexander; Rabus, Ralf; Nuel, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Score-based pairwise alignments are widely used in bioinformatics in particular with molecular database search tools, such as the BLAST family. Due to sophisticated heuristics, such algorithms are usually fast but the underlying scoring model unfortunately lacks a statistical description of the reliability of the reported alignments. In particular, close to gaps, in low-score or low-complexity regions, a huge number of alternative alignments arise which results in a decrease of the certainty of the alignment. ppALIGN is a software package that uses hidden Markov Model techniques to compute position-wise reliability of score-based pairwise alignments of DNA or protein sequences. The design of the model allows for a direct connection between the scoring function and the parameters of the probabilistic model. For this reason it is suitable to analyze the outcomes of popular score based aligners and search tools without having to choose a complicated set of parameters. By contrast, our program only requires the classical score parameters (the scoring function and gap costs). The package comes along with a library written in C++, a standalone program for user defined alignments (ppALIGN) and another program (ppBLAST) which can process a complete result set of BLAST. The main algorithms essentially exhibit a linear time complexity (in the alignment lengths), and they are hence suitable for on-line computations. We have also included alternative decoding algorithms to provide alternative alignments. ppALIGN is a fast program/library that helps detect and quantify questionable regions in pairwise alignments. Due to its structure, the input/output interface it can to be connected to other post-processing tools. Empirically, we illustrate its usefulness in terms of correctly predicted reliable regions for sequences generated using the ROSE model for sequence evolution, and identify sensor-specific regions in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum. PMID

  12. Sequence alignment with tandem duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, G.

    1997-12-01

    Algorithm development for comparing and aligning biological sequences has, until recently, been based on the SI model of mutational events which assumes that modification of sequences proceeds through any of the operations of substitution, insertion or deletion (the latter two collectively termed indels). While this model has worked farily well, it has long been apparent that other mutational events occur. In this paper, we introduce a new model, the DSI model which includes another common mutational event, tandem duplication. Tandem duplication produces tandem repeats which are common in DNA, making up perhaps 10% of the human genome. They are responsible for some human diseases and may serve a multitude of functions in DNA regulation and evolution. Using the DSI model, we develop new exact and heuristic algorithms for comparing and aligning DNA sequences when they contain tandem repeats. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Sparse alignment for robust tensor learning.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Xu, Yong; Zhao, Cairong; Sun, Mingming

    2014-10-01

    Multilinear/tensor extensions of manifold learning based algorithms have been widely used in computer vision and pattern recognition. This paper first provides a systematic analysis of the multilinear extensions for the most popular methods by using alignment techniques, thereby obtaining a general tensor alignment framework. From this framework, it is easy to show that the manifold learning based tensor learning methods are intrinsically different from the alignment techniques. Based on the alignment framework, a robust tensor learning method called sparse tensor alignment (STA) is then proposed for unsupervised tensor feature extraction. Different from the existing tensor learning methods, L1- and L2-norms are introduced to enhance the robustness in the alignment step of the STA. The advantage of the proposed technique is that the difficulty in selecting the size of the local neighborhood can be avoided in the manifold learning based tensor feature extraction algorithms. Although STA is an unsupervised learning method, the sparsity encodes the discriminative information in the alignment step and provides the robustness of STA. Extensive experiments on the well-known image databases as well as action and hand gesture databases by encoding object images as tensors demonstrate that the proposed STA algorithm gives the most competitive performance when compared with the tensor-based unsupervised learning methods. PMID:25291733

  14. MULTAN: a program to align multiple DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Bains, W

    1986-01-01

    I describe a computer program which can align a large number of nucleic acid sequences with one another. The program uses an heuristic, iterative algorithm which has been tested extensively, and is found to produce useful alignments of a variety of sequence families. The algorithm is fast enough to be practical for the analysis of large number of sequences, and is implemented in a program which contains a variety of other functions to facilitate the analysis of the aligned result. PMID:3003672

  15. Aligning Biomolecular Networks Using Modular Graph Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Towfic, Fadi; Greenlee, M. Heather West; Honavar, Vasant

    Comparative analysis of biomolecular networks constructed using measurements from different conditions, tissues, and organisms offer a powerful approach to understanding the structure, function, dynamics, and evolution of complex biological systems. We explore a class of algorithms for aligning large biomolecular networks by breaking down such networks into subgraphs and computing the alignment of the networks based on the alignment of their subgraphs. The resulting subnetworks are compared using graph kernels as scoring functions. We provide implementations of the resulting algorithms as part of BiNA, an open source biomolecular network alignment toolkit. Our experiments using Drosophila melanogaster, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mus musculus and Homo sapiens protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the DIP repository of protein-protein interaction data demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithms (as measured by % GO term enrichment of subnetworks identified by the alignment) is competitive with some of the state-of-the-art algorithms for pair-wise alignment of large protein-protein interaction networks. Our results also show that the inter-species similarity scores computed based on graph kernels can be used to cluster the species into a species tree that is consistent with the known phylogenetic relationships among the species.

  16. On comparing two structured RNA multiple alignments.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vandanaben; Wang, Jason T L; Setia, Shefali; Verma, Anurag; Warden, Charles D; Zhang, Kaizhong

    2010-12-01

    We present a method, called BlockMatch, for aligning two blocks, where a block is an RNA multiple sequence alignment with the consensus secondary structure of the alignment in Stockholm format. The method employs a quadratic-time dynamic programming algorithm for aligning columns and column pairs of the multiple alignments in the blocks. Unlike many other tools that can perform pairwise alignment of either single sequences or structures only, BlockMatch takes into account the characteristics of all the sequences in the blocks along with their consensus structures during the alignment process, thus being able to achieve a high-quality alignment result. We apply BlockMatch to phylogeny reconstruction on a set of 5S rRNA sequences taken from fifteen bacteria species. Experimental results showed that the phylogenetic tree generated by our method is more accurate than the tree constructed based on the widely used ClustalW tool. The BlockMatch algorithm is implemented into a web server, accessible at http://bioinformatics.njit.edu/blockmatch. A jar file of the program is also available for download from the web server. PMID:21121021

  17. CARNA--alignment of RNA structure ensembles.

    PubMed

    Sorescu, Dragos Alexandru; Möhl, Mathias; Mann, Martin; Backofen, Rolf; Will, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    Due to recent algorithmic progress, tools for the gold standard of comparative RNA analysis, namely Sankoff-style simultaneous alignment and folding, are now readily applicable. Such approaches, however, compare RNAs with respect to a simultaneously predicted, single, nested consensus structure. To make multiple alignment of RNAs available in cases, where this limitation of the standard approach is critical, we introduce a web server that provides a complete and convenient interface to the RNA structure alignment tool 'CARNA'. This tool uniquely supports RNAs with multiple conserved structures per RNA and aligns pseudoknots intrinsically; these features are highly desirable for aligning riboswitches, RNAs with conserved folding pathways, or pseudoknots. We represent structural input and output information as base pair probability dot plots; this provides large flexibility in the input, ranging from fixed structures to structure ensembles, and enables immediate visual analysis of the results. In contrast to conventional Sankoff-style approaches, 'CARNA' optimizes all structural similarities in the input simultaneously, for example across an entire RNA structure ensemble. Even compared with already costly Sankoff-style alignment, 'CARNA' solves an intrinsically much harder problem by applying advanced, constraint-based, algorithmic techniques. Although 'CARNA' is specialized to the alignment of RNAs with several conserved structures, its performance on RNAs in general is on par with state-of-the-art general-purpose RNA alignment tools, as we show in a Bralibase 2.1 benchmark. The web server is freely available at http://rna.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/CARNA. PMID:22689637

  18. Global multiple protein-protein interaction network alignment by combining pairwise network alignments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background A wealth of protein interaction data has become available in recent years, creating an urgent need for powerful analysis techniques. In this context, the problem of finding biologically meaningful correspondences between different protein-protein interaction networks (PPIN) is of particular interest. The PPIN of a species can be compared with that of other species through the process of PPIN alignment. Such an alignment can provide insight into basic problems like species evolution and network component function determination, as well as translational problems such as target identification and elucidation of mechanisms of disease spread. Furthermore, multiple PPINs can be aligned simultaneously, expanding the analytical implications of the result. While there are several pairwise network alignment algorithms, few methods are capable of multiple network alignment. Results We propose SMAL, a MNA algorithm based on the philosophy of scaffold-based alignment. SMAL is capable of converting results from any global pairwise alignment algorithms into a MNA in linear time. Using this method, we have built multiple network alignments based on combining pairwise alignments from a number of publicly available (pairwise) network aligners. We tested SMAL using PPINs of eight species derived from the IntAct repository and employed a number of measures to evaluate performance. Additionally, as part of our experimental investigations, we compared the effectiveness of SMAL while aligning up to eight input PPINs, and examined the effect of scaffold network choice on the alignments. Conclusions A key advantage of SMAL lies in its ability to create MNAs through the use of pairwise network aligners for which native MNA implementations do not exist. Experiments indicate that the performance of SMAL was comparable to that of the native MNA implementation of established methods such as IsoRankN and SMETANA. However, in terms of computational time, SMAL was significantly faster

  19. Aligning parallel arrays to reduce communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, Thomas J.; Schreiber, Robert; Gilbert, John R.; Chatterjee, Siddhartha

    1994-01-01

    Axis and stride alignment is an important optimization in compiling data-parallel programs for distributed-memory machines. We previously developed an optimal algorithm for aligning array expressions. Here, we examine alignment for more general program graphs. We show that optimal alignment is NP-complete in this setting, so we study heuristic methods. This paper makes two contributions. First, we show how local graph transformations can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. Second, we give a heuristic that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. Our algorithms have been implemented; we present experimental results showing their effect on the performance of some example programs running on the CM-5.

  20. Short Read Alignment Using SOAP2.

    PubMed

    Hurgobin, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have rapidly evolved in the last 5 years, leading to the generation of millions of short reads in a single run. Consequently, various sequence alignment algorithms have been developed to compare these reads to an appropriate reference in order to perform important downstream analysis. SOAP2 from the SOAP series is one of the most commonly used alignment programs to handle NGS data, and it efficiently does so using low computer memory usage and fast alignment speed. This chapter describes the protocol used to align short reads to a reference genome using SOAP2, and highlights the significance of using the in-built command-line options to tune the behavior of the algorithm according to the inputs and the desired results. PMID:26519410

  1. Shiva automatic pinhole alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Suski, G.J.

    1980-09-05

    This paper describes a computer controlled closed loop alignment subsystem for Shiva, which represents the first use of video sensors for large laser alignment at LLNL. The techniques used on this now operational subsystem are serving as the basis for all closed loop alignment on Nova, the 200 terawatt successor to Shiva.

  2. SWAMP+: multiple subsequence alignment using associative massive parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfadt, Shannon Irene; Baker, Johnnie W

    2010-10-18

    A new parallel algorithm SWAMP+ incorporates the Smith-Waterman sequence alignment on an associative parallel model known as ASC. It is a highly sensitive parallel approach that expands traditional pairwise sequence alignment. This is the first parallel algorithm to provide multiple non-overlapping, non-intersecting subsequence alignments with the accuracy of Smith-Waterman. The efficient algorithm provides multiple alignments similar to BLAST while creating a better workflow for the end users. The parallel portions of the code run in O(m+n) time using m processors. When m = n, the algorithmic analysis becomes O(n) with a coefficient of two, yielding a linear speedup. Implementation of the algorithm on the SIMD ClearSpeed CSX620 confirms this theoretical linear speedup with real timings.

  3. Multiple structure alignment with msTALI

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple structure alignments have received increasing attention in recent years as an alternative to multiple sequence alignments. Although multiple structure alignment algorithms can potentially be applied to a number of problems, they have primarily been used for protein core identification. A method that is capable of solving a variety of problems using structure comparison is still absent. Here we introduce a program msTALI for aligning multiple protein structures. Our algorithm uses several informative features to guide its alignments: torsion angles, backbone Cα atom positions, secondary structure, residue type, surface accessibility, and properties of nearby atoms. The algorithm allows the user to weight the types of information used to generate the alignment, which expands its utility to a wide variety of problems. Results msTALI exhibits competitive results on 824 families from the Homstrad and SABmark databases when compared to Matt and Mustang. We also demonstrate success at building a database of protein cores using 341 randomly selected CATH domains and highlight the contribution of msTALI compared to the CATH classifications. Finally, we present an example applying msTALI to the problem of detecting hinges in a protein undergoing rigid-body motion. Conclusions msTALI is an effective algorithm for multiple structure alignment. In addition to its performance on standard comparison databases, it utilizes clear, informative features, allowing further customization for domain-specific applications. The C++ source code for msTALI is available for Linux on the web at http://ifestos.cse.sc.edu/mstali. PMID:22607234

  4. HubAlign: an accurate and efficient method for global alignment of protein–protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Hashemifar, Somaye; Xu, Jinbo

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput experimental techniques have produced a large amount of protein–protein interaction (PPI) data. The study of PPI networks, such as comparative analysis, shall benefit the understanding of life process and diseases at the molecular level. One way of comparative analysis is to align PPI networks to identify conserved or species-specific subnetwork motifs. A few methods have been developed for global PPI network alignment, but it still remains challenging in terms of both accuracy and efficiency. Results: This paper presents a novel global network alignment algorithm, denoted as HubAlign, that makes use of both network topology and sequence homology information, based upon the observation that topologically important proteins in a PPI network usually are much more conserved and thus, more likely to be aligned. HubAlign uses a minimum-degree heuristic algorithm to estimate the topological and functional importance of a protein from the global network topology information. Then HubAlign aligns topologically important proteins first and gradually extends the alignment to the whole network. Extensive tests indicate that HubAlign greatly outperforms several popular methods in terms of both accuracy and efficiency, especially in detecting functionally similar proteins. Availability: HubAlign is available freely for non-commercial purposes at http://ttic.uchicago.edu/∼hashemifar/software/HubAlign.zip Contact: jinboxu@gmail.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25161231

  5. Aligning graphs and finding substructures by a cavity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradde, S.; Braunstein, A.; Mahmoudi, H.; Tria, F.; Weigt, M.; Zecchina, R.

    2010-02-01

    We introduce a new distributed algorithm for aligning graphs or finding substructures within a given graph. It is based on the cavity method and is used to study the maximum-clique and the graph-alignment problems in random graphs. The algorithm allows to analyze large graphs and may find applications in fields such as computational biology. As a proof of concept we use our algorithm to align the similarity graphs of two interacting protein families involved in bacterial signal transduction, and to predict actually interacting protein partners between these families.

  6. Ontology Alignment Repair through Modularization and Confidence-Based Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Santos, Emanuel; Faria, Daniel; Pesquita, Catia; Couto, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    Ontology Matching aims at identifying a set of semantic correspondences, called an alignment, between related ontologies. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in efficient and effective matching methods for large ontologies. However, alignments produced for large ontologies are often logically incoherent. It was only recently that the use of repair techniques to improve the coherence of ontology alignments began to be explored. This paper presents a novel modularization technique for ontology alignment repair which extracts fragments of the input ontologies that only contain the necessary classes and relations to resolve all detectable incoherences. The paper presents also an alignment repair algorithm that uses a global repair strategy to minimize both the degree of incoherence and the number of mappings removed from the alignment, while overcoming the scalability problem by employing the proposed modularization technique. Our evaluation shows that our modularization technique produces significantly small fragments of the ontologies and that our repair algorithm produces more complete alignments than other current alignment repair systems, while obtaining an equivalent degree of incoherence. Additionally, we also present a variant of our repair algorithm that makes use of the confidence values of the mappings to improve alignment repair. Our repair algorithm was implemented as part of AgreementMakerLight, a free and open-source ontology matching system. PMID:26710335

  7. Ontology Alignment Repair through Modularization and Confidence-Based Heuristics

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Emanuel; Faria, Daniel; Pesquita, Catia; Couto, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    Ontology Matching aims at identifying a set of semantic correspondences, called an alignment, between related ontologies. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in efficient and effective matching methods for large ontologies. However, alignments produced for large ontologies are often logically incoherent. It was only recently that the use of repair techniques to improve the coherence of ontology alignments began to be explored. This paper presents a novel modularization technique for ontology alignment repair which extracts fragments of the input ontologies that only contain the necessary classes and relations to resolve all detectable incoherences. The paper presents also an alignment repair algorithm that uses a global repair strategy to minimize both the degree of incoherence and the number of mappings removed from the alignment, while overcoming the scalability problem by employing the proposed modularization technique. Our evaluation shows that our modularization technique produces significantly small fragments of the ontologies and that our repair algorithm produces more complete alignments than other current alignment repair systems, while obtaining an equivalent degree of incoherence. Additionally, we also present a variant of our repair algorithm that makes use of the confidence values of the mappings to improve alignment repair. Our repair algorithm was implemented as part of AgreementMakerLight, a free and open-source ontology matching system. PMID:26710335

  8. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  9. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    Comparative analyses of graph-structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each -tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext-Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  10. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-09-01

    Comparative analyses of graph structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given $k$ graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each $k$-tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs, and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method, and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  11. Recombination-aware alignment of diploid individuals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditionally biological similarity search has been studied under the abstraction of a single string to represent each genome. The more realistic representation of diploid genomes, with two strings defining the genome, has so far been largely omitted in this context. With the development of sequencing techniques and better phasing routines through haplotype assembly algorithms, we are not far from the situation when individual diploid genomes could be represented in their full complexity with a pair-wise alignment defining the genome. Results We propose a generalization of global alignment that is designed to measure similarity between phased predictions of individual diploid genomes. This generalization takes into account that individual diploid genomes evolve through a mutation and recombination process, and that predictions may be erroneous in both dimensions. Even though our model is generic, we focus on the case where one wants to measure only the similarity of genome content allowing free recombination. This results into efficient algorithms for direct application in (i) evaluation of variation calling predictions and (ii) progressive multiple alignments based on labeled directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) to represent profiles. The latter may be of more general interest, in connection to covering alignment of DAGs. Extensions of our model and algorithms can be foreseen to have applications in evaluating phasing algorithms, as well as more fundamental role in phasing child genome based on parent genomes. PMID:25572943

  12. GRAT--genome-scale rapid alignment tool.

    PubMed

    Kindlund, Ellen; Tammi, Martti T; Arner, Erik; Nilsson, Daniel; Andersson, Björn

    2007-04-01

    Modern alignment methods designed to work rapidly and efficiently with large datasets often do so at the cost of method sensitivity. To overcome this, we have developed a novel alignment program, GRAT, built to accurately align short, highly similar DNA sequences. The program runs rapidly and requires no more memory and CPU power than a desktop computer. In addition, specificity is ensured by statistically separating the true alignments from spurious matches using phred quality values. An efficient separation is especially important when searching large datasets and whenever there are repeats present in the dataset. Results are superior in comparison to widely used existing software, and analysis of two large genomic datasets show the usefulness and scalability of the algorithm. PMID:17292508

  13. Protein alignment: Exact versus approximate. An illustration.

    PubMed

    Randić, Milan; Pisanski, Tomaž

    2015-05-30

    We illustrate solving the protein alignment problem exactly using the algorithm VESPA (very efficient search for protein alignment). We have compared our result with the approximate solution obtained with BLAST (basic local alignment search tool) software, which is currently the most widely used for searching for protein alignment. We have selected human and mouse proteins having around 170 amino acids for comparison. The exact solution has found 78 pairs of amino acids, to which one should add 17 individual amino acid alignments giving a total of 95 aligned amino acids. BLAST has identified 64 aligned amino acids which involve pairs of more than two adjacent amino acids. However, the difference between the two outputs is not as large as it may appear, because a number of amino acids that are adjacent have been reported by BLAST as single amino acids. So if one counts all amino acids, whether isolated (single) or in a group of two and more amino acids, then the count for BLAST is 89 and for VESPA is 95, a difference of only six. PMID:25800773

  14. CARNA—alignment of RNA structure ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Sorescu, Dragoş Alexandru; Möhl, Mathias; Mann, Martin; Backofen, Rolf; Will, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Due to recent algorithmic progress, tools for the gold standard of comparative RNA analysis, namely Sankoff-style simultaneous alignment and folding, are now readily applicable. Such approaches, however, compare RNAs with respect to a simultaneously predicted, single, nested consensus structure. To make multiple alignment of RNAs available in cases, where this limitation of the standard approach is critical, we introduce a web server that provides a complete and convenient interface to the RNA structure alignment tool ‘CARNA’. This tool uniquely supports RNAs with multiple conserved structures per RNA and aligns pseudoknots intrinsically; these features are highly desirable for aligning riboswitches, RNAs with conserved folding pathways, or pseudoknots. We represent structural input and output information as base pair probability dot plots; this provides large flexibility in the input, ranging from fixed structures to structure ensembles, and enables immediate visual analysis of the results. In contrast to conventional Sankoff-style approaches, ‘CARNA’ optimizes all structural similarities in the input simultaneously, for example across an entire RNA structure ensemble. Even compared with already costly Sankoff-style alignment, ‘CARNA’ solves an intrinsically much harder problem by applying advanced, constraint-based, algorithmic techniques. Although ‘CARNA’ is specialized to the alignment of RNAs with several conserved structures, its performance on RNAs in general is on par with state-of-the-art general-purpose RNA alignment tools, as we show in a Bralibase 2.1 benchmark. The web server is freely available at http://rna.informatik.uni-freiburg.de/CARNA. PMID:22689637

  15. Structural analysis of aligned RNAs.

    PubMed

    Voss, Björn

    2006-01-01

    The knowledge about classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is growing very fast and it is mainly the structure which is the common characteristic property shared by members of the same class. For correct characterization of such classes it is therefore of great importance to analyse the structural features in great detail. In this manuscript I present RNAlishapes which combines various secondary structure analysis methods, such as suboptimal folding and shape abstraction, with a comparative approach known as RNA alignment folding. RNAlishapes makes use of an extended thermodynamic model and covariance scoring, which allows to reward covariation of paired bases. Applying the algorithm to a set of bacterial trp-operon leaders using shape abstraction it was able to identify the two alternating conformations of this attenuator. Besides providing in-depth analysis methods for aligned RNAs, the tool also shows a fairly well prediction accuracy. Therefore, RNAlishapes provides the community with a powerful tool for structural analysis of classes of RNAs and is also a reasonable method for consensus structure prediction based on sequence alignments. RNAlishapes is available for online use and download at http://rna.cyanolab.de. PMID:17020924

  16. Chunk Alignment for Corpus-Based Machine Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae Dong

    2011-01-01

    Since sub-sentential alignment is critically important to the translation quality of an Example-Based Machine Translation (EBMT) system, which operates by finding and combining phrase-level matches against the training examples, we developed a new alignment algorithm for the purpose of improving the EBMT system's performance. This new…

  17. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  18. Orthodontics and Aligners

    MedlinePlus

    ... Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth-Colored Fillings Orthodontics and Aligners Straighten teeth for a healthier smile. Orthodontics When consumers think about orthodontics, braces are the ...

  19. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  20. Automata-theoretic models of mutation and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Searls, D.B.; Murphy, K.P.

    1995-12-31

    Finite-state automata called transducers, which have both input and output, can be used to model simple mechanisms of biological mutation. We present a methodology whereby numerically-weighted versions of such specifications can be mechanically adapted to create string edit machines that are essentially equivalent to recurrence relations of the sort that characterize dynamic programming alignment algorithms. Based on this, we have developed a visual programming system for designing new alignment algorithms in a rapid-prototyping fashion.

  1. Algorithms and Algorithmic Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veselov, V. M.; Koprov, V. M.

    This paper is intended as an introduction to a number of problems connected with the description of algorithms and algorithmic languages, particularly the syntaxes and semantics of algorithmic languages. The terms "letter, word, alphabet" are defined and described. The concept of the algorithm is defined and the relation between the algorithm and…

  2. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  3. An efficient, FPGA-based, cluster detection algorithm implementation for a strip detector readout system in a Time Projection Chamber polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photo- electron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  4. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-01-01

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration. PMID:26556353

  5. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS.

    PubMed

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-01-01

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration. PMID:26556353

  6. FlexSnap: Flexible Non-sequential Protein Structure Alignment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteins have evolved subject to energetic selection pressure for stability and flexibility. Structural similarity between proteins that have gone through conformational changes can be captured effectively if flexibility is considered. Topologically unrelated proteins that preserve secondary structure packing interactions can be detected if both flexibility and Sequential permutations are considered. We propose the FlexSnap algorithm for flexible non-topological protein structural alignment. Results The effectiveness of FlexSnap is demonstrated by measuring the agreement of its alignments with manually curated non-sequential structural alignments. FlexSnap showed competitive results against state-of-the-art algorithms, like DALI, SARF2, MultiProt, FlexProt, and FATCAT. Moreover on the DynDom dataset, FlexSnap reported longer alignments with smaller rmsd. Conclusions We have introduced FlexSnap, a greedy chaining algorithm that reports both sequential and non-sequential alignments and allows twists (hinges). We assessed the quality of the FlexSnap alignments by measuring its agreements with manually curated non-sequential alignments. On the FlexProt dataset, FlexSnap was competitive to state-of-the-art flexible alignment methods. Moreover, we demonstrated the benefits of introducing hinges by showing significant improvements in the alignments reported by FlexSnap for the structure pairs for which rigid alignment methods reported alignments with either low coverage or large rmsd. Availability An implementation of the FlexSnap algorithm will be made available online at http://www.cs.rpi.edu/~zaki/software/flexsnap. PMID:20047669

  7. DoSA: Database of Structural Alignments.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Swapnil; Agarwal, Garima; Iftekhar, Mohammed; Offmann, Bernard; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is a crucial step in protein structure-function analysis. Despite the advances in protein structure alignment algorithms, some of the local conformationally similar regions are mislabeled as structurally variable regions (SVRs). These regions are not well superimposed because of differences in their spatial orientations. The Database of Structural Alignments (DoSA) addresses this gap in identification of local structural similarities obscured in global protein structural alignments by realigning SVRs using an algorithm based on protein blocks. A set of protein blocks is a structural alphabet that abstracts protein structures into 16 unique local structural motifs. DoSA provides unique information about 159,780 conformationally similar and 56,140 conformationally dissimilar SVRs in 74 705 pairwise structural alignments of homologous proteins. The information provided on conformationally similar and dissimilar SVRs can be helpful to model loop regions. It is also conceivable that conformationally similar SVRs with conserved residues could potentially contribute toward functional integrity of homologues, and hence identifying such SVRs could be helpful in understanding the structural basis of protein function. Database URL: http://bo-protscience.fr/dosa/ PMID:23846594

  8. DoSA: Database of Structural Alignments

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Swapnil; Agarwal, Garima; Iftekhar, Mohammed; Offmann, Bernard; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is a crucial step in protein structure–function analysis. Despite the advances in protein structure alignment algorithms, some of the local conformationally similar regions are mislabeled as structurally variable regions (SVRs). These regions are not well superimposed because of differences in their spatial orientations. The Database of Structural Alignments (DoSA) addresses this gap in identification of local structural similarities obscured in global protein structural alignments by realigning SVRs using an algorithm based on protein blocks. A set of protein blocks is a structural alphabet that abstracts protein structures into 16 unique local structural motifs. DoSA provides unique information about 159 780 conformationally similar and 56 140 conformationally dissimilar SVRs in 74 705 pairwise structural alignments of homologous proteins. The information provided on conformationally similar and dissimilar SVRs can be helpful to model loop regions. It is also conceivable that conformationally similar SVRs with conserved residues could potentially contribute toward functional integrity of homologues, and hence identifying such SVRs could be helpful in understanding the structural basis of protein function. Database URL: http://bo-protscience.fr/dosa/ PMID:23846594

  9. Snapshot imaging of postpulse transient molecular alignment revivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loriot, V.; Tehini, R.; Hertz, E.; Lavorel, B.; Faucher, O.

    2008-07-01

    Laser induced field-free alignment of linear molecules is investigated by using a single-shot spatial imaging technique. The measurements are achieved by femtosecond time-resolved optical polarigraphy (FTOP). Individual alignment revivals recorded at high resolution in CO2 , as well as simultaneous observation of several alignment revivals produced within the rotational period of the O2 molecule are reported. The data are analyzed with a theoretical model describing the alignment experienced by each molecule standing within the interaction region observed by the detector. The temporal dynamics, intensity dependence, and degree of alignment are measured and compared with the awaited results. The technique is simple and can be easily implemented in a large class of molecular samples. Improvement to extend the performance of the method is discussed. The reported study is a decisive step toward feedback optimization and optimal control of field-free molecular alignment.

  10. SPEAR3 Construction Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    LeCocq, Catherine; Banuelos, Cristobal; Fuss, Brian; Gaudreault, Francis; Gaydosh, Michael; Griffin, Levirt; Imfeld, Hans; McDougal, John; Perry, Michael; Rogers, Michael; /SLAC

    2005-08-17

    An ambitious seven month shutdown of the existing SPEAR2 synchrotron radiation facility was successfully completed in March 2004 when the first synchrotron light was observed in the new SPEAR3 ring, SPEAR3 completely replaced SPEAR2 with new components aligned on a new highly-flat concrete floor. Devices such as magnets and vacuum chambers had to be fiducialized and later aligned on girder rafts that were then placed into the ring over pre-aligned support plates. Key to the success of aligning this new ring was to ensure that the new beam orbit matched the old SPEAR2 orbit so that existing experimental beamlines would not have to be reoriented. In this presentation a pictorial summary of the Alignment Engineering Group's surveying tasks for the construction of the SPEAR3 ring is provided. Details on the networking and analysis of various surveys throughout the project can be found in the accompanying paper.

  11. Construction of the CDF silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Snider, F.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S. ); Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Gonzales, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T. ); Carithers, W.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester

    1992-04-01

    Technical details and methods used in constructing the CDF silicon vertex detector are presented. This description includes a discussion of the foam-carbon fiber composite structure used to silicon microstrip detectors and the procedure for achievement of 5 {mu}m detector alignment. The construction of the beryllium barrel structure, which houses the detector assemblies, is also described. In addition, the 10 {mu}m placement accuracy of the detectors in the barrel structure is discussed and the detector cooling and mounting systems are described. 12 refs.

  12. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, F.; Austin, M. E.; Campbell, G.; Deterly, T.

    2012-10-15

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  13. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization.

    PubMed

    Volpe, F; Austin, M E; Campbell, G; Deterly, T

    2012-10-01

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase. PMID:23126766

  14. Beam-based alignment of the final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Raimondi, P.; Oide, K.; Floettmann, K.

    1995-12-01

    Beam-based alignment of quadrupole and sextupole magnets is crucial for the overall performance of linear collider final focus systems, especially for elimination of backgrounds and higher-order aberrations. At the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), alignment tolerances required for achieving the desired spot size are 100 microns in the horizontal and 30 microns in the vertical. Using a combination of independent magnet power supplies, hi-h-resolution stripline beam position monitors and precision magnet movers, the FFTB can be aligned to these tolerances in about 8 hours. Description of the algorithm, presentation of alignment results, and possible improvements to the system are discussed.

  15. Regular language constrained sequence alignment revisited.

    PubMed

    Kucherov, Gregory; Pinhas, Tamar; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal

    2011-05-01

    Imposing constraints in the form of a finite automaton or a regular expression is an effective way to incorporate additional a priori knowledge into sequence alignment procedures. With this motivation, the Regular Expression Constrained Sequence Alignment Problem was introduced, which proposed an O(n²t⁴) time and O(n²t²) space algorithm for solving it, where n is the length of the input strings and t is the number of states in the input non-deterministic automaton. A faster O(n²t³) time algorithm for the same problem was subsequently proposed. In this article, we further speed up the algorithms for Regular Language Constrained Sequence Alignment by reducing their worst case time complexity bound to O(n²t³)/log t). This is done by establishing an optimal bound on the size of Straight-Line Programs solving the maxima computation subproblem of the basic dynamic programming algorithm. We also study another solution based on a Steiner Tree computation. While it does not improve the worst case, our simulations show that both approaches are efficient in practice, especially when the input automata are dense. PMID:21554020

  16. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  17. Optimizing a global alignment of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Ma, Cheng-Yu; Liao, Chung-Shou; Berger, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The global alignment of protein interaction networks is a widely studied problem. It is an important first step in understanding the relationship between the proteins in different species and identifying functional orthologs. Furthermore, it can provide useful insights into the species’ evolution. Results: We propose a novel algorithm, PISwap, for optimizing global pairwise alignments of protein interaction networks, based on a local optimization heuristic that has previously demonstrated its effectiveness for a variety of other intractable problems. PISwap can begin with different types of network alignment approaches and then iteratively adjust the initial alignments by incorporating network topology information, trading it off for sequence information. In practice, our algorithm efficiently refines other well-studied alignment techniques with almost no additional time cost. We also show the robustness of the algorithm to noise in protein interaction data. In addition, the flexible nature of this algorithm makes it suitable for different applications of network alignment. This algorithm can yield interesting insights into the evolutionary dynamics of related species. Availability: Our software is freely available for non-commercial purposes from our Web site, http://piswap.csail.mit.edu/. Contact: bab@csail.mit.edu or csliao@ie.nthu.edu.tw Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24048352

  18. Effects of defect pixel correction algorithms for x-ray detectors on image quality in planar projection and volumetric CT data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttig, Jan; Steiding, Christian; Hupfer, Martin; Karolczak, Marek; Kolditz, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    In this study we compared various defect pixel correction methods for reducing artifact appearance within projection images used for computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. Defect pixel correction algorithms were examined with respect to their artifact behaviour within planar projection images as well as in volumetric CT reconstructions. We investigated four algorithms: nearest neighbour, linear and adaptive linear interpolation, and a frequency-selective spectral-domain approach. To characterise the quality of each algorithm in planar image data, we inserted line defects of varying widths and orientations into images. The structure preservation of each algorithm was analysed by corrupting and correcting the image of a slit phantom pattern and by evaluating its line spread function (LSF). The noise preservation was assessed by interpolating corrupted flat images and estimating the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the interpolated region. For the volumetric investigations, we examined the structure and noise preservation within a structured aluminium foam, a mid-contrast cone-beam phantom and a homogeneous Polyurethane (PUR) cylinder. The frequency-selective algorithm showed the best structure and noise preservation for planar data of the correction methods tested. For volumetric data it still showed the best noise preservation, whereas the structure preservation was outperformed by the linear interpolation. The frequency-selective spectral-domain approach in the correction of line defects is recommended for planar image data, but its abilities within high-contrast volumes are restricted. In that case, the application of a simple linear interpolation might be the better choice to correct line defects within projection images used for CT.

  19. STAR: ultrafast universal RNA-seq aligner

    PubMed Central

    Dobin, Alexander; Davis, Carrie A.; Schlesinger, Felix; Drenkow, Jorg; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Batut, Philippe; Chaisson, Mark; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Accurate alignment of high-throughput RNA-seq data is a challenging and yet unsolved problem because of the non-contiguous transcript structure, relatively short read lengths and constantly increasing throughput of the sequencing technologies. Currently available RNA-seq aligners suffer from high mapping error rates, low mapping speed, read length limitation and mapping biases. Results: To align our large (>80 billon reads) ENCODE Transcriptome RNA-seq dataset, we developed the Spliced Transcripts Alignment to a Reference (STAR) software based on a previously undescribed RNA-seq alignment algorithm that uses sequential maximum mappable seed search in uncompressed suffix arrays followed by seed clustering and stitching procedure. STAR outperforms other aligners by a factor of >50 in mapping speed, aligning to the human genome 550 million 2 × 76 bp paired-end reads per hour on a modest 12-core server, while at the same time improving alignment sensitivity and precision. In addition to unbiased de novo detection of canonical junctions, STAR can discover non-canonical splices and chimeric (fusion) transcripts, and is also capable of mapping full-length RNA sequences. Using Roche 454 sequencing of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplicons, we experimentally validated 1960 novel intergenic splice junctions with an 80–90% success rate, corroborating the high precision of the STAR mapping strategy. Availability and implementation: STAR is implemented as a standalone C++ code. STAR is free open source software distributed under GPLv3 license and can be downloaded from http://code.google.com/p/rna-star/. Contact: dobin@cshl.edu. PMID:23104886

  20. Antares alignment gimbal positioner

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Saxman, A.C.; Lujan, R.E.; Woodfin, G.L.; Sweatt, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Antares is a 24-beam 40-TW carbon-dioxide (CO/sub 2/) laser fusion system currently under construction at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Antares alignment gimbal positioner (AGP) is an optomechanical instrument that will be used for target alignment and alignment of the 24 laser beams, as well as beam quality assessments. The AGP will be capable of providing pointing, focusing, and wavefront optical path difference, as well as aberration information at both helium-neon (He-Ne) and CO/sub 2/ wavelengths. It is designed to allow the laser beams to be aligned to any position within a 1-cm cube to a tolerance of 10 ..mu..m.

  1. EINSTEIN Cluster Alignments Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, S. W.; Melott, A. L.; Miller, C. J.

    2000-12-01

    We have examined whether the major axes of rich galaxy clusters tend to point (in projection) toward their nearest neighboring cluster. We used the data of Ulmer, McMillan and Kowalski, who used x-ray morphology to define position angles. Our cluster samples, with well measured redshifts and updated positions, were taken from the MX Northern Abell Cluster Survey. The usual Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows no significant alignment signal for nonrandom angles for all separations less than 100 Mpc/h. Refining the null hypothesis, however, with the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, reveals a high confidence signal for alignment. This confidence is highest when we restrict our sample to small nearest neighbor separations. We conclude that we have identified a more powerful tool for testing cluster-cluster alignments. Moreover, there is a strong signal in the data for alignment, consistent with a picture of hierarchical cluster formation in which matter falls into clusters along large scale filamentary structures.

  2. Optical alignment of high resolution Fourier transform spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Ocallaghan, F. G.; Cassie, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    Remote sensing, high resolution FTS instruments often contain three primary optical subsystems: Fore-Optics, Interferometer Optics, and Post, or Detector Optics. We discuss the alignment of a double-pass FTS containing a cat's-eye retro-reflector. Also, the alignment of fore-optics containing confocal paraboloids with a reflecting field stop which relays a field image onto a camera is discussed.

  3. The SORDS trimodal imager detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakeford, Daniel; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Li, Liqian; Bray, Nick; Locklin, Darren; Hynes, Michael V.; Toolin, Maurice; Harris, Bernard; McElroy, John; Wallace, Mark; Lanza, Richard

    2009-05-01

    The Raytheon Trimodal Imager (TMI) uses coded aperture and Compton imaging technologies as well as the nonimaging shadow technology to locate an SNM or radiological threat in the presence of background. The heart of the TMI is two arrays of NaI crystals. The front array serves as both a coded aperture and the first scatterer for Compton imaging. It is made of 35 5x5x2" crystals with specially designed low profile PMTs. The back array is made of 30 2.5x3x24" position-sensitive crystals which are read out at both ends. These crystals are specially treated to provide the required position resolution at the best possible energy resolution. Both arrays of detectors are supported by aluminum superstructures. These have been efficiently designed to allow a wide field of view and to provide adequate support to the crystals to permit use of the TMI as a vehicle-mounted, field-deployable system. Each PMT has a locally mounted high-voltage supply that is remotely controlled. Each detector is connected to a dedicated FPGA which performs automated gain alignment and energy calibration, event timing and diagnostic health checking. Data are streamed, eventby- event, from each of the 65 detector FPGAs to one master FPGA. The master FPGA acts both as a synchronization clock, and as an event sorting unit. Event sorting involves stamping events as singles or as coincidences, based on the approximately instantaneous detector hit pattern. Coincidence determination by the master FPGA provides a pre-sorting for the events that will ultimately be used in the Compton imaging and coded aperture imaging algorithms. All data acquisition electronics have been custom designed for the TMI.

  4. Local Structural Alignment of RNA with Affine Gap Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas K. F.; Cheung, Brenda W. Y.; Lam, T. W.; Yiu, S. M.

    Predicting new non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of a family can be done by aligning the potential candidate with a member of the family with known sequence and secondary structure. Existing tools either only consider the sequence similarity or cannot handle local alignment with gaps. In this paper, we consider the problem of finding the optimal local structural alignment between a query RNA sequence (with known secondary structure) and a target sequence (with unknown secondary structure) with the affine gap penalty model. We provide the algorithm to solve the problem. Based on a preliminary experiment, we show that there are ncRNA families in which considering local structural alignment with gap penalty model can identify real hits more effectively than using global alignment or local alignment without gap penalty model.

  5. Alignment of the magnet and a positioning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Il

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac and magnets for the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) were installed in the tunnel and the beamlines. The fiducialization process was accomplished with the measurement of mechanical shape and the transfer of the coordinates to the fiducial points that are used in two laser-trackers based alignments. The reference points called the alignment network were set up on the wall inside tunnel. The linac and the beam transport magnets were aligned based on the survey results of the alignment networks. In this paper, the alignment procedure and the alignment results are presented, and an algorithm that was developed to manipulate the adjusters of the magnetsis introduced.

  6. Measurement of the Inclusive Jet Cross Section using the k(T) algorithm in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, Anthony Allen; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, Konstantin; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Comenius U.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on measurements of the inclusive jet production cross section as a function of the jet transverse momentum in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using the k{sub T} algorithm and a data sample corresponding to 1.0 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II. The measurements are carried out in five different jet rapidity regions with |y{sup jet}| < 2.1 and transverse momentum in the range 54 < p{sub T}{sup jet} < 700 GeV/c. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions are in good agreement with the measured cross sections.

  7. Reconstruction of three-dimensional molecular structure from diffraction of laser-aligned molecules.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Makhija, Varun; Kumarappan, Vinod; Centurion, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Diffraction from laser-aligned molecules has been proposed as a method for determining 3-D molecular structures in the gas phase. However, existing structural retrieval algorithms are limited by the imperfect alignment in experiments and the rotational averaging in 1-D alignment. Here, we demonstrate a two-step reconstruction comprising a genetic algorithm that corrects for the imperfect alignment followed by an iterative phase retrieval method in cylindrical coordinates. The algorithm was tested with simulated diffraction patterns. We show that the full 3-D structure of trifluorotoluene, an asymmetric-top molecule, can be reconstructed with atomic resolution. PMID:26798781

  8. New Effective Multithreaded Matching Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Manne, Fredrik; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2014-05-19

    Matching is an important combinatorial problem with a number of applications in areas such as community detection, sparse linear algebra, and network alignment. Since computing optimal matchings can be very time consuming, several fast approximation algorithms, both sequential and parallel, have been suggested. Common to the algorithms giving the best solutions is that they tend to be sequential by nature, while algorithms more suitable for parallel computation give solutions of less quality. We present a new simple 1 2 -approximation algorithm for the weighted matching problem. This algorithm is both faster than any other suggested sequential 1 2 -approximation algorithm on almost all inputs and also scales better than previous multithreaded algorithms. We further extend this to a general scalable multithreaded algorithm that computes matchings of weight comparable with the best sequential algorithms. The performance of the suggested algorithms is documented through extensive experiments on different multithreaded architectures.

  9. Anomalous Polarization May Improve Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chan-Lon; Pan, Dee-Son

    1990-01-01

    New configurations proposed for quantum-well devices. Simplifies alignment, increases sensitivity, and opens up more possibilities in design of quantum-well detectors of infrared radiation. In detector made according to proposed concept, light incident broadside on front surface absorbed. No special waveguide structures required.

  10. Alignment of Short Reads: A Crucial Step for Application of Next-Generation Sequencing Data in Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Meehan, Joe; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine or personalized medicine has been proposed as a modernized and promising medical strategy. Genetic variants of patients are the key information for implementation of precision medicine. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an emerging technology for deciphering genetic variants. Alignment of raw reads to a reference genome is one of the key steps in NGS data analysis. Many algorithms have been developed for alignment of short read sequences since 2008. Users have to make a decision on which alignment algorithm to use in their studies. Selection of the right alignment algorithm determines not only the alignment algorithm but also the set of suitable parameters to be used by the algorithm. Understanding these algorithms helps in selecting the appropriate alignment algorithm for different applications in precision medicine. Here, we review current available algorithms and their major strategies such as seed-and-extend and q-gram filter. We also discuss the challenges in current alignment algorithms, including alignment in multiple repeated regions, long reads alignment and alignment facilitated with known genetic variants. PMID:26610555

  11. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  12. Graph-based molecular alignment (GMA).

    PubMed

    Marialke, J; Körner, R; Tietze, S; Apostolakis, Joannis

    2007-01-01

    We describe a combined 2D/3D approach for the superposition of flexible chemical structures, which is based on recent progress in the efficient identification of common subgraphs and a gradient-based torsion space optimization algorithm. The simplicity of the approach is reflected in its generality and computational efficiency: the suggested approach neither requires precalculated statistics on the conformations of the molecules nor does it make simplifying assumptions on the topology of the molecules being compared. Furthermore, graph-based molecular alignment produces alignments that are consistent with the chemistry of the molecules as well as their general structure, as it depends on both the local connectivities between atoms and the overall topology of the molecules. We validate this approach on benchmark sets taken from the literature and show that it leads to good results compared to computationally and algorithmically more involved methods. The results suggest that, for most practical purposes, graph-based molecular alignment is a viable alternative to molecular field alignment with respect to structural superposition and leads to structures of comparable quality in a fraction of the time. PMID:17381175

  13. An iterative method for flat-field correction of digital radiography when detector is at any position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyoung-Koo; Kim, Do-Il; Kim, Sung-Hyeon; Park, Dae-Sop; Choe, Bo-Young; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2005-04-01

    For non-uniformity correction a flat field x-ray image is needed, and to obtain it the center of detector is usually aligned with the focal spot of the x-ray tube, which is conserved when examining patients to preserve the flat field. In some of radiographic techniques, however, it is necessary to move the x-ray tube off the center position of detector or tilt the detector. We investigated the effect of X-ray tube positions with respect to detector on the non-uniformity correction, and propose a method to reduce the effect using a new algorithm with computer simulation. Gain images were taken in two SIDs. Pixel values at second SID was calculated using the pixel values at first SID, gain coefficient that represents pixels own unique radiation sensitivity characteristics and the formula based on the solid angle of each detector pixel facing to the x-ray source. Gain coefficient was adjusted using the difference between calculated and real pixel values. Calculation was repeated with new gain coefficient until the gain coefficient was converged into prescribed range. Non-uniformity of blank x-ray images taken with the detector tilted by 0 to 45 degrees was corrected and five ROIs across the image were defined and analyzed. When the proposed algorithm was used for the flat field correction standard deviations of pixel values in the ROIs were reduce to 10% of the cases of usual flat field correction.

  14. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  15. Multiple Sequence Alignment Based on Chaotic PSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xiu-Juan; Sun, Jing-Jing; Ma, Qian-Zhi

    This paper introduces a new improved algorithm called chaotic PSO (CPSO) based on the thought of chaos optimization to solve multiple sequence alignment. For one thing, the chaotic variables are generated between 0 and 1 when initializing the population so that the particles are distributed uniformly in the solution space. For another thing, the chaotic sequences are generated using the Logistic mapping function in order to make chaotic search and strengthen the diversity of the population. The simulation results of several benchmark data sets of BAliBase show that the improved algorithm is effective and has good performances for the data sets with different similarity.

  16. QUADRUPOLE BEAM-BASED ALIGNMENT AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NIEDZIELA, J.; MONTAG, C.; SATOGATA, T.

    2005-05-16

    Successful implementation of a beam-based alignment algorithm, tailored to different types of quadrupoles at RHIC, provides significant benefits to machine operations for heavy ions and polarized protons. This algorithm was used to calibrate beam position monitor centers relative to interaction region quadrupoles to maximize aperture. This approach was also used to determine the optimal orbit through transition jump quadrupoles to minimize orbit changes during the transition jump for heavy ion acceleration. This paper provides background discussion and results from first measurements during the RHIC 2005 run.

  17. BigFoot: Bayesian alignment and phylogenetic footprinting with MCMC

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Rahul; Novák, Ádám; Miklós, István; Lyngsø, Rune; Hein, Jotun

    2009-01-01

    Background We have previously combined statistical alignment and phylogenetic footprinting to detect conserved functional elements without assuming a fixed alignment. Considering a probability-weighted distribution of alignments removes sensitivity to alignment errors, properly accommodates regions of alignment uncertainty, and increases the accuracy of functional element prediction. Our method utilized standard dynamic programming hidden markov model algorithms to analyze up to four sequences. Results We present a novel approach, implemented in the software package BigFoot, for performing phylogenetic footprinting on greater numbers of sequences. We have developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach which samples both sequence alignments and locations of slowly evolving regions. We implement our method as an extension of the existing StatAlign software package and test it on well-annotated regions controlling the expression of the even-skipped gene in Drosophila and the α-globin gene in vertebrates. The results exhibit how adding additional sequences to the analysis has the potential to improve the accuracy of functional predictions, and demonstrate how BigFoot outperforms existing alignment-based phylogenetic footprinting techniques. Conclusion BigFoot extends a combined alignment and phylogenetic footprinting approach to analyze larger amounts of sequence data using MCMC. Our approach is robust to alignment error and uncertainty and can be applied to a variety of biological datasets. The source code and documentation are publicly available for download from PMID:19715598

  18. Improved pen alignment for bidirectional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Edgar; Allebach, Jan P.; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2006-01-01

    The quality of the prints produced by an inkjet printer is highly dependent on the characteristics of the dots produced by the inkjet pens. While some literature discusses metrics for the objective evaluation of print quality, few of the efforts have combined automated quality tests with subjective assessment. We develop an algorithm for analyzing printed dots and study the effects of the dot characteristics on the perceived print alignment. We establish the perceptual preferences of human observers via a set of psychophysical experiments.

  19. Alignment sensing and control for squeezed vacuum states of light.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, E; Dooley, K L; Vahlbruch, H; Affeldt, C; Bisht, A; Leong, J R; Lough, J; Prijatelj, M; Slutsky, J; Was, M; Wittel, H; Danzmann, K; Grote, H

    2016-01-11

    Beam alignment is an important practical aspect of the application of squeezed states of light. Misalignments in the detection of squeezed light result in a reduction of the observable squeezing level. In the case of squeezed vacuum fields that contain only very few photons, special measures must be taken in order to sense and control the alignment of the essentially dark beam. The GEO 600 gravitational wave detector employs a squeezed vacuum source to improve its detection sensitivity beyond the limits set by classical quantum shot noise. Here, we present our design and implementation of an alignment sensing and control scheme that ensures continuous optimal alignment of the squeezed vacuum field at GEO 600 on long time scales in the presence of free-swinging optics. This first demonstration of a squeezed light automatic alignment system will be of particular interest for future long-term applications of squeezed vacuum states of light. PMID:26832246

  20. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae Sok; Park, Chan; Cha, Sang-Mok; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Kwijong; Kim, Kang-Min; Chun, Moo-Young; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Oh, Heeyoung; Jeong, Ueejeong; Nah, Jakyoung; Lee, Hanshin; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-06-01

    The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA) detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL) mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  1. Parameterized BLOSUM Matrices for Protein Alignment.

    PubMed

    Song, Dandan; Chen, Jiaxing; Chen, Guang; Li, Ning; Li, Jin; Fan, Jun; Bu, Dongbo; Li, Shuai Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Protein alignment is a basic step for many molecular biology researches. The BLOSUM matrices, especially BLOSUM62, are the de facto standard matrices for protein alignments. However, after widely utilization of the matrices for 15 years, programming errors were surprisingly found in the initial version of source codes for their generation. And amazingly, after bug correction, the "intended" BLOSUM62 matrix performs consistently worse than the "miscalculated" one. In this paper, we find linear relationships among the eigenvalues of the matrices and propose an algorithm to find optimal unified eigenvectors. With them, we can parameterize matrix BLOSUMx for any given variable x that could change continuously. We compare the effectiveness of our parameterized isentropic matrix with BLOSUM62. Furthermore, an iterative alignment and matrix selection process is proposed to adaptively find the best parameter and globally align two sequences. Experiments are conducted on aligning 13,667 families of Pfam database and on clustering MHC II protein sequences, whose improved accuracy demonstrates the effectiveness of our proposed method. PMID:26357279

  2. Subminiature infrared detector translation stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a precision subminiature three-axis translation stage used in the GOES Sounder to provide positional adjustment of 12 cooled infrared detectors. Four separate translation stages and detectors are packaged into a detector mechanism which has an overall size of 0.850 x 1.230 x 0.600 inches. Each translation stage is capable of + or - 0.015 inch motion in the X and Y axes and +0.050/-0.025 inch motion in the Z axis with a sensitivity of 0.0002 inches. The function of the detector translation stage allows real time detector signal peaking during Sounder alignment. The translation stage operates in a cryogenic environment under a 10 to the -6th torr vacuum.

  3. FMIT alignment cart

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, R.C.; Dauelsberg, L.B.; Clark, D.C.; Grieggs, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility alignment cart must perform several functions. It must serve as a fixture to receive the drift-tube girder assembly when it is removed from the linac tank. It must transport the girder assembly from the linac vault to the area where alignment or disassembly is to take place. It must serve as a disassembly fixture to hold the girder while individual drift tubes are removed for repair. It must align the drift tube bores in a straight line parallel to the girder, using an optical system. These functions must be performed without violating any clearances found within the building. The bore tubes of the drift tubes will be irradiated, and shielding will be included in the system for easier maintenance.

  4. Barrel alignment fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeley, J. D.

    1981-04-01

    Fabrication of slapper type detonator cables requires bonding of a thin barrel over a bridge. Location of the barrel hole with respect to the bridge is critical: the barrel hole must be centered over the bridge uniform spacing on each side. An alignment fixture which permits rapid adjustment of the barrel position with respect to the bridge is described. The barrel is manipulated by pincer-type fingers which are mounted on a small x-y table equipped with micrometer adjustments. Barrel positioning, performed under a binocular microscopy, is rapid and accurate. After alignment, the microscope is moved out of position and an infrared (IR) heat source is aimed at the barrel. A 5-second pulse of infrared heat flows the adhesive under the barrel and bonds it to the cable. Sapphire and Fotoform glass barrels were bonded successfully with the alignment fixture.

  5. Improved docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for the alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for 3-D translation and 3-D rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera is affixed to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface is affixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture. A monitor displays in real-time images from the camera such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible marking on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  6. Optics Alignment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The Optics Alignment Panel (OAP) was commissioned by the HST Science Working Group to determine the optimum alignment of the OTA optics. The goal was to find the position of the secondary mirror (SM) for which there is no coma or astigmatism in the camera images due to misaligned optics, either tilt or decenter. The despace position was reviewed of the SM and the optimum focus was sought. The results of these efforts are as follows: (1) the best estimate of the aligned position of the SM in the notation of HDOS is (DZ,DY,TZ,TY) = (+248 microns, +8 microns, +53 arcsec, -79 arcsec), and (2) the best focus, defined to be that despace which maximizes the fractional energy at 486 nm in a 0.1 arcsec radius of a stellar image, is 12.2 mm beyond paraxial focus. The data leading to these conclusions, and the estimated uncertainties in the final results, are presented.

  7. Orientation and Alignment Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2015-04-01

    We present one of the simplest classical systems featuring the echo phenomenon—a collection of randomly oriented free rotors with dispersed rotational velocities. Following excitation by a pair of time-delayed impulsive kicks, the mean orientation or alignment of the ensemble exhibits multiple echoes and fractional echoes. We elucidate the mechanism of the echo formation by the kick-induced filamentation of phase space, and provide the first experimental demonstration of classical alignment echoes in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  8. Segment alignment control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubrun, JEAN-N.; Lorell, Ken R.

    1988-01-01

    The segmented primary mirror for the LDR will require a special segment alignment control system to precisely control the orientation of each of the segments so that the resulting composite reflector behaves like a monolith. The W.M. Keck Ten Meter Telescope will utilize a primary mirror made up of 36 actively controlled segments. Thus the primary mirror and its segment alignment control system are directly analogous to the LDR. The problems of controlling the segments in the face of disturbances and control/structures interaction, as analyzed for the TMT, are virtually identical to those for the LDR. The two systems are briefly compared.

  9. Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

    2011-09-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

  10. Vertical Alignment and Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Donna; Calzada, Lucio; LaPointe, Nancy; Lee, Audra; Sullivan, Lynn

    This study investigated whether vertical (grade level sequence) alignment of the curriculum in conjunction with teacher collaboration would enhance student performance on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) test in south Texas school districts of various sizes. Surveys were mailed to the office of the superintendent of 47 school…

  11. Curriculum Alignment: Establishing Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagné, Philippe; Dumont, Laurence; Brunet, Sabine; Boucher, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide to implement a curricular alignment project, directed at professional development and student support, and developed in a higher education French as a second language department. We outline best practices and preliminary results from our experience and provide ways to adapt our experience to other…

  12. Aligning brains and minds

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Haxby and colleagues describe a new method for aligning functional brain activity patterns across participants. Their study demonstrates that objects are similarly represented across different brains, allowing for reliable classification of one person’s brain activity based on another’s. PMID:22017984

  13. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  14. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  15. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  16. Fast feature identification for holographic tracking: the orientation alignment transform.

    PubMed

    Krishnatreya, Bhaskar Jyoti; Grier, David G

    2014-06-01

    The concentric fringe patterns created by features in holograms may be associated with a complex-valued orientational order field. Convolution with an orientational alignment operator then identifies centers of symmetry that correspond to the two-dimensional positions of the features. Feature identification through orientational alignment is reminiscent of voting algorithms such as Hough transforms, but may be implemented with fast convolution methods, and so can be orders of magnitude faster. PMID:24921472

  17. Intelligent Detector Design

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, N.; Cassell, R.; Johnson, T.; McCormick, J.; Magill, S.; Kuhlmann, S.; /Argonne

    2007-02-13

    At a future e+e- linear collider, precision measurements of jets will be required in order to understand physics at and beyond the electroweak scale. Calorimetry will be used with other detectors in an optimal way to reconstruct particle 4-vectors with unprecedented precision. This Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA) approach is seen as the best way to achieve particle mass resolutions from dijet measurements in the range of {approx} 30%/{radical}E, resulting in innovative methods for choosing the calorimeter technology and optimizing the detector design.

  18. Automation of the targeting and reflective alignment concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redfield, Robin C.

    1992-01-01

    The automated alignment system, described herein, employs a reflective, passive (requiring no power) target and includes a PC-based imaging system and one camera mounted on a six degree of freedom robot manipulator. The system detects and corrects for manipulator misalignment in three translational and three rotational directions by employing the Targeting and Reflective Alignment Concept (TRAC), which simplifies alignment by decoupling translational and rotational alignment control. The concept uses information on the camera and the target's relative position based on video feedback from the camera. These relative positions are converted into alignment errors and minimized by motions of the robot. The system is robust to exogenous lighting by virtue of a subtraction algorithm which enables the camera to only see the target. These capabilities are realized with relatively minimal complexity and expense.

  19. Alignment-related effects in forward proton experiments at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszewski, R.; Chwastowski, J.; Korcyl, K.; Trzebiński, M.

    2015-11-01

    The activity in the field of diffractive physics at the Large Hadron Collider has been constantly increasing. This includes the planning for additional dedicated apparatus - horizontal forward proton detectors. This work focuses on the problems related to the alignment of such devices. The effects of the misalignment of the detectors on their geometric acceptance and on the reconstruction of the proton kinematics are studied. The requirements for the alignment precision are inferred for different types of possible measurements.

  20. Aligning transcript of historical documents using dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaev, Irina; Cohen, Rafi; El-Sana, Jihad; Kedem, Klara

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple and accurate approach for aligning historical documents with their corresponding transcription. First, a representative of each letter in the historical document is cropped. Then, the transcription is transformed to synthetic word images by representing the letters in the transcription by the cropped letters. These synthetic word images are aligned to groups of connected components in the original text, along each line, using dynamic programming. For measuring image similarities we experimented with a variety of feature extraction and matching methods. The presented alignment algorithm was tested on two historical datasets and provided excellent results.

  1. Response microcantilever thermal detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Joseph P.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Evans III, Boyd M.

    2004-10-19

    A "folded leg" thermal detector microcantilever constructed of a substrate with at least one leg interposed between a fixed end and a deflective end, each leg having at least three essentially parallel leg segments interconnected on alternate opposing ends and aligned in a serpentine pattern with only the first leg segment attached to the fixed end and only the last leg segment attached to the deflective end. Alternate leg segment are coated on the pentalever with coating applied to the top of the first, third, and fifth leg segments of each leg and to the bottom of the second and fourth leg segments of each leg.

  2. Scoring consensus of multiple ECG annotators by optimal sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Haghpanahi, Masoumeh; Sameni, Reza; Borkholder, David A

    2014-01-01

    Development of ECG delineation algorithms has been an area of intense research in the field of computational cardiology for the past few decades. However, devising evaluation techniques for scoring and/or merging the results of such algorithms, both in the presence or absence of gold standards, still remains as a challenge. This is mainly due to existence of missed or erroneous determination of fiducial points in the results of different annotation algorithms. The discrepancy between different annotators increases when the reference signal includes arrhythmias or significant noise and its morphology deviates from a clean ECG signal. In this work, we propose a new approach to evaluate and compare the results of different annotators under such conditions. Specifically, we use sequence alignment techniques similar to those used in bioinformatics for the alignment of gene sequences. Our approach is based on dynamic programming where adequate mismatch penalties, depending on the type of the fiducial point and the underlying signal, are defined to optimally align the annotation sequences. We also discuss how to extend the algorithm for more than two sequences by using suitable data structures to align multiple annotation sequences with each other. Once the sequences are aligned, different heuristics are devised to evaluate the performance against a gold standard annotation, or to merge the results of multiple annotations when no gold standard exists. PMID:25570339

  3. Alignement automatise de fibres optiques amorces monomodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Amant, Yves

    Cette these jette les bases necessaires au developpement d'algorithmes a base de modele pour l'automatisation de l'alignement de fibres amorces monomodes. A partir de la methode de l'integrale de recouvrement et de deux solutions approximatives existantes, un modele analytique d'efficacite de couplage optique permettant d'estimer la puissance transmise entre un composant et une fibre amorce monomode est d'abord formule. Avec celui-ci, sept proprietes pouvant etre utiles au developpement d'algorithmes a base de modele sont ensuite identifiees et validees. Enfin, a l'aide de ces proprietes, une strategie d'alignement a base de modele est developpee et validee experimentalement. Les resultats obtenus demontrent clairement la repetitivite, la robustesse, la precision et la rapidite de la strategie proposee. Ils demontrent aussi qu'il est possible de realiser un alignement complet sans l'utilisation de systemes auxiliaires tels des systemes de vision, des cameras infrarouges, des capteurs de contact ou des systemes de fixation hautement precis.

  4. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Quasiparticle Level Alignment for Photocatalytic Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Migani, Annapaoala; Mowbray, Duncan J; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje; Rubio, Angel

    2014-05-13

    Electronic level alignment at the interface between an adsorbed molecular layer and a semiconducting substrate determines the activity and efficiency of many photocatalytic materials. Standard density functional theory (DFT)-based methods have proven unable to provide a quantitative description of this level alignment. This requires a proper treatment of the anisotropic screening, necessitating the use of quasiparticle (QP) techniques. However, the computational complexity of QP algorithms has meant a quantitative description of interfacial levels has remained elusive. We provide a systematic study of a prototypical interface, bare and methanol-covered rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, to determine the type of many-body theory required to obtain an accurate description of the level alignment. This is accomplished via a direct comparison with metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and two-photon photoemission (2PP) spectroscopy. We consider GGA DFT, hybrid DFT, and G0W0, scQPGW1, scQPGW0, and scQPGW QP calculations. Our results demonstrate that G0W0, or our recently introduced scQPGW1 approach, are required to obtain the correct alignment of both the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied interfacial molecular levels (HOMO/LUMO). These calculations set a new standard in the interpretation of electronic structure probe experiments of complex organic molecule/semiconductor interfaces. PMID:26580537

  6. Quasiparticle Level Alignment for Photocatalytic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Migani, Annapaola; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje; Rubio, Angel

    2014-05-13

    Electronic level alignment at the interface between an adsorbed molecular layer and a semiconducting substrate determines the activity and efficiency of many photocatalytic materials. Standard density functional theory (DFT)-based methods have proven unable to provide a quantitative description of this level alignment. This requires a proper treatment of the anisotropic screening, necessitating the use of quasiparticle (QP) techniques. However, the computational complexity of QP algorithms has meant a quantitative description of interfacial levels has remained elusive. We provide a systematic study of a prototypical interface, bare and methanol-covered rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, to determine the type of many-body theory required to obtain an accurate description of the level alignment. This is accomplished via a direct comparison with metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and two-photon photoemission (2PP) spectroscopy. We consider GGA DFT, hybrid DFT, and G0W0, scQPGW1, scQPGW0, and scQPGW QP calculations. Our results demonstrate that G0W0, or our recently introduced scQPGW1 approach, are required to obtain the correct alignment of both the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied interfacial molecular levels (HOMO/LUMO). These calculations set a new standard in the interpretation of electronic structure probe experiments of complex organic molecule/semiconductor interfaces.

  7. Inflation by alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Roest, Diederik

    2015-06-08

    Pseudo-Goldstone bosons (pGBs) can provide technically natural inflatons, as has been comparatively well-explored in the simplest axion examples. Although inflationary success requires trans-Planckian decay constants, f≳M{sub p}, several mechanisms have been proposed to obtain this, relying on (mis-)alignments between potential and kinetic energies in multiple-field models. We extend these mechanisms to a broader class of inflationary models, including in particular the exponential potentials that arise for pGB potentials based on noncompact groups (and so which might apply to moduli in an extra-dimensional setting). The resulting potentials provide natural large-field inflationary models and can predict a larger primordial tensor signal than is true for simpler single-field versions of these models. In so doing we provide a unified treatment of several alignment mechanisms, showing how each emerges as a limit of the more general setup.

  8. On the alignment space.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi-Yi; Wang, Kui; Hu, Gang; Chen, Lu-Sheng; Zhang, Hua; Xia, Shu-Tao

    2005-01-01

    Sequences with generalized errors which are called mutations in bioinformatics and generalized error-correcting codes are studied in this paper. In the areas of bioinformatics, computer science and information theory, sequences with generalized errors are discussed respectively for different aims. Firstly, we give the definitions of alignment distance and Levenshtein distance by expansion sequences and discuss their properties and relations. Then the modular structure theory is introduced for strictly describe the expansion sequences. We show that the expansion modular structures of sequences form a Boolean algebra. As applications of the modular structure theory, we give a new and more strict proof of triangle inequality for alignment distance. At last, the definition and construction of generalized error-correcting codes are studied, and some optimal codes with small length are listed. PMID:17282158

  9. Alignment reference device

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Gail Y.; Torgerson, Darrel D.

    1987-01-01

    An alignment reference device provides a collimated laser beam that minimizes angular deviations therein. A laser beam source outputs the beam into a single mode optical fiber. The output end of the optical fiber acts as a source of radiant energy and is positioned at the focal point of a lens system where the focal point is positioned within the lens. The output beam reflects off a mirror back to the lens that produces a collimated beam.

  10. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  11. Dynamic Alignment at SLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2003-04-23

    The relative alignment of components in the storage ring of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) is guaranteed by mechanical means. The magnets are rigidly fixed to 48 girders by means of alignment rails with tolerances of less than {+-}15 {micro}m. The bending magnets, supported by 3 point ball bearings, overlap adjacent girders and thus establish virtual train links between the girders, located near the bending magnet centres. Keeping the distortion of the storage ring geometry within a tolerance of {+-}100 {micro}m in order to guarantee sufficient dynamic apertures, requires continuous monitoring and correction of the girder locations. Two monitoring systems for the horizontal and the vertical direction will be installed to measure displacements of the train link between girders, which are due to ground settings and temperature effects: The hydrostatic levelling system (HLS) gives an absolute vertical reference, while the horizontal positioning system (HPS), which employs low cost linear encoders with sub-micron resolution, measures relative horizontal movements. The girder mover system based on five DC motors per girder allows a dynamic realignment of the storage ring within a working window of more than {+-}1 mm for girder translations and {+-}1 mrad for rotations. We will describe both monitoring systems (HLS and HPS) as well as the applied correction scheme based on the girder movers. We also show simulations indicating that beam based girder alignment takes care of most of the static closed orbit correction.

  12. Docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for three-dimensional translation and three-dimensional rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera 18 is fixedly mounted to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm 10 of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface 30 is fixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture 20. A monitor 50 displays in real-time images from the camera, such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible markings on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm 10 manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  13. Polar cap arcs: Sun-aligned or cusp-aligned?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Zhang, Qinghe; Xing, Zanyang

    2016-08-01

    Polar cap arcs are often called sun-aligned arcs. Satellite observations reveal that polar cap arcs join together at the cusp and are actually cusp aligned. Strong ionospheric plasma velocity shears, thus field aligned currents, were associated with polar arcs and they were likely caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz waves around the low-latitude magnetopause under a northward IMF Bz. The magnetic field lines around the magnetopause join together in the cusp region so are the field aligned currents and particle precipitation. This explains why polar arcs are cusp aligned.

  14. Alignment and alignment transition of bent core nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamain, Omaima; Hegde, Gurumurthy; Komitov, Lachezar

    2013-07-01

    We report on the alignment of nematics consisting of bimesogen bent core molecules of chlorine substituent of benzene derivative and their binary mixture with rod like nematics. It was found that the alignment layer made from polyimide material, which is usually used for promoting vertical (homeotropic) alignment of rod like nematics, promotes instead a planar alignment of the bent core nematic and its nematic mixtures. At higher concentration of the rod like nematic component in these mixtures, a temperature driven transition from vertical to planar alignment was found near the transition to isotropic phase.

  15. Alignment as a Teacher Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew C.; Smithson, John; Blank, Rolf; Zeidner, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of the procedures developed by Porter and colleagues (Porter, 2002), other methods of defining and measuring alignment are essentially limited to alignment between tests and standards. Porter's procedures have been generalized to investigating the alignment between content standards, tests, textbooks, and even classroom…

  16. Matt: local flexibility aids protein multiple structure alignment.

    PubMed

    Menke, Matthew; Berger, Bonnie; Cowen, Lenore

    2008-01-01

    Even when there is agreement on what measure a protein multiple structure alignment should be optimizing, finding the optimal alignment is computationally prohibitive. One approach used by many previous methods is aligned fragment pair chaining, where short structural fragments from all the proteins are aligned against each other optimally, and the final alignment chains these together in geometrically consistent ways. Ye and Godzik have recently suggested that adding geometric flexibility may help better model protein structures in a variety of contexts. We introduce the program Matt (Multiple Alignment with Translations and Twists), an aligned fragment pair chaining algorithm that, in intermediate steps, allows local flexibility between fragments: small translations and rotations are temporarily allowed to bring sets of aligned fragments closer, even if they are physically impossible under rigid body transformations. After a dynamic programming assembly guided by these "bent" alignments, geometric consistency is restored in the final step before the alignment is output. Matt is tested against other recent multiple protein structure alignment programs on the popular Homstrad and SABmark benchmark datasets. Matt's global performance is competitive with the other programs on Homstrad, but outperforms the other programs on SABmark, a benchmark of multiple structure alignments of proteins with more distant homology. On both datasets, Matt demonstrates an ability to better align the ends of alpha-helices and beta-strands, an important characteristic of any structure alignment program intended to help construct a structural template library for threading approaches to the inverse protein-folding problem. The related question of whether Matt alignments can be used to distinguish distantly homologous structure pairs from pairs of proteins that are not homologous is also considered. For this purpose, a p-value score based on the length of the common core and average root

  17. Connectivity independent protein-structure alignment: a hierarchical approach

    PubMed Central

    Kolbeck, Bjoern; May, Patrick; Schmidt-Goenner, Tobias; Steinke, Thomas; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2006-01-01

    Background Protein-structure alignment is a fundamental tool to study protein function, evolution and model building. In the last decade several methods for structure alignment were introduced, but most of them ignore that structurally similar proteins can share the same spatial arrangement of secondary structure elements (SSE) but differ in the underlying polypeptide chain connectivity (non-sequential SSE connectivity). Results We perform protein-structure alignment using a two-level hierarchical approach implemented in the program GANGSTA. On the first level, pair contacts and relative orientations between SSEs (i.e. α-helices and β-strands) are maximized with a genetic algorithm (GA). On the second level residue pair contacts from the best SSE alignments are optimized. We have tested the method on visually optimized structure alignments of protein pairs (pairwise mode) and for database scans. For a given protein structure, our method is able to detect significant structural similarity of functionally important folds with non-sequential SSE connectivity. The performance for structure alignments with strictly sequential SSE connectivity is comparable to that of other structure alignment methods. Conclusion As demonstrated for several applications, GANGSTA finds meaningful protein-structure alignments independent of the SSE connectivity. GANGSTA is able to detect structural similarity of protein folds that are assigned to different superfamilies but nevertheless possess similar structures and perform related functions, even if these proteins differ in SSE connectivity. PMID:17118190

  18. GASOLINE: a Cytoscape app for multiple local alignment of PPI networks

    PubMed Central

    Micale, Giovanni; Continella, Andrea; Ferro, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Pulvirenti, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Comparing protein interaction networks can reveal interesting patterns of interactions for a specific function or process in distantly related species. In this paper we present GASOLINE, a Cytoscape app for multiple local alignments of PPI (protein-protein interaction) networks. The app is based on the homonymous greedy and stochastic algorithm. GASOLINE starts with the identification of sets of similar nodes, called seeds of the alignment. Alignments are then extended in a greedy manner and finally refined. Both the identification of seeds and the extension of alignments are performed through an iterative Gibbs sampling strategy. GASOLINE is a Cytoscape app for computing and visualizing local alignments, without requiring any post-processing operations. GO terms can be easily attached to the aligned proteins for further functional analysis of alignments. GASOLINE can perform the alignment task in few minutes, even for a large number of input networks. PMID:25324964

  19. Ultra-high-precision alignment technology for lens manufacturing used for high-end optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffner, Sebastian; Sure, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the progress in the area of modern centration technology by using digital image processing. This work is motivated by the continuously increasing demand for high-end optics. During the last years the surface lens quality has been continuously improved. Today the image quality is more determined by the manufacturing tolerances for the mechanical interface which is responsible for decenter and tilt of the lenses respectively the subgroups. Some of the aberrations are directly linked to the decenter of the lenses, Coma for example. Hence it is necessary to realize the subgroups with tolerances below lpm. To determine the decenter of a lens an auto collimation telescope is used to image the reflex of the lens surfaces onto a detector, commonly a half covert photodiode. Rotating the lens generates a sinusoidal signal, which is evaluated by a lock-in amplifier to drive two actuators to adjust the alignment chuck. Typical internal reflections caused by stray light for example disturb the current procedure in such a way that it is impossible to get a stable alignment process. Digital image processing allows us to fix these problems with image recognition. We will demonstrate how a modified auto collimation telescope in combination with the developed software algorithms made the manufacturing process more accurate, faster and useable for a broad spectrum of lenses. It has been proofed by some thousand diverse lenses that with these new technique subgroups can be centered within 0.25μm.

  20. Dynamic Programming Used to Align Protein Structures with a Spectrum Is Robust

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Allen; Simon, Jacqueline; Strauser, Jonathon; Taylor, Jonathan; Shibberu, Yosi

    2013-01-01

    Several efficient algorithms to conduct pairwise comparisons among large databases of protein structures have emerged in the recent literature. The central theme is the design of a measure between the Cα atoms of two protein chains, from which dynamic programming is used to compute an alignment. The efficiency and efficacy of these algorithms allows large-scale computational studies that would have been previously impractical. The computational study herein shows that the structural alignment algorithm eigen-decomposition alignment with the spectrum (EIGAs) is robust against both parametric and structural variation. PMID:24833226

  1. Solar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, Juan Antonio

    The sun was such an important divinity in antiquity, and even today, that solar alignments should be expected within a large variety of places and cultures. These are probably the most conspicuous kind of astronomical alignments a field researcher can deal with. The need for a correct identification is thus evident. The different kind of solar phenomena susceptible of being determined by astronomical alignments will be scrutinized, following by the way in which such alignments can materialize in space. It will be shown that analyzing solar alignments is not always an easy task.

  2. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  3. Alignment of R-R interval signals using the circadian heart rate rhythm.

    PubMed

    Gayraud, Nathalie T H; Manis, George

    2015-01-01

    R-R interval signals that come from different subjects are regularly aligned and averaged according to the horological starting time of the recordings. We argue that the horological time is a faulty alignment criterion and provide evidence in the form of a new alignment method. Our main motivation is that the human heart rate (HR) rhythm follows a circadian cycle, whose pattern can vary among different classes of people. We propose two novel alignment algorithms that consider the HR circadian rhythm, the Puzzle Piece Alignment Algorithm (PPA) and the Event Based Alignment Algorithm (EBA). First, we convert the R-R interval signal into a series of time windows and compute the mean HR per window. Then our algorithms search for matching circadian patterns to align the signals. We conduct experiments using R-R interval signals extracted from two databases in the Physionet Data Bank. Both algorithms are able to align the signals with respect to the circadian rhythmicity of HR. Furthermore, our findings confirm the presence of more than one pattern in the circadian HR rhythm. We suggest an automatic classification of signals according to the three most prominent patterns. PMID:26737009

  4. Method of "Active Correlations" for DSSSD detector application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time PC based algorithm is developed for DSSSD ( Double Side Silicon Strip Detector) detector. Brief description of the detection system is also presented. Complete fusion nuclear reaction nat Yt + 48 Ca → 217 Th is used to test this algorithm at 48Ca beam. Example of successful application of a former algorithm for resistive strip PIPS (resistive strip Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon) detector is presented too.

  5. Chromatographic alignment by warping and dynamic programming as a pre-processing tool for PARAFAC modelling of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Bylund, Dan; Danielsson, Rolf; Malmquist, Gunnar; Markides, Karin E

    2002-07-01

    Solutes analysed with LC-MS are characterised by their retention times and mass spectra, and quantified by the intensities measured. This highly selective information can be extracted by multiway modelling. However, for full use and interpretability it is necessary that the assumptions made for the model are valid. For PARAFAC modelling, the assumption is a trilinear data structure. With LC-MS, several factors, e.g. non-linear detector response and ionisation suppression may introduce deviations from trilinearity. The single largest problem, however, is the retention time shifts not related to the true sample variations. In this paper, a time warping algorithm for alignment of LC-MS data in the chromatographic direction has been examined. Several refinements have been implemented and the features are demonstrated for both simulated and real data. With moderate time shifts present in the data, pre-processing with this algorithm yields approximately trilinear data for which reasonable models can be made. PMID:12184621

  6. Image correlation method for DNA sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were "digitally" obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment. PMID:22761742

  7. TSGC and JSC Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Humberto

    2013-01-01

    NASA and the SGCs are, by design, intended to work closely together and have synergistic Vision, Mission, and Goals. The TSGC affiliates and JSC have been working together, but not always in a concise, coordinated, nor strategic manner. Today we have a couple of simple ideas to present about how TSGC and JSC have started to work together in a more concise, coordinated, and strategic manner, and how JSC and non-TSG Jurisdiction members have started to collaborate: Idea I: TSGC and JSC Technical Alignment Idea II: Concept of Clusters.

  8. Long Read Alignment with Parallel MapReduce Cloud Platform

    PubMed Central

    Al-Absi, Ahmed Abdulhakim; Kang, Dae-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Genomic sequence alignment is an important technique to decode genome sequences in bioinformatics. Next-Generation Sequencing technologies produce genomic data of longer reads. Cloud platforms are adopted to address the problems arising from storage and analysis of large genomic data. Existing genes sequencing tools for cloud platforms predominantly consider short read gene sequences and adopt the Hadoop MapReduce framework for computation. However, serial execution of map and reduce phases is a problem in such systems. Therefore, in this paper, we introduce Burrows-Wheeler Aligner's Smith-Waterman Alignment on Parallel MapReduce (BWASW-PMR) cloud platform for long sequence alignment. The proposed cloud platform adopts a widely accepted and accurate BWA-SW algorithm for long sequence alignment. A custom MapReduce platform is developed to overcome the drawbacks of the Hadoop framework. A parallel execution strategy of the MapReduce phases and optimization of Smith-Waterman algorithm are considered. Performance evaluation results exhibit an average speed-up of 6.7 considering BWASW-PMR compared with the state-of-the-art Bwasw-Cloud. An average reduction of 30% in the map phase makespan is reported across all experiments comparing BWASW-PMR with Bwasw-Cloud. Optimization of Smith-Waterman results in reducing the execution time by 91.8%. The experimental study proves the efficiency of BWASW-PMR for aligning long genomic sequences on cloud platforms. PMID:26839887

  9. Long Read Alignment with Parallel MapReduce Cloud Platform.

    PubMed

    Al-Absi, Ahmed Abdulhakim; Kang, Dae-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Genomic sequence alignment is an important technique to decode genome sequences in bioinformatics. Next-Generation Sequencing technologies produce genomic data of longer reads. Cloud platforms are adopted to address the problems arising from storage and analysis of large genomic data. Existing genes sequencing tools for cloud platforms predominantly consider short read gene sequences and adopt the Hadoop MapReduce framework for computation. However, serial execution of map and reduce phases is a problem in such systems. Therefore, in this paper, we introduce Burrows-Wheeler Aligner's Smith-Waterman Alignment on Parallel MapReduce (BWASW-PMR) cloud platform for long sequence alignment. The proposed cloud platform adopts a widely accepted and accurate BWA-SW algorithm for long sequence alignment. A custom MapReduce platform is developed to overcome the drawbacks of the Hadoop framework. A parallel execution strategy of the MapReduce phases and optimization of Smith-Waterman algorithm are considered. Performance evaluation results exhibit an average speed-up of 6.7 considering BWASW-PMR compared with the state-of-the-art Bwasw-Cloud. An average reduction of 30% in the map phase makespan is reported across all experiments comparing BWASW-PMR with Bwasw-Cloud. Optimization of Smith-Waterman results in reducing the execution time by 91.8%. The experimental study proves the efficiency of BWASW-PMR for aligning long genomic sequences on cloud platforms. PMID:26839887

  10. Understanding Beam Alignment in a Coherent Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Roychoudhari, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam alignment in a coherent lidar (or ladar) receiver system plays a critical role in optimizing its performance. Optical alignment in a coherent lidar system dictates the wavefront curvature (phase front) and Poynting vector) matching of the local oscillator beam with the incoming receiver beam on a detector. However, this alignment is often not easy to achieve and is rarely perfect. Furthermore, optical fibers are being increasingly used in coherent lidar system receivers for transporting radiation to achieve architectural elegance. Single mode fibers also require stringent mode matching for efficient light coupling. The detector response characteristics vary with the misalignment of the two pointing vectors. Misalignment can lead to increase in DC current. Also, a lens in front of the detector may exasperate phase front and Poynting vector mismatch. Non-Interaction of Waves, or the NIW property indicates the light beams do not interfere by themselves in the absence of detecting dipoles. In this paper, we will analyze the extent of misalignment on the detector specifications using pointing vectors of mixing beams in light of the NIW property.

  11. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An early warning fire detection sensor developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter is being evaluated as a possible hazard prevention system for mining operations. The incipient Fire Detector represents an advancement over commercially available smoke detectors in that it senses and signals the presence of a fire condition before the appearance of flame and smoke, offering an extra margin of safety.

  12. Optical Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  13. Metal Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  14. Towards the adaptive optimization of field-free molecular alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouzée, Arnaud; Hertz, Edouard; Lavorel, Bruno; Faucher, Olivier

    2008-04-01

    We theoretically report the optimization of field-free molecular alignment by spectral phase shaping of femtosecond laser pulses. Optimal pulse shapes are designed iteratively by an evolutionary algorithm in conjunction with a non-perturbative regime calculation. The investigation is conducted in O2 and N2 under realistic conditions of intensity, temperature and pulse shaping. We demonstrate that specific tailored pulses can provide significant maximization of field-free alignment compared to the Fourier transform limited pulses of the same energy. The underlying control mechanism is discussed. The effect of pulse energy and temperature is analysed leading to the identification of a general criteria for a successful optimization. Finally, the optimal spectral phase learned from the algorithm is rather smooth and can be described by a representation in terms of a sigmoidal function. We show that the use of a low-dimensional parametrization of the phase yields an efficient optimization of the alignment within a highly reduced convergence time.

  15. Local alignment of two-base encoded DNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Nils; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA sequence comparison is based on optimal local alignment of two sequences using a similarity score. However, some new DNA sequencing technologies do not directly measure the base sequence, but rather an encoded form, such as the two-base encoding considered here. In order to compare such data to a reference sequence, the data must be decoded into sequence. The decoding is deterministic, but the possibility of measurement errors requires searching among all possible error modes and resulting alignments to achieve an optimal balance of fewer errors versus greater sequence similarity. Results We present an extension of the standard dynamic programming method for local alignment, which simultaneously decodes the data and performs the alignment, maximizing a similarity score based on a weighted combination of errors and edits, and allowing an affine gap penalty. We also present simulations that demonstrate the performance characteristics of our two base encoded alignment method and contrast those with standard DNA sequence alignment under the same conditions. Conclusion The new local alignment algorithm for two-base encoded data has substantial power to properly detect and correct measurement errors while identifying underlying sequence variants, and facilitating genome re-sequencing efforts based on this form of sequence data. PMID:19508732

  16. Smov Fos/fgs Fine Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1994-01-01

    Fine FOS/FGS alignment will be determined. A TALED image in the 0.3 followed by an INT ACQ and a confirming ACQ image in the 4.3 will be obtained. Lastly, a fine ACQ/PEAK and confirming ACQ IMAGE will be taken. PASS reports will be analyzed in conjunction with the observations to allow determination of (V2,V3) positioning. The goal is to measure the precise plate scale and orientation. This will be acheived by performing a raster step and dwell sequence in the 4.3 arcsec aperture. The edges of the aperture should be avoided to prevent vignetting effects. An aperture map is required at each step of the dwell sequence. This test has to be conducted for both the RED and BLUE detectors. We will also determine the offset between the two detectors. The goal is to measure the precise aperture locations and sizes. The analysis of the observations will result in database changes to the table of aperture locations. Aperture maps of the TALEDs and an elliptical galaxy with a flat energy distribution in the nucleus which uniformly fill the apertures will be used to roughly determine the location of the apertures. Next the precise aperture locations will be detrmined by performing a raster step and dwell sequence in the FOS apertures along the edges of the apertures. An aperture map is required at each step of the dwell sequence. This test has tobe conducted for both the RED and BLUE detectors.

  17. Fourier transform interferometer alignment method.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Naulleau, Patrick; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2002-08-01

    A rapid and convenient method has been developed to facilitate the alignment of the image-plane components of point-diffraction interferometers, including the phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometer. In real time, the Fourier transform of the detected image is used to calculate a pseudoimage of the electric field in the image plane of the test optic where thecritical alignment o f variousoptical components is performed. Reconstruction of the pseudoimage is similar to off-axis, Fourier transform holography. Intermediate steps in the alignment procedure are described. Fine alignment is aided by the introduction and optimization of a global-contrast parameter that is easily calculated from the Fourier transform. Additional applications include the alignment of image-plane apertures in general optical systems, the rapid identification of patterned image-plane alignment marks, and the probing of important image-plane field properties. PMID:12153074

  18. Onorbit IMU alignment error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Star Tracker, Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS), and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from a complex navigation system with a multitude of error sources were combined. A complete list of the system errors is presented. The errors were combined in a rational way to yield an estimate of the IMU alignment accuracy for STS-1. The expected standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 type alignments was determined to be 72 arc seconds per axis for star tracker alignments and 188 arc seconds per axis for COAS alignments. These estimates are based on current knowledge of the star tracker, COAS, IMU, and navigation base error specifications, and were partially verified by preliminary Monte Carlo analysis.

  19. Nuclear reactor internals alignment configuration

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2009-11-10

    An alignment system that employs jacking block assemblies and alignment posts around the periphery of the top plate of a nuclear reactor lower internals core shroud to align an upper core plate with the lower internals and the core shroud with the core barrel. The distal ends of the alignment posts are chamfered and are closely received within notches machined in the upper core plate at spaced locations around the outer circumference of the upper core plate. The jacking block assemblies are used to center the core shroud in the core barrel and the alignment posts assure the proper orientation of the upper core plate. The alignment posts may alternately be formed in the upper core plate and the notches may be formed in top plate.

  20. Partial face recognition: alignment-free approach.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengcai; Jain, Anil K; Li, Stan Z

    2013-05-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for holistic face recognition with impressive performance. However, few studies have tackled how to recognize an arbitrary patch of a face image. Partial faces frequently appear in unconstrained scenarios, with images captured by surveillance cameras or handheld devices (e.g., mobile phones) in particular. In this paper, we propose a general partial face recognition approach that does not require face alignment by eye coordinates or any other fiducial points. We develop an alignment-free face representation method based on Multi-Keypoint Descriptors (MKD), where the descriptor size of a face is determined by the actual content of the image. In this way, any probe face image, holistic or partial, can be sparsely represented by a large dictionary of gallery descriptors. A new keypoint descriptor called Gabor Ternary Pattern (GTP) is also developed for robust and discriminative face recognition. Experimental results are reported on four public domain face databases (FRGCv2.0, AR, LFW, and PubFig) under both the open-set identification and verification scenarios. Comparisons with two leading commercial face recognition SDKs (PittPatt and FaceVACS) and two baseline algorithms (PCA+LDA and LBP) show that the proposed method, overall, is superior in recognizing both holistic and partial faces without requiring alignment. PMID:23520259

  1. Aligned Defrosting Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    17 August 2004 This July 2004 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a group of aligned barchan sand dunes in the martian north polar region. At the time, the dunes were covered with seasonal frost, but the frost had begun to sublime away, leaving dark spots and dark outlines around the dunes. The surrounding plains exhibit small, diffuse spots that are also the result of subliming seasonal frost. This northern spring image, acquired on a descending ground track (as MGS was moving north to south on the 'night' side of Mars) is located near 78.8oN, 34.8oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  2. Alignment system for encoders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villani, Daniel D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An improved encoder alignment system is disclosed which provides an indication of the extent of misalignment and a measure of the rate at which the misalignment may be changing. The invention is adapted for use with a conventional encoder which provides a digital coarse word having at least significant bit and a digital fine word having a least significant bit and a most significant bit. The invention generates the exclusive or of the least significant bit of the coarse digital signal and the least significant bit of the fine digital signal to provide a first signal. The invention then generates the exclusive or of the first signal and the complement of the most significant bit of the fine digital signal to provide an output signal which represents the misalignment of the encoder.

  3. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  4. Lunar Alignments - Identification and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, A. César

    Lunar alignments are difficult to establish given the apparent lack of written accounts clearly pointing toward lunar alignments for individual temples. While some individual cases are reviewed and highlighted, the weight of the proof must fall on statistical sampling. Some definitions for the lunar alignments are provided in order to clarify the targets, and thus, some new tools are provided to try to test the lunar hypothesis in several cases, especially in megalithic astronomy.

  5. Solar sensor subsystems alignment check using solar scans for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurczyk, S. G.; Moore, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    The alignment of a dual-axes sun sensor subsystem to a telescope having a multiple sensor subsystem is described. The sun sensor consists of two analog and one digital silicon detectors. The analog detectors are shadow mask type operating in the visible spectrum. The detectors are mounted for azimuth and elevation positioning of biaxial gimbals. The digital detector is a linear diode array that operates at a spectral position of 0.7 micron and is used for elevation positioning. The position signals correspond to relative angles between the sun sensor and the solar disk. These three detectors are aligned on an Invar structure which is mounted to a Cassegrain telescope. This telescope relays solar radiance to an eight channel detector subsystem operating in the infrared range from 2 to 10 microns. The test technique and results to check the boresight alignment of these two subsystems by scanning the solar disk will be reported. The boresight alignment for both the azimuth and elevation axes of the two detector subsystems is verified using this technique.

  6. Gold Alignment and Internal Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.

    1997-07-01

    The measures of mechanical alignment are obtained for both prolate and oblate grains whose temperatures are comparable to the grain kinetic energy divided by k, the Boltzmann constant. For such grains, the alignment of angular momentum, J, with the axis of maximal inertia, a, is only partial, which substantially alters the mechanical alignment as compared with the results obtained by Lazarian and Roberge, Hanany, & Messinger under the assumption of perfect alignment. We also describe Gold alignment when the Barnett dissipation is suppressed and derive an analytical expression that relates the measure of alignment to the parameters of grain nonsphericity and the direction of the gas-grain drift. This solution provides the lower limit for the measure of alignment, while the upper limit is given by the method derived by Lazarian. Using the results of a recent study of incomplete internal relaxation by Lazarian & Roberge, we find measures of alignment for the whole range of ratios of grain rotational energy to kTs, where Ts is the grain temperature. To describe alignment for mildly supersonic drifts, we suggest an analytical approach that provides good correspondence with the results of direct numerical simulations by Roberge, Hanany, & Messinger. We also extend our approach to account for simultaneous action of the Gold and Davis-Greenstein mechanisms.

  7. Product Grammars for Alignment and Folding.

    PubMed

    Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L; Stadler, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    We develop a theory of algebraic operations over linear and context-free grammars that makes it possible to combine simple "atomic" grammars operating on single sequences into complex, multi-dimensional grammars. We demonstrate the utility of this framework by constructing the search spaces of complex alignment problems on multiple input sequences explicitly as algebraic expressions of very simple one-dimensional grammars. In particular, we provide a fully worked frameshift-aware, semiglobal DNA-protein alignment algorithm whose grammar is composed of products of small, atomic grammars. The compiler accompanying our theory makes it easy to experiment with the combination of multiple grammars and different operations. Composite grammars can be written out in L(A)T(E)X for documentation and as a guide to implementation of dynamic programming algorithms. An embedding in Haskell as a domain-specific language makes the theory directly accessible to writing and using grammar products without the detour of an external compiler. Software and supplemental files available here: http://www.bioinf. uni-leipzig.de/Software/gramprod/. PMID:26357262

  8. A two-stage approach to automatic face alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Ai, Haizhou; Huang, Gaofeng

    2003-09-01

    Face alignment is very important in face recognition, modeling and synthesis. Many approaches have been developed for this purpose, such as ASM, AAM, DAM and TC-ASM. After a brief review of all those methods, it is pointed out that these approaches all require a manual initialization to the positions of the landmarks and are very sensitive to it, and despite of all those devoted works the outline of a human face remains a difficult task to be localized precisely. In this paper, a two-stage method to achieve frontal face alignment fully automatically is introduced. The first stage is landmarks' initialization called coarse face alignment. In this stage, after a face is detected by an Adaboost cascade face detector, we use Simple Direct Appearance Model (SDAM) to locate a few key points of human face from the texture according which all the initial landmarks are setup as the coarse alignment. The second stage is fine face alignment that uses a variant of AAM method in which shape variation is predicted from texture reconstruction error together with an embedded ASM refinement for the outline landmarks of the face to achieve the fine alignment. Experiments on a face database of 500 people show that this method is very effective for practical applications.

  9. Alignment Test Results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope Mirrors in the Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASAs Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the SI detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  10. SAS-Pro: Simultaneous Residue Assignment and Structure Superposition for Protein Structure Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shweta B.; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is the problem of determining an assignment between the amino-acid residues of two given proteins in a way that maximizes a measure of similarity between the two superimposed protein structures. By identifying geometric similarities, structure alignment algorithms provide critical insights into protein functional similarities. Existing structure alignment tools adopt a two-stage approach to structure alignment by decoupling and iterating between the assignment evaluation and structure superposition problems. We introduce a novel approach, SAS-Pro, which addresses the assignment evaluation and structure superposition simultaneously by formulating the alignment problem as a single bilevel optimization problem. The new formulation does not require the sequentiality constraints, thus generalizing the scope of the alignment methodology to include non-sequential protein alignments. We employ derivative-free optimization methodologies for searching for the global optimum of the highly nonlinear and non-differentiable RMSD function encountered in the proposed model. Alignments obtained with SAS-Pro have better RMSD values and larger lengths than those obtained from other alignment tools. For non-sequential alignment problems, SAS-Pro leads to alignments with high degree of similarity with known reference alignments. The source code of SAS-Pro is available for download at http://eudoxus.cheme.cmu.edu/saspro/SAS-Pro.html. PMID:22662161

  11. [The design of handheld fast ECG detector].

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Zhang, Genxuan; Tsau, Young

    2013-03-01

    A new handheld fast ECG detector based on low gain amplifier, the high resolution analog to digital converter, the real-time digital filter, fast P-QRS-T wave detection and abstraction algorithm was designed. The results showed that the ECG detector can meet the requirements of fast detecting heart rate and ECG P-QRS-T waveforms. PMID:23777065

  12. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  13. Rapid Quantification of 3D Collagen Fiber Alignment and Fiber Intersection Correlations with High Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Bloom, Alexander B.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancers aggressively reorganize collagen in their microenvironment. For example, radially orientated collagen fibers have been observed surrounding tumor cell clusters in vivo. The degree of fiber alignment, as a consequence of this remodeling, has often been difficult to quantify. In this paper, we present an easy to implement algorithm for accurate detection of collagen fiber orientation in a rapid pixel-wise manner. This algorithm quantifies the alignment of both computer generated and actual collagen fiber networks of varying degrees of alignment within 5°°. We also present an alternative easy method to calculate the alignment index directly from the standard deviation of fiber orientation. Using this quantitative method for determining collagen alignment, we demonstrate that the number of collagen fiber intersections has a negative correlation with the degree of fiber alignment. This decrease in intersections of aligned fibers could explain why cells move more rapidly along aligned fibers than unaligned fibers, as previously reported. Overall, our paper provides an easier, more quantitative and quicker way to quantify fiber orientation and alignment, and presents a platform in studying effects of matrix and cellular properties on fiber alignment in complex 3D environments. PMID:26158674

  14. Mobile and replicated alignment of arrays in data-parallel programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    When a data-parallel language like FORTRAN 90 is compiled for a distributed-memory machine, aggregate data objects (such as arrays) are distributed across the processor memories. The mapping determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. A common approach is to break the mapping into two stages: first, an alignment that maps all the objects to an abstract template, and then a distribution that maps the template to the processors. We solve two facets of the problem of finding alignments that reduce residual communication: we determine alignments that vary in loops, and objects that should have replicated alignments. We show that loop-dependent mobile alignment is sometimes necessary for optimum performance, and we provide algorithms with which a compiler can determine good mobile alignments for objects within do loops. We also identify situations in which replicated alignment is either required by the program itself (via spread operations) or can be used to improve performance. We propose an algorithm based on network flow that determines which objects to replicate so as to minimize the total amount of broadcast communication in replication. This work on mobile and replicated alignment extends our earlier work on determining static alignment.

  15. Rapid Quantification of 3D Collagen Fiber Alignment and Fiber Intersection Correlations with High Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng; Bloom, Alexander B; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancers aggressively reorganize collagen in their microenvironment. For example, radially orientated collagen fibers have been observed surrounding tumor cell clusters in vivo. The degree of fiber alignment, as a consequence of this remodeling, has often been difficult to quantify. In this paper, we present an easy to implement algorithm for accurate detection of collagen fiber orientation in a rapid pixel-wise manner. This algorithm quantifies the alignment of both computer generated and actual collagen fiber networks of varying degrees of alignment within 5°°. We also present an alternative easy method to calculate the alignment index directly from the standard deviation of fiber orientation. Using this quantitative method for determining collagen alignment, we demonstrate that the number of collagen fiber intersections has a negative correlation with the degree of fiber alignment. This decrease in intersections of aligned fibers could explain why cells move more rapidly along aligned fibers than unaligned fibers, as previously reported. Overall, our paper provides an easier, more quantitative and quicker way to quantify fiber orientation and alignment, and presents a platform in studying effects of matrix and cellular properties on fiber alignment in complex 3D environments. PMID:26158674

  16. Pairagon: a highly accurate, HMM-based cDNA-to-genome aligner

    PubMed Central

    Lu, David V.; Brown, Randall H.; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Brent, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: The most accurate way to determine the intron–exon structures in a genome is to align spliced cDNA sequences to the genome. Thus, cDNA-to-genome alignment programs are a key component of most annotation pipelines. The scoring system used to choose the best alignment is a primary determinant of alignment accuracy, while heuristics that prevent consideration of certain alignments are a primary determinant of runtime and memory usage. Both accuracy and speed are important considerations in choosing an alignment algorithm, but scoring systems have received much less attention than heuristics. Results: We present Pairagon, a pair hidden Markov model based cDNA-to-genome alignment program, as the most accurate aligner for sequences with high- and low-identity levels. We conducted a series of experiments testing alignment accuracy with varying sequence identity. We first created ‘perfect’ simulated cDNA sequences by splicing the sequences of exons in the reference genome sequences of fly and human. The complete reference genome sequences were then mutated to various degrees using a realistic mutation simulator and the perfect cDNAs were aligned to them using Pairagon and 12 other aligners. To validate these results with natural sequences, we performed cross-species alignment using orthologous transcripts from human, mouse and rat. We found that aligner accuracy is heavily dependent on sequence identity. For sequences with 100% identity, Pairagon achieved accuracy levels of >99.6%, with one quarter of the errors of any other aligner. Furthermore, for human/mouse alignments, which are only 85% identical, Pairagon achieved 87% accuracy, higher than any other aligner. Availability: Pairagon source and executables are freely available at http://mblab.wustl.edu/software/pairagon/ Contact: davidlu@wustl.edu; brent@cse.wustl.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19414532

  17. Drive alignment pays maintenance dividends

    SciTech Connect

    Fedder, R.

    2008-12-15

    Proper alignment of the motor and gear drive on conveying and processing equipment will result in longer bearing and coupling life, along with lower maintenance costs. Selecting an alignment free drive package instead of a traditional foot mounted drive and motor is a major advancement toward these goals. 4 photos.

  18. Lexical alignment in triadic communication

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Anouschka; Gaspers, Judith; Thiele, Kristina; Stenneken, Prisca; Cimiano, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Lexical alignment refers to the adoption of one’s interlocutor’s lexical items. Accounts of the mechanisms underlying such lexical alignment differ (among other aspects) in the role assigned to addressee-centered behavior. In this study, we used a triadic communicative situation to test which factors may modulate the extent to which participants’ lexical alignment reflects addressee-centered behavior. Pairs of naïve participants played a picture matching game and received information about the order in which pictures were to be matched from a voice over headphones. On critical trials, participants did or did not hear a name for the picture to be matched next over headphones. Importantly, when the voice over headphones provided a name, it did not match the name that the interlocutor had previously used to describe the object. Participants overwhelmingly used the word that the voice over headphones provided. This result points to non-addressee-centered behavior and is discussed in terms of disrupting alignment with the interlocutor as well as in terms of establishing alignment with the voice over headphones. In addition, the type of picture (line drawing vs. tangram shape) independently modulated lexical alignment, such that participants showed more lexical alignment to their interlocutor for (more ambiguous) tangram shapes compared to line drawings. Overall, the results point to a rather large role for non-addressee-centered behavior during lexical alignment. PMID:25762955

  19. Semiautomated improvement of RNA alignments

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Ebbe S.; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Knudsen, Bjarne; Kristensen, Susie E.; Havgaard, Jakob H.; Torarinsson, Elfar; Larsen, Niels; Zwieb, Christian; Sestoft, Peter; Kjems, Jørgen; Gorodkin, Jan

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a semiautomated RNA sequence editor (SARSE) that integrates tools for analyzing RNA alignments. The editor highlights different properties of the alignment by color, and its integrated analysis tools prevent the introduction of errors when doing alignment editing. SARSE readily connects to external tools to provide a flexible semiautomatic editing environment. A new method, Pcluster, is introduced for dividing the sequences of an RNA alignment into subgroups with secondary structure differences. Pcluster was used to evaluate 574 seed alignments obtained from the Rfam database and we identified 71 alignments with significant prediction of inconsistent base pairs and 102 alignments with significant prediction of novel base pairs. Four RNA families were used to illustrate how SARSE can be used to manually or automatically correct the inconsistent base pairs detected by Pcluster: the mir-399 RNA, vertebrate telomase RNA (vert-TR), bacterial transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), and the signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA. The general use of the method is illustrated by the ability to accommodate pseudoknots and handle even large and divergent RNA families. The open architecture of the SARSE editor makes it a flexible tool to improve all RNA alignments with relatively little human intervention. Online documentation and software are available at http://sarse.ku.dk. PMID:17804647

  20. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  1. On the alignment of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-F.

    1986-06-01

    Taking the two Savage-Bolton 5 deg x 5 deg regions of optical quasar patrol as samples, a systematic analysis of the number of aligned quasars was made and compared with the random data generated by Monte Carlo method. The statistical result is that, at least for these two samples, there is no clear evidence for alignment.

  2. On the alignment of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xing-fen

    1986-06-01

    Taking the two Savage-Bolton 5° × 5° regions of optical quasar patrol as samples, I made a systematic analysis of the number of aligned quasars and compared with the random data generated by Monte Carlo method. The statistical result is that, at least for these two samples, there is no clear evidence for alignment.

  3. Self-Aligned Guard Rings For Schottky-Barrier Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1990-01-01

    Proposed self-aligned guard ring increases active area of Schottky-barrier infrared detector. Concept developed for silicide Schottky-barrier diodes in which platinum silicide or iridium silicide Schottky-contacts provide cutoff wavelengths of about 6 or 10 micrometers. Grid of silicon dioxide doped with phosphorus etched on silicon wafer, and phosphorus from grid diffused into substrate, creating n-type guard rings. Silicide layers formed in open areas of grid. Overlap of guard rings and silicide layers small.

  4. Space Mirror Alignment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; McKinney, Colin; Smythe, Robert F.; Palmer, Dean L.

    2011-01-01

    An optical alignment mirror mechanism (AMM) has been developed with angular positioning accuracy of +/-0.2 arcsec. This requires the mirror s linear positioning actuators to have positioning resolutions of +/-112 nm to enable the mirror to meet the angular tip/tilt accuracy requirement. Demonstrated capabilities are 0.1 arc-sec angular mirror positioning accuracy, which translates into linear positioning resolutions at the actuator of 50 nm. The mechanism consists of a structure with sets of cross-directional flexures that enable the mirror s tip and tilt motion, a mirror with its kinematic mount, and two linear actuators. An actuator comprises a brushless DC motor, a linear ball screw, and a piezoelectric brake that holds the mirror s position while the unit is unpowered. An interferometric linear position sensor senses the actuator s position. The AMMs were developed for an Astrometric Beam Combiner (ABC) optical bench, which is part of an interferometer development. Custom electronics were also developed to accommodate the presence of multiple AMMs within the ABC and provide a compact, all-in-one solution to power and control the AMMs.

  5. Alignment positioning mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantasia, Peter M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An alignment positioning mechanism for correcting and compensating for misalignment of structures to be coupled is disclosed. The mechanism comprises a power screw with a base portion and a threaded shank portion. A mounting fixture is provided for rigidly coupling said base portion to the mounting interface of a supporting structure with the axis of the screw perpendicular thereto. A traveling ball nut threaded on the power screw is formed with an external annular arcuate surface configured in the form of a spherical segment and enclosed by a ball nut housing with a conforming arcuate surface for permitting gimballed motion thereon. The ball nut housing is provided with a mounting surface which is positionable in cooperable engagement with the mounting interface of a primary structure to be coupled to the supporting structure. Cooperative means are provided on the ball nut and ball nut housing, respectively, for positioning the ball nut and ball nut housing in relative gimballed position within a predetermined range of relative angular relationship whereby severe structural stresses due to unequal loadings and undesirable bending moments on the mechanism are avoided.

  6. Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing Algorithm for Coarse Phasing Segmented Mirror Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spechler, Joshua A.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.

    2013-01-01

    Segment mirror phasing, a critical step of segment mirror alignment, requires the ability to sense and correct the relative pistons between segments from up to a few hundred microns to a fraction of wavelength in order to bring the mirror system to its full diffraction capability. When sampling the aperture of a telescope, using auto-collimating flats (ACFs) is more economical. The performance of a telescope with a segmented primary mirror strongly depends on how well those primary mirror segments can be phased. One such process to phase primary mirror segments in the axial piston direction is dispersed fringe sensing (DFS). DFS technology can be used to co-phase the ACFs. DFS is essentially a signal fitting and processing operation. It is an elegant method of coarse phasing segmented mirrors. DFS performance accuracy is dependent upon careful calibration of the system as well as other factors such as internal optical alignment, system wavefront errors, and detector quality. Novel improvements to the algorithm have led to substantial enhancements in DFS performance. The Advanced Dispersed Fringe Sensing (ADFS) Algorithm is designed to reduce the sensitivity to calibration errors by determining the optimal fringe extraction line. Applying an angular extraction line dithering procedure and combining this dithering process with an error function while minimizing the phase term of the fitted signal, defines in essence the ADFS algorithm.

  7. Genetic algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Bayer, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are mathematical, highly parallel, adaptive search procedures (i.e., problem solving methods) based loosely on the processes of natural genetics and Darwinian survival of the fittest. Basic genetic algorithms concepts are introduced, genetic algorithm applications are introduced, and results are presented from a project to develop a software tool that will enable the widespread use of genetic algorithm technology.

  8. Alignment-Annotator web server: rendering and annotating sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    Gille, Christoph; Fähling, Michael; Weyand, Birgit; Wieland, Thomas; Gille, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Alignment-Annotator is a novel web service designed to generate interactive views of annotated nucleotide and amino acid sequence alignments (i) de novo and (ii) embedded in other software. All computations are performed at server side. Interactivity is implemented in HTML5, a language native to web browsers. The alignment is initially displayed using default settings and can be modified with the graphical user interfaces. For example, individual sequences can be reordered or deleted using drag and drop, amino acid color code schemes can be applied and annotations can be added. Annotations can be made manually or imported (BioDAS servers, the UniProt, the Catalytic Site Atlas and the PDB). Some edits take immediate effect while others require server interaction and may take a few seconds to execute. The final alignment document can be downloaded as a zip-archive containing the HTML files. Because of the use of HTML the resulting interactive alignment can be viewed on any platform including Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, Android and iOS in any standard web browser. Importantly, no plugins nor Java are required and therefore Alignment-Anotator represents the first interactive browser-based alignment visualization. Availability: http://www.bioinformatics.org/strap/aa/ and http://strap.charite.de/aa/. PMID:24813445

  9. Testing the tidal alignment model of galaxy intrinsic alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Seljak, Uroš; McQuinn, Matthew E-mail: mmcquinn@berkeley.edu

    2011-05-01

    Weak gravitational lensing has become a powerful probe of large-scale structure and cosmological parameters. Precision weak lensing measurements require an understanding of the intrinsic alignment of galaxy ellipticities, which can in turn inform models of galaxy formation. It is hypothesized that elliptical galaxies align with the background tidal field and that this alignment mechanism dominates the correlation between ellipticities on cosmological scales (in the absence of lensing). We use recent large-scale structure measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to test this picture with several statistics: (1) the correlation between ellipticity and galaxy overdensity, w{sub g+}; (2) the intrinsic alignment auto-correlation functions; (3) the correlation functions of curl-free, E, and divergence-free, B, modes, the latter of which is zero in the linear tidal alignment theory; (4) the alignment correlation function, w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ), a recently developed statistic that generalizes the galaxy correlation function to account for the angle between the galaxy separation vector and the principle axis of ellipticity. We show that recent measurements are largely consistent with the tidal alignment model and discuss dependence on galaxy luminosity. In addition, we show that at linear order the tidal alignment model predicts that the angular dependence of w{sub g}(r{sub p},θ) is simply w{sub g+}(r{sub p})cos (2θ) and that this dependence is consistent with recent measurements. We also study how stochastic nonlinear contributions to galaxy ellipticity impact these statistics. We find that a significant fraction of the observed LRG ellipticity can be explained by alignment with the tidal field on scales ∼> 10 \\hMpc. These considerations are relevant to galaxy formation and evolution.

  10. A near-Infrared SETI Experiment: Alignment and Astrometric precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duenas, Andres; Maire, Jerome; Wright, Shelley; Drake, Frank D.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Siemion, Andrew; Stone, Remington P. S.; Tallis, Melisa; Treffers, Richard R.; Werthimer, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Beginning in March 2015, a Near-InfraRed Optical SETI (NIROSETI) instrument aiming to search for fast nanosecond laser pulses, has been commissioned on the Nickel 1m-telescope at Lick Observatory. The NIROSETI instrument makes use of an optical guide camera, SONY ICX694 CCD from PointGrey, to align our selected sources into two 200µm near-infrared Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) with a field-of-view of 2.5"x2.5" each. These APD detectors operate at very fast bandwidths and are able to detect pulse widths extending down into the nanosecond range. Aligning sources onto these relatively small detectors requires characterizing the guide camera plate scale, static optical distortion solution, and relative orientation with respect to the APD detectors. We determined the guide camera plate scale as 55.9+- 2.7 milli-arcseconds/pixel and magnitude limit of 18.15mag (+1.07/-0.58) in V-band. We will present the full distortion solution of the guide camera, orientation, and our alignment method between the camera and the two APDs, and will discuss target selection within the NIROSETI observational campaign, including coordination with Breakthrough Listen.

  11. An Overview of DNA Microarray Grid Alignment and Foreground Separation Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajcsy, Peter

    2006-12-01

    This paper overviews DNA microarray grid alignment and foreground separation approaches. Microarray grid alignment and foreground separation are the basic processing steps of DNA microarray images that affect the quality of gene expression information, and hence impact our confidence in any data-derived biological conclusions. Thus, understanding microarray data processing steps becomes critical for performing optimal microarray data analysis. In the past, the grid alignment and foreground separation steps have not been covered extensively in the survey literature. We present several classifications of existing algorithms, and describe the fundamental principles of these algorithms. Challenges related to automation and reliability of processed image data are outlined at the end of this overview paper.

  12. High precision beam alignment of electromagnetic wigglers

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Qiu, X.Z.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of Free-Electron Lasers depends critically on the quality of the alignment of the electron beam to the wiggler's magnetic axis and the deviation of this axis from a straight fine. The measurement of the electron beam position requires numerous beam position monitors in the wiggler, where space is at premium. The beam position measurement is used to set beam steerers for an orbit correction in the wiggler. The authors propose an alternative high precision alignment method in which one or two external Beam Position Monitors (BPM) are used. In this technique, the field in the electro-wiggler is modulated section by section and the beam position movement at the external BPM is detected in synchronism with the modulation. A beam offset at the modulated beam section will produce a modulation of the beam position at the detector that is a function of the of the beam offset and the absolute value of the modulation current. The wiggler errors produce a modulation that is a function of the modulation current. It will be shown that this method allows the detection and correction of the beam position at each section in the presence of wiggler errors with a good resolution. Furthermore, it allows one to measure the first and second integrals of the wiggler error over each wiggler section. Lastly, provided that wiggler sections can be degaussed effectively, one can test the deviation of the wiggler's magnetic axis from a straight line.

  13. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  14. Non-rigid alignment in electron tomography in materials science.

    PubMed

    Printemps, Tony; Bernier, Nicolas; Bleuet, Pierre; Mula, Guido; Hervé, Lionel

    2016-09-01

    Electron tomography is a key technique that enables the visualization of an object in three dimensions with a resolution of about a nanometre. High-quality 3D reconstruction is possible thanks to the latest compressed sensing algorithms and/or better alignment and preprocessing of the 2D projections. Rigid alignment of 2D projections is routine in electron tomography. However, it cannot correct misalignments induced by (i) deformations of the sample due to radiation damage or (ii) drifting of the sample during the acquisition of an image in scanning transmission electron microscope mode. In both cases, those misalignments can give rise to artefacts in the reconstruction. We propose a simple-to-implement non-rigid alignment technique to correct those artefacts. This technique is particularly suited for needle-shaped samples in materials science. It is initiated by a rigid alignment of the projections and it is then followed by several rigid alignments of different parts of the projections. Piecewise linear deformations are applied to each projection to force them to simultaneously satisfy the rigid alignments of the different parts. The efficiency of this technique is demonstrated on three samples, an intermetallic sample with deformation misalignments due to a high electron dose typical to spectroscopic electron tomography, a porous silicon sample with an extremely thin end particularly sensitive to electron beam and another porous silicon sample that was drifting during image acquisitions. PMID:27018779

  15. Unrooted unordered homeomorphic subtree alignment of RNA trees.

    PubMed

    Milo, Nimrod; Zakov, Shay; Katzenelson, Erez; Bachmat, Eitan; Dinitz, Yefim; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal

    2013-01-01

    : We generalize some current approaches for RNA tree alignment, which are traditionally confined to ordered rooted mappings, to also consider unordered unrooted mappings. We define the Homeomorphic Subtree Alignment problem (HSA), and present a new algorithm which applies to several modes, combining global or local, ordered or unordered, and rooted or unrooted tree alignments. Our algorithm generalizes previous algorithms that either solved the problem in an asymmetric manner, or were restricted to the rooted and/or ordered cases. Focusing here on the most general unrooted unordered case, we show that for input trees T and S, our algorithm has an O(nTnS + min(dT,dS)LTLS) time complexity, where nT,LT and dT are the number of nodes, the number of leaves, and the maximum node degree in T, respectively (satisfying dT ≤ LT ≤ nT), and similarly for nS,LS and dS with respect to the tree S. This improves the time complexity of previous algorithms for less general variants of the problem.In order to obtain this time bound for HSA, we developed new algorithms for a generalized variant of the Min-Cost Bipartite Matching problem (MCM), as well as to two derivatives of this problem, entitled All-Cavity-MCM and All-Pairs-Cavity-MCM. For two input sets of size n and m, where n ≤ m, MCM and both its cavity derivatives are solved in O(n3 + nm) time, without the usage of priority queues (e.g. Fibonacci heaps) or other complex data structures. This gives the first cubic time algorithm for All-Pairs-Cavity-MCM, and improves the running times of MCM and All-Cavity-MCM problems in the unbalanced case where n ≪ m.We implemented the algorithm (in all modes mentioned above) as a graphical software tool which computes and displays similarities between secondary structures of RNA given as input, and employed it to a preliminary experiment in which we ran all-against-all inter-family pairwise alignments of RNAse P and Hammerhead RNA

  16. Advanced Mask Aligner Lithography (AMALITH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bramati, Arianna

    2015-03-01

    Mask aligner lithography is very attractive for less-critical lithography layers and is widely used for LED, display, CMOS image sensor, micro-fluidics and MEMS manufacturing. Mask aligner lithography is also a preferred choice the semiconductor back-end for 3D-IC, TSV interconnects, advanced packaging (AdP) and wafer-level-packaging (WLP). Mask aligner lithography is a mature technique based on shadow printing and has not much changed since the 1980s. In shadow printing lithography a geometric pattern is transferred by free-space propagation from a photomask to a photosensitive layer on a wafer. The inherent simplicity of the pattern transfer offers ease of operation, low maintenance, moderate capital expenditure, high wafers-per-hour (WPH) throughput, and attractive cost-of-ownership (COO). Advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) comprises different measures to improve shadow printing lithography beyond current limits. The key enabling technology for AMALITH is a novel light integrator systems, referred to as MO Exposure Optics® (MOEO). MOEO allows to fully control and shape the properties of the illumination light in a mask aligner. Full control is the base for accurate simulation and optimization of the shadow printing process (computational lithography). Now photolithography enhancement techniques like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC), phase masks (AAPSM), half-tone lithography and Talbot lithography could be used in mask aligner lithography. We summarize the recent progress in advanced mask aligner lithography (AMALITH) and discuss possible measures to further improve shadow printing lithography.

  17. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  18. MAMA Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  19. Score distributions of gapped multiple sequence alignments down to the low-probability tail.

    PubMed

    Fieth, Pascal; Hartmann, Alexander K

    2016-08-01

    Assessing the significance of alignment scores of optimally aligned DNA or amino acid sequences can be achieved via the knowledge of the score distribution of random sequences. But this requires obtaining the distribution in the biologically relevant high-scoring region, where the probabilities are exponentially small. For gapless local alignments of infinitely long sequences this distribution is known analytically to follow a Gumbel distribution. Distributions for gapped local alignments and global alignments of finite lengths can only be obtained numerically. To obtain result for the small-probability region, specific statistical mechanics-based rare-event algorithms can be applied. In previous studies, this was achieved for pairwise alignments. They showed that, contrary to results from previous simple sampling studies, strong deviations from the Gumbel distribution occur in case of finite sequence lengths. Here we extend the studies to multiple sequence alignments with gaps, which are much more relevant for practical applications in molecular biology. We study the distributions of scores over a large range of the support, reaching probabilities as small as 10^{-160}, for global and local (sum-of-pair scores) multiple alignments. We find that even after suitable rescaling, eliminating the sequence-length dependence, the distributions for multiple alignment differ from the pairwise alignment case. Furthermore, we also show that the previously discussed Gaussian correction to the Gumbel distribution needs to be refined, also for the case of pairwise alignments. PMID:27627266

  20. Aligning for Innovation - Alignment Strategy to Drive Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Hurel; Teltschik, David; Bussey, Horace, Jr.; Moy, James

    2010-01-01

    With the sudden need for innovation that will help the country achieve its long-term space exploration objectives, the question of whether NASA is aligned effectively to drive the innovation that it so desperately needs to take space exploration to the next level should be entertained. Authors such as Robert Kaplan and David North have noted that companies that use a formal system for implementing strategy consistently outperform their peers. They have outlined a six-stage management systems model for implementing strategy, which includes the aligning of the organization towards its objectives. This involves the alignment of the organization from the top down. This presentation will explore the impacts of existing U.S. industrial policy on technological innovation; assess the current NASA organizational alignment and its impacts on driving technological innovation; and finally suggest an alternative approach that may drive the innovation needed to take the world to the next level of space exploration, with NASA truly leading the way.

  1. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  2. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  3. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  4. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  5. Multibeam field emission x-ray system with half-scan reconstruction algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yang; Yu Hengyong; Cao Guohua; Zhao Jun; Wang Ge; Zhou, Otto

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this article, the authors propose a multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) system along with a half-scan fan-beam reconstruction algorithm. Methods: The proposed system consists of a linear CNT-based MBFEX source array, a single large area detector that is divided into same number of segments as the number of x-ray beams, a multihole collimator that aligns each beam with a corresponding detector segment, and a sample rotation stage. The collimator is placed between the source and the object to restrict the x-ray radiations through the target object only. In this design, all the x-ray beams are activated simultaneously to provide multiple projection views of the object. The detector is virtually segmented and synchronized with the x-ray exposure and the physiological signals when gating is involved. The transmitted x-ray intensity from each beam is collected by the corresponding segment on the detector. After each exposure, the object is rotated by a step angle until sufficient data set is collected. The half-scan reconstruction formula for MBFEX system is derived from the conventional filtered backprojection algorithm. To demonstrate the advantages of the system and method in reducing motion artifacts, the authors performed simulations with both standard and dynamic Shepp-Logan phantoms. Results: The numerical results indicate that the proposed multibeam system and the associated half-scan algorithm can effectively reduce the scanning time and improve the image quality for a time-varying object. Conclusions: The MBFEX technique offers an opportunity for the innovation of multisource imaging system.

  6. Optimization of segmented alignment marks for advanced semiconductor fabrication processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Lu, Zhijian G.; Williams, Gary; Zach, Franz X.; Liegl, Bernhard

    2001-08-01

    The continued downscaling of semiconductor fabrication ground rule has imposed increasingly tighter overlay tolerances, which becomes very challenging at the 100 nm lithographic node. Such tight tolerances will require very high performance in alignment. Past experiences indicate that good alignment depends largely on alignment signal quality, which, however, can be strongly affected by chip design and various fabrication processes. Under some extreme circumstances, they can even be reduced to the non- usable limit. Therefore, a systematic understanding of alignment marks and a method to predict alignment performance based on mark design are necessary. Motivated by this, we have performed a detailed study of bright field segmented alignment marks that are used in current state-of- the-art fabrication processes. We find that alignment marks at different lithographic levels can be organized into four basic categories: trench mark, metal mark, damascene mark, and combo mark. The basic principles of these four types of marks turn out to be so similar that they can be characterized within the theoretical framework of a simple model based on optical gratings. An analytic expression has been developed for such model and it has been tested using computer simulation with the rigorous time-domain finite- difference (TD-FD) algorithm TEMPEST. Consistent results have been obtained; indicating that mark signal can be significantly improved through the optimization of mark lateral dimensions, such as segment pitch and segment width. We have also compared simulation studies against experimental data for alignment marks at one typical lithographic level and a good agreement is found.

  7. Detection of Extensive Cosmic Air Showers by Small Scintillation Detectors with Wavelength-Shifting Fibres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiola, Salvatore; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    A set of three small scintillation detectors was employed to measure correlated events due to the passage of cosmic muons originating from extensive air showers. The coincidence rate between (any) two detectors was extracted as a function of their relative distance. The difference between the arrival times in three non-aligned detectors was used…

  8. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, Charles R.; Hammond, Robert B.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  9. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, C.R.; Hammond, R.B.

    The disclosure related to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  10. Theory of grain alignment in molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Wayne G.

    1993-01-01

    Research accomplishments are presented and include the following: (1) mathematical theory of grain alignment; (2) super-paramagnetic alignment of molecular cloud grains; and (3) theory of grain alignment by ambipolar diffusion.

  11. Protein structure alignment beyond spatial proximity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Ma, Jianzhu; Peng, Jian; Xu, Jinbo

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is a fundamental problem in computational structure biology. Many programs have been developed for automatic protein structure alignment, but most of them align two protein structures purely based upon geometric similarity without considering evolutionary and functional relationship. As such, these programs may generate structure alignments which are not very biologically meaningful from the evolutionary perspective. This paper presents a novel method DeepAlign for automatic pairwise protein structure alignment. DeepAlign aligns two protein structures using not only spatial proximity of equivalent residues (after rigid-body superposition), but also evolutionary relationship and hydrogen-bonding similarity. Experimental results show that DeepAlign can generate structure alignments much more consistent with manually-curated alignments than other automatic tools especially when proteins under consideration are remote homologs. These results imply that in addition to geometric similarity, evolutionary information and hydrogen-bonding similarity are essential to aligning two protein structures. PMID:23486213

  12. Plastic neutron detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Tiffany M.S; King, Michael J.; Doty, F. Patrick

    2008-12-01

    This work demonstrated the feasibility and limitations of semiconducting {pi}-conjugated organic polymers for fast neutron detection via n-p elastic scattering. Charge collection in conjugated polymers in the family of substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene)s (PPV) was evaluated using band-edge laser and proton beam ionization. These semiconducting materials can have high H/C ratio, wide bandgap, high resistivity and high dielectric strength, allowing high field operation with low leakage current and capacitance noise. The materials can also be solution cast, allowing possible low-cost radiation detector fabrication and scale-up. However, improvements in charge collection efficiency are necessary in order to achieve single particle detection with a reasonable sensitivity. The work examined processing variables, additives and environmental effects. Proton beam exposure was used to verify particle sensitivity and radiation hardness to a total exposure of approximately 1 MRAD. Conductivity exhibited sensitivity to temperature and humidity. The effects of molecular ordering were investigated in stretched films, and FTIR was used to quantify the order in films using the Hermans orientation function. The photoconductive response approximately doubled for stretch-aligned films with the stretch direction parallel to the electric field direction, when compared to as-cast films. The response was decreased when the stretch direction was orthogonal to the electric field. Stretch-aligned films also exhibited a significant sensitivity to the polarization of the laser excitation, whereas drop-cast films showed none, indicating improved mobility along the backbone, but poor {pi}-overlap in the orthogonal direction. Drop-cast composites of PPV with substituted fullerenes showed approximately a two order of magnitude increase in photoresponse, nearly independent of nanoparticle concentration. Interestingly, stretch-aligned composite films showed a substantial decrease in

  13. Fixture for aligning motor assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shervington, Roger M.; Vaghani, Vallabh V.; Vanek, Laurence D.; Christensen, Scott A.

    2009-12-08

    An alignment fixture includes a rotor fixture, a stator fixture and a sensor system which measures a rotational displacement therebetween. The fixture precisely measures rotation of a generator stator assembly away from a NULL position referenced by a unique reference spline on the rotor shaft. By providing an adjustable location of the stator assembly within the housing, the magnetic axes within each generator shall be aligned to a predetermined and controlled tolerance between the generator interface mounting pin and the reference spline on the rotor shaft. Once magnetically aligned, each generator is essentially a line replaceable unit which may be readily mounted to any input of a multi-generator gearbox assembly with the assurance that the magnetic alignment will be within a predetermined tolerance.

  14. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  15. Well-pump alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  16. In-flight alignment using H ∞ filter for strapdown INS on aircraft.

    PubMed

    Pei, Fu-Jun; Liu, Xuan; Zhu, Li

    2014-01-01

    In-flight alignment is an effective way to improve the accuracy and speed of initial alignment for strapdown inertial navigation system (INS). During the aircraft flight, strapdown INS alignment was disturbed by lineal and angular movements of the aircraft. To deal with the disturbances in dynamic initial alignment, a novel alignment method for SINS is investigated in this paper. In this method, an initial alignment error model of SINS in the inertial frame is established. The observability of the system is discussed by piece-wise constant system (PWCS) theory and observable degree is computed by the singular value decomposition (SVD) theory. It is demonstrated that the system is completely observable, and all the system state parameters can be estimated by optimal filter. Then a H ∞ filter was designed to resolve the uncertainty of measurement noise. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reach a better accuracy under the dynamic disturbance condition. PMID:24511300

  17. In-Flight Alignment Using H∞ Filter for Strapdown INS on Aircraft

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Fu-Jun; Liu, Xuan; Zhu, Li

    2014-01-01

    In-flight alignment is an effective way to improve the accuracy and speed of initial alignment for strapdown inertial navigation system (INS). During the aircraft flight, strapdown INS alignment was disturbed by lineal and angular movements of the aircraft. To deal with the disturbances in dynamic initial alignment, a novel alignment method for SINS is investigated in this paper. In this method, an initial alignment error model of SINS in the inertial frame is established. The observability of the system is discussed by piece-wise constant system (PWCS) theory and observable degree is computed by the singular value decomposition (SVD) theory. It is demonstrated that the system is completely observable, and all the system state parameters can be estimated by optimal filter. Then a H∞ filter was designed to resolve the uncertainty of measurement noise. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reach a better accuracy under the dynamic disturbance condition. PMID:24511300

  18. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of

  19. GATA: A graphic alignment tool for comparative sequenceanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, David A.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2005-01-01

    Several problems exist with current methods used to align DNA sequences for comparative sequence analysis. Most dynamic programming algorithms assume that conserved sequence elements are collinear. This assumption appears valid when comparing orthologous protein coding sequences. Functional constraints on proteins provide strong selective pressure against sequence inversions, and minimize sequence duplications and feature shuffling. For non-coding sequences this collinearity assumption is often invalid. For example, enhancers contain clusters of transcription factor binding sites that change in number, orientation, and spacing during evolution yet the enhancer retains its activity. Dotplot analysis is often used to estimate non-coding sequence relatedness. Yet dot plots do not actually align sequences and thus cannot account well for base insertions or deletions. Moreover, they lack an adequate statistical framework for comparing sequence relatedness and are limited to pairwise comparisons. Lastly, dot plots and dynamic programming text outputs fail to provide an intuitive means for visualizing DNA alignments.

  20. Where Does the Alignment Score Distribution Shape Come from?

    PubMed Central

    Ortet, Philippe; Bastien, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Alignment algorithms are powerful tools for searching for homologous proteins in databases, providing a score for each sequence present in the database. It has been well known for 20 years that the shape of the score distribution looks like an extreme value distribution. The extremely large number of times biologists face this class of distributions raises the question of the evolutionary origin of this probability law. We investigated the possibility of deriving the main properties of sequence alignment score distributions from a basic evolutionary process: a duplication-divergence protein evolution process in a sequence space. Firstly, the distribution of sequences in this space was defined with respect to the genetic distance between sequences. Secondly, we derived a basic relation between the genetic distance and the alignment score. We obtained a novel score probability distribution which is qualitatively very similar to that of Karlin-Altschul but performing better than all other previous model. PMID:21258650

  1. Binocular collimation vs conditional alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, William J.

    2012-10-01

    As binocular enthusiasts share their passion, topics related to collimation abound. Typically, we find how observers, armed only with a jeweler's screwdriver, can "perfectly collimate" his or her binocular, make it "spot on," or other verbiage of similar connotation. Unfortunately, what most are addressing is a form of pseudo-collimation I have referred to since the mid-1970s as "Conditional Alignment." Ignoring the importance of the mechanical axis (hinge) in the alignment process, this "condition," while having the potential to make alignment serviceable, or even outstanding—within a small range of IPD (Interpupillary Distance) settings relative to the user's spatial accommodation (the ability to accept small errors in parallelism of the optical axes)—may take the instrument farther from the 3-axis collimation conscientious manufacturers seek to implement. Becoming more optically savvy—and especially with so many mechanically inferior binoculars entering the marketplace— the consumer contemplating self-repair and alignment has a need to understand the difference between clinical, 3-axis "collimation" (meaning both optical axes are parallel with the axis of the hinge) and "conditional alignment," as differentiated in this paper. Furthermore, I believe there has been a long-standing need for the term "Conditional Alignment," or some equivalent, to be accepted as part of the vernacular of those who use binoculars extensively, whether for professional or recreational activities. Achieving that acceptance is the aim of this paper.

  2. DAPS: Database of Aligned Protein Structures

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mallick, Parag; Rice, Danny; Eisenberg, David

    DAPS is based on the FSSP, DSSP, PDB and CATH databases. There also exists a subset of DAPS known as DDAPS (also pronounced DAPS) - Database of Distant Aligned Protein Structures. It is a database of structures that have low sequence similarity but share a similar fold. There are a number of filters used to make the DDAPS list more useful. The algorithm requires that an FSSP file exists for one of the members of a pair and that the other member is listed in that FSSP file. It requires that each member of the pair be within the CATH database and share a common CAT classification. It also requires that the secondary structure can be determined by DSSP. How is DAPS constructed? We begin with the set of all chains from the current release of the PDB. An all on all search is done on the list to find pairs that have the same fold acoording to both the FSSP and CATH databases and clustered into groups by a representative structure (representative structures have less than 25% sequence identity to each other). For each protein pair, regions aligned by the DALI program are extracted from the corresponding FSSP file, or recomputed using DALI-lite. In domain DAPS, only regions that are called "domains" by CATH are included in the alignment. The amino acid type, secondary structure type, and solvent accessibility are extracted from the DSSP file and written pairwise into the database. DAPS is updated with updates of CATH.[Taken from http://nihserver.mbi.ucla.edu/DAPS/daps_help.html

  3. A line-source method for aligning on-board and other pinhole SPECT systems

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In order to achieve functional and molecular imaging as patients are in position for radiation therapy, a robotic multipinhole SPECT system is being developed. Alignment of the SPECT system—to the linear accelerator (LINAC) coordinate frame and to the coordinate frames of other on-board imaging systems such as cone-beam CT (CBCT)—is essential for target localization and image reconstruction. An alignment method that utilizes line sources and one pinhole projection is proposed and investigated to achieve this goal. Potentially, this method could also be applied to the calibration of the other pinhole SPECT systems. Methods: An alignment model consisting of multiple alignment parameters was developed which maps line sources in three-dimensional (3D) space to their two-dimensional (2D) projections on the SPECT detector. In a computer-simulation study, 3D coordinates of line-sources were defined in a reference room coordinate frame, such as the LINAC coordinate frame. Corresponding 2D line-source projections were generated by computer simulation that included SPECT blurring and noise effects. The Radon transform was utilized to detect angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the line-source projections. Alignment parameters were then estimated by a nonlinear least squares method, based on the α and ρ values and the alignment model. Alignment performance was evaluated as a function of number of line sources, Radon transform accuracy, finite line-source width, intrinsic camera resolution, Poisson noise, and acquisition geometry. Experimental evaluations were performed using a physical line-source phantom and a pinhole-collimated gamma camera attached to a robot. Results: In computer-simulation studies, when there was no error in determining angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the measured projections, six alignment parameters (three translational and three rotational) were estimated perfectly using three line sources. When angles (α) and offsets (ρ) were provided by

  4. A line-source method for aligning on-board and other pinhole SPECT systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Susu; Bowsher, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: In order to achieve functional and molecular imaging as patients are in position for radiation therapy, a robotic multipinhole SPECT system is being developed. Alignment of the SPECT system—to the linear accelerator (LINAC) coordinate frame and to the coordinate frames of other on-board imaging systems such as cone-beam CT (CBCT)—is essential for target localization and image reconstruction. An alignment method that utilizes line sources and one pinhole projection is proposed and investigated to achieve this goal. Potentially, this method could also be applied to the calibration of the other pinhole SPECT systems.Methods: An alignment model consisting of multiple alignment parameters was developed which maps line sources in three-dimensional (3D) space to their two-dimensional (2D) projections on the SPECT detector. In a computer-simulation study, 3D coordinates of line-sources were defined in a reference room coordinate frame, such as the LINAC coordinate frame. Corresponding 2D line-source projections were generated by computer simulation that included SPECT blurring and noise effects. The Radon transform was utilized to detect angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the line-source projections. Alignment parameters were then estimated by a nonlinear least squares method, based on the α and ρ values and the alignment model. Alignment performance was evaluated as a function of number of line sources, Radon transform accuracy, finite line-source width, intrinsic camera resolution, Poisson noise, and acquisition geometry. Experimental evaluations were performed using a physical line-source phantom and a pinhole-collimated gamma camera attached to a robot.Results: In computer-simulation studies, when there was no error in determining angles (α) and offsets (ρ) of the measured projections, six alignment parameters (three translational and three rotational) were estimated perfectly using three line sources. When angles (α) and offsets (ρ) were provided by

  5. Silicon Detector Letter of Intent

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Burrows, P.; Oreglia, M.

    2010-05-26

    This document presents the current status of SiD's effort to develop an optimized design for an experiment at the International Linear Collider. It presents detailed discussions of each of SiD's various subsystems, an overview of the full GEANT4 description of SiD, the status of newly developed tracking and calorimeter reconstruction algorithms, studies of subsystem performance based on these tools, results of physics benchmarking analyses, an estimate of the cost of the detector, and an assessment of the detector R&D needed to provide the technical basis for an optimised SiD.

  6. Fitting alignment tensor components to experimental RDCs, CSAs and RQCs.

    PubMed

    Wirz, Lukas N; Allison, Jane R

    2015-05-01

    Residual dipolar couplings, chemical shift anisotropies and quadrupolar couplings provide information about the orientation of inter-spin vectors and the anisotropic contribution of the local environment to the chemical shifts of nuclei, respectively. Structural interpretation of these observables requires parameterization of their angular dependence in terms of an alignment tensor. We compare and evaluate two algorithms for generating the optimal alignment tensor for a given molecular structure and set of experimental data, namely SVD (Losonczi et al. in J Magn Reson 138(2):334-342, 1999), which scales as [Formula: see text], and the linear least squares algorithm (Press et al. in Numerical recipes in C. The art of scientific computing, 2nd edn. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1997), which scales as [Formula: see text]. PMID:25652903

  7. Proteins comparison through probabilistic optimal structure local alignment

    PubMed Central

    Micale, Giovanni; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba; Ferro, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Multiple local structure comparison helps to identify common structural motifs or conserved binding sites in 3D structures in distantly related proteins. Since there is no best way to compare structures and evaluate the alignment, a wide variety of techniques and different similarity scoring schemes have been proposed. Existing algorithms usually compute the best superposition of two structures or attempt to solve it as an optimization problem in a simpler setting (e.g., considering contact maps or distance matrices). Here, we present PROPOSAL (PROteins comparison through Probabilistic Optimal Structure local ALignment), a stochastic algorithm based on iterative sampling for multiple local alignment of protein structures. Our method can efficiently find conserved motifs across a set of protein structures. Only the distances between all pairs of residues in the structures are computed. To show the accuracy and the effectiveness of PROPOSAL we tested it on a few families of protein structures. We also compared PROPOSAL with two state-of-the-art tools for pairwise local alignment on a dataset of manually annotated motifs. PROPOSAL is available as a Java 2D standalone application or a command line program at http://ferrolab.dmi.unict.it/proposal/proposal.html. PMID:25228906

  8. Current Methods for Automated Filtering of Multiple Sequence Alignments Frequently Worsen Single-Gene Phylogenetic Inference

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ge; Muffato, Matthieu; Ledergerber, Christian; Herrero, Javier; Goldman, Nick; Gil, Manuel; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic inference is generally performed on the basis of multiple sequence alignments (MSA). Because errors in an alignment can lead to errors in tree estimation, there is a strong interest in identifying and removing unreliable parts of the alignment. In recent years several automated filtering approaches have been proposed, but despite their popularity, a systematic and comprehensive comparison of different alignment filtering methods on real data has been lacking. Here, we extend and apply recently introduced phylogenetic tests of alignment accuracy on a large number of gene families and contrast the performance of unfiltered versus filtered alignments in the context of single-gene phylogeny reconstruction. Based on multiple genome-wide empirical and simulated data sets, we show that the trees obtained from filtered MSAs are on average worse than those obtained from unfiltered MSAs. Furthermore, alignment filtering often leads to an increase in the proportion of well-supported branches that are actually wrong. We confirm that our findings hold for a wide range of parameters and methods. Although our results suggest that light filtering (up to 20% of alignment positions) has little impact on tree accuracy and may save some computation time, contrary to widespread practice, we do not generally recommend the use of current alignment filtering methods for phylogenetic inference. By providing a way to rigorously and systematically measure the impact of filtering on alignments, the methodology set forth here will guide the development of better filtering algorithms. PMID:26031838

  9. Current Methods for Automated Filtering of Multiple Sequence Alignments Frequently Worsen Single-Gene Phylogenetic Inference.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ge; Muffato, Matthieu; Ledergerber, Christian; Herrero, Javier; Goldman, Nick; Gil, Manuel; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    Phylogenetic inference is generally performed on the basis of multiple sequence alignments (MSA). Because errors in an alignment can lead to errors in tree estimation, there is a strong interest in identifying and removing unreliable parts of the alignment. In recent years several automated filtering approaches have been proposed, but despite their popularity, a systematic and comprehensive comparison of different alignment filtering methods on real data has been lacking. Here, we extend and apply recently introduced phylogenetic tests of alignment accuracy on a large number of gene families and contrast the performance of unfiltered versus filtered alignments in the context of single-gene phylogeny reconstruction. Based on multiple genome-wide empirical and simulated data sets, we show that the trees obtained from filtered MSAs are on average worse than those obtained from unfiltered MSAs. Furthermore, alignment filtering often leads to an increase in the proportion of well-supported branches that are actually wrong. We confirm that our findings hold for a wide range of parameters and methods. Although our results suggest that light filtering (up to 20% of alignment positions) has little impact on tree accuracy and may save some computation time, contrary to widespread practice, we do not generally recommend the use of current alignment filtering methods for phylogenetic inference. By providing a way to rigorously and systematically measure the impact of filtering on alignments, the methodology set forth here will guide the development of better filtering algorithms. PMID:26031838

  10. Quadrupole Beam-Based Alignment in the RHIC Interaction Regions

    SciTech Connect

    T. Satogata, J. Ziegler

    2011-03-01

    Continued beam-based alignment (BBA) efforts have provided significant benefit to both heavy ion and polarized proton operations at RHIC. Recent studies demonstrated previously unknown systematic beam position monitor (BPM) offset errors and produced accurate measurements of individual BPM offsets in the experiment interaction regions. Here we describe the algorithm used to collect and analyze data during the 2010 and early 2011 RHIC runs and the results of these measurements.

  11. Multianode Photomultiplier Tube Alignment for the MINERvA Experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    The MINERvA experiment (Main INjector ExpeRiment vA) at FNAL will study the neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-nucleus interaction. The light collection from the detector will be done via optic fibers using Hamamatsu H8804 64-channel photomultiplier tubes (PMT). Each PMT channel needs to be precisely aligned with the corresponding optic fiber. The MINERvA PMT optical boxes contain precision machined optic ``cookies'' which capture the 8x8 array of optic fibers. Each PMT-cookie pair needs to be aligned as precisely as possible. This contribution will describe the alignment setup and procedure implemented at James Madison University.

  12. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  13. Flame Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Scientific Instruments, Inc. has now developed a second generation, commercially available instrument to detect flames in hazardous environments, typically refineries, chemical plants and offshore drilling platforms. The Model 74000 detector incorporates a sensing circuit that detects UV radiation in a 100 degree conical field of view extending as far as 250 feet from the instrument. It operates in a bandwidth that makes it virtually 'blind' to solar radiation while affording extremely high sensitivity to ultraviolet flame detection. A 'windowing' technique accurately discriminates between background UV radiation and ultraviolet emitted from an actual flame, hence the user is assured of no false alarms. Model 7410CP is a combination controller and annunciator panel designed to monitor and control as many as 24 flame detectors. *Model 74000 is no longer being manufactured.

  14. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  15. Shape-based discriminative analysis of combined bilateral hippocampi using multiple object alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Makedon, Fillia; Saykin, Andrew

    2004-05-01

    Shape analysis of hippocampi in schizophrenia has been preformed previously using the spherical harmonic SPHARM description. In these studies, the left and right hippocampi are aligned independently and the spatial relation between them is not explored. This paper presents a new SPHARM-based technique which examines not only the individual shape information of the two hippocampi but also the spatial relation between them. The left and right hippocampi are treated as a single shape configuration. A ploy-shape alignment algorithm is developed for aligning configurations of multiple SPHARM surfaces as follows: (1) the total volume is normalized; (2) the parameter space is aligned for creating the surface correspondence; (3) landmarks are created by a uniform sampling of multiple surfaces for each configuration; (4) a quaternion-based algorithm is employed to align each landmark representation to the mean configuration through the least square rotation and translation iteratively until the mean converges. After applying the poly-shape alignment algorithm, a point distribution model is applied to aligned landmarks for feature extraction. Classification is performed using Fisher's linear discriminant with an effective feature selection scheme. Applying the above procedure to our hippocampal data (14 controls versus 25 schizophrenics, all right-handed males), we achieve the best cross-validation accuracy of 92%, supporting the idea that the whole shape configuration of the two hippocampi provides valuable information in detecting schizophrenia. The results of an ROC analysis and a visualization of discriminative patterns are also included.

  16. Optimization and Improvement of FOA Corner Cube Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    McClay, W A; Awwal, A S; Burkhart, S C; Candy, J V

    2004-10-01

    Alignment of laser beams based on video images is a crucial task necessary to automate operation of the 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The final optics assembly (FOA) is the optical element that aligns the beam into the target chamber. This work presents an algorithm for determining the position of a corner cube alignment image in the final optics assembly. The improved algorithm was compared to the existing FOA algorithm on 900 noise-simulated images. While the existing FOA algorithm based on correlation with a synthetic template has a radial standard deviation of 1 pixel, the new algorithm based on classical matched filtering (CMF) and polynomial fit to the correlation peak improves the radial standard deviation performance to less than 0.3 pixels. In the new algorithm the templates are designed from real data stored during a year of actual operation.

  17. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  18. Fast multiple alignment of ungapped DNA sequences using information theory and a relaxation method.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Thomas D; Mastronarde, David N

    1996-12-01

    An information theory based multiple alignment ("Malign") method was used to align the DNA binding sequences of the OxyR and Fis proteins, whose sequence conservation is so spread out that it is difficult to identify the sites. In the algorithm described here, the information content of the sequences is used as a unique global criterion for the quality of the alignment. The algorithm uses look-up tables to avoid recalculating computationally expensive functions such as the logarithm. Because there are no arbitrary constants and because the results are reported in absolute units (bits), the best alignment can be chosen without ambiguity. Starting from randomly selected alignments, a hill-climbing algorithm can track through the immense space of s(n) combinations where s is the number of sequences and n is the number of positions possible for each sequence. Instead of producing a single alignment, the algorithm is fast enough that one can afford to use many start points and to classify the solutions. Good convergence is indicated by the presence of a single well-populated solution class having higher information content than other classes. The existence of several distinct classes for the Fis protein indicates that those binding sites have self-similar features. PMID:19953199

  19. Alignator: a GPU powered software package for robust fiducial-less alignment of cryo tilt-series.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Scheffer, Margot; Al-Amoudi, Ashraf; Frangakis, Achilleas S

    2010-04-01

    The robust alignment of tilt-series collected for cryo-electron tomography in the absence of fiducial markers, is a problem that, especially for tilt-series of vitreous sections, still represents a significant challenge. Here we present a complete software package that implements a cross-correlation-based procedure that tracks similar image features that are present in several micrographs and explores them implicitly as substitutes for fiducials like gold beads and quantum dots. The added value compared to previous approaches, is that the algorithm explores a huge number of random positions, which are tracked on several micrographs, while being able to identify trace failures, using a cross-validation procedure based on the 3D marker model of the tilt-series. Furthermore, this method allows the reliable identification of areas which behave as a rigid body during the tilt-series and hence addresses specific difficulties for the alignment of vitreous sections, by correcting practical caveats. The resulting alignments can attain sub-pixel precision at the local level and is able to yield a substantial number of usable tilt-series (around 60%). In principle, the algorithm has the potential to run in a fully automated fashion, and could be used to align any tilt-series directly from the microscope. Finally, we have significantly improved the user interface and implemented the source code on the graphics processing unit (GPU) to accelerate the computations. PMID:20117216

  20. Graphics processing unit-based alignment of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiang; Zhou, Zhonghua; Ma, Jin; Xiang, Chaojuan; Nie, Qing; Zhang, Wu

    2015-08-01

    Network alignment is an important bridge to understanding human protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and functions through model organisms. However, the underlying subgraph isomorphism problem complicates and increases the time required to align protein interaction networks (PINs). Parallel computing technology is an effective solution to the challenge of aligning large-scale networks via sequential computing. In this study, the typical Hungarian-Greedy Algorithm (HGA) is used as an example for PIN alignment. The authors propose a HGA with 2-nearest neighbours (HGA-2N) and implement its graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration. Numerical experiments demonstrate that HGA-2N can find alignments that are close to those found by HGA while dramatically reducing computing time. The GPU implementation of HGA-2N optimises the parallel pattern, computing mode and storage mode and it improves the computing time ratio between the CPU and GPU compared with HGA when large-scale networks are considered. By using HGA-2N in GPUs, conserved PPIs can be observed, and potential PPIs can be predicted. Among the predictions based on 25 common Gene Ontology terms, 42.8% can be found in the Human Protein Reference Database. Furthermore, a new method of reconstructing phylogenetic trees is introduced, which shows the same relationships among five herpes viruses that are obtained using other methods. PMID:26243827

  1. Evaluating the Accuracy and Efficiency of Multiple Sequence Alignment Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pervez, Muhammad Tariq; Babar, Masroor Ellahi; Nadeem, Asif; Aslam, Muhammad; Awan, Ali Raza; Aslam, Naeem; Hussain, Tanveer; Naveed, Nasir; Qadri, Salman; Waheed, Usman; Shoaib, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of 10 most popular Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) tools, namely, MUSCLE, MAFFT(L-INS-i), MAFFT (FFT-NS-2), T-Coffee, ProbCons, SATe, Clustal Omega, Kalign, Multalin, and Dialign-TX is presented. We also focused on the significance of some implementations embedded in algorithm of each tool. Based on 10 simulated trees of different number of taxa generated by R, 400 known alignments and sequence files were constructed using indel-Seq-Gen. A total of 4000 test alignments were generated to study the effect of sequence length, indel size, deletion rate, and insertion rate. Results showed that alignment quality was highly dependent on the number of deletions and insertions in the sequences and that the sequence length and indel size had a weaker effect. Overall, ProbCons was consistently on the top of list of the evaluated MSA tools. SATe, being little less accurate, was 529.10% faster than ProbCons and 236.72% faster than MAFFT(L-INS-i). Among other tools, Kalign and MUSCLE achieved the highest sum of pairs. We also considered BALiBASE benchmark datasets and the results relative to BAliBASE- and indel-Seq-Gen-generated alignments were consistent in the most cases. PMID:25574120

  2. Electro-optic Lightning Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Solakiewicz, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    The design, alignment, calibration, and field deployment of a solid-state lightning detector is described. The primary sensing component of the detector is a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) electro-optic crystal that is attached in series to a flat plate aluminum antenna; the antenna is exposed to the ambient thundercloud electric field. A semiconductor laser diode (lambda = 685 nm), polarizing optics, and the crystal are arranged in a Pockels cell configuration. Lightning-caused electric field changes are related to small changes in the transmission of laser light through the optical cell. Several hundred lightning electric field change excursions were recorded during five thunderstorms that occurred in the summer of 1998 at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in northern Alabama.

  3. Electro-Optic Lighting Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Solakiewicz, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    The design, alignment, calibration, and field deployment of a solid-state lightning detector is described. The primary sensing component of the detector is a potassium dihydrogen phosphate electro-optic crystal that is attached in series to a flat-plate aluminum antenna; the antenna is exposed to the ambient thundercloud electric field. A semiconductor laser diode (lambda = 685 nm), polarizing optics, and the crystal are arranged in a Pockels cell configuration. Lightning-caused electric field changes are related to small changes in the transmission of laser light through the optical cell. Several hundred lightning electric field change excursions were recorded during five thunderstorms that occurred in the summer of 1998 at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in northern Alabama.

  4. Electro-optic lightning detector.

    PubMed

    Koshak, W J; Solakiewicz, R J

    1999-07-20

    The design, alignment, calibration, and field deployment of a solid-state lightning detector is described. The primary sensing component of the detector is a potassium dihydrogen phosphate electro-optic crystal that is attached in series to a flat-plate aluminum antenna; the antenna is exposed to the ambient thundercloud electric field. A semiconductor laser diode (lambda = 685 nm), polarizing optics, and the crystal are arranged in a Pockels cell configuration. Lightning-caused electric field changes are related to small changes in the transmission of laser light through the optical cell. Several hundred lightning electric field change excursions were recorded during five thunderstorms that occurred in the summer of 1998 at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in northern Alabama. PMID:18323949

  5. Optimizing the beam-beam alignment in an electron lens using bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Thieberger, P.; Haug, E.

    2010-05-23

    Installation of electron lenses for the purpose of head-on beam-beam compensation is foreseen at RHIC. To optimize the relative alignment of the electron lens beam with the circulating proton (or ion) beam, photon detectors will be installed to measure the bremsstrahlung generated by momentum transfer from protons to electrons. We present the detector layout and simulations of the bremsstrahlung signal as function of beam offset and crossing angle.

  6. Alignment of a three-mirror anastigmatic telescope using nodal aberration theory.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Changxiang; Wang, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Most computer-aided alignment methods for optical systems are based on numerical algorithms at present, which omit aberration theory. This paper presents a novel alignment algorithm for three-mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescopes using Nodal Aberration Theory (NAT). The aberration field decenter vectors and boresight error of misaligned TMA telescopes are derived. Two alignment models based on 3rd and 5th order NAT are established successively and compared in the same alignment example. It is found that the average and the maximum RMS wavefront errors in the whole field of view of 0.3° × 0.15° are 0.063 λ (λ = 1 μm) and 0.068 λ respectively after the 4th alignment action with the 3rd order model, and 0.011 λ and 0.025 λ (nominal values) respectively after the 3rd alignment action with the 5th order model. Monte-Carlo alignment simulations are carried out with the 5th order model. It shows that the 5th order model still has good performance even when the misalignment variables are large (-1 mm≤linear misalignment≤1 mm, -0.1°≤angular misalignment≤0.1°), and multiple iterative alignments are needed when the misalignment variables increase. PMID:26406716

  7. A Vondrak low pass filter for IMU sensor initial alignment on a disturbed base.

    PubMed

    Li, Zengke; Wang, Jian; Gao, Jingxiang; Li, Binghao; Zhou, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The initial alignment of the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is an important process of INS to determine the coordinate transformation matrix which is used in the integration of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). In this paper a novel alignment method for a disturbed base, such as a vehicle disturbed by wind outdoors, implemented with the aid of a Vondrak low pass filter, is proposed. The basic principle of initial alignment including coarse alignment and fine alignment is introduced first. The spectral analysis is processed to compare the differences between the characteristic error of INS force observation on a stationary base and on disturbed bases. In order to reduce the high frequency noise in the force observation more accurately and more easily, a Vondrak low pass filter is constructed based on the spectral analysis result. The genetic algorithms method is introduced to choose the smoothing factor in the Vondrak filter and the corresponding objective condition is built. The architecture of the proposed alignment method with the Vondrak low pass filter is shown. Furthermore, simulated experiments and actual experiments were performed to validate the new algorithm. The results indicate that, compared with the conventional alignment method, the Vondrak filter could eliminate the high frequency noise in the force observation and the proposed alignment method could improve the attitude accuracy. At the same time, only one parameter needs to be set, which makes the proposed method easier to implement than other low-pass filter methods. PMID:25513826

  8. A Vondrak Low Pass Filter for IMU Sensor Initial Alignment on a Disturbed Base

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zengke; Wang, Jian; Gao, Jingxiang; Li, Binghao; Zhou, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The initial alignment of the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is an important process of INS to determine the coordinate transformation matrix which is used in the integration of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) with Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). In this paper a novel alignment method for a disturbed base, such as a vehicle disturbed by wind outdoors, implemented with the aid of a Vondrak low pass filter, is proposed. The basic principle of initial alignment including coarse alignment and fine alignment is introduced first. The spectral analysis is processed to compare the differences between the characteristic error of INS force observation on a stationary base and on disturbed bases. In order to reduce the high frequency noise in the force observation more accurately and more easily, a Vondrak low pass filter is constructed based on the spectral analysis result. The genetic algorithms method is introduced to choose the smoothing factor in the Vondrak filter and the corresponding objective condition is built. The architecture of the proposed alignment method with the Vondrak low pass filter is shown. Furthermore, simulated experiments and actual experiments were performed to validate the new algorithm. The results indicate that, compared with the conventional alignment method, the Vondrak filter could eliminate the high frequency noise in the force observation and the proposed alignment method could improve the attitude accuracy. At the same time, only one parameter needs to be set, which makes the proposed method easier to implement than other low-pass filter methods. PMID:25513826

  9. A Nonlinear Observer for Gyro Alignment Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thienel, J.; Sanner, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    A nonlinear observer for gyro alignment estimation is presented. The observer is composed of two error terms, an attitude error and an alignment error. The observer is globally stable with exponential convergence of the attitude errors. The gyro alignment estimate converges to the true alignment when the system is completely observable.

  10. Global Alignment System for Large Genomic Sequencing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-03-01

    AVID is a global alignment system tailored for the alignment of large genomic sequences up to megabases in length. Features include the possibility of one sequence being in draft form, fast alignment, robustness and accuracy. The method is an anchor based alignment using maximal matches derived from suffix trees.

  11. Optical Device for Converting a Laser Beam into Two Co-aligned but Oppositely Directed Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Optical systems consisting of a series of optical elements require alignment from the input end to the output end. The optical elements can be mirrors, lenses, sources, detectors, or other devices. Complex optical systems are often difficult to align from end-to-end because the alignment beam must be inserted at one end in order for the beam to traverse the entire optical path to the other end. The ends of the optical train may not be easily accessible to the alignment beam. Typically, when a series of optical elements is to be aligned, an alignment laser beam is inserted into the optical path with a pick-off mirror at one end of the series of elements. But it may be impossible to insert the beam at an end-point. It can be difficult to locate the pick-off mirror at the desired position because there is not enough space, there is no mounting surface, or the location is occupied by a source, detector, or other component. Alternatively, the laser beam might be inserted at an intermediate location (not at an end-point) and sent, first in one direction and then the other, to the opposite ends of the optical system for alignment. However, in this case, alignment must be performed in two directions and extra effort is required to co-align the two beams to make them parallel and coincident, i.e., to follow the same path as an end-to-end beam. An optical device has been developed that accepts a laser beam as input and produces two co-aligned, but counter-propagating beams. In contrast to a conventional alignment laser placed at one end of the optical path, this invention can be placed at a convenient position within the optical train and aligned to send its two beams simultaneously along precisely opposite paths that, taken together, trace out exactly the same path as the conventional alignment laser. This invention allows the user the freedom to choose locations within the optical train for placement of the alignment beam. It is also self-aligned by design and requires

  12. Combining Multiple Pairwise Structure-based Alignments

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-12

    CombAlign is a new Python code that generates a gapped, one-to-many, multiple structure-based sequence alignment(MSSA) given a set of pairwise structure-based alignments. In order to better define regions of similarity among related protein structures, it is useful to detect the residue-residue correspondences among a set of pairwise structure alignments. Few codes exist for constructing a one-to-many, multiple sequence alignment derived from a set of structure alignments, and we perceived a need for creating a new tool for combing pairwise structure alignments that would allow for insertion of gaps in the reference structure.

  13. Alignment method for parabolic trough solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Richard B.

    2010-02-23

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  14. Grain Alignment in Starless Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. J.; Bagley, M.; Krejny, M.; Andersson, B.-G.; Bastien, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present near-IR polarimetry data of background stars shining through a selection of starless cores taken in the K band, probing visual extinctions up to {{A}V}˜ 48. We find that {{P}K}/{{τ }K} continues to decline with increasing AV with a power law slope of roughly -0.5. Examination of published submillimeter (submm) polarimetry of starless cores suggests that by {{A}V}≳ 20 the slope for P versus τ becomes ˜-1, indicating no grain alignment at greater optical depths. Combining these two data sets, we find good evidence that, in the absence of a central illuminating source, the dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores with no internal radiation source cease to become aligned with the local magnetic field at optical depths greater than {{A}V}˜ 20. A simple model relating the alignment efficiency to the optical depth into the cloud reproduces the observations well.

  15. Alignment of the VISA Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert

    1999-04-15

    The Visible-Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) undulator consists of four 99cm long segments. Each undulator segment is set up on a pulsed-wire bench, to characterize the magnetic properties and to locate the magnetic axis of the FODO array. Subsequently, the location of the magnetic axis, as defined by the wire, is referenced to tooling balls on each magnet segment by means of a straightness interferometer. After installation in the vacuum chamber, the four magnet segments are aligned with respect to themselves and globally to the beam line reference laser. A specially designed alignment fixture is used to mount one straightness interferometer each in the horizontal and vertical plane of the beam. The goal of these procedures is to keep the combined rms trajectory error, due to magnetic and alignment errors, to 50{micro}m.

  16. Fourier Lucas-Kanade algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Simon; Navarathna, Rajitha; Ashraf, Ahmed Bilal; Sridharan, Sridha

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework for both gradient descent image and object alignment in the Fourier domain. Our method centers upon the classical Lucas & Kanade (LK) algorithm where we represent the source and template/model in the complex 2D Fourier domain rather than in the spatial 2D domain. We refer to our approach as the Fourier LK (FLK) algorithm. The FLK formulation is advantageous when one preprocesses the source image and template/model with a bank of filters (e.g., oriented edges, Gabor, etc.) as 1) it can handle substantial illumination variations, 2) the inefficient preprocessing filter bank step can be subsumed within the FLK algorithm as a sparse diagonal weighting matrix, 3) unlike traditional LK, the computational cost is invariant to the number of filters and as a result is far more efficient, and 4) this approach can be extended to the Inverse Compositional (IC) form of the LK algorithm where nearly all steps (including Fourier transform and filter bank preprocessing) can be precomputed, leading to an extremely efficient and robust approach to gradient descent image matching. Further, these computational savings translate to nonrigid object alignment tasks that are considered extensions of the LK algorithm, such as those found in Active Appearance Models (AAMs). PMID:23599053

  17. Image stack alignment in full-field X-ray absorption spectroscopy using SIFT_PyOCL.

    PubMed

    Paleo, Pierre; Pouyet, Emeline; Kieffer, Jérôme

    2014-03-01

    Full-field X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments allow the acquisition of millions of spectra within minutes. However, the construction of the hyperspectral image requires an image alignment procedure with sub-pixel precision. While the image correlation algorithm has originally been used for image re-alignment using translations, the Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm (which is by design robust versus rotation, illumination change, translation and scaling) presents an additional advantage: the alignment can be limited to a region of interest of any arbitrary shape. In this context, a Python module, named SIFT_PyOCL, has been developed. It implements a parallel version of the SIFT algorithm in OpenCL, providing high-speed image registration and alignment both on processors and graphics cards. The performance of the algorithm allows online processing of large datasets. PMID:24562570

  18. Aligning Arrays of Lenses and Single-Mode Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan

    2004-01-01

    through the relay lenses and the beam compressor/expander, then split so that half goes to a detector and half to the interferometer. The output of the detector is used as a feedback control signal for the six-axis stage to effect alignment.

  19. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  20. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  1. Alignment Tool For Inertia Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Compact, easy-to-use tool aligns drive bar of inertia welder over hole in stub. Ensures drive bar concentric to hole within 0.002 in. (0.051 mm.). Holds two batteries and light bulb. Electrical circuit completed, providing current to bulb when pin in contact with post. When pin centered in post hole, it does not touch post, and lamp turns off. Built for use in making repair welds on liquid-oxygen-injector posts in Space Shuttle main engine. Version having suitably modified dimensions used to facilitate alignment in other forests of post.

  2. Dust Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a recent sounding rocket experiment which found charged dust in the Earth's tropical mesosphere. The dust detector was designed to measure small (5000 - 10000 amu.) charged dust particles, most likely of meteoric origin. A 5 km thick layer of positively charged dust was found at an altitude of 90 km, in the vicinity of an observed sporadic sodium layer and sporadic E layer. The observed dust was positively charged in the bulk of the dust layer, but was negatively charged near the bottom.

  3. Ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, Andrew M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  4. Reinforced adaboost face detector using support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jaeyoon; Yunkoo, C.; Jaehong, K.; Yoon, Hosub

    2014-08-01

    We propose a novel face detection algorithm in order to improve higher detection rate of face-detector than conventional haar - adaboost face detector. Our purposed method not only improves detection rate of a face but decreases the number of false-positive component. In order to get improved detection ability, we merged two classifiers: adaboost and support vector machine. Because SVM and Adaboost use different feature, they are complementary each other. We can get 2~4% improved performance using proposed method than previous our detector that is not applied proposed method. This method makes improved detector that shows better performance without algorithm replacement.

  5. Heuristic reusable dynamic programming: efficient updates of local sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Hong, Changjin; Tewfik, Ahmed H

    2009-01-01

    Recomputation of the previously evaluated similarity results between biological sequences becomes inevitable when researchers realize errors in their sequenced data or when the researchers have to compare nearly similar sequences, e.g., in a family of proteins. We present an efficient scheme for updating local sequence alignments with an affine gap model. In principle, using the previous matching result between two amino acid sequences, we perform a forward-backward alignment to generate heuristic searching bands which are bounded by a set of suboptimal paths. Given a correctly updated sequence, we initially predict a new score of the alignment path for each contour to select the best candidates among them. Then, we run the Smith-Waterman algorithm in this confined space. Furthermore, our heuristic alignment for an updated sequence shows that it can be further accelerated by using reusable dynamic programming (rDP), our prior work. In this study, we successfully validate "relative node tolerance bound" (RNTB) in the pruned searching space. Furthermore, we improve the computational performance by quantifying the successful RNTB tolerance probability and switch to rDP on perturbation-resilient columns only. In our searching space derived by a threshold value of 90 percent of the optimal alignment score, we find that 98.3 percent of contours contain correctly updated paths. We also find that our method consumes only 25.36 percent of the runtime cost of sparse dynamic programming (sDP) method, and to only 2.55 percent of that of a normal dynamic programming with the Smith-Waterman algorithm. PMID:19875856

  6. Sun sensor boresight alignment testing for the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. S.; Laney, V. S.; Mauldin, L. E., III

    1987-01-01

    The boresight alignment testing for the sun sensor assembly on the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) is described. The sun sensor assembly consists of three sensors that provide feedback signals for controlling dual axes gimbals. Two energy balancing silicon detectors are operated as wideband sensors in the azimuth and elevation axes. The third sensor is a silicon photodiode array operated as a narrow-band sensor in the elevation axis. These sensors are mounted on a common Invar structure which is mounted to the HALOE telescope. A blackbody was used as the stimulating source to perform the initial boresight alignment and this was checked with a heliostat solar look and a direct solar look. These tests are explained with a comparison between each source used.

  7. Evaluation of an instrument to improve PET timing alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, J.; Thompson, C. J.

    2010-08-01

    PurposeIn order to increase the simplicity and accuracy of performing the time alignment on a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, a new generation timing alignment probe has been developed. MethodsA timing alignment probe containing a plastic scintillator with an embedded sodium-22 source which is optically coupled to a fast photomultiplier tube (PMT) is described and tested. When a positron is ejected from the radioactive atom's nucleus, its kinetic energy is absorbed in and can be detected as a light flash from the scintillator. This is used as the reference time for each atom's positron decay. It is only after the positron slows that it can combine with an electron, forming positronium after which the 511 keV annihilation photons will be created, possibly traveling to the PET detectors. In practice, the probe is placed in the center of the scanner's field of view and connected to the coincidence circuit. Since the delay between an annihilation photon's detection and positron detection is almost identical (the lifetime of positronium in a solid is extremely short, and the gamma rays' path lengths are equal with the probe in the center of the scanner), the probe's signal provides a fixed reference time to which the response of individual crystals in the PET detectors can be compared. We present an evaluation of the performance of this probe. We first investigated the intrinsic performance of the time-alignment probe comparing its timing resolution with two barium fluoride crystals in coincidence. We then investigated the timing performance of the probe in coincidence with various individual scintillation crystals and with detectors from two commercial PET scanners. ResultsThe best full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) timing resolution of the probe was found when in coincidence with BaF 2 at 400 ps. The common commercial scintillator lutetium oxy-orthosilicate (LSO) was tested and its FWHM was 510 ps. When testing the crystal arrays used in two commercial

  8. Seed selection strategy in global network alignment without destroying the entire structures of functional modules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Network alignment is one of the most common biological network comparison methods. Aligning protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of different species is of great important to detect evolutionary conserved pathways or protein complexes across species through the identification of conserved interactions, and to improve our insight into biological systems. Global network alignment (GNA) problem is NP-complete, for which only heuristic methods have been proposed so far. Generally, the current GNA methods fall into global heuristic seed-and-extend approaches. These methods can not get the best overall consistent alignment between networks for the opinionated local seed. Furthermore These methods are lost in maximizing the number of aligned edges between two networks without considering the original structures of functional modules. Methods We present a novel seed selection strategy for global network alignment by constructing the pairs of hub nodes of networks to be aligned into multiple seeds. Beginning from every hub seed and using the membership similarity of nodes to quantify to what extent the nodes can participate in functional modules associated with current seed topologically we align the networks by modules. By this way we can maintain the functional modules are not damaged during the heuristic alignment process. And our method is efficient in resolving the fatal problem of most conventional algorithms that the initialization selected seeds have a direct influence on the alignment result. The similarity measures between network nodes (e.g., proteins) include sequence similarity, centrality similarity, and dynamic membership similarity and our algorithm can be called Multiple Hubs-based Alignment (MHA). Results When applying our seed selection strategy to several pairs of real PPI networks, it is observed that our method is working to strike a balance, extending the conserved interactions while maintaining the functional modules unchanged. In

  9. Incorporating peak grouping information for alignment of multiple liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry datasets

    PubMed Central

    Wandy, Joe; Daly, Rónán; Breitling, Rainer; Rogers, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The combination of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has been widely used for large-scale comparative studies in systems biology, including proteomics, glycomics and metabolomics. In almost all experimental design, it is necessary to compare chromatograms across biological or technical replicates and across sample groups. Central to this is the peak alignment step, which is one of the most important but challenging preprocessing steps. Existing alignment tools do not take into account the structural dependencies between related peaks that coelute and are derived from the same metabolite or peptide. We propose a direct matching peak alignment method for LC/MS data that incorporates related peaks information (within each LC/MS run) and investigate its effect on alignment performance (across runs). The groupings of related peaks necessary for our method can be obtained from any peak clustering method and are built into a pair-wise peak similarity score function. The similarity score matrix produced is used by an approximation algorithm for the weighted matching problem to produce the actual alignment result. Results: We demonstrate that related peak information can improve alignment performance. The performance is evaluated on a set of benchmark datasets, where our method performs competitively compared to other popular alignment tools. Availability: The proposed alignment method has been implemented as a stand-alone application in Python, available for download at http://github.com/joewandy/peak-grouping-alignment. Contact: Simon.Rogers@glasgow.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25649621

  10. Aligned natural inflation with modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kiwoon; Kim, Hyungjin

    2016-08-01

    The weak gravity conjecture applied for the aligned natural inflation indicates that generically there can be a modulation of the inflaton potential, with a period determined by sub-Planckian axion scale. We study the oscillations in the primordial power spectrum induced by such modulation, and discuss the resulting observational constraints on the model.

  11. Laser-Beam-Alignment Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasowski, M. J.; Dickens, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    In laser-beam-alignment controller, images from video camera compared to reference patterns by fuzzy-logic pattern comparator. Results processed by fuzzy-logic microcontroller, which sends control signals to motor driver adjusting lens and pinhole in spatial filter.

  12. Aligning Assessments for COSMA Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Curt; Johnson, Dennis A.; Alderman, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Many higher education sport management programs are currently in the process of seeking accreditation from the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation (COSMA). This article provides a best-practice method for aligning student learning outcomes with a sport management program's mission and goals. Formative and summative assessment procedures…

  13. Alignment of the ALICE Inner Tracking System with Cosmic-Ray Tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, K.; Awes, Terry C; Enokizono, Akitomo; Silvermyr, David O; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiment devoted to investigating the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC energies. The ALICE ITS, Inner Tracking System, consists of six cylindrical layers of silicon detectors with three different technologies; in the outward direction: two layers of pixel detectors, two layers each of drift, and strip detectors. The number of parameters to be determined in the spatial alignment of the 2198 sensor modules of the ITS is about 13,000. The target alignment precision is well below 10 {micro}m in some cases (pixels). The sources of alignment information include survey measurements, and the reconstructed tracks from cosmic rays and from proton-proton collisions. The main track-based alignment method uses the Millepede global approach. An iterative local method was developed and used as well. We present the results obtained for the ITS alignment using about 10{sup 5} charged tracks from cosmic rays that have been collected during summer 2008, with the ALICE solenoidal magnet switched off.

  14. Neutron Detector Waveform Digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toebbe, Jonathan; Gray, Fred; Grafil, Elliot; Greife, Uwe

    2010-11-01

    In the frame of a DoE Office of Nuclear Energy funded collaboration to design a next generation neutron elastic and inelastic scattering experiment, the Colorado School of Mines/Regis University group is responsible for developing and testing neutron detectors, pulse shape discrimination and read-out methods. This contribution will describe the test setup based on an n-ToF neutron selection using a ^244Cm-^13C source and the Regis Digitizer. Results on pulse shape discrimination from waveform digitization will be compared to other commercially available discrimination methods. We will also present our efforts to explore different types of algorithm for extraction of neutron assignment probabilities from the collected waveforms.

  15. Comparative evaluation of eight software programs for alignment of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry chromatograms in metabolomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Niu, Weihuan; Knight, Elisa; Xia, Qingyou; McGarvey, Brian D

    2014-12-29

    Since retention times of compounds in GC-MS chromatograms always vary slightly from chromatogram to chromatogram, it is necessary to align chromatograms before comparing them in metabolomics experiments. Several software programs have been developed to automate this process. Here we report a comparative evaluation of the performance of eight programs using prepared samples of mixtures of chemicals, and an extract of tomato vines spiked with three concentrations of a mixture of alkanes. The programs included in the comparison were SpectConnect, MetaboliteDetector 2.01a, MetAlign 041012, MZmine 2.0, TagFinder 04, XCMS Online 1.21.01, MeltDB and GAVIN. Samples were analyzed by GC-MS, chromatograms were aligned using the selected programs, and the resulting data matrices were preprocessed and submitted to principal components analysis. In the first trial, SpectConnect, MetAlign and MetaboliteDetector correctly identified ≥90% of the true positives. In the second trial, MetAlign and MetaboliteDetector correctly identified 87% and 81% of the true positives, respectively. In addition, in both trials >90% of the peaks identified by MetAlign and MetaboliteDetector were true positives. PMID:25435458

  16. Quantum algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Daniel S.

    This thesis describes several new quantum algorithms. These include a polynomial time algorithm that uses a quantum fast Fourier transform to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a Hamiltonian operator, and that can be applied in cases (commonly found in ab initio physics and chemistry problems) for which all known classical algorithms require exponential time. Fast algorithms for simulating many body Fermi systems are also provided in both first and second quantized descriptions. An efficient quantum algorithm for anti-symmetrization is given as well as a detailed discussion of a simulation of the Hubbard model. In addition, quantum algorithms that calculate numerical integrals and various characteristics of stochastic processes are described. Two techniques are given, both of which obtain an exponential speed increase in comparison to the fastest known classical deterministic algorithms and a quadratic speed increase in comparison to classical Monte Carlo (probabilistic) methods. I derive a simpler and slightly faster version of Grover's mean algorithm, show how to apply quantum counting to the problem, develop some variations of these algorithms, and show how both (apparently distinct) approaches can be understood from the same unified framework. Finally, the relationship between physics and computation is explored in some more depth, and it is shown that computational complexity theory depends very sensitively on physical laws. In particular, it is shown that nonlinear quantum mechanics allows for the polynomial time solution of NP-complete and #P oracle problems. Using the Weinberg model as a simple example, the explicit construction of the necessary gates is derived from the underlying physics. Nonlinear quantum algorithms are also presented using Polchinski type nonlinearities which do not allow for superluminal communication. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  17. A statistical physics perspective on alignment-independent protein sequence comparison

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Amit K.; Nasiev, Diar; Flower, Darren R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Within bioinformatics, the textual alignment of amino acid sequences has long dominated the determination of similarity between proteins, with all that implies for shared structure, function and evolutionary descent. Despite the relative success of modern-day sequence alignment algorithms, so-called alignment-free approaches offer a complementary means of determining and expressing similarity, with potential benefits in certain key applications, such as regression analysis of protein structure-function studies, where alignment-base similarity has performed poorly. Results: Here, we offer a fresh, statistical physics-based perspective focusing on the question of alignment-free comparison, in the process adapting results from ‘first passage probability distribution’ to summarize statistics of ensemble averaged amino acid propensity values. In this article, we introduce and elaborate this approach. Contact: d.r.flower@aston.ac.uk PMID:25810434

  18. Digital Shaping Algorithms for GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Sarah-Jane; Cizewski, Jolie; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Pain, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Gammasphere-ORRUBA: Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) combines the highly segmented position-sensitive silicon strip detectors of ORRUBA with up to 110 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors from Gammasphere, for high resolution for particle-gamma coincidence measurements. The signals from the silicon strip detectors have position-dependent rise times, and require different forms of pulse shaping for optimal position and energy resolutions. Traditionally, a compromise was achieved with a single shaping of the signals performed by conventional analog electronics. However, there are benefits to using digital acquisition of the detector signals, including the ability to apply multiple custom shaping algorithms to the same signal, each optimized for position and energy, in addition to providing a flexible triggering system, and a reduction in rate-limitation due to pile-up. Recent developments toward creating digital signal processing algorithms for GODDESS will be discussed. This work is supported in part by the U.S. D.O.E. and N.S.F.

  19. First spatial alignment of the LHCb VELO and analysis of beam absorber collision data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, S.; Gersabeck, M.; Parkes, C.; Szumlak, T.; Affolder, A.; Akiba, K.; Anderson, J.; Artuso, M.; Basiladze, S.; Bates, A.; Bay, A.; Behrendt, O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T.; Buytaert, J.; Casse, G.; Collins, P.; de Capua, S.; de Vries, H.; Donleavy, S.; Eklund, L.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Frei, R.; Hennessy, K.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jans, E.; John, M.; Ketel, T.; Lefeuvre, G.; Leflat, A.; Marinho, F.; McNulty, R.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Noor, A.; Papadelis, A.; Patel, G.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rinnert, K.; Rodrigues, E.; Shears, T.; Smith, N. A.; Tobin, M.; Traynor, S.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Verlaat, B.; Wang, J.

    2010-06-01

    A first alignment of the LHCb Vertex Locator has been obtained from beam induced tracks at the LHC. A 450 GeV/ c protons were collided on a beam absorber during the LHC synchronisation tests of the anti-clockwise beam in August and September 2008. The resulting particle tracks have been reconstructed by the Vertex Locator. This was the first full reconstruction of tracks induced by the LHC beam. The quality of the data obtained is discussed. A total of 2200 tracks were reconstructed from the full data sample, and a first spatial alignment was obtained. The detector is aligned to an accuracy of 5 μm in the sensor plane. The results confirm that all detector modules have not been displaced from their surveyed positions by more than 10 μm.

  20. Structural Alignment of RNA with Complex Pseudoknot Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas K. F.; Lam, T. W.; Sung, Wing-Kin; Yiu, S. M.

    The secondary structure of an ncRNA molecule is known to play an important role in its biological functions. Aligning a known ncRNA to a target candidate to determine the sequence and structural similarity helps in identifying de novo ncRNA molecules that are in the same family of the known ncRNA. However, existing algorithms cannot handle complex pseudoknot structures which are found in nature. In this paper, we propose algorithms to handle two types of complex pseudoknots: simple non-standard pseudoknots and recursive pseudoknots. Although our methods are not designed for general pseudoknots, it already cover all known ncRNAs in both Rfam and PseudoBase databases. A preliminary evaluation on our algorithms show that it is useful to identify ncRNA molecules in other species which are in the same family of a known ncRNA.

  1. Oscillator detector

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, B.M.

    1980-05-13

    An alien liquid detector employs a monitoring element and an oscillatory electronic circuit for maintaining the temperature of the monitoring element substantially above ambient temperature. The output wave form, eg., frequency of oscillation or wave shape, of the oscillatory circuit depends upon the temperaturedependent electrical characteristic of the monitoring element. A predetermined change in the output waveform allows water to be discriminated from another liquid, eg., oil. Features of the invention employing two thermistors in two oscillatory circuits include positioning one thermistor for contact with water and the other thermistor above the oil-water interface to detect a layer of oil if present. Unique oscillatory circuit arrangements are shown that achieve effective thermistor action with an economy of parts and energizing power. These include an operational amplifier employed in an astable multivibrator circuit, a discrete transistor-powered tank circuit, and use of an integrated circuit chip.

  2. Ice detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An ice detector is provided for the determination of the thickness of ice on the outer surface on an object (e.g., aircraft) independently of temperature or the composition of the ice. First capacitive gauge, second capacitive gauge, and temperature gauge are embedded in embedding material located within a hollowed out portion of the outer surface. This embedding material is flush with the outer surface to prevent undesirable drag. The first capacitive gauge, second capacitive gauge, and the temperature gauge are respectively connected to first capacitive measuring circuit, second capacitive measuring circuit, and temperature measuring circuit. The geometry of the first and second capacitive gauges is such that the ratio of the voltage outputs of the first and second capacitance measuring circuits is proportional to the thickness of ice, regardless of ice temperature or composition. This ratio is determined by offset and dividing circuit.

  3. Introduction to high-resolution accelerator alignment using x-ray optics.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B. X.; Friedsam, H.

    2006-01-01

    A novel alignment technique utilizing the x-ray beam of a dedicated alignment undulator in conjunction with pinholes and position-sensitive detectors for positioning accelerator components in an x-ray free-electron laser will be presented. In this concept two retractable pinholes at each end of the main undulator line define a stable and reproducible x-ray beam axis (XBA). Targets are precisely positioned on the XBA using a pinhole camera technique. Position-sensitive detectors responding to both x-ray and electron beams enable the direct transfer of the position setting from the XBA to the electron beam. This system has the potential to deliver superior alignment accuracy in the micron range for target pinholes in the transverse directions over long distances. It defines the beam axis for the electron-beam-based alignment with high reproducibility. This concept complements the electron-beam-based alignment and the existing survey methods advancing the alignment accuracy of long accelerators to an unprecedented level. Further improvements of the transverse accuracy using x-ray zone plates and a concurrent measurement scheme during accelerator operation, providing real-time feedback for transverse position corrections, will be discussed.

  4. CYLINDER LENS ALIGNMENT IN THE LTP

    SciTech Connect

    TAKACS, P.Z.

    2005-07-26

    The Long Trace Profiler (LTP), is well-suited for the measurement of the axial figure of cylindrical mirrors that usually have a long radius of curvature in the axial direction but have a short radius of curvature in the sagittal direction. The sagittal curvature causes the probe beam to diverge in the transverse direction without coming to a focus on the detector, resulting in a very weak signal. It is useful to place a cylinder lens into the optical system above the mirror under test to refocus the sagittal divergence and increase the signal level. A positive cylinder lens can be placed at two positions above the surface: the Cat's Eye reflection position and the Wavefront-Matching position. The Cat's Eye position, is very tolerant to mirror misalignment, which is not good if absolute axial radius of curvature is to be measured. Lateral positioning and rotational misalignments of lens and the mirror combine to produce unusual profile results. This paper looks at various alignment issues with measurements and by raytrace simulations to determine the best strategy to minimize radius of curvature errors in the measurement of cylindrical aspheres.

  5. A max-margin model for efficient simultaneous alignment and folding of RNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Do, Chuong B.; Foo, Chuan-Sheng; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The need for accurate and efficient tools for computational RNA structure analysis has become increasingly apparent over the last several years: RNA folding algorithms underlie numerous applications in bioinformatics, ranging from microarray probe selection to de novo non-coding RNA gene prediction. In this work, we present RAF (RNA Alignment and Folding), an efficient algorithm for simultaneous alignment and consensus folding of unaligned RNA sequences. Algorithmically, RAF exploits sparsity in the set of likely pairing and alignment candidates for each nucleotide (as identified by the CONTRAfold or CONTRAlign programs) to achieve an effectively quadratic running time for simultaneous pairwise alignment and folding. RAF's fast sparse dynamic programming, in turn, serves as the inference engine within a discriminative machine learning algorithm for parameter estimation. Results: In cross-validated benchmark tests, RAF achieves accuracies equaling or surpassing the current best approaches for RNA multiple sequence secondary structure prediction. However, RAF requires nearly an order of magnitude less time than other simultaneous folding and alignment methods, thus making it especially appropriate for high-throughput studies. Availability: Source code for RAF is available at:http://contra.stanford.edu/contrafold/ Contact: chuongdo@cs.stanford.edu PMID:18586747

  6. Haplotyping algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, E.; Lange, K.; O`Connell, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Haplotyping is the logical process of inferring gene flow in a pedigree based on phenotyping results at a small number of genetic loci. This paper formalizes the haplotyping problem and suggests four algorithms for haplotype reconstruction. These algorithms range from exhaustive enumeration of all haplotype vectors to combinatorial optimization by simulated annealing. Application of the algorithms to published genetic analyses shows that manual haplotyping is often erroneous. Haplotyping is employed in screening pedigrees for phenotyping errors and in positional cloning of disease genes from conserved haplotypes in population isolates. 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Estimation Filter for Alignment of the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David

    2007-01-01

    A document presents a summary of an onboard estimation algorithm now being used to calibrate the alignment of the Spitzer Space Telescope (formerly known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility). The algorithm, denoted the S2P calibration filter, recursively generates estimates of the alignment angles between a telescope reference frame and a star-tracker reference frame. At several discrete times during the day, the filter accepts, as input, attitude estimates from the star tracker and observations taken by the Pointing Control Reference Sensor (a sensor in the field of view of the telescope). The output of the filter is a calibrated quaternion that represents the best current mean-square estimate of the alignment angles between the telescope and the star tracker. The S2P calibration filter incorporates a Kalman filter that tracks six states - two for each of three orthogonal coordinate axes. Although, in principle, one state per axis is sufficient, the use of two states per axis makes it possible to model both short- and long-term behaviors. Specifically, the filter properly models transient learning, characteristic times and bounds of thermomechanical drift, and long-term steady-state statistics, whether calibration measurements are taken frequently or infrequently. These properties ensure that the S2P filter performance is optimal over a broad range of flight conditions, and can be confidently run autonomously over several years of in-flight operation without human intervention.

  8. Automated alignment method for coherence-controlled holographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostal, Zbynek; Slaby, Tomas; Kvasnica, Lukas; Lostak, Martin; Krizova, Aneta; Chmelik, Radim

    2015-11-01

    A coherence-controlled holographic microscope (CCHM) was developed particularly for quantitative phase imaging and measurement of live cell dynamics, which is the proper subject of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). CCHM in low-coherence mode extends DHM in the study of living cells. However, this advantage is compensated by sensitivity of the system to easily become misaligned, which is a serious hindrance to wanted performance. Therefore, it became clear that introduction of a self-correcting system is inevitable. Accordingly, we had to devise a theory of a suitable control and design an automated alignment system for CCHM. The modulus of the reconstructed holographic signal was identified as a significant variable for guiding the alignment procedures. From this, we derived the original basic realignment three-dimensional algorithm, which encompasses a unique set of procedures for automated alignment that contains processes for initial and advanced alignment as well as long-term maintenance of microscope tuning. All of these procedures were applied to a functioning microscope and the tested processes were successfully validated. Finally, in such a way, CCHM is enabled to substantially contribute to study of biology, particularly of cancer cells in vitro.

  9. Visual alignment technology for seamless steel pipe linearity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Xue, Ting; Zhu, Jigui; Ye, Shenghua

    2006-06-01

    Linearity measurement is the key problem in seamless steel pipe industry. For the modern industry of seamless steel pipe production, the traditional method cannot meet the needs of on-line and real-time measurement performance. Recently, visual inspection has developed rapidly and has the advantages of high speed, high precision, non-contact, automation and high manoeuvrability. So a novel approach to on-line and real-time linearity measurement of seamless steel pipe based on visual alignment technology is presented in this paper. Firstly the theory of visual alignment measuring is introduced. And then an on-line and real-time linearity measuring system, which consists of multistructured light sensor for seamless steel pipe factory of Tianjin, is invented with the technology of visual alignment. And key technologies for a visual alignment, such as the optimum design of high precision light-structured sensor, coordinates integration of multisensor, the mathematical model of visual measurement, and algorithm for ellipse center computations with high precision are studied in detail. Measurement results show that the measuring system is reasonable and can measure not only the linearity but also the coaxiality of large-scale parts.

  10. Automatic laser beam alignment using blob detection for an environment monitoring spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khidir, Jarjees; Chen, Youhua; Anderson, Gary

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes a fully automated system to align an infra-red laser beam with a small retro-reflector over a wide range of distances. The component development and test were especially used for an open-path spectrometer gas detection system. Using blob detection under OpenCV library, an automatic alignment algorithm was designed to achieve fast and accurate target detection in a complex background environment. Test results are presented to show that the proposed algorithm has been successfully applied to various target distances and environment conditions.

  11. Prism Window for Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    A prism window has been devised for use, with an autocollimator, in aligning optical components that are (1) required to be oriented parallel to each other and/or at a specified angle of incidence with respect to a common optical path and (2) mounted at different positions along the common optical path. The prism window can also be used to align a single optical component at a specified angle of incidence. Prism windows could be generally useful for orienting optical components in manufacture of optical instruments. "Prism window" denotes an application-specific unit comprising two beam-splitter windows that are bonded together at an angle chosen to obtain the specified angle of incidence.

  12. Alignment of the VISA Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2000-02-09

    As part of the R and D program towards a fourth generation light source, a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) demonstration is being prepared. The Visible-Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) undulator is being installed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The VISA undulator is an in-vacuum, 4-meter long, 1.8 cm period, pure-permanent magnet device, with a novel, strong focusing, permanent magnet FODO array included within the fixed, 6 mm undulator gap. The undulator is constructed of 99 cm long segments. To attain maximum SASE gain requires establishing overlap of electron and photon beams to within 50 pm rms. This imposes challenging tolerances on mechanical fabrication and magnetic field quality, and necessitates use of laser straightness interferometry for calibration and alignment of the magnetic axes of the undulator segments. This paper describes the magnetic centerline determination, and the fiducialization and alignment processes, which were performed to meet the tolerance goal.

  13. Aligned mesoporous architectures and devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Lu, Yunfeng

    2011-03-01

    This is the final report for the Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering - PECASE (LDRD projects 93369 and 118841) awarded to Professor Yunfeng Lu (Tulane University and University of California-Los Angeles). During the last decade, mesoporous materials with tunable periodic pores have been synthesized using surfactant liquid crystalline as templates, opening a new avenue for a wide spectrum of applications. However, the applications are somewhat limited by the unfavorabe pore orientation of these materials. Although substantial effort has been devoted to align the pore channels, fabrication of mesoporous materials with perpendicular pore channels remains challenging. This project focused on fabrication of mesoporous materials with perpendicularly aligned pore channels. We demonstrated structures for use in water purification, separation, sensors, templated synthesis, microelectronics, optics, controlled release, and highly selective catalysts.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of phase detectors for active bit synchronizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Self-synchronizing digital data communication systems usually use active or phase-locked loop (PLL) bit synchronizers. The three main elements of PLL synchronizers are the phase detector, loop filter, and the voltage controlled oscillator. Of these three elements, phase detector synthesis is the main source of difficulty, particularly when the received signals are demodulated square-wave signals. A phase detector synthesis technique is reviewed that provides a physically realizable design for bit synchronizer phase detectors. The development is based upon nonlinear recursive estimation methods. The phase detector portion of the algorithm is isolated and analyzed.

  15. Interactive display system having a matrix optical detector

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

    2007-01-23

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. An image beam is projected across the inlet face laterally and transversely for display on the outlet face. An optical detector including a matrix of detector elements is optically aligned with the inlet face for detecting a corresponding lateral and transverse position of an inbound light spot on the outlet face.

  16. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Warren, Mial Evans; Snipes, Jr., Morris Burton; Armendariz, Marcelino Guadalupe; Word, V., James Cole

    1997-01-01

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring.

  17. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, S.H.; Warren, M.E.; Snipes, M.B. Jr.; Armendariz, M.G.; Word, J.C. V

    1997-08-19

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring. 8 figs.

  18. Alignment Tool For Welding Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Steffins, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    Alignment tool enables accurate positioning of optoelectronic sensor measuring weld penetration. Designed for use on tungsten/inert-gas welding apparatus, used to adjust position of sensor so photodiode puts out maximum signal. Tangs of slotted cap bent slightly inward to provide spring force holding cap snugly on sensor mount. Tool installed and removed without aid of other tools. Length of pointer adjusted with set-screws. Used with variety of gas cup and electrode lengths.

  19. NICMOS SM-2 SMOV Alignment Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupie, O.; Lallo, M.; Cox, C.; Bergeron, E.

    1997-08-01

    This technical memo documents the alignment calibration, spreadsheet model modifications and the update of aperture tables using results from in-flight NICM alignment tests performed during the Second Servicing Mission Orbital Verification Phase.

  20. SIM Lite: ground alignment of the instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekens, Frank G.; Goullioud, Renaud; Nicaise, Fabien; Kuan, Gary; Morales, Mauricio

    2010-07-01

    We present the start of the ground alignment plan for the SIM Lite Instrument. We outline the integration and alignment of the individual benches on which all the optics are mounted, and then the alignment of the benches to form the Science and Guide interferometers. The Instrument has a guide interferometer with only a 40 arc-seconds field of regard, and 200 arc-seconds of alignment adjustability. This requires each sides of the interferometer to be aligned to a fraction of that, while at the same time be orthogonal to the baseline defined by the External Metrology Truss. The baselines of the Science and Guide interferometers must also be aligned to be parallel. The start of these alignment plans is captured in a SysML Instrument System model, in the form of activity diagrams. These activity diagrams are then related to the hardware design and requirements. We finish with future plans for the alignment and integration activities and requirements.

  1. SIM Lite: Ground Alignment of the Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekens, Frank G.; Goullioud, Renaud; Nicaise, Fabien; Kuan, Gary; Morales, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    We present the start of the ground alignment plan for the SIM Lite Instrument. We outline the integration and alignment of the individual benches on which all the optics are mounted, and then the alignment of the benches to form the Science and Guide interferometers. The Instrument has a guide interferometer with only a 40 arc-seconds field of regard, and 200 arc-seconds of alignment adjustability. This requires each sides of the interferometer to be aligned to a fraction of that, while at the same time be orthogonal to the baseline defined by the External Metrology Truss. The baselines of the Science and Guide interferometers must also be aligned to be parallel. The start of these alignment plans is captured in a SysML Instrument System model, in the form of activity diagrams. These activity diagrams are then related to the hardware design and requirements. We finish with future plans for the alignment and integration activities and requirements.

  2. Threaded pilot insures cutting tool alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, R.; Schneider, W. E.

    1966-01-01

    Threaded pilot allows machining of a port component, or boss, after the reciprocating hole has been threaded. It is used to align cutting surfaces with the boss threads, thus insuring precision alignment.

  3. Grain alignment in starless cores

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T. J.; Bagley, M.; Krejny, M.; Andersson, B.-G.; Bastien, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present near-IR polarimetry data of background stars shining through a selection of starless cores taken in the K band, probing visual extinctions up to A{sub V}∼48. We find that P{sub K}/τ{sub K} continues to decline with increasing A{sub V} with a power law slope of roughly −0.5. Examination of published submillimeter (submm) polarimetry of starless cores suggests that by A{sub V}≳20 the slope for P versus τ becomes ∼−1, indicating no grain alignment at greater optical depths. Combining these two data sets, we find good evidence that, in the absence of a central illuminating source, the dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores with no internal radiation source cease to become aligned with the local magnetic field at optical depths greater than A{sub V}∼20. A simple model relating the alignment efficiency to the optical depth into the cloud reproduces the observations well.

  4. Optimal Parameter Design of Coarse Alignment for Fiber Optic Gyro Inertial Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Baofeng; Wang, Qiuying; Yu, Chunmei; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Two different coarse alignment algorithms for Fiber Optic Gyro (FOG) Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on inertial reference frame are discussed in this paper. Both of them are based on gravity vector integration, therefore, the performance of these algorithms is determined by integration time. In previous works, integration time is selected by experience. In order to give a criterion for the selection process, and make the selection of the integration time more accurate, optimal parameter design of these algorithms for FOG INS is performed in this paper. The design process is accomplished based on the analysis of the error characteristics of these two coarse alignment algorithms. Moreover, this analysis and optimal parameter design allow us to make an adequate selection of the most accurate algorithm for FOG INS according to the actual operational conditions. The analysis and simulation results show that the parameter provided by this work is the optimal value, and indicate that in different operational conditions, the coarse alignment algorithms adopted for FOG INS are different in order to achieve better performance. Lastly, the experiment results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26121614

  5. Optimal Parameter Design of Coarse Alignment for Fiber Optic Gyro Inertial Navigation System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Baofeng; Wang, Qiuying; Yu, Chunmei; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Two different coarse alignment algorithms for Fiber Optic Gyro (FOG) Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on inertial reference frame are discussed in this paper. Both of them are based on gravity vector integration, therefore, the performance of these algorithms is determined by integration time. In previous works, integration time is selected by experience. In order to give a criterion for the selection process, and make the selection of the integration time more accurate, optimal parameter design of these algorithms for FOG INS is performed in this paper. The design process is accomplished based on the analysis of the error characteristics of these two coarse alignment algorithms. Moreover, this analysis and optimal parameter design allow us to make an adequate selection of the most accurate algorithm for FOG INS according to the actual operational conditions. The analysis and simulation results show that the parameter provided by this work is the optimal value, and indicate that in different operational conditions, the coarse alignment algorithms adopted for FOG INS are different in order to achieve better performance. Lastly, the experiment results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26121614

  6. Orbital Verification of the CXO High-Resolution Mirror Assembly Alignment and Vignetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaetz, T. J.; Jerius, D.; Edgar, R. J.; VanSpeybroeck, L. P.; Schwartz, D. A.; Markevitch, M.; Schulz, N. S.

    2000-01-01

    Prior to launch, the High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) of the Chandra X-ray Observatory underwent extensive ground testing at the X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville. Observations made during the post-launch Orbital Activation and Calibration period, allow the on-orbit condition of the X-ray optics to be assessed. Based on these ground-based and on-orbit data, we examine the alignment of the x-ray optics based on the PSF, and the boresight and alignment of the optical axis alignment relative to the detectors. We examine the vignetting and the single reflection ghost suppression properties of the telescope. Slight imperfections in alignment lead to a small azimuthal dependence of the off-axis area; the morphology of off-axis images also shows an additional small azimuthal dependence varying as 1/2 the off-axis azimuth angle.

  7. Alignment of capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry datasets using accurate mass information.

    PubMed

    Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; Derks, Rico; Deelder, André M; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Palmblad, Magnus

    2009-12-01

    Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is a powerful technique for the analysis of small soluble compounds in biological fluids. A major drawback of CE is the poor migration time reproducibility, which makes it difficult to combine data from different experiments and correctly assign compounds. A number of alignment algorithms have been developed but not all of them can cope with large and irregular time shifts between CE-MS runs. Here we present a genetic algorithm designed for alignment of CE-MS data using accurate mass information. The utility of the algorithm was demonstrated on real data, and the results were compared with one of the existing packages. The new algorithm showed a significant reduction of elution time variation in the aligned datasets. The importance of mass accuracy for the performance of the algorithm was also demonstrated by comparing alignments of datasets from a standard time-of-flight (TOF) instrument with those from the new ultrahigh resolution TOF maXis (Bruker Daltonics). PMID:19826795

  8. Alignment mechanisms of paramagnetic grains revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seki, Munezo

    1989-01-01

    Taking into account the tight coupling of grain axis with angular momentum due to effective dissipation of rotation energy, the alignment of spheroidal grains was investigated by paramagnetic relaxation. Alignment degree will be significantly improved in diffuse clouds. The inclusions of superparamagnetic (SPM) substances may play a key role in grain alignment in dark clouds as well as in diffuse clouds.

  9. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  10. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    SciTech Connect

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  11. Physician-Hospital Alignment in Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D

    2015-09-01

    The concept of "alignment" between physicians and hospitals is a popular buzzword in the age of health care reform. Despite their often tumultuous histories, physicians and hospitals find themselves under increasing pressures to work together toward common goals. However, effective alignment is more than just simple cooperation between parties. The process of achieving alignment does not have simple, universal steps. Alignment will differ based on individual situational factors and the type of specialty involved. Ultimately, however, there are principles that underlie the concept of alignment and should be a part of any physician-hospital alignment efforts. In orthopedic surgery, alignment involves the clinical, administrative, financial, and even personal aspects of a surgeon's practice. It must be based on the principles of financial interest, clinical authority, administrative participation, transparency, focus on the patient, and mutual necessity. Alignment can take on various forms as well, with popular models consisting of shared governance and comanagement, gainsharing, bundled payments, accountable care organizations, and other methods. As regulatory and financial pressures continue to motivate physicians and hospitals to develop alignment relationships, new and innovative methods of alignment will also appear. Existing models will mature and evolve, with individual variability based on local factors. However, certain trends seem to be appearing as time progresses and alignment relationships deepen, including regional and national collaboration, population management, and changes in the legal system. This article explores the history, principles, and specific methods of physician-hospital alignment and its critical importance for the future of health care delivery. PMID:26375539

  12. Reconfigurable systems for sequence alignment and for general dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Ricardo P; Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio; Carvalho, Luis G A; Llanos, Carlos H; Hartenstein, Reiner W

    2005-01-01

    Reconfigurable systolic arrays can be adapted to efficiently resolve a wide spectrum of computational problems; parallelism is naturally explored in systolic arrays and reconfigurability allows for redefinition of the interconnections and operations even during run time (dynamically). We present a reconfigurable systolic architecture that can be applied for the efficient treatment of several dynamic programming methods for resolving well-known problems, such as global and local sequence alignment, approximate string matching and longest common subsequence. The dynamicity of the reconfigurability was found to be useful for practical applications in the construction of sequence alignments. A VHDL (VHSIC hardware description language) version of this new architecture was implemented on an APEX FPGA (Field programmable gate array). It would be several magnitudes faster than the software algorithm alternatives. PMID:16342039

  13. Fast Implementation of Matched Filter Based Automatic Alignment Image Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S; Rice, K; Taha, T

    2008-04-02

    Video images of laser beams imprinted with distinguishable features are used for alignment of 192 laser beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Algorithms designed to determine the position of these beams enable the control system to perform the task of alignment. Centroiding is a common approach used for determining the position of beams. However, real world beam images suffer from intensity fluctuation or other distortions which make such an approach susceptible to higher position measurement variability. Matched filtering used for identifying the beam position results in greater stability of position measurement compared to that obtained using the centroiding technique. However, this gain is achieved at the expense of extra processing time required for each beam image. In this work we explore the possibility of using a field programmable logic array (FPGA) to speed up these computations. The results indicate a performance improvement of 20 using the FPGA relative to a 3 GHz Pentium 4 processor.

  14. Minimal-effort planning of active alignment processes for beam-shaping optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Schranner, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Schlette, Christian; Losch, Daniel; Brecher, Christian; Roßmann, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    In science and industry, the alignment of beam-shaping optics is usually a manual procedure. Many industrial applications utilizing beam-shaping optical systems require more scalable production solutions and therefore effort has been invested in research regarding the automation of optics assembly. In previous works, the authors and other researchers have proven the feasibility of automated alignment of beam-shaping optics such as collimation lenses or homogenization optics. Nevertheless, the planning efforts as well as additional knowledge from the fields of automation and control required for such alignment processes are immense. This paper presents a novel approach of planning active alignment processes of beam-shaping optics with the focus of minimizing the planning efforts for active alignment. The approach utilizes optical simulation and the genetic programming paradigm from computer science for automatically extracting features from a simulated data basis with a high correlation coefficient regarding the individual degrees of freedom of alignment. The strategy is capable of finding active alignment strategies that can be executed by an automated assembly system. The paper presents a tool making the algorithm available to end-users and it discusses the results of planning the active alignment of the well-known assembly of a fast-axis collimator. The paper concludes with an outlook on the transferability to other use cases such as application specific intensity distributions which will benefit from reduced planning efforts.

  15. Alignment of high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectra using warping methods.

    PubMed

    Giskeødegård, Guro F; Bloemberg, Tom G; Postma, Geert; Sitter, Beathe; Tessem, May-Britt; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Bathen, Tone F; Buydens, Lutgarde M C

    2010-12-17

    The peaks of magnetic resonance (MR) spectra can be shifted due to variations in physiological and experimental conditions, and correcting for misaligned peaks is an important part of data processing prior to multivariate analysis. In this paper, five warping algorithms (icoshift, COW, fastpa, VPdtw and PTW) are compared for their feasibility in aligning spectral peaks in three sets of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) MR spectra with different degrees of misalignments, and their merits are discussed. In addition, extraction of information that might be present in the shifts is examined, both for simulated data and the real MR spectra. The generic evaluation methodology employs a number of frequently used quality criteria for evaluation of the alignments, together with PLS-DA to assess the influence of alignment on the classification outcome. Peak alignment greatly improved the internal similarity of the data sets. Especially icoshift and COW seem suitable for aligning HR-MAS MR spectra, possibly because they perform alignment segment-wise. The choice of reference spectrum can influence the alignment result, and it is advisable to test several references. Information from the peak shifts was extracted, and in one case cancer samples were successfully discriminated from normal tissue based on shift information only. Based on these findings, general recommendations for alignment of HR-MAS MRS data are presented. Where possible, observations are generalized to other data types (e.g. chromatographic data). PMID:21094376

  16. Optical alignment of pixelated 4f optical system using multiplexed filter.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, N; Neil, M A A; Balachandran, W

    2013-11-10

    Novel optical alignment techniques to perform precise alignment of a typical pixelated 4f optical system are presented in this paper. These techniques use optical multiplexed matched filters, which were designed using a simple, efficient iterative optimization algorithm, known as direct binary search. Three alignment challenges are identified: positioning, focusing, and magnification. The first two alignments were performed using the optical multiplexed matched filtering technique, and the last one was performed using a new optical arrangement. Experimental results of the new alignment techniques and a simple optical pattern recognition problem to demonstrate the benefits of the new alignment techniques are also presented. Two pixelated, electrically addressed spatial light modulators (128 × 128 pixels and one pixel width is 80 μm) were used to represent the input and filter planes. The results clearly show that the new alignment techniques allow the 4f system to be aligned to a precision of 80 μm in the x-y direction and 0.716 mm in the z direction. PMID:24216742

  17. The ATLAS Inner Detector commissioning and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Dos Santos Pedrosa, F. Baltasar; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Harpaz, S. Behar; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ami, S. Ben; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernabéu, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S. J.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de Mora, L.; de Oliveira Branco, M.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D. V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S. P.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dewilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Luise, S.; di Mattia, A.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M. A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Doan, T. K. O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drasal, Z.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Dührssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dunford, M.; Yildiz, H. Duran; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C. A.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C. U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M. J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Martin, T. Fonseca; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A. J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S. T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, Y. S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; García, C.; Navarro, J. E. García; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gautard, V.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; Georgatos, F.; George, S.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P. F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Göpfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goggi, V.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Fajardo, L. S. Gomez; Gonçalo, R.; Gonella, L.; Gong, C.; González de La Hoz, S.; Silva, M. L. Gonzalez; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Eschrich, I. Gough; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H. M.; Gray, J. A.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Groh, M.; Groll, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guillemin, T.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Gusakov, Y.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hadley, D. R.; Haefner, P.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G. A.; Harenberg, T.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, K.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Hemperek, T.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Correia, A. M. Henriques; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Henß, T.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Hershenhorn, A. D.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hessey, N. P.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Homma, Y.; Horazdovsky, T.; Hori, T.; Horn, C.; Horner, S.; Horvat, S.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howe, T.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huang, G. S.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Irles Quiles, A.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Isobe, T.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Itoh, Y.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J. N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D. K.; Jankowski, E.; Jansen, E.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jenni, P.; Jez, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Belenguer, M. Jimenez; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. J.; Jorge, P. M.; Joseph, J.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Kabachenko, V. V.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz Unel, M.; Karnevskiy, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kastoryano, M.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M. S.; Kayumov, F.; Kazanin, V. A.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Keates, J. R.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kelly, M.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Khakzad, M.; Khalil-Zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, P. C.; Kim, S. H.; Kind, O.; Kind, P.; King, B. T.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G. P.; Kirsch, L. E.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Klute, M.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N. S.; Kneringer, E.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koblitz, B.; Kocian, M.; Kocnar, A.; Kodys, P.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Koenig, S.; Köpke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Kollar, D.; Kolos, S.; Kolya, S. D.; Komar, A. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Koperny, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Korotkov, V. A.; Kortner, O.; Kostka, P.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotov, K. 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D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Della Porta, G. Zevi; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector is a composite tracking system consisting of silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes in a 2 T magnetic field. Its installation was completed in August 2008 and the detector took part in data-taking with single LHC beams and cosmic rays. The initial detector operation, hardware commissioning and in-situ calibrations are described. Tracking performance has been measured with 7.6 million cosmic-ray events, collected using a tracking trigger and reconstructed with modular pattern-recognition and fitting software. The intrinsic hit efficiency and tracking trigger efficiencies are close to 100%. Lorentz angle measurements for both electrons and holes, specific energy-loss calibration and transition radiation turn-on measurements have been performed. Different alignment techniques have been used to reconstruct the detector geometry. After the initial alignment, a transverse impact parameter resolution of 22.1±0.9 μm and a relative momentum resolution σ p / p=(4.83±0.16)×10-4 GeV-1× p T have been measured for high momentum tracks.

  18. Phase Sensor for Aligning a Segmented Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, Philip; Walker, Chanda Barlett

    2006-01-01

    A phase sensor has been developed for use in aligning a segmented telescope mirror to within a fraction of a wavelength in piston. (As used here, piston signifies displacement of a mirror segment along the optical axis of the telescope.) Such precise alignment is necessary in order to realize the full benefit of the large aperture achievable through segmentation. This phase sensor is achromatic. It is based on two-wavelength shearing interferometry, and can be modified to utilize an extended or broad-band (e.g., white) light source. The sensor optics include a ruled diffraction grating and an imaging lens. The sensor can measure the piston shift between segments as well as aberrations of the segments. It can measure the surface error of an individual segment, making it possible to compensate for the error with optimal amount(s) of piston and/or tilt. The precise capture range of the sensor depends partly on the telescope design; the largest relative piston shifts measurable by use of this sensor are of the order of 100 m. The accuracy of the sensor also depends partly on the telescope design; in general, the accuracy is sufficient to enable alignment to within approximately half a wavelength. The interferometric image is digitized and processed by a simple algorithm in real time, and the output of the algorithm can be used to maintain alignment in real time, even in the presence of atmospheric turbulence. The sensor is robust. Through calibration, it can be made insensitive to (and, hence, tolerant of) misalignments and aberrations of its own optics, most aberrations of the telescope as a whole (in contradistinction to aberrations of individual segments), and most aberrations introduced by atmospheric turbulence

  19. GCALIGNER 1.0: an alignment program to compute a multiple sample comparison data matrix from large eco-chemical datasets obtained by GC.

    PubMed

    Dellicour, Simon; Lecocq, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    GCALIGNER 1.0 is a computer program designed to perform a preliminary data comparison matrix of chemical data obtained by GC without MS information. The alignment algorithm is based on the comparison between the retention times of each detected compound in a sample. In this paper, we test the GCALIGNER efficiency on three datasets of the chemical secretions of bumble bees. The algorithm performs the alignment with a low error rate (<3%). GCALIGNER 1.0 is a useful, simple and free program based on an algorithm that enables the alignment of table-type data from GC. PMID:23894053

  20. Dynamic alignment models for neural coding.

    PubMed

    Kollmorgen, Sepp; Hahnloser, Richard H R

    2014-03-01

    Recently, there have been remarkable advances in modeling the relationships between the sensory environment, neuronal responses, and behavior. However, most models cannot encompass variable stimulus-response relationships such as varying response latencies and state or context dependence of the neural code. Here, we consider response modeling as a dynamic alignment problem and model stimulus and response jointly by a mixed pair hidden Markov model (MPH). In MPHs, multiple stimulus-response relationships (e.g., receptive fields) are represented by different states or groups of states in a Markov chain. Each stimulus-response relationship features temporal flexibility, allowing modeling of variable response latencies, including noisy ones. We derive algorithms for learning of MPH parameters and for inference of spike response probabilities. We show that some linear-nonlinear Poisson cascade (LNP) models are a special case of MPHs. We demonstrate the efficiency and usefulness of MPHs in simulations of both jittered and switching spike responses to white noise and natural stimuli. Furthermore, we apply MPHs to extracellular single and multi-unit data recorded in cortical brain areas of singing birds to showcase a novel method for estimating response lag distributions. MPHs allow simultaneous estimation of receptive fields, latency statistics, and hidden state dynamics and so can help to uncover complex stimulus response relationships that are subject to variable timing and involve diverse neural codes. PMID:24625448

  1. Vertex detector for a linear beauty factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratta, G.; Zaccardelli, C.

    1988-02-01

    A very high resolution vertex detector to help in B meson identification both tagging on the B decay length and antitagging on the D decay length; reduce the combinatorial problems for charged tracks; measure lifetimes study B(0) B bar (0) mixing as a function of time for both Bd and Bs systems; study time dependent asymmetries due to CP violation; look for DD bar mixing; and detect phenomena which could become reachable with the new regime of luminosity is proposed. The detector is based on 3 coaxial layers of silicon pixel devices, each made of 10 flat detectors arranged cylindrically. Mechanics and vacuum of the system are outlined, along with control electronics and alignment.

  2. Linking GPS and travel diary data using sequence alignment in a study of children's independent mobility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Global positioning systems (GPS) are increasingly being used in health research to determine the location of study participants. Combining GPS data with data collected via travel/activity diaries allows researchers to assess where people travel in conjunction with data about trip purpose and accompaniment. However, linking GPS and diary data is problematic and to date the only method has been to match the two datasets manually, which is time consuming and unlikely to be practical for larger data sets. This paper assesses the feasibility of a new sequence alignment method of linking GPS and travel diary data in comparison with the manual matching method. Methods GPS and travel diary data obtained from a study of children's independent mobility were linked using sequence alignment algorithms to test the proof of concept. Travel diaries were assessed for quality by counting the number of errors and inconsistencies in each participant's set of diaries. The success of the sequence alignment method was compared for higher versus lower quality travel diaries, and for accompanied versus unaccompanied trips. Time taken and percentage of trips matched were compared for the sequence alignment method and the manual method. Results The sequence alignment method matched 61.9% of all trips. Higher quality travel diaries were associated with higher match rates in both the sequence alignment and manual matching methods. The sequence alignment method performed almost as well as the manual method and was an order of magnitude faster. However, the sequence alignment method was less successful at fully matching trips and at matching unaccompanied trips. Conclusions Sequence alignment is a promising method of linking GPS and travel diary data in large population datasets, especially if limitations in the trip detection algorithm are addressed. PMID:22142322

  3. Accelerator and transport line survey and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    This paper summarizes the survey and alignment processes of accelerators and transport lines and discusses the propagation of errors associated with these processes. The major geodetic principles governing the survey and alignment measurement space are introduced and their relationship to a lattice coordinate system shown. The paper continues with a broad overview about the activities involved in the step sequence from initial absolute alignment to final smoothing. Emphasis is given to the relative alignment of components, in particular to the importance of incorporating methods to remove residual systematic effects in surveying and alignment operations. Various approaches to smoothing used at major laboratories are discussed. 47 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Detector simulation needs for detector designers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.

    1987-11-01

    Computer simulation of the components of SSC detectors and of the complete detectors will be very important for the designs of the detectors. The ratio of events from interesting physics to events from background processes is very low, so detailed understanding of detector response to the backgrounds is needed. Any large detector for the SSC will be very complex and expensive and every effort must be made to design detectors which will have excellent performance and will not have to undergo major rebuilding. Some areas in which computer simulation is particularly needed are pattern recognition in tracking detectors and development of shower simulation code which can be trusted as an aid in the design and optimization of calorimeters, including their electron identification performance. Existing codes require too much computer time to be practical and need to be compared with test beam data at energies of several hundred GeV. Computer simulation of the processing of the data, including electronics response to the signals from the detector components, processing of the data by microprocessors on the detector, the trigger, and data acquisition will be required. In this report we discuss the detector simulation needs for detector designers.

  5. Infrared micro-scanning error compensation algorithm based on edge location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hang; Chen, Qian; Sui, Xiubao

    2015-03-01

    For area-array thermal imaging devices, an essential factor affecting the system imaging quality is the sub-sampling caused by oversized discrete sampling pitch. In order to obtain higher spatial resolution, staring infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) gets multi-frame sub-sampling images by micro-scanning movement to achieve an adequate spatial sampling frequency. However, influenced by external environment and the accuracy of the scanning system itself, the relative displacement between the detector and the scene cannot be absolutely precisely controlled, but exist some error, which will affect the final performance of the reconstructed high-resolution image. We analyzed the distribution of the error and then proposed an infrared micro-scanning error compensation algorithm based on edge location, which is inspired by human retina fixational eye movement pattern. It first locates the edge point in the reconstruction unit and finds the corresponding characteristic values. Later on, matches the characteristic value with the fixed templates and reorders the pixel responses in reconstruction unit utilizing the gray correlation. Finally, it compensates the error real-timely through repeated update and iteration. We apply the algorithm in video sequences acquired by 4-step infrared micro-scanning system. The experiment results show that when aligning to a static scene or stationary region in dynamic scene, the algorithm possesses good resolution enhancement effect, particularly, can improve the clarity and the accuracy of static image edge details.

  6. An automatic image fusion algorithm for unregistered multiply multi-focus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Yu, Feihong

    2015-04-01

    The multi-focus image fusion technique provides a promising way to extend the depth of defocused images by combining multiple images with diverse focuses into a single focused one. In this paper, we present a robust and automated algorithm for the fusion of unregistered multiply multi-focus images. The motivation of our method lies in the fact that the source images are assumed to be perfectly aligned in the majority of previous research. Actually, the assumption is difficult to achieve in many practical situations. Hence, image registration method for multi-focus images is talked in this paper. We choose a multi-focus image as reference one in the image registration process by entropy theory. Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) feature detector with Binary Robust Invariant Scalable Keypoints (BRISK) feature descriptor is used in the feature matching process. An improved RANdom Sample Consensus (RANSAC) algorithm is adopted to reject incorrect matches. The registered images are fused using stationary wavelet transform (SWT) with sym5 wavelet basis. The experimental results prove that the proposed algorithm achieves better performance for unregistered multiply multi-focus images, and it is especially robust to scale and rotation translation compared with traditional direct fusion method.

  7. Energy-based RNA consensus secondary structure prediction in multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Washietl, Stefan; Bernhart, Stephan H; Kellis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    Many biologically important RNA structures are conserved in evolution leading to characteristic mutational patterns. RNAalifold is a widely used program to predict consensus secondary structures in multiple alignments by combining evolutionary information with traditional energy-based RNA folding algorithms. Here we describe the theory and applications of the RNAalifold algorithm. Consensus secondary structure prediction not only leads to significantly more accurate structure models, but it also allows to study structural conservation of functional RNAs. PMID:24639158

  8. Vision-guided self-alignment and manipulation in a walking robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickels, Kevin M.; Kennedy, Brett; Aghazarian, Hrand; Collins, Curtis; Garrett(dagger), Mike; Magnone, Lee; Okon, Avi; Townsend, Julie

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the vision algorithms used in several tasks, as well as the vision-guided manipulation algorithms developed to mitigate mismatches between the vision system and the limbs used for manipulation. Two system-level tasks will be described, one involving a two meter walk culminating in a bolt-fastening task and one involving a vision-guided alignment ending with the robot mating with a docking station.

  9. Target alignment in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.; Bliss, E.S.; Murray, J.E.

    1994-06-06

    Accurate placement of hundreds of focused laser beams on target is necessary to achieve success in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The current system requirement is {le}7 {mu}rad error in output pointing and {le}1 mm error in focusing. To accommodate several system shots per day, a target alignment system must be able to align the target to chamber center, inject an alignment beam to represent each shot beam, and point and focus the alignment beams onto the target in about one hour. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have developed a target alignment concept and built a prototype to validate the approach. The concept comprises three systems: the chamber center reference, target alignment sensor, and target alignment beams.

  10. Combining Multiple Pairwise Structure-based Alignments

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-12

    CombAlign is a new Python code that generates a gapped, one-to-many, multiple structure-based sequence alignment(MSSA) given a set of pairwise structure-based alignments. In order to better define regions of similarity among related protein structures, it is useful to detect the residue-residue correspondences among a set of pairwise structure alignments. Few codes exist for constructing a one-to-many, multiple sequence alignment derived from a set of structure alignments, and we perceived a need for creating a newmore » tool for combing pairwise structure alignments that would allow for insertion of gaps in the reference structure.« less

  11. Multiscale peak alignment for chromatographic datasets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Lu, Hong-Mei; Tan, Bin-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Na; Ferro, Miguel

    2012-02-01

    Chromatography has been extensively applied in many fields, such as metabolomics and quality control of herbal medicines. Preprocessing, especially peak alignment, is a time-consuming task prior to the extraction of useful information from the datasets by chemometrics and statistics. To accurately and rapidly align shift peaks among one-dimensional chromatograms, multiscale peak alignment (MSPA) is presented in this research. Peaks of each chromatogram were detected based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and aligned against a reference chromatogram from large to small scale gradually, and the aligning procedure is accelerated by fast Fourier transform cross correlation. The presented method was compared with two widely used alignment methods on chromatographic dataset, which demonstrates that MSPA can preserve the shapes of peaks and has an excellent speed during alignment. Furthermore, MSPA method is robust and not sensitive to noise and baseline. MSPA was implemented and is available at http://code.google.com/p/mspa. PMID:22222564

  12. Alignment method for solar collector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Driver, Jr., Richard B

    2012-10-23

    The present invention is directed to an improved method for establishing camera fixture location for aligning mirrors on a solar collector array (SCA) comprising multiple mirror modules. The method aligns the mirrors on a module by comparing the location of the receiver image in photographs with the predicted theoretical receiver image location. To accurately align an entire SCA, a common reference is used for all of the individual module images within the SCA. The improved method can use relative pixel location information in digital photographs along with alignment fixture inclinometer data to calculate relative locations of the fixture between modules. The absolute locations are determined by minimizing alignment asymmetry for the SCA. The method inherently aligns all of the mirrors in an SCA to the receiver, even with receiver position and module-to-module alignment errors.

  13. An Automatic Registration Algorithm for 3D Maxillofacial Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Luwen; Zhou, Zhongwei; Guo, Jixiang; Lv, Jiancheng

    2016-09-01

    3D image registration aims at aligning two 3D data sets in a common coordinate system, which has been widely used in computer vision, pattern recognition and computer assisted surgery. One challenging problem in 3D registration is that point-wise correspondences between two point sets are often unknown apriori. In this work, we develop an automatic algorithm for 3D maxillofacial models registration including facial surface model and skull model. Our proposed registration algorithm can achieve a good alignment result between partial and whole maxillofacial model in spite of ambiguous matching, which has a potential application in the oral and maxillofacial reparative and reconstructive surgery. The proposed algorithm includes three steps: (1) 3D-SIFT features extraction and FPFH descriptors construction; (2) feature matching using SAC-IA; (3) coarse rigid alignment and refinement by ICP. Experiments on facial surfaces and mandible skull models demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of our algorithm.

  14. Pupil Alignment Measuring Technique and Alignment Reference for Instruments or Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A technique was created to measure the pupil alignment of instruments in situ by measuring calibrated pupil alignment references (PARs) in instruments. The PAR can also be measured using an alignment telescope or an imaging system. PAR allows the verification of the science instrument (SI) pupil alignment at the integrated science instrument module (ISIM) level of assembly at ambient and cryogenic operating temperature. This will allow verification of the ISIM+SI alignment, and provide feedback to realign the SI if necessary.

  15. Single shot x-ray phase contrast imaging using a direct conversion microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagias, M.; Cartier, S.; Wang, Z.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Stampanoni, M.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging enables the measurement of the electron density of a sample with high sensitivity compared to the conventional absorption contrast. This is advantageous for the study of dose-sensitive samples, in particular, for biological and medical investigations. Recent developments relaxed the requirement for the beam coherence, such that conventional X-ray sources can be used for phase contrast imaging and thus clinical applications become possible. One of the prominent phase contrast imaging methods, Talbot-Lau grating interferometry, is limited by the manufacturing, alignment, and photon absorption of the analyzer grating, which is placed in the beam path in front of the detector. We propose an alternative improved method based on direct conversion charge integrating detectors, which enables a grating interferometer to be operated without an analyzer grating. Algorithms are introduced, which resolve interference fringes with a periodicity of 4.7 μm recorded with a 25 μm pitch Si microstrip detector (GOTTHARD). The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by an experiment at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source on a polyethylene sample.

  16. Alignment and Performance of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, Joseph A.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mentzell, J. Eric; Madison, Timothy J.; Hylan, Jason E.; Mink, Ronald G.; Saha, Timo T.; Tveekrem, June L.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Chambers, V. John; Fitzgerald, Danetter; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; MacKenty, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a principle investigator class instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 and 2.1 meter telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 - 2.5 micron) spectrometer with low-to mid-resolving power (R = 300 - 3000). IRMOS produces simultaneous spectra of approximately 100 objects in its 2.8 x 2.0 arc-min field of view (4 m telescope) using a commercial Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) micro-mirror array (MMA) from Texas Instruments. The IRMOS optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the MMA field stop, and the spectrograph images the MMA onto the detector. We describe ambient breadboard subsystem alignment and imaging performance of each stage independently, and ambient imaging performance of the fully assembled instrument. Interferometric measurements of subsystem wavefront error serve as a qualitative alignment guide, and are accomplished using a commercial, modified Twyman-Green laser unequal path interferometer. Image testing provides verification of the optomechanical alignment method and a measurement of near-angle scattered light due to mirror small-scale surface error. Image testing is performed at multiple field points. A mercury-argon pencil lamp provides a spectral line at 546.1 nanometers, a blackbody source provides a line at 1550 nanometers, and a CCD camera and IR camera are used as detectors. We use commercial optical modeling software to predict the point-spread function and its effect on instrument slit transmission and resolution. Our breadboard and instrument level test results validate this prediction. We conclude with an instrument performance prediction for cryogenic operation and first light in late 2003.

  17. Alignment and performance of the Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Joseph A.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Mentzell, J. E.; Madison, Timothy J.; Hylan, Jason E.; Mink, Ronald G.; Saha, Timo T.; Tveekrem, June L.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Chambers, Victor J.; Fitzgerald, Danette L.; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; MacKenty, John W.

    2003-10-01

    The Infrared Multi-Object Spectrometer (IRMOS) is a principle investigator class instrument for the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 and 2.1 m telescopes. IRMOS is a near-IR (0.8 2.5 μm) spectrometer with low- to mid-resolving power (R = 300 3000). IRMOS produces simultaneous spectra of ~100 objects in its 2.8 ´ 2.0 arc-min field of view (4 m telescope) using a commercial Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) micro-mirror array (MMA) from Texas Instruments. The IRMOS optical design consists of two imaging subsystems. The focal reducer images the focal plane of the telescope onto the MMA field stop, and the spectrograph images the MMA onto the detector. We describe ambient breadboard subsystem alignment and imaging performance of each stage independently, and ambient imaging performance of the fully assembled instrument. Interferometric measurements of subsystem wavefront error serve as a qualitative alignment guide, and are accomplished using a commercial, modified Twyman-Green laser unequal path interferometer. Image testing provides verification of the optomechanical alignment method and a measurement of near-angle scattered light due to mirror small-scale surface error. Image testing is performed at multiple field points. A mercury-argon pencil lamp provides a spectral line at 546.1 nm, a blackbody source provides a line at 1550 nm, and a CCD camera and IR camera are used as detectors. We use commercial optical modeling software to predict the point-spread function and its effect on instrument slit transmission and resolution. Our breadboard and instrument level test results validate this prediction. We conclude with an instrument performance prediction for cryogenic operation and first light in late 2003.

  18. Ridge effect and alignment phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Lokhtin, I. P. Managadze, A. K. Snigirev, A. M.

    2013-05-15

    It is assumed that the ridge effect observed by the CMS Collaboration in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and the phenomenon observed by the Pamir Collaboration in emulsion experiments with cosmic rays and characterized by the alignment of spots on a film is a manifestation of the same as-yet-unknown mechanism of the emergence of a coplanar structure of events. A large coplanar effect at the LHC in the region of forward rapidities is predicted on the basis of this hypothesis and an analysis of experimental data.

  19. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, J.

    2015-12-01

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.

  20. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kempa, J.

    2015-12-15

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.