Science.gov

Sample records for detector dead time

  1. Dead-time effects in microchannel-plate imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.; Fraser, George W.

    1991-01-01

    The observed counting rates of microchannel plate (MCP) based detectors for high resolution observations of celestial EUV and X-ray sources vary over many orders of magnitude; the counting capability of an individual channel, however, is not high, and is associated with dead-times ranging from 0.1 msec to 1 sec. The dead-time increases with the area illuminated; attention is presently given to laboratory determinations of the count rate characteristics of a MCP detector as a function of illuminated area, and a model is developed for these results' use in the interpretation of space observations.

  2. Effect of detector dead time on the performance of optical direct-detection communication links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-C.

    1988-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating in the Geiger mode can provide a significantly improved single-photon detection sensitivity over conventional photodiodes. However, the quenching circuit required to remove the excess charge carriers after each photon event can introduce an undesirable dead time into the detection process. The effect of this detector dead time on the performance of a binary pulse-position-modulated (PPM) channel is studied by analyzing the error probability. It is shown that, when background noise is negligible, the performance of the detector with dead time is similar to that of a quantum-limited receiver. For systems with increasing background intensities, the error rate of the receiver starts to degrade rapidly with increasing dead time. The power penalty due to detector dead time is also evaluated and shown to depend critically on badkground intensity as well as dead time. Given the expected background strength in an optical channel, therefore, a constraint must be placed on the bandwidth of the receiver to limit the amount of power penalty due to detector dead time.

  3. Effect of Detector Dead Time on the Performance of Optical Direct-Detection Communication Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-C.

    1988-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating in the Geiger mode can provide a significantly improved single-photon detect ion sensitivity over conventional photodiodes. However, the quenching circuit required to remove the excess charge carriers after each photon event can introduce an undesirable dead time into the detection process. The effect of this detector dead time on the performance of a binary pulse-position-modulted (PPM) channel is studied by analyzing the error probability. It is shown that, when back- ground noise is negligible, the performance of the detector with dead time is similar to that o f a quantum-limited receiver. For systems with increasing background intensities, the error rate of the receiver starts to degrade rapidly with increasing dead time. The power penalty due to detector dead time is also evaluated and shown to depend critically on background intensity as well as dead time. Given the expected background strength in an optical channel, therefore, a constraint must be placed on the bandwidth of the receiver to limit the amount of power penalty due to detector dead time.

  4. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron e xperiments: detector dead time and apatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    In almost every detector counting system, a minimal dead time is required to record two successive events as two separated pulses. Due to the random nature of neutron interactions in the subcritical assembly, there is always some probability that a true neutron event will not be recorded because it occurs too close to the preceding event. These losses may become rather severe for counting systems with high counting rates, and should be corrected before any utilization of the experimental data. This report examines the dead time effects for the pulsed neutron experiments of the YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly. The nonparalyzable model is utilized to correct the experimental data due to dead time. Overall, the reactivity values are increased by 0.19$ and 0.32$ after the spatial corrections for the YALINA-Booster 36% and 21% configurations respectively. The differences of the reactivities obtained with He-3 long or short detectors at the same detector channel diminish after the dead time corrections of the experimental data for the 36% YALINA-Booster configuration. In addition, better agreements between reactivities obtained from different experimental data sets are also observed after the dead time corrections for the 21% YALINA-Booster configuration.

  5. Correction for the detector-dead-time effect on the second-order correlation of stationary sub-Poissonian light in a two-detector configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Byoung-moo; Song, Younghoon; Kim, Junki; Yang, Daeho; An, Kyungwon

    2015-08-01

    Exact measurement of the second-order correlation function g(2 )(t ) of a light source is essential when investigating the photon statistics and the light generation process of the source. For a stationary single-mode light source, the Mandel Q factor is directly related to g(2 )(0 ) . For a large mean photon number in the mode, the deviation of g(2 )(0 ) from unity is so small that even a tiny error in measuring g(2 )(0 ) would result in an inaccurate Mandel Q . In this work, we address the detector-dead-time effect on g(2 )(0 ) of stationary sub-Poissonian light. It is then found that detector dead time can induce a serious error in g(2 )(0 ) and thus in Mandel Q in those cases even in a two-detector configuration. Utilizing the cavity-QED microlaser, a well-established sub-Poissonian light source, we measured g(2 )(0 ) with two different types of photodetectors with different dead times. We also introduced prolonged dead time by intentionally deleting the photodetection events following a preceding one within a specified time interval. We found that the observed Q of the cavity-QED microlaser was underestimated by 19% with respect to the dead-time-free Q when its mean photon number was about 600. We derived an analytic formula which well explains the behavior of the g(2 )(0 ) as a function of the dead time.

  6. Measurement of the front-end dead-time of the LHCb muon detector and evaluation of its contribution to the muon detection inefficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Anelli, M.; Archilli, F.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, W.; Bencivenni, G.; Bizzeti, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bochin, B.; Bozzi, C.; Brundu, D.; Cadeddu, S.; Campana, P.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Carletti, M.; Casu, L.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Dané, E.; De Simone, P.; Falabella, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, M.; Fontana, M.; Fresch, P.; Furfaro, E.; Graziani, G.; Kashchuk, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Loi, A.; Maev, O.; Manca, G.; Martellotti, G.; Neustroev, P.; Oldeman, R. G. C.; Palutan, M.; Passaleva, G.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Saitta, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Tellarini, G.; Vacca, C.; Vazquez-Gomez, R.; Vecchi, S.; Veltri, M.; Vorobyev, A.

    2016-04-01

    A method is described which allows to deduce the dead-time of the front-end electronics of the LHCb muon detector from a series of measurements performed at different luminosities at a bunch-crossing rate of 20 MHz. The measured values of the dead-time range from ~ 70 ns to ~ 100 ns. These results allow to estimate the performance of the muon detector at the future bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz and at higher luminosity.

  7. Success and failure of dead-time models as applied to hybrid pixel detectors in high-flux applications

    PubMed Central

    Sobott, B. A.; Broennimann, Ch.; Schmitt, B.; Trueb, P.; Schneebeli, M.; Lee, V.; Peake, D. J.; Elbracht-Leong, S.; Schubert, A.; Kirby, N.; Boland, M. J.; Chantler, C. T.; Barnea, Z.; Rassool, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of a single-photon-counting hybrid pixel detector has been investigated at the Australian Synchrotron. Results are compared with the body of accepted analytical models previously validated with other detectors. Detector functionals are valuable for empirical calibration. It is shown that the matching of the detector dead-time with the temporal synchrotron source structure leads to substantial improvements in count rate and linearity of response. Standard implementations are linear up to ∼0.36 MHz pixel−1; the optimized linearity in this configuration has an extended range up to ∼0.71 MHz pixel−1; these are further correctable with a transfer function to ∼1.77 MHz pixel−1. This new approach has wide application both in high-accuracy fundamental experiments and in standard crystallographic X-ray fluorescence and other X-ray measurements. The explicit use of data variance (rather than N 1/2 noise) and direct measures of goodness-of-fit (χr 2) are introduced, raising issues not encountered in previous literature for any detector, and suggesting that these inadequacies of models may apply to most detector types. Specifically, parametrization of models with non-physical values can lead to remarkable agreement for a range of count-rate, pulse-frequency and temporal structure. However, especially when the dead-time is near resonant with the temporal structure, limitations of these classical models become apparent. Further, a lack of agreement at extreme count rates was evident. PMID:23412493

  8. Realistic PET Monte Carlo Simulation With Pixelated Block Detectors, Light Sharing, Random Coincidences and Dead-Time Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Bastein; Fakhri, Georges El

    2008-01-01

    We have developed and validated a realistic simulation of random coincidences, pixelated block detectors, light sharing among crystal elements and dead-time in 2D and 3D positron emission tomography (PET) imaging based on the SimSET Monte Carlo simulation software. Our simulation was validated by comparison to a Monte Carlo transport code widely used for PET modeling, GATE, and to measurements made on a PET scanner. Methods We have modified the SimSET software to allow independent tracking of single photons in the object and septa while taking advantage of existing voxel based attenuation and activity distributions and validated importance sampling techniques implemented in SimSET. For each single photon interacting in the detector, the energy-weighted average of interaction points was computed, a blurring model applied to account for light sharing and the associated crystal identified. Detector dead-time was modeled in every block as a function of the local single rate using a variance reduction technique. Electronic dead-time was modeled for the whole scanner as a function of the prompt coincidences rate. Energy spectra predicted by our simulation were compared to GATE. NEMA NU-2 2001 performance tests were simulated with the new simulation as well as with SimSET and compared to measurements made on a Discovery ST (DST) camera. Results Errors in simulated spatial resolution (full width at half maximum, FWHM) were 5.5% (6.1%) in 2D (3D) with the new simulation, compared with 42.5% (38.2%) with SimSET. Simulated (measured) scatter fractions were 17.8% (21.3%) in 2D and 45.8% (45.2%) in 3D. Simulated and measured sensitivities agreed within 2.3 % in 2D and 3D for all planes and simulated and acquired count rate curves (including NEC) were within 12.7% in 2D in the [0: 80 kBq/cc] range and in 3D in the [0: 35 kBq/cc] range. The new simulation yielded significantly more realistic singles’ and coincidences’ spectra, spatial resolution, global sensitivity and lesion

  9. Conceptual design of the TRACE detector readout using a compact, dead time-less analog memory ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliaga, R. J.; Herrero-Bosch, V.; Capra, S.; Pullia, A.; Dueñas, J. A.; Grassi, L.; Triossi, A.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Gadea, R.; González, V.; Hüyük, T.; Sanchís, E.; Gadea, A.; Mengoni, D.

    2015-11-01

    The new TRacking Array for light Charged particle Ejectiles (TRACE) detector system requires monitorization and sampling of all pulses in a large number of channels with very strict space and power consumption restrictions for the front-end electronics and cabling. Its readout system is to be based on analog memory ASICs with 64 channels each that sample a 1 μs window of the waveform of any valid pulses at 200 MHz while discarding any other signals and are read out at 50 MHz with external ADC digitization. For this purpose, a new, compact analog memory architecture is described that allows pulse capture with zero dead time in any channel while vastly reducing the total number of storage cells, particularly for large amounts of input channels. This is accomplished by partitioning the typical Switched Capacitor Array structure into two pipelined, asymmetric stages and introducing FIFO queue-like control circuitry for captured data, achieving total independence between the capture and readout operations.

  10. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Urbain, X. Bech, D.; Van Roy, J.-P.; Géléoc, M.; Weber, S. J.

    2015-02-15

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H{sub 3} into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  11. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Urbain, X; Bech, D; Van Roy, J-P; Géléoc, M; Weber, S J; Huetz, A; Picard, Y J

    2015-02-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme. PMID:25725834

  12. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbain, X.; Bech, D.; Van Roy, J.-P.; Géléoc, M.; Weber, S. J.; Huetz, A.; Picard, Y. J.

    2015-02-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  13. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-05-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed. PMID:27140146

  14. Dead layer measurements on diode detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagoulian, Areg; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Klein, Andreas; Wilburn, Scott

    2007-10-01

    The goal of the abBA experiment involves coincidence measurements of protons and electrons from the neutron beta decay. While electron detection is rather straightforward, the detection of the protons is complicated due to their low energies. In order to understand the detector reponse and to determine the lower cut off value for the energy a technique for determining the thickness of the dead layer has been developed. A discussion of the measurement and of the results will be presented.

  15. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOEpatents

    Larson, J.A.; Krueger, F.P.

    1987-10-05

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events. 5 figs.

  16. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOEpatents

    Larson, John A.; Krueger, Frederick P.

    1988-09-20

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events.

  17. Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2008-03-05

    Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and attenuation for every measurement for both the original and dead-time corrected data at the following wavelengths: 0.316, 0.856, 3.2, 5, and 10cm (W,K,X,C,S bands). Pavlos Kollias provided the code to do these calculations.

  18. Unified dead-time compensation structure for SISO processes with multiple dead times.

    PubMed

    Normey-Rico, Julio E; Flesch, Rodolfo C C; Santos, Tito L M

    2014-11-01

    This paper proposes a dead-time compensation structure for processes with multiple dead times. The controller is based on the filtered Smith predictor (FSP) dead-time compensator structure and it is able to control stable, integrating, and unstable processes with multiple input/output dead times. An equivalent model of the process is first computed in order to define the predictor structure. Using this equivalent model, the primary controller and the predictor filter are tuned to obtain an internally stable closed-loop system which also attempts some closed-loop specifications in terms of set-point tracking, disturbance rejection, and robustness. Some simulation case studies are used to illustrate the good properties of the proposed approach. PMID:25245526

  19. Dead time and count loss determination for radiation detection systems in high count rate applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Amol

    This research is focused on dead time and the subsequent count loss estimation in radiation detection systems. The dead time is the minimum amount of time required between two events to permit detection of those events individually by a radiation detection system. If events occur during the system dead time, they are lost. Such lost information can be important in many applications including high-precision spectroscopy, positron emission tomography (PET), and the scanning of spent nuclear fuel. Understanding of the behavior of radiation detection systems is important; thus this work included a comprehensive review of dead time and pulse pile-up models and methods. The most common way to estimate detector dead time is by one-parameter approximations known as nonparalyzable and paralyzable models. This research proposes a two parameter model that estimates the detector paralysis factor and the dead time based on a graphical method. To determine the two parameters characteristics of a detection system, this work tested a novel technique to saturate the detector using a decaying source. The modified decaying source method, unlike other methods, does not assume the idealized behavior of detection system in use and calculates the overall dead time of the detection system. The paralysis factor for high purity germanium detection system was estimated approaching 100% and the dead time was on the order of 5--10 micros which compares well with the literature.

  20. Theory of particle detection and multiplicity counting with dead time effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, L.; Pazsit, I.

    2013-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the investigation of the effect of the dead time on the statistics of the particle detection process. A theoretical treatment is provided with the application of the methods of renewal theory. The detector efficiency and various types of the dead time are accounted for. Exact analytical results are derived for the probability distribution functions, the expectations and the variances of the number of detected particles. Explicit solutions are given for a few representative cases. The results should serve for the evaluation of the measurements in view of the dead time correction effects for the higher moments of the detector counts. (authors)

  1. Performance of a four-element Si drift detector for X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy: resolution, maximum count rate, and dead-time correction with incorporation into the ATHENA data analysis software

    SciTech Connect

    Woicik, J.C.; Newburgh, W.; Ravel, B.; Fischer, D.A.

    2010-03-09

    The performance of a four-element Si drift detector for energy-dispersive fluorescence-yield X-ray absorption fine-structure measurements is reported, operating at the National Institute of Standards and Technology beamline X23A2 at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The detector can acquire X-ray absorption fine-structure spectra with a throughput exceeding 4 x 10{sup 5} counts per second per detector element (>1.6 x 10{sup 6} total counts per second summed over all four channels). At this count rate the resolution at 6 keV is approximately 220 eV, which adequately resolves the Mn K{sub {alpha}} and K{sup {beta}} fluorescence lines. Accurate dead-time correction is demonstrated, and it has been incorporated into the ATHENA data analysis program. To maintain counting efficiency and high signal to background, it is suggested that the incoming count rate should not exceed {approx}70% of the maximum throughput.

  2. Dead Time of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Tudisco, S.; Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A.; Fallica, G.; Mazzillo, M.; Zimbone, M.

    2011-06-01

    Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) is the new generation of Geiger-Muller counter device developed in semiconductor technology [S. Privitera et al. Sensors Journal, vol 8 Iss. 8 (2008) 4636; S. Tudisco et al. IEEE Sensors Journal vol 8 ISS 7-8 (2008) 1324; S. Cova et al. Applied Optics 35 (1996) 1956]. Physical dead time model and noise production process has been analyzed and their corrections have been performed [S.H. Lee, R.P. Gardner, M. Jae, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B 263 (2007) 46]. We have been able to extract the real amount of incident photon rate up to 10 7cps using a device with 0.97μs total deadtime. We also developed the equation of the noise count rate vs incoming photon rate, supported by Montecarlo simulation and experimental data. We marked the difference between dark rate and noise count rate, and introduced the noise rate inside the hybrid deadtime equation used for SPAD device.

  3. Zero-dead-time operation of interleaved atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, G W; Takase, K; Wu, X; Deslauriers, L; Roy, S; Kasevich, M A

    2013-10-25

    We demonstrate a zero-dead-time operation of atomic clocks. This clock reduces sensitivity to local oscillator noise, integrating as nearly 1/τ whereas a clock with dead time integrates as 1/τ(1/2) under identical conditions. We contend that a similar scheme may be applied to improve the stability of optical clocks. PMID:24206471

  4. Simulation of Simple Controlled Processes with Dead-Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Keith R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The determination of closed-loop response of processes containing dead-time is typically not covered in undergraduate process control, possibly because the solution by Laplace transforms requires the use of Pade approximation for dead-time, which makes the procedure lengthy and tedious. A computer-aided method is described which simplifies the…

  5. Receiver dead time in non-line-of-sight ultraviolet communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, Robert J.; Yu, Paul L.; Chen, Gang; Sadler, Brian M.

    2014-05-01

    Advances in ultraviolet (UV) source, detector, and solar-blind filtering technologies have recently spurred significant research interest in non-line-of-sight (NLOS) UV communications. Although this research has primarily focused on short-range applications, the achievable range of a NLOS UV system can be extended (e.g., up to a few kilometers) with the use of a pulsed UV laser transmitter. However, the short-duration high-intensity pulses of such a laser have the potential to overwhelm the response time of photomultiplier detectors, which are often employed by a receiver to implement high-sensitivity photon-counting detection. In particular, after the detection of a photon, there exists a period of time, called dead time, during which the detector is unable to detect subsequently impinging photons, resulting in missed photon detections and, hence, altered received signal statistics relative to an ideal photon counter. In this paper, we examine the effect of receiver dead time on a NLOS UV system. We extend an existing UV NLOS channel model to account for nonzero dead time at the receiver and then use this extended model to examine the significance of dead-time effects for various representative system configurations. The results suggest the importance of accounting for dead time when designing practical UV communication systems.

  6. Real-time dynamic simulation of angular velocity and suppression of dead zone in IFOG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hong; Huan, Yunpeng; Wang, Ansu; Luan, Jinwen

    2015-02-01

    The mechanism of the dead zone in closed-loop IFOGs is theoretically analyzed. The digital closed-loop transfer model for fiber-optic gyroscope is modified and the electronic cross-coupling interference from the feedback channel in the output signal of the detector in the forward channel is added. Using this model, we achieve a real-time dynamic simulation for the dead zone. The simulation results are basically consistent with experiment results. Before the electronic cross-coupling has been eliminated, the dead zone of the high-precision fiber-optic gyro is about , while the medium precision fiber-optic gyro is . After modifying the modulator circuit boards, the dead zone and the noise of the IFOG are of the same order of magnitude, better than and , respectively.

  7. High-rate dead-time corrections in a general purpose digital pulse processing system

    PubMed Central

    Abbene, Leonardo; Gerardi, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Dead-time losses are well recognized and studied drawbacks in counting and spectroscopic systems. In this work the abilities on dead-time correction of a real-time digital pulse processing (DPP) system for high-rate high-resolution radiation measurements are presented. The DPP system, through a fast and slow analysis of the output waveform from radiation detectors, is able to perform multi-parameter analysis (arrival time, pulse width, pulse height, pulse shape, etc.) at high input counting rates (ICRs), allowing accurate counting loss corrections even for variable or transient radiations. The fast analysis is used to obtain both the ICR and energy spectra with high throughput, while the slow analysis is used to obtain high-resolution energy spectra. A complete characterization of the counting capabilities, through both theoretical and experimental approaches, was performed. The dead-time modeling, the throughput curves, the experimental time-interval distributions (TIDs) and the counting uncertainty of the recorded events of both the fast and the slow channels, measured with a planar CdTe (cadmium telluride) detector, will be presented. The throughput formula of a series of two types of dead-times is also derived. The results of dead-time corrections, performed through different methods, will be reported and discussed, pointing out the error on ICR estimation and the simplicity of the procedure. Accurate ICR estimations (nonlinearity < 0.5%) were performed by using the time widths and the TIDs (using 10 ns time bin width) of the detected pulses up to 2.2 Mcps. The digital system allows, after a simple parameter setting, different and sophisticated procedures for dead-time correction, traditionally implemented in complex/dedicated systems and time-consuming set-ups. PMID:26289270

  8. Simplified dead-time compensator for multiple delay SISO systems.

    PubMed

    Torrico, Bismark Claure; Correia, Wilkley Bezerra; Nogueira, Fabrício Gonzalez

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a dead-time compensation structure able to deal with stable and unstable multiple delay single input single output (SISO) systems. The proposed method aims to simplify the primary controller by replacing it for FIR filters placed at the feedback path. Such modification reduces the total number of parameters to be tuned which facilitates the overall design in comparison with other primary controllers normally considered. Simulation results show a better performance for the proposed control approach compared with other dead-time compensator (DTC) recently proposed in the literature. PMID:26593966

  9. Si(Li) detectors with thin dead layers for low energy x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rossington, C.S.; Walton, J.T.; Jaklevic, J.M.

    1990-10-01

    Regions of incomplete charge collection, or dead layers'', are compared for Si(Li) detectors fabricated with Au and Pd entrance window electrodes. The dead layers were measured by characterizing the detector spectral response to x-ray energies above and below the Si K{alpha} absorption edge. It was found that Si(Li) detectors with Pd electrodes exhibit consistently thinner effective Si dead layers than those with Au electrodes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the minimum thickness required for low resistivity Pd electrodes is thinner than that required for low resistivity Au electrodes, which further reduces the signal attenuation in Pd/Si(Li) detectors. A model, based on Pd compensation of oxygen vacancies in the SiO{sub 2} at the entrance window Si(Li) surface, is proposed to explain the observed differences in detector dead layer thickness. Electrode structures for optimum Si(Li) detector performance at low x-ray energies are discussed. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Improved dead-time correction for PET scanners: application to small-animal PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, E.; Herraiz, J. L.; España, S.; Herranz, E.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.; Udías, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Pile-up and dead-time are two main causes of nonlinearity in the response of a PET scanner as a function of activity in the field of view (FOV). For a given scanner and acquisition system, pile-up effects depend on the material and size of the object being imaged and on the distribution of activity inside and outside the FOV, because these factors change the singles-to-coincidences ratio (SCR). Thus, it is difficult to devise an accurate correction that would be valid for any acquisition. In this work, we demonstrate a linear relationship between SCR and effective dead-time, which measures the effects of both dead-time (losses) and pile-up (gains and losses). This relationship allows us to propose a simple method to accurately estimate dead-time and pile-up corrections using only two calibration acquisitions with, respectively, a high and low SCR. The method has been tested with simulations and experimental data for two different scanner geometries: a scanner with large area detectors and no pile-up rejection, and a scanner composed of two full rings of smaller detectors. Our results show that the SCR correction method is accurate within 7%, even for high activities in the FOV, and avoids the bias of the standard single-parameter method.

  11. Enhanced detection of early photons in time-domain optical imaging by running in the "dead-time" regime.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Lagnojita; Brankov, Jovan G; Tichauer, Kenneth M

    2016-07-15

    Optical tomography can yield anatomical and molecular information about biological tissue. However, its spatial resolution is poor in thick samples owing to high scatter. Early photon approaches, where photon arrival times are measured with time-resolved detectors, provide one means of improving spatial resolution through selection of photons that travel a straighter path. Here, a novel approach to significantly enhance detection of early photons in time-correlated single photon counting with avalanche photodiodes has been discussed. Results suggest that the early photon detection rate can be increased by about 10 orders of magnitude by running the detector in a dead-time regime. PMID:27420501

  12. Coding for Communication Channels with Dead-Time Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon

    2004-01-01

    Coding schemes have been designed and investigated specifically for optical and electronic data-communication channels in which information is conveyed via pulse-position modulation (PPM) subject to dead-time constraints. These schemes involve the use of error-correcting codes concatenated with codes denoted constrained codes. These codes are decoded using an interactive method. In pulse-position modulation, time is partitioned into frames of Mslots of equal duration. Each frame contains one pulsed slot (all others are non-pulsed). For a given channel, the dead-time constraints are defined as a maximum and a minimum on the allowable time between pulses. For example, if a Q-switched laser is used to transmit the pulses, then the minimum allowable dead time is the time needed to recharge the laser for the next pulse. In the case of bits recorded on a magnetic medium, the minimum allowable time between pulses depends on the recording/playback speed and the minimum distance between pulses needed to prevent interference between adjacent bits during readout. The maximum allowable dead time for a given channel is the maximum time for which it is possible to satisfy the requirement to synchronize slots. In mathematical shorthand, the dead-time constraints for a given channel are represented by the pair of integers (d,k), where d is the minimum allowable number of zeroes between ones and k is the maximum allowable number of zeroes between ones. A system of the type to which the present schemes apply is represented by a binary- input, real-valued-output channel model illustrated in the figure. At the transmitting end, information bits are first encoded by use of an error-correcting code, then further encoded by use of a constrained code. Several constrained codes for channels subject to constraints of (d,infinity) have been investigated theoretically and computationally. The baseline codes chosen for purposes of comparison were simple PPM codes characterized by M-slot PPM

  13. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-11-15

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  14. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization.

    PubMed

    Peronio, P; Acconcia, G; Rech, I; Ghioni, M

    2015-11-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring "long" data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed. PMID:26628115

  15. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-11-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring "long" data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (˜80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  16. Assessment of three dead detector correction methods for cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, David W.; Shukla, Hemant I.; Nixon, Earl; Bayouth, John E.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Dead detectors due to manufacturing defects or radiation damage in the electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) used for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can lead to image degradation and ring artifacts. In this work three dead detector correction methods were assessed using megavoltage CBCT (MVCBCT) as a test system, with the goals of assessing the relative effectiveness of the three methods and establishing the conditions for which they fail. Methods: MVCBCT projections acquired with four linacs at 8 and 60 MU (monitor units) were degraded with varying percentages (2%-95%) of randomly distributed dead single detectors (RDSs), randomly distributed dead detector clusters (RDCs) of 2 mm diameter, and nonrandomly distributed dead detector disks (NRDDs) of varying diameter (4-16 mm). Correction algorithms were bidirectional linear interpolation (BLI), quad-directional linear interpolation (QLI), and a Laplacian solution (LS) method. Correction method failure was defined to occur if ring artifacts were present in the reconstructed phantom images from any linac or if the modulation transfer function (MTF) for any linac dropped below baseline with a p value, calculated with the two sample t test, of less than 0.01. Results: All correction methods failed at the same or lower RDC/RDS percentages and NRDD diameters for the 60 MU as for the 8 MU cases. The LS method tended to outperform or match the BLI and QLI methods. If ring artifacts anywhere in the images were considered unacceptable, the LS method failed for 60 MU at >33% RDS, >2% RDC, and >4 mm NRDD. If ring artifacts within 4 mm longitudinally of the phantom section interfaces were considered acceptable, the LS method failed for 60 MU at >90% RDS, >80% RDC, and >4 mm NRDD. LS failed due to MTF drop for 60 MU at >50% RDS, >25% RDC, and >4 mm NRDD. Conclusions: The LS method is superior to the BLI and QLI methods, and correction algorithm effectiveness decreases as imaging dose increases. All correction

  17. SU-E-I-88: The Effect of System Dead Time On Real-Time Plastic and GOS Based Fiber-Optic Dosimetry Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerner, M; Hintenlang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A methodology is presented to correct for measurement inaccuracies at high detector count rates using a plastic and GOS scintillation fibers coupled to a photomultiplier tube with digital readout. This system allows temporal acquisition and manipulation of measured data. Methods: The detection system used was a plastic scintillator and a separate gadolinium scintillator, both (0.5 diameter) coupled to an optical fiber with a Hamamatsu photon counter with a built-in microcontroller and digital interface. Count rate performance of the system was evaluated using the nonparalzable detector model. Detector response was investigated across multiple radiation sources including: orthovoltage x-ray system, colbat-60 gamma rays, proton therapy beam, and a diagnostic radiography x-ray tube. The dead time parameter was calculated by measuring the count rate of the system at different exposure rates using a reference detector. Results: The system dead time was evaluated for the following sources of radiation used clinically: diagnostic energy x-rays, cobalt-60 gamma rays, orthovoltage xrays, particle proton accelerator, and megavoltage x-rays. It was found that dead time increased significantly when exposing the detector to sources capable of generating Cerenkov radiation, all of the sources sans the diagnostic x-rays, with increasing prominence at higher photon energies. Percent depth dose curves generated by a dedicated ionization chamber and compared to the detection system demonstrated that correcting for dead time improves accuracy. On most sources, nonparalzable model fit provided an improved system response. Conclusion: Overall, the system dead time was variable across the investigated radiation particles and energies. It was demonstrated that the system response accuracy was greatly improved by correcting for dead time effects. Cerenkov radiation plays a significant role in the increase in the system dead time through transient absorption effects attributed to

  18. Dead layer on silicon p-i-n diode charged-particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, B. L.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H. C.; Bodine, L. I.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, Tom H.; Chaoui, Z.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, Peter J.; Enomoto, S.; Harms, F.; Harper, Gregory; Howe, M. A.; Martin, E. L.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, David; Petzold, Linda; Renschler, R.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wustling, S.; Wierman, K. J.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2014-04-21

    Abstract Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon p-i-n diode used in the KATRIN neutrinomass experiment has such a dead layer. We have constructed a detailed Monte Carlo model for the passage of electrons from vacuum into a silicon detector, and compared the measured energy spectra to the predicted ones for a range of energies from 12 to 20 keV. The comparison provides experimental evidence that a substantial fraction of the ionization produced in the "dead" layer evidently escapes by discussion, with 46% being collected in the depletion zone and the balance being neutralized at the contact or by bulk recombination. The most elementary model of a thinner dead layer from which no charge is collected is strongly disfavored.

  19. Estimation of Maximum Likelihood of the Unextendable Dead Time Period in a Flow of Physical Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gortsev, A. M.; Solov'ev, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    A flow of physical events (photons, electrons, etc.) is studied. One of the mathematical models of such flows is the MAP-flow of events. The flow circulates under conditions of the unextendable dead time period, when the dead time period is unknown. The dead time period is estimated by the method of maximum likelihood from observations of arrival instants of events.

  20. No Time for Dead Time: Timing Analysis of Bright Black Hole Binaries with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick; Tomsick, John; Schmid, Christian; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Hailey, Charles J.; Kara, Erin; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller, Jon M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Stern, Daniel; Uttley, Phil; Walton, Dominic J.; Wilms, Jörn; Zhang, William W.

    2015-02-01

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time per event is relatively long (~2.5 msec) and varies event-to-event by a few percent. The most obvious effect is a distortion of the white noise level in the power density spectrum (PDS) that cannot be easily modeled with standard techniques due to the variable nature of the dead time. In this paper, we show that it is possible to exploit the presence of two completely independent focal planes and use the cospectrum, the real part of the cross PDS, to obtain a good proxy of the white-noise-subtracted PDS. Thereafter, one can use a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the remaining effects of dead time, namely, a frequency-dependent modulation of the variance and a frequency-independent drop of the sensitivity to variability. In this way, most of the standard timing analysis can be performed, albeit with a sacrifice in signal-to-noise ratio relative to what would be achieved using more standard techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339-4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105.

  1. Pulse-height defect due to electron interaction in dead layers of Ge/Li/ gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, R. N.; Strauss, M. G.

    1969-01-01

    Study shows the pulse-height degradation of gamma ray spectra in germanium/lithium detectors to be due to electron interaction in the dead layers that exist in all semiconductor detectors. A pulse shape discrimination technique identifies and eliminates these defective pulses.

  2. Detector response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry at high pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulcicek, Erol E.; Boyle, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Dead time effects in chevron configured dual microchannel plates (MCPs) are investigated. Response times are determined experimentally for one chevron-configured dual MCP-type detector and two discrete dynode-type electron multipliers with 16 and 23 resistively divided stages. All of these detectors are found to be suitable for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), yielding 3-6-ns (FWHM) response times triggered on a single ion pulse. It is concluded that, unless there are viable solutions to overcome dead time disadvantages for continuous dynode detectors, suitable discrete dynode detectors for TOF MS appear to have a significant advantage for high repetition rate operation.

  3. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Barnes, Ryan P; Keller, Timothy J; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power. PMID:26507308

  4. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Keller, Timothy J.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  5. Dead-time free pixel readout architecture for ATLAS front-end IC

    SciTech Connect

    Einsweiler, K.; Joshi, A.; Kleinfelder, S.; Luo, L.; Marchesini, R.; Milgrome, O.; Pengg, F.

    1999-06-01

    A low-power, sparse-scan, readout architecture has been developed for the ATLAS pixel front-end electronics. The architecture supports a dual discriminator and extracts the time over threshold (TOT) information along with a 2-D spatial address of the hits and associates them with a unique 7-bit beam crossing number. The IC implements level-1 trigger filtering along with event building (grouping together all hits in a beam crossing) in the end of column (EOC) buffer. The events are transmitted over a 40 MHz serial data link with the protocol supporting buffer overflow handling by appending error flags to events. This mixed-mode full custom IC is implemented in 0.8 {micro} HP process to meet the requirements for the pixel readout in the ATLAS inner detector. The circuits have been tested and the IC has been found to provide dead-time-less ambiguity-free readout at 40 MHz data rate.

  6. Live-timer method of automatic dead-time correction for precision counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porges, K. G.; Rudnick, S. J.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic correction for dead time losses in nuclear counting experiments is implemented by a simple live timer arrangement in which each counting interval is extended for compensation for the dead time during that interval. this method eliminates repetitious manual calculations, source of error, and dependence upon paralysis shifts.

  7. Examining the Impact of External Influences on Police Use of Deadly Force over Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    Used interrupted time-series analysis (ARIMA) to study the impact of legislation and judicial intervention on the use of deadly force by police officers in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Findings generally suggest that dynamic changes in the internal working environment can outweigh the influence of external mechanisms on deadly force use. Findings…

  8. Long-Time Sustainability of Rossby Wave Instability in Protoplanetary Disks with Dead Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Li, H.

    2015-10-01

    We have run 2D simulations to investigate the generation and sustainability of Rossby wave instability (RWI) in proto-planetary disks with constant viscosity and for disks with low viscosity regions (dead zone). For the constant viscosity case, the development of RWI requires a low viscosity and life time of the RWI is short. We also find that the vortex, when it migrates, does so much faster than the disk's viscous drift rate. For disks with dead zone case, a much larger viscosity can be used and the RWI vortex can be sustained for a long time, even the life time of the disk, depending on the width and depth of the dead zone. For a narrow dead zone, the vortex depicts a periodic pattern with a period inversely proportional to the viscosity. If the dead-zone width exceeds some threshold, the periodicity of the RWI disappears.

  9. Simulation of Rate-Related (Dead-Time) Losses In Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.G.; Norman, P.I.; Leadbeater, T.W.; Croft, S.; Philips, S.

    2008-07-01

    Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting (PNMC) based on Multiplicity Shift Register (MSR) electronics (a form of time correlation analysis) is a widely used non-destructive assay technique for quantifying spontaneously fissile materials such as Pu. At high event rates, dead-time losses perturb the count rates with the Singles, Doubles and Triples being increasingly affected. Without correction these perturbations are a major source of inaccuracy in the measured count rates and assay values derived from them. This paper presents the simulation of dead-time losses and investigates the effect of applying different dead-time models on the observed MSR data. Monte Carlo methods have been used to simulate neutron pulse trains for a variety of source intensities and with ideal detection geometry, providing an event by event record of the time distribution of neutron captures within the detection system. The action of the MSR electronics was modelled in software to analyse these pulse trains. Stored pulse trains were perturbed in software to apply the effects of dead-time according to the chosen physical process; for example, the ideal paralysable (extending) and non-paralysable models with an arbitrary dead-time parameter. Results of the simulations demonstrate the change in the observed MSR data when the system dead-time parameter is varied. In addition, the paralysable and non-paralysable models of deadtime are compared. These results form part of a larger study to evaluate existing dead-time corrections and to extend their application to correlated sources. (authors)

  10. Dead time effects in non-line-of-sight ultraviolet communications.

    PubMed

    Drost, Robert J; Sadler, Brian M; Chen, Gang

    2015-06-15

    By exploiting unique properties of the atmospheric propagation of radiation in the deep-ultraviolet band (200-300 nm), ultraviolet communications (UVC) offers the novel possibility of establishing non-line-of-sight (NLOS) optical links. UVC systems often employ photon-counting receivers, which may exhibit nonideal behavior owing to dead time, a period of time after the detection of a photon during which such a receiver is unable to detect subsequently impinging photons. In this paper, we extend a NLOS UVC channel model to account for dead time and then use this extended model to study the effects of dead time in representative system scenarios. Experimentally collected channel-sounding data is then used for model validation and real-world illustration of these effects. Finally, we investigate the effect of dead time on communication performance. The results demonstrate that dead time can have a significant impact in practical communication scenarios and suggest the usefulness of the proposed modeling framework in developing receiver designs that compensate for dead time effects. PMID:26193553

  11. Effects of lung time constant, gas analyser delay and rise time on measurements of respiratory dead-space.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongquan; Turner, Martin J; Baker, A Barry

    2005-12-01

    This study evaluated effects of mechanical time constants (tau(m)) of the respiratory system, delays between flow and CO(2) partial pressure (P(CO)(2)) signals and rise time of the CO(2) analyser on dead-space measurements. A computer model simulated low alveolar dead-space, high alveolar dead-space, 0.2 time delays and anatomic and physiological dead-spaces were calculated. The CO(2) analyser was simulated as a critically damped second-order system with 10-90% rise times of 25-400 ms. The error in measured dead-space increases approximately 2.5% per 10 ms signal delay for normal lungs (tau(m) = 1 s), but has low sensitivity (0.58% per 10 ms) to the rise time of the CO(2) analyser. Sensitivity of physiological dead-space, but not anatomic dead-space to delay is decreased in high alveolar dead-space and abnormal V/Q distribution. Shorter tau(m) increase the error sensitivity of both physiological and anatomic dead-spaces to both delay and rise time. P(CO)(2) and flow should be well synchronized, particularly when tau(m) are short, to avoid dead-space errors. PMID:16311457

  12. Dead-Time Effects on Counting Statistics in Subcritical Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, Felix C.

    2002-10-15

    The analysis of the fluctuations of signals coming from detectors in the vicinity of a subcritical assembly of fissile materials is commonly used for the control and safeguard of nuclear materials and might be used for the surveillance of an accelerator driven system. One of the stochastic techniques is the measurement of the probability distributions of counts in time intervals {delta}t (gates); the departure of the ratio of the variance and the mean value with respect to 1 (the correlation) is directly related to the amount of fissile material and its subcriticality. The measurement of this correlation is affected by dead-time effects due to count losses because of the finite-time resolution of the detection system. We present a theory that allows (a) the calculation of the probability of losing n counts (P{sup (n)}) in gate {delta}t, (b) the definition of experimental conditions under which P{sup (2)} << P{sup (1)}, and (c) a methodology to correct the measured correlation because of losing one count in any gate. The theory is applied to the analysis of experiments performed in a highly enriched subcritical assembly.

  13. Dead-time correction for time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectral images: a critical issue in multivariate image analysis.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Bonnie J; Peterson, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    Dead-time effects result in a non-linear detector response in the common time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry instruments. This can result in image artifacts that can often be misinterpreted. Although the Poisson correction procedure has been shown to effectively eliminate this non-linearity in spectra, applying the correction to images presents difficulties because the low number of counts per pixel can create large statistical errors. The efficacy of three approaches to dead-time correction in images has been explored. These approaches include: pixel binning, image segmentation and a binomial statistical correction. When few pixels are fully saturated, all three approaches work satisfactorily. When a large number of pixels are fully saturated, the statistical approach fails to remove the dead-time artifacts revealed by multivariate analysis. Pixel binning is accurate at higher levels of saturation so long as the bin size is much smaller than the feature size. The segmentation approach works well independent of feature size or the number of fully saturated pixels but requires an accurate segmentation algorithm. It is recommended that images be collected under conditions that minimize the number of fully saturated pixels. When this is impractical and small features are present in the image, segmentation can provide an accurate way to correct for the detector saturation effect. PMID:24707067

  14. [Dead time determination of the second dimension in a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Kong, Hongwei; Ye, Fen; Lu, Xin; Dong, Mingquan; Guo, Lei; Xu, Guowang

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) is rapidly gaining importance for the analysis of complex samples. In order to predict chromatogram and optimize the operational conditions, the dead time of each dimension should be obtained exactly. Two methods to calculate the dead time of the second dimension were introduced. In the first method, based on the relationship between the time differences of a series of n-alkanes substances and the apparent retention times under different pressures, the true retention time can be calculated for non-synchronous GC x GC. The retention times of homologous series were used to calculate the dead time. Another rapid method to calculate the dead time of the second dimension is based on three or more apparent retention times in a single temperature programmed chromatographic run. The results show that the dead time of the second dimension can be calculated successfully by using the proposed methods and the deviation between the two methods is less than 0.05 s. PMID:15881364

  15. Examining the impact of external influences on police use of deadly force over time.

    PubMed

    White, Michael D

    2003-02-01

    Prior deadly force research has sought to identify appropriate mechanisms that can effectively control police officers' decisions to use deadly force. However, the relative impact of external discretion control policies on police shooting behavior remains largely unknown. Using data from Philadelphia for a period of more than two decades, this article employs interrupted time-series analysis (ARIMA) to examine the impact of legislation and judicial intervention on use of deadly force by Philadelphia police officers. The article also considers the impact of larger, community-level characteristics on levels of deadly force. Findings produced modest support for the potential effect of external discretion control policies and community-level factors on police shooting behavior but generally suggest that dynamic changes in the internal working environment can outweigh the influence of the external mechanisms. PMID:12568060

  16. Digital filter based on the Fisher linear discriminant to reduce dead-time paralysis in photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Shane Z.; Schmitt, Paul D.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Muir, Ryan D.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-03-01

    Photon counting represents the Poisson limit in signal to noise, but can often be complicated in imaging applications by detector paralysis, arising from the finite rise / fall time of the detector upon photon absorption. We present here an approach for reducing dead-time by generating a deconvolution digital filter based on optimizing the Fisher linear discriminant. In brief, two classes are defined, one in which a photon event is initiated at the origin of the digital filter, and one in the photon event is non-coincident with the filter origin. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is then performed to optimize the digital filter that best resolves the coincident and non-coincident training set data.1 Once trained, implementation of the filter can be performed quickly, significantly reducing dead-time issues and measurement bias in photon counting applications. Experimental demonstration of the LDA-filter approach was performed in fluorescence microscopy measurements using a highly convolved impulse response with considerable ringing. Analysis of the counts supports the capabilities of the filter in recovering deconvolved impulse responses under the conditions considered in the study. Potential additional applications and possible limitations are also considered.

  17. Dead time effect on the Brewer measurements: correction and estimated uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoulakis, I.; Redondas, A. M.; Bais, A. F.; Rodriguez-Franco, J. J.; Fragkos, K.; Cede, A.

    2015-12-01

    Brewer spectrophotometers are widely used instruments which perform spectral measurements of the direct and the global solar UV irradiance. By processing these measurements a variety of secondary products can be derived such as the total columns of ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, and aerosol optical properties. Estimating and limiting the uncertainties of the final products is of critical importance. High quality data have a lot of applications and can provide accurate estimations of trends. The dead time is characteristic for each instrument and non-proper correction of the raw data for its effect may lead to important errors in the final products. It may change with time and the currently used methodology is not always sufficient to accurately determine the correct dead time. For specific cases, such as for low ozone slant columns and high intensities of the direct solar irradiance, the error in the retrieved TOC, due a 10 ns change in the dead time from its nominal value, is found to be up to 5 %. The error in the calculation of UV irradiance is about 3-4 % near the maximum operational limit of light intensities. While in the existing documentation it is indicated that the dead time effects are important when the error in the used value is greater than 2 ns, we found that for single monochromator Brewers a 2 ns error in the dead time may lead to uncertainties above the limit of 1 % in the calculation of TOC; thus the tolerance limit should be lowered. A new routine for the determination of the dead time from direct solar irradiance measurements has been created and tested and a validation of the operational algorithm has been performed. Additionally, new methods for the estimation and the validation of the dead time have been developed and are analytically described. Therefore, the present study in addition to highlighting the importance of the dead time for the processing of Brewer datasets, also provide useful information for their quality control

  18. Dead time effect on the Brewer measurements: correction and estimated uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoulakis, Ilias; Redondas, Alberto; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; José Rodriguez-Franco, Juan; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Cede, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Brewer spectrophotometers are widely used instruments which perform spectral measurements of the direct, the scattered and the global solar UV irradiance. By processing these measurements a variety of secondary products can be derived such as the total columns of ozone (TOC), sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide and aerosol optical properties. Estimating and limiting the uncertainties of the final products is of critical importance. High-quality data have a lot of applications and can provide accurate estimations of trends.The dead time is specific for each instrument and improper correction of the raw data for its effect may lead to important errors in the final products. The dead time value may change with time and, with the currently used methodology, it cannot always be determined accurately. For specific cases, such as for low ozone slant columns and high intensities of the direct solar irradiance, the error in the retrieved TOC, due to a 10 ns change in the dead time from its value in use, is found to be up to 5 %. The error in the calculation of UV irradiance can be as high as 12 % near the maximum operational limit of light intensities. While in the existing documentation it is indicated that the dead time effects are important when the error in the used value is greater than 2 ns, we found that for single-monochromator Brewers a 2 ns error in the dead time may lead to errors above the limit of 1 % in the calculation of TOC; thus the tolerance limit should be lowered. A new routine for the determination of the dead time from direct solar irradiance measurements has been created and tested and a validation of the operational algorithm has been performed. Additionally, new methods for the estimation and the validation of the dead time have been developed and are analytically described. Therefore, the present study, in addition to highlighting the importance of the dead time for the processing of Brewer data sets, also provides useful information for their

  19. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  20. Corrections for the combined effects of decay and dead time in live-timed counting of short-lived radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R

    2016-03-01

    Studies and calibrations of short-lived radionuclides, for example (15)O, are of particular interest in nuclear medicine. Yet counting experiments on such species are vulnerable to an error due to the combined effect of decay and dead time. Separate decay corrections and dead-time corrections do not account for this issue. Usually counting data are decay-corrected to the start time of the count period, or else instead of correcting the count rate, the mid-time of the measurement is used as the reference time. Correction factors are derived for both those methods, considering both extending and non-extending dead time. Series approximations are derived here and the accuracy of those approximations are discussed. PMID:26682893

  1. On-line compensation of dead-time and inverter nonlinearity with disturbance voltage observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Beomseok; Kwon, Jung-Min; Kim, Jaehong

    2014-03-01

    This paper discusses and analyses a simple on-line compensation scheme for dead-time and inverter nonlinearity in the pulse width modulated (PWM) voltage source inverter (VSI). Dead-time effect and voltage drop in switching devices cause nonlinearity between reference and output voltage. In a conventional three-phase six-switch inverter, this nonideal condition adds extraneous harmonics that badly disturb voltage characteristics. In its turn, voltage disturbance causes distortion of the current waveform and degrades performance. In this paper, an on-line dead-time compensation method based on inverse dynamics control is proposed, and it is much simpler than conventional full/reduced order observation methods adopted in dead-time compensation. Disturbance voltages are observed on-line with no additional circuitry or off-line measurements. The observed disturbance voltages are fed back to the voltage reference for compensation. Stability problem of the proposed observer arisen from inverter delay and parameter mismatch was analysed. The proposed method is applied to a surface-mounted permanent-magnet synchronous motor (SPMSM) drive. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is validated by the experimental results.

  2. Utilization of Baeten's Dead-Time Correction Formalism for Multiplicity Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.

    1999-07-12

    We evaluate a dead-time correction formalism for double and triple coincidences in multiplicity counting. We will describe the accuracy by which S (singles), D (doubles), and T (triples) (and consequently, the mass, multiplication, and alpha) of fissile material samples can be determined using this formalism.

  3. Conditions for Recurrence of a Flow of Physical Events with Unextendable Dead Time Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhel'skaya, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    A flow of physical events (photons, electrons, etc.) is studied. One of the mathematical models of such flows is the modulated MAP flow of events circulating under conditions of unextendable dead time period. The explicit form of the probability density of interarrival interval of the flow is presented together with the explicit form of the joint probability density of two adjacent intervals in the observed flow. The conditions for recurrence of the observable flow of events are presented.

  4. Fast timing methods for semiconductor detectors. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, H.

    1984-10-01

    This tutorial paper discusses the basic parameters which determine the accuracy of timing measurements and their effect in a practical application, specifically timing with thin-surface barrier detectors. The discussion focusses on properties of the detector, low-noise amplifiers, trigger circuits and time converters. New material presented in this paper includes bipolar transistor input stages with noise performance superior to currently available FETs, noiseless input terminations in sub-nanosecond preamplifiers and methods using transmission lines to couple the detector to remotely mounted preamplifiers. Trigger circuits are characterized in terms of effective rise time, equivalent input noise and residual jitter.

  5. Symmetrically biased T/R switches for NMR and MRI with microsecond dead time.

    PubMed

    Brunner, David O; Furrer, Lukas; Weiger, Markus; Baumberger, Werner; Schmid, Thomas; Reber, Jonas; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Wilm, Bertram J; Froidevaux, Romain; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-02-01

    For direct NMR detection and imaging of compounds with very short coherence life times the dead time between radio-frequency (RF) pulse and reception of the free induction decay (FID) is a major limiting factor. It is typically dominated by the transient and recovery times of currently available transmit-receive (T/R) switches and amplification chains. A novel PIN diode-based T/R switch topology is introduced allowing for fast switching by high bias transient currents but nevertheless producing a very low video leakage signal and insertion loss (0.5dB). The low transient spike level in conjunction with the high isolation (75dB) prevent saturation of the preamplifier entirely which consequently does not require time for recovery. Switching between transmission and reception is demonstrated within less than 1μs in bench tests as well as in acquisitions of FIDs and zero echo time (ZTE) images with bandwidths up to 500kHz at 7T. Thereby the 2kW switch exhibited a rise-time of 350ns (10-99%) producing however a total video leakage of below 20mV peak-to-peak and less than -89dBm in-band. The achieved switching time renders the RF pulse itself the dominant contribution to the dead time in which a coherence cannot be observed, thus making pulsed NMR experiments almost time-optimal even for compounds with very short signal life times. PMID:26796113

  6. Symmetrically biased T/R switches for NMR and MRI with microsecond dead time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, David O.; Furrer, Lukas; Weiger, Markus; Baumberger, Werner; Schmid, Thomas; Reber, Jonas; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Wilm, Bertram J.; Froidevaux, Romain; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-02-01

    For direct NMR detection and imaging of compounds with very short coherence life times the dead time between radio-frequency (RF) pulse and reception of the free induction decay (FID) is a major limiting factor. It is typically dominated by the transient and recovery times of currently available transmit-receive (T/R) switches and amplification chains. A novel PIN diode-based T/R switch topology is introduced allowing for fast switching by high bias transient currents but nevertheless producing a very low video leakage signal and insertion loss (0.5 dB). The low transient spike level in conjunction with the high isolation (75 dB) prevent saturation of the preamplifier entirely which consequently does not require time for recovery. Switching between transmission and reception is demonstrated within less than 1 μs in bench tests as well as in acquisitions of FIDs and zero echo time (ZTE) images with bandwidths up to 500 kHz at 7 T. Thereby the 2 kW switch exhibited a rise-time of 350 ns (10-99%) producing however a total video leakage of below 20 mV peak-to-peak and less than -89 dBm in-band. The achieved switching time renders the RF pulse itself the dominant contribution to the dead time in which a coherence cannot be observed, thus making pulsed NMR experiments almost time-optimal even for compounds with very short signal life times.

  7. A novel compact real time radiation detector.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiping; Xu, Xiufeng; Cao, Hongrui; Tang, Shibiao; Ding, Baogang; Yin, Zejie

    2012-08-01

    A novel compact real time radiation detector with cost-effective, ultralow power and high sensitivity based on Geiger counter is presented. The power consumption of this detector which employs CMOS electro circuit and ultralow-power microcontroller is down to only 12.8 mW. It can identify the presences of 0.22 μCi (60)Co at a distance of 1.29 m. Furthermore, the detector supports both USB bus and serial interface. It can be used for personal radiation monitoring and also fits the distributed sensor network for radiation detection. PMID:22738843

  8. Optical time domain reflectometry with low noise waveguide-coupled superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuck, C.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Ma, X.; Tang, H. X.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate optical time domain reflectometry over 200 km of optical fiber using low-noise NbTiN superconducting single-photon detectors integrated with Si3N4 waveguides. Our small detector footprint enables high timing resolution of 50 ps and a dark count rate of 3 Hz with unshielded fibers, allowing for identification of defects along the fiber over a dynamic range of 37.4 dB. Photons scattered and reflected back from the fiber under test can be detected in free-running mode without showing dead zones or other impairments often encountered in semiconductor photon-counting optical time domain reflectometers.

  9. A Unified Approach to Adaptive Neural Control for Nonlinear Discrete-Time Systems With Nonlinear Dead-Zone Input.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Gao, Ying; Tong, Shaocheng; Chen, C L Philip

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an effective adaptive control approach is constructed to stabilize a class of nonlinear discrete-time systems, which contain unknown functions, unknown dead-zone input, and unknown control direction. Different from linear dead zone, the dead zone, in this paper, is a kind of nonlinear dead zone. To overcome the noncausal problem, which leads to the control scheme infeasible, the systems can be transformed into a m -step-ahead predictor. Due to nonlinear dead-zone appearance, the transformed predictor still contains the nonaffine function. In addition, it is assumed that the gain function of dead-zone input and the control direction are unknown. These conditions bring about the difficulties and the complicacy in the controller design. Thus, the implicit function theorem is applied to deal with nonaffine dead-zone appearance, the problem caused by the unknown control direction can be resolved through applying the discrete Nussbaum gain, and the neural networks are used to approximate the unknown function. Based on the Lyapunov theory, all the signals of the resulting closed-loop system are proved to be semiglobal uniformly ultimately bounded. Moreover, the tracking error is proved to be regulated to a small neighborhood around zero. The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by a simulation example. PMID:26353383

  10. Two-degree-of-freedom fractional order-PID controllers design for fractional order processes with dead-time.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjie; Zhou, Ping; Zhao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jinggang

    2016-03-01

    Recently, fractional order (FO) processes with dead-time have attracted more and more attention of many researchers in control field, but FO-PID controllers design techniques available for the FO processes with dead-time suffer from lack of direct systematic approaches. In this paper, a simple design and parameters tuning approach of two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) FO-PID controller based on internal model control (IMC) is proposed for FO processes with dead-time, conventional one-degree-of-freedom control exhibited the shortcoming of coupling of robustness and dynamic response performance. 2-DOF control can overcome the above weakness which means it realizes decoupling of robustness and dynamic performance from each other. The adjustable parameter η2 of FO-PID controller is directly related to the robustness of closed-loop system, and the analytical expression is given between the maximum sensitivity specification Ms and parameters η2. In addition, according to the dynamic performance requirement of the practical system, the parameters η1 can also be selected easily. By approximating the dead-time term of the process model with the first-order Padé or Taylor series, the expressions for 2-DOF FO-PID controller parameters are derived for three classes of FO processes with dead-time. Moreover, compared with other methods, the proposed method is simple and easy to implement. Finally, the simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of this method. PMID:26753617

  11. Dead Layer Measurement in P-type Point Contact Germanium Detectors for the Majorana Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elia, Sophia; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) of the isotope 76Ge. In anticipation of the future large-scale experiments, its goal is to demonstrate a path forward to a background rate of one cnt/(ROI-t-y) in a 4 keV region around the Q-value of the 76Ge 0 νββ . The Majorana Demonstrator consists of an array of high purity germanium detectors arranged in strings. Before installation in the cryostat, each string has been characterized. A vertical scan along the string (Z-scan) using radioactive sources is performed to measure the dead layer of each detector while an azimuthal scan is taken to measure the orientation of the crystal axes, useful for axion physics. Understanding the dead layer of the crystals is crucial to precisely determine the effective mass of the detectors. This poster presents Z-scan measurements and data analysis. The dead layer determination obtained through detailed comparison of simulation and data will be discussed.

  12. Time expanding multihit TDC for the BELLE TOF detector at the KEK B-factory

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, G.; Kichimi, H.; Yamaguchi, H.

    1997-12-31

    Utilizing a time expansion technique, a multihit TDC has been developed for readout of the BELLE TOF detector at the KEK B-Factory. Time digitization consists of three steps: tagging an input signal with respect to a beam collision synchronized reference clock, expansion of this time interval, and readout by a conventional multihit TDC. Using a time expansion factor of 20 and a multihit TDC with a 500 ps LSB, this system provides a precision TOF measurement of 25 ps LSB, {approximately}20 ps resolution, and with a dead time of less than 1 {mu}s.

  13. Simultaneous Analysis of Monovalent Anions and Cations with a Sub-Microliter Dead-Volume Flow-Through Potentiometric Detector for Ion Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dumanli, Rukiye; Attar, Azade; Erci, Vildan; Isildak, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    A microliter dead-volume flow-through cell as a potentiometric detector is described in this article for sensitive, selective and simultaneous detection of common monovalent anions and cations in single column ion chromatography for the first time. The detection cell consisted of less selective anion- and cation-selective composite membrane electrodes together with a solid-state composite matrix reference electrode. The simultaneous separation and sensitive detection of sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), ammonium (NH4 (+)), chloride (Cl(-)) and nitrate (NO3 (-)) in a single run was achieved by using 98% 1.5 mM MgSO4 and 2% acetonitrile eluent with a mixed-bed ion-exchange separation column without suppressor column system. The separation and simultaneous detection of the anions and cations were completed in 6 min at the eluent flow-rate of 0.8 mL/min. Detection limits, at S/N = 3, were ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 µM for the anions and 0.3 to 3.0 µM for the cations, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of monovalent anions and cations in several environmental and biological samples. PMID:26786906

  14. Time resolution of a scintillating fiber detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, S.; Toeda, T.; Daito, I.; Doushita, N.; Hasegawa, T.; Horikawa, N.; Iwata, T.; Kibe, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Miyachi, Y.; Noboriguchi, K.; Takabayashi, N.; Tohyama, T.; Wakai, A.

    1999-07-01

    The performance of scintillating fiber detectors with 2 m long light guides was investigated for COMPASS experiment, using a 450 MeV/ c electron beam.Prototypes consisting of 0.5 mm diameter fibers (Kuraray SCSF-38 single-cladding) with the position-sensitive photomultipliers H6568 (Hamamatsu) were constructed for the test. The time resolution of σ˜430 ps was obtained with about 10 photoelectrons for the prototype of 10-layers structure.

  15. The CDF Time of Flight Detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. Cabrera et al.

    2004-01-06

    A new Time of Flight (TOF) detector based on scintillator bars with fine-mesh photomultipliers at both ends has been in operation since 2001 in the CDF experiment. With a design resolution of 100 ps, the TOF can provide separation between K{sup +-} and {pi}{sup +-} in p{bar p} collisions at the 2{omega} level for low momentum, which enhances b flavor tagging capabilities. Because of its very fast response, the TOF is an excellent triggering device, and it is used to trigger on highly ionizing particles, multiple minimum ionizing particles and cosmic rays. Particle identification is achieved by comparing the time-of-flight of the particle measured by the TOF to the time expected for a given mass hypothesis. In order to obtain the resolution necessary for particle ID, optimal calibrations are critical. This paper describes the TOF detector, its calibration procedure, the achieved resolution, the long term operation performances and some of the first results from data analysis using this detector.

  16. The TORCH time-of-flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnew, N.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcia, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-07-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2 and 10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m2, and has a DIRC-like construction. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple Cherenkov photons produced within quartz radiator plates of 10 mm thickness. A four-year R&D programme is underway with an industrial partner (Photek, UK) to produce 53×53 mm2 Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT will provide a timing accuracy of 40 ps per photon and it will have a lifetime of up to at least 5 Ccm-2 of integrated anode charge by utilizing an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coating. The MCP will be read out using charge division with customised electronics incorporating the NINO chipset. Laboratory results on prototype MCPs are presented. The construction of a prototype TORCH module and its simulated performance are also described.

  17. Adaptive NN tracking control of uncertain nonlinear discrete-time systems with nonaffine dead-zone input.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jun; Tong, Shaocheng

    2015-03-01

    In the paper, an adaptive tracking control design is studied for a class of nonlinear discrete-time systems with dead-zone input. The considered systems are of the nonaffine pure-feedback form and the dead-zone input appears nonlinearly in the systems. The contributions of the paper are that: 1) it is for the first time to investigate the control problem for this class of discrete-time systems with dead-zone; 2) there are major difficulties for stabilizing such systems and in order to overcome the difficulties, the systems are transformed into an n-step-ahead predictor but nonaffine function is still existent; and 3) an adaptive compensative term is constructed to compensate for the parameters of the dead-zone. The neural networks are used to approximate the unknown functions in the transformed systems. Based on the Lyapunov theory, it is proven that all the signals in the closed-loop system are semi-globally uniformly ultimately bounded and the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of zero. Two simulation examples are provided to verify the effectiveness of the control approach in the paper. PMID:24968366

  18. Fundamental limits of scintillation detector timing precision.

    PubMed

    Derenzo, Stephen E; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A(-1/2) more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA(-1/2). An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons ns(-1). PMID:24874216

  19. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  20. Real-Time Accumulative Computation Motion Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; López, María Teresa; Castillo, José Carlos; Maldonado-Bascón, Saturnino

    2009-01-01

    The neurally inspired accumulative computation (AC) method and its application to motion detection have been introduced in the past years. This paper revisits the fact that many researchers have explored the relationship between neural networks and finite state machines. Indeed, finite state machines constitute the best characterized computational model, whereas artificial neural networks have become a very successful tool for modeling and problem solving. The article shows how to reach real-time performance after using a model described as a finite state machine. This paper introduces two steps towards that direction: (a) A simplification of the general AC method is performed by formally transforming it into a finite state machine. (b) A hardware implementation in FPGA of such a designed AC module, as well as an 8-AC motion detector, providing promising performance results. We also offer two case studies of the use of AC motion detectors in surveillance applications, namely infrared-based people segmentation and color-based people tracking, respectively. PMID:22303161

  1. Real-time accumulative computation motion detectors.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; López, María Teresa; Castillo, José Carlos; Maldonado-Bascón, Saturnino

    2009-01-01

    The neurally inspired accumulative computation (AC) method and its application to motion detection have been introduced in the past years. This paper revisits the fact that many researchers have explored the relationship between neural networks and finite state machines. Indeed, finite state machines constitute the best characterized computational model, whereas artificial neural networks have become a very successful tool for modeling and problem solving. The article shows how to reach real-time performance after using a model described as a finite state machine. This paper introduces two steps towards that direction: (a) A simplification of the general AC method is performed by formally transforming it into a finite state machine. (b) A hardware implementation in FPGA of such a designed AC module, as well as an 8-AC motion detector, providing promising performance results. We also offer two case studies of the use of AC motion detectors in surveillance applications, namely infrared-based people segmentation and color-based people tracking, respectively. PMID:22303161

  2. Recipes for high resolution time-of-flight detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anz, S.J. |; Felter, T.E.; Hess, B.V.; Daley, R.S.; Roberts, M.L.; Williams, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss the dynamics, construction, implementation and benefits of a time-of-flight (TOF) detector with count rates an order of magnitude higher and resolution three to four times better than that obtainable with a surface barrier detector. The propose use of design criteria for a time-of-flight detector is outlined, and the determination of a TOF detector`s total relative timing error and how this value determines the mass resolution are illustrated using a graphical analysis. They present simulation and experimental examples employing light ions and discuss advantages and pitfalls of medium-energy heavy ion TOF spectrometry.

  3. Dead time analysis of inductor commutation dc-to-dc converter controlled by a small saturable core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Kazurou; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Harada, Koosuke

    1990-09-01

    A novel method of high-frequency switching for dc-to-dc converters is presented. This method is based on the commutation with the aid of inductor current, where a short interval (dead time) of both switches off is given for removing switching surges and switching losses. By the method of constant current-ripple using a saturable core, the condition of zero voltage switching is made independent of the duty ratio. The output voltage is regulated by pulse width modulation in the same way as that of the conventional converter of PWM control. From calculations and experiments, it is found that a desired dead time is derived by connecting external capacitance to the gate-source terminal of the MOSFET.

  4. The Feynman-Y Statistic in Relation to Shift-Register Neutron Coincidence Counting: Precision and Dead Time

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter A.; Henzlova, Daniela; Hauck, Danielle K.; Favalli, Andrea

    2012-07-13

    The Feynman-Y statistic is a type of autocorrelation analysis. It is defined as the excess variance-to-mean ratio, Y = VMR - 1, of the number count distribution formed by sampling a pulse train using a series of non-overlapping gates. It is a measure of the degree of correlation present on the pulse train with Y = 0 for Poisson data. In the context of neutron coincidence counting we show that the same information can be obtained from the accidentals histogram acquired using the multiplicity shift-register method, which is currently the common autocorrelation technique applied in nuclear safeguards. In the case of multiplicity shift register analysis however, overlapping gates, either triggered by the incoming pulse stream or by a periodic clock, are used. The overlap introduces additional covariance but does not alter the expectation values. In this paper we discuss, for a particular data set, the relative merit of the Feynman and shift-register methods in terms of both precision and dead time correction. Traditionally the Feynman approach is applied with a relatively long gate width compared to the dieaway time. The main reason for this is so that the gate utilization factor can be taken as unity rather than being treated as a system parameter to be determined at characterization/calibration. But because the random trigger interval gate utilization factor is slow to saturate this procedure requires a gate width many times the effective 1/e dieaway time. In the traditional approach this limits the number of gates that can be fitted into a given assay duration. We empirically show that much shorter gates, similar in width to those used in traditional shift register analysis can be used. Because the way in which the correlated information present on the pulse train is extracted is different for the moments based method of Feynman and the various shift register based approaches, the dead time losses are manifested differently for these two approaches. The resulting

  5. Analysis of the influence of germanium dead layer on detector calibration simulation for environmental radioactive samples using the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, J.; Pascual, A.; Zarza, I.; Serradell, V.; Ortiz, J.; Ballesteros, L.

    2003-01-01

    Germanium crystals have a dead layer that causes a decrease in efficiency, since the layer is not useful for detection, but strongly attenuates photons. The thickness of this inactive layer is not well known due to the existence of a transition zone where photons are increasingly absorbed. Therefore, using data provided by manufacturers in the detector simulation model, some strong discrepancies appear between calculated and measured efficiencies. The Monte Carlo method is applied to simulate the calibration of a HP Ge detector in order to determine the total inactive germanium layer thickness and the active volume that are needed in order to obtain the minimum discrepancy between estimated and experimental efficiency. Calculations and measurements were performed for all of the radionuclides included in a standard calibration gamma cocktail solution. A Marinelli beaker was considered for this analysis, as it is one of the most commonly used sample container for environmental radioactivity measurements. Results indicated that a good agreement between calculated and measured efficiencies is obtained using a value for the inactive germanium layer thickness equal to approximately twice the value provided by the detector manufacturer. For all energy peaks included in the calibration, the best agreement with experimental efficiency was found using a combination of a small thickness of the inactive germanium layer and a small detection active volume.

  6. A 2D smart pixel detector for time-resolved protein crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Beuville, E.; Cork, C.; Earnest, T.

    1995-10-01

    A smart pixel detector is being developed for Time Resolved Crystallography for biological and material science applications. Using the Pixel detector presented here, the Laue method will enable the study of the evolution of structural changes that occur within the protein as a function of time. The x-ray pixellated detector is assembled to the integrated circuit through a bump bonding process. Within a pixel size of 150 x 150 {mu}m{sup 2}, a low noise preamplifier-shaper, a discriminator, a 3 bit counter and the readout logic are integrated. The readout, based on the Column Architecture principle, will accept hit rates above 5x10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2}/s with a maximum hit rate per pixel of 1 MHz. This detector will allow time resolved Laue crystallography to be performed in a frameless operation mode, without dead time. Target specifications, architecture, and preliminary results on the 8 x 8 front-end prototype and column readout are presented.

  7. Results on diamond timing detector for the TOTEM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossini, E.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the results and status of our R&D on diamond timing detectors for the TOTEM experiment at CERN. Tests with commercial devices have been done and here reported; the unsatisfactory results push us to design a new detector. We present test beams results and the front-end electronics, critical point of the design. Efficiency studies and timing performance dependence from detector capacitance will be also reported.

  8. Time and position sensitive single photon detector for scintillator read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schössler, S.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Tittelmeier, K.; Czasch, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Jagutzki, O.

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a photon counting detector system for combined neutron and γ radiography which can determine position, time and intensity of a secondary photon flash created by a high-energy particle or photon within a scintillator screen. The system is based on a micro-channel plate photomultiplier concept utilizing image charge coupling to a position- and time-sensitive read-out anode placed outside the vacuum tube in air, aided by a standard photomultiplier and very fast pulse-height analyzing electronics. Due to the low dead time of all system components it can cope with the high throughput demands of a proposed combined fast neutron and dual discrete energy γ radiography method (FNDDER). We show tests with different types of delay-line read-out anodes and present a novel pulse-height-to-time converter circuit with its potential to discriminate γ energies for the projected FNDDER devices for an automated cargo container inspection system (ACCIS).

  9. Analysis of regional travel time data from the November 1999 dead sea explosions observed in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Abdullah, M S; Ar-Rajehi, A; Al-Khalifah, T; Al-Amri, M S; Al-Haddad, M S; Al-Arifi, N

    2000-04-19

    Two large chemical explosions were detonated in the Dead Sea in order to calibrate seismic travel times and improve location accuracy for the International Monitoring System (IMS) to monitor a Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). These explosions provided calibration data for regional seismic networks in the Middle East. In this paper we report analysis of seismic data from these shots as recorded by two seismic networks run by King Saud University (KSU) and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Saudi Arabia. The shots were well observed in the distance range 180-480 km mostly to the south of the Dead Sea in the Gulf of Aqaba region of northwestern Saudi Arabia. An average one-dimensional velocity model for the paths was inferred from the travel times of the regional phases Pn, Pg and Sg. Short-period Sn phases were not observed. The velocity model features a thin crust (crustal thickness 26-30 km) and low velocities (average P-wave velocity 5.8-6.0 km/s), consistent with the extensional tectonics of the region and previous studies.

  10. High time-resolution imaging with the MAMA detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn; Smith, Andrew M.; Hill, Bob; Kasle, David B.

    1990-01-01

    Current uses of the MAMA detector which utilize the photon time-tagging capabilities of these detectors are reported. These applications currently include image stabilization by means of post-processing corrections of platform drift and speckle interferometry. The initial results of a sounding rocket experiment to obtain UV images of NGC 6240 and results from speckle interferometry of Neptune's moon Triton are presented.

  11. Measuring Sulfur Isotope Ratios from Solid Samples with the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument and the Effects of Dead Time Corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Kasprzak, W.; Lyness, E.; Raaen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite comprises the largest science payload on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) "Curiosity" rover. SAM will perform chemical and isotopic analysis of volatile compounds from atmospheric and solid samples to address questions pertaining to habitability and geochemical processes on Mars. Sulfur is a key element of interest in this regard, as sulfur compounds have been detected on the Martian surface by both in situ and remote sensing techniques. Their chemical and isotopic composition can belp constrain environmental conditions and mechanisms at the time of formation. A previous study examined the capability of the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) to determine sulfur isotope ratios of SO2 gas from a statistical perspective. Here we discuss the development of a method for determining sulfur isotope ratios with the QMS by sampling SO2 generated from heating of solid sulfate samples in SAM's pyrolysis oven. This analysis, which was performed with the SAM breadboard system, also required development of a novel treatment of the QMS dead time to accommodate the characteristics of an aging detector.

  12. Timing and mechanism of late-Pleistocene calcite vein formation across the Dead Sea Fault Zone, northern Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuriel, Perach; Weinberger, Ram; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Golding, Suzanne D.; Zhao, Jian-xin; Tonguc Uysal, I.; Bar-Matthews, Miryam; Gross, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    The emplacement of calcite-filled veins perpendicular to the Dead Sea Fault Zone in northern Israel reflects strain partitioning during transpression. We present structural, geochemical, and U-Th geochronological data that constrain the mechanism, conditions and timing of vein formation. Vein walls are strongly brecciated and commonly cemented with coarsely crystalline calcite, whereas calcite-filled veins are composed of wall-parallel bands of calcite crystals. Elongated blocky and fibrous calcite crystals grew perpendicular to the vein walls and are characterised by a truncate sealing-hiatus morphology, indicating episodes of partial or complete sealing of the fractures during calcite precipitation. Stable isotope and rare-earth element and yttrium (REY) analyses indicate that calcite-filled veins precipitated by karst processes, involving meteoric water and limited fluid-rock interactions. U-Th dating results show a prolonged history of vein growth. While some veins initiated prior to 500 ka, the majority of the veins were active between 358 and 17 ka. Age constraints on vein activity correspond to an ˜E-W regional shortening phase in this sector of the Dead Sea Fault Zone, associated with an increased component of convergence during the late-Pleistocene.

  13. Cosmic Ray Muons Timing in the ATLAS Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meirose, Bernhard

    2009-12-17

    In this talk I discuss the use of calorimeter timing both for detector commissioning and in searches for new physics. In particular I present real and simulated cosmic ray muons data (2007) results for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter system. The analysis shows that several detector errors such as imperfect calibrations can be uncovered. I also demonstrate the use of ATLAS Tile Calorimeter's excellent timing resolution in suppressing cosmic ray fake missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) in searches for supersymmetry.

  14. On oscillation reduction in feedback control for processes with an uncertain dead time and internal-external disturbances.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqiong; Li, Donghai; Gao, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Qinling

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to find a practical solution to reduce oscillation on the Smith Predictor (SP) based design with the dead time (DT) uncertainty, making it less sensitive to DT change and more effective in disturbance rejection. First, a conditional feedback mechanism is introduced in SP to reduce the amount of oscillation caused by the model inaccuracies in the DT parameter. Then, to address the oscillation caused by the phase lag in traditional PI controller and uncertain dynamics, this conditional SP is combined with active disturbance rejection control (ADRC), assisted by the knowledge of process dynamics. A practical tuning method is provided for the practicing engineers. The proposed approach is validated in extensive simulation studies with different types of plants and in frequency domain analysis. The simulation results show significant improvements in performance robustness and transient response. PMID:26372085

  15. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jesse Andrew

    2011-03-15

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  16. Beam Test of a Time-of-Flight Detector Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Ratcliff, B.; Ramberg, E.; Albrow, M.; Ronzhin, A.; Ertley, C.; Natoli, T.; May, E.; Byrum, K.; /Argonne

    2009-04-01

    We report on results of a Time-of-Flight, TOF, counter prototype in beam tests at SLAC and Fermilab. Using two identical 64-pixel Photonis Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers, MCP-PMTs, to provide start and stop signals, each having a 1 cm-long quartz Cherenkov radiator, we have achieved a timing resolution of {sigma}{sub Single{_}detector} {approx} 14 ps.

  17. Timing resolution measurements of a 3 in. lanthanum bromide detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, L.; De Gerone, M.; Dussoni, S.; Nicolò, D.; Papa, A.; Tenchini, F.; Signorelli, G.

    2013-08-01

    Cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) is a scintillator that presents very good energy and timing resolutions and it is a perfect candidate for photon detector in future experiments to search for lepton flavor violation as in μ → eγ or μ → e conversion. While energy resolution was thoroughly investigated, timing resolution at several MeV presents some experimental challenge. We measured the timing resolution of a 3 in.×3 in. cylindrical LaBr3(Ce) crystal versus few reference detectors by means of a nuclear reaction from a Cockcroft-Walton accelerator that produces coincident γ-rays in the 4.4-11.6 MeV range. Preliminary results allow us to extrapolate the properties of a segmented γ-ray detector in the 50-100 MeV range.

  18. Quantitative changes in hydrocarbons over time in fecal pellets of Incisitermes minor may predict whether colonies are alive or dead.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Vernard R; Nelson, Lori J; Haverty, Michael I; Baldwin, James A

    2010-11-01

    Hydrocarbon mixtures extracted from fecal pellets of drywood termites are species-specific and can be characterized to identify the termites responsible for damage, even when termites are no longer present or are unable to be recovered easily. In structures infested by drywood termites, it is common to find fecal pellets, but difficult to sample termites from the wood. When fecal pellets appear after remedial treatment of a structure, it is difficult to determine whether this indicates that termites in the structure are still alive and active or not. We examined the hydrocarbon composition of workers, alates, and soldiers of Incisitermes minor (Hagen) (family Kalotermitidae) and of fecal pellets of workers. Hydrocarbons were qualitatively similar among castes and pellets. Fecal pellets that were aged for periods of 0, 30, 90, and 365 days after collection were qualitatively similar across all time periods, however, the relative quantities of certain individual hydrocarbons changed over time, with 19 of the 73 hydrocarbon peaks relatively increasing or decreasing. When the sums of the positive and negative slopes of these 19 hydrocarbons were indexed, they produced a highly significant linear correlation (R² =0.89). Consequently, the quantitative differences of these hydrocarbons peaks can be used to determine the age of worker fecal pellets, and thus help determine whether the colony that produced them is alive or dead. PMID:20882326

  19. Fast timing and trigger Cherenkov detector for collider experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Karavicheva, T. L.; Konevskikh, A. S.; Kurepin, A. B.; Loginov, V. A.; Melikyan, Yu A.; Morozov, I. V.; Reshetin, A. I.; Serebryakov, D. V.; Shabanov, A. I.; Slupecki, M.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tykmanov, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of fast timing and trigger Cherenkov detector's design for its use in collider experiments is presented. Several specific requirements are taken into account - necessity of the radiator's placement as close to the beam pipe as possible along with the requirement of gapless (solid) radiator's design. Characteristics of the Cherenkov detector's laboratory prototype obtained using a pion beam at the CERN Proton Synchrotron are also presented, showing the possibility of obtaining sufficiently high geometrical efficiency along with good enough time resolution (50 ps sigma).

  20. Enumeration of Viable Listeria monocytogenes Cells by Real-Time PCR with Propidium Monoazide and Ethidium Monoazide in the Presence of Dead Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Propidium monoazide (PMA) and ethidium monoazide were used for enumeration of viable Listeria monocytogenes cells in the presence of dead cells. PMA had no antimicrobial effect on L. monocytogenes. Viable cell counts were linearly related to real-time PCR threshold cycle values for PMA-treated cel...

  1. Study on GASTOF - A 10 ps resolution timing detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Luc; Liao, Junhui; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof

    2014-10-01

    GASTOF (Gas Time Of Flight) is a type of fast-time detector affiliated to the HPS (High Precision Spectrometer) project which is a forward physics collaborator within CMS. It is a picosecond time resolution Cherenkov gas detector using very fast single anode micro-channel plate photomultiplier (Hamamatsu R3809U-50 or Photek 210) as a photon detector. We firstly measured characteristics of these two types of MCP-PMTs by a fast laser pulse in lab. Then two GASTOF detectors both equipped with a Hamamatsu R3809U-50 tube were studied in a beam test at CERN. According to the analysis of beam test data, the average number of photoelectrons (phe) was 2.0 for both phototubes. By making a cut on the number of photoelectrons such that the mean phe was 3.6 in one phototube and 3.2 in another, we obtained a time resolution of σ ~ 11.7 picosecond (ps) and σ ~ 8.2 ps.

  2. Late Holocene Paleoseismic Timing and Slip History Along the Missyaf Segment of the Dead Sea Fault in Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghraoui, M.; Gomez, F.; Sbeinati, R.; Van der Woerd, J.; Mouty, M.; Hijazi, F.; Darkal, A.; Darawcheh, R.; Radwan, Y.; Al-Najjar, H.; Layous, I.; Al-Ghazzi, R.; Barazangi, M.

    2001-12-01

    We investigate the timing of Holocene earthquakes and related slip rate along the main segment of the Dead Sea fault south of the Ghab pull-apart basin in western Syria. The 60-70 km long Missyaf segment consists of a single fault branch of the north-south trending left-lateral fault at the plate boundary between Africa and Arabia. The late Quaternary tectonic activity along the fault is characterized by (1) deflected streams with consistent left-lateral displacements of different sizes (50 to 300 m), and (2) evidence of large shutter-ridge structures and small pull-apart basins. Microtopographic surveys and trenching across the fault at two sites document the size and timing of paleoseismic events and the related faulting behavior. Near El Harif village, the fault cut across a Roman aqueduct (younger than 22 AD) and induces 10.5 ±0.1 m of left-lateral displacement. Nearby trench-excavations and test pits exhibit the fault with the shear zone affecting a succession of young alluvial deposits of a terrace meander. Radiocarbon dating of the faulting events with vertical displacements reveal the occurrence of a large seismic event prior to 408-380 BC, a penultimate event between 22 - 979 AD and the most recent event between 979 - 1255 AD. The two most recent events being most likely responsible for the Roman aqueduct total displacement, it implies an average coseismic left-lateral movement of 5 m and a slip rate of about 5 mm/yr. The correlation with the historical seismicity catalogue suggests that the most recent faulting event may correspond to the well documented large earthquake of 1170 AD.

  3. Late Holocene Paleoseismic Timing and Slip Rate Along The Missyaf Segment of The Dead Sea Fault In Syria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghraoui, M.; Gomez, F.; Sbeinati, R.; van der Woerd, J.; Mouty, M.; Darkal, A.; Darawcheh, R.; Radwan, Y.; Al-Ghazzi, R.; Barazangi, M.

    We investigate the timing of Holocene earthquakes and related slip rate along the main segment of the Dead Sea fault south of the Ghab pull-apart basin in western Syria. The 60-70 km long Missyaf segment consists of a single fault branch of the north-south trending left-lateral fault at the plate boundary between Africa and Arabia. The late Quaternary tectonic activity along the fault is characterized by (1) deflected streams with consistent left-lateral displacements of different sizes (50 to 300 m), and (2) ev- idence of large shutter-ridge structures and small pull-apart basins. Microtopographic surveys and trenching across the fault at two sites document the size and timing of paleoseismic events and the related faulting behaviour. Near El Harif village, the fault cut across a Roman aqueduct (younger than 22 AD) and induces 13.6 s0.1 m of left-´ lateral displacement. Nearby trench-excavations and test pits exhibit the fault with the shear zone affecting a succession of young alluvial deposits of a terrace meander. First radiocarbon dating of the faulting events with vertical displacements reveal the occur- rence of a large seismic event prior to 348 BC - 810 BC, a penultimate event between 650 - 1152 AD and the most recent event between 979 - 1255 AD. The two most re- cent events being most likely responsible for the Roman aqueduct total displacement, it implies a coseismic left-lateral movement of 6.8 m per event at this location and a slip rate of about 6 - 7 mm/yr for the last 2000 years. The correlation with the histor- ical seismicity catalogue suggests that the most recent faulting event may correspond to the well documented large earthquake of 1170 AD for which we estimate Mw = 7.3 - 7.5.

  4. The timing upgrade project of the TOTEM Roman Pots detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretti, M.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the upgrade project developed by the TOTEM Collaboration to measure the time of flight (TOF) of the protons in the vertical Roman Pot detectors. The physics program that the upgraded system aims to accomplish will be addressed. Simulation studies allowed us to define a geometry of the sensor such that the detection inefficiency due to the pile-up of the particles in the same electrode is low even with a small amount of read-out channels. The measurement of the protons TOF with ~ 50 ps time resolution requires the development of several challenging technological solutions. The arrival time of the protons will be measured by scCVD diamond detectors, for which a dedicated fast and low-noise electronics for the signal amplification has been designed. Indeed, while diamond sensors have the advantage of higher radiation hardness, lower noise and faster signal than silicon sensors, the amount of charge released in the medium is lower. The sampling of the waveform is performed at a rate up to 10 GS/s with the SAMPIC chip. The sampled waveforms are then analysed offline where optimal algorithms can be implemented to reduce the time walk effects. The clock distribution system, based on the Universal Picosecond Timing System developed at GSI, is optimized in order to have a negligible uncertainty on the TOF measurement. Finally an overview of the control system which will interface the timing detectors to the experiment DAQ is given.

  5. Timing Measurements of Scintillator Bars with Silicon Phtotomultiplier Light Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelor, Mark; Elizondo, Leonardo; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To track and analyze cosmic rays via precise measurements of muon and similarly penetrating particle's airshower axes directions, we constructed a prototype consisting of two 1-meter long scintillator bars. Each bar is embedded with green wavelength shifting fibers to increase detection rate of two silicon photomultiplier, SiPM, light detectors to record light produced by cosmic rays via scintillation. The focus of the experiment was to determine the performance of these devices. Evaluation was performed for two makes of SiPM models - from AdvanSiD and Hamamatsu. Timing measurements of the apparatus were performed under several trigger conditions to filter out noise such as coincidence trigger with 2 photomultiplier detectors, as well as SiPM detectors in self-triggered mode. The SiPM detector waveforms were digitized using a 4-channel fast waveform sampler, the DRS4 digitizer. Signals were analyzed with the CERN PAW package. From our results, we deduced the speed of light in the scintillator using the SiPM modules to be about 66% of the speed of light in a vacuum which is in accordance with the specifications of the index of refraction for the fibers given by the manufacturer's specifications. The results of our timing measurements would be presented. Dept. of Ed. Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  6. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors.

    PubMed

    Tabacchini, Valerio; Borghi, Giacomo; Schaart, Dennis R

    2015-07-21

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest scintillation photons can be recorded by each of the photosensor pixels every time a gamma interaction occurs. Generally, the time stamps are used to determine the gamma interaction time while the light intensities are used to estimate the 3D position of the interaction point. In this work we show that the spatio-temporal distribution of the time stamps also carries information on the location of the gamma interaction point and thus the time stamps can be used as explanatory variables for position estimation. We present a model for the spatial resolution obtainable when the interaction position is estimated using exclusively the time stamp of the first photon detected on each of the photosensor pixels. The model is shown to be in agreement with experimental measurements on a 16 mm  ×  16 mm  ×  10 mm LSO : Ce,0.2%Ca crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array where a spatial resolution of 3 mm (root mean squared error) is obtained. Finally we discuss the effects of the main parameters such as scintillator rise and decay time, light output and photosensor single photon time resolution and pixel size. PMID:26133784

  7. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabacchini, Valerio; Borghi, Giacomo; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest scintillation photons can be recorded by each of the photosensor pixels every time a gamma interaction occurs. Generally, the time stamps are used to determine the gamma interaction time while the light intensities are used to estimate the 3D position of the interaction point. In this work we show that the spatio-temporal distribution of the time stamps also carries information on the location of the gamma interaction point and thus the time stamps can be used as explanatory variables for position estimation. We present a model for the spatial resolution obtainable when the interaction position is estimated using exclusively the time stamp of the first photon detected on each of the photosensor pixels. The model is shown to be in agreement with experimental measurements on a 16 mm  ×  16 mm  ×  10 mm LSO : Ce,0.2%Ca crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array where a spatial resolution of 3 mm (root mean squared error) is obtained. Finally we discuss the effects of the main parameters such as scintillator rise and decay time, light output and photosensor single photon time resolution and pixel size.

  8. Fast rise time IR detectors for lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, A.; Bini, S.; Cestelli Guidi, M.; Marcelli, A.; Pace, E.

    2016-07-01

    Diagnostics is a fundamental issue for accelerators whose demands are continuously increasing. In particular bunch-by-bunch diagnostics is a key challenge for the latest generation of lepton colliders and storage rings. The Frascati Φ-factory, DAΦNE, colliding at 1.02 GeV in the centre of mass, hosts in the main rings few synchrotron radiation beamlines and two of them collect the synchrotron radiation infrared emission: SINBAD from the electron ring and 3+L from the positron ring. At DAΦNE each bucket is 2.7 ns long and particles are gathered in bunches emitting pulsed IR radiation, whose intensity in the long wavelength regime is directly proportional to the accumulated particles. Compact uncooled photoconductive HgCdTe detectors have been tested in both beamlines using dedicated optical layouts. Actually, the fast rise time of HgCdTe semiconductors give us the chance to test bunch-by-bunch devices for both longitudinal and transverse diagnostics. For the longitudinal case, single pixel detectors have been used, while for the transverse diagnostics, multi-pixel array detectors, with special custom design, are under test. This contribution will briefly describe the status of the research on fast IR detectors at DAΦNE, the results obtained and possible foreseen developments.

  9. Time-domain response of the ARIANNA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwick, S. W.; Berg, E. C.; Besson, D. Z.; Duffin, T.; Hanson, J. C.; Klein, S. R.; Kleinfelder, S. A.; Piasecki, M.; Ratzlaff, K.; Reed, C.; Roumi, M.; Stezelberger, T.; Tatar, J.; Walker, J.; Young, R.; Zou, L.

    2015-03-01

    The Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a high-energy neutrino detector designed to record the Askaryan electric field signature of cosmogenic neutrino interactions in ice. To understand the inherent radio-frequency (RF) neutrino signature, the time-domain response of the ARIANNA RF receiver must be measured. ARIANNA uses Create CLP5130-2N log-periodic dipole arrays (LPDAs). The associated effective height operator converts incident electric fields to voltage waveforms at the LDPA terminals. The effective height versus time and incident angle was measured, along with the associated response of the ARIANNA RF amplifier. The results are verified by correlating to field measurements in air and ice, using oscilloscopes. Finally, theoretical models for the Askaryan electric field are combined with the detector response to predict the neutrino signature.

  10. Virtual-detector approach to tunnel ionization and tunneling times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeny, Nicolas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Bauke, Heiko

    2016-08-01

    Tunneling times in atomic ionization are studied theoretically by a virtual detector approach. A virtual detector is a hypothetical device that allows one to monitor the wave function's density with spatial and temporal resolution during the ionization process. With this theoretical approach, it becomes possible to define unique moments when the electron enters and leaves with highest probability the classically forbidden region from first principles and a tunneling time can be specified unambiguously. It is shown that neither the moment when the electron enters the tunneling barrier nor when it leaves the tunneling barrier coincides with the moment when the external electric field reaches its maximum. Under the tunneling barrier as well as at the exit the electron has a nonzero velocity in the electric field direction. This nonzero exit velocity has to be incorporated when the free motion of the electron is modeled by classical equations of motion.

  11. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362–33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm3 LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15°C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  12. Multi-CFD Timing Estimators for PET Block Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ullisch, Marcus G.; Moses, William W.

    2006-05-05

    In a conventional PET system with block detectors, a timing estimator is created by generating the analog sum of the signals from the four photomultiplier tubes (PMT) in a module and discriminating the sum with a single constant fraction discriminator (CFD). The differences in the propagation time between the PMTs in the module can potentially degrade the timing resolution of the module. While this degradation is probably too small to affect performance in conventional PET imaging, it may impact the timing inaccuracy for time-of-flight PET systems (which have higher timing resolution requirements). Using a separate CFD for each PMT would allow for propagation time differences to be removed through calibration and correction in software. In this paper we investigate and quantify the timing resolution achievable when the signal from each of the 4 PMTs is digitized by a separate CFD. Several methods are explored for both obtaining values for the propagation time differences between the PMTs and combining the four arrival times to form a single timing estimator. We find that the propagation time correction factors are best derived through an exhaustive search, and that the ''weighted average'' method provides the best timing estimator. Using these methods, the timing resolution achieved with 4 CFDs (1052 {+-} 82 ps) is equivalent to the timing resolution with the conventional single CFD setup (1067 {+-} 158 ps).

  13. Algorithm Implementation for a Prototype Time-Encoded Signature Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, Theresa M.; Runkle, Robert C.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Hyronimus, Brian J.; Morris, Scott J.; Seifert, Allen; Wyatt, Cory R.

    2007-12-31

    The authors constructed a prototype Time-Encoded Signature (TES) system, complete with automated detection algorithms, useful for the detection of point-like, gamma-ray sources in search applications where detectors observe large variability in background count rates beyond statistical (Poisson) noise. The person-carried TES instrument consists of two Cesium Iodide scintillators placed on opposite sides of a Tungsten shield. This geometry mitigates systematic background variation, and induces a unique signature upon encountering point-like sources. This manuscript focuses on the development of detection algorithms that both identify point-source signatures and are computationally simple. The latter constraint derives from the instrument’s mobile (and thus low power) operation. The authors evaluated algorithms on both simulated and field data. The results of this analysis demonstrate the ability to detect sources at a wide range of source-detector distances using computationally simple algorithms.

  14. Quantum Detectors in Generic Non Flat FLRW Space-Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabochaya, Yevgeniya; Zerbini, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a quantum field theoretical approach, in which a quantum probe is used to investigate the properties of generic non-flat FLRW space-times. The probe is identified with a conformally coupled massless scalar field defined on a space-time with horizon and the procedure to investigate the local properties is realized by the use of Unruh-DeWitt detector and by the evaluation of the regularized quantum fluctuations. In the case of de Sitter space, the coordinate independence of our results is checked, and the Gibbons-Hawking temperature is recovered. A possible generalization to the electromagnetic probe is also briefly indicated.

  15. The Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Dead Sea is the lowest point on Earth at 418 meters below sea level, and also one of the saltiest bodies of water on Earth with a salinity of about 300 parts-per-thousand (nine times greater than ocean salinity). It is located on the border between Jordan and Israel, and is fed by the Jordan River. The Dead Sea is located in the Dead Sea Rift, formed as a result of the Arabian tectonic plate moving northward away from the African Plate. The mineral content of the Dead Sea is significantly different from that of ocean water, consisting of approximately 53% magnesium chloride, 37% potassium chloride and 8% sodium chloride. In the early part of the 20th century, the Dead Sea began to attract interest from chemists who deduced that the Sea was a natural deposit of potash and bromine. From the Dead Sea brine, Israel and Jordan produce 3.8 million tons potash, 200,000 tons elemental bromine, 45,000 tons caustic soda, 25, 000 tons magnesium metal, and sodium chloride. Both countries use extensive salt evaporation pans that have essentially diked the entire southern end of the Dead Sea.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop

  16. Readout of silicon strip detectors with position and timing information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Irmler, C.; Pernicka, M.

    2009-01-01

    Low-noise front-end amplifiers for silicon strip detectors are already available for decades, providing excellent signal-to-noise ratio and thus very precise spatial resolution, but at the cost of a long shaping time in the microsecond range. Due to occupancy and pile-up issues, modern experiments need much faster electronics. With submicron ASICs, adequate readout and data processing, it is possible to obtain not only spatial hit data, but also accurate timing information—a feature which is rarely exploited so far. We present the concept of a silicon vertex detector readout system intended for an upgrade of the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan). The APV25 front-end chip, originally developed for CMS at CERN, is used in a way where it delivers multiple samples along the shaped waveform, such that not only the analog pulse height, but also the timing of each particle hit can be determined. We developed a complete readout system including an FADC +Processor VME module which performs zero-suppression in FPGAs. The hit time measurement is also planned on the same module. As fast amplifiers are inherently more susceptible to noise, which largely depends on the load capacitance, the front-end chips should be located as close to the detector as possible. On the other hand, the material budget, especially in a low-energy electron-positron machine such as Belle, should be minimized. We tried to merge those demands with a fully functional "Flex_Module", where thinned APV25 readout chips are mounted on the silicon sensor.

  17. Coherence time measurements using a single detector with variable time resolution.

    PubMed

    Assmann, Marc; Bayer, Manfred

    2012-07-15

    We present a simple technique for measuring coherence times for stationary light fields using a single detector with tunable time resolution. By measuring the equal-time second-order correlation function at varying instrument response functions it is possible to determine the coherence time and also the shape of the temporal decay without the need to record time-resolved data. The technique is demonstrated for pseudothermal light. Possible applications for dynamic light scattering and photon statistics measurements are discussed. PMID:22825142

  18. Basic processes in time-projection like detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sauli, F.

    1984-01-01

    There is a general feeling that unpleasant surprises may still appear in the operation of time projection chambers, and that some modifications of the original design (e.g., the choice of the wire and pad geometry and of the gas mixing) may result in improved performances. The purpose of these notes is, after a short discussion of some physical processes involved in the TPC-like detectors operation, to point out the areas where detailed information is still lacking and where problems have been found or may be expected. If possible, a solution or a line of research are offered to overcome the problems.

  19. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S

    2013-02-21

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362-33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm(3) LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15° C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  20. Comparison of health state utility values derived using time trade-off, rank and discrete choice data anchored on the full health-dead scale.

    PubMed

    Brazier, John; Rowen, Donna; Yang, Yaling; Tsuchiya, Aki

    2012-10-01

    Recent years have seen increasing interest in the use of ordinal methods to elicit health state utility values as an alternative to conventional methods such as standard gamble and time trade-off (TTO). However, in order to use these ordinal methods to produce health state values for use in cost-effectiveness analysis using cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) analysis, these values must be anchored on the full health-dead scale. The paper reports on two feasibility studies that use two approaches to anchor health state utility values derived from discrete choice data on the full health-dead scale: normalising using (1) the TTO value of the worst state and (2) the coefficient on the 'dead' dummy variable. Health state utility values obtained using rank and discrete choice data are compared to more commonly used TTO utility values for two condition-specific preference-based measures; asthma and overactive bladder. Ordinal methods were found to offer a promising alternative to conventional cardinal methods of standard gamble and TTO. There remains a large and important research agenda to address. PMID:21959651

  1. Application of ethidium bromide monoazide for quantification of viable and dead cells of Salmonella enterica by real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guo Ping; Chen, Su Hua; Levin, Robert E

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and efficient method for quantification and discrimination of Salmonella enterica ser. Enteritidis between viable and dead cells killed by heat was developed using ethidium bromide monoazide (EMA) in combination with a real-time loop amplified (Rti-LAMP) DNA assay. The use of 8.0 μg/ml or less of EMA did not inhibit DNA amplification in Rti-LAMP assays derived from viable cells. However, 8.0 μg/ml of EMA notably inhibited DNA amplification and significantly increased the Tp values with dead cells. When the DNA from 2000 viable CFU was subjected to EMA-Rti-LAMP the resulting Tp value was 13 min. In contrast, the DNA from 2000 CFU completely heat destroyed CFU still yielded a Tp value, which was greatly increased to 33.1 min. When the DNA from viable plus heat killed CFU at a ratio of 7:1993 was subjected to EMA-Rti-LAMP, the resulting Tp value was 19.3 min, which was statistically identical (P<0.05) to the Tp value of 19.9 min. obtained with the DNA from only 7 viable CFU. These results indicate that even though 2000 dead cells yielded a Tp value of 33.1 min., low numbers of viable cells in the presence of much higher numbers of dead cells still yielded a linear plot for enumerating viable CFU from Tp values. In addition, propidium monoazide (PMA) was found to be ineffective in distinguishing between low numbers of viable and heat killed cells of S. enterica. PMID:26187777

  2. Optical and UV Sensing Sealed Tube Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors with High Time Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Tremsin, A.; Hull, J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.

    2014-09-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) based imaging, photon time tagging detector sealed tube schemes have a unique set of operational features that enable high time resolution astronomical and remote sensing applications to be addressed. New detectors using the cross strip (XS), cross delay line (XDL), or stripline anode readouts, a wide range of photocathode types, and advanced MCP technologies have been implemented to improve many performance characteristics. A variety of sealed tubes have been developed including 18mm XS readout devices with GaAs and SuperGenII photocathodes, 25mm XDL readout devices with SuperGenII and GaN photocathodes, and 20 x 20 cm sealed tubes with bialkali photocathodes and strip line readout. One key technology that has just become viable is the ability to make MCPs using atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. This employs nanofabrication of the active layers of an MCP on a microcapillary array. This technique opens new performance opportunities, including, very large MCP areas (>20cm), very low intrinsic background, lower radiation induced background, much longer overall lifetime and gain stability, and markedly lower outgassing which can improve the sealed tube lifetime and ease of fabrication. The XS readout has been implemented in formats of 22mm, 50mm and 100mm, and uses MCP charge signals detected on two orthogonal layers of conductive fingers to encode event X-Y positions. We have achieved spatial resolution XS detectors better than 25 microns FWHM, with good image linearity while at low gain (<10^6), substantially increasing local counting rate capabilities and the overall tube lifetime. XS tubes with updated electronics can encode event rates of >5 MHz with ~12% dead time and event timing accuracy of ~100ps. XDL sealed tubes in 25mm format demonstrate ~40 micron spatial resolution at up to ~2 MHz event rates, and have been developed with SupergenII visible regime photocathodes. The XDL tubes also achieve ~100 ps time resolution. Most

  3. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  4. A polarization-sensitive 4-contact detector for terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bulgarevich, Dmitry S; Watanabe, Makoto; Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Niehues, Gudrun; Nishizawa, Seizi; Tani, Masahiko

    2014-05-01

    A light polarization angle-sensitive photoconductive detector for terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is computer-modeled, microfabricated, and tested. The experimental results show good agreement with the linear angular response for an ideal detector. The detector's frequency, angular, and crosstalk responses are discussed in the context of theoretical and experimental considerations. PMID:24921735

  5. Real-time self-networking radiation detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Edward; Lemley, James; Tsang, Thomas Y.; Milian, Laurence W.

    2007-06-12

    The present invention is for a radiation detector apparatus for detecting radiation sources present in cargo shipments. The invention includes the features of integrating a bubble detector sensitive to neutrons and a GPS system into a miniaturized package that can wirelessly signal the presence of radioactive material in shipping containers. The bubble density would be read out if such indicated a harmful source.

  6. Rise time of voltage pulses in NbN superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, K. V.; Divochiy, A. V.; Vakhtomin, Yu. B.; Sidorova, M. V.; Karpova, U. V.; Morozov, P. V.; Seleznev, V. A.; Zotova, A. N.; Vodolazov, D. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    We have found experimentally that the rise time of voltage pulse in NbN superconducting single photon detectors increases nonlinearly with increasing the length of the detector L. The effect is connected with dependence of resistance of the detector Rn, which appears after photon absorption, on its kinetic inductance Lk and, hence, on the length of the detector. This conclusion is confirmed by our calculations in the framework of two temperature model.

  7. SU-E-I-20: Dead Time Count Loss Compensation in SPECT/CT: Projection Versus Global Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ∼10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime

  8. Microsphere plate detectors used with a compact Mott polarimeter for time-of-flight studies

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, G.; Viefhaus, J.; Dunning, F. B.; Berrah, N.

    2000-06-01

    A compact retarding-potential Mott polarimeter combined with microsphere plates (MSP) as electron detectors was built to perform spin-resolved time-of-flight electron spectroscopy. The comparison of the performance of MSP and channeltron detectors shows that the MSP detector has a better time resolution but a lower efficiency. The overall time resolution of the system was determined to be 350 ps using synchrotron radiation pulses. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Clancy, T. J.; Hatarik, R.; McNaney, J.; Zaitseva, N. P.

    2012-10-15

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  10. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGAa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Clancy, T. J.; Hatarik, R.; McNaney, J.; Zaitseva, N. P.

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  11. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Caggiano, J A; Carman, M L; Clancy, T J; Hatarik, R; McNaney, J; Zaitseva, N P

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented. PMID:23126836

  12. Timing in the NOvA detectors with atomic clock based time transfers between Fermilab, the Soudan mine and the NOvA Far detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A.; Niner, E.; Habig, A.

    2015-12-01

    The NOvA experiment uses a GPS based timing system both to internally synchronize the readout of the DAQ components and to establish an absolute wall clock reference which can be used to link the Fermilab accelerator complex with the neutrino flux that crosses the NOvA detectors. We describe the methods that were used during the commissioning of the NOvA DAQ and Timing systems to establish the synchronization between the Fermilab beam and the NOvA far detector. We present how high precision atomic clocks were trained and transported between the MINOS and NOvA detectors during a Northern Minnesota blizzard to validate the absolute time offsets of the experiments and make the first observation of beam neutrinos in the NOvA far detector.

  13. 100 ps time resolution with thin silicon pixel detectors and a SiGe HBT amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Favre, Y.; Iacobucci, G.; Nessi, M.; Paolozzi, L.; Shu, K.

    2016-03-01

    A 100 μm thick silicon detector with 1 mm2 pad readout optimized for sub-nanosecond time resolution has been developed and tested. Coupled to a purposely developed amplifier based on SiGe HBT technology, this detector was characterized at the H8 beam line at the CERN SPS. An excellent time resolution of (106 ± 1) ps for silicon detectors was measured with minimum ionizing particles.

  14. An efficient, FPGA-based, cluster detection algorithm implementation for a strip detector readout system in a Time Projection Chamber polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photo- electron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  15. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  16. A real-time earthquake detector with prefiltering by wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botella, F.; Rosa-Herranz, J.; Giner, J. J.; Molina, S.; Galiana-Merino, J. J.

    2003-08-01

    With the recent development and the growth of personal computers technology, we decided to implement a new earthquake detector. This detector, WDetect, can register in continuous mode all signals received from all our stations of the Local Seismic Network in the province of Alicante in the South-East of Spain. Simultaneously, our program can detect and store seismic events using the classical algorithm based on short- and long-term averages (STA and LTA, respectively). As a new improvement in the detection process, we have added signal prefiltering using the discrete wavelet transform, which increases the detection rate and reduces the false alarm rate, in contrast to other detectors like XDetect or XRTP. All this has been achieved without losing any meaningful event. These improvements were verified by an analysis performed during March 2001 on data from the Local Seismic Network in the province of Alicante, where WDetect has been running since the end of year 2000.

  17. Method to quantify live and dead cells in multi-species oral biofilm by real-time PCR with propidium monoazide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Real-time PCR (qPCR) is a widely used technique in analysing environmental and clinical microbiological samples. However, its main limitation was its inability to discriminate between live and dead cells. Recently, propidium monoazide (PMA) together with qPCR has been used to overcome this problem, with good results for different bacterial species in different types of samples. Our objective was to implement this technique for analysing mortality in multi-species oral biofilms formed in vitro with five oral bacteria: Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Veillonella parvula, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia. We also tested its effectiveness on biofilms treated with an antiseptic solution containing 0.07% w/w cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). Standardisation of the qPCR-PMA method was performed on pure, heat-killed planktonic cultures of each species, detecting mortality higher than 4 log in S. oralis, S. gordonii and F. nucleatum and higher than 2 for V. parvula and P. intermedia. We obtained similar results for all species when using CPC. When we analysed biofilms with qPCR-PMA, we found that the mortality in the non-CPC treated multi-species biofilms was lower than 1 log for all species. After treatment with CPC, the viability reduction was higher than 4 log in S. oralis and S. gordonii, higher than 3 log in F. nucleatum and P. intermedia and approximately 2 in V. parvula. In short, we standardised the conditions for using qPCR-PMA in 5 oral bacterial species and proved its usefulness for quantification of live and dead cells in multi-species oral biofilms formed in vitro, after use of an antiseptic. PMID:23289803

  18. Determining time resolution of microchannel plate detectors for electron time-of-flight spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Zhao, Kun; Chang, Zenghu

    2010-07-01

    The temporal resolution of a 40 mm diameter chevron microchannel plate (MCP) detector followed by a constant fraction discriminator and a time-to-digital converter was determined by using the third order harmonic of 25 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses. The resolution was found to deteriorate from 200 to 300 ps as the total voltage applied on the two MCPs increased from 1600 to 2000 V. This was likely due to a partial saturation of the MCP and/or the constant fraction discriminator working with signals beyond its optimum range of pulse width and shape. PMID:20687710

  19. Charge distribution and response time for a modulation-doped extrinsic infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadek, Victor

    1987-01-01

    The electric charge distribution and response time of a modulation-doped extrinsic infrared detector are determined. First, it is demonstrated theoretically that the photoconductive layer is effectively depleted of ionized majority-impurity charges so that scattering is small and mobility is high for photogenerated carriers. Then, using parameters appropriate to an actual detector, the predicted response time is 10 to the -8th to about 10 to the -9th s, which is much faster than comparable conventional detectors. Thus, the modulation-doped detector design would be valuable for heterodyne applications.

  20. Obesity More Deadly for Men Than Women: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159852.html Obesity More Deadly for Men Than Women: Study Losing ... 14, 2016 WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is nearly three times more deadly for men ...

  1. Day of the Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide…

  2. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  3. Imaging by time-tagging photons with the multi-anode microchannel array detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    The capability and initial use of the Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector in the time-tag mode is reported. The detector hardware currently in use consists of a visible-light detector tube with a semitransparent photocathode proximity-focused to a high-gain curved-channel microchannel plate MCP. The photoevents are detected by a (256 x 1024)-pixel coincidence-anode array with pixel dimensions of 25 x 25 microns connected to charge-sensitive amplifiers and event-detection circuitry. In the time-lag mode, the detector delivers the pixel address and the time of arrival for each detected photon to an accuracy of 10 microns. The maximum count rate is limited by the speed of data-acquisition hardware. The MAMA detector in the time-lag mode is currently being evaluated in programs of astrometry and speckle imaging.

  4. Measurement of time resolution of thermoregulated SiPM for time of flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavazza, D.; D'Antone, I.; Foschi, E.; Guandalini, C.; Lax, I.; Levi, G.; Quadrani, L.; Sbarra, C.; Zuffa, M.

    2012-11-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) are considered very promising in many application where high timing performances, low cost, hardness to radiation damage and single photon counting are requested. Such applications go from astrophysics, high energy accelerator physics to medical physics. A group of SiPM from Hamamatsu has been tested with a low noise fast amplifier based on a hetero-junction FET, mounted on a proper front end board. A first telescope prototype has been used to test the electronics and results are shown. The SiPM time resolution has been measured to be σ∼30 ps, in agreement with other studies reported in literature. The SiPM gain depends critically on temperature and a thermoelectric module to control the circuit was also studied in order to use the system for space detectors.

  5. Performance comparison of optimal fractional order hybrid fuzzy PID controllers for handling oscillatory fractional order processes with dead time.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Pan, Indranil; Das, Shantanu

    2013-07-01

    Fuzzy logic based PID controllers have been studied in this paper, considering several combinations of hybrid controllers by grouping the proportional, integral and derivative actions with fuzzy inferencing in different forms. Fractional order (FO) rate of error signal and FO integral of control signal have been used in the design of a family of decomposed hybrid FO fuzzy PID controllers. The input and output scaling factors (SF) along with the integro-differential operators are tuned with real coded genetic algorithm (GA) to produce optimum closed loop performance by simultaneous consideration of the control loop error index and the control signal. Three different classes of fractional order oscillatory processes with various levels of relative dominance between time constant and time delay have been used to test the comparative merits of the proposed family of hybrid fractional order fuzzy PID controllers. Performance comparison of the different FO fuzzy PID controller structures has been done in terms of optimal set-point tracking, load disturbance rejection and minimal variation of manipulated variable or smaller actuator requirement etc. In addition, multi-objective Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) has been used to study the Pareto optimal trade-offs between the set point tracking and control signal, and the set point tracking and load disturbance performance for each of the controller structure to handle the three different types of processes. PMID:23664205

  6. Macromolecular crystallographic results obtained using a 2048{times}2048 CCD detector at CHESS

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, D.J.; Ealick, S.E.; Tate, M.W.; Gruner, S.M.; Eikenberry, E.F. ||

    1996-09-01

    We present results of macromolecular crystallographic experiments performed at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) with a new CCD-based detector. This detector, installed in January 1995, complements a 1024{times}1024 CCD detector that has been in continuous operation at CHESS since December 1993. The new detector is based on a 4-port, 2048{times}2048 pixel CCD that is directly coupled to a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb phosphor by a 3:1 tapered fiber optic. The active area of the phosphor is a square 82 mm on an edge. The readout time is 7 seconds. In the standard mode of operation, the pixel size at the active area is 41 {mu}m on the edge leading to the capability of resolving approximately 200 orders of diffraction across the detector face. The detector also operates in a 1024{times}1024 mode in which the pixel size is electronically increased by a factor of 4 in area resulting in smaller data files and faster detector readout but at the expense of spatial resolution. Most of the data that has been collected by this detector has been collected in this mode. Dozens of data sets have been collected by many experimenters using this detector at CHESS during the four month period from its installation until the start of the six-month down period of the storage ring. The capabilities of the detector will be illustrated with results from various crystallographic measurements including experiments in which the recorded diffraction patterns extend in resolution as far as 1 A. The results demonstrate that this detector is capable of collecting data of quality at least equal to that of imaging plates but, in many circumstances, with much greater beamline efficiency. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Infrared detector Dewars - Increased LN2 hold time and vacuum jacket life spans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Boyd, W. J.; Blass, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    IR detector Dewars commonly suffer from shorter than desired LN2 hold times and insulation jacket vacuum corruption over relatively short time periods. In an attempt to solve this problem for a 9144 detector Dewar, small 1 liter/s appendage ion pumps were selected for continuous pumping of the vacuum jackets. This procedure extended LN2 hold times from 20 to 60 h and virtually eliminated vacuum jacket corruption. Thus the detector systems are usable continuously over periods of 6 months or more.

  8. [The dead mother].

    PubMed

    Green, A

    1993-03-01

    This study is not concerned, as the title might suggest, with the actual death of the mother but with the child's experience of a mother who is physically present but internally absent due to depression. The child simultaneously introjects and splits off the mother imago, making mourning and "burial" equally impossible. The consequence of this cathectic deprivation is what the author calls "psychic holes" or "white depression". Green attributes to the dead mother a similar structuring function for the psychic apparatus to that attributed to the dead father in Freud's Totem and Taboo, and places the dead mother complex side by side with the Oedipus complex. PMID:8465007

  9. Dead Sea Scrolls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A consortium of researchers from Jet Propulsion Laboratory and three other organizations used charged coupled devices (CCDs) and other imaging enhancement technology to decipher previously unreadable portions of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The technique has potentially important implications for archeology.

  10. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Tobin, , M.

    2016-07-01

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  11. Reaching time resolution of less than 10 ps with plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Sun, B. H.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Zhu, L. H.; Enomoto, A.; Nagae, D.; Nishimura, T.; Omika, S.; Ozawa, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    Timing-pick up detectors with excellent timing resolutions are essential in many modern nuclear physics experiments. Aiming to develop a Time-Of-Flight system with precision down to about 10 ps, we have made a systematic study of the timing characteristic of TOF detectors, which consist of several combinations of plastic scintillators and photomultiplier tubes. With the conventional electronics, the best timing resolution of about 5.1 ps (σ) has been achieved for detectors with an area size of 3 × 1cm2 . It is found that for data digitalization a combination of TAC and ADC can achieve a better time resolution than the currently available TDC. Simultaneous measurements of both time and pulse height are very valuable for the correction of time-walk effect.

  12. A high-throughput, multi-channel photon-counting detector with picosecond timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Fraser, G. W.; Miller, G. M.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Jarron, P.; Despeisse, M.; Powolny, F.; Howorth, J.; Milnes, J.

    2009-06-01

    High-throughput photon counting with high time resolution is a niche application area where vacuum tubes can still outperform solid-state devices. Applications in the life sciences utilizing time-resolved spectroscopies, particularly in the growing field of proteomics, will benefit greatly from performance enhancements in event timing and detector throughput. The HiContent project is a collaboration between the University of Leicester Space Research Centre, the Microelectronics Group at CERN, Photek Ltd., and end-users at the Gray Cancer Institute and the University of Manchester. The goal is to develop a detector system specifically designed for optical proteomics, capable of high content (multi-parametric) analysis at high throughput. The HiContent detector system is being developed to exploit this niche market. It combines multi-channel, high time resolution photon counting in a single miniaturized detector system with integrated electronics. The combination of enabling technologies; small pore microchannel plate devices with very high time resolution, and high-speed multi-channel ASIC electronics developed for the LHC at CERN, provides the necessary building blocks for a high-throughput detector system with up to 1024 parallel counting channels and 20 ps time resolution. We describe the detector and electronic design, discuss the current status of the HiContent project and present the results from a 64-channel prototype system. In the absence of an operational detector, we present measurements of the electronics performance using a pulse generator to simulate detector events. Event timing results from the NINO high-speed front-end ASIC captured using a fast digital oscilloscope are compared with data taken with the proposed electronic configuration which uses the multi-channel HPTDC timing ASIC.

  13. A time-gating scintillation detector for the measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Yea, Kwon-hae; Cha, Hyungki

    2009-06-15

    A time-gating scintillation detector, in which a fast high voltage switch is used for gating a channel photomultiplier, was developed for a measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons. The x rays generated from the intense femtosecond laser and the solid target interactions were suppressed selectively and a time-of-flight signal of a laser-generated fast neutron was measured effectively. The detector was used successfully to measure the neutron yield of a femtosecond, deuterated, polystyrene plasma.

  14. A time-gating scintillation detector for the measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Yea, Kwon-hae; Cha, Hyungki

    2009-06-01

    A time-gating scintillation detector, in which a fast high voltage switch is used for gating a channel photomultiplier, was developed for a measurement of laser-induced fast neutrons. The x rays generated from the intense femtosecond laser and the solid target interactions were suppressed selectively and a time-of-flight signal of a laser-generated fast neutron was measured effectively. The detector was used successfully to measure the neutron yield of a femtosecond, deuterated, polystyrene plasma. PMID:19566199

  15. Note: A timing micro-channel plate detector with backside fast preamplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Deyang Lu, Rongchun; Liu, Junliang; Cai, Xiaohong

    2014-03-15

    A timing micro-channel plate detector with a backside double-channel fast preamplifier was developed to avoid distortion during signal propagation from the anode to the preamplifier. The mechanical and electronic structure is described. The detector including its backside preamplifier is tested by a {sup 241}Am α-source and a rise time of ∼2 ns with an output background noise of 4 mV{sub rms} was achieved.

  16. Laser Testing for the ATLAS Forward Proton Time of Flight Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howley, Ian; Brandt, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    In 10 trillionths of a second light travels 3mm. Our group at UTA is currently developing the most precise time of flight (TOF) detector ever deployed in a collider experiment, with a resolution on this 10 picosecond scale. In conjunction with several other universities we have proposed to install a fast timing system as part of a proton detector upgrade to the main ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . Precise measurement of the timing of proton tracks will allow rejection of background to the physics processes of interest, which include the elusive Higgs Boson. Laser based tests at UTA allow us to measure the response of our detectors downstream electronics including constant fraction discriminators, amplifiers and most importantly the microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes, which are at the heart of this fast-timing system. By isolating the individual components of the detector in this fashion, we can fully characterize each device's response. My research is part of the ongoing data analysis using the CERN analysis package ROOT. By closely examining the pulse height, time difference distributions, and transit time spread (TTS) we are be able to understand the performance of the detectors and electronics in laser and beam tests to better prepare ourselves for future test beams and eventually full scale installation and operation. I will present the latest performance test results from data I have analyzed.

  17. Laser Testing for the ATLAS Forward Proton Time of Flight Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howley, Ian; Brandt, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    In 10 trillionths of a second light travels 3mm. Our group at UTA is currently developing the most precise time of flight (TOF) detector ever deployed in a collider experiment, with a resolution on this 10 picosecond scale. In conjunction with several other universities we have proposed to install a fast timing system as part of a proton detector upgrade to the main ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . Precise measurement of the timing of proton tracks will allow rejection of background to the physics processes of interest, which include the elusive Higgs Boson. Laser based tests at UTA allow us to measure the response of our detectors downstream electronics including constant fraction discriminators, amplifiers and most importantly the microchannel plate photomultiplier tubes, which are at the heart of this fast-timing system. By isolating the individual components of the detector in this fashion, we can fully characterize each device's response. My research is part of the ongoing data analysis using the CERN analysis package ROOT. By closely examining the pulse height, time difference distributions, and transit time spread (TTS) we are be able to understand the performance of the detectors and electronics in laser and beam tests to better prepare ourselves for future test beams and eventually full scale installation and operation. I will present the latest performance test results from data I have analyzed. )

  18. Response regime studies on standard detectors for decay time determination in phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappe, C.; Abou Nada, F.; Lindén, J.; Richter, M.; Aldén, M.

    2013-09-01

    This work compares the extent of linear response regimes from standard time-resolving optical detectors for phosphor thermometry. Different types of Photomultipliers (ordinary and time-gated) as well as an Avalanche Photodiode are tested and compared using the phosphorescent time decay of CdWO4 that ranges from 10 μs down to a few ns within a temperature span of 290 to 580 K. Effects originating from incipient detector saturation, far from obvious to the operator's eye, are revealed as a change in evaluated phosphorescence decay time. Since the decay time of thermographic phosphors itself is used for temperature determination - systematic temperature errors up to several tens of Kelvins may be introduced by such detector saturation. A detector mapping procedure is suggested in order to identify linear response regions where the decay-to-temperature evaluation can be performed unbiased. Generation of such a library is highly recommended prior to any quantitative measurement attempt. Using this detector library, even signals collected in the partly saturated regime can be corrected to their unbiased value extending the usable detector operating range significantly. Further, the use of an external current-to-voltage amplifier proved useful for most applications in time-based phosphor thermometry helping to limit saturation effects whilst maintaining a reasonable bandwidth and signal outputs.

  19. Active quenching and gating circuit of the photon counting detector for laser time transfer with improved timing resolution and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef; Kodet, Jan; Michalek, Vojtech

    2015-05-01

    We are presenting the results of research and development of a new active quenching and gating electronics for Single Photon Avalanche Detector (SPAD). The goal of the work was to develop a new SPAD detector package for Laser Time Transfer ground to space with improved timing resolution and stability. The first version of a SPAD detector is operational on board of GNSS navigation satellites. They are based on 25 μm diameter K14 series SPAD chips. They do provide timing resolution of typically 125 ps and stability of the order of 10 ps. The new control electronics provides timing resolution of 25 ps and timing stability and drifts of the order of one picosecond. The device is constructed on a basis of electronics components for which the space qualified equivalents are commercially available. The device construction, tests and results will be presented in detail.

  20. A new neutron time-of-flight detector for fuel-areal-density measurements on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V. Yu. Forrest, C. J.; Marshall, K. L.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-11-15

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector for fuel-areal-density measurements in cryogenic DT implosions was installed on the OMEGA Laser System. The nTOF detector has a cylindrical thin-wall, stainless-steel, 8-in.-diam, 4-in.-thick cavity filled with an oxygenated liquid xylene scintillator. Four gated photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with different gains are used to measure primary DT and D{sub 2} neutrons, down-scattered neutrons in nT and nD kinematic edge regions, and to study tertiary neutrons in the same detector. The nTOF detector is located 13.4 m from target chamber center in a well-collimated line of sight. The design details of the nTOF detector, PMT optimization, and test results on OMEGA will be presented.

  1. A new neutron time-of-flight detector for fuel-areal-density measurements on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C. J.; Marshall, K. L.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-11-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector for fuel-areal-density measurements in cryogenic DT implosions was installed on the OMEGA Laser System. The nTOF detector has a cylindrical thin-wall, stainless-steel, 8-in.-diam, 4-in.-thick cavity filled with an oxygenated liquid xylene scintillator. Four gated photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with different gains are used to measure primary DT and D2 neutrons, down-scattered neutrons in nT and nD kinematic edge regions, and to study tertiary neutrons in the same detector. The nTOF detector is located 13.4 m from target chamber center in a well-collimated line of sight. The design details of the nTOF detector, PMT optimization, and test results on OMEGA will be presented.

  2. Compton rejection for HPGe detectors via real-time pulse shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beckedahl, D; Blair, J J; Friensehner, A; Kammeraad, J E; Kreek, S A; Payne, B; Schmid, G J

    1998-07-31

    A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-developed pulse shape analysis (PSA) technique which performs real-time Compton suppression in High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors without the use of anti-coincidence detectors is described. Some preliminary measurements of a variety of sources with a standard HPGe detector system and our prototype PSA algorithm have been made and indicate that a reduction in Compton continuum can be achieved via PSA. These measurements represent an initial assessment of the effectiveness of the prototype PSA system for the improvement of spectral quality and future improvements are expected. Additional work is progressing to optimize the effectiveness of the algorithm for Compton rejection in standard HPGe detectors. Work is also progressing to extend the methodology to segmented HPGe detectors which could potentially yield significantly better Compton rejection and gamma-ray ima

  3. A new neutron time-of-flight detector for fuel-areal-density measurements on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C J; Marshall, K L; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C

    2014-11-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector for fuel-areal-density measurements in cryogenic DT implosions was installed on the OMEGA Laser System. The nTOF detector has a cylindrical thin-wall, stainless-steel, 8-in.-diam, 4-in.-thick cavity filled with an oxygenated liquid xylene scintillator. Four gated photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with different gains are used to measure primary DT and D2 neutrons, down-scattered neutrons in nT and nD kinematic edge regions, and to study tertiary neutrons in the same detector. The nTOF detector is located 13.4 m from target chamber center in a well-collimated line of sight. The design details of the nTOF detector, PMT optimization, and test results on OMEGA will be presented. PMID:25430281

  4. Parameters affecting temporal resolution of Time Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron Detector (TRION)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, I.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bar, D.; Feldman, G.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Weierganz, M.

    2013-11-01

    The Time-Resolved Integrative Optical Neutron (TRION) detector was developed for Fast Neutron Resonance Radiography (FNRR), a fast-neutron transmission imaging method that exploits characteristic energy-variations of the total scattering cross-section in the En = 1-10 MeV range to detect specific elements within a radiographed object. As opposed to classical event-counting time of flight (ECTOF), it integrates the detector signal during a well-defined neutron Time of Flight window corresponding to a pre-selected energy bin, e.g., the energy-interval spanning a cross-section resonance of an element such as C, O and N. The integrative characteristic of the detector permits loss-free operation at very intense, pulsed neutron fluxes, at a cost however, of recorded temporal resolution degradation This work presents a theoretical and experimental evaluation of detector related parameters which affect temporal resolution of the TRION system.

  5. Comparison of detector materials for time-of-flight positron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1982-06-01

    Knowledge of detection efficiency and timing resolution is essential when comparing detector materials for time-of-flight positron tomography. We present results of Monte Carlo calculations of the detection efficiency of plastic, lead loaded plastic, NaI(T1), liquid xenon, bismuth germanate (BGO), CsF, BaF/sub 2/, Ge, and HgI/sub 2/ for 511 keV photons. We also use recently published values of timing resolution for these detector materials to tabulate the quantity (efficiency)/sup 2//(time resolution) which is a measure of the relative sensitivity for time of flight positron tomography.

  6. A Novel Time of Flight Detector for the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dix, Richard; Drummond, Kirk; Powell, William; Chiu, Mickey

    2010-11-01

    Time-of Flight (TOF) detectors allow one to identify particles created in collider experiments. The Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment (PHENIX) at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposing new forward timing detectors to measure the TOF with a 10 picosecond (ps) timing resolution. A prototype of the detector electronics system was tested by using Cherenkov signals from cosmic rays and translating them into digital signals. Each signal was split and delivered to two analog-to-digital-converters (ADCs). C++ and ROOT were used to write programs to compare voltage readings reported by the two ADC channels and determine the time difference between them, which was 76 ps. Using new ADCs, which run 17 times faster, the timing resolution will be 5 ps. This will allow PHENIX to probe the meson-baryon anomaly at intermediate, transverse momentum by making detailed measurements in a psuedorapidity region which has not been well measured.

  7. The Time Of Flight Scintillators For The Blast Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindile, A. T.

    2001-10-01

    The testing procedures for the time-of-flight scintillators of the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid are presented. The manufacturing process is described and the results for the time resolution and efficiency tests are shown, with details of the hardware and sofware used.

  8. Photo-Detectors for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (ToF-PET)

    PubMed Central

    Spanoudaki, Virginia Ch.; Levin⋆, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the most recent advances in photo-detector design employed in time of flight positron emission tomography (ToF-PET). PET is a molecular imaging modality that collects pairs of coincident (temporally correlated) annihilation photons emitted from the patient body. The annihilation photon detector typically comprises a scintillation crystal coupled to a fast photo-detector. ToF information provides better localization of the annihilation event along the line formed by each detector pair, resulting in an overall improvement in signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed image. Apart from the demand for high luminosity and fast decay time of the scintillation crystal, proper design and selection of the photo-detector and methods for arrival time pick-off are a prerequisite for achieving excellent time resolution required for ToF-PET. We review the two types of photo-detectors used in ToF-PET: photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) and silicon photo-multipliers (SiPMs) with a special focus on SiPMs. PMID:22163482

  9. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S. Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D.; Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-07-15

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  10. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mirfayzi, S R; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Krygier, A G; Green, A; Alejo, A; Clarke, R; Freeman, R R; Fuchs, J; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Morrison, J T; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M

    2015-07-01

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil. PMID:26233373

  11. A multi-channel high time resolution detector for high content imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, J. S.; Fraser, G. W.; Miller, G. M.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Jarron, P.; Despeisse, M.; Powolny, F.; Howorth, J.; Milnes, J.

    2009-10-01

    Medical imaging has long benefited from advances in photon counting detectors arising from space and particle physics. We describe a microchannel plate-based detector system for high content (multi-parametric) analysis, specifically designed to provide a step change in performance and throughput for measurements in imaged live cells and tissue for the 'omics'. The detector system integrates multi-channel, high time resolution, photon counting capability into a single miniaturized detector with integrated ASIC electronics, comprising a fast, low power amplifier discriminator and TDC for every channel of the discrete pixel electronic readout, and achieving a pixel density improvement of order two magnitudes compared with current comparable devices. The device combines high performance, easy reconfigurability, and economy within a compact footprint. We present simulations and preliminary measurements in the context of our ultimate goals of 20 ps time resolution with multi-channel parallel analysis (1024 channels).

  12. Position information by signal analysis in real time from resistive anode microchannel plate detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, K.; Benmaimon, R.; Prabhakaran, A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Heber, O.; Schwalm, D.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-07-01

    Resistive anode multichannel plate detectors are extensively used for imaging photons, electrons and ions. We present a method to acquire position information from such detector systems by considering simple parameters of the signals produced from the resistive anode encoder. Our technique is easy to implement and computes position in real time during experiments. Position information can be obtained using our method without the need for dedicated position analyser units.

  13. "Living versus Dead":

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Pratik

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Semple antirabies vaccine was developed by David Semple in India in 1911. Semple introduced a peculiarly British approach within the Pasteurian tradition by using carbolized dead virus. This article studies this unique phase of vaccine research between 1910 and 1935 to show that in the debates and laboratory experiments around the potency and safety of vaccines, categories like "living" and "dead" were often used as ideological and moral denominations. These abstract and ideological debates were crucial in defining the final configuration of the Semple vaccine, the most popular antirabies vaccine used globally, and also in shaping international vaccination policies. PMID:21037397

  14. Development of real time detector for fluorescent particles

    SciTech Connect

    Prevost, C.; Vendel, J.; Seigneur, A.

    1997-08-01

    Aerosols tagged by a fluorescent dye are a worthwhile tool within the framework of ventilation and filtration studies. The detection in real time of a specific particulate tracer allows characterization of ventilation behaviour such as air change rate, the determination of a good or bad mixing zone and transfer coefficient, or the determination of the decontamination factor for High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. Generally, these tests require specific aerosols in order to get rid of the atmospheric aerosol background. Until now the principle of fluorescent aerosol concentration measuring has only allowed an integral response with a time lag by means of sampling on filters and a fluorimetric analysis after specific conditioning of these filters. 5 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  16. A position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschbaumer, S.; Bergmaier, A.; Dollinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    A new 2D position sensitive time of flight detector for heavy ion ERD has been developed. The detector features separate time and position measurement in a straight geometry. An electrostatic lens focuses the secondary electrons ejected from a carbon foil onto a channel plate stack maintaining the position information despite the electron momentum distribution. For position readout a 2D Backgammon anode is used. A position resolution of <0.6 mm (FWHM) and a time resolution of 96 ps (FWHM) is demonstrated.

  17. The CDFII Time-of-Flight detector and impact on beauty flavor tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giagu, Stefano

    2003-06-01

    The new CDFII detector incorporates a Time-of-Flight detector (TOF), employing plastic scintillator bars and fine-mesh photomultipliers. Since August 2001 the TOF system has been fully instrumented and integrated into the CDFII data acquisition system. With a design goal of 100 ps resolution the TOF system will provide at least two standard deviations separation between K± and π± for momenta p < 1.6 GeV/ c, complementing low momentum particle identification by means of the specific ionization energy loss measured in the drift chamber. We describe the design of the TOF detector and discuss the current status of its calibration and initial performances. Finally we review the expected impact of the TOF detector in the flavor tagging of neutral Bs0 meson.

  18. Time-of-flight calibration of a 6Li glass epithermal neutron detector

    PubMed

    Livingston; Saleh; Block; Brand

    2000-10-01

    The curing of Portland cement concrete involves the conversion of water from a free to a bound state. The process can be monitored nondestructively by measuring the shift in the neutron energy spectrum in the epithermal range (0.025-1 eV). A tuned array of 6Li glass detectors has been constructed with varying efficiencies over the epithermal energy range. To determine the efficiency of each detector as a function of neutron energy, it is necessary to calibrate it against a reference neutron spectrum. This was accomplished using a time-of-flight approach with a pulsed neutron beam produced at the Gaerttner LINAC Laboratory at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. With a neutron flight path of 25 m it was possible to determine the neutron detector efficiencies to an energy resolution of 11 microeV. The data showed good agreement with the detector design calculations. PMID:11003519

  19. Parasitic antenna effect in terahertz plasmon detector array for real-time imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Ryu, Min Woo; Rok Kim, Kyung; Han, Seong-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The performance uniformity of each pixel integrated with a patch antenna in a terahertz plasmon detector array is very important in building the large array necessary for a real-time imaging system. We found a parasitic antenna effect in the terahertz plasmon detector whose response is dependent on the position of the detector pixel in the illumination area of the terahertz beam. It was also demonstrated that the parasitic antenna effect is attributed to the physical structure consisting of signal pads, bonding wires, and interconnection lines on a chip and a printed circuit board. Experimental results show that the performance of the detector pixel is determined by the sum of the effects of each parasitic antenna and the on-chip integrated antenna designed to detect signals at the operating frequency. The parasitic antenna effect can be minimized by blocking the interconnections with a metallic shield.

  20. Detector module for a simplified ultrasonic time delay spectrometry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammell, Paul M.; Liu, Yunbo; Maruvada, Subha; Harris, Gerald R.

    2012-05-01

    When setting up a water-tank based ultrasonic system, aligning the transmitting and receiving transducers to maximize the received signal is required. With a digital time delay spectrometry (TDS) system the "dechirped" signal is observed while positional adjustments are being made. Observation is easier if only the envelope, rather than the modulated signal, is displayed. A module is described that provides an envelope (rectified signal) that, when displayed on an oscilloscope, is suitable as an alignment aid for use with the TDS system described elsewhere in these Proceedings.

  1. A bin-per-bin dead-time control technique for time-of-flight measurements in the G0 experiment: The differential buddy

    SciTech Connect

    L. Bimbot; G0 Collaboration

    2005-02-01

    The general principle is presented. The application to the G0 experiment [1] was enabled by the specificity of the time encoding ASIC component. On the poster, some encountered difficulties are exposed, together with a possible software remedy. An internal report is in preparation [2].

  2. Design and performance of a high spatial resolution, time-of-flight PET detector

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Srilalan; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Werner, Matthew E.; Kaul, Madhuri; Newcomer, F. M.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a high spatial resolution PET detector with time-of-flight capabilities. With an emphasis on high spatial resolution and sensitivity, we initially evaluated the performance of several 1.5 × 1.5 and 2.0 × 2.0 mm2 and 12–15 mm long LYSO crystals read out by several appropriately sized PMTs. Experiments to evaluate the impact of reflector on detector performance were performed and the final detector consisted of a 32 × 32 array of 1.5 × 1.5 × 15 mm3 LYSO crystals packed with a diffuse reflector and read out by a single Hamamatsu 64 channel multi-anode PMT. Such a design made it compact, modular and offered a cost-effective solution to obtaining excellent energy and timing resolution. To minimize the number of readout signals, a compact front-end readout electronics that summed anode signals along each of the orthogonal directions was also developed. Experimental evaluation of detector performance demonstrates clear discrimination of the crystals within the detector. An average energy resolution (FWHM) of 12.7 ± 2.6% and average coincidence timing resolution (FWHM) of 348 ps was measured, demonstrating suitability for use in the development of a high spatial resolution time-of-flight scanner for dedicated breast PET imaging. PMID:25246711

  3. Time delay and integration detectors using charge transfer devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccann, D. H.; White, M. H.; Turly, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    An imaging system comprises a multi-channel matrix array of CCD devices wherein a number of sensor cells (pixels) in each channel are subdivided and operated in discrete intercoupled groups of subarrays with a readout CCD shift register terminating each end of the channels. Clock voltages, applied to the subarrays, selectively cause charge signal flow in each subarray in either direction independent of the other subarrays. By selective application of four phase clock voltages, either one, two or all three of the sections subarray sections cause charge signal flow in one direction, while the remainder cause charge signal flow in the opposite direction. This creates a form of selective electronic exposure control which provides an effective variable time delay and integration of three, six or nine sensor cells or integration stages. The device is constructed on a semiconductor sustrate with a buried channel and is adapted for front surface imaging through transparent doped tin oxide gates.

  4. Standardization of (166m)Ho and 243Am/239Np by live-timed anti-coincidence counting with extending dead time.

    PubMed

    da Silva, C J; Loureiro, J S; Delgado, J U; Poledna, R; Moreira, D S; Iwahara, A; Tauhata, L; da Silva, R L; Lopes, R T

    2012-09-01

    The National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LNMRI)/Brazil acquired (166m)Ho and (243)Am/(239)Np solutions from commercial suppliers in order to realize primary standardization and therefore reducing the associated uncertainties. The method used in the standardization was the live-timed 4πβ(LS)-γ(ΝaI(Tl)) anticoincidence counting. The live-timed anticoincidence system is operated since 2006 in LNMRI and is composed of two MTR2 modules donated by Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB)/France. The data acquisition system uses a homemade LabView program and an Excel file for calculus. These systems have been used for primary standardization at LNMRI for many radionuclides and recently took part in the (124)Sb and (177)Lu International Key Comparisons with good performance. PMID:22417696

  5. Time and Amplitude Characteristics of Large Scintillation Detectors with SiPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplin, V. A.; Makliaev, E. F.; Melikyan, Yu. A.; Naumov, P. P.; Naumov, P. Yu.; Runtso, M. F.

    A large plastic scintillation detector system with silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout has been developed as a prototype for future astroparticle experiments' detectors. A set of SiPM connected in parallel was used in order to enlarge the light collection effective area and thus enhance the detector's amplitude and timing performance. Here we report on the values of time resolution and scintillation detection efficiency of such a system for different types of SiPM as a function of the distance between the scintillation strip edge with photomultipliers attached to it, and the penetrating particle. Results of a special simulation study of the system's amplitude and timing performance as a function of the SiPM radiation aging are also presented.

  6. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  7. Real-time alignment and cali bration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujany, Giulio; Storaci, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  8. Towards a life-time-limited 8-octave-infrared photoconductive germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, S. G.; Deßmann, N.; Pohl, A.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Mittendorff, M.; Winnerl, S.; Zhukavin, R. Kh; Tsyplenkov, V. V.; Shengurov, D. V.; Shastin, V. N.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast, ultra-broad-band photoconductive detector based on heavily doped and highly compensated germanium has been demonstrated. Such a material demonstrates optical sensitivity in the more than 8 octaves, in the infrared, from about 2 mm to about 8 μm. The spectral sensitivity peaks up between 2 THz and 2.5 THz and is slowly reduced towards lower and higher frequencies. The life times of free electrons/holes measured by a pump-probe technique approach a few tenths of picoseconds and remain almost independent on the optical input intensity and on the temperature of a detector in the operation range. During operation, a detector is cooled down to liquid helium temperature but has been approved to detect, with a reduced sensitivity, up to liquid nitrogen temperature. The response time is shorter than 200 ps that is significantly faster than previously reported times.

  9. A system for accurate and automated injection of hyperpolarized substrate with minimal dead time and scalable volumes over a large range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Steven; Bucur, Adriana; Port, Michael; Alizadeh, Tooba; Kazan, Samira M.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Paley, Martyn N. J.

    2014-02-01

    Over recent years hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization has become an established technique for studying metabolism in vivo in animal models. Temporal signal plots obtained from the injected metabolite and daughter products, e.g. pyruvate and lactate, can be fitted to compartmental models to estimate kinetic rate constants. Modeling and physiological parameter estimation can be made more robust by consistent and reproducible injections through automation. An injection system previously developed by us was limited in the injectable volume to between 0.6 and 2.4 ml and injection was delayed due to a required syringe filling step. An improved MR-compatible injector system has been developed that measures the pH of injected substrate, uses flow control to reduce dead volume within the injection cannula and can be operated over a larger volume range. The delay time to injection has been minimized by removing the syringe filling step by use of a peristaltic pump. For 100 μl to 10.000 ml, the volume range typically used for mice to rabbits, the average delivered volume was 97.8% of the demand volume. The standard deviation of delivered volumes was 7 μl for 100 μl and 20 μl for 10.000 ml demand volumes (mean S.D. was 9 ul in this range). In three repeat injections through a fixed 0.96 mm O.D. tube the coefficient of variation for the area under the curve was 2%. For in vivo injections of hyperpolarized pyruvate in tumor-bearing rats, signal was first detected in the input femoral vein cannula at 3-4 s post-injection trigger signal and at 9-12 s in tumor tissue. The pH of the injected pyruvate was 7.1 ± 0.3 (mean ± S.D., n = 10). For small injection volumes, e.g. less than 100 μl, the internal diameter of the tubing contained within the peristaltic pump could be reduced to improve accuracy. Larger injection volumes are limited only by the size of the receiving vessel connected to the pump.

  10. A system for accurate and automated injection of hyperpolarized substrate with minimal dead time and scalable volumes over a large range☆

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Steven; Bucur, Adriana; Port, Michael; Alizadeh, Tooba; Kazan, Samira M.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Paley, Martyn N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization has become an established technique for studying metabolism in vivo in animal models. Temporal signal plots obtained from the injected metabolite and daughter products, e.g. pyruvate and lactate, can be fitted to compartmental models to estimate kinetic rate constants. Modeling and physiological parameter estimation can be made more robust by consistent and reproducible injections through automation. An injection system previously developed by us was limited in the injectable volume to between 0.6 and 2.4 ml and injection was delayed due to a required syringe filling step. An improved MR-compatible injector system has been developed that measures the pH of injected substrate, uses flow control to reduce dead volume within the injection cannula and can be operated over a larger volume range. The delay time to injection has been minimized by removing the syringe filling step by use of a peristaltic pump. For 100 μl to 10.000 ml, the volume range typically used for mice to rabbits, the average delivered volume was 97.8% of the demand volume. The standard deviation of delivered volumes was 7 μl for 100 μl and 20 μl for 10.000 ml demand volumes (mean S.D. was 9 ul in this range). In three repeat injections through a fixed 0.96 mm O.D. tube the coefficient of variation for the area under the curve was 2%. For in vivo injections of hyperpolarized pyruvate in tumor-bearing rats, signal was first detected in the input femoral vein cannula at 3–4 s post-injection trigger signal and at 9–12 s in tumor tissue. The pH of the injected pyruvate was 7.1 ± 0.3 (mean ± S.D., n = 10). For small injection volumes, e.g. less than 100 μl, the internal diameter of the tubing contained within the peristaltic pump could be reduced to improve accuracy. Larger injection volumes are limited only by the size of the receiving vessel connected to the pump. PMID:24355621

  11. A system for accurate and automated injection of hyperpolarized substrate with minimal dead time and scalable volumes over a large range.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Steven; Bucur, Adriana; Port, Michael; Alizadeh, Tooba; Kazan, Samira M; Tozer, Gillian M; Paley, Martyn N J

    2014-02-01

    Over recent years hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization has become an established technique for studying metabolism in vivo in animal models. Temporal signal plots obtained from the injected metabolite and daughter products, e.g. pyruvate and lactate, can be fitted to compartmental models to estimate kinetic rate constants. Modeling and physiological parameter estimation can be made more robust by consistent and reproducible injections through automation. An injection system previously developed by us was limited in the injectable volume to between 0.6 and 2.4ml and injection was delayed due to a required syringe filling step. An improved MR-compatible injector system has been developed that measures the pH of injected substrate, uses flow control to reduce dead volume within the injection cannula and can be operated over a larger volume range. The delay time to injection has been minimized by removing the syringe filling step by use of a peristaltic pump. For 100μl to 10.000ml, the volume range typically used for mice to rabbits, the average delivered volume was 97.8% of the demand volume. The standard deviation of delivered volumes was 7μl for 100μl and 20μl for 10.000ml demand volumes (mean S.D. was 9 ul in this range). In three repeat injections through a fixed 0.96mm O.D. tube the coefficient of variation for the area under the curve was 2%. For in vivo injections of hyperpolarized pyruvate in tumor-bearing rats, signal was first detected in the input femoral vein cannula at 3-4s post-injection trigger signal and at 9-12s in tumor tissue. The pH of the injected pyruvate was 7.1±0.3 (mean±S.D., n=10). For small injection volumes, e.g. less than 100μl, the internal diameter of the tubing contained within the peristaltic pump could be reduced to improve accuracy. Larger injection volumes are limited only by the size of the receiving vessel connected to the pump. PMID:24355621

  12. Dead Star Rumbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite of Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A This Spitzer Space Telescope composite shows the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (white ball) and surrounding clouds of dust (gray, orange and blue). It consists of two processed images taken one year apart. Dust features that have not changed over time appear gray, while those that have changed are colored blue or orange. Blue represents an earlier time and orange, a later time.

    These observations illustrate that a blast of light from Cassiopeia A is waltzing outward through the dusty skies. This dance, called an 'infrared echo,' began when the remnant erupted about 50 years ago.

    Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion 325 years ago. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. This remnant is located 10,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia.

    An infrared echo is created when a star explodes or erupts, flashing light into surrounding clumps of dust. As the light zips through the dust clumps, it heats them up, causing them to glow successively in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The result is an optical illusion, in which the dust appears to be flying outward at the speed of light. This apparent motion can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps.

    Echoes are distinct from supernova shockwaves, which are made up material that is swept up and hurled outward by exploding stars.

    This infrared echo is the largest ever seen, stretching more than 50 light-years away from Cassiopeia A. If viewed from Earth, the entire movie frame would take up the same amount of space as two full moons.

    Hints of an older infrared echo from Cassiopeia A's supernova explosion hundreds of years ago can also be seen.

    The earlier Spitzer image was taken on November 30

  13. Real-time violent action detector for elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Seki, Makito; Hirai, Takahide; Koichi, Takeuchi; Koichi, Sasakawa

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a new critical event detection method simplified for an embedded appliance mounted on an elevator car. We first define that the critical event is unusual action such as violent action, counteraction, etc, and introduce the violent action degree(VAD). We use an optical flow based method to analyze the current state of the motion through an ITV(Industrial TeleVision) camera. After motion analysis, we calculate a normalized statistical value, which is the VAD. The statistical value is the multiple of the optical flow direction variance, the optical flow magnitude variance, and optical flow area. Our method calculates the statistical value variance and normalize it by the variance. At last we can detect critical event by thresholding the VAD. Then we implement this method on an embedded appliance. The appliance has an A/D converter with special designed frame buffer, a 400MIPS high performance micro processor, dynamic memory, and some flash ROM. Since we need to process the method 4Hz or faster to keep the detection performance, we shrink the images into 80 by 60 size, adopt the recursive correlation method, and analyze optical flows. The special designed frame buffer enables us for capturing sequencial two images at any time. After that we achieve about 8Hz processing performance on it. Our method detects 80% of critical events where at most 6% of false acception.

  14. A fast 1-D detector for imaging and time resolved SAXS experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menk, R. H.; Arfelli, F.; Bernstorff, S.; Pontoni, D.; Sarvestani, A.; Besch, H. J.; Walenta, A. H.

    1999-02-01

    A one-dimensional test detector on the principle of a highly segmented ionization chamber with shielding grid (Frisch grid) was developed to evaluate if this kind of detector is suitable for advanced small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments. At present it consists of 128 pixels which can be read out within 0.2 ms with a noise floor of 2000 e-ENC. A quantum efficiency of 80% for a photon energy of 8 keV was achieved. This leads to DQE values of 80% for photon fluxes above 1000 photons/pixel and integration time. The shielding grid is based on the principles of the recently invented MCAT structure and the GEM structure which also allows electron amplification in the gas. In the case of the MCAT structure, an energy resolution of 20% at 5.9 keV was observed. The gas amplification mode enables imaging with this integrating detector on a subphoton noise level with respect to the integration time. Preliminary experiments of saturation behavior show that this kind of detector digests a photon flux density up to 10 12 photons/mm 2 s and operates linearly. A spatial resolution of at least three line pairs/mm was obtained. All these features show that this type of detector is well suited for time-resolved SAXS experiments as well as high flux imaging applications.

  15. Timing performance measurements of Si-PM-based LGSO phoswich detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Okumura, Satoshi; Yeom, Jung Yeol

    2016-06-01

    Since the timing resolution was significantly improved using silicon photomultipliers (Si-PMs) combined with fast scintillators, we expect that phoswich detectors will be used in future TOF-PET systems. However, no practical phoswich detector has been proposed for TOF-PET detectors. We conducted timing performance measurements of phoswich detectors comprised of two types of Ce-doped LGSO scintillators with different decay times coupled to Si-PMs and digitized the output signals using a high bandwidth digital oscilloscope. We prepared three types of LGSOs (LGSO-fast, LGSO-standard, and LGSO-slow) with different Ce concentrations. After measuring the decay time, the energy performance, and the timing performance of each LGSO, we conducted pulse shape analysis and timing resolution measurements for two versions of phoswich LGSOs: LGSO-standard/LGSO-fast and LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combinations. The pulse shape spectra for a 10-mm-long crystal LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combination showed good separation of the front and back crystals with a peak-to-valley ratio of 2.0. The timing resolutions for the 20-mm-long crystal LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combination were ~300 ps FWHM. The timing resolutions for the phoswich LGSOs were slightly inferior than that measured with the individual LGSO fast, but the acquired timing resolution for the phoswich configuration, ~300 ps with a LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combination, is adequate for TOF-PET systems. We conclude that LGSO phoswich detectors are promising for TOF-DOI-PET systems.

  16. Optical delay encoding for fast timing and detector signal multiplexing in PET

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Alexander M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The large number of detector channels in modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners poses a challenge in terms of readout electronics complexity. Multiplexing schemes are typically implemented to reduce the number of physical readout channels, but often result in performance degradation. Novel methods of multiplexing in PET must be developed to avoid this data degradation. The preservation of fast timing information is especially important for time-of-flight PET. Methods: A new multiplexing scheme based on encoding detector interaction events with a series of extremely fast overlapping optical pulses with precise delays is demonstrated in this work. Encoding events in this way potentially allows many detector channels to be simultaneously encoded onto a single optical fiber that is then read out by a single digitizer. A two channel silicon photomultiplier-based prototype utilizing this optical delay encoding technique along with dual threshold time-over-threshold is demonstrated. Results: The optical encoding and multiplexing prototype achieves a coincidence time resolution of 160 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) and an energy resolution of 13.1% FWHM at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 LYSO crystals. All interaction information for both detectors, including timing, energy, and channel identification, is encoded onto a single optical fiber with little degradation. Conclusions: Optical delay encoding and multiplexing technology could lead to time-of-flight PET scanners with fewer readout channels and simplified data acquisition systems. PMID:26233181

  17. Picosecond timing of high-energy heavy ions with semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Vladimir; Kiselev, Oleg; Egorov, Nicolai; Eremin, Igor; Tuboltsev, Yuri; Verbitskaya, Elena; Gorbatyuk, Andrei

    2015-10-01

    Construction of new accelerating facilities to investigate reactions with heavy ions requires upgrading of the Time-of-Flight (TOF) systems for on-line ion identification. The requested time resolution of the TOF system developed for Super FRagment Separator in the frame of the FAIR program at GSI, Germany, is in the range of tens of picoseconds, which can be realized by using planar silicon detectors. Such resolution will allow characterization of relativistic ions from Lithium to Uranium. However, fast timing of heavy ions with semiconductor detectors is expected to be limited by the so-called plasma effect due to a high concentration of electron-hole pairs in tracks. Here the results of the experiment with relativistic 197Au ions (the energy of 920 MeV per nucleon) obtained with Si detectors are described, which showed the TOF time resolution around 14 ps rms. The physical mechanism of charge collection from high-density penetrating tracks of relativistic heavy ions is considered and the analysis of timing characteristics is performed taking into account track polarization. Polarization is shown to have a strong influence on the formation of the leading edge of the detector current response generated by relativistic heavy ions, which allows us to explain the observed high time resolution.

  18. Energy and Timing Measurement with Time-Based Detector Readout for PET Applications: Principle and Validation with Discrete Circuit Components.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xishan; Lan, Allan K; Bircher, Chad; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Yinong; Shao, Yiping

    2011-06-11

    A new signal processing method for PET application has been developed, with discrete circuit components to measure energy and timing of a gamma interaction based solely on digital timing processing without using an amplitude-to-digital convertor (ADC) or a constant fraction discriminator (CFD). A single channel discrete component time-based readout (TBR) circuit was implemented in a PC board. Initial circuit functionality and performance evaluations have been conducted. Accuracy and linearity of signal amplitude measurement were excellent, as measured with test pulses. The measured timing accuracy from test pulses reached to less than 300 ps, a value limited mainly by the timing jitter of the prototype electronics circuit. Both suitable energy and coincidence timing resolutions (~18% and ~1.0 ns) have been achieved with 3 × 3 × 20 mm(3) LYSO scintillator and photomultiplier tube-based detectors. With its relatively simple circuit and low cost, TBR is expected to be a suitable front-end signal readout electronics for compact PET or other radiation detectors requiring the reading of a large number of detector channels and demanding high performance for energy and timing measurement. PMID:21743761

  19. The MRPC-based ALICE time-of-flight detector: Status andperformance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.; ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The large time-of-flight (TOF) array is one of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the mid-rapidity region of the ALICE experiment at the LHC. It allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9<η<0.9. The TOF exploits the innovative MRPC technology capable of an intrinsic time resolution better than 50 ps with an efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. The TOF detector has been efficiently taking data since the first pp collisions recorded in ALICE in December 2009. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved for both pp and Pb-Pb collisions aredescribed.

  20. The timing resolution of scintillation-detector systems: Monte Carlo analysis.

    PubMed

    Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-11-01

    Recent advancements in fast scintillating materials and fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) have stimulated renewed interest in time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET). It is well known that the improvement in the timing resolution in PET can significantly reduce the noise variance in the reconstructed image resulting in improved image quality. In order to evaluate the timing performance of scintillation detectors used in TOF PET, we use Monte Carlo analysis to model the physical processes (crystal geometry, crystal surface finish, scintillator rise time, scintillator decay time, photoelectron yield, PMT transit time spread, PMT single-electron response, amplifier response and time pick-off method) that can contribute to the timing resolution of scintillation-detector systems. In the Monte Carlo analysis, the photoelectron emissions are modeled by a rate function, which is used to generate the photoelectron time points. The rate function, which is simulated using Geant4, represents the combined intrinsic light emissions of the scintillator and the subsequent light transport through the crystal. The PMT output signal is determined by the superposition of the PMT single-electron response resulting from the photoelectron emissions. The transit time spread and the single-electron gain variation of the PMT are modeled in the analysis. Three practical time pick-off methods are considered in the analysis. Statistically, the best timing resolution is achieved with the first photoelectron timing. The calculated timing resolution suggests that a leading edge discriminator gives better timing performance than a constant fraction discriminator and produces comparable results when a two-threshold or three-threshold discriminator is used. For a typical PMT, the effect of detector noise on the timing resolution is negligible. The calculated timing resolution is found to improve with increasing mean photoelectron yield, decreasing scintillator decay time and

  1. XNAP: a hybrid pixel detector with nanosecond resolution for time resolved synchrotron radiation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, P.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Dautet, H.; Davies, M.; Fischer, P.; Göttlicher, P.; Graafsma, H.; Hervé, C.; Rüffer, R.; Thil, C.

    2013-03-01

    The XNAP collaboration is constructing a hybrid pixel X-ray detector based on a monolithic silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) sensor array aiming at applications in synchrotron radiation facilities. The 2D detector is capable of identifying which individual electron bunch produces each detected X-ray photon, even when the storage ring operates in multibunch filling modes. This instrument is intended to be used in X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and Nuclear Resonance experiments and serve as a demonstrator for various kind of time resolved diffraction and scattering applications as well as a very high count rate device. The detector is a 1 kilopixel device with 280 μm pitch that implements both counting mode up to MHz frame rates and event-by-event readout with sub-nanosecond time resolution. The paper describes the detector design and some results obtained with small 4×4 pixel prototypes that have been built and measured to make and validate the most critical choices for the final detector.

  2. A real-time microprocessor QRS detector system with a 1-ms timing accuracy for the measurement of ambulatory HRV.

    PubMed

    Ruha, A; Sallinen, S; Nissilä, S

    1997-03-01

    The design, test methods and results of an ambulatory QRS detector are presented. The device is intended for the accurate measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) and reliable QRS detection in both ambulatory and clinical use. The aim of the design work was to achieve high QRS detection performance in terms of timing accuracy and reliability, without compromising the size and power consumption of the device. The complete monitor system consists of a host computer and the detector unit. The detector device is constructed of a commonly available digital signal processing (DSP) microprocessor and other components. The QRS detection algorithm uses optimized prefiltering in conjunction with a matched filter and dual edge threshold detection. The purpose of the prefiltering is to attenuate various noise components in order to achieve improved detection reliability. The matched filter further improves signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and symmetries the QRS complex for the threshold detection, which is essential in order to achieve the desired performance. The decision for detection is made in real-time and no search-back method is employed. The host computer is used to configure the detector unit, which includes the setting of the matched filter impulse response, and in the retrieval and postprocessing of the measurement results. The QRS detection timing accuracy and detection reliability of the detector system was tested with an artificially generated electrocardiogram (ECG) signal corrupted with various noise types and a timing standard deviation of less than 1 ms was achieved with most noise types and levels similar to those encountered in real measurements. A QRS detection error rate (ER) of 0.1 and 2.2% was achieved with records 103 and 105 from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database, respectively. PMID:9216129

  3. Iterative Bayesian Estimation of Travel Times on Urban Arterials: Fusing Loop Detector and Probe Vehicle Data

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Meng-Ying; Cao, Peng; Wang, Jiang-Bo

    2016-01-01

    On urban arterials, travel time estimation is challenging especially from various data sources. Typically, fusing loop detector data and probe vehicle data to estimate travel time is a troublesome issue while considering the data issue of uncertain, imprecise and even conflicting. In this paper, we propose an improved data fusing methodology for link travel time estimation. Link travel times are simultaneously pre-estimated using loop detector data and probe vehicle data, based on which Bayesian fusion is then applied to fuse the estimated travel times. Next, Iterative Bayesian estimation is proposed to improve Bayesian fusion by incorporating two strategies: 1) substitution strategy which replaces the lower accurate travel time estimation from one sensor with the current fused travel time; and 2) specially-designed conditions for convergence which restrict the estimated travel time in a reasonable range. The estimation results show that, the proposed method outperforms probe vehicle data based method, loop detector based method and single Bayesian fusion, and the mean absolute percentage error is reduced to 4.8%. Additionally, iterative Bayesian estimation performs better for lighter traffic flows when the variability of travel time is practically higher than other periods. PMID:27362654

  4. Iterative Bayesian Estimation of Travel Times on Urban Arterials: Fusing Loop Detector and Probe Vehicle Data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Cui, Meng-Ying; Cao, Peng; Wang, Jiang-Bo

    2016-01-01

    On urban arterials, travel time estimation is challenging especially from various data sources. Typically, fusing loop detector data and probe vehicle data to estimate travel time is a troublesome issue while considering the data issue of uncertain, imprecise and even conflicting. In this paper, we propose an improved data fusing methodology for link travel time estimation. Link travel times are simultaneously pre-estimated using loop detector data and probe vehicle data, based on which Bayesian fusion is then applied to fuse the estimated travel times. Next, Iterative Bayesian estimation is proposed to improve Bayesian fusion by incorporating two strategies: 1) substitution strategy which replaces the lower accurate travel time estimation from one sensor with the current fused travel time; and 2) specially-designed conditions for convergence which restrict the estimated travel time in a reasonable range. The estimation results show that, the proposed method outperforms probe vehicle data based method, loop detector based method and single Bayesian fusion, and the mean absolute percentage error is reduced to 4.8%. Additionally, iterative Bayesian estimation performs better for lighter traffic flows when the variability of travel time is practically higher than other periods. PMID:27362654

  5. Dead Sea rhodopsins revisited.

    PubMed

    Bodaker, Idan; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Oren, Aharon; Béjà, Oded

    2012-12-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique hypersaline ecosystem with near toxic magnesium levels (∼2 M), dominance of divalent cations and a slightly acidic pH. Previously, we reported a haloarchaeon related to Halobacterium salinarum to dominate in a microbial bloom that developed in 1992 in the upper water layers of the lake following massive freshwater runoff. Whether this clade also dominated an earlier bloom in 1980-1982 cannot be ascertained as no samples for cultivation-independent analysis were preserved. The presence of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin was reported in the 1980-1982 bloom of prokaryotes that had developed in the Dead Sea. To test the hypothesis that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping may play a major role in determining what type of haloarchaea may dominate in specific bloom conditions, we compared rhodopsin genes recovered from Dead Sea biomass collected in different periods with genes coding for retinal proteins in isolated haloarchaea. Novel bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin genes were found in samples collected in 2007 and 2010. The fact that no rhodopsin genes were recovered from samples collected during the 1992 bloom, which was dominated by a single species, suggests that different clades were present in the 1980-1982 and 1992 blooms, and that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping did not necessarily play a determinative role in the dominance of specific halophiles in the blooms. PMID:23760932

  6. MULTICHANNEL ENERGY AND TIMING MEASUREMENTS WITH THE PEAK DETECTOR/DERANDOMIZER ASIC.

    SciTech Connect

    O'CONNOR,P.; DE GERONIMO,G.; GROSHOLZ,J.; KANDASAMY,A.; JUNNARKAR,S.; FRIED,J.

    2004-10-16

    The Peak Detector/Derandomizer ASIC (PDD) provides threshold discrimination, peak detection, time-to-amplitude conversion, analog memory, sparsification, and multiplexing for 32 channels of analog pulse data. In this work the spectroscopic capabilities of the chip (high resolution and high rate) are demonstrated along with correlated measurements of pulse risetime. Imaging and coincidence detection using the PDD chip will also be illustrated.

  7. Detector Development for the abBA Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Seo, P.-N.; Bowman, J. D.; Mitchell, G. S.; Penttila, S. I.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new type of field-expansion spectrometer to measure the neutron beta decay correlations (a, b, B, and A). A precision measurement of these correlations places stringent requirements on charged particle detectors. The design employs large area segmented silicon detectors to detect both protons and electrons in coincidence. Other requirements include good energy resolution (< 5 keV), a thin dead layer to allow observation of 30-keV protons, fast timing resolution (~1 ns) to reconstruct electron-backscattering events, and nearly unity efficiency. We report results of testing commercially available surface-barrier silicon detectors for energy resolution and timing performance, and measurement of the dead-layer thickness of ion-implanted silicon detectors with a 3.2 MeV alpha source. PMID:27308162

  8. Timing calibration and synchronization of surface and fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, P.; Bellido, J.; Bertou, Xavier; Covault, C.E.; Fick, B.E.; Gemmeke, H.; Kleifges, M.; Mostafa, M.; Menshikov, A.; Meyer, F.; Pryke, C.; Sommers, P.; Vanderpan, E.; Vernotte, F.; Wiencke, L.

    2005-08-01

    Reconstruction of cosmic ray arrival directions for Surface Detectors (SD) and Fluorescence Detectors (FD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory requires accurate timing (25 nanoseconds or better) between measurements at individual detectors and instrument triggers. Timing systems for both SD and FD are based on Motorola Oncore UT+ GPS receivers installed into custom-built time-tagging circuits that are calibrated in the laboratory to a statistical precision of better than 15 ns. We describe timing calibration and synchronization methods applied in the field for both the SD and the FD systems in four areas: (1) checks of timing offsets within the SD using co-located station pairs and timing residuals on reconstructed showers, (2) calibration within the FD using a custom-build LED calibration system, (3) calibration between SD and FD using laser signals fed simultaneously into an SD station and across the FD via the Central Laser Facility (CLF), and (4) studies of synchronization between FD and SD through the analysis of events detected by both systems, called hybrid events. These hybrid events allow for a much more accurate reconstruction of the shower and for relatively tight constraints on timing calibration offsets. We demonstrate that statistical and systematic timing uncertainties have no significant impact on the event reconstruction.

  9. Non-contact time-resolved diffuse reflectance imaging at null source-detector separation.

    PubMed

    Mazurenka, M; Jelzow, A; Wabnitz, H; Contini, D; Spinelli, L; Pifferi, A; Cubeddu, R; Mora, A Dalla; Tosi, A; Zappa, F; Macdonald, R

    2012-01-01

    We report results of the proof-of-principle tests of a novel non-contact tissue imaging system. The system utilizes a quasi-null source-detector separation approach for time-domain near-infrared spectroscopy, taking advantage of an innovative state-of-the-art fast-gated single photon counting detector. Measurements on phantoms demonstrate the feasibility of the non-contact approach for the detection of optically absorbing perturbations buried up to a few centimeters beneath the surface of a tissue-like turbid medium. The measured depth sensitivity and spatial resolution of the new system are close to the values predicted by Monte Carlo simulations for the inhomogeneous medium and an ideal fast-gated detector, thus proving the feasibility of the non-contact approach for high density diffuse reflectance measurements on tissue. Potential applications of the system are also discussed. PMID:22274351

  10. A highly efficient neutron time-of-flight detector for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Yamaguchi, K.; Yamagajo, T.; Nakano, T.; Kasai, T.; Urano, T.; Azechi, H.; Nakai, S.; Iida, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed the highly efficient neutron detector system MANDALA for the inertial-confinement-fusion experiment. The MANDALA system consists of 842 elements plastic scintillation detectors and data acquisition electronics. The detection level is the yield of 1.2×105 for 2.5 MeV and 1×105 for 14.1 MeV neutrons (with 100 detected hits). We have calibrated the intrinsic detection efficiencies of the detector elements using a neutron generator facility. Timing calibration and integrity test of the system were also carried out with a 60Co γ ray source. MANDALA system was applied to the implosion experiments at the GEKKO XII laser facility. The integrity test was carried out by implosion experiments.

  11. Real-time particle-detection probabilities in accelerated macroscopic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastopoulos, Charis; Savvidou, Ntina

    2015-01-01

    We construct the detection rate for particle detectors moving along non-inertial trajectories and interacting with quantum fields. The detectors described here are characterized by the presence of records of observation throughout their history, so that the detection rate corresponds to directly measurable quantities. This is in contrast to past treatments of detectors, which actually refer to probes, i.e., microscopic systems from which we extract information only after their interaction has been completed. Our treatment incorporates the irreversibility due to the creation of macroscopic records of observation. The key result is a real-time description of particle detection and a rigorously defined time-local probability density function (PDF). The PDF depends on the scale of the temporal coarse-graining that is necessary for the formation of a macroscopic record. The evaluation of the PDF for Unruh-DeWitt detectors along different types of trajectory shows that only paths with at least one characteristic time-scale much smaller than lead to appreciable particle detection. Our approach allows for averaging over fast motions and thus predicts a constant detection rate for all fast periodic motions.

  12. Design and Fabrication of TES Detector Modules for the TIME-Pilot [CII] Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunacek, J.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Bumble, B.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A.; Crites, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Gong, Y.; Kenyon, M.; Koch, P.; Li, C.-T.; O'Brient, R.; Shirokoff, E.; Shiu, C.; Staniszewski, Z.; Uzgil, B.; Zemcov, M.

    2016-08-01

    We are developing a series of close-packed modular detector arrays for TIME-Pilot, a new mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array that will map the intensity fluctuations of the redshifted 157.7 \\upmu m emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) from redshift z ˜ 5 to 9. TIME-Pilot's two banks of 16 parallel-plate waveguide spectrometers (one bank per polarization) will have a spectral range of 183-326 GHz and a resolving power of R ˜ 100. The spectrometers use a curved diffraction grating to disperse and focus the light on a series of output arcs, each sampled by 60 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers with gold micro-mesh absorbers. These low-noise detectors will be operated from a 250 mK base temperature and are designed to have a background-limited NEP of {˜ }10^{-17} mathrm {W}/mathrm {Hz}^{1/2}. This proceeding presents an overview of the detector design in the context of the TIME-Pilot instrument. Additionally, a prototype detector module produced at the Microdevices Laboratory at JPL is shown.

  13. Design and Fabrication of TES Detector Modules for the TIME-Pilot [CII] Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunacek, J.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Bumble, B.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A.; Crites, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Gong, Y.; Kenyon, M.; Koch, P.; Li, C.-T.; O'Brient, R.; Shirokoff, E.; Shiu, C.; Staniszewski, Z.; Uzgil, B.; Zemcov, M.

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a series of close-packed modular detector arrays for TIME-Pilot, a new mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array that will map the intensity fluctuations of the redshifted 157.7 \\upmu m emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) from redshift z ˜ 5 to 9. TIME-Pilot's two banks of 16 parallel-plate waveguide spectrometers (one bank per polarization) will have a spectral range of 183-326 GHz and a resolving power of R ˜ 100 . The spectrometers use a curved diffraction grating to disperse and focus the light on a series of output arcs, each sampled by 60 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers with gold micro-mesh absorbers. These low-noise detectors will be operated from a 250 mK base temperature and are designed to have a background-limited NEP of {˜ }10^{-17} W/Hz^{1/2} . This proceeding presents an overview of the detector design in the context of the TIME-Pilot instrument. Additionally, a prototype detector module produced at the Microdevices Laboratory at JPL is shown.

  14. Distinct coincidence detectors govern the corticostriatal spike timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fino, Elodie; Paille, Vincent; Cui, Yihui; Morera-Herreras, Teresa; Deniau, Jean-Michel; Venance, Laurent

    2010-08-15

    Corticostriatal projections constitute the main input to the basal ganglia, an ensemble of interconnected subcortical nuclei involved in procedural learning. Thus, long-term plasticity at corticostriatal synapses would provide a basic mechanism for the function of basal ganglia in learning and memory. We had previously reported the existence of a corticostriatal anti-Hebbian spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) at synapses onto striatal output neurons, the medium-sized spiny neurons. Here, we show that the blockade of GABAergic transmission reversed the time dependence of corticostriatal STDP. We explored the receptors and signalling mechanisms involved in the corticostriatal STDP. Although classical models for STDP propose NMDA receptors as the unique coincidence detector, the involvement of multiple coincidence detectors has also been demonstrated. Here, we show that corticostriatal STDP depends on distinct coincidence detectors. Specifically, long-term potentiation is dependent on NMDA receptor activation, while long-term depression requires distinct coincidence detectors: the phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) and the inositol-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-gated calcium stores. Furthermore, we found that PLCbeta activation is controlled by group-I metabotropic glutamate receptors, type-1 muscarinic receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channel activities. Activation of PLCbeta and IP3Rs leads to robust retrograde endocannabinoid signalling mediated by 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol and cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Interestingly, the same coincidence detectors govern the corticostriatal anti-Hebbian STDP and the Hebbian STDP reported at cortical synapses. Therefore, LTP and LTD induced by STDP at corticostriatal synapses are mediated by independent signalling mechanisms, each one being controlled by distinct coincidence detectors. PMID:20603333

  15. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of autonomous radio detector stations for extensive air showers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    To exploit the full potential of radio measurements of cosmic-ray air showers at MHz frequencies, a detector timing synchronization within 1 ns is needed. Large distributed radio detector arrays such as the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) rely on timing via the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the synchronization of individual detector station clocks. Unfortunately, GPS timing is expected to have an accuracy no better than about 5 ns. In practice, in particular in AERA, the GPS clocks exhibit drifts on the order of tens of ns. We developed a technique to correct for the GPS drifts, and an independentmore » method used for cross-checks that indeed we reach nanosecond-scale timing accuracy by this correction. First, we operate a “beacon transmitter” which emits defined sine waves detected by AERA antennas recorded within the physics data. The relative phasing of these sine waves can be used to correct for GPS clock drifts. In addition to this, we observe radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, the position of which we determine in real time from Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcasts intercepted with a software-defined radio. From the known source location and the measured arrival times of the pulses we determine relative timing offsets between radio detector stations. We demonstrate with a combined analysis that the two methods give a consistent timing calibration with an accuracy of 2 ns or better. Consequently, the beacon method alone can be used in the future to continuously determine and correct for GPS clock drifts in each individual event measured by AERA.« less

  16. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of autonomous radio detector stations for extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the full potential of radio measurements of cosmic-ray air showers at MHz frequencies, a detector timing synchronization within 1 ns is needed. Large distributed radio detector arrays such as the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) rely on timing via the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the synchronization of individual detector station clocks. Unfortunately, GPS timing is expected to have an accuracy no better than about 5 ns. In practice, in particular in AERA, the GPS clocks exhibit drifts on the order of tens of ns. We developed a technique to correct for the GPS drifts, and an independent method is used to cross-check that indeed we reach a nanosecond-scale timing accuracy by this correction. First, we operate a ``beacon transmitter'' which emits defined sine waves detected by AERA antennas recorded within the physics data. The relative phasing of these sine waves can be used to correct for GPS clock drifts. In addition to this, we observe radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, the position of which we determine in real time from Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcasts intercepted with a software-defined radio. From the known source location and the measured arrival times of the pulses we determine relative timing offsets between radio detector stations. We demonstrate with a combined analysis that the two methods give a consistent timing calibration with an accuracy of 2 ns or better. Consequently, the beacon method alone can be used in the future to continuously determine and correct for GPS clock drifts in each individual event measured by AERA.

  17. Analysis of inelastic neutron scattering spectra from a time-of-flight spectrometer with filter detector

    SciTech Connect

    Vorderwisch, P.; Mezei, F.; Eckert, J.; Goldstone, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra obtained from time-of-flight spectrometers with filter detector suffer in energy resolution from a long time-of-flight tail in the filter response function. A mathematical method is described which removes this tail in measured spectra. The energy resolution can thereby be adapted for each part of the spectrum. Applications of the method to data taken at the LANSCE pulsed spallation source are presented.

  18. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  19. Software-Based Real-Time Acquisition and Processing of PET Detector Raw Data.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Schug, David; Lerche, Christoph W; Salomon, André; Gebhardt, Pierre; Weissler, Bjoern; Wehner, Jakob; Dueppenbecker, Peter M; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2016-02-01

    In modern positron emission tomography (PET) readout architectures, the position and energy estimation of scintillation events (singles) and the detection of coincident events (coincidences) are typically carried out on highly integrated, programmable printed circuit boards. The implementation of advanced singles and coincidence processing (SCP) algorithms for these architectures is often limited by the strict constraints of hardware-based data processing. In this paper, we present a software-based data acquisition and processing architecture (DAPA) that offers a high degree of flexibility for advanced SCP algorithms through relaxed real-time constraints and an easily extendible data processing framework. The DAPA is designed to acquire detector raw data from independent (but synchronized) detector modules and process the data for singles and coincidences in real-time using a center-of-gravity (COG)-based, a least-squares (LS)-based, or a maximum-likelihood (ML)-based crystal position and energy estimation approach (CPEEA). To test the DAPA, we adapted it to a preclinical PET detector that outputs detector raw data from 60 independent digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM)-based detector stacks and evaluated it with a [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-filled hot-rod phantom. The DAPA is highly reliable with less than 0.1% of all detector raw data lost or corrupted. For high validation thresholds (37.1 ± 12.8 photons per pixel) of the dSiPM detector tiles, the DAPA is real time capable up to 55 MBq for the COG-based CPEEA, up to 31 MBq for the LS-based CPEEA, and up to 28 MBq for the ML-based CPEEA. Compared to the COG-based CPEEA, the rods in the image reconstruction of the hot-rod phantom are only slightly better separable and less blurred for the LS- and ML-based CPEEA. While the coincidence time resolution (∼ 500 ps) and energy resolution (∼12.3%) are comparable for all three CPEEA, the system sensitivity is up to 2.5 × higher for the LS- and ML-based CPEEA

  20. Time-of-flight measurement of fast neutrons with Timepix detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, B.; Nelson, R. O.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Pospisil, S.; Solc, J.; Takai, H.; Vykydal, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Timepix pixel detectors have been used to study the response of silicon hybrid pixel detectors to fast neutrons from a pulsed neutron beam at WNR FP30R, a 14 m long flight path, in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Neutrons with kinetic energies up to 600 MeV were available. In order to enhance the conversion of neutrons to energetic charged particles, several converter foils and filters were attached to the 300 μm thick silicon sensor, i.e. polyethylene, polyethylene with aluminum, 6LiF, 6LiF with aluminum, aluminum. The Time-of-Arrival mode of the Timepix detectors has permitted the application of the Time-of-Flight (TOF) technique for the assignment of the detected interactions in the form of clusters (groups of adjacent pixels) in the pixel matrix, to the kinetic energies of the incident neutrons. It was found that, for lower neutron energies ( ~ MeV range) the cluster rates below the polyethylene and the polyethylene and aluminum region, produced by recoil protons, are a good measure for the mean kinetic energies of neutrons. For energies above 50 MeV nuclear reactions in the silicon dominate the detector response. In this energy range the shape of the clusters indicates the neutron kinetic energy.

  1. Eating the dead in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Gwyn

    2013-12-01

    Cannibalism has been poorly understood and has seldom been studied, since it was often suppressed by missionaries and colonial administrators, and very few societies still practise it. Cannibalistic practices are more complex than was originally thought. They may be supported in societies under stress or in times of famine, to reflect aggression and antisocial behaviour (in cases where the bodies of enemies killed in battle or people who have harmed the family are eaten), or to honour a dead kinsman. It was, for example, noted in Madagascar during the imperial campaigns of Ranavalona I in the period 1829 - 1853. Two types of cannibalism have been described: exocannibalism, where enemies were consumed, and endocannibalism, where dead relatives were eaten to assist their passing to the world of the ancestors, or to prolong contact with beloved and admired family members and absorb their good qualities. This article reviews some of the beliefs and motivations that surrounded the cannibalistic practices of the people of Madagascar in the 19th century.  PMID:24300654

  2. Can the dead be brought into disrepute?

    PubMed

    Masterton, Malin; Hansson, Mats G; Höglund, Anna T; Helgesson, Gert

    2007-01-01

    Queen Christina of Sweden was unconventional in her time, leading to hypotheses on her gender and possible hermaphroditic nature. If genetic analysis can substantiate the latter claim, could this bring the queen into disrepute 300 years after her death? Joan C. Callahan has argued that if a reputation changes, this constitutes a change only in the group of people changing their views and not in the person whose reputation it is. Is this so? This paper analyses what constitutes change and draws out the implications to the reputation of the dead. It is argued that a reputation is a relational property which can go through changes. The change is "real" for the group changing their views on Queen Christina and of a Cambridge kind for the long dead queen herself. Cambridge changes result in new properties being acquired, some of which can be of significance. Although the dead cannot go through any non-relational changes, it is possible for the dead to change properties through Cambridge changes. In this sense changes in reputation do affect the dead, and thus Queen Christina can acquire a new property, in this case possibly a worse reputation. PMID:17549606

  3. UCNB and Nab Detector Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeck, Bryan; UCNB Collaboration; Nab Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The UCNB and Nab experiments, designed to measure correlations in neutron beta decay, will detect the charged decay particles with segmented, large area, thick silicon detectors with thin dead layers. Development of the detector mount and the associated preamplifier and data acquisition system has been ongoing at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the LANSCE Ultracold Neutron facility. A 24 channel prototype preamplifier and data acquisition system has been demonstrated to meet performance specifications, including a 10 keV trigger threshold (required to detect the decay protons), a 3 keV FWHM particle kinetic energy resolution (required to measure the decay electron energy spectrum to sufficient accuracy), and a 40 ns pulse rise time (required to identify the direction of travel of decay electrons). Results of timing and coincidence studies, a report on progress to a fully instrumented detection system, and a final design for the detector mount compatible with the Nab experimental setup will be presented.

  4. 78 FR 62354 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-18

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times'' ACTION... exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice was corrected...

  5. 77 FR 64373 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times,'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times... the exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice...

  6. 78 FR 24462 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times... the exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice...

  7. 78 FR 16565 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times'' ACTION... exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice was corrected...

  8. The UCSD high energy X-ray timing experiment cosmic ray particle anticoincidence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hink, P. L.; Rothschild, R. E.; Pelling, M. R.; Macdonald, D. R.; Gruber, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The HEXTE, part of the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), is designed to make high sensitivity temporal and spectral measurements of X-rays with energies between 15 and 250 keV using NaI/CsI phoswich scintillation counters. To achieve the required sensitivity it is necessary to provide anticoincidence of charged cosmic ray particles incident upon the instrument, some of which interact to produce background X-rays. The proposed cosmic ray particle anticoincidence shield detector for HEXTE uses a novel design based on plastic scintillators and wavelength-shifter bars. It consists of five segments, each with a 7 mm thick plastic scintillator, roughly 50 cm x 50 cm in size, coupled to two wavelength-shifter bars viewed by 1/2 inch photomultiplier tubes. These segments are configured into a five-sided, box-like structure around the main detector system. Results of laboratory testing of a model segment, and calculations of the expected performance of the flight segments and particle anticoincidence detector system are presented to demonstrate that the above anticoincidence detector system satisfies its scientific requirements.

  9. Energy and coincidence time resolution measurements of CdTe detectors for PET

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Cabruja, E.; Calderón, Y.; Kolstein, M.; Macias-Montero, J.G.; Martinez, R.; Mikhaylova, E.; Uzun, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the characterization of 2 mm thick CdTe diode detector with Schottky contacts to be employed in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. Results at −8°C with an applied bias voltage of −1000 V/mm show a 1.2% FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. Coincidence time resolution has been measured by triggering on the preamplifier output signal to improve the timing resolution of the detector. Results at the same bias and temperature conditions show a FWHM of 6 ns with a minimum acceptance energy of 500 keV. These results show that pixelated CdTe Schottky diode is an excellent candidate for the development of next generation nuclear medical imaging devices such as PET, Compton gamma cameras, and especially PET-MRI hybrid systems when used in a magnetic field immune configuration. PMID:23750177

  10. Status and performance of the ALICE MRPC-based Time-Of-Flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2012-10-01

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the CERN LHC. One of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the ALICE central barrel is a large Time-Of-Flight (TOF) array; it allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9 < η < 0.9. The very good performance required for such a system has been achieved by means of the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) whose intrinsic time resolution is better than 50 ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved during the 2010 and 2011 data taking periods are reported together with selected physics results obtained with pp and Pb-Pb collisions.

  11. Measurement and deconvolution of detector response time for short HPM pulses: Part 1, Microwave diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.

    1987-06-01

    A technique is described for measuring and deconvolving response times of microwave diode detection systems in order to generate corrected input signals typical of an infinite detection rate. The method has been applied to cases of 2.86 GHz ultra-short HPM pulse detection where pulse rise time is comparable to that of the detector; whereas, the duration of a few nanoseconds is significantly longer. Results are specified in terms of the enhancement of equivalent deconvolved input voltages for given observed voltages. The convolution integral imposes the constraint of linear detector response to input power levels. This is physically equivalent to the conservation of integrated pulse energy in the deconvolution process. The applicable dynamic range of a microwave diode is therefore limited to a smaller signal region as determined by its calibration.

  12. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V. V.; Kuznetsov, Yu L.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2013-07-01

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions.

  13. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchenko, V V; Kuznetsov, Yu L; Meglinski, I V

    2013-07-31

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions. (laser applications in biology and medicine)

  14. The Effect of dead-timeless silicon strip readout at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    A. Affolder et al.

    2002-03-12

    The Run IIa CDF Silicon Upgrade has recently finished installation. The detector uses revision D of the SVX3 readout IC. This final revision incorporated new features in order to improve the potential of dead-timeless operation. This paper describes measurements of dead-timeless effects on silicon strip readout on the test bench. This paper also describes tests of the dynamic pedestal subtraction circuitry, which is shown to improve greatly the dead-timeless performance of the silicon systems.

  15. The CDFII time-of-flight detector and impact on beauty flavor tagging

    SciTech Connect

    C. Grozis et al.

    2002-12-03

    Following the successful RunI from 1992 to 1996, the CDF detector has undergone a major upgrade [1] for the RunII which begun in March 2001. The approval for the addition of a Time-of-Flight detector was granted in January 1999. The installation of the TOF detector was completed in August 2001 and its data has been included in the CDFII readout since then. The primary physics motivation for TOF is to complement and enhance the particle identification capability provided by the central drift chamber (COT) since it distinguishes K{sup {+-}} and {pi}{sup {+-}} in the momentum region of their cross-over in dE=dX. With an expected time-of-flight resolution of 100 ps, the TOF system will be capable of identifying charged kaons from pions by their flight time difference with at least two standard deviation separation up to kaon momenta of 1.6 GeV/c. Such an addition results in an enhancement of the b flavor identification power, crucial to improve the statistical precision in CP violation and B{sub s} mixing measurements.

  16. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now. PMID:27250477

  17. A time-of-flight detector for thermal neutrons from radiotherapy Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, V.; Bartesaghi, G.; Bolognini, D.; Mascagna, V.; Perboni, C.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Mozzanica, A.; Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E.

    2007-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a therapeutic technique exploiting the release of dose inside the tumour cell after a fission of a 10B nucleus following the capture of a thermal neutron. BNCT could be the treatment for extended tumors (liver, stomach, lung), radio-resistant ones (melanoma) or tumours surrounded by vital organs (brain). The application of BNCT requires a high thermal neutron flux (>5×108 n cm-2 s-1) with the correct energy spectrum (neutron energy <10 keV), two requirements that for the moment are fulfilled only by nuclear reactors. The INFN PhoNeS (Photo Neutron Source) project is trying to produce such a neutron beam with standard radiotherapy Linacs, maximizing with a dedicated photo-neutron converter the neutrons produced by Giant Dipole Resonance by a high energy ( >8 MeV) photon beam. In this framework, we have developed a real-time detector to measure the thermal neutron time-of -flight to compute the flux and the energy spectrum. Given the pulsed nature of Linac beams, the detector is a single neutron counting system made of a scintillator detecting the photon emitted after the neutron capture by the hydrogen nuclei. The scintillator signal is sampled by a dedicated FPGA clock thus obtaining the exact arrival time of the neutron itself. The paper will present the detector and its electronics, the feasibility measurements with a Varian Clinac 1800/2100CD and comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation.

  18. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  19. An infrared motion detector system for lossless real-time monitoring of animal preference tests.

    PubMed

    Pogány, A; Heszberger, J; Szurovecz, Zita; Vincze, E; Székely, T

    2014-12-01

    Automated behavioural observations are routinely used in many fields of biology, including ethology, behavioural ecology and physiology. When preferences for certain resources are investigated, the focus is often on simple response variables, such as duration and frequency of visits to choice chambers. Here we present an automated motion detector system that use passive infrared sensors to eliminate many drawbacks of currently existing methods. Signals from the sensors are processed by a custom-built interface, and after unnecessary data is filtered by a computer software, the total time and frequency of the subject's visits to each of the choice chambers are calculated. We validate the detector system by monitoring (using the system) and in the same time video recording mating preferences of zebra finches in a four-way choice apparatus. Manual scoring of the video recordings showed very high consistency with data from the detector system both for time and for frequency of visits. Furthermore, the validation revealed that if we used micro-switches or light barriers, the most commonly applied automatic detection techniques, this would have resulted in approximately 22% less information compared to our lossless system. The system provides a low-cost alternative for monitoring animal movements, and we discuss its further applicability. PMID:25475978

  20. Central Time-Of-Flight detector for CLAS12 Hall-B upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Vitaly

    2013-10-01

    The time-of-flight system for CLAS12 at Hall-B of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will have a refurbished forward-angle detector and a new barrel scintillation detector for the time-of-flight measurements in the central region inside the superconducting 5 T-solenoid. The 92 cm-long barrel with the inner diameter 50 cm is formed by 48 scintillators of a trapezoidal cross-section about 3×3 cm2. Each scintillator is readout by R2083 PMTs from both upstream and downstream sides via a novel focusing light guides 1 m- and 1.6 m-long respectively. Both PMTs of each counter are enclosed into a novel dynamical magnetic shield that allows PMT performance at 1000 G-solenoid fringe fields. The expected timing resolution of this detector is 60 ps that allows pion-kaon and pion-proton separation at 3.3. sigma level up to 0.64 GeV/c and 1.25 GeV/c respectively. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Done...processed 770 records...10:56:06

  1. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-15

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  2. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Waugh, C J; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule. PMID:26026524

  3. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  4. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition,more » comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.« less

  5. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  6. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas is thought to be the cause of about 1100 lung cancer related deaths each year in the UK (1). Radon concentrations can be monitored using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable microscopic analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (2, 3). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs. Six SSNTDs were placed in a chamber with a luminous dial watch for a fixed period. The detectors were etched for between 30 minutes and 4.5 hours using 6M NaOH at a temperature of 90oC. A 'LEXT' OLS4000 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 2D and 3D image datasets of CR-39 plastic SSNTDs. Confocal microscope 3D images were acquired using a x50 or x100 objective lens. Data were saved as images and also spreadsheet files with height measurements. Software was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., USA) to analyse the height data. Comparing the 30 minute and 4 hour etching time detectors, we observed that there were marked differences in track area; the lower the etching time the smaller the track area. The degree to which etching may prevent visualising adjacent tracks also requires further study as it is possible that etching could result in some tracks being subsumed in other tracks. On the other hand if there is too little etching, track sizes would be reduced and hence could be more difficult to image; thus there is a balance required to obtain suitable measurement accuracy. (1) Gray A, Read S, McGale P and Darby S. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them. BMJ 2009; 338: a3110. (2) Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in

  7. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time.

  8. Characterization studies of silicon photomultipliers and crystals matrices for a novel time of flight PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Ben Mimoun Bel Hadj, F.; Cortinovis, D.; Doroud, K.; Garutti, E.; Lecoq, P.; Liu, Z.; Martinez, R.; Paganoni, M.; Pizzichemi, M.; Silenzi, A.; Xu, C.; Zvolský, M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the characterization of crystal matrices and silicon photomultiplier arrays for a novel Positron Emission Tomography (PET) detector, namely the external plate of the EndoTOFPET-US system. The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration aims to integrate Time-Of-Flight PET with ultrasound endoscopy in a novel multimodal device, capable to support the development of new biomarkers for prostate and pancreatic tumors. The detector consists in two parts: a PET head mounted on an ultrasound probe and an external PET plate. The challenging goal of 1 mm spatial resolution for the PET image requires a detector with small crystal size, and therefore high channel density: 4096 LYSO crystals individually readout by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) make up the external plate. The quality and properties of these components must be assessed before the assembly. The dark count rate, gain, breakdown voltage and correlated noise of the SiPMs are measured, while the LYSO crystals are evaluated in terms of light yield and energy resolution. In order to effectively reduce the noise in the PET image, high time resolution for the gamma detection is mandatory. The Coincidence Time Resolution (CTR) of all the SiPMs assembled with crystals is measured, and results show a value close to the demanding goal of 200 ps FWHM. The light output is evaluated for every channel for a preliminary detector calibration, showing an average of about 1800 pixels fired on the SiPM for a 511 keV interaction. Finally, the average energy resolution at 511 keV is about 13 %, enough for effective Compton rejection.

  9. Dead of night.

    PubMed

    Balter, Leon

    2010-07-01

    Dead of Night, the first psychoanalytic horror film, was produced in England in 1945, immediately after the end of World War II--that is, after the English population had suffered systematic Nazi terror from imminent invasion, incessant aerial bombing, and rocket-bombs. This film continued the prewar format of horror films based on themes of the supernatural and the hubris and excesses of science. However, it introduced psychoanalysis as the science in question. The film is structured on two levels: a genteel English country weekend to which witty and urbane guests have been invited; and five horror stories told by the guests. Psychoanalytic insights into this film structure are used here to explain how the film induces horror in the audience. PMID:20726184

  10. Electro-Optic Time-to-Space Converter for Optical Detector Jitter Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, Kevin; Farr, William

    2013-01-01

    A common problem in optical detection is determining the arrival time of a weak optical pulse that may comprise only one to a few photons. Currently, this problem is solved by using a photodetector to convert the optical signal to an electronic signal. The timing of the electrical signal is used to infer the timing of the optical pulse, but error is introduced by random delay between the absorption of the optical pulse and the creation of the electrical one. To eliminate this error, a time-to-space converter separates a sequence of optical pulses and sends them to different photodetectors, depending on their arrival time. The random delay, called jitter, is at least 20 picoseconds for the best detectors capable of detecting the weakest optical pulses, a single photon, and can be as great as 500 picoseconds. This limits the resolution with which the timing of the optical pulse can be measured. The time-to-space converter overcomes this limitation. Generally, the time-to-space converter imparts a time-dependent momentum shift to the incoming optical pulses, followed by an optical system that separates photons of different momenta. As an example, an electro-optic phase modulator can be used to apply longitudinal momentum changes (frequency changes) that vary in time, followed by an optical spectrometer (such as a diffraction grating), which separates photons with different momenta into different paths and directs them to impinge upon an array of photodetectors. The pulse arrival time is then inferred by measuring which photodetector receives the pulse. The use of a time-to-space converter mitigates detector jitter and improves the resolution with which the timing of an optical pulse is determined. Also, the application of the converter enables the demodulation of a pulse position modulated signal (PPM) at higher bandwidths than using previous photodetector technology. This allows the creation of a receiver for a communication system with high bandwidth and high bits