Science.gov

Sample records for detector dynamic range

  1. Large dynamic range radiation detector and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Marrs, Roscoe E.; Madden, Norman W.

    2012-02-14

    According to one embodiment, a radiation detector comprises a scintillator and a photodiode optically coupled to the scintillator. The radiation detector also includes a bias voltage source electrically coupled to the photodiode, a first detector operatively electrically coupled to the photodiode for generating a signal indicative of a level of a charge at an output of the photodiode, and a second detector operatively electrically coupled to the bias voltage source for generating a signal indicative of an amount of current flowing through the photodiode.

  2. A large dynamic range readout design for the plastic scintillator detector of DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhiyu; Yu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yongjie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling; Hu, Bitao

    2016-08-01

    A large dynamic range is required by the Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) of DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) to detect particles from electron to heavy ions with Z ≤ 20. To expand the dynamic range, the readout design based on the double-dynodes signal extraction from the photomultiplier tube has been proposed and adopted by PSD. To verify this design, a prototype detector module has been constructed and tested with cosmic ray and relativistic ion beam. The results match with the estimation and the readout unit could easily cover the required dynamic range of about 4 orders of magnitude.

  3. Discussion on resolution and dynamic range of Se-TFT direct digital radiographic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Denny L. Y.; Cheung, Lawrence K.; Palecki, Eugene F.; Jeromin, Lothar S.

    1996-04-01

    The imaging performance of a new direct digital radiographic detector based on amorphous selenium and amorphous silicon TFT array which is under development is discussed. Progress has been made on the development of a multilayer digital x-ray detector panel with a structure consisting of a thin-film transistor pixel array, selenium x-ray photoconductor, dielectric layer and top electrode. An electronic system allows the rapid readout of image data which produces high resolution and wide dynamic range images. Using a straight edge, small wires and low contrast small holes targets, we have studied the spatial resolution, contrast detectability, and dynamic range of this new detector. Digital signals obtained from each pixel of this detector are almost linear with the total x-ray energy absorbed within the pixel area over a wide range of x-ray exposures. The resultant wide dynamic range allows extended latitude of exposure conditions and the enhancement or emphasis of different gray level regions from a single set of image data. For example, from one single exposure of the head, the soft tissue of the nose, detail structure of the teeth, as well as the bone structure of the neck can be examined by displaying and emphasizing selective gray levels of the image data. Image information obtained from this detector appears to be more evenly distributed over a wide dynamic range which is different from digital data obtained from other digital modalities such as the electrometer sensing of discharged potentials on photoconductors or from film digitization. Examples of images are shown. The discrete pixel structure of this detector and the higher intrinsic spatial resolution of selenium combine to produce image sharpness greater than those produced from digital detectors of similar pixel pitch using indirect conversion method or from digitizing film-screen images. The applicability of mathematical tools, such as the MTF which was developed primarily for analog images on a

  4. Force spectroscopy with a large dynamic range using small cantilevers and an array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2002-04-01

    The important characteristics of a detector for force spectroscopy measurements are sensitivity, linearity and dynamic range. The commonly used two-segment detector that measures the position of a light beam reflected from the force-sensing cantilever in an atomic force microscope becomes nonlinear when the beam shifts significantly onto one of the segments. For a detection setup optimized for high sensitivity, such as needed for the use with small cantilevers, it is shown both experimentally and theoretically that the dynamic range extends to an upper detection limit of only about 115 nm in cantilever deflection if <10% nonlinearity is required. A detector is presented that circumvents that limitation. This detector is based on a linear arrangement of multiple photodiode segments that are read out individually. With such an array detector, the irradiance distribution of the reflected beam is measured. The reflected beam not only shifts in position but also deforms when the cantilever deflects because the bent cantilever acts as a curved mirror. The mean of the distribution, however, is a linear function of cantilever deflection in both theory and experiment. An array detector is consequently well suited for force measurements for which both high sensitivity and a large dynamic range are required.

  5. High dynamic range CMOS-based mammography detector for FFDM and DBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Miller, James J.; Lomako, Andrey

    2016-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) requires excellent image quality in a dynamic mode at very low dose levels while Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) is a static imaging modality that requires high saturation dose levels. These opposing requirements can only be met by a dynamic detector with a high dynamic range. This paper will discuss a wafer-scale CMOS-based mammography detector with 49.5 μm pixels and a CsI scintillator. Excellent image quality is obtained for FFDM as well as DBT applications, comparing favorably with a-Se detectors that dominate the X-ray mammography market today. The typical dynamic range of a mammography detector is not high enough to accommodate both the low noise and the high saturation dose requirements for DBT and FFDM applications, respectively. An approach based on gain switching does not provide the signal-to-noise benefits in the low-dose DBT conditions. The solution to this is to add frame summing functionality to the detector. In one X-ray pulse several image frames will be acquired and summed. The requirements to implement this into a detector are low noise levels, high frame rates and low lag performance, all of which are unique characteristics of CMOS detectors. Results are presented to prove that excellent image quality is achieved, using a single detector for both DBT as well as FFDM dose conditions. This method of frame summing gave the opportunity to optimize the detector noise and saturation level for DBT applications, to achieve high DQE level at low dose, without compromising the FFDM performance.

  6. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Abella, M.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  7. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    PubMed Central

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Philipp, Hugh T.; Wilke, Robin N.; Aquila, Andrew; Osterhoff, Markus; Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S.; Zozulya, Alexey V.; Salditt, Tim; Gruner, Sol M.; Mancuso, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 108 8-keV photons pixel−1 s−1, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 1010 photons µm−2 s−1 within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described. PMID:25178008

  8. Increasing the energy dynamic range of solid-state nuclear track detectors using multiple surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zylstra, A B; Rinderknecht, H G; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Manuel, M; Séguin, F H; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2011-08-01

    Solid-state nuclear track detectors, such as CR-39, are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. In the ICF experiments, the particles of interest, such as D(3)He-protons, have ranges of order of the detector thickness. In this case, the dynamic range of the detector can be extended by recording data on both the front and back sides of the detector. Higher energy particles which are undetectable on the front surface can then be measured on the back of the detector. Studies of track formation under the conditions on the front and back of the detector reveal significant differences. Distinct front and back energy calibrations of CR-39 are therefore necessary and are presented for protons. Utilizing multiple surfaces with additional calibrations can extend the range of detectable energies on a single piece of CR-39 by up to 7-8 MeV. The track formation process is explored with a Monte Carlo code, which shows that the track formation difference between front and back is due to the non-uniform ion energy deposition in matter. PMID:21895237

  9. Two-phase low-power analogue CMOS peak detector with high dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malankin, E.

    2016-02-01

    A low-power two-phase peak detector with wide dynamic range was developed. The PD was designed on the basis ofthe CMOS UMC 180 nm process. This block is considered as a part of the read-out electronics of the CBM experiment at upcoming FAIR accelerator (Germany). Peak detector has the following advantages: wide dynamic range of 5 - 1000 mV, low power consumption of 500 µW. The designed PD meets the requirements to the muon chamber read-out electronics of the CBM experiment. Due to the area efficiency (100×90 μm2) and low power consumption it can be used in different applications for high-energy physics read-out electronics.

  10. Dynamic range extension of SiPM detectors with the time-gated operation.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Eva; Diéguez, Angel

    2014-05-19

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a novel detector technology that has undergone a fast development in the last few years, owing to its single-photon resolution and ultra-fast response time. However, the typical high dark count rates of the sensor may prevent the detection of low intensity radiation fluxes. In this article, the time-gated operation with short active periods in the nanosecond range is proposed as a solution to reduce the number of cells fired due to noise and thus increase the dynamic range. The technique is aimed at application fields that function under a trigger command, such as gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:24921320

  11. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams. PMID:26750260

  12. Dynamic range considerations for EUV MAMA detectors. [Extreme UV Multianode Microchannel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illing, Rainer M. E.; Bybee, Richard L.; Timothy, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    The multianode microchannel array (MAMA) has been chosen as the detector for two instruments on the ESA/NASA Solar Heliospheric Observatory. The response of the MAMA to the two extreme types of solar spectra, disk and corona, have been modeled with a view toward evaluating dynamic range effects present. The method of MAMA operation is discussed, with emphasis given to modeling the effect of electron cloud charge spreading to several detector anodes and amplifiers (n-fold events). Representative synthetic EUV spectra have been created. The detector response to these spectra is modeled by dissecting the input photon radiation field across the detector array into contributions to the various amplifier channels. The results of this dissection are shown for spectral regions across the entire wavelength region of interest. These results are used to identify regions in which total array photon counting rate or individual amplifier rate may exceed the design limits. This allows the design or operational modes to be tailored to eliminate the problem areas.

  13. A high sensitive two-line detector with large dynamic range for intravenous coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, M.; Besch, H. J.; Dix, W.-R.; Dünger, O.; Jung, M.; Menk, R. H.; Reime, B.; Schildwächter, L.

    1998-12-01

    The medical community is highly interested in methods for non-invasive imaging of coronary arteries. One method under development is dichromography. This method allows imaging of small fast moving objects like the coronary arteries including distal parts and sidebranches after intravenous injection of contrast material. Two images with monochromatic X-rays at energies just below and above the K-edge of iodine at 33.17 keV are simultaneously taken. After logarithmic subtraction coronary arteries down to 0.7 mm diameter with extremely low iodine concentrations of 10 mg/ml become visible. At the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at DESY in Hamburg, Germany the system NIKOS was developed for dichromography. In this system the detector is one of the main components. This two-line detector is an ionization chamber for the two energies. The two gaps are separated by the drift cathode. A Frisch-grid for shielding the ions in a distance of 3 mm defines the conversion room. The 336 anode strips per line with a length of 56 mm in the direction of the beam are connected to the frontend electronics. The parameters of the current version of the detector in one setting are: noise equivalent of 7.6 photons, dynamic range of 300 000 : 1, readout time for the two lines (672 pixels) 0.18 ms.

  14. Front end ASIC for AGIPD, a high dynamic range fast detector for the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahgholi, A.; Becker, J.; Bianco, L.; Delfs, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Ariño-Estrada, G.; Goettlicher, P.; Graafsma, H.; Greiffenberg, D.; Hirsemann, H.; Jack, S.; Klanner, R.; Klyuev, A.; Krueger, H.; Lange, S.; Marras, A.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Rah, S.; Xia, Q.; Schmitt, B.; Schwandt, J.; Sheviakov, I.; Shi, X.; Smoljanin, S.; Trunk, U.; Zhang, J.; Zimmer, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector (AGIPD) is a hybrid pixel X-ray detector for the European-XFEL. One of the detector's important parts is the radiation tolerant front end ASIC fulfilling the European-XFEL requirements: high dynamic range—from sensitivity to single 12.5keV-photons up to 104 photons. It is implemented using the dynamic gain switching technique with three possible gains of the charge sensitive preamplifier. Each pixel can store up to 352 images in memory operated in random-access mode at >=4.5 MHz frame rate. An external vetoing may be applied to overwrite unwanted frames.

  15. Extension of photomultiplier tube dynamic range for the LHAASO-KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Hongkui; Sheng, Xiangdong; He, Huihai; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Zhongquan; Hou, Chao; Zhao, Jing

    2015-05-01

    In the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), the 1 km2 array (KM2A) requires linear measurement of optical intensity with a wide dynamic range. Over 5000 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are employed in this experiment and developed as "two outputs" device (anode and dynode) to meet the relevant requirements. In this study, the linearity of the anode and the eighth dynode (DY8), which is limited by space charge effects and mainly related to the relative dynode voltage ratios of the PMT divider, is examined. A voltage divider for the Hamamatsu R11102 PMT is designed and a dramatically enhanced linearity is demonstrated. Test results show that this design can cover a wide dynamic range from 20 to 2×105 photoelectrons and achieve a peak anode current of 380 mA at a PMT gain of 105, which satisfies the requirements of KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors. The circuit design has been successfully simulated using the simulation software Multisim. The details of PMT performance tests and simulations are described.

  16. Extension of the dynamic range of large photocathode PMTs for a UHECR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Castellina, A.; Maldera, S.; Morello, C.

    2013-06-01

    Ground arrays for UHECR shower detection based on traditional counters, water Cerenkov tanks or scintillator modules, are unavoidably limited by the saturation suffered by the counters nearest to the shower axis. Reducing to a negligible level the amount of events recorded with saturated counters should be mandatory in a future UHECR ground array. The use of the signals extracted from the internal dynodes of the used photomultipliers can offer an elegant and inexpensive way to increase the dynamic range of such detectors. The viability of this technique has been explored studying in laboratory the performances of a sample of 3 Hamamatsu R5912-MOD photomultipliers. Exploiting the signal from the fifth dynode, a linear response up to an equivalent anodic peak current larger than 1A (at gain G = 2 ṡ 105) has been measured for all the studied PMTs. The feasibility of this technique in the frame of a new ground array for UHECR studies should be verified with a larger sample of photomultipliers.

  17. Flat panel X-ray detector with reduced internal scattering for improved attenuation accuracy and dynamic range

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Peter D.; Claytor, Thomas N.; Berry, Phillip C.; Hills, Charles R.

    2010-10-12

    An x-ray detector is disclosed that has had all unnecessary material removed from the x-ray beam path, and all of the remaining material in the beam path made as light and as low in atomic number as possible. The resulting detector is essentially transparent to x-rays and, thus, has greatly reduced internal scatter. The result of this is that x-ray attenuation data measured for the object under examination are much more accurate and have an increased dynamic range. The benefits of this improvement are that beam hardening corrections can be made accurately, that computed tomography reconstructions can be used for quantitative determination of material properties including density and atomic number, and that lower exposures may be possible as a result of the increased dynamic range.

  18. Imaging X-ray detector front-end with high dynamic range: IDeF-X HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevin, O.; Lemaire, O.; Lugiez, F.; Michalowska, A.; Baron, P.; Limousin, O.; Delagnes, E.

    2012-12-01

    Presented circuit, IDeF-X HD (Imaging Detector Front-end) is a member of the IDeF-X ASICs family for space applications. It has been optimized for a half millimeter pitch CdTe or CdZnTe pixelated detector arranged in 16×16 array. It is aimed to operate in the hard X-ray range from few keV up to 250 keV or more. The ASIC has been realized in AMS 0.35 μm CMOS process. The IDeF-X HD is a 32 channel analog front-end with self-triggering capability. The architecture of the analog channel includes a chain of charge sensitive amplifier with continuous reset system and non-stationary noise suppressor, adjustable gain stage, pole-zero cancellation stage, adjustable shaping time low pass filter, baseline holder and peak detector with discriminator. The power consumption of the IDeF-X HD is 800 μW per channel. With the in-channel variable gain stage the nominal 250 keV dynamic range of the ASIC can be extended up to 1 MeV anticipating future applications using thick sensors. Measuring the noise performance without a detector at the input with minimized leakage current (programmable) at the input, we achieved ENC of 33 electrons rms at 10.7 μs peak time. Measurements with CdTe detector show good energy resolution FWHM of 1.1 keV at 60 keV and 4.3 keV at 662 keV with detection threshold below 4 keV. In addition, an absolute temperature sensor has been integrated with resolution of 1.5 °C.

  19. High dynamic range diamond detector acquisition system for beam wire scanner applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirvent, J. L.; Dehning, B.; Piselli, E.; Emery, J.; Dieguez, A.

    2016-03-01

    The CERN Beam Instrumentation group has been working during the last years on the beam wire scanners upgrade to cope up with the increasing requirements of CERN experiments. These devices are used to measure the beam profile by crossing a thin wire through a circulating beam, the resulting secondary particles produced from beam/wire interaction are detected and correlated with the wire position to reconstruct the beam profile. The upgraded secondary particles acquisition electronics will use polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamond detectors for particle shower measurements, with low noise acquisitions performed on the tunnel, near the detector. The digital data is transmitted to the surface through an optical link with the GBT protocol. Two integrator ASICs (ICECAL and QIE10) are being characterized and compared for detector readout with the complete acquisition chain prototype. This contribution presents the project status, the QIE10 front-end performance and the first measurements with the complete acquisition system prototype. In addition, diamond detector signals from particle showers generated by an operational beam wire scanner are analysed and compared with an operational system.

  20. Monte Carlo Simulations of High-speed, Time-gated MCP-based X-ray Detectors: Saturation Effects in DC and Pulsed Modes and Detector Dynamic Range

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Kruschwitz, Ming Wu, Ken Moy, Greg Rochau

    2008-10-31

    We present here results of continued efforts to understand the performance of microchannel plate (MCP)–based, high-speed, gated, x-ray detectors. This work involves the continued improvement of a Monte Carlo simulation code to describe MCP performance coupled with experimental efforts to better characterize such detectors. Our goal is a quantitative description of MCP saturation behavior in both static and pulsed modes. We have developed a new model of charge buildup on the walls of the MCP channels and measured its effect on MCP gain. The results are compared to experimental data obtained with a short-pulse, high-intensity ultraviolet laser; these results clearly demonstrate MCP saturation behavior in both DC and pulsed modes. The simulations compare favorably to the experimental results. The dynamic range of the detectors in pulsed operation is of particular interest when fielding an MCP–based camera. By adjusting the laser flux we study the linear range of the camera. These results, too, are compared to our simulations.

  1. Novel image detail enhancement technology for high dynamic range infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Zhu, Caigao

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel image detail enhancement technology which is well solved the problem of how to suppress the noise and enhance the detail at the same time of the infrared image. This technology is based on the layer separation idea. In nowadays, this idea is studied by many researchers, and many detail enhancement algorithms have been come up through this idea such as the bilateral filter for detail enhancement. According to our research, these algorithms although have the advantages of enhancing the detail without enhancing the noise, they also have the disadvantages of massive calculation, low speed and the worst is the gradient flipping effect which cause the enhanced image distorted. Our solution is based on the Guided Image Filter (GIF) to deal the separated detail layer of an image. The gradient flipping effect will be greatly suppressed with the priority that the GIF is a linear filter. Which means that the processed image will become much closer to the original image. We determine an adaptive weighting coefficient as the filter kernel. After that, we compress the base component into the display range by our modified histogram projection and enhance the detail component using the gain mask of the filter weighting coefficient. At last, we recombine the two parts and quantize the result to 8-bit domain. Experimental verification and detailed realization have been provided in this paper. We also have done significant comparison between our method and the proposed algorithm to show the superiority of our algorithm.

  2. A low-noise wide-dynamic-range event-driven detector using SOI pixel technology for high-energy particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Sumeet; Kamehama, Hiroki; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Takeda, Ayaki; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Arai, Yasuo

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a low-noise wide-dynamic-range pixel design for a high-energy particle detector in astronomical applications. A silicon on insulator (SOI) based detector is used for the detection of wide energy range of high energy particles (mainly for X-ray). The sensor has a thin layer of SOI CMOS readout circuitry and a thick layer of high-resistivity detector vertically stacked in a single chip. Pixel circuits are divided into two parts; signal sensing circuit and event detection circuit. The event detection circuit consisting of a comparator and logic circuits which detect the incidence of high energy particle categorizes the incident photon it into two energy groups using an appropriate energy threshold and generate a two-bit code for an event and energy level. The code for energy level is then used for selection of the gain of the in-pixel amplifier for the detected signal, providing a function of high-dynamic-range signal measurement. The two-bit code for the event and energy level is scanned in the event scanning block and the signals from the hit pixels only are read out. The variable-gain in-pixel amplifier uses a continuous integrator and integration-time control for the variable gain. The proposed design allows the small signal detection and wide dynamic range due to the adaptive gain technique and capability of correlated double sampling (CDS) technique of kTC noise canceling of the charge detector.

  3. A Fully Digital AGC System with 100MHz Bandwidth and 35dB Dynamic Range Power Detectors for DVB-S2 Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Younggun; Lee, Kang-Yoon

    This paper presents a fully digital gain control system with a new high bandwidth and wide dynamic range power detector for DVB-S2 application. Because the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of DVB-S2 system is so high and the settling time requirement is so stringent, the conventional closed-loop analog gain control scheme cannot be used. The digital gain control is necessary for the robust gain control and the direct digital interface with the baseband modem. Also, it has several advantages over the analog gain control in terms of the settling time and insensitivity to the process, voltage and temperature variation. In order to have a wide gain range with fine step resolution, a new AGC system is proposed. The system is composed of high-bandwidth digital VGAs, wide dynamic range power detectors with RMS detector, low power SAR type ADC, and a digital gain controller. To reduce the power consumption and chip area, only one SAR type ADC is used, and its input is time-interleaved based on four power detectors. Simulation and measurement results show that the new AGC system converges with gain error less than 0.25dB to the desired level within 10µs. It is implemented in a 0.18µm CMOS process. The measurement results of the proposed IF AGC system exhibit 80-dB gain range with 0.25-dB resolution, 8nV/\\\\!\\\\sqrt{Hz} input referred noise, and 5-dBm IIP3 at 60-mW power consumption. The power detector shows the 35dB dynamic range for 100MHz input.

  4. Physical evaluation of a high-frame-rate extended dynamic range flat panel detector for real-time cone beam computed tomography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, Sarah J.; Chawla, Amarpreet; Samei, Ehsan

    2005-04-01

    The use of flat panel detectors in computed tomography (CT) systems can improve resolution, reduce system cost, and add operational flexibility by combining fluoroscopy and radiography applications within CT systems. However, some prior studies have suggested that flat panel detectors would not perform well in CT applications due to their lack of high dynamic range, lag artifacts, and inadequate frame rate. The purpose of this study was to perform a physical evaluation of a prototype flat panel detector capable of high frame rates and extended dynamic range. The flat panel detector used had a pixel size of 194 microns and a matrix size of 2048x1536. The detector could be configured for several combinations of frame rate and matrix size up to 750 frames per second for a 512x16 matrix size with 4x4 binning. The evaluation was performed in terms of the MTF and DQE as a function of frame rate and exposure at the IEC RQA5 (~75 kVp, 21 mm Al) beam quality. The image lag was evaluated in terms of temporal-frequency dependent transfer function. Offset shift were also evaluated. Preliminary results indicate 0.1 MTF at 0.92 cycles/mm and DQE(0) of approximately 0.8, 0.6, 0.4, and 0.22 at 0.144, 0.065, 0.035, and 0.008 mR per frame exposures. The temporal MTF exhibited a low-frequency drop and a value of 0.5 at the Nyquist frequency. Offset shift was negligible. Considering high frame rate capabilities of the new detector, the results suggest that the detector has potential for use in real-time CT applications including CT angiography.

  5. The Dynamic Range of LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; LZ Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The electronics of the LZ experiment, the 7-ton dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), is designed to provide a 70% efficiency for events that produce three photoelectrons in the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). This corresponds approximately to the lowest energy threshold achievable in such a detector, and drives the noise specifications for the front end. The upper limit of the LZ dynamic range is defined by the electroluminescence (S2) signals. The low-energy channels of the LZ amplifiers provide the dynamic range required for the tritium and krypton calibrations. The high-energy channels provide the dynamic range required to measure the activated Xe lines. S2 signals induced by alpha particles from radon decay will saturate one or more channels of the top PMT array but techniques are being developed to recover the information lost due to saturation. This work was supported by the Department of Energy, Grant DE-SC0006605.

  6. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Mane, Anil; Elam, Jeffrey; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  7. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Wolf, Michael A.; McAtee, James L.; Unruh, Wesley P.; Cucchiara, Alfred L.; Huchton, Roger L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  8. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  9. The dynamic range of LZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.

    2016-02-01

    The electronics of the LZ experiment, the 7-tonne dark matter detector to be installed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), is designed to permit studies of physics where the energies deposited range from 1 keV of nuclear-recoil energy up to 3,000 keV of electron-recoil energy. The system is designed to provide a 70% efficiency for events that produce three photoelectrons in the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). This corresponds approximately to the lowest energy threshold achievable in multi-tonne time-projection chambers, and drives the noise specifications for the front end. The upper limit of the LZ dynamic range is defined to accommodate the electroluminescence (S2) signals. The low-energy channels of the LZ amplifiers provide the dynamic range required for the tritium and krypton calibrations. The high-energy channels provide the dynamic range required to measure the activated Xe lines.

  10. Design and characterization of the ePix10k: a high dynamic range integrating pixel ASIC for LCLS detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caragiulo, P.; Dragone, A.; Markovic, B.; Herbst, R.; Nishimura, K.; Reese, B.; Herrmann, S.; Hart, P.; Blaj, G.; Segal, J.; Tomada, A.; Hasi, J.; Carini, G.; Kenney, C.; Haller, G.

    2015-05-01

    ePix10k is a variant of a novel class of integrating pixel ASICs architectures optimized for the processing of signals in second generation LINAC Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-Ray cameras. The ASIC is optimized for high dynamic range application requiring high spatial resolution and fast frame rates. ePix ASICs are based on a common platform composed of a random access analog matrix of pixel with global shutter, fast parallel column readout, and dedicated sigma-delta analog to digital converters per column. The ePix10k variant has 100um×100um pixels arranged in a 176×192 matrix, a resolution of 140e- r.m.s. and a signal range of 3.5pC (10k photons at 8keV). In its final version it will be able to sustain a frame rate of 2kHz. A first prototype has been fabricated and characterized. Performance in terms of noise, linearity, uniformity, cross-talk, together with preliminary measurements with bump bonded sensors are reported here.

  11. Isosceles detector provides maximum resolution in expanded range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watterson, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Dynamic range expansion system for radio frequency /RF/ signal detection equipment consists of RF amplifiers, RF amplitude modulated detectors, and operational amplifier. The analog output gives maximum resolution over fixed voltage range, without switching. Two minor drawbacks of this circuit are cited.

  12. Fan-less long range alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Bounds, John A.

    1994-01-01

    A fan-less long range alpha detector which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces.

  13. Fan-less long range alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-05-10

    A fan-less long range alpha detector is disclosed which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces. 2 figures.

  14. Enabling photon counting detectors with dynamic attenuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-01

    Photon-counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are being investigated as a replacement for conventional x-ray detectors because they promise several advantages, including better dose efficiency, higher resolution and spectral imaging. However, many of these advantages disappear when the x-ray flux incident on the detector is too high. We recently proposed a dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator (or beam shaping filter) that can control the flux incident on the detector. This can restrict the operating range of the PCXD to keep the incident count rate below a given limit. We simulated a system with the piecewise-linear attenuator and a PCXD using raw data generated from forward projected DICOM files. We investigated the classic paralyzable and nonparalyzable PCXD as well as a weighted average of the two, with the weights chosen to mimic an existing PCXD (Taguchi et al, Med Phys 2011). The dynamic attenuator has small synergistic benefits with the nonparalyzable detector and large synergistic benefits with the paralyzable detector. Real PCXDs operate somewhere between these models, and the weighted average model still shows large benefits from the dynamic attenuator. We conclude that dynamic attenuators can reduce the count rate performance necessary for adopting PCXDs.

  15. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  16. Streak camera dynamic range optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedwald, J.D.; Lerche, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    The LLNL optical streak camera is used by the Laser Fusion Program in a wide range of applications. Many of these applications require a large recorded dynamic range. Recent work has focused on maximizing the dynamic range of the streak camera recording system. For our streak cameras, image intensifier saturation limits the upper end of the dynamic range. We have developed procedures to set the image intensifier gain such that the system dynamic range is maximized. Specifically, the gain is set such that a single streak tube photoelectron is recorded with an exposure of about five times the recording system noise. This ensures detection of single photoelectrons, while not consuming intensifier or recording system dynamic range through excessive intensifier gain. The optimum intensifier gain has been determined for two types of film and for a lens-coupled CCD camera. We have determined that by recording the streak camera image with a CCD camera, the system is shot-noise limited up to the onset of image intensifier nonlinearity. When recording on film, the film determines the noise at high exposure levels. There is discussion of the effects of slit width and image intensifier saturation on dynamic range. 8 refs.

  17. High dynamic range infrared radiometry and imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, Darryl D.; Karunasiri, R. P. G.; Bandara, K. M. S. V.

    1988-01-01

    The use is described of cryogenically cooled, extrinsic silicon infrared detectors in an unconventional mode of operation which offers an unusually large dynamic range. The system performs intensity-to-frequency conversion at the focal plane via simple circuits with very low power consumption. The incident IR intensity controls the repetition rate of short duration output pulses over a pulse rate dynamic range of about 10(6). Theory indicates the possibility of monotonic and approx. linear response over the full dynamic range. A comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results shows that the model provides a reasonably good description of experimental data. Some measurements of survivability with a very intense IR source were made on these devices and found to be very encouraging. Evidence continues to indicate that some variations in interpulse time intervals are deterministic rather than probabilistic.

  18. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  19. Short-range laser obstacle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriger, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    Detector, designed for slow-moving vehicle to explore surface of Mars, will automatically divert vehicle from obstacles as small as 0.5 m in its path. Detector comprises injection laser operating in pulse time-delay measurement, or radar, mode. It is capable of scanning area extending from few meters to approximately 30 m.

  20. A Wide Dynamic Range Tapped Linear Array Image Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washkurak, William D.; Chamberlain, Savvas G.; Prince, N. Daryl

    1988-08-01

    Detectors for acousto-optic signal processing applications require fast transient response as well as wide dynamic range. There are two major choices of detectors: conductive or integration mode. Conductive mode detectors have an initial transient period before they reach then' i equilibrium state. The duration of 1 his period is dependent on light level as well as detector capacitance. At low light levels a conductive mode detector is very slow; response time is typically on the order of milliseconds. Generally. to obtain fast transient response an integrating mode detector is preferred. With integrating mode detectors. the dynamic range is determined by the charge storage capability of the tran-sport shift registers and the noise level of the image sensor. The conventional net hod used to improve dynamic range is to increase the shift register charge storage capability. To achieve a dynamic range of fifty thousand assuming two hundred noise equivalent electrons, a charge storage capability of ten million electrons would be required. In order to accommodate this amount of charge. unrealistic shift registers widths would be required. Therefore, with an integrating mode detector it is difficult to achieve a dynamic range of over four orders of magnitude of input light intensity. Another alternative is to solve the problem at the photodetector aml not the shift, register. DALSA's wide dynamic range detector utilizes an optimized, ion implant doped, profiled MOSFET photodetector specifically designed for wide dynamic range. When this new detector operates at high speed and at low light levels the photons are collected and stored in an integrating fashion. However. at bright light levels where transient periods are short, the detector switches into a conductive mode. The light intensity is logarithmically compressed into small charge packets, easily carried by the CCD shift register. As a result of the logarithmic conversion, dynamic ranges of over six orders of

  1. The solid state detector technology for picosecond laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    We developed an all solid state laser ranging detector technology, which makes the goal of millimeter accuracy achievable. Our design and construction philosophy is to combine the techniques of single photon ranging, ultrashort laser pulses, and fast fixed threshold discrimination while avoiding any analog signal processing within the laser ranging chain. The all solid state laser ranging detector package consists of the START detector and the STOP solid state photon counting module. Both the detectors are working in an optically triggered avalanche switching regime. The optical signal is triggering an avalanche current buildup which results in the generation of a uniform, fast risetime output pulse.

  2. Wide Dynamic Range CCD Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younse, J. M.; Gove, R. J.; Penz, P. A.; Russell, D. E.

    1984-11-01

    A liquid crystal attenuator (LCA) operated as a variable neutral density filter has been attached to a charge-coupled device (CCD) imager to extend the dynamic range of a solid-state TV camera by an order of magnitude. Many applications are best served by a camera with a dynamic range of several thousand. For example, outside security systems must operate unattended with "dawn-to-dusk" lighting conditions. Although this can be achieved with available auto-iris lens assemblies, more elegant solutions which provide the small size, low power, high reliability advantages of solid state technology are now available. This paper will describe one such unique way of achieving these dynamic ranges using standard optics by making the CCD imager's glass cover a controllable neutral density filter. The liquid crystal attenuator's structure and theoretical properties for this application will be described along with measured transmittance. A small integrated TV camera which utilizes a "virtual-phase" CCD sensor coupled to a LCA will be described and test results for a number of the camera's optical and electrical parameters will be given. These include the following camera parameters: dynamic range, Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), spectral response, and uniformity. Also described will be circuitry which senses the ambient scene illuminance and automatically provides feedback signals to appropriately adjust the transmittance of the LCA. Finally, image photographs using this camera, under various scene illuminations, will be shown.

  3. Wide dynamic range beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.M.; van Dyck, O.B.; Bilskie, J.R.; Brown, D.; Hardekopf, R.

    1985-10-01

    An economical harp multiplexer system has been developed to achieve a wide dynamic range. The harp system incorporates a pneumatically actuated harp detector with ceramic boards and carbon wires; a high-sensitivity multiplexer packaged in a double-wide NIM module; and flat, shielded ribbon cable consisting of individual twisted pairs. The system multiplexes 30 wires in each of the x and y planes simultaneously and operates with or without computer control. The system has operated in beams of 100 nA to 1 mA, 1- to 120-Hz repetition rate, with a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 10/1.

  4. Wide dynamic range beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.M.; Brown, D.; Hardekopf, R.; Bilskie, J.R.; van Dyck, O.B.V.

    1985-01-01

    An economical harp multiplexer system has been developed to achieve a wide dynamic range. The harp system incorporates a pneumatically actuated harp detector with ceramic boards and carbon wires; a high-sensitivity multiplexer packaged in a double-wide NIM module; and flat, shielded ribbon cable consisting of individual twisted pairs. The system multiplexes 30 wires in each of the x and y planes simultaneously and operates with or without computer control. The system has operated in beams of 100 nA to 1 mA, 1- to 120-Hz repetition rate, with a signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 10/1.

  5. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1993-02-16

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  6. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; McAtee, James L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, whcih is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  7. Small long-range alpha detector (LRAD) with computer readout

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1991-10-01

    The small long-range alpha detector developed by N-2 was described in detail in the Los Alamos publication LA-12073-MS, Long-Range Alpha Detector,'' published in 1991. Since publication of that report, a computerized data acquisition system has been added to the LRAD detector. In addition to detailing the new data acquisition system, we discuss new data generated with the enhanced system, including measurements of (1) ultimate sensitivity; (2) detector linearity; (3) ion lifetime; and (4) characteristics. Furthermore, we have expanded our understanding of ion recombination and statistical noise effects in the LRAD and have addressed them here as well as several proposed applications. 6 refs., 30 figs.

  8. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  9. Wind dynamic range video camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, G. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A television camera apparatus is disclosed in which bright objects are attenuated to fit within the dynamic range of the system, while dim objects are not. The apparatus receives linearly polarized light from an object scene, the light being passed by a beam splitter and focused on the output plane of a liquid crystal light valve. The light valve is oriented such that, with no excitation from the cathode ray tube, all light is rotated 90 deg and focused on the input plane of the video sensor. The light is then converted to an electrical signal, which is amplified and used to excite the CRT. The resulting image is collected and focused by a lens onto the light valve which rotates the polarization vector of the light to an extent proportional to the light intensity from the CRT. The overall effect is to selectively attenuate the image pattern focused on the sensor.

  10. HIGH DYNAMIC-RANGE HIGH SPEED LINAC CURRENT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, Craig Edmond; Curry, Douglas E; Dickson, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    It is desired to measure the linac current of a charged particle beam with a consistent accuracy over a dynamic range of over 120 dB. Conventional current transformers suffer from droop, can be susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and can be bandwidth limited. A novel detector and electronics were designed to maximize dynamic range of about 120 dB and measure rise-times on the order of 10 nanoseconds.

  11. Multi-dimensional position sensor using range detectors

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    A small, non-contact optical sensor uses ranges and images to detect its relative position to an object in up to six degrees of freedom. The sensor has three light emitting range detectors which illuminate a target and can be used to determine distance and two tilt angles. A camera located between the three range detectors senses the three remaining degrees of freedom, two translations and one rotation. Various range detectors, with different light sources, e.g. lasers and LEDs, different collection options, and different detection schemes, e.g. diminishing return and time of flight can be used. This sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines, e.g. it can instruct a robot how to adjust automatically to different positions and orientations of a part.

  12. EMIR high-dynamic range readout modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez, Miguel; Gago, Fernando; Garzón, Francisco; Díaz, José J.; Barreto, Mary; Patrón, Jesús; González-Fenández, Carlos; Hammersley, Peter L.; López, Luis; Castro, Nieves

    2012-07-01

    EMIR is the NIR imager and multiobject spectrograph being built as a common user instrument for the GTC and it is currently entering in the integration and verification phase at system level. EMIR is being built by a Consortium of Spanish and French institutes led by the IAC. In this paper we describe the readout modes of EMIR detector, a Hawaii2 FPA, after two full calibrations campaigns. Besides the standard set of modes (reset-read, CDS, Fowler, Follow-up the ramp), the modified SDSU-III hardware and home made software will also offer high dynamic range readout modes, which will improve the ability of the instrument to sound densely populated areas which often are made of objects with large differences in brightness. These new high dynamic range modes are: single readout with very short integration time, window mode and combination of both. The results show that the new modes behave linearly with different exposition times, improve the maximum frame rate and increase the saturation limit in image mode for EMIR instrument.

  13. Simple dynamic electromagnetic radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Been, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Detector monitors gamma dose rate at particular position in a radiation facility where a mixed neutron-gamma environment exists, thus determining reactor power level changes. Device also maps gamma intensity profile across a neutron-gamma beam.

  14. Development of a wide-range tritium-concentration detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, F.; Zhe, L.; Shicheng, L.; Jiangfeng, S.; Deli, L.

    2015-03-15

    According to the requirements of the tritium related systems of the TBM (Test Blanket Module) for monitoring the on-line tritium concentration, a wide-range tritium-concentration detector has been developed to measure the tritium concentration in the range of 10{sup 4} Bq/ml - 5*10{sup 8} Bq/ml. This detector is combined with a low-memory helium ionization chamber. The weak current signal collected in the ionization chamber is converted to the voltage signal by an I-V converter. The minimum weak current which the detector could be measured is 10{sup -14} A. The performance of the background current and the current response linearity of the prototype have been tested. The test result indicates that the linear response of the current signal of the prototype without connecting the ionization chamber is good. The linear correlation coefficient is R{sup 2} = 0.998.

  15. Understanding synthesis imaging dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.

    2013-03-01

    We develop a general framework for quantifying the many different contributions to the noise budget of an image made with an array of dishes or aperture array stations. Each noise contribution to the visibility data is associated with a relevant correlation timescale and frequency bandwidth so that the net impact on a complete observation can be assessed when a particular effect is not captured in the instrumental calibration. All quantities are parameterised as function of observing frequency and the visibility baseline length. We apply the resulting noise budget analysis to a wide range of existing and planned telescope systems that will operate between about 100 MHz and 5 GHz to ascertain the magnitude of the calibration challenges that they must overcome to achieve thermal noise limited performance. We conclude that calibration challenges are increased in several respects by small dimensions of the dishes or aperture array stations. It will be more challenging to achieve thermal noise limited performance using 15 m class dishes rather than the 25 m dishes of current arrays. Some of the performance risks are mitigated by the deployment of phased array feeds and more with the choice of an (alt,az,pol) mount, although a larger dish diameter offers the best prospects for risk mitigation. Many improvements to imaging performance can be anticipated at the expense of greater complexity in calibration algorithms. However, a fundamental limitation is ultimately imposed by an insufficient number of data constraints relative to calibration variables. The upcoming aperture array systems will be operating in a regime that has never previously been addressed, where a wide range of effects are expected to exceed the thermal noise by two to three orders of magnitude. Achieving routine thermal noise limited imaging performance with these systems presents an extreme challenge. The magnitude of that challenge is inversely related to the aperture array station diameter.

  16. Laser ranging and mapping with a photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Priedhorsky, W C; Smith, R C; Ho, C

    1996-01-20

    We propose a new technique for remote sensing: photon-counting laser mapping. MicroChannel plate detectors with a crossed delay-line (MCP/CDL) readout combine high position accuracy and subnanosecond photon timing, at event rates of 10(6) detected photons per second and more. A mapping system would combine an MCP/CDL detector with a fast-pulse, high-repetition-rate laser illuminator. The system would map solid targets with exceptional in-range and cross-range resolution. The resulting images would be intrinsically three dimensional, without resorting to multiple viewing angles, so that objects of identical albedo could be discriminated. For a detector time resolution and pulse width of the order of 10(-10) s, the in-range resolution would be a few centimeters, permitting the discrimination of surfaces by their textures. Images could be taken at night, at illumination levels up to full moonlight, from ground, airborne, or space platforms. We discuss signal to noise as a function of laser flux and background level and present simulated images. PMID:21069029

  17. Field Funneling and Range Straggling in Silicon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Malone, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Magnitudes of field funneling and range straggling determined in silicon-surface-barrier (Schottky-barrier) charged-particle detectors (SSBD's) through meaurement of charges collected from alpha-particle tracks. Method used extended to straightforward measurement of charge collection from heavy-ion tracks in these and other semiconductor devices. Such measurements used to assess single-event upsets in integratedcircuit chips, with view toward making them resistant to radiation. Field funneling and range straggling measured with electronic system in which charge collected from individual ions measured and recorded by multichannel analyzer.

  18. [A solar blind light source with long dynamic range].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Yan, Feng; Zhang, Ming-Chao; Gao, Song-Tao

    2012-06-01

    In order to realize the irradiance calibration of SBUV-ICCD (solar blind ultraviolent Intensified change-coupled device) with dynamic range reaching 120 dB, a light source with long dynamic range was designed and realized. Firstly, the irradiance dynamic range was estimated. Then using deuterium lamp, integrating sphere, precise stop and rail, an ultraviolent light source was developed, which has fixed structure of spectrum, but the irradiance can change continuously in long range. At last the light source's performance was tested. The result shows that the irradiance between 0.278 and 2.8 x 10(-7) microW x cm(-2) was covered, and the stability was 0.93%/3 h. So the demand of calibration of irradiance was satisfied. It will help for measuring the surface uniformity of detector and the calibration of imaging systems. PMID:22870617

  19. Use of high dynamic range imaging for quantitative combustion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Giassi, Davide; Liu, Bolun; Long, Marshall B

    2015-05-10

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging is applied to quantitative combustion diagnostics in coflow laminar diffusion flames as a way to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and measurement sensitivity. The technique relies on the combination of partially saturated frames into a single unsaturated image; in this work, the effectiveness of the HDR approach is demonstrated when applied to two-color ratio pyrometry. Specifically, it is shown than an increase in SNR results in more precise temperature measurements for both soot and thin filament pyrometry. Linearity and reciprocity analysis under partially saturated conditions were performed on three selected detectors, and the camera response functions, which are required for HDR image reconstruction, were determined. The linearity/reciprocity of the detectors allowed the use of a simplified algorithm that was implemented to compute the HDR images; soot and flame temperature were calculated from those images by employing color-ratio pyrometry. The reciprocity analysis revealed that pixel cross talk can be a limiting factor in a detector's HDR capabilities. The comparison with low dynamic range results showed the advantage of the HDR approach. Due to the higher SNR, the measured temperature exhibits a smoother distribution, and the range is extended to lower temperature regions, where the pyrometry technique starts to lose sensitivity due to detector limitations. PMID:25967519

  20. A Wide Range Neutron Detector for Space Nuclear Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nassif, Eduardo; Sismonda, Miguel; Matatagui, Emilio; Pretorius, Stephan

    2007-01-30

    We propose here a versatile and innovative solution for monitoring and controlling a space-based nuclear reactor that is based on technology already proved in ground based reactors. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) allows for a reduction in the complexity of space based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. A ground model, predecessor of the proposed system, has been installed and is operating at the OPAL (Open Pool Advanced Light Water Research Reactor) in Australia, providing long term functional data. A space compatible Engineering Qualification Model of the WRND has been developed, manufactured and verified satisfactorily by analysis, and is currently under environmental testing.

  1. Wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-11-16

    A wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector and monitor capable of measuring radioactive-gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude is described. The device is designed to have an ionization chamber sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel-plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel-plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization-chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  2. Dynamic range tuning of graphene nanoresonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, Marsha M.; Gangavarapu, P. R. Yasasvi; Naik, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    From sensing perspective, smaller electromechanical devices, in general, are expected to be more responsive to the stimuli. This enhanced performance, however, is contingent upon the noise sources remaining unchanged and the onset of nonlinear behavior not being precipitated by miniaturization. In this paper, we study the effect of strain on the nonlinearities and dynamic range in graphene nanoresonators. The dynamic response and the onset of nonlinearity in these devices are sensitive both to the electrostatic field used to actuate the device and the strain. By tuning the strain of the device by two orders of magnitude, we observe an enhancement of 25 dB in the dynamic range leading to a mass resolution of 100 yoctogram. The increase in dynamic range in our devices is modeled as a combined effect of strain and partial cancellation of elastic and electrostatic nonlinearities.

  3. Subjective evaluation of higher dynamic range video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanhart, Philippe; Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2014-09-01

    High dynamic range (HDR) imaging is able to capture a wide range of luminance values, closer to what the human eye can perceive. However, for capture and display technologies, it is important to answer the question on the significance of higher dynamic range for user preference. This paper answers this question by investigating the added value of higher dynamic range via a rigorous set of subjective experiments using paired comparison methodology. Video sequences at four different peak luminance levels were displayed side-by-side on a Dolby Research HDR RGB backlight dual modulation display (aka `Pulsar'), which is capable of reliably displaying video content at 4000 cd=m2 peak luminance. The results of the subjective experiment demonstrate that the preference of an average viewer increases logarithmically with the increase in the maximum luminance level at which HDR content is displayed, with 4000 cd=m2 being the most attractive option.

  4. High dynamic range holographic data storage media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askham, Fred; Ayres, Mark R.; Urness, Adam C.

    2015-08-01

    Holographic data storage (HDS) employs the physics of holography to record digital data in three dimensions in a highly stable photopolymer medium. The photopolymer medium must provide the essential characteristics of low scatter and high dynamic range while maintaining low recording induced physical shrinkage and long archival lifetimes. In this article, we report on media advancements employing Akonia's DREDTM technology which provide a 5x increase in media dynamic range with unchanged media shrinkage. We also discuss the implications of these results for photopolymer media mechanistic models.

  5. Dynamic cardiac volume imaging using area detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Herbert; Hoelzel, Arne; Stierstorfer, Karl; Rauscher, Annabella; Flohr, Thomas

    2003-05-01

    We present a reconstruction scheme for dynamic cardiac volume imaging using Area Detector Computed Tomography (CT) named Multi-Sector Cardiac Volume Reconstruction (MCVR) which is based on a 3D-backprojection of the Feldkamp-type. It is intended for circular scanning using area detectors covering the whole heart volume, but the method can easily be extended to cardiac spiral imaging using multi-slice CT. In cardiac imaging with multi-slice CT continuous data acquisition combined with the parallel recording of the patient's ECG enables retrospective gating of data segments for image reconstruction. Using consecutive heart cycles MCVR identifies complementary and time consistent projection data segments <= π using temporal information of the ECG. After a row by row parallel rebinning and temporal rebinning the projection data have to be filtered using conventional convolution kernels and finally reconstructed to image space using a 3D-backprojection. A dynamic anthropomorphic computer model of the human heart was developed in order to validate the MCVR approach. A 256-slice detector system with 0.5mm slice collimation was simulated operating in a circular scanning mode at a gantry rotation time of 330ms and compared to state-of-the-art 16-slice technology. At enddiastole the coronary anatomy can be visualized with excellent image quality. Although an area detector with large cone angling covering the entire heart volume was used no cone-artifacts could be observed. Using a 2-sector approach a nearly motion free 3D visualization of the heart chambers was obtained even at endsystole.

  6. High Dynamic Range Digital Imaging of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Brian A.; Chalmers, Alan; Debattista, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The ability to capture engineering imagery with a wide degree of dynamic range during rocket launches is critical for post launch processing and analysis [USC03, NNC86]. Rocket launches often present an extreme range of lightness, particularly during night launches. Night launches present a two-fold problem: capturing detail of the vehicle and scene that is masked by darkness, while also capturing detail in the engine plume.

  7. Shadow Attenuation With High Dynamic Range Images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shadow often interferes with accurate image analysis. To mitigate shadow effects in near-earth imagery (2 m above ground level), we created high dynamic range (HDR) nadir images and used them to measure grassland ground cover. HDR composites were created by merging three differentially-exposed image...

  8. Nonperturbative short-range dynamics in TMDs

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Christian

    2013-05-01

    This presentation covers: deep inelastic processes and transverse momentum distributions; chiral symmetry breaking, including the physical picture, the dynamical model, and parton distributions; partonic structures, including transverse momentum distributions, coordinate space correlator, and short range correlations; and measurements of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, correlations, and multi-parton processes in pp interactions.

  9. Signal phase switches offer greater dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.

    1970-01-01

    Circuit, placed in the signal path of a closed-loop receiver to modulate telemetered data in the 10-MHz spectrum, improves signal-to-noise ratio by 3 db in a communication receiver. The switch enables bandwidth reduction which reduces noise overload on the following stages, giving the system greater dynamic range.

  10. Integration of Dynamic Models in Range Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2004-01-01

    This work addresses the various model interactions in real-time to make an efficient internet based decision making tool for Shuttle launch. The decision making tool depends on the launch commit criteria coupled with physical models. Dynamic interaction between a wide variety of simulation applications and techniques, embedded algorithms, and data visualizations are needed to exploit the full potential of modeling and simulation. This paper also discusses in depth details of web based 3-D graphics and applications to range safety. The advantages of this dynamic model integration are secure accessibility and distribution of real time information to other NASA centers.

  11. Adaptive optimal spectral range for dynamically changing scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, Ephi; Siman-tov, Avihay; Peles, David

    2012-06-01

    A novel multispectral video system that continuously optimizes both its spectral range channels and the exposure time of each channel autonomously, under dynamic scenes, varying from short range-clear scene to long range-poor visibility, is currently being developed. Transparency and contrast of high scattering medium of channels with spectral ranges in the near infrared is superior to the visible channels, particularly to the blue range. Longer wavelength spectral ranges that induce higher contrast are therefore favored. Images of 3 spectral channels are fused and displayed for (pseudo) color visualization, as an integrated high contrast video stream. In addition to the dynamic optimization of the spectral channels, optimal real-time exposure time is adjusted simultaneously and autonomously for each channel. A criterion of maximum average signal, derived dynamically from previous frames of the video stream is used (Patent Application - International Publication Number: WO2009/093110 A2, 30.07.2009). This configuration enables dynamic compatibility with the optimal exposure time of a dynamically changing scene. It also maximizes the signal to noise ratio and compensates each channel for the specified value of daylight reflections and sensors response for each spectral range. A possible implementation is a color video camera based on 4 synchronized, highly responsive, CCD imaging detectors, attached to a 4CCD dichroic prism and combined with a common, color corrected, lens. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) technique is then applied for real time "dimensional collapse" in color space, in order to select and fuse, for clear color visualization, the 3 most significant principal channels out of at least 4 characterized by high contrast and rich details in the image data.

  12. High dynamic range Josephson parametric amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roch, Nicolas; Murch, Kater W.; Vijay, Rajamani

    Josephson parametric amplifiers (JPAs) have become the technology of choice to amplify small amplitude microwave signals since they show noise performances close to the quantum limit of amplification. An important challenge that faces this technology is the low dynamic range of current devices, which limits the number of measurements that can be performed concurrently and the rate of information acquisition for single measurements. We have fabricated and tested novel parametric amplifiers based on arrays of up to 100 SQUIDS. The amplifiers produce gain in excess of 20 dB over a large bandwidth and match the dynamic range achieved with traveling wave devices. Compared to the latter devices they are fabricated in a single lithography step and we will show that their bandwidth performance can be further extended using a recently developed impedance matching technique.

  13. Wide-range dynamic magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Riek, Kerstin; Klatt, Dieter; Nuzha, Hassan; Mueller, Susanne; Neumann, Ulf; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Jürgen

    2011-04-29

    Tissue mechanical parameters have been shown to be highly sensitive to disease by elastography. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) in the human body relies on the low-dynamic range of tissue mechanics <100 Hz. In contrast, MRE suited for investigations of mice or small tissue samples requires vibration frequencies 10-20 times higher than those used in human MRE. The dispersion of the complex shear modulus (G(⁎)) prevents direct comparison of elastography data at different frequency bands and, consequently, frequency-independent viscoelastic models that fit to G(*) over a wide dynamic range have to be employed. This study presents data of G(*) of samples of agarose gel, liver, brain, and muscle measured by high-resolution MRE in a 7T-animal scanner at 200-800 Hz vibration frequency. Material constants μ and α according to the springpot model and related to shear elasticity and slope of the G(*)-dispersion were determined. Both μ and α of calf brain and bovine liver were found to be similar, while a sample of fibrotic human liver (METAVIR score of 3) displayed about fifteen times higher shear elasticity, similar to μ of bovine muscle measured in muscle fiber direction. α was the highest in fibrotic liver, followed by normal brain and liver, while muscle had the lowest α-values of all biological samples investigated in this study. As expected, the least G(*)-dispersion was seen in soft gel. The proposed technique of wide-range dynamic MRE can provide baseline data for both human MRE and high-dynamic MRE for better understanding tissue mechanics of different tissue structures. PMID:21295305

  14. Novel Ultra-Sensitive Detectors in the 10–50 μm Wavelength Range

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Takeji; Komiyama, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    We have developed novel single-photon detectors in the 10–50 μm wavelength region. The detectors are charge-sensitive infrared phototransistors (CSIPs) fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well (QW) structures, in which a photo-generated hole (+e) in the floating gate (upper QW) modulates the conductance of a capacitively-coupled channel located underneath (lower QW). The excellent noise equivalent power (NEP = 8.3 × 10−19 W/Hz1/2) and specific detectivity (D* = 8 × 1014 cm Hz1/2/W) are demonstrated for 15 micron detection up to 23 K, which are by a few orders of magnitude better than those of other state-of-the-art high-sensitivity detectors. The dynamic range exceeds 106 (∼aW to pW) by repeatedly resetting the accumulated holes in the upper QW. Simple device structure makes the detectors feasible for array fabrication: Furthermore, monolithic integration with reading circuits will be possible. PMID:22163662

  15. Temperature Dependence of Novel Single-Photon Detectors in the Long-Wavelength Infrared Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Takeji; An, Zhenghua; Komiyama, Susumu

    2011-05-01

    Novel single-photon detectors, called Charge-sensitive Infrared Phototransistor (CSIP), have been developed in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range. The devices are fabricated in GaAs/AlGaAs double-quantum-well (DQW) structure, and do not require ultralow temperatures ( T < 1 K) for operation. Figures of merit are determined in a T-range of 4.2 K˜30 K by using a homemade all-cryogenic spectrometer. We found that the photo-signal persists up to around 30 K. Excellent specific detectivity D * = 9.6 × 1014 cm Hz1/2/W and noise equivalent power NEP = 8.3 × 10-19 W/Hz1/2 are derived up to T = 23 K. The dynamic range of detection exceeds 106, roughly ranging from attowatt to picowatt levels. These values are by a few orders of magnitude higher than that of the state-of-the-art values of other detectors. Simple planar structure of CSIPs is feasible for array fabrication and will make it possible to monolithically integrate with reading circuit. CSIPs are, therefore, not only extremely sensitive but also suitable for practical use in wide ranging applications.

  16. Single and double grid long-range alpha detectors

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.

    1993-03-16

    Alpha particle detectors capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a voltage is generated in a single electrically conductive grid while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across the conductive grid. The current in the conductive grid can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. Another embodiment builds on this concept and provides an additional grid so that air ions of both polarities can be detected. The detector can be used in many applications, such as for pipe or duct, tank, or soil sample monitoring.

  17. Single and double grid long-range alpha detectors

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.

    1993-01-01

    Alpha particle detectors capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a voltage is generated in a single electrically conductive grid while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across the conductive grid. The current in the conductive grid can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. Another embodiment builds on this concept and provides an additional grid so that air ions of both polarities can be detected. The detector can be used in many applications, such as for pipe or duct, tank, or soil sample monitoring.

  18. Mitochondrial uncouplers with an extraordinary dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Lou, Phing-How; Hansen, Birgit S; Olsen, Preben H; Tullin, Søren; Murphy, Michael P; Brand, Martin D

    2007-10-01

    We have discovered that some weak uncouplers (typified by butylated hydroxytoluene) have a dynamic range of more than 10(6) in vitro: the concentration giving measurable uncoupling is less than one millionth of the concentration causing full uncoupling. They achieve this through a high-affinity interaction with the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase that causes significant but limited uncoupling at extremely low uncoupler concentrations, together with more conventional uncoupling at much higher concentrations. Uncoupling at the translocase is not by a conventional weak acid/anion cycling mechanism since it is also caused by substituted triphenylphosphonium molecules, which are not anionic and cannot protonate. Covalent attachment of the uncoupler to a mitochondrially targeted hydrophobic cation sensitizes it to membrane potential, giving a small additional effect. The wide dynamic range of these uncouplers in isolated mitochondria and intact cells reveals a novel allosteric activation of proton transport through the adenine nucleotide translocase and provides a promising starting point for designing safer uncouplers for obesity therapy. PMID:17608618

  19. Mitochondrial uncouplers with an extraordinary dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Phing-How; Hansen, Birgit S.; Olsen, Preben H.; Tullin, Søren; Murphy, Michael P.; Brand, Martin D.

    2007-01-01

    We have discovered that some weak uncouplers (typified by butylated hydroxytoluene) have a dynamic range of more than 106 in vitro: the concentration giving measurable uncoupling is less than one millionth of the concentration causing full uncoupling. They achieve this through a high-affinity interaction with the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase that causes significant but limited uncoupling at extremely low uncoupler concentrations, together with more conventional uncoupling at much higher concentrations. Uncoupling at the translocase is not by a conventional weak acid/anion cycling mechanism since it is also caused by substituted triphenylphosphonium molecules, which are not anionic and cannot protonate. Covalent attachment of the uncoupler to a mitochondrially targeted hydrophobic cation sensitizes it to membrane potential, giving a small additional effect. The wide dynamic range of these uncouplers in isolated mitochondria and intact cells reveals a novel allosteric activation of proton transport through the adenine nucleotide translocase and provides a promising starting point for designing safer uncouplers for obesity therapy. PMID:17608618

  20. High-dynamic-range MCP structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Timothy, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    We report on the development of a new high-dynamic-range two-stage Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) imaging tube designed for improved high count rate performance at FUV and EUV wavelengths. The new two-stage MAMA tube employs two 25-mm-diameter format MCPs placed in tandem with a small gap between the plates. The front (input) MCP is designed to be a low-gain converter plate that supports an opaque photocathode and converts the detected photons to electrons, while the second (output) MCP is of higher conductivity and thus maintains the overall gain of the multiplier at high count rates. The second MCP is mounted in proximity focus with a (224 x 960)-pixel fine-fine coincidence MAMA array for high-spatial-resolution imaging studies. The applied voltage across each MCP can be controlled independently. We report on the gain and dynamic range performance characteristics of the two-stage MAMA tube in two different configurations: first, with the output MCP having moderate conductivity (about 100 MOhm); and second, with the output MCP having very high conductivity (about 2 MOhm). These results are compared and contrasted with those of the more conventional MAMA tube configuration which employs a single high-gain curved-channel MCP.

  1. Large dynamic range relative B1+ mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Aaron T.; Aljabar, Paul; Malik, Shaihan J.; Jezzard, Peter; Robson, Matthew D.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Koopmans, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Parallel transmission (PTx) requires knowledge of the B1+ produced by each element. However, B1+ mapping can be challenging when transmit fields exhibit large dynamic range. This study presents a method to produce high quality relative B1+ maps when this is the case. Theory and Methods The proposed technique involves the acquisition of spoiled gradient echo (SPGR) images at multiple radiofrequency drive levels for each transmitter. The images are combined using knowledge of the SPGR signal equation using maximum likelihood estimation, yielding an image for each channel whose signal is proportional to the B1+ field strength. Relative B1+ maps are then obtained by taking image ratios. The method was tested using numerical simulations, phantom imaging, and through in vivo experiments. Results The numerical simulations demonstrated that the proposed method can reconstruct relative transmit sensitivities over a wide range of B1+ amplitudes and at several SNR levels. The method was validated at 3 Tesla (T) by comparing it with an alternative B1+ mapping method, and demonstrated in vivo at 7T. Conclusion Relative B1+ mapping in the presence of large dynamic range has been demonstrated through numerical simulations, phantom imaging at 3T and experimentally at 7T. The method will enable PTx to be applied in challenging imaging scenarios at ultrahigh field. Magn Reson Med 76:490–499, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26308375

  2. Technology information profile: Long-Range Alpha Detector (LRAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Bounds, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    The idea to develop some sort of radiation detection using this knowledge was passed down and after extensive and ground-breaking development, practical and sensitive devices were invented that are particularly sensitive to alpha radiation. Well over twenty different LRAD detectors have been successfully built and plans exist for many more. No parallel work is known to exist, and the ability to detect alpha radiation at such distances is unequaled.

  3. High dynamic range, hyper-terahertz detection with silicon photoconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, A. C.; Hussain, A.; Andrews, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency response of ion implanted silicon photoconductive devices designed for coherent detection in time domain terahertz spectroscopy has been studied between 0.2 and 30 THz. Unlike devices using polar photoconductors or ones having polar substrates, which have a complicated response spectrum in the region of their reststrahlen bands, the response of silicon detectors fabricated on silicon substrates is relatively featureless. When used with amplified laser systems, the dynamic range of Si detectors is shown to be very similar to that of GaAs devices with the same geometry over a 20 THz range, superior to air-biased coherent detection (ABCD) at frequencies below ˜7 THz and comparable with both ABCD and electro-optic sampling in thin ZnTe crystals between 7 and 20 THz. Together with their ease of use and linear response in terahertz fields approaching 1 MV/cm, this suggests that Si photoconductors could be a competitive choice for sensitive detection in nonlinear hyper-terahertz spectroscopy.

  4. Dual Transition Edge Sensor Bolometer for Enhanced Dynamic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Benford, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Irwin, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    Broadband surveys at the millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths will require bolometers that can reach new limits of sensitivity and also operate under high background conditions. To address this need, we present results on a dual transition edge sensor (TES) device with two operating modes: one for low background, ultrasensitive detection and one for high background, enhanced dynamic range detection. The device consists of a detector element with two transition temperatures (T(sub c)) of 0.25 and 0.51 K located on the same micromachined, thermally isolated membrane structure. It can be biased on either transition, and features phonon-limited noise performance at the lower T(sub c). We measure noise performance on the lower transition 7 x 10(exp -18) W/rt(Hz) and the bias power on the upper transition of 12.5 pW, giving a factor of 10 enhancement of the dynamic range for the device. We discuss the biasable range of this type of device and present a design concept to optimize utility of the device.

  5. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  6. Performance optimization of detector electronics for millimeter laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cova, Sergio; Lacaita, A.; Ripamonti, Giancarlo

    1993-01-01

    The front-end electronic circuitry plays a fundamental role in determining the performance actually obtained from ultrafast and highly sensitive photodetectors. We deal here with electronic problems met working with microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCP-PMTs) and single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) for detecting single optical photons and measuring their arrival time with picosecond resolution. The performance of available fast circuits is critically analyzed. Criteria for selecting the most suitable electronics are derived and solutions for exploiting the detector performance are presented and discussed.

  7. Development of wide-ranged diamond-based detector unit for gamma radiation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, M. A.; Boyko, A. V.; Chebyshev, S. B.; Cherkashin, I. I.; Kireev, V. P.; Petrov, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    In the article the description of wide-ranged diamond-based detector unit is given. Characteristics of the diamond detector were studied in current and in impulse mode. As well it was studied how detector's sensitivity depends on power doze within the limits from 10-3 to 0,4Gy/h (impulse mode) and from 10-1to 2 104Gy/h (current mode). On the basis of the obtained data it is possible to estimate about the possibility of using the detector to prevent emergency accident on a nuclear power plant and for everyday control at a nuclear power plant.

  8. Dynamic range multiwavelength particle characterization using analytical ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Walter, Johannes; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-04-14

    We demonstrate how a sophisticated data analysis methodology enables us to perform multiwavelength evaluations of dynamic rotor speed gradient experiments obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with a multiwavelength detector. Our data evaluation tool HDR-MULTIFIT allows for the accurate analysis of sedimentation coefficient distributions which can be converted to particle size distributions. By means of multiwavelength evaluation, species dependent extinction spectra can be determined even for complex mixtures. Moreover, optical and hydrodynamic properties can be correlated for spherical particles of known optical properties applying multiwavelength evaluation and Mie's theory leading to a significant increase in the dynamic range of the experiment. We provide the theoretical background about the operation principle of our methodology and compare the performance of the multiwavelength analysis to the conventional single wavelength analysis as it is applied in turbidity analysis. We validate our technique using NIST traceable reference particles and show that our technique is universally applicable to materials of known and unknown optical properties, thus clearly extending the possibilities of particle analysis. PMID:26837517

  9. Dynamic range multiwavelength particle characterization using analytical ultracentrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Johannes; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how a sophisticated data analysis methodology enables us to perform multiwavelength evaluations of dynamic rotor speed gradient experiments obtained by analytical ultracentrifugation equipped with a multiwavelength detector. Our data evaluation tool HDR-MULTIFIT allows for the accurate analysis of sedimentation coefficient distributions which can be converted to particle size distributions. By means of multiwavelength evaluation, species dependent extinction spectra can be determined even for complex mixtures. Moreover, optical and hydrodynamic properties can be correlated for spherical particles of known optical properties applying multiwavelength evaluation and Mie's theory leading to a significant increase in the dynamic range of the experiment. We provide the theoretical background about the operation principle of our methodology and compare the performance of the multiwavelength analysis to the conventional single wavelength analysis as it is applied in turbidity analysis. We validate our technique using NIST traceable reference particles and show that our technique is universally applicable to materials of known and unknown optical properties, thus clearly extending the possibilities of particle analysis.

  10. Dynamic range control of audio signals by digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, N. H. C.

    It is often necessary to reduce the dynamic range of musical programs, particularly those comprising orchestral and choral music, for them to be received satisfactorily by listeners to conventional FM and AM broadcasts. With the arrival of DAB (Digital Audio Broadcasting) a much wider dynamic range will become available for radio broadcasting, although some listeners may prefer to have a signal with a reduced dynamic range. This report describes a digital processor developed by the BBC to control the dynamic range of musical programs in a manner similar to that of a trained Studio Manager. It may be used prior to transmission in conventional broadcasting, replacing limiters or other compression equipment. In DAB, it offers the possibility of providing a dynamic range control signal to be sent to the receiver via an ancillary data channel, simultaneously with the uncompressed audio, giving the listener the option of the full dynamic range or a reduced dynamic range.

  11. High dynamic range video transmission and display using standard dynamic range technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léonce, A.; Hsu, Tao-i.; Wickramanayake, D. S.; Edirisinghe, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a novel system that makes effective use of High Dynamic Range (HDR) image data to improve and maintain the best viewing quality of video broadcast on current mobile display devices. The proposed approach combines bilateral filtering with an adaptive tone mapping method used to enable the enhancement of the perceptual quality of the video frames at the display device. The bilateral filter separates the frame into large-scale and detail layers. The large-scale layer is divided into bright, mid-tone and dark regions, which are each processed by an appropriate tone mapping function. Ambient and backlight sensors at the display device provide information about current illumination conditions, which are used to intelligently and dynamically vary the levels and thresholds of post-processing applied at the decoder, thereby maintaining a constant level of perceived quality.

  12. A composite tracking sensor with high accuracy and large dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyu; Wei, Kai; Zheng, Wenjia; Rao, Changhui

    2014-07-01

    A composite tracking sensor, in which a reflect mirror with a central hole is inserted in the imaging systems so that the reflective beam beyond the hole is directed to the large dynamic range detector and the beam passing the hole is reimaged by a lens to enter the high sensitivity detector, can be used for tip-tilt detecting with high accuracy and large dynamic range simultaneously. A composite tracking sensor prototype based on the multi-anode photo-multiplier tubes (MAPMT) is developed for 1.8 meter astronomical telescope in the Gaomeigu astronomical observation station. In this paper, the principle of the composite tracking sensor is introduced. The prototype is described in detailed and the experimental results are presented. The results show that this composite tracking sensor can reach the tracking accuracy of 0.2 μrad and higher within the dynamic range of 870 μrad.

  13. Optimal exposure sets for high dynamic range scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valli Kumari, V.; RaviKiran, B.; Raju, K. V. S. V. N.; Shajahan Basha, S. A.

    2011-10-01

    The dynamic range of many natural scenes is far greater than the dynamic range of the imaging devices. These scenes present a challenge to the consumer digital cameras. The well-known technique to capture the full dynamic range of the scene is by fusing multiple images of the same scene. Usually people combine three or five different exposures to get the full dynamic range of the scene. Some cameras like Pentax K-7, always combines fixed exposures together to produce the output result. However, this should be adaptive to the scene characteristics. We propose an optimal solution for dynamically selecting the exposure sets.

  14. Development of a stacked detector system for the x-ray range and its possible applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Daniel; Limousin, Olivier; Meuris, Aline; Pürckhauer, Sabina; Santangelo, Andrea; Schanz, Thomas; Tenzer, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    We have constructed a stacked detector system operating in the X-ray range from 0.5 keV to 250 keV that consists of a Si-based 64×64 DePFET-Matrix in front of a CdTe hybrid detector called Caliste-64. The setup is operated under laboratory conditions that approximate the expected environment of a space-borne observatory. The DePFET detector is an active pixel matrix that provides high count-rate capabilities with a near Fanolimited spectral resolution at energies up to 15 keV. The Caliste-64 hard X-ray camera consists of a 1mm thick CdTe crystal combined with very compact integrated readout electronics, constituting a high performance spectro-imager with event-triggered time-tagging capability in the energy range between 2 keV and 200 keV. In this combined geometry the DePFET detector works as the Low Energy Detector (LED) while the Caliste-64 - as the High Energy Detector (HED) - detects predominantly the high energetic photons that have passed the LED. In addition to the individual optimization of both detectors, we use the setup to test and optimize the performance of the combined detector system. Side-effects like X-ray fluorescence photons, electrical crosstalk, and mutual heating have negative impacts on the data quality and will be investigated. Besides the primary application as a combined imaging detector system with high sensitivity across a broad energy range, additional applications become feasible. Via the analysis of coincident events in both detectors we can estimate the capabilities of the setup to be used as a Compton camera and as an X-ray polarimeter - both desirable functionalities for use in the lab as well as for future X-ray missions.

  15. Conductance measurement circuit with wide dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Von Esch, Myron (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A conductance measurement circuit to measure conductance of a solution under test with an output voltage proportional to conductance over a 5-decade range, i.e., 0.01 uS to 1000 uS or from 0.1 uS to 10,000 uS. An increase in conductance indicates growth, or multiplication, of the bacteria in the test solution. Two circuits are used each for an alternate half-cycle time periods of an alternate squarewave in order to cause alternate and opposite currents to be applied to the test solution. The output of one of the two circuits may be scaled for a different range optimum switching frequency dependent upon the solution conductance and to enable uninterrupted measurement over the complete 5-decade range. This circuitry provides two overlapping ranges of conductance which can be read simultaneously without discontinuity thereby eliminating range switching within the basic circuitry. A VCO is used to automatically change the operating frequency according to the particular value of the conductance being measured, and comparators indicate which range is valid and also facilitate computer-controlled data acquisition. A multiplexer may be used to monitor any number of solutions under test continuously.

  16. Servomotor and Controller Having Large Dynamic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.; Howard, David E.; Smith, Dennis A.; Dutton, Ken; Paulson, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    A recently developed micro-commanding rotational-position-control system offers advantages of less mechanical complexity, less susceptibility to mechanical resonances, less power demand, less bulk, less weight, and lower cost, relative to prior rotational-position-control systems based on stepping motors and gear drives. This system includes a digital-signal- processor (DSP)-based electronic controller, plus a shaft-angle resolver and a servomotor mounted on the same shaft. Heretofore, micro-stepping has usually been associated with stepping motors, but in this system, the servomotor is micro-commanded in response to rotational-position feedback from the shaft-angle resolver. The shaft-angle resolver is of a four-speed type chosen because it affords four times the resolution of a single-speed resolver. A key innovative aspect of this system is its position-feedback signal- conditioning circuits, which condition the resolver output signal for multiple ranges of rotational speed. In the preferred version of the system, two rotational- speed ranges are included, but any number of ranges could be added to expand the speed range or increase resolution in particular ranges. In the preferred version, the resolver output is conditioned with two resolver-to-digital converters (RDCs). One RDC is used for speeds from 0.00012 to 2.5 rpm; the other RDC is used for speeds of 2.5 to 6,000 rpm. For the lower speed range, the number of discrete steps of RDC output per revolution was set at 262,144 (4 quadrants at 16 bits per quadrant). For the higher speed range, the number of discrete steps per revolution was set at 4,096 (4 quadrants at 10 bits per quadrant).

  17. Inertial Range Dynamics in Boussinesq Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    1996-01-01

    L'vov and Falkovich have shown that the dimensionally possible inertial range scaling laws for Boussinesq turbulence, Kolmogorov and Bolgiano scaling, describe steady states with constant flux of kinetic energy and of entropy respectively. These scaling laws are treated as similarity solutions of the direct interaction approximation for Boussinesq turbulence. The Kolmogorov scaling solution corresponds to a weak perturbation by gravity of a state in which the temperature is a passive scalar but in which a source of temperature fluctuations exists. Using standard inertial range balances, the renormalized viscosity and conductivity, turbulent Prandtl number, and spectral scaling law constants are computed for Bolgiano scaling.

  18. Displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of the displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors in a general format to establish their dependence on fiber sizes, optoelectronic detector specifications, input power, and other relevant parameters. The formations for the normalized reflected optical power change are derived for the evaluation of the optimal sensor response, the linearity range, and the minimum detectable displacement. The theoretical models are verified by an experiment which determines sensor response, modulation index, reflected optical power change, and linear response range through dynamic measurement. The application of this theoretical model to the study of a fiber-optic microphone for acoustic pressure detection is considered.

  19. Logarithmic circuit with wide dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, P. H.; Manus, E. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A circuit deriving an output voltage that is proportional to the logarithm of a dc input voltage susceptible to wide variations in amplitude includes a constant current source which forward biases a diode so that the diode operates in the exponential portion of its voltage versus current characteristic, above its saturation current. The constant current source includes first and second, cascaded feedback, dc operational amplifiers connected in negative feedback circuit. An input terminal of the first amplifier is responsive to the input voltage. A circuit shunting the first amplifier output terminal includes a resistor in series with the diode. The voltage across the resistor is sensed at the input of the second dc operational feedback amplifier. The current flowing through the resistor is proportional to the input voltage over the wide range of variations in amplitude of the input voltage.

  20. Ultra-wide Range Gamma Detector System for Search and Locate Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Odell, D. Mackenzie Odell; Harpring, Larry J.; Moore, Frank S. Jr.; French, Phillip J.; Gordon, John R.

    2005-10-26

    Collecting debris samples following a nuclear event requires that operations be conducted from a considerable stand-off distance. An ultra-wide range gamma detector system has been constructed to accomplish both long range radiation search and close range hot sample collection functions. Constructed and tested on a REMOTEC Andros platform, the system has demonstrated reliable operation over six orders of magnitude of gamma dose from 100's of uR/hr to over 100 R/hr. Functional elements include a remotely controlled variable collimator assembly, a NaI(Tl)/photomultiplier tube detector, a proprietary digital radiation instrument, a coaxially mounted video camera, a digital compass, and both local and remote control computers with a user interface designed for long range operations. Long range sensitivity and target location, as well as close range sample selection performance are presented.

  1. Dynamic range measurement and calibration of SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Lauscher, M.; Middendorf, L.; Niggemann, T.; Schumacher, J.; Stephan, M.; Bueno, A.; Navas, S.; Ruiz, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    Photosensors have played and will continue to play an important role in high-energy and Astroparticle cutting-edge experiments. As of today, the most common photon detection device in use is the photomultiplier tube (PMT). However, we are witnessing rapid progress in the field and new devices now show very competitive features when compared to PMTs. Among those state-of-the-art photo detectors, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are a relatively new kind of semiconductor whose potential is presently studied by many laboratories. Their characteristics make them a very attractive candidate for future Astroparticle physics experiments recording fluorescence and Cherenkov light, both in the atmosphere and on the ground. Such applications may require the measurement of the light flux on the sensor for the purpose of energy reconstruction. This is a complex task due to the limited dynamic range of SiPMs and the presence of thermal and correlated noise. In this work we study the response of three SiPM types in terms of delivered charge when exposed to light pulses in a broad range of intensities: from single photon to saturation. The influence of the pulse time duration and the SiPM over-voltage on the response are also quantified. Based on the observed behaviour, a method is presented to reconstruct the real number of photons impinging on the SiPM surface directly from the measured SiPM charge. A special emphasis is placed on the description of the methodology and experimental design used to perform the measurements.

  2. Determining the dynamic range of MCPs based on pore size and strip current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, C.; Adrian, M. L.; Herrero, F.; James, P.; Jones, H. H.; Rodriguez, M.; Roman, P.; Shappirio, M.

    2010-12-01

    Micro-Channel Plates (MCPs) are used as detectors for almost all detectors measuring particles (both ions, electrons and neutrals) below 30 keV. Recent advances in the manufacturing technology of the MCPs have increased the number of options one has when selecting plates for an instrument. But it is not clear how many of these options affect the performance of the MCPs. In particular the dynamic range is not a clear cut calculation to make from the strip current. There is also some evidence that pore size and coating play a role. We measured the dynamic range and pulse height distribution of MCPs detector chevron stacks with a wide variety of strip currents from the low “normal” range in the EDR range. We also looked at the effects of varying the pore size from 25 microns to 10 microns, partial plating of the MCP surface and coating one surface on each MCP with gold rather than the standard zinc chromium. We will show how the dynamic range and pulse height distributions vary vs. strip current, pore size, and surface plating configurations.

  3. Missing data outside the detector range: Continuous-variable entanglement verification and quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Megan R.; van Enk, S. J.

    2013-10-01

    In continuous-variable quantum information processing, detectors are necessarily coarse grained and of finite range. We discuss how, especially, the latter feature is a bug and may easily lead to overoptimistic estimates of entanglement and of security when missed data outside the detector range are ignored. We demonstrate that a straightforward worst-case analysis is sufficient to avoid false positive statements about entanglement. We show that, for our worst-case analysis, entropic separability or security criteria are much superior to variance-based criteria.

  4. On image sensor dynamic range utilized by security cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, Anders

    2012-03-01

    The dynamic range is an important quantity used to describe an image sensor. Wide/High/Extended dynamic range is often brought forward as an important feature to compare one device to another. The dynamic range of an image sensor is normally given as a single number, which is often insufficient since a single number will not fully describe the dynamic capabilities of the sensor. A camera is ideally based on a sensor that can cope with the dynamic range of the scene. Otherwise it has to sacrifice some part of the available data. For a security camera the latter may be critical since important objects might be hidden in the sacrificed part of the scene. In this paper we compare the dynamic capabilities of some image sensors utilizing a visual tool. The comparison is based on the use case, common in surveillance, where low contrast objects may appear in any part of a scene that through its uneven illumination, span a high dynamic range. The investigation is based on real sensor data that has been measured in our lab and a synthetic test scene is used to mimic the low contrast objects. With this technique it is possible to compare sensors with different intrinsic dynamic properties as well as some capture techniques used to create an effect of increased dynamic range.

  5. Local dynamic range compensation for scanning electron microscope imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Huang, Y H

    2015-01-01

    This is the extended project by introducing the modified dynamic range histogram modification (MDRHM) and is presented in this paper. This technique is used to enhance the scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging system. By comparing with the conventional histogram modification compensators, this technique utilizes histogram profiling by extending the dynamic range of each tile of an image to the limit of 0-255 range while retains its histogram shape. The proposed technique yields better image compensation compared to conventional methods. PMID:25969945

  6. Silicon field-effect transistors as radiation detectors for the Sub-THz range

    SciTech Connect

    But, D. B. Golenkov, O. G.; Sakhno, N. V.; Sizov, F. F.; Korinets, S. V.; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J. V.; Reva, V. P.; Bunchuk, S. G.

    2012-05-15

    The nonresonance response of silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (Si-MOSFETs) with a long channel (1-20 {mu}m) to radiation in the frequency range 43-135 GHz is studied. The transistors are fabricated by the standard CMOS technology with 1-{mu}m design rules. The volt-watt sensitivity and the noise equivalent power (NEP) for such detectors are estimated with the calculated effective area of the detecting element taken into account. It is shown that such transistors can operate at room temperature as broadband direct detectors of sub-THz radiation. In the 4-5 mm range of wavelengths, the volt-watt sensitivity can be as high as tens of kV/W and the NEP can amount to 10{sup -11} - 10{sup -12}W/{radical}Hz . The parameters of detectors under study can be improved by the optimization of planar antennas.

  7. Field funneling and range straggling in partially depleted silicon surface-barrier detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Malone, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of field funneling and range straggling have been quantitatively observed in the measurement of charge collected from alpha-particle tracks in silicon surface-barrier charged-particle detectors. The method described may be used for the straight-forward measurement of charge collection from heavy ions in these and other semiconductor devices.

  8. Photon counting detector for space debris laser tracking and lunar laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, Franz

    2014-08-01

    We are reporting on a design, construction and performance of solid state photon counting detector package which has been designed for laser tracking of space debris. The detector has been optimized for top photon detection efficiency and detection delay stability. The active area of the commercially available avalanche photodiode manufactured on Si (SAP500 supplied by Laser Components, Inc.) is circular with a diameter of 500 μm. The newly designed control circuit enables to operate the detection sensor at a broad range of biases 5-50 V above its breakdown voltage of 125 V. This permits to select a right trade-off between photon detection efficiency, timing resolution and dark count rate. The photon detection efficiency exceeds 70% at the wavelength of 532 nm. This is the highest photon detection efficiency ever reported for such a device. The timing properties of the detector have been investigated in detail. The timing resolution is better than 80 ps r.m.s, the detection delay is stable within units of picoseconds over several hours of operation. The detection delay stability in a sense of time deviation of 800 fs has been achieved. The temperature change of the detection delay is 0.5 ps/K. The detector has been tested as an echo signal detector in laser tracking of space debris at the satellite laser station in Graz, Austria. Its application in lunar laser ranging is under consideration by several laser stations.

  9. Signal integration enhances the dynamic range in neuronal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Mirasso, Claudio; Eguíluz, Víctor M.

    2012-04-01

    The dynamic range measures the capacity of a system to discriminate the intensity of an external stimulus. Such an ability is fundamental for living beings to survive: to leverage resources and to avoid danger. Consequently, the larger is the dynamic range, the greater is the probability of survival. We investigate how the integration of different input signals affects the dynamic range, and in general the collective behavior of a network of excitable units. By means of numerical simulations and a mean-field approach, we explore the nonequilibrium phase transition in the presence of integration. We show that the firing rate in random and scale-free networks undergoes a discontinuous phase transition depending on both the integration time and the density of integrator units. Moreover, in the presence of external stimuli, we find that a system of excitable integrator units operating in a bistable regime largely enhances its dynamic range.

  10. Simulation of the dynamic inefficiency of the CMS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartók, M.

    2015-05-01

    The Pixel Detector is the innermost part of the CMS Tracker. It therefore has to prevail in the harshest environment in terms of particle fluence and radiation. There are several mechanisms that may decrease the efficiency of the detector. These are mainly caused by data acquisition (DAQ) problems and/or Single Event Upsets (SEU). Any remaining efficiency loss is referred to as the dynamic inefficiency. It is caused by various mechanisms inside the Readout Chip (ROC) and depends strongly on the data occupancy. In the 2012 data, at high values of instantaneous luminosity the inefficiency reached 2% (in the region closest to the interaction point) which is not negligible. In the 2015 run higher instantaneous luminosity is expected, which will result in lower efficiencies; therefore this effect needs to be understood and simulated. A data-driven method has been developed to simulate dynamic inefficiency, which has been shown to successfully simulate the effects.

  11. The simulation of a readout integrated circuit with high dynamic range for long wave infrared FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yongcheng; Ding, Rui-jun; Chen, Guo-qiang; Wang, Pan; Hao, Li-chao

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the simulation results of a high performance readout integrated circuit (ROIC) designed for long wave infrared (LWIR) detectors, which has high dynamic range (HDR). A special architecture is used to the input unit cell to accommodate the wide scene dynamic range requirement, thus providing over a factor of 70dB dynamic range. A capacitive feedback transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) provides a low noise detector interface circuit capable of operating at low input currents and a folded cascade amplifier with a gain of 73dB is designed. A 6.4pF integration capacitor is used for supporting a wide scene dynamic range, which can store 80Me. Because of the restriction of the layout area, four unit cells will share an integration capacitor. A sample and hold capacitor is also part of the input unit cell architecture, which allows the infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) to be operated in full frame snapshot mode and provides the maximum integration time available. The integration time is electronically controlled by an external clock pulse. The simulation results show that the circuit works well under 5V power supply and the nonlinearity is calculated less than 0.1%. The total power dissipation is less than 150mW.

  12. Wide Dynamic Range Front-end Electronics for Beam Current and Position Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rawnsley, W. R.; Potter, R. J.; Verzilov, V. A.; Root, L.

    2006-11-20

    An Analog Devices log detector, AD8306, and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP), ADSP-21992, have been found useful for building wide dynamic range, accurate and inexpensive front-end electronics to measure and process the RF signals from TRIUMF's beam monitors. The high-precision log detector has a useful dynamic range of over 100 dB. The 160 MHz mixed-signal DSP is used to digitize the log detector output, linearize it via a lookup table, perform temperature compensation, and remove the variable duty cycle 1 kHz pulse structure of the beam. This approach has been applied to two types of devices in a 500 MeV proton beamline. The 0.1% DC to CW total current monitor is based on a capacitive pickup resonant at 46.11 MHz, the second harmonic of the bunch frequency. The DSP software provides low pass filtering, calculates the antilog of the data and passes the output to a CAMAC input register. The BPM electronics process data from inductive pickup loops. The DSP controls a GaAs switch which multiplexes signals from four adjacent pickups to a single log detector. The DSP performs difference-over-sum or log-ratio data analysis along with averaging over an arbitrary number of samples.

  13. Dynamics of range margins for metapopulations under climate change.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J; Akçakaya, H R; Araújo, M B; Fordham, D A; Martinez-Meyer, E; Thuiller, W; Brook, B W

    2009-04-22

    We link spatially explicit climate change predictions to a dynamic metapopulation model. Predictions of species' responses to climate change, incorporating metapopulation dynamics and elements of dispersal, allow us to explore the range margin dynamics for two lagomorphs of conservation concern. Although the lagomorphs have very different distribution patterns, shifts at the edge of the range were more pronounced than shifts in the overall metapopulation. For Romerolagus diazi (volcano rabbit), the lower elevation range limit shifted upslope by approximately 700 m. This reduced the area occupied by the metapopulation, as the mountain peak currently lacks suitable vegetation. For Lepus timidus (European mountain hare), we modelled the British metapopulation. Increasing the dispersive estimate caused the metapopulation to shift faster on the northern range margin (leading edge). By contrast, it caused the metapopulation to respond to climate change slower, rather than faster, on the southern range margin (trailing edge). The differential responses of the leading and trailing range margins and the relative sensitivity of range limits to climate change compared with that of the metapopulation centroid have important implications for where conservation monitoring should be targeted. Our study demonstrates the importance and possibility of moving from simple bioclimatic envelope models to second-generation models that incorporate both dynamic climate change and metapopulation dynamics. PMID:19324811

  14. Dynamics of range margins for metapopulations under climate change

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, B.J.; Akçakaya, H.R.; Araújo, M.B.; Fordham, D.A.; Martinez-Meyer, E.; Thuiller, W.; Brook, B.W.

    2009-01-01

    We link spatially explicit climate change predictions to a dynamic metapopulation model. Predictions of species' responses to climate change, incorporating metapopulation dynamics and elements of dispersal, allow us to explore the range margin dynamics for two lagomorphs of conservation concern. Although the lagomorphs have very different distribution patterns, shifts at the edge of the range were more pronounced than shifts in the overall metapopulation. For Romerolagus diazi (volcano rabbit), the lower elevation range limit shifted upslope by approximately 700 m. This reduced the area occupied by the metapopulation, as the mountain peak currently lacks suitable vegetation. For Lepus timidus (European mountain hare), we modelled the British metapopulation. Increasing the dispersive estimate caused the metapopulation to shift faster on the northern range margin (leading edge). By contrast, it caused the metapopulation to respond to climate change slower, rather than faster, on the southern range margin (trailing edge). The differential responses of the leading and trailing range margins and the relative sensitivity of range limits to climate change compared with that of the metapopulation centroid have important implications for where conservation monitoring should be targeted. Our study demonstrates the importance and possibility of moving from simple bioclimatic envelope models to second-generation models that incorporate both dynamic climate change and metapopulation dynamics. PMID:19324811

  15. DRACULA: Dynamic range control for broadcasting and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, N. H. C.

    The BBC has developed a digital processor which is capable of reducing the dynamic range of audio in an unobtrusive manner. It is ideally suited to the task of controlling the level of musical programs. Operating as a self-contained dynamic range controller, the processor is suitable for controlling levels in conventional AM or FM broadcasting, or for applications such as the compression of program material for in-flight entertainment. It can, alternatively, be used to provide a supplementary signal in DAB (digital audio broadcasting) for optional dynamic compression in the receiver.

  16. Radon monitoring using long-range alpha detector-based technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    Long-Range Alpha Detector (LRAD) technology is being studied for monitoring radon gas concentrations. LRAD-based instruments collect and measure the ionization produced in air by alpha decays. These ions can be moved to a collection grid via electrostatic ion-transport design collected approximately 95% of the radon produced ions, while instruments using an airflow transport design collected from 44% to 77% of these ions, depending on detector geometry. The current produced by collecting this ionization is linear with respect to {sup 222}Rn concentration over the available test range of 0.07 to 820 pCi/L. In the absence of statistical limitations due to low radon concentrations, the speed of response of LRAD-based instruments is determined by the air exchange rate, and therefore changes in radon concentration can be detected in just a few seconds. Recent tests show that at radon concentrations below 20 pCi/L current pulses produced by individual alpha decays can be counted, thus improving detector sensitivity and stability even further. Because these detectors are simple, rugged, and do not consume much power, they are natural candidates for portable, battery operation.

  17. A detector based on silica fibers for ion beam monitoring in a wide current range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Braccini, S.; Carzaniga, T. S.; Ereditato, A.; Nesteruk, K. P.; Scampoli, P.

    2016-03-01

    A detector based on doped silica and optical fibers was developed to monitor the profile of particle accelerator beams of intensity ranging from 1 pA to tens of μA. Scintillation light produced in a fiber moving across the beam is measured, giving information on its position, shape and intensity. The detector was tested with a continuous proton beam at the 18 MeV Bern medical cyclotron used for radioisotope production and multi-disciplinary research. For currents from 1 pA to 20 μA, Ce3+ and Sb3+ doped silica fibers were used as sensors. Read-out systems based on photodiodes, photomultipliers and solid state photomultipliers were employed. Profiles down to the pA range were measured with this method for the first time. For currents ranging from 1 pA to 3 μA, the integral of the profile was found to be linear with respect to the beam current, which can be measured by this detector with an accuracy of ~1%. The profile was determined with a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm. For currents ranging from 5 μA to 20 μA, thermal effects affect light yield and transmission, causing distortions of the profile and limitations in monitoring capabilities. For currents higher than ~1 μA, non-doped optical fibers for both producing and transporting scintillation light were also successfully employed.

  18. Benchmarking novel approaches for modelling species range dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zurell, Damaris; Thuiller, Wilfried; Pagel, Jörn; Cabral, Juliano S; Münkemüller, Tamara; Gravel, Dominique; Dullinger, Stefan; Normand, Signe; Schiffers, Katja H.; Moore, Kara A.; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing biodiversity loss due to climate change is one of the most vital challenges of the 21st century. To anticipate and mitigate biodiversity loss, models are needed that reliably project species’ range dynamics and extinction risks. Recently, several new approaches to model range dynamics have been developed to supplement correlative species distribution models (SDMs), but applications clearly lag behind model development. Indeed, no comparative analysis has been performed to evaluate their performance. Here, we build on process-based, simulated data for benchmarking five range (dynamic) models of varying complexity including classical SDMs, SDMs coupled with simple dispersal or more complex population dynamic models (SDM hybrids), and a hierarchical Bayesian process-based dynamic range model (DRM). We specifically test the effects of demographic and community processes on model predictive performance. Under current climate, DRMs performed best, although only marginally. Under climate change, predictive performance varied considerably, with no clear winners. Yet, all range dynamic models improved predictions under climate change substantially compared to purely correlative SDMs, and the population dynamic models also predicted reasonable extinction risks for most scenarios. When benchmarking data were simulated with more complex demographic and community processes, simple SDM hybrids including only dispersal often proved most reliable. Finally, we found that structural decisions during model building can have great impact on model accuracy, but prior system knowledge on important processes can reduce these uncertainties considerably. Our results reassure the clear merit in using dynamic approaches for modelling species’ response to climate change but also emphasise several needs for further model and data improvement. We propose and discuss perspectives for improving range projections through combination of multiple models and for making these approaches

  19. Benchmarking novel approaches for modelling species range dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zurell, Damaris; Thuiller, Wilfried; Pagel, Jörn; Cabral, Juliano S; Münkemüller, Tamara; Gravel, Dominique; Dullinger, Stefan; Normand, Signe; Schiffers, Katja H; Moore, Kara A; Zimmermann, Niklaus E

    2016-08-01

    Increasing biodiversity loss due to climate change is one of the most vital challenges of the 21st century. To anticipate and mitigate biodiversity loss, models are needed that reliably project species' range dynamics and extinction risks. Recently, several new approaches to model range dynamics have been developed to supplement correlative species distribution models (SDMs), but applications clearly lag behind model development. Indeed, no comparative analysis has been performed to evaluate their performance. Here, we build on process-based, simulated data for benchmarking five range (dynamic) models of varying complexity including classical SDMs, SDMs coupled with simple dispersal or more complex population dynamic models (SDM hybrids), and a hierarchical Bayesian process-based dynamic range model (DRM). We specifically test the effects of demographic and community processes on model predictive performance. Under current climate, DRMs performed best, although only marginally. Under climate change, predictive performance varied considerably, with no clear winners. Yet, all range dynamic models improved predictions under climate change substantially compared to purely correlative SDMs, and the population dynamic models also predicted reasonable extinction risks for most scenarios. When benchmarking data were simulated with more complex demographic and community processes, simple SDM hybrids including only dispersal often proved most reliable. Finally, we found that structural decisions during model building can have great impact on model accuracy, but prior system knowledge on important processes can reduce these uncertainties considerably. Our results reassure the clear merit in using dynamic approaches for modelling species' response to climate change but also emphasize several needs for further model and data improvement. We propose and discuss perspectives for improving range projections through combination of multiple models and for making these approaches

  20. Quench dynamics in long-range interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Zhexuan

    2016-05-01

    A distinctive feature of atomic, molecular, and optical systems is that interactions between particles are often long-ranged. Control techniques from quantum optics often allow one to tune the pattern of these long-range interactions, creating an entirely new degree of freedom, absent in typical condensed matter systems. These tunable long-range interactions can result in very different far-from-equilibrium dynamics compared to systems with only short-range interactions. In the first half of the talk, I will describe how very general types of long-range interactions can qualitatively change the entanglement and correlation growth shortly after a quantum quench. In the second half of the talk I will show that, at longer times, long-range interactions can lead to exotic quasi-stationary states and dynamical phase transitions. These theoretical ideas have been explored in recent trapped-ion experiments, and connections to these experiments will be emphasized in both parts of the talk.

  1. Real time pre-detection dynamic range compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A real time, pre-detection optical dynamic range compression system uses a photorefractive crystal, such as BaTiO3 or LiNbO3, in which light induced scattering from crystal inhomogeneities of the optical input occurs as a nonlinear function of the input intensity. The greater the intensity, the faster random interference gratings are created to scatter the incident light. The unscattered portion of the optical signal is therefore reduced in dynamic range over time. The amount or range of dynamic range compression may be controlled by adjusting the time of application of the unscattered crystal output to the photodetector with regard to the time of application of the optical input to the crystal.

  2. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Evans, P. M.; Green, S.; Manolopoulos, S.; Nieto-Camero, J.; Parker, D. J.; Poludniowski, G.; Price, T.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N. M.

    2015-06-01

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  3. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging. PMID:27032979

  4. Photonic microwave bandpass filter with improved dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu; Yao, Jianping

    2008-08-01

    A technique to improve the dynamic range of a photonic microwave bandpass filter is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The filter is implemented based on phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion using fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) serving as frequency discriminators, with the optical carriers located at the left or right slopes of the FBGs, to generate positive or negative tap coefficients. The dynamic range of the photonic microwave bandpass filter is increased by reducing the optical-carrier-induced shot noise and relative intensity noise at the photodetector, which is realized by placing the optical carriers at the lower slopes of the FBG reflection spectra. A photonic microwave bandpass filter with an improvement in dynamic range of about 10 dB is demonstrated. PMID:18670527

  5. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  6. Real-Time Local Range On-Demand and Dynamic Regional Range Images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.V.

    2000-02-22

    This paper presents a new approach to a gesture tracking system using real-time range on-demand. The system represents a gesture-controlled interface for interactive visual exploration of large data sets. The paper describes a method performing range processing only when necessary and where necessary. Range data is processed only for non-static regions of interest. This is accomplished by a set of filters on the color, motion, and range data. The speedup achieved is between 41% and 54%. The algorithm also includes a robust skin color segmentation insensitive to illumination changes. Selective range processing results in dynamic regional range images (DRRIs). This development is also placed in a broader context of a biological visual system emulation, specifically redundancies and attention mechanisms.

  7. Real-Time Local Range On-Demand for Tracking Gestures and Dynamic Regional Range Images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.V.

    2000-05-30

    This paper presents a new approach to a gesture-tracking system using real-time range on-demand. The system represents a gesture-controlled interface for interactive visual exploration of large data sets. The paper describes a method performing range processing only when necessary and where necessary. Range data is processed only for non-static regions of interest. This is accomplished by a set of filters on the color, motion, and range data. The speedup achieved is between 41% and 54%. The algorithm also includes a robust skin-color segmentation insensitive to illumination changes. Selective range processing results in dynamic regional range images (DRRIs). This development is also placed in a broader context of a biological visual system emulation, specifically redundancies and attention mechanisms.

  8. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, Roger M.; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint.

  9. Real-time extended dynamic range imaging in shearography.

    PubMed

    Groves, Roger M; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Osten, Wolfgang

    2008-10-20

    Extended dynamic range (EDR) imaging is a postprocessing technique commonly associated with photography. Multiple images of a scene are recorded by the camera using different shutter settings and are merged into a single higher dynamic range image. Speckle interferometry and holography techniques require a well-modulated intensity signal to extract the phase information, and of these techniques shearography is most sensitive to different object surface reflectivities as it uses self-referencing from a sheared image. In this paper the authors demonstrate real-time EDR imaging in shearography and present experimental results from a difficult surface reflectivity sample: a wooden panel painting containing gold and dark earth color paint. PMID:18936802

  10. A full range detector for the HIRRBS high resolution RBS magnetic spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Skala, Wayne G.; Haberl, Arthur W.; Bakhru, Hassaram; Lanford, William

    2013-04-19

    The UAlbany HIRRBS (High Resolution RBS) system has been updated for better use in rapid analysis. The focal plane detector now covers the full range from U down to O using a linear stepper motor to translate the 1-cm detector across the 30-cm range. Input is implemented with zero-back-angle operation in all cases. The chamber has been modified to allow for quick swapping of sample holders, including a channeling goniometer. A fixed standard surface-barrier detector allows for normal RBS simultaneously with use of the magnetic spectrometer. The user can select a region on the standard spectrum or can select an element edge or an energy point for collection of the expanded spectrum portion. The best resolution currently obtained is about 2-to-3 keV, probably representing the energy width of the incoming beam. Calibration is maintained automatically for any spectrum portion and any beam energy from 1.0 to 3.5 MeV. Element resolving power, sensitivity and depth resolution are shown using several examples. Examples also show the value of simultaneous conventional RBS.

  11. A full range detector for the HIRRBS high resolution RBS magnetic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Wayne G.; Haberl, Arthur W.; Bakhru, Hassaram; Lanford, William

    2013-04-01

    The UAlbany HIRRBS (High Resolution RBS) system has been updated for better use in rapid analysis. The focal plane detector now covers the full range from U down to O using a linear stepper motor to translate the 1-cm detector across the 30-cm range. Input is implemented with zero-back-angle operation in all cases. The chamber has been modified to allow for quick swapping of sample holders, including a channeling goniometer. A fixed standard surface-barrier detector allows for normal RBS simultaneously with use of the magnetic spectrometer. The user can select a region on the standard spectrum or can select an element edge or an energy point for collection of the expanded spectrum portion. The best resolution currently obtained is about 2-to-3 keV, probably representing the energy width of the incoming beam. Calibration is maintained automatically for any spectrum portion and any beam energy from 1.0 to 3.5 MeV. Element resolving power, sensitivity and depth resolution are shown using several examples. Examples also show the value of simultaneous conventional RBS.

  12. A single-photon detector in the far-infrared range

    PubMed

    Komiyama; Astafiev; Antonov; Kutsuwa; Hirai

    2000-01-27

    The far-infrared region (wavelengths in the range 10 microm-1 mm) is one of the richest areas of spectroscopic research, encompassing the rotational spectra of molecules and vibrational spectra of solids, liquids and gases. But studies in this spectral region are hampered by the absence of sensitive detectors--despite recent efforts to improve superconducting bolometers, attainable sensitivities are currently far below the level of single-photon detection. This is in marked contrast to the visible and near-infrared regions (wavelengths shorter than about 1.5 microm), in which single-photon counting is possible using photomultiplier tubes. Here we report the detection of single far-infrared photons in the wavelength range 175-210 microm (6.0-7.1 meV), using a single-electron transistor consisting of a semiconductor quantum dot in high magnetic field. We detect, with a time resolution of a millisecond, an incident flux of 0.1 photons per second on an effective detector area of 0.1 mm2--a sensitivity that exceeds previously reported values by a factor of more than 10(4). The sensitivity is a consequence of the unconventional detection mechanism, in which one absorbed photon leads to a current of 10(6)-10(12) electrons through the quantum dot. By contrast, mechanisms of conventional detectors or photon assisted tunnelling in single-electron transistors produce only a few electrons per incident photon. PMID:10667787

  13. A low-noise large dynamic-range readout suitable for laser spectroscopy with photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullia, A.; Sanvito, T.; Potenza, M. A.; Zocca, F.

    2012-10-01

    An original low-noise large dynamic-range readout system for optical light spectroscopy with PIN diodes is presented. The front-end circuit is equipped with a smart device for automatic cancellation of the large dc offset brought about by the photodiode current. This device sinks away the exact amount of dc current from the preamplifier input, yielding auto zeroing of the output-voltage offset, while introducing the minimum electronic noise possible. As a result the measurement dynamic-range is maximized. Moreover, an auxiliary inspection point is provided which precisely tracks the dc component of the photodiode current. This output allows for precise beam alignment and may also be used for diagnostic purposes. The excellent gain stability and linearity make the circuit perfectly suited for optical-light pulse spectroscopy. Applications include particle sizing in the 100 nm range, two-dimensional characterization of semiconductor detectors, ultra-precise characterization of laser beam stability, confocal microscopy.

  14. True coincidence summing corrections for an extended energy range HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Venegas-Argumedo, Y.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-23

    True coincidence summing (TCS) effect for natural radioactive families of U-238 and Th-232 represents a problem when an environmental sample with a close source-detector geometry measurement is performed. By using a certified multi-nuclide standard source to calibrate an energy extended range (XtRa) HPGe detector, it is possible to obtain an intensity spectrum slightly affected by the TCS effect with energies from 46 to 1836 keV. In this work, the equations and some other considerations required to calculate the TCS correction factor for isotopes of natural radioactive chains are described. It is projected a validation of the calibration, performed with the IAEA-CU-2006-03 samples (soil and water)

  15. Uncalibrated stereo rectification and disparity range stabilization: a comparison of different feature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Jayarathne, Uditha L.; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Pautler, Stephen E.; Schlacta, Christopher M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper studies uncalibrated stereo rectification and stable disparity range determination for surgical scene three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction. Stereoscopic endoscope calibration sometimes is not available and also increases the complexity of the operating-room environment. Stereo from uncalibrated endoscopic cameras is an alternative to reconstruct the surgical field visualized by binocular endoscopes within the body. Uncalibrated rectification is usually performed on the basis of a number of matched feature points (semi-dense correspondence) between the left and the right images of stereo pairs. After uncalibrated rectification, the corresponding feature points can be used to determine the proper disparity range that helps to improve the reconstruction accuracy and reduce the computational time of disparity map estimation. Therefore, the corresponding or matching accuracy and robustness of feature point descriptors is important to surgical field 3-D reconstruction. This work compares four feature detectors: (1) scale invariant feature transform (SIFT), (2) speeded up robust features (SURF), (3) affine scale invariant feature transform (ASIFT), and (4) gauge speeded up robust features (GSURF) with applications to uncalibrated rectification and stable disparity range determination. We performed our experiments on surgical endoscopic video images that were collected during robotic prostatectomy. The experimental results demonstrate that ASIFT outperforms other feature detectors in the uncalibrated stereo rectification and also provides a stable stable disparity range for surgical scene reconstruction.

  16. Evaluation of color encodings for high dynamic range pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boitard, Ronan; Mantiuk, Rafal K.; Pouli, Tania

    2015-03-01

    Traditional Low Dynamic Range (LDR) color spaces encode a small fraction of the visible color gamut, which does not encompass the range of colors produced on upcoming High Dynamic Range (HDR) displays. Future imaging systems will require encoding much wider color gamut and luminance range. Such wide color gamut can be represented using floating point HDR pixel values but those are inefficient to encode. They also lack perceptual uniformity of the luminance and color distribution, which is provided (in approximation) by most LDR color spaces. Therefore, there is a need to devise an efficient, perceptually uniform and integer valued representation for high dynamic range pixel values. In this paper we evaluate several methods for encoding colour HDR pixel values, in particular for use in image and video compression. Unlike other studies we test both luminance and color difference encoding in a rigorous 4AFC threshold experiments to determine the minimum bit-depth required. Results show that the Perceptual Quantizer (PQ) encoding provides the best perceptual uniformity in the considered luminance range, however the gain in bit-depth is rather modest. More significant difference can be observed between color difference encoding schemes, from which YDuDv encoding seems to be the most efficient.

  17. Monolithic single-photon detectors and time-to-digital converters for picoseconds time-of-flight ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Bojan; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel "smart-pixel" able to measure and record in-pixel the time delay (photon timing) between a START (e.g. given by laser excitation, cell stimulus, or LIDAR flash) and a STOP (e.g. arrival of the first returning photon from the fluorescence decay signal or back reflection from an object). Such smart-pixel relies of a SPAD detector and a Timeto- Digital Converter monolithically designed and manufactured in the same chip. Many pixels can be laid out in a rows by columns architecture, to give birth to expandable 2D imaging arrays for picoseconds-level single-photon timing applications. Distance measurements, by means of direct TOF detection (used in LIDAR systems) provided by each pixel, can open the way to the fabrication of single-chip 3D ranging arrays for scene reconstruction and intelligent object recognition. We report on the design and characterization of prototype circuits, fabricated in a 0.35 μm standard CMOS technology containing complete conversion channels, "smart-pixel" and ancillary electronics with 20 μm active area diameter SPAD detector and related quenching circuitry. With a 100 MHz reference clock, the TDC provides timeresolution of 10 ps, dynamic range of 160 ns and very high conversion linearity.

  18. Dynamic Range Size Analysis of Territorial Animals: An Optimality Approach.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yun; Börger, Luca; Hastings, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Home range sizes of territorial animals are often observed to vary periodically in response to seasonal changes in foraging opportunities. Here we develop the first mechanistic model focused on the temporal dynamics of home range expansion and contraction in territorial animals. We demonstrate how simple movement principles can lead to a rich suite of range size dynamics, by balancing foraging activity with defensive requirements and incorporating optimal behavioral rules into mechanistic home range analysis. Our heuristic model predicts three general temporal patterns that have been observed in empirical studies across multiple taxa. First, a positive correlation between age and territory quality promotes shrinking home ranges over an individual's lifetime, with maximal range size variability shortly before the adult stage. Second, poor sensory information, low population density, and large resource heterogeneity may all independently facilitate range size instability. Finally, aggregation behavior toward forage-rich areas helps produce divergent home range responses between individuals from different age classes. This model has broad applications for addressing important unknowns in animal space use, with potential applications also in conservation and health management strategies. PMID:27622879

  19. High resolution, large dynamic range field map estimation

    PubMed Central

    Dagher, Joseph; Reese, Timothy; Bilgin, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We present a theory and a corresponding method to compute high resolution field maps over a large dynamic range. Theory and Methods We derive a closed-form expression for the error in the field map value when computed from two echoes. We formulate an optimization problem to choose three echo times which result in a pair of maximally distinct error distributions. We use standard field mapping sequences at the prescribed echo times. We then design a corresponding estimation algorithm which takes advantage of the optimized echo times to disambiguate the field offset value. Results We validate our method using high resolution images of a phantom at 7T. The resulting field maps demonstrate robust mapping over both a large dynamic range, and in low SNR regions. We also present high resolution offset maps in vivo using both, GRE and MEGE sequences. Even though the proposed echo time spacings are larger than the well known phase aliasing cutoff, the resulting field maps exhibit a large dynamic range without the use of phase unwrapping or spatial regularization techniques. Conclusion We demonstrate a novel 3-echo field map estimation method which overcomes the traditional noise-dynamic range trade-off. PMID:23401245

  20. High dynamic range image display with halo and clipping prevention.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Gabriele; Marsi, Stefano; Ramponi, Giovanni

    2011-05-01

    The dynamic range of an image is defined as the ratio between the highest and the lowest luminance level. In a high dynamic range (HDR) image, this value exceeds the capabilities of conventional display devices; as a consequence, dedicated visualization techniques are required. In particular, it is possible to process an HDR image in order to reduce its dynamic range without producing a significant change in the visual sensation experienced by the observer. In this paper, we propose a dynamic range reduction algorithm that produces high-quality results with a low computational cost and a limited number of parameters. The algorithm belongs to the category of methods based upon the Retinex theory of vision and was specifically designed in order to prevent the formation of common artifacts, such as halos around the sharp edges and clipping of the highlights, that often affect methods of this kind. After a detailed analysis of the state of the art, we shall describe the method and compare the results and performance with those of two techniques recently proposed in the literature and one commercial software. PMID:21078576

  1. Log amplifier instrument measures physiological biopotentials over wide dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kado, R. T.

    1970-01-01

    To record biopotentials with extreme dynamic ranges, biopotential inputs are capacitatively coupled to a miniature, low power, solid-state signal conditioner consisting of a two-stage differential preamplifier that has a low noise figure. The ouput of the preamplifier uses diodes to provide an overall gain which is nearly logarithmic.

  2. Motion adaptive signal integration-high dynamic range (MASI-HDR) video processing for dynamic platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentino, Michael R.; Berends, David C.; Zhang, David C.; Gudis, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Two of the biggest challenges in designing U×V vision systems are properly representing high dynamic range scene content using low dynamic range components and reducing camera motion blur. SRI's MASI-HDR (Motion Adaptive Signal Integration-High Dynamic Range) is a novel technique for generating blur-reduced video using multiple captures for each displayed frame while increasing the effective camera dynamic range by four bits or more. MASI-HDR processing thus provides high performance video from rapidly moving platforms in real-world conditions in low latency real time, enabling even the most demanding applications on air, ground and water.

  3. Switched-capacitor neuromorphs with wide-range variable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Elias, J G; Northmore, D M

    1995-01-01

    The use of switched capacitors as wide-range, programmable resistive elements in spatially extensive artificial dendritic trees (ADT's) is described. We show that silicon neuro-morphs with ADT's can produce impulse responses that last millions of times longer than the initiating impulse and that dynamical responses are tunable in both shape and duration over a wide range. The switched-capacitor resistors forming a dendritic tree are shown indirectly to have a useful programmable resistance range between 500 KOmega and 1000 GOmega. Experimental results are presented that show variable impulse response functions, tunable frequency selectivity, and rate-invariance of spatiotemporal pattern responses. PMID:18263448

  4. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector at 532 nm and demonstration in satellite laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Chen, Sijing; You, Lixing; Meng, Wengdong; Wu, Zhibo; Zhang, Zhongping; Tang, Kai; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Weijun; Yang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-02-22

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) at a wavelength of 532 nm were designed and fabricated aiming to satellite laser ranging (SLR) applications. The NbN SNSPDs were fabricated on one-dimensional photonic crystals with a sensitive-area diameter of 42 μm. The devices were coupled with multimode fiber (ϕ = 50 μm) and exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency of 75% at an extremely low dark count rate of <0.1 Hz. An SLR experiment using an SNSPD at a wavelength of 532 nm was successfully demonstrated. The results showed a depth ranging with a precision of ~8.0 mm for the target satellite LARES, which is ~3,000 km away from the ground ranging station at the Sheshan Observatory. PMID:26907010

  5. Cryocooled terahertz photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance in 1.5–4 THz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Makoto; Hiromoto, Norihisa

    2015-10-15

    We describe a 4-K-cryocooled dual-band terahertz (THz) photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance. The detector system comprises two THz photoconductive detectors covering a response in a wide frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz, low noise amplifiers, optical low-pass filters to eliminate input radiation of higher frequencies, and a mechanical 4 K Gifford-McMahon refrigerator that provides practical and convenient operation without a liquid He container. The electrical and optical performances of the THz detector system were evaluated at a detector temperature of 4 K under 300 K background radiation. We proved that the detector system can achieve background-limited noise-equivalent-power on the order of 10{sup −14} W/Hz{sup 1/2} in the frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz even if the vibration noise of the mechanical refrigerator is present.

  6. Cryocooled terahertz photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance in 1.5-4 THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Makoto; Hiromoto, Norihisa

    2015-10-01

    We describe a 4-K-cryocooled dual-band terahertz (THz) photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance. The detector system comprises two THz photoconductive detectors covering a response in a wide frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz, low noise amplifiers, optical low-pass filters to eliminate input radiation of higher frequencies, and a mechanical 4 K Gifford-McMahon refrigerator that provides practical and convenient operation without a liquid He container. The electrical and optical performances of the THz detector system were evaluated at a detector temperature of 4 K under 300 K background radiation. We proved that the detector system can achieve background-limited noise-equivalent-power on the order of 10-14 W/Hz1/2 in the frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz even if the vibration noise of the mechanical refrigerator is present.

  7. Cryocooled terahertz photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance in 1.5-4 THz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Makoto; Hiromoto, Norihisa

    2015-10-01

    We describe a 4-K-cryocooled dual-band terahertz (THz) photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance. The detector system comprises two THz photoconductive detectors covering a response in a wide frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz, low noise amplifiers, optical low-pass filters to eliminate input radiation of higher frequencies, and a mechanical 4 K Gifford-McMahon refrigerator that provides practical and convenient operation without a liquid He container. The electrical and optical performances of the THz detector system were evaluated at a detector temperature of 4 K under 300 K background radiation. We proved that the detector system can achieve background-limited noise-equivalent-power on the order of 10(-14) W/Hz(1/2) in the frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz even if the vibration noise of the mechanical refrigerator is present. PMID:26520978

  8. Missing data outside the detector range. II. Application to time-frequency entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Megan R.; van Enk, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    In a previous paper, we pointed out the problem of missing data outside the detector range for continuous-variable entanglement verification and quantum key distribution, and we provided a straightforward solution based on entropic separability criteria (as those work better than variance-based criteria). We apply that solution here to the verification of time-frequency entanglement of photon pairs, particularly to the quantum key distribution scheme proposed by Nunn [Opt. ExpressOPEXFF1094-408710.1364/OE.21.015959 21, 15959 (2013)]. We find that the scheme does lead to verifiable entanglement, but that transmission noise quickly destroys the ability to verify the entanglement.

  9. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    PubMed

    Kirchberger, Martin; Russo, Frank A

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings. PMID:26868955

  10. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings. PMID:26868955

  11. Slow and long-ranged dynamical heterogeneities in dissipative fluids.

    PubMed

    Avila, Karina E; Castillo, Horacio E; Vollmayr-Lee, Katharina; Zippelius, Annette

    2016-06-28

    A two-dimensional bidisperse granular fluid is shown to exhibit pronounced long-ranged dynamical heterogeneities as dynamical arrest is approached. Here we focus on the most direct approach to study these heterogeneities: we identify clusters of slow particles and determine their size, Nc, and their radius of gyration, RG. We show that , providing direct evidence that the most immobile particles arrange in fractal objects with a fractal dimension, df, that is observed to increase with packing fraction ϕ. The cluster size distribution obeys scaling, approaching an algebraic decay in the limit of structural arrest, i.e., ϕ→ϕc. Alternatively, dynamical heterogeneities are analyzed via the four-point structure factor S4(q,t) and the dynamical susceptibility χ4(t). S4(q,t) is shown to obey scaling in the full range of packing fractions, 0.6 ≤ϕ≤ 0.805, and to become increasingly long-ranged as ϕ→ϕc. Finite size scaling of χ4(t) provides a consistency check for the previously analyzed divergences of χ4(t) ∝ (ϕ-ϕc)(-γχ) and the correlation length ξ∝ (ϕ-ϕc)(-γξ). We check the robustness of our results with respect to our definition of mobility. The divergences and the scaling for ϕ→ϕc suggest a non-equilibrium glass transition which seems qualitatively independent of the coefficient of restitution. PMID:27230572

  12. Range image segmentation using Zernike moment-based generalized edge detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosal, S.; Mehrotra, R.

    1992-01-01

    The authors proposed a novel Zernike moment-based generalized step edge detection method which can be used for segmenting range and intensity images. A generalized step edge detector is developed to identify different kinds of edges in range images. These edge maps are thinned and linked to provide final segmentation. A generalized edge is modeled in terms of five parameters: orientation, two slopes, one step jump at the location of the edge, and the background gray level. Two complex and two real Zernike moment-based masks are required to determine all these parameters of the edge model. Theoretical noise analysis is performed to show that these operators are quite noise tolerant. Experimental results are included to demonstrate edge-based segmentation technique.

  13. A direct comparison of Ge and Si(Li) detectors in the 2--20 keV range

    SciTech Connect

    Rossington, C.S.; Giauque, R.D.; Jaklevic, J.M.

    1991-10-01

    The spectral response of high purity Ge (HPGe) and lithium-drifted Si (Si(Li)) surface barrier detectors of similar geometry has been measured over a range of x-ray energies under identical experimental conditions. Detector characteristics such as spectral background, escape peak intensity, entrance window absorption, and energy resolution are presented and compared. Although these characteristic have been discussed in the literature previously, this paper represents an attempt to consolidate the information by making comparisons under equivalent experimental conditions for the two types of detectors. A primary goal of the study is a comparison of the two types of detectors for use in x-ray fluorescence applications.

  14. Dynamic Kerr effect responses in the terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häberle, Uli; Diezemann, Gregor

    2005-05-01

    Dynamic Kerr effect measurements provide a simple realization of a nonlinear experiment. We propose a field-off experiment where an electric field of one or several sinusoidal cycles with frequency Ω is applied to a sample in thermal equilibrium. Afterwards, the evolution of the polarizability is measured. If such an experiment is performed in the terahertz range it might provide valuable information about the low-frequency dynamics in disordered systems. We treat these dynamics in terms of a Brownian oscillator model and calculate the Kerr effect response. It is shown that frequency-selective behavior can be expected. In the interesting case of underdamped vibrational motion we find that the frequency dependence of the phonon damping can be determined from the experiment. Also the behavior of overdamped relaxational modes is discussed. For typical glassy materials we estimate the magnitude of all relevant quantities, which we believe will be helpful in experimental realizations.

  15. Protein lethality investigated in terms of long range dynamical interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Francisco A; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2009-04-01

    The relationship between network structure/dynamics and biological function constitutes a fundamental issue in systems biology. However, despite many related investigations, the correspondence between structure and biological functions is not yet fully understood. A related subject that has deserved particular attention recently concerns how essentiality is related to the structure and dynamics of protein interactions. In the current work, protein essentiality is investigated in terms of long range influences in protein-protein interaction networks by considering simulated dynamical aspects. This analysis is performed with respect to outward activations, an approach which models the propagation of interactions between proteins by considering self-avoiding random walks. The obtained results are compared to protein local connectivity. Both the connectivity and the outward activations were found to be strongly related to protein essentiality. PMID:19396375

  16. Expanding the dynamic range of short wave infrared (SWIR) imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Marc; Stern, Mark C.

    2010-04-01

    Advances have been made in short wave infrared (SWIR) imaging technology to address the most demanding imaging and surveillance applications. Multiple techniques have been developed and deployed in Goodrich's SWIR indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) cameras to optimize the dynamic range performance of standard, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products. New developments have been implemented on multiple levels to give these cameras the unique ability to automatically compensate for changes in light levels over more than 5 orders of magnitude, while improving intra-scenic dynamic range. Features recently developed and implemented include a new Automatic Gain Control (AGC) algorithm, image flash suppression, and a proprietary image-enhancement algorithm with a simplified but powerful user command structure.

  17. Enstrophy inertial range dynamics in generalized two-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwayama, Takahiro; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    We show that the transition to a k-1 spectrum in the enstrophy inertial range of generalized two-dimensional turbulence can be derived analytically using the eddy damped quasinormal Markovianized (EDQNM) closure. The governing equation for the generalized two-dimensional fluid system includes a nonlinear term with a real parameter α . This parameter controls the relationship between the stream function and generalized vorticity and the nonlocality of the dynamics. An asymptotic analysis accounting for the overwhelming dominance of nonlocal triads allows the k-1 spectrum to be derived based upon a scaling analysis. We thereby provide a detailed analytical explanation for the scaling transition that occurs in the enstrophy inertial range at α =2 in terms of the spectral dynamics of the EDQNM closure, which extends and enhances the usual phenomenological explanations.

  18. Linear dynamic range enhancement in a CMOS imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A CMOS imager with increased linear dynamic range but without degradation in noise, responsivity, linearity, fixed-pattern noise, or photometric calibration comprises a linear calibrated dual gain pixel in which the gain is reduced after a pre-defined threshold level by switching in an additional capacitance. The pixel may include a novel on-pixel latch circuit that is used to switch in the additional capacitance.

  19. High Dynamic Range Characterization of the Trauma Patient Plasma Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Kaushal, Amit; Monroe, Matthew E.; Varnum, Susan M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Maier, Ronald V.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-06-08

    While human plasma represents an attractive sample for disease biomarker discovery, the extreme complexity and large dynamic range in protein concentrations present significant challenges for characterization, candidate biomarker discovery, and validation. Herein, we describe a strategy that combines immunoaffinity subtraction and chemical fractionation based on cysteinyl peptide and N-glycopeptide captures with 2D-LC-MS/MS to increase the dynamic range of analysis for plasma. Application of this ''divide-and-conquer'' strategy to trauma patient plasma significantly improved the overall dynamic range of detection and resulted in confident identification of 22,267 unique peptides from four different peptide populations (cysteinyl peptides, non-cysteinyl peptides, N-glycopeptides, and non-glycopeptides) that covered 3654 nonredundant proteins. Numerous low-abundance proteins were identified, exemplified by 78 ''classic'' cytokines and cytokine receptors and by 136 human cell differentiation molecules. Additionally, a total of 2910 different N-glycopeptides that correspond to 662 N-glycoproteins and 1553 N-glycosylation sites were identified. A panel of the proteins identified in this study is known to be involved in inflammation and immune responses. This study established an extensive reference protein database for trauma patients, which provides a foundation for future high-throughput quantitative plasma proteomic studies designed to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie systemic inflammatory responses.

  20. Joint focus stacking and high dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qinchun; Gunturk, Bahadir K.; Batur, Aziz U.

    2013-01-01

    Focus stacking and high dynamic range (HDR) imaging are two paradigms of computational photography. Focus stacking aims to produce an image with greater depth of field (DOF) from a set of images taken with different focus distances, whereas HDR imaging aims to produce an image with higher dynamic range from a set of images taken with different exposure settings. In this paper, we present an algorithm which combines focus stacking and HDR imaging in order to produce an image with both higher dynamic range and greater DOF than any of the input images. The proposed algorithm includes two main parts: (i) joint photometric and geometric registration and (ii) joint focus stacking and HDR image creation. In the first part, images are first photometrically registered using an algorithm that is insensitive to small geometric variations, and then geometrically registered using an optical flow algorithm. In the second part, images are merged through weighted averaging, where the weights depend on both local sharpness and exposure information. We provide experimental results with real data to illustrate the algorithm. The algorithm is also implemented on a smartphone with Android operating system.

  1. Development of automatic target recognition for infrared sensor-based close-range land mine detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngan, Peter; Garcia, Sigberto A.; Cloud, Eugene L.; Duvoisin, Herbert A., III; Long, Daniel T.; Hackett, Jay K.

    1995-06-01

    Infrared imagery scenes change continuously with environmental conditions. Strategic targets embedded in them are often difficult to be identified with the naked eye. An IR sensor-based mine detector must include Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) to detect and extract land mines from IR scenes. In the course of the ATR development process, mine signature data were collected using a commercial 8-12 (mu) spectral range FLIR, model Inframetrics 445L, and a commercial 3-5 (mu) starting focal planar array FLIR, model Infracam. These sensors were customized to the required field-of-view for short range operation. These baseline data were then input into a specialized parallel processor on which the mine detection algorithm is developed and trained. The ATR is feature-based and consists of several subprocesses to progress from raw input IR imagery to a neural network classifier for final nomination of the targets. Initially, image enhancement is used to remove noise and sensor artifact. Three preprocessing techniques, namely model-based segmentation, multi-element prescreener, and geon detector are then applied to extract specific features of the targets and to reject all objects that do not resemble mines. Finally, to further reduce the false alarm rate, the extracted features are presented to the neural network classifier. Depending on the operational circumstances, one of three neural network techniques will be adopted; back propagation, supervised real-time learning, or unsupervised real-time learning. The Close Range IR Mine Detection System is an Army program currently being experimentally developed to be demonstrated in the Army's Advanced Technology Demonstration in FY95. The ATR resulting from this program will be integrated in the 21st Century Land Warrior program in which the mine avoidance capability is its primary interest.

  2. Highly mobile laser ranging facilities of the Crustal Dynamics Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Technical specifications, performance, and applications of the NASA transportable laser ranging systems (TLRS-1 and -2) for use in the Crustal Dynamics Program are described. TLRS-1 is truck-mounted, with the laser deployed through the roof. Interacting with the LAGEOS satellite, TLRS has a photoelectric receiver for gathering data on the roundtrip time of the laser beam for calculations of the range gate. The laser has a 0.1 nsec pulse at 3.5 mJ/pulse. Range is measured to within an error of 9 cm. The TLRS-2 version is configured for ease of air transport and modular breakdown and assembly. It has been activated on Easter Island. TLRS-3 and -4 are in development to serve as mobile units in South America and the Mediterranean area.

  3. Electro-optical detector for use in a wide mass range mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giffin, Charles E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An electro-optical detector is disclosed for use in a wide mass range mass spectrometer (MS), in the latter the focal plane is at or very near the exit end of the magnetic analyzer, so that a strong magnetic field of the order of 1000G or more is present at the focal plane location. The novel detector includes a microchannel electron multiplier array (MCA) which is positioned at the focal plane to convert ion beams which are focused by the MS at the focal plane into corresponding electron beams which are then accelerated to form visual images on a conductive phosphored surface. These visual images are then converted into images on the target of a vidicon camera or the like for electronic processing. Due to the strong magnetic field at the focal plane, in one embodiment of the invention, the MCA with front and back parallel ends is placed so that its front end forms an angle of not less than several degrees, preferably on the order of 10.degree.-20.degree., with respect to the focal plane, with the center line of the front end preferably located in the focal plane. In another embodiment the MCA is wedge-shaped, with its back end at an angle of about 10.degree.-20.degree. with respect to the front end. In this embodiment the MCA is placed so that its front end is located at the focal plane.

  4. Range of acceptable stimulus intensities: an estimator of dynamic range for intensive perceptual continua.

    PubMed

    Teghtsoonian, R; Teghtsoonian, M

    1997-07-01

    The dynamic range (DR) of a sensory system is the span (usually given in log units) from the lowest to highest intensities over which a continuously graded response is evoked, and may be a distinctive feature of each such system. Teghtsoonian (1971) proposed that, although DR varies widely over sensory systems, its subjective size (SDR) is invariant. Assuming the psychophysical power law, the exponent for any continuum is given by the ratio of subjective span to DR, both quantities expressed logarithmically. Thus, exponents are inversely related to the DR and many be interpreted as indexes of it. Because DR can be difficult or even dangerous to measure directly, we sought to define a smaller range representing some fixed proportion of DR that could be used in its place to test the hypothesis of an invariant subjective range. Observations manipulated the intensities of five target continua to produce the broadest range they found acceptable and reasonably comfortable, a range of acceptable stimulus intensities (RASIN). Combined with an assumed constant SDR (derived from previous research), RASINs accurately predicted exponents obtained by magnitude production from the same observers on the five continua, as well as exponents reported in the literature. PMID:9259639

  5. Fast parallel algorithms for short-range molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, S.

    1993-05-01

    Three parallel algorithms for classical molecular dynamics are presented. The first assigns each processor a subset of atoms; the second assigns each a subset of inter-atomic forces to compute; the third assigns each a fixed spatial region. The algorithms are suitable for molecular dynamics models which can be difficult to parallelize efficiently -- those with short-range forces where the neighbors of each atom change rapidly. They can be implemented on any distributed-memory parallel machine which allows for message-passing of data between independently executing processors. The algorithms are tested on a standard Lennard-Jones benchmark problem for system sizes ranging from 500 to 10,000,000 atoms on three parallel supercomputers, the nCUBE 2, Intel iPSC/860, and Intel Delta. Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems. For large problems, the spatial algorithm achieves parallel efficiencies of 90% and the Intel Delta performs about 30 times faster than a single Y-MP processor and 12 times faster than a single C90 processor. Trade-offs between the three algorithms and guidelines for adapting them to more complex molecular dynamics simulations are also discussed.

  6. Dynamic range compression in a liquid argon calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, W.E.; Lissauer, D.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S.; Takai, H.; Wingerter-Seez, I.

    1996-12-31

    The anticipated range of particle energies at the LHC, coupled with the need for precision, low noise calorimetry makes severe demands on the dynamic range of the calorimeter readout. A common approach to this problem is to use shapers with two or more gain scales. In this paper, the authors describe their experience with a new approach in which a preamplifier with dynamic gain compression is used. An unavoidable consequence of dynamic gain adjustment is that the peaking time of the shaper output signal becomes amplitude dependent. The authors have carried out a test of such a readout system in the RD3 calorimeter, a liquid argon device with accordion geometry. The calibration system is used to determine both the gain of the individual channels as well as to map the shape of the waveform as a function of signal amplitude. A new procedure for waveform analysis, in which the fitted parameters describe the impulse response of the system, permits a straightforward translation of the calibration waveform to the waveform generated by a particle crossing the ionization gap. They find that the linearity and resolution of the calorimeter is equivalent to that obtained with linear preamplifiers, up to an energy of 200 GeV.

  7. Large Dynamic Range Simulations of Galaxies Hosting Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Robyn

    2011-08-01

    The co-evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies is a rich problem, spanning a large-dynamic range and depending on many physical processes. Simulating the transport of gas and angular momentum from super-galactic scales all the way down to the outer edge of the black hole's accretion disk requires sophisticated numerical techniques with extensive treatment of baryonic physics. We use a hydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulation to follow the growth and evolution of a typical disk galaxy hosting an SMBH, in a cosmological context (covering a dynamical range of 10 million!). We have adopted a piecemeal approach, focusing our attention on the gas dynamics in the central few hundred parsecs of the simulated galaxy (with boundary conditions provided by the larger cosmological simulation), and beginning with a simplified picture (no mergers or feedback). In this scenario, we find that the circumnuclear disk remains marginally stable against catastrophic fragmentation, allowing stochastic fueling of gas into the vicinity of the SMBH. I will discuss the successes and the limitations of these simulations, and their future direction.

  8. Frequency-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Ranging Using Photon-Counting Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Barber, Zeb W.; Dahl, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Optical ranging is a problem of estimating the round-trip flight time of a phase- or amplitude-modulated optical beam that reflects off of a target. Frequency- modulated, continuous-wave (FMCW) ranging systems obtain this estimate by performing an interferometric measurement between a local frequency- modulated laser beam and a delayed copy returning from the target. The range estimate is formed by mixing the target-return field with the local reference field on a beamsplitter and detecting the resultant beat modulation. In conventional FMCW ranging, the source modulation is linear in instantaneous frequency, the reference-arm field has many more photons than the target-return field, and the time-of-flight estimate is generated by balanced difference- detection of the beamsplitter output, followed by a frequency-domain peak search. This work focused on determining the maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation algorithm when continuous-time photoncounting detectors are used. It is founded on a rigorous statistical characterization of the (random) photoelectron emission times as a function of the incident optical field, including the deleterious effects caused by dark current and dead time. These statistics enable derivation of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRB) on the accuracy of FMCW ranging, and derivation of the ML estimator, whose performance approaches this bound at high photon flux. The estimation algorithm was developed, and its optimality properties were shown in simulation. Experimental data show that it performs better than the conventional estimation algorithms used. The demonstrated improvement is a factor of 1.414 over frequency-domainbased estimation. If the target interrogating photons and the local reference field photons are costed equally, the optimal allocation of photons between these two arms is to have them equally distributed. This is different than the state of the art, in which the local field is stronger than the target return. The optimal

  9. Nonlinear tuning of microresonators for dynamic range enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Saghafi, M.; Dankowicz, H.; Lacarbonara, W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the development of a novel framework and its implementation for the nonlinear tuning of nano/microresonators. Using geometrically exact mechanical formulations, a nonlinear model is obtained that governs the transverse and longitudinal dynamics of multilayer microbeams, and also takes into account rotary inertia effects. The partial differential equations of motion are discretized, according to the Galerkin method, after being reformulated into a mixed form. A zeroth-order shift as well as a hardening effect are observed in the frequency response of the beam. These results are confirmed by a higher order perturbation analysis using the method of multiple scales. An inverse problem is then proposed for the continuation of the critical amplitude at which the transition to nonlinear response characteristics occurs. Path-following techniques are employed to explore the dependence on the system parameters, as well as on the geometry of bilayer microbeams, of the magnitude of the dynamic range in nano/microresonators. PMID:26345078

  10. Better forecasts of range dynamics using genetic data.

    PubMed

    Fordham, Damien A; Brook, Barry W; Moritz, Craig; Nogués-Bravo, David

    2014-08-01

    The spatiotemporal response of species to past global change must be understood for adaptive management and to make useful predictions. Characteristics of past population dynamics are imprinted in genes, yet these molecular 'log books' are just beginning to be used to improve forecasts of biotic responses to climate change. This is despite there now being robust quantitative frameworks to incorporate such information. A tighter integration of genetic data into models of species range dynamics should lead to more robust and validated predictions of the response of demographic and evolutionary processes to large-scale environmental change. The use of these multidisciplinary methods will help conservation scientists to better connect theory to the on-ground design and implementation of effective measures to protect biodiversity. PMID:24951394

  11. Shadow correction in high dynamic range images for generating orthophotos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Chikatsu, Hirofumi

    2011-07-01

    High dynamic range imagery is widely used in remote sensing. With the widespread use of aerial digital cameras such as the DMC, ADS40, RMK-D, and UltraCamD, high dynamic range imaging is generally expected for generating minuteness orthophotos in digital aerial photogrammetry. However, high dynamic range images (12-bit, 4,096 gray levels) are generally compressed into an 8-bit depth digital image (256 gray levels) owing to huge amount of data and interface with peripherals such as monitors and printers. This means that a great deal of image data is eliminated from the original image, and this introduces a new shadow problem. In particular, the influence of shadows in urban areas causes serious problems when generating minuteness orthophotos and performing house detection. Therefore, shadow problems can be solved by addressing the image compression problems. There is a large body of literature on image compression techniques such as logarithmic compression and tone mapping algorithms. However, logarithmic compression tends to cause loss of details in dark and/or light areas. Furthermore, the logarithmic method intends to operate on the full scene. This means that high-resolution luminance information can not be obtained. Even though tone mapping algorithms have the ability to operate over both full scene and local scene, background knowledge is required. To resolve the shadow problem in digital aerial photogrammetry, shadow areas should be recognized and corrected automatically without the loss of luminance information. To this end, a practical shadow correction method using 12-bit real data acquired by DMC is investigated in this paper.

  12. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, P.

    2013-11-07

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  13. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel

    2013-11-01

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  14. Low Power, Wide Dynamic Range Carbon Nanotube Vacuum Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Manohara, Harish M.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation presents carbon nanotube vacuum pressure sensor gauges that operate at low power and exhibit a wide-dynamic range based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. The fabrication facility, and the formation process are shown. Pressure sensitivity was found to increase rapidly as the bias power was increased. In addition, by etching part of the thermal SiO2 beneath the tubes and minimizing heat conduction through the substrate, pressure sensitivity was extended toward lower pressures. Results are compared to a conventional thin film meander resistor, which was fabricated and whose pressure response was also measured for comparative purposes.

  15. Application of commercial star couplers to increase signal dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Whitcomb, B.M.; Smiley, V.N.; Flurer, R.L.; Nelson, L.K.

    1984-01-01

    Fused biconical tapered (FBT) fiber optic star couplers have been used in a variety of applications at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in several diagnostic experiments to provide increased dynamic range for the recording devices or to divide the available signal between different recording devices. A number of installation problems have been manifested in this application of FBT couplers. The most severe problem results from the modal selection mechanism inherent in the design of FBT couplers. Substantial work has been done to characterize a variety of commercial couplers for this application.

  16. Reconfigurable long-range phonon dynamics in optomechanical arrays.

    PubMed

    Xuereb, André; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Paternostro, Mauro; Dantan, Aurélien

    2014-04-01

    We investigate periodic optomechanical arrays as reconfigurable platforms for engineering the coupling between multiple mechanical and electromagnetic modes and for exploring many-body phonon dynamics. Exploiting structural resonances in the coupling between light fields and collective motional modes of the array, we show that tunable effective long-range interactions between mechanical modes can be achieved. This paves the way towards the implementation of controlled phononic walks and heat transfer on densely connected graphs as well as the coherent transfer of excitations between distant elements of optomechanical arrays. PMID:24745417

  17. Tuning properties and dynamic range of type 1 vomeronasal receptors

    PubMed Central

    Haga-Yamanaka, Sachiko; Ma, Limei; Yu, C. Ron

    2015-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) expresses chemosensory receptors that detect intra-species as well as inter-species cues. The vomeronasal neurons are thought to be highly selective in their responses. The tuning properties of individual receptors remain difficult to characterize due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here, we take a transgenic approach to ectopically express two type 1 vomeronasal receptors in the mouse VNO and characterize their responses to steroid compounds. We find that V1rj2 and V1rj3 are sensitive to two sulfated estrogens (SEs) and can be activated by a broad variety of sulfated and glucuronidated steroids at high concentrations. Individual neurons exhibit narrow range of concentration-dependent activation. Collectively, a neuronal population expressing the same receptor covers a wide dynamic range in their responses to SEs. These properties recapitulate the response profiles of endogenous neurons to SEs. PMID:26236183

  18. Tuning properties and dynamic range of type 1 vomeronasal receptors.

    PubMed

    Haga-Yamanaka, Sachiko; Ma, Limei; Yu, C Ron

    2015-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) expresses chemosensory receptors that detect intra-species as well as inter-species cues. The vomeronasal neurons are thought to be highly selective in their responses. The tuning properties of individual receptors remain difficult to characterize due to the lack of a robust heterologous expression system. Here, we take a transgenic approach to ectopically express two type 1 vomeronasal receptors in the mouse VNO and characterize their responses to steroid compounds. We find that V1rj2 and V1rj3 are sensitive to two sulfated estrogens (SEs) and can be activated by a broad variety of sulfated and glucuronidated steroids at high concentrations. Individual neurons exhibit narrow range of concentration-dependent activation. Collectively, a neuronal population expressing the same receptor covers a wide dynamic range in their responses to SEs. These properties recapitulate the response profiles of endogenous neurons to SEs. PMID:26236183

  19. The MOLDY short-range molecular dynamics package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackland, G. J.; D'Mellow, K.; Daraszewicz, S. L.; Hepburn, D. J.; Uhrin, M.; Stratford, K.

    2011-12-01

    We describe a parallelised version of the MOLDY molecular dynamics program. This Fortran code is aimed at systems which may be described by short-range potentials and specifically those which may be addressed with the embedded atom method. This includes a wide range of transition metals and alloys. MOLDY provides a range of options in terms of the molecular dynamics ensemble used and the boundary conditions which may be applied. A number of standard potentials are provided, and the modular structure of the code allows new potentials to be added easily. The code is parallelised using OpenMP and can therefore be run on shared memory systems, including modern multicore processors. Particular attention is paid to the updates required in the main force loop, where synchronisation is often required in OpenMP implementations of molecular dynamics. We examine the performance of the parallel code in detail and give some examples of applications to realistic problems, including the dynamic compression of copper and carbon migration in an iron-carbon alloy. Program summaryProgram title: MOLDY Catalogue identifier: AEJU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJU_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 382 881 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6 705 242 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 95/OpenMP Computer: Any Operating system: Any Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes. OpenMP is required for parallel execution RAM: 100 MB or more Classification: 7.7 Nature of problem: Moldy addresses the problem of many atoms (of order 10 6) interacting via a classical interatomic potential on a timescale of microseconds. It is designed for problems where statistics must be gathered over a number of equivalent runs, such as

  20. Design of a ROIC with high dynamic range for LWIR FPAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yongcheng; Ding, Ruijun

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a high performance readout integrated circuit (ROIC) designed for long wave infrared (LWIR) detectors is introduced, which has high dynamic range (HDR). To accommodate the wide scene dynamic range requirement, special circuit architecture is used to the input unit cell. A capacitive feedback transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) as input circuit is used to provide high injection efficiency, low input resistance, good linearity, precise voltage bias. Because of the restriction of the layout area, four unit cells will share an integration capacitor and each unit cell has a correlated double sampling (CDS) circuit, which allows the infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) to be operated in full frame snapshot mode and provides the maximum integration time available. The charge transfer circuit is used and we don't need to consider the drive ability of the unit cell. The simulation results confirm that the ROIC provides over a factor of 70dB dynamic range with the 5.0v power supply.

  1. High dynamic range measurement of the pulse contrast in a Ti:sapphire/Nd:glass multiterawatt laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanheira, Ana; Cardoso, Luís; Pires, Hugo; Figueira, Gonçalo

    2011-05-01

    We describe the design and implementation study of a high dynamic range, third order contrast-ratio measurement diagnostic for a high power laser chain. The device, known as Optical Parametric Amplification Correlator (OPAC) is based on degenerate three-wave mixing in a nonlinear crystal, it is self-referencing and compact. By measuring the idler pulse with a slow detector and a set of calibrated filters, a dynamic range of up to 1010 is achievable. The pulse contrast is to be characterized at the mJ-level, 10 Hz, Ti:sapphire pre-amplifier stage, in a time window of 100 ps.

  2. Generational Spreading Speed and the Dynamics of Population Range Expansion.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Andrew W; Neubert, Michael G; Krkošek, Martin; Lewis, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    Some of the most fundamental quantities in population ecology describe the growth and spread of populations. Population dynamics are often characterized by the annual rate of increase, λ, or the generational rate of increase, R0. Analyses involving R0 have deepened our understanding of disease dynamics and life-history complexities beyond that afforded by analysis of annual growth alone. While range expansion is quantified by the annual spreading speed, a spatial analog of λ, an R0-like expression for the rate of spread is missing. Using integrodifference models, we derive the appropriate generational spreading speed for populations with complex (stage-structured) life histories. The resulting measure, relevant to locations near the expanding edge of a (re)colonizing population, incorporates both local population growth and explicit spatial dispersal rather than solely growth across a population, as is the case for R0. The calculations for generational spreading speed are often simpler than those for annual spreading speed, and analytic or partial analytic solutions can yield insight into the processes that facilitate or slow a population's spatial spread. We analyze the spatial dynamics of green crabs, sea otters, and teasel as examples to demonstrate the flexibility of our methods and the intuitive insights that they afford. PMID:26655354

  3. Alternating-Z tripler with high dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Eimerl, D.; Milam, D.

    1996-10-10

    A KD*P alternating-Z tripler suitable for NIF consists of two detuned Type I doublers and one aligned Type II mixer. The dynamic range for efficient tripling is predicted to be larger for this arrangement than for a standard 2-crystal tripler. We tested an alternating-Z tripler that had doublers with thicknesses of 13 and 10 mm, and a 10-mm-thick mixer. All of the crystals were 80% deuterated. The model of this tripler provided an excellent description of the efficiencies that were measured using pulses with duration of 1 or 6 ns. We confirmed the importance for alternating-Z triplers of controlling the phase differences arising from wavelength dispersion in the air gap between the doublers. The confirmed wide dynamic range of this arrangement is of interest for conversion of the 21-ns Haan pulse, or for conversion of beams with significant intensity fluctuations. Compensation for wavelength dispersion in the gap between the crystals is not an issue if the crystals are in vacuum.

  4. Optimizing bandwidth and dynamic range of lumped Josephson parametric amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddins, A.; Vijay, R.; Macklin, C.; Minev, Z.; Siddiqi, I.

    2013-03-01

    Superconducting parametric amplifiers have revolutionized the field of quantum measurement by providing high gain, ultra-low noise amplification. They have been used successfully for high-fidelity qubit state measurements, probing nano-mechanical resonators, quantum feedback, and for microwave quantum optics experiments. Though several designs exist, a simple and robust architecture is the Lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifier (LJPA). This device consists of a capacitively shunted SQUID directly coupled to a transmission line to form a low quality factor (Q) nonlinear resonator. We discuss amplifiers which can be tuned over the full 4-8 GHz band with 20-25 dB of gain and 10 - 50 MHz of signal bandwidth. However, similar to other parametric amplifiers employing a resonant circuit, the LJPA suffers from low dynamic range and has a -1 dB gain compression point of order -130 dBm. We explore new designs comprised of an array of SQUIDs to improve the dynamic range. We will present the results of numerical simulations and preliminary experiments. We will also briefly discuss improvements obtained from different biasing methods and packaging. This research was supported by the Army Research Office under a QCT grant.

  5. Increasing Linear Dynamic Range of a CMOS Image Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata

    2007-01-01

    A generic design and a corresponding operating sequence have been developed for increasing the linear-response dynamic range of a complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor. The design provides for linear calibrated dual-gain pixels that operate at high gain at a low signal level and at low gain at a signal level above a preset threshold. Unlike most prior designs for increasing dynamic range of an image sensor, this design does not entail any increase in noise (including fixed-pattern noise), decrease in responsivity or linearity, or degradation of photometric calibration. The figure is a simplified schematic diagram showing the circuit of one pixel and pertinent parts of its column readout circuitry. The conventional part of the pixel circuit includes a photodiode having a small capacitance, CD. The unconventional part includes an additional larger capacitance, CL, that can be connected to the photodiode via a transfer gate controlled in part by a latch. In the high-gain mode, the signal labeled TSR in the figure is held low through the latch, which also helps to adapt the gain on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Light must be coupled to the pixel through a microlens or by back illumination in order to obtain a high effective fill factor; this is necessary to ensure high quantum efficiency, a loss of which would minimize the efficacy of the dynamic- range-enhancement scheme. Once the level of illumination of the pixel exceeds the threshold, TSR is turned on, causing the transfer gate to conduct, thereby adding CL to the pixel capacitance. The added capacitance reduces the conversion gain, and increases the pixel electron-handling capacity, thereby providing an extension of the dynamic range. By use of an array of comparators also at the bottom of the column, photocharge voltages on sampling capacitors in each column are compared with a reference voltage to determine whether it is necessary to switch from the high-gain to the low-gain mode. Depending upon

  6. Calibration of semiconductor detectors in the 200-8500 keV range at VNIIM.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenko, Evgeny E; Moiseev, Nikolay

    2012-09-01

    At the ionising radiation department of the D.I. Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology, a semiconductor detector was calibrated in the energy range 200-8500 keV using (n,2γ) and (n,γ) reactions. Separate cylindrical targets (77 mm diameter and 10mm height) were made from mercuric sulphate, sodium chloride and metallic titanium. A (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source, placed in 150 mm diameter polyethylene ball, was used to generate thermal neutrons. The optimal target dimensions were determined taking into account the thermal neutron cross-sections and gamma-radiation attenuations in the target materials. The influence of the background radiation induced by neutrons from the walls, floors and ceilings was also taken into account. The shapes of the efficiency curves for point and volume sources in the 200-8500 keV range have been investigated. The experimental results are in good agreement with Monte-Carlo calculations. The emission rate of the 6.13 MeV photons from a (238)Pu-(13)C source was determined with an expanded uncertainty, U(c), of 10% (k=2). PMID:22512978

  7. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, François; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu; Després, Philippe; Therriault-Proulx, François; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  8. Validating plastic scintillation detectors for photon dosimetry in the radiologic energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, Francois; Archambault, Louis; Plamondon, Mathieu; and others

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Photon dosimetry in the kilovolt (kV) energy range represents a major challenge for diagnostic and interventional radiology and superficial therapy. Plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) are potentially good candidates for this task. This study proposes a simple way to obtain accurate correction factors to compensate for the response of PSDs to photon energies between 80 and 150 kVp. The performance of PSDs is also investigated to determine their potential usefulness in the diagnostic energy range. Methods: A 1-mm-diameter, 10-mm-long PSD was irradiated by a Therapax SXT 150 unit using five different beam qualities made of tube potentials ranging from 80 to 150 kVp and filtration thickness ranging from 0.8 to 0.2 mmAl + 1.0 mmCu. The light emitted by the detector was collected using an 8-m-long optical fiber and a polychromatic photodiode, which converted the scintillation photons to an electrical current. The PSD response was compared with the reference free air dose rate measured with a calibrated Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber. PSD measurements were corrected using spectra-weighted corrections, accounting for mass energy-absorption coefficient differences between the sensitive volumes of the ionization chamber and the PSD, as suggested by large cavity theory (LCT). Beam spectra were obtained from x-ray simulation software and validated experimentally using a CdTe spectrometer. Correction factors were also obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were compensated for beam hardening using the LCT correction method. These PDD measurements were compared with uncorrected PSD data, PDD measurements obtained using Gafchromic films, Monte Carlo simulations, and previous data. Results: For each beam quality used, the authors observed an increase of the energy response with effective energy when no correction was applied to the PSD response. Using the LCT correction, the PSD response was almost energy independent, with

  9. Long-range forces: atmospheric neutrino oscillation at a magnetized detector

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Abhijit

    2011-09-01

    Among the combinations L{sub e}-L{sub μ}, L{sub e}-L{sub τ} and L{sub μ}-L{sub τ} any one can be gauged in anomaly free way with the standard model gauge group. The masses of these gauge bosons can be so light that it can induce long-range forces on the Earth due to the electrons in the Sun. This type of forces can be constrained significantly from neutrino oscillation. As the sign of the potential is opposite for neutrinos and antineutrinos, a magnetized iron calorimeter detector (ICAL) would be able to produce strong constraint on it. We have made conservative studies of these long-range forces with atmospheric neutrinos at ICAL considering only the muons of charge current interactions. We find stringent bounds on the couplings α{sub eμ,eτ} ∼< 1.65 × 10{sup −53} at 3σ CL with an exposure of 1 Mton·yr if there is no such force. For nonzero input values of the couplings we find that the potential V{sub eμ} opposes and V{sub eτ} helps to discriminate the mass hierarchy. However, both potentials help significantly to discriminate the octant of θ{sub 23}. The explanation of the anomaly in recent MINOS data (the difference of Δm{sub 32}{sup 2} for neutrinos and antineutrinos), using long-range force originated from the mixing of the gauge boson Z' of L{sub μ}-L{sub τ} with the standard model gauge boson Z, can be tested at ICAL at more than 5σ CL. We have also discussed how to disentangle this from the solution with CPT violation using the seasonal change of the distance between the Earth and the Sun.

  10. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  11. Image sensor with high dynamic range linear output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Designs and operational methods to increase the dynamic range of image sensors and APS devices in particular by achieving more than one integration times for each pixel thereof. An APS system with more than one column-parallel signal chains for readout are described for maintaining a high frame rate in readout. Each active pixel is sampled for multiple times during a single frame readout, thus resulting in multiple integration times. The operation methods can also be used to obtain multiple integration times for each pixel with an APS design having a single column-parallel signal chain for readout. Furthermore, analog-to-digital conversion of high speed and high resolution can be implemented.

  12. Fractional dynamics of coupled oscillators with long-range interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.; Zaslavsky, George M.

    2006-06-15

    We consider a one-dimensional chain of coupled linear and nonlinear oscillators with long-range powerwise interaction. The corresponding term in dynamical equations is proportional to 1/|n-m|{sup {alpha}}{sup +1}. It is shown that the equation of motion in the infrared limit can be transformed into the medium equation with the Riesz fractional derivative of order {alpha}, when 0<{alpha}<2. We consider a few models of coupled oscillators and show how their synchronization can appear as a result of bifurcation, and how the corresponding solutions depend on {alpha}. The presence of a fractional derivative also leads to the occurrence of localized structures. Particular solutions for fractional time-dependent complex Ginzburg-Landau (or nonlinear Schroedinger) equation are derived. These solutions are interpreted as synchronized states and localized structures of the oscillatory medium.

  13. High-dynamic range DMD-based IR scene projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Julia R.; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Newbry, Scott P.

    2013-03-01

    OPTRA is developing a next-generation digital micromirror device (DMD) based two-band infrared scene projector (IRSP) with infinite bit-depth independent of frame rate and an order of magnitude improvement in contrast over the state of the art. Traditionally DMD-based IRSPs have offered larger format and superior uniformity and pixel operability relative to resistive and diode arrays, however, they have been limited in contrast and also by the inherent bitdepth / frame rate tradeoff imposed by pulse width modulation (PWM). OPTRA's high dynamic range IRSP (HIDRA SP) has broken this dependency with a dynamic structured illumination solution. The HIDRA SP uses a source conditioning DMD to impose the structured illumination on two projector DMDs - one for each spectral band. The source conditioning DMD is operated in binary mode, and the relay optics which form the structured illumination act as a low pass spatial filter. The structured illumination is therefore spatially grayscaled and more importantly is analog with no PWM. In addition, the structured illumination concentrates energy where bright object will be projected and extinguishes energy in dark regions; the result is a significant improvement in contrast. The projector DMDs are operated with 8-bit PWM, however the total projected image is analog with no bit-depth / frame rate dependency. In this paper we describe our progress towards the development, build, and test of a prototype HIDRA SP.

  14. High-dynamic range DMD-based infrared scene projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Newbry, Scott P.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia

    2013-05-01

    OPTRA is developing a next-generation digital micromirror device (DMD) based two-band infrared scene projector (IRSP) with infinite bit-depth independent of frame rate and an order of magnitude improvement in contrast over the state of the art. Traditionally DMD-based IRSPs have offered larger format and superior uniformity and pixel operability relative to resistive and diode arrays, however, they have been limited in contrast and also by the inherent bitdepth / frame rate tradeoff imposed by pulse width modulation (PWM). OPTRA's high dynamic range IRSP (HIDRA SP) has broken this dependency with a dynamic structured illumination solution. The HIDRA SP uses a source conditioning DMD to impose the structured illumination on two projector DMDs - one for each spectral band. The source conditioning DMD is operated in binary mode, and the relay optics which form the structured illumination act as a low pass spatial filter. The structured illumination is therefore spatially grayscaled and more importantly is analog with no PWM. In addition, the structured illumination concentrates energy where bright object will be projected and extinguishes energy in dark regions; the result is a significant improvement in contrast. The projector DMDs are operated with 8-bit PWM, however the total projected image is analog with no bit-depth / frame rate dependency. In this paper we describe our progress towards the development, build, and test of a prototype HIDRA SP.

  15. Dynamic range in the C. elegans brain network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonopoulos, Chris G.

    2016-01-01

    We study external electrical perturbations and their responses in the brain dynamic network of the Caenorhabditis elegans soil worm, given by the connectome of its large somatic nervous system. Our analysis is inspired by a realistic experiment where one stimulates externally specific parts of the brain and studies the persistent neural activity triggered in other cortical regions. In this work, we perturb groups of neurons that form communities, identified by the walktrap community detection method, by trains of stereotypical electrical Poissonian impulses and study the propagation of neural activity to other communities by measuring the corresponding dynamic ranges and Steven law exponents. We show that when one perturbs specific communities, keeping the rest unperturbed, the external stimulations are able to propagate to some of them but not to all. There are also perturbations that do not trigger any response. We found that this depends on the initially perturbed community. Finally, we relate our findings for the former cases with low neural synchronization, self-criticality, and large information flow capacity, and interpret them as the ability of the brain network to respond to external perturbations when it works at criticality and its information flow capacity becomes maximal.

  16. Adaptive detection of range-spread targets by the generalized detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzlukov, Vyacheslav

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we address an adaptive detection of range-spread targets or targets embedded in Gaussian noise with unknown covariance matrix by the generalized detector (GD) based on the generalized approach to signal processing (GASP) in noise. We assume that cells or secondary data that are free of signal components are available. Those secondary data are supposed to process either the same covariance matrix or the same structure of the covariance matrix of the cells under test. In this context, under designing GD we use a two-step procedure. The criteria lead to receivers ensuring the constant false alarm rate (CFAR) property with respect to unknown quantities. A thorough performance assessment of the proposed detection strategies highlights that the two-step design procedure of decision-making rule in accordance with GASP is to be preferred with respect to the plain one. In fact, the proposed design procedure leads to GD that achieves significant improvement in detection performance under several situation of practical interest. For estimation purposes, we resort to a set of secondary data. In addition to the classical homogeneous scenario, we consider the case wherein the power value of primary and secondary data vectors is not the same. The design of adaptive detection algorithms based on GASP in the case of mismatch is a problem of primary concern for radar applications. We demonstrate that two-step design procedure based on GASP ensures minimal loss.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958), 10.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α -particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble nucleation in dark matter detectors.

    PubMed

    Denzel, Philipp; Diemand, Jürg; Angélil, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Bubble chambers and droplet detectors used in dosimetry and dark matter particle search experiments use a superheated metastable liquid in which nuclear recoils trigger bubble nucleation. This process is described by the classical heat spike model of F. Seitz [Phys. Fluids (1958-1988) 1, 2 (1958)PFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1724333], which uses classical nucleation theory to estimate the amount and the localization of the deposited energy required for bubble formation. Here we report on direct molecular dynamics simulations of heat-spike-induced bubble formation. They allow us to test the nanoscale process described in the classical heat spike model. 40 simulations were performed, each containing about 20 million atoms, which interact by a truncated force-shifted Lennard-Jones potential. We find that the energy per length unit needed for bubble nucleation agrees quite well with theoretical predictions, but the allowed spike length and the required total energy are about twice as large as predicted. This could be explained by the rapid energy diffusion measured in the simulation: contrary to the assumption in the classical model, we observe significantly faster heat diffusion than the bubble formation time scale. Finally we examine α-particle tracks, which are much longer than those of neutrons and potential dark matter particles. Empirically, α events were recently found to result in louder acoustic signals than neutron events. This distinction is crucial for the background rejection in dark matter searches. We show that a large number of individual bubbles can form along an α track, which explains the observed larger acoustic amplitudes. PMID:26871185

  19. He II Liquid/Vapor Phase Separator for Large Dynamic Range Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, A.; Petrac, D.

    1995-01-01

    A phase separator, which separates helium vapor from liquid superfluid helium (He II), is an indispensable device for space cryogenics. The most recent approach to the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) uses a new design concept in which only the detector package is cold at launch, the remainder of the telescope being subsequently cooled to operating temperature on orbit. Therefore, a large dynamic operational range is required of the cryogen system. This is a report of initial laboratory test results with candidate porous plugs as phase separators. Mass flow rates and pressure and temperature differences across a porous plug were measured in this experiment. Relatively large mass flow rates were observed even at small pressure differences. In the high mass flow rate region, a hysteresis was observed with increases and decreases of the pressure difference. A linear theory is proposed and compared with experimental data to explain several phenomena observed in this system.

  20. Method for increasing the dynamic range of mass spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail; Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.

    2004-09-07

    A method for enhancing the dynamic range of a mass spectrometer by first passing a sample of ions through the mass spectrometer having a quadrupole ion filter, whereupon the intensities of the mass spectrum of the sample are measured. From the mass spectrum, ions within this sample are then identified for subsequent ejection. As further sampling introduces more ions into the mass spectrometer, the appropriate rf voltages are applied to a quadrupole ion filter, thereby selectively ejecting the undesired ions previously identified. In this manner, the desired ions may be collected for longer periods of time in an ion trap, thus allowing better collection and subsequent analysis of the desired ions. The ion trap used for accumulation may be the same ion trap used for mass analysis, in which case the mass analysis is performed directly, or it may be an intermediate trap. In the case where collection is an intermediate trap, the desired ions are accumulated in the intermediate trap, and then transferred to a separate mass analyzer. The present invention finds particular utility where the mass analysis is performed in an ion trap mass spectrometer or a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

  1. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Douglas, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  2. High Dynamic Range Beam Imaging with Two Simultaneously Sampling CCDs

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, Pavel; Douglas, David R.; Legg, Robert A.; Tennant, Christopher D.

    2013-05-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement with sufficiently high dynamic range (HDR) is a key diagnostic to measure the beam halo, understand its sources and evolution. In this contribution we describe our initial experience with the HDR imaging of the electron beam at the JLab FEL. On contrary to HDR measurements made with wire scanners in counting mode, which provide only two or three 1D projections of transverse beam distribution, imaging allows to measure the distribution itself. That is especially important for non-equilibrium beams in the LINACs. The measurements were made by means of simultaneous imaging with two CCD sensors with different exposure time. Two images are combined then numerically in to one HDR image. The system works as an online tool providing HDR images at 4 Hz. An optically polished YAG:Ce crystal with the thickness of 100 {micro}m was used for the measurements. When tested with a laser beam images with the DR of about 10{sup 5} were obtained. With the electron beam the DR was somewhat smaller due to the limitations in the time structure of the tune-up beam macro pulse.

  3. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T. J. Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D.

    2014-10-15

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  4. High dynamic range imaging of non-static scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Imtiaz; Gunturk, Bahadir K.

    2011-01-01

    A well-known technique in high dynamic range (HDR) imaging is to take multiple photographs, each one with a different exposure time, and then combine them to produce an HDR image. Unless the scene is static and the camera position is fixed, this process creates the so-called "ghosting" artifacts. In order to handle non-static scenes or moving camera, images have to be spatially registered. This is a challenging problem because most optical flow estimation algorithm depends on the constant brightness assumption, which is obviously not the case in HDR imaging. In this paper, we present an algorithm to estimate the dense motion field in image sequences with photometric variations. In an alternating optimization scheme, the algorithm estimates both the dense motion field and the photometric mapping. As a latent information, the occluded regions are extracted and excluded from the photometric mapping estimation. We include experiments with both synthetic and real imagery to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithm. We show that the ghosting artifacts are reduced significantly in HDR imaging of non-static scenes.

  5. Dynamic range of atomically thin vibrating nanomechanical resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2014-03-10

    Atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) crystals offer attractive properties for making resonant nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) operating at high frequencies. While the fundamental limits of linear operation in such systems are important, currently there is very little quantitative knowledge of the linear dynamic range (DR) and onset of nonlinearity in these devices, which are different than in conventional 1D NEMS such as nanotubes and nanowires. Here, we present theoretical analysis and quantitative models that can be directly used to predict the DR of vibrating 2D circular drumhead NEMS resonators. We show that DR has a strong dependence ∝10log(E{sub Y}{sup 3/2}ρ{sub 3D}{sup -1/2}rtε{sup 5/2}) on device parameters, in which strain ε plays a particularly important role in these 2D systems, dominating over dimensions (radius r, thickness t). This study formulizes the effects from device physical parameters upon DR and sheds light on device design rules toward achieving high DR in 2D NEMS vibrating at radio and microwave frequencies.

  6. High dynamic range coherent imaging using compressed sensing.

    PubMed

    He, Kuan; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Cossairt, Oliver

    2015-11-30

    In both lensless Fourier transform holography (FTH) and coherent diffraction imaging (CDI), a beamstop is used to block strong intensities which exceed the limited dynamic range of the sensor, causing a loss in low-frequency information, making high quality reconstructions difficult or even impossible. In this paper, we show that an image can be recovered from high-frequencies alone, thereby overcoming the beamstop problem in both FTH and CDI. The only requirement is that the object is sparse in a known basis, a common property of most natural and manmade signals. The reconstruction method relies on compressed sensing (CS) techniques, which ensure signal recovery from incomplete measurements. Specifically, in FTH, we perform compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction of captured holograms and show that this method is applicable not only to standard FTH, but also multiple or extended reference FTH. For CDI, we propose a new phase retrieval procedure, which combines Fienup's hybrid input-output (HIO) method and CS. Both numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed CS-based reconstructions in dealing with missing data in both FTH and CDI. PMID:26698723

  7. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, T J; Saunter, C D; O'Nions, W; Girkin, J M; Love, G D

    2014-10-01

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences. PMID:25362409

  8. Joint high dynamic range imaging and color demosaicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwig, Johannes; Pauli, Josef

    2011-11-01

    A non-parametric high dynamic range (HDR) fusion approach is proposed that works on raw images of single-sensor color imaging devices which incorporate the Bayer pattern. Thereby the non-linear opto-electronic conversion function (OECF) is recovered before color demosaicing, so that interpolation artifacts do not aect the photometric calibration. Graph-based segmentation greedily clusters the exposure set into regions of roughly constant radiance in order to regularize the OECF estimation. The segmentation works on Gaussian-blurred sensor images, whereby the articial gray value edges caused by the Bayer pattern are smoothed away. With the OECF known the 32-bit HDR radiance map is reconstructed by weighted summation from the dierently exposed raw sensor images. Because the radiance map contains lower sensor noise than the individual images, it is nally demosaiced by weighted bilinear interpolation which prevents the interpolation across edges. Here, the previous segmentation results from the photometric calibration are utilized. After demosaicing, tone mapping is applied, whereby remaining interpolation artifacts are further damped due to the coarser tonal quantization of the resulting image.

  9. MRI dynamic range and its compatibility with signal transmission media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Schär, Michael; Edelstein, Arthur D.; Kraitchman, Dara L.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2009-06-01

    As the number of MRI phased array coil elements grows, interactions among cables connecting them to the system receiver become increasingly problematic. Fiber optic or wireless links would reduce electromagnetic interference, but their dynamic range (DR) is generally less than that of coaxial cables. Raw MRI signals, however, have a large DR because of the high signal amplitude near the center of k-space. Here, we study DR in MRI in order to determine the compatibility of MRI multicoil imaging with non-coaxial cable signal transmission. Since raw signal data are routinely discarded, we have developed an improved method for estimating the DR of MRI signals from conventional magnitude images. Our results indicate that the DR of typical surface coil signals at 3 T for human subjects is less than 88 dB, even for three-dimensional acquisition protocols. Cardiac and spine coil arrays had a maximum DR of less than 75 dB and head coil arrays less than 88 dB. The DR derived from magnitude images is in good agreement with that measured from raw data. The results suggest that current analog fiber optic links, with a spurious-free DR of 60-70 dB at 500 kHz bandwidth, are not by themselves adequate for transmitting MRI data from volume or array coils with DR ˜90 dB. However, combining analog links with signal compression might make non-coaxial cable signal transmission viable.

  10. Fast-gated single-photon avalanche diode for extremely wide dynamic-range applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, A.; Dalla Mora, A.; Zappa, F.; Cova, S.; Contini, D.; Pifferi, A.; Spinelli, L.; Torricelli, A.; Cubeddu, R.

    2009-02-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) picosecond pulsed light shined in biological tissues (e.g. brain, breast, muscle) offers the opportunity for non-invasive quantitative spectroscopy and imaging. Tissue optical properties determine high attenuation levels of optical signals and nanosecond scale dynamics. Therefore high-performance set-ups are needed. We aimed at developing a winning photodetector-electronics pairing for a broad field of multiple-wavelengths faint-signal optical investigations, like brain functional imaging, optical mammography, in-vivo spectroscopy, drugs characterization, molecular imaging. We present an electronic instrumentation based on silicon Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) and fast-gating frontend electronics, in a Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting (TCSPC) set-up. Detection efficiency is very high (50% at 550 nm and 15% at 800 nm), allowing acquisition of very faint optical signals on a wide spectral range. Furthermore, the fast-gating circuitry enables the detector very quickly (500 ps) and for user-selectable (200 ps - 510 ns) durations, thus allowing the rejection of very intense optical signals (e.g. scattered light from more superficial layers of the tissue under investigation) preceding useful faint signals (e.g. scattered light from sub-cellular components or coming from "deep" tissue layers), which would be otherwise overwhelmed and made undetectable. We attain photon-counting dynamic ranges up to 107 with photon-timing resolutions of 95 ps.

  11. High dynamic range pixel architecture for advanced diagnostic medical x-ray imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Izadi, Mohammad Hadi; Karim, Karim S.

    2006-05-15

    The most widely used architecture in large-area amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers is a passive pixel sensor (PPS), which consists of a detector and a readout switch. While the PPS has the advantage of being compact and amenable toward high-resolution imaging, small PPS output signals are swamped by external column charge amplifier and data line thermal noise, which reduce the minimum readable sensor input signal. In contrast to PPS circuits, on-pixel amplifiers in a-Si technology reduce readout noise to levels that can meet even the stringent requirements for low noise digital x-ray fluoroscopy (<1000 noise electrons). However, larger voltages at the pixel input cause the output of the amplified pixel to become nonlinear thus reducing the dynamic range. We reported a hybrid amplified pixel architecture based on a combination of PPS and amplified pixel designs that, in addition to low noise performance, also resulted in large-signal linearity and consequently higher dynamic range [K. S. Karim et al., Proc. SPIE 5368, 657 (2004)]. The additional benefit in large-signal linearity, however, came at the cost of an additional pixel transistor. We present an amplified pixel design that achieves the goals of low noise performance and large-signal linearity without the need for an additional pixel transistor. Theoretical calculations and simulation results for noise indicate the applicability of the amplified a-Si pixel architecture for high dynamic range, medical x-ray imaging applications that require switching between low exposure, real-time fluoroscopy and high-exposure radiography.

  12. Parsimonious snow model explains reindeer population dynamics and ranging behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.; Aanes, R.; Hansen, B. B.; Loe, L.; Severinsen, T.; Stien, A.

    2008-12-01

    Winter snow is a key factor affecting polar ecosystems. One example is the strong negative correlation of winter precipitation with fluctuations in population in some high-arctic animal populations. Ice layers within and at the base of the snowpack have particularly deleterious effects on such populations. Svalbard reindeer have small home ranges and are vulnerable to local "locked pasture" events due to ground-ice formation. When pastures are locked, reindeer are faced with the decision of staying, living off a diminishing fat store, or trying to escape beyond the unknown spatial borders of the ice. Both strategies may inhibit reproduction and increase mortality, leading to population declines. Here we assess the impact of winter snow and ice on the population dynamics of an isolated herd of Svalbard reindeer near Ny-Ålesund, monitored annually since 1978, with a retrospective analysis of the winter snowpack. Because there are no long-term observational records of snow or snow properties, such as ice layers, we must recourse to snowpack modeling. A parsimonious model of snow and ground-ice thickness is driven with daily temperature and precipitation data collected at a nearby weather station. The model uses the degree-day concept and has three adjustable parameters which are tuned to correlate model snow and ground-ice thicknesses to the limited observations available: April snow accumulation measurements on two local glaciers, and a limited number of ground-ice observations made in recent years. Parameter values used are comparable to those reported elsewhere. We find that modeled mean winter ground-ice thickness explains a significant percentage of the observed variance in reindeer population growth rate. Adding other explanatory parameters, such as modeled mean winter snowpack thickness or previous years' population size does not significanly improve the relation. Furthermore, positioning data from a small subset of reindeer show that model icing events are

  13. High dynamic range active pixel sensor arrays for digital x-ray imaging using a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Jackson; Nathan, Arokia; Rowlands, John

    2006-05-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) active matrix flat panel imagers have gained considerable significance in large area digital imaging applications, in view of their large area readout capability. Current interests lie in a multifaceted a-Si:H array which is compatible with multiple x-ray imaging modalities. This concept entails a single detector system with sufficient dynamic range and variable signal gain. This article reports on an active pixel sensor (APS) array with high dynamic range and programable gain for multimodality x-ray imaging. Initial results have demonstrated sensitivity from subpicoampere to nanoampere photocurrent, which proves amenable for both low-dosage dynamic imaging and high input static imaging. In addition, the programable system signal gain alleviates problems such as output saturation and ensures signal readout linearity to further improve the exploitable dynamic range. Together with external amplification, this APS circuit delivers the performance needed in terms of signal gain, dynamic range, and readout rate entailed by fluoroscopic and radiographic imaging applications.

  14. A dynamic attenuator improves spectral imaging with energy-discriminating, photon counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2015-03-01

    Energy-discriminating, photon counting (EDPC) detectors have high potential in spectral imaging applications but exhibit degraded performance when the incident count rate approaches or exceeds the characteristic count rate of the detector. In order to reduce the requirements on the detector, we explore the strategy of modulating the X-ray flux field using a recently proposed dynamic, piecewise-linear attenuator. A previous paper studied this modulation for photon counting detectors but did not explore the impact on spectral applications. In this work, we modeled detection with a bipolar triangular pulse shape (Taguchi et al., 2011) and estimated the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) of the variance of material selective and equivalent monoenergetic images, assuming deterministic errors at high flux could be corrected. We compared different materials for the dynamic attenuator and found that rare earth elements, such as erbium, outperformed previously proposed materials such as iron in spectral imaging. The redistribution of flux reduces the variance or dose, consistent with previous studies on benefits with conventional detectors. Numerical simulations based on DICOM datasets were used to assess the impact of the dynamic attenuator for detectors with several different characteristic count rates. The dynamic attenuator reduced the peak incident count rate by a factor of 4 in the thorax and 44 in the pelvis, and a 10 Mcps/mm (2) EDPC detector with dynamic attenuator provided generally superior image quality to a 100 Mcps/mm (2) detector with reference bowtie filter for the same dose. The improvement is more pronounced in the material images. PMID:25265628

  15. A phenomenological model to study the energy discrimination potential of GEM detectors in the X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Causa, F.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Claps, G.; Gabellieri, L.

    2015-11-01

    An empirical model is presented to study the operational characteristics of GEM detectors in the X-ray range and, in particular, its energy discrimination potential. Physical processes are modelled from a macroscopic point of view, to provide a simple but effective simulation tool. Experimental data from monochromatic and combined, two-line fluorescence sources, are used to validate the model and provide realistic estimates of the empirical parameters used in the description. The model is instrumental in understanding the role of threshold, gain and operational conditions to achieve energy-discriminating response. Appropriate choices of gas mixtures, threshold and gain will permit to best utilise this new functionality of the GEM to improve the efficiency of image detectors in applications ranging from in-situ imaging in harsh environments, such as tokamaks, to composite materials analysis and medical imaging of tissues.

  16. A compendium of results from long-range alpha detector soil surface monitoring: June 1992--May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, S.E.; Bounds, J.A.; Allander, K.S.; Johnson, J.D.; MacArthur, D.W.; Caress, R.W.

    1994-11-01

    Soil surface monitors based on long-range alpha detector (LRAD) technology are being used to monitor alpha contamination at various sites in the Department of Energy complex. These monitors, the large soil-surface monitor (LSSM) and the small soil-surface monitor (SSSM), were used to help characterize sites at Fernald, Ohio, and active or inactive firing sites at Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Monitoring results are presented herein in chronological order.

  17. Toward real-time dynamic close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, Colin W.; Siebert, J. P.

    1993-10-01

    The goal of the Active Stereo Probe (ASP) project is the on-line recovery of 3D surfaces from stereo images captured using a dynamic binocular robot vision system. In this paper, we present results of 3D surface recovery using scale-space automatic stereo-matching. These results have been considerably enhanced by bathing the scene in textured light provided by the ASP active illumination source. We also describe a two stage approach that incorporates photogrammetric techniques into the ASP system to maintain calibration during dynamic system operation. Direct Linear Transform based calibration provides an initial static calibration. Thereafter, dynamic calibration is maintained by exploiting high resolution encoders to track the systems external orientation parameters and thereby constrain the search space of subsequent bundle adjustment. We expect this strategy to achieve the speed and accuracy required to satisfy many on-line 3D surface recovery applications.

  18. Satellite laser ranging using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors at 1064  nm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Li, Zhulian; Zhang, Labao; Zhai, Dongsheng; Li, Yuqiang; Zhang, Sen; Li, Ming; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng; Xiong, Yaoheng

    2016-08-15

    Satellite laser ranging operating at 1064 nm wavelength using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) is successfully demonstrated. A SNSPD with an intrinsic quantum efficiency of 80% and a dark count rate of 100 cps at 1064 nm wavelength is developed and introduced to Yunnan Observatory in China. With improved closed-loop telescope systems (field of view of about 26''), satellites including Cryosat, Ajisai, and Glonass with ranges of 1600 km, 3100 km, and 19,500 km, respectively, are experimentally ranged with mean echo rates of 1200/min, 4200/min, and 320/min, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of laser ranging for satellites using SNSPDs at 1064 nm wavelength. Theoretical analysis of the detection efficiency and the mean echo rate for typical satellites indicate that it is possible for a SNSPD to range satellites from low Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit. PMID:27519105

  19. Dynamically stable check valve concept for wide flow range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Absalom, J. G.

    1968-01-01

    Poppet-type check valve design accommodates a wide flow range without the usual chatter problem at low flow conditions. This pressure isolation check valve is proposed for the J-2 rocket pneumatic package.

  20. A high-dynamic range (HDR) back-side illuminated (BSI) CMOS image sensor for extreme UV detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinyang; Wolfs, Bram; Bogaerts, Jan; Meynants, Guy; BenMoussa, Ali

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a back-side illuminated 1 Megapixel CMOS image sensor made in 0.18um CMOS process for EUV detection. The sensor applied a so-call "dual-transfer" scheme to achieve low noise, high dynamic range. The EUV sensitivity is achieved with backside illumination use SOI-based solution. The epitaxial silicon layer is thinned down to less than 3um. The sensor is tested and characterized at 5nm to 30nm illumination. At 17.4nm targeted wavelength, the detector external QE (exclude quantum yield factor) reaches almost 60%. The detector reaches read noise of 1.2 ph- (@17.4nm), i.e. close to performance of EUV photon counting.

  1. An LC-IMS-MS Platform Providing Increased Dynamic Range for High-Throughput Proteomic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Livesay, Eric A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Danielson, William F.; Prior, David C.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2010-02-05

    A high-throughput approach and platform using 15 minute reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography (RPLC) separations in conjunction with ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) measurements was evaluated for the rapid analysis of complex proteomics samples. To test the separation quality of the short LC gradient, a sample was prepared by spiking twenty reference peptides at varying concentrations from 1 ng/mL to 10 µg/mL into a tryptic digest of mouse blood plasma and analyzed with both a LC-Linear Ion Trap Fourier Transform (FT) MS and LC-IMS-TOF MS. The LC-FT MS detected thirteen out of the twenty spiked peptides that had concentrations ≥100 ng/mL. In contrast, the drift time selected mass spectra from the LC-IMS-TOF MS analyses yielded identifications for nineteen of the twenty peptides with all spiking level present. The greater dynamic range of the LC-IMS-TOF MS system could be attributed to two factors. First, the LC-IMS-TOF MS system enabled drift time separation of the low concentration spiked peptides from the high concentration mouse peptide matrix components, reducing signal interference and background, and allowing species to be resolved that would otherwise be obscured by other components. Second, the automatic gain control (AGC) in the linear ion trap of the hybrid FT MS instrument limits the number of ions that are accumulated to reduce space charge effects, but in turn limits the achievable dynamic range compared to the TOF detector.

  2. A 1-channel 3-band wide dynamic range compression chip for vibration transducer of implantable hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Seong, Kiwoong; Kim, Myoungnam; Cho, Jinho; Lee, Jyunghyun

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a digital audio processing chip which uses a wide dynamic range compression (WDRC) algorithm is designed and implemented for implantable hearing aids system. The designed chip operates at a single voltage of 3.3V and drives a 16 bit parallel input and output at 32 kHz sample. The designed chip has 1-channel 3-band WDRC composed of a FIR filter bank, a level detector, and a compression part. To verify the performance of the designed chip, we measured the frequency separations of bands and compression gain control to reflect the hearing threshold level. PMID:24211991

  3. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  4. High-performance quantum ring detector for the 1-3 terahertz range

    SciTech Connect

    Bhowmick, S.; Huang, G.; Guo, W.; Lee, C. S.; Bhattacharya, P.; Ariyawansa, G.; Perera, A. G. U.

    2010-06-07

    Molecular beam epitaxy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots and their subsequent transformation to quantum rings by postepitaxy thermal annealing have been investigated. Photoconductive detectors with multiple quantum ring layers in the active region exhibit dark current density approx10{sup -8} A/cm{sup 2} at a bias of 2 V at 4.2 K. The rings have a single bound state, and emission of photoexcited carriers gives rise to a spectral response peaking at 1.82 THz (165 mum) at 5.2 K. Peak responsivity of 25 A/W, specific detectivity, D*, of 1x10{sup 16} Jones and a total quantum efficiency of 19% are measured with 1 V bias at 5.2 K. At 10 K and 1 V, D*approx3x10{sup 15} Jones is measured.

  5. Motor Controller System For Large Dynamic Range of Motor Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, David E. (Inventor); Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor); Dutton, Kenneth R. (Inventor); Paulson, Mitchell Scott (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A motor controller system uses a rotary sensor with a plurality of signal conditioning units, coupled to the rotary sensor. Each of these units, which is associated with a particular range of motor output shaft rotation rates, generate a feedback signal indicative of the position of the motor s output shaft. A controller (i) converts a selected motor output shaft rotation rate to a corresponding incremental amount of rotational movement for a selected fixed time period, (ii) selects, at periodic completions of the selected fixed time period, the feedback signal from one of the signal conditioning units for which the particular range of motor output shaft rotation rates associated therewith encompasses the selected motor output shaft rotation rate, and (iii) generates a motor drive signal based on a difference between the incremental amount of rotational movement and the feedback signal from the selected one of the signal conditioning Units.

  6. The dynamics of biogeographic ranges in the deep sea.

    PubMed

    McClain, Craig R; Hardy, Sarah Mincks

    2010-12-01

    Anthropogenic disturbances such as fishing, mining, oil drilling, bioprospecting, warming, and acidification in the deep sea are increasing, yet generalities about deep-sea biogeography remain elusive. Owing to the lack of perceived environmental variability and geographical barriers, ranges of deep-sea species were traditionally assumed to be exceedingly large. In contrast, seamount and chemosynthetic habitats with reported high endemicity challenge the broad applicability of a single biogeographic paradigm for the deep sea. New research benefiting from higher resolution sampling, molecular methods and public databases can now more rigorously examine dispersal distances and species ranges on the vast ocean floor. Here, we explore the major outstanding questions in deep-sea biogeography. Based on current evidence, many taxa appear broadly distributed across the deep sea, a pattern replicated in both the abyssal plains and specialized environments such as hydrothermal vents. Cold waters may slow larval metabolism and development augmenting the great intrinsic ability for dispersal among many deep-sea species. Currents, environmental shifts, and topography can prove to be dispersal barriers but are often semipermeable. Evidence of historical events such as points of faunal origin and climatic fluctuations are also evident in contemporary biogeographic ranges. Continued synthetic analysis, database construction, theoretical advancement and field sampling will be required to further refine hypotheses regarding deep-sea biogeography. PMID:20667884

  7. The dynamics of biogeographic ranges in the deep sea

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Craig R.; Hardy, Sarah Mincks

    2010-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbances such as fishing, mining, oil drilling, bioprospecting, warming, and acidification in the deep sea are increasing, yet generalities about deep-sea biogeography remain elusive. Owing to the lack of perceived environmental variability and geographical barriers, ranges of deep-sea species were traditionally assumed to be exceedingly large. In contrast, seamount and chemosynthetic habitats with reported high endemicity challenge the broad applicability of a single biogeographic paradigm for the deep sea. New research benefiting from higher resolution sampling, molecular methods and public databases can now more rigorously examine dispersal distances and species ranges on the vast ocean floor. Here, we explore the major outstanding questions in deep-sea biogeography. Based on current evidence, many taxa appear broadly distributed across the deep sea, a pattern replicated in both the abyssal plains and specialized environments such as hydrothermal vents. Cold waters may slow larval metabolism and development augmenting the great intrinsic ability for dispersal among many deep-sea species. Currents, environmental shifts, and topography can prove to be dispersal barriers but are often semipermeable. Evidence of historical events such as points of faunal origin and climatic fluctuations are also evident in contemporary biogeographic ranges. Continued synthetic analysis, database construction, theoretical advancement and field sampling will be required to further refine hypotheses regarding deep-sea biogeography. PMID:20667884

  8. Testing the Equivalence Principle in an Einstein Elevator: Detector Dynamics and Gravity Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, Dorthy (Technical Monitor); Lorenzini, E. C.; Shapiro, I. I.; Cosmo, M. L.; Ashenberg, J.; Parzianello, G.; Iafolla, V.; Nozzoli, S.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss specific, recent advances in the analysis of an experiment to test the Equivalence Principle (EP) in free fall. A differential accelerometer detector with two proof masses of different materials free falls inside an evacuated capsule previously released from a stratospheric balloon. The detector spins slowly about its horizontal axis during the fall. An EP violation signal (if present) will manifest itself at the rotational frequency of the detector. The detector operates in a quiet environment as it slowly moves with respect to the co-moving capsule. There are, however, gravitational and dynamical noise contributions that need to be evaluated in order to define key requirements for this experiment. Specifically, higher-order mass moments of the capsule contribute errors to the differential acceleration output with components at the spin frequency which need to be minimized. The dynamics of the free falling detector (in its present design) has been simulated in order to estimate the tolerable errors at release which, in turn, define the release mechanism requirements. Moreover, the study of the higher-order mass moments for a worst-case position of the detector package relative to the cryostat has led to the definition of requirements on the shape and size of the proof masses.

  9. High Dynamic Range Complex Impedance Measurement System for Petrophysical Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; He, X.; Yao, H.; Tan, S.; Shi, H.; Shen, R.; Yan, C.; Zeng, P.; He, L.; Qiao, N.; Xi, F.; Zhang, H.; Xie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization method (SIP) or complex resistivity method is increasing its application in metalliferous ore exploration, hydrocarbon exploration, underground water exploration, monitoring of environment pollution, and the evaluation of environment remediation. And the measurement of complex resistivity or complex impedance of rock/ore sample and polluted water plays a fundamental role in improving the application effect of SIP and the application scope of SIP. However, current instruments can't guaranty the accuracy of measurement when the resistance of sample is less than 10Ω or great than 100kΩ. A lot of samples, such as liquid, polluted sea water, igneous rock, limestone, and sandstone, can't be measured with reliable complex resistivity result. Therefore, this problem projects a shadow in the basic research and application research of SIP. We design a high precision measurement system from the study of measurement principle, sample holder, and measurement instrument. We design input buffers in a single board. We adopt operation amplifier AD549 in this system because of its ultra-high input impedance and ultra-low current noise. This buffer is good in acquiring potential signal across high impedance sample. By analyzing the sources of measurement error and errors generated by the measurement system, we propose a correction method to remove the error in order to achieve high quality complex impedance measurement for rock and ore samples. This measurement system can improve the measurement range of the complex impedance to 0.1 Ω ~ 10 GΩ with amplitude error less than 0.1% and phase error less than 0.1mrad when frequency ranges as 0.01 Hz ~ 1 kHz. We tested our system on resistors with resistance as 0.1Ω ~ 10 GΩ in frequency range as 1 Hz ~ 1000 Hz, and the measurement error is less than 0.1 mrad. We also compared the result with LCR bridge and SCIP, we can find that the bridge's measuring range only reaches 100 MΩ, SCIP's measuring range

  10. Population dynamics and range expansion in nine-banded armadillos.

    PubMed

    Loughry, William J; Perez-Heydrich, Carolina; McDonough, Colleen M; Oli, Madan K

    2013-01-01

    Understanding why certain species can successfully colonize new areas while others do not is a central question in ecology. The nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) is a conspicuous example of a successful invader, having colonized much of the southern United States in the last 200 years. We used 15 years (1992-2006) of capture-mark-recapture data from a population of armadillos in northern Florida in order to estimate, and examine relationships among, various demographic parameters that may have contributed to this ongoing range expansion. Modeling across a range of values for γ, the probability of juveniles surviving in the population until first capture, we found that population growth rates varied from 0.80 for γ = 0.1, to 1.03 for γ = 1.0. Growth rates approached 1.0 only when γ ≥ 0.80, a situation that might not occur commonly because of the high rate of disappearance of juveniles. Net reproductive rate increased linearly with γ, but life expectancy (estimated at 3 years) was independent of γ. We also found that growth rates were lower during a 3-year period of hardwood removal that removed preferred habitat than in the years preceding or following. Life-table response experiment (LTRE) analysis indicated the decrease in growth rate during logging was primarily due to changes in survival rates of adults. Likewise, elasticity analyses of both deterministic and stochastic population growth rates revealed that survival parameters were more influential on population growth than were those related to reproduction. Collectively, our results are consistent with recent theories regarding biological invasions which posit that populations no longer at the leading edge of range expansion do not exhibit strong positive growth rates, and that high reproductive output is less critical in predicting the likelihood of successful invasion than are life-history strategies that emphasize allocation of resources to future, as opposed to current, reproduction

  11. Population Dynamics and Range Expansion in Nine-Banded Armadillos

    PubMed Central

    Loughry, William J.; Perez-Heydrich, Carolina; McDonough, Colleen M.; Oli, Madan K.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding why certain species can successfully colonize new areas while others do not is a central question in ecology. The nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) is a conspicuous example of a successful invader, having colonized much of the southern United States in the last 200 years. We used 15 years (1992–2006) of capture-mark-recapture data from a population of armadillos in northern Florida in order to estimate, and examine relationships among, various demographic parameters that may have contributed to this ongoing range expansion. Modeling across a range of values for γ, the probability of juveniles surviving in the population until first capture, we found that population growth rates varied from 0.80 for γ = 0.1, to 1.03 for γ = 1.0. Growth rates approached 1.0 only when γ ≥0.80, a situation that might not occur commonly because of the high rate of disappearance of juveniles. Net reproductive rate increased linearly with γ, but life expectancy (estimated at 3 years) was independent of γ. We also found that growth rates were lower during a 3-year period of hardwood removal that removed preferred habitat than in the years preceding or following. Life-table response experiment (LTRE) analysis indicated the decrease in growth rate during logging was primarily due to changes in survival rates of adults. Likewise, elasticity analyses of both deterministic and stochastic population growth rates revealed that survival parameters were more influential on population growth than were those related to reproduction. Collectively, our results are consistent with recent theories regarding biological invasions which posit that populations no longer at the leading edge of range expansion do not exhibit strong positive growth rates, and that high reproductive output is less critical in predicting the likelihood of successful invasion than are life-history strategies that emphasize allocation of resources to future, as opposed to current

  12. Large dynamic range Atomic Force Microscope for overlay improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Stefan; Fritz, Erik; Crowcombe, Will; Liebig, Thomas; Kramer, Geerten; Witvoet, Gert; Duivenvoorde, Tom; Overtoom, Ton; Rijnbeek, Ramon; van Zwet, Erwin; van Dijsseldonk, Anton; den Boef, Arie; Beems, Marcel; Levasier, Leon

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays most overlay metrology tools assess the overlay performance based on marker features which are deposited next to the functional device features within each layer of the semiconductor device. However, correct overlay of the relatively coarse marker features does not directly guarantee correct overlay of the much smaller device features. This paper presents the development of a tool that allows to measure the relative distance between the marker and device features within each layer of the semiconductor device, which can be used to improve the overlay at device feature level. In order to be effective, the marker to device feature distance should be measured with sub-nanometer measurement uncertainty over several millimeters range. Furthermore, the tool should be capable of profiling the marker features to allows prediction of the location interpretation of the optical diffraction based alignment sensors, which are sensitive for potential asymmetry of the marker features. To enable this, a highly stable Atomic Force Microscope system is being developed. The probe is positioned relative to the wafer with a 6DOF controlled hexapod stage, which has a relatively large positioning range of 8x8mm. The position and orientation of this stage is measured relative to the wafer using 6 interferometers via a highly stable metrology frame. A tilted probe concept is utilized to allow profiling of the high aspect ratio marker and device features. Current activities are aimed at demonstrating the measurement capabilities of the developed AFM system.

  13. Calibration and GEANT4 Simulations of the Phase II Proton Compute Tomography (pCT) Range Stack Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Uzunyan, S. A.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Coutrakon, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Kalnins, J.; Zutshi, V.; Ford, R.; Rauch, J. E.; Rubinov, P.; Sellberg, G.; Wilson, P.; Naimuddin, M.

    2015-12-29

    Northern Illinois University in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and Delhi University has been designing and building a proton CT scanner for applications in proton treatment planning. The Phase II proton CT scanner consists of eight planes of tracking detectors with two X and two Y coordinate measurements both before and after the patient. In addition, a range stack detector consisting of a stack of thin scintillator tiles, arranged in twelve eight-tile frames, is used to determine the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of each track through the patient. The X-Y coordinates and WEPL are required input for image reconstruction software to find the relative (proton) stopping powers (RSP) value of each voxel in the patient and generate a corresponding 3D image. In this Note we describe tests conducted in 2015 at the proton beam at the Central DuPage Hospital in Warrenville, IL, focusing on the range stack calibration procedure and comparisons with the GEANT~4 range stack simulation.

  14. A long-range, wide field-of-view infrared eyeblink detector.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Steven B; Detweiler, Krystal L; Holland, Kyle H; Hord, Michael A; Bracha, Vlastislav

    2006-04-15

    Classical conditioning of the eyeblink response in the rabbit is one of the most advanced models of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. Successful use of the eyeblink conditioning paradigm requires precise measurements of the eyeblink response. One common technique of eyelid movement detection utilizes measurements of infrared (IR) light reflected from the surface of the eye. The performance of current IR sensors, however, is limited by their sensitivity to ambient infrared noise, by their small field-of-view and by short working distances. To address these limitations, we developed an IR eyeblink detector consisting of a pulsing (62.5 kHz) IR light emitting diode (LED) paired with a silicon IR photodiode and circuit that synchronously demodulates the recorded signal and rejects background IR noise. The working distance of the sensor exceeds 20 mm, and the field-of-view is larger than the area of a rabbit's eye. Due to its superior characteristics, the new sensor is ideally suited for both standard eyeblink conditioning and for studies that utilize IR-containing visual stimuli and/or that are conducted in an environment contaminated with IR noise. PMID:16257057

  15. Single-Photon Detectors for Time-of-Flight Range Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, David; Simoni, Andrea

    We live in a three-dimensional (3D) world and thanks to the stereoscopic vision provided by our two eyes, in combination with the powerful neural network of the brain we are able to perceive the distance of the objects. Nevertheless, despite the huge market volume of digital cameras, solid-state image sensors can capture only a two-dimensional (2D) projection, of the scene under observation, losing a variable of paramount importance, i.e., the scene depth. On the contrary, 3D vision tools could offer amazing possibilities of improvement in many areas thanks to the increased accuracy and reliability of the models representing the environment. Among the great variety of distance measuring techniques and detection systems available, this chapter will treat only the emerging niche of solid-state, scannerless systems based on the TOF principle and using a detector SPAD-based pixels. The chapter is organized into three main parts. At first, TOF systems and measuring techniques will be described. In the second part, most meaningful sensor architectures for scannerless TOF distance measurements will be analyzed, focusing onto the circuital building blocks required by time-resolved image sensors. Finally, a performance summary is provided and a perspective view for the near future developments of SPAD-TOF sensors is given.

  16. Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy with high temporal dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Domke, Matthias; Rapp, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael; Huber, Heinz P

    2012-04-23

    Ultrafast pump-probe microscopy is a common method for time and space resolved imaging of short and ultra-short pulse laser ablation. The temporal delay between the ablating pump pulse and the illuminating probe pulse is tuned either by an optical delay, resulting in several hundred femtoseconds temporal resolution for delay times up to a few ns, or by an electronic delay, resulting in several nanoseconds resolution for longer delay times. In this work we combine both delay types for temporally high resolved observations of complete ablation processes ranging from femtoseconds to microseconds, while ablation is initiated by an ultrafast 660 fs laser pump pulse. For this purpose, we also demonstrate the calibration of the delay time zero point, the synchronization of both probe sources, as well as a method for image quality enhancing. In addition, we present for the first time to our knowledge pump-probe microscopy investigations of the complete substrate side selective ablation process of molybdenum films on glass. The initiation of mechanical film deformation is observed at about 400 ps, continues until approximately 15 ns, whereupon a Mo disk is sheared off free from thermal effects due to a directly induced laser lift-off ablation process. PMID:22535122

  17. Holarctic genetic structure and range dynamics in the woolly mammoth

    PubMed Central

    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria; Dalén, Love; Lister, Adrian M.; Vartanyan, Sergey; Sablin, Mikhail; Sher, Andrei; Edmark, Veronica Nyström; Brandström, Mikael D.; Germonpré, Mietje; Barnes, Ian; Thomas, Jessica A.

    2013-01-01

    Ancient DNA analyses have provided enhanced resolution of population histories in many Pleistocene taxa. However, most studies are spatially restricted, making inference of species-level biogeographic histories difficult. Here, we analyse mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in the woolly mammoth from across its Holarctic range to reconstruct its history over the last 200 thousand years (kyr). We identify a previously undocumented major mtDNA lineage in Europe, which was replaced by another major mtDNA lineage 32–34 kyr before present (BP). Coalescent simulations provide support for demographic expansions at approximately 121 kyr BP, suggesting that the previous interglacial was an important driver for demography and intraspecific genetic divergence. Furthermore, our results suggest an expansion into Eurasia from America around 66 kyr BP, coinciding with the first exposure of the Bering Land Bridge during the Late Pleistocene. Bayesian inference indicates Late Pleistocene demographic stability until 20–15 kyr BP, when a severe population size decline occurred. PMID:24026825

  18. Development of a longer range standoff millimetre wave radar concealed threat detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, Nicholas J.; Southgate, Matthew J.; Andrews, David A.; Rezgui, Nacer D.; Harmer, Stuart W.; O'Reilly, Dean

    2013-05-01

    A millimeter wave (75 - 110 GHz) polarimetric radar system (MiRTLE) has been developed for the detection of threat objects, such as guns, knives, or explosive devices, which have been concealed under clothing upon the human body. The system uses a Gaussian lens antenna to enable operation at stand-off ranges up to 25 meters. By utilizing ultra-wideband Swept Frequency Continuous Wave Radar very high range resolution (~ 10mm) is realized. The system is capable of detecting objects positioned in front of the body and of measuring the range of a target. By interpretation of the scattered waveform, the presence of a wide spectrum of threat items concealed on the human body may be detected. Threat detection is autonomously rendered by application of a neural network to the scattered time domain, polarimetric radar returns and the system may be taught to alarm or reject certain classes of objects; this allows for highly specific or broad spectrum threat detection. The radar system is portable and operator steerable allowing standoff monitoring of moving human targets in real time. Rapid (1ms) sweep times and fast signal acquisition and processing allow decisions to be made at video frame rates (30 fps) and integrated directly to a video feed providing the operator with a field of view and facilitating aiming. Performance parameters for detection of guns and simulated explosive devices are presented for ranges up to 25 meters.

  19. Estimability and simple dynamical analyses of range (range-rate range-difference) observations to artificial satellites. [laser range observations to LAGEOS using non-Bayesian statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangelder, B. H. W.

    1978-01-01

    Non-Bayesian statistics were used in simulation studies centered around laser range observations to LAGEOS. The capabilities of satellite laser ranging especially in connection with relative station positioning are evaluated. The satellite measurement system under investigation may fall short in precise determinations of the earth's orientation (precession and nutation) and earth's rotation as opposed to systems as very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and lunar laser ranging (LLR). Relative station positioning, determination of (differential) polar motion, positioning of stations with respect to the earth's center of mass and determination of the earth's gravity field should be easily realized by satellite laser ranging (SLR). The last two features should be considered as best (or solely) determinable by SLR in contrast to VLBI and LLR.

  20. Experimental and MC determination of HPGe detector efficiency in the 40-2754 keV energy range for measuring point source geometry with the source-to-detector distance of 25 cm.

    PubMed

    Dryak, Pavel; Kovar, Petr

    2006-01-01

    A precise model of a 40% relative efficiency p-type HPGe detector was created for photon detection efficiency calculation using the MCNP code. All detector parameters were determined by different experiments. No experimental calibration points were used for the modification of detector parameters. The model was validated by comparing calculated and experimental full energy peak efficiencies in the 40-2754 keV energy range, for point-source geometry with the source-to-detector distance of 25 cm. PMID:16564693

  1. NASA’s new High Dynamic Range Camera Records Rocket Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is footage of Orbital ATK’s QM-2 solid rocket booster test taken by NASA’s High Dynamic Range Stereo X (HiDyRS-X) camera. HiDyRS-X records high speed, high dynamic range footage in multiple ex...

  2. A gaze-contingent high-dynamic range display for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2010-02-01

    The grayscale resolution of current liquid crystal display technology limits its applications in medical imaging with wide dynamic range and dense grayscales are required. We propose an approach that dynamically processes the display image such that the luminance and contrast of the gazed area is optimized. A gazecontingent interactive display system based on an 8-bit LCD and an eye-tracker was implemented to emulate the proposed concept for a high-dynamic range display.

  3. Characterization of a fiber-optic-coupled radioluminescent detector for application in the mammography energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Benevides, Luis A.; Huston, Alan L.; Justus, Brian L.; Falkenstein, Paul; Brateman, Libby F.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2007-06-15

    Fiber-optic-coupled radioluminescent (FOC) dosimeters are members of a new family of dosimeters that are finding increased clinical applications. This study provides the first characterization of a Cu doped quartz FOC dosimeter at diagnostic energies, specifically across the range of x-ray energies and intensities used in mammographies. We characterize the calibration factors, linearity, angular dependence, and reproducibility of the FOC dosimeters. The sensitive element of each dosimeter was coupled to a photon counting photomultiplier module via 1 m long optical fibers. A computer controlled interface permitted real-time monitoring of the dosimeter output and rapid data acquisition. The axial-angular responses for all dosimeter models show nearly uniform response without any marked decrease in sensitivity. However, the normal-to-axial angular response showed a marked decrease in sensitivity of about 0 deg. C and 180 deg. C. In most clinical applications, appropriate dosimeter positioning can minimize the contributions of the varying normal-to-axial response. The FOC dosimeters having the greatest sensitive length provided the greatest sensitivity, with greatest to lowest sensitivity observed for 4.0, 1.9, 1.6, and 1.1 mm length sensitive elements. The average sensitivity of the dosimeters varies linearly with sensitive volume (R{sup 2}=95%) and as a function of tube potential and target/filter combinations, generally exhibiting an increased sensitivity for higher energies. The dosimeter sensitivity as a function of tube potential had an average increase of 4.72{+-}2.04% for dosimeter models and three target-filter combinations tested (Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, and Rh/Rh) over a range of 25-31 kVp. All dosimeter models exhibited a linear response (R{sup 2}{>=}0.997) to exposure for all target-filter combinations, tube potentials, and tube current-time product stations evaluated and demonstrated reproducibility within 2%. All of the dosimeters examined in this study provided a

  4. Characterization of a fiber-optic-coupled radioluminescent detector for application in the mammography energy range.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Luis A; Huston, Alan L; Justus, Brian L; Falkenstein, Paul; Brateman, Libby F; Hintenlang, David E

    2007-06-01

    Fiber-optic-coupled radioluminescent (FOC) dosimeters are members of a new family of dosimeters that are finding increased clinical applications. This study provides the first characterization of a Cu doped quartz FOC dosimeter at diagnostic energies, specifically across the range of x-ray energies and intensities used in mammographies. We characterize the calibration factors, linearity, angular dependence, and reproducibility of the FOC dosimeters. The sensitive element of each dosimeter was coupled to a photon counting photomultiplier module via 1 m long optical fibers. A computer controlled interface permitted real-time monitoring of the dosimeter output and rapid data acquisition. The axial-angular responses for all dosimeter models show nearly uniform response without any marked decrease in sensitivity. However, the normal-to-axial angular response showed a marked decrease in sensitivity of about 0 degrees C and 180 degrees C. In most clinical applications, appropriate dosimeter positioning can minimize the contributions of the varying normal-to-axial response. The FOC dosimeters having the greatest sensitive length provided the greatest sensitivity, with greatest to lowest sensitivity observed for 4.0, 1.9, 1.6, and 1.1 mm length sensitive elements. The average sensitivity of the dosimeters varies linearly with sensitive volume (R2=95%) and as a function of tube potential and target/filter combinations, generally exhibiting an increased sensitivity for higher energies. The dosimeter sensitivity as a function of tube potential had an average increase of 4.72 +/- 2.04% for dosimeter models and three target-filter combinations tested (Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, and Rh/Rh) over a range of 25-31 kVp. All dosimeter models exhibited a linear response (R2 > or = 0.997) to exposure for all target-filter combinations, tube potentials, and tube current-time product stations evaluated and demonstrated reproducibility within 2%. All of the dosimeters examined in this study provided a

  5. Predicted image quality of a CMOS APS X-ray detector across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinidis, A.

    2015-09-01

    Digital X-ray detectors based on Complementary Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor (CMOS) Active Pixel Sensor (APS) technology have been introduced in the early 2000s in medical imaging applications. In a previous study the X-ray performance (i.e. presampling Modulation Transfer Function (pMTF), Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE)) of the Dexela 2923MAM CMOS APS X-ray detector was evaluated within the mammographic energy range using monochromatic synchrotron radiation (i.e. 17-35 keV). In this study image simulation was used to predict how the mammographic beam quality affects image quality. In particular, the experimentally measured monochromatic pMTF, NNPS and SNR parameters were combined with various mammographic spectral shapes (i.e. Molybdenum/Molybdenum (Mo/Mo), Rhodium/Rhodium (Rh/Rh), Tungsten/Aluminium (W/Al) and Tungsten/Rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filtration combinations at 28 kV). The image quality was measured in terms of Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR) using a synthetic breast phantom (4 cm thick with 50% glandularity). The results can be used to optimize the imaging conditions in order to minimize patient's Mean Glandular Dose (MGD).

  6. A simulation study investigating a radiation detector utilizing the prompt gamma range verification technique for proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Andrew David

    Proton therapy has shown to be a viable therapy for radiation oncology applications. The advantages of using protons as compared to photons in the treatments of diseases with radiation are numerous including the ability to deliver overall lower amounts of lethal radiation doses to the patient. This advantage is due to the fundamental interaction mechanism of the incident therapeutic protons with the patient, which produces a characteristic dose-distribution unique only to protons. Unlike photons, the entire proton beam is absorbed within the patent and the dose-distribution's maximum occurs near the end of the proton's path. Protons deliver less dose on the skin and intervening tissues, tighter dose conformality to the disease site, as well as no dose past the target volume, sparring healthy tissue distally in the patient. Current research in proton therapy is geared towards minimizing proton range uncertainty and monitoring in-vivo the location of the proton's path. Monitoring the beam's path serves also to verify which healthy structures/tissues were irradiated and whether the target volume has met the prescription dose. Among the many techniques used for in-vivo proton monitoring, the technique based on the emitted secondary particles, specifically the Prompt Gamma (PG) method, can be used for clinical implementation. This work focuses on developing a radiation detector system for using the PG method by investigating the characterizing the secondary particle field emitted from plastic and water phantoms as well as a radiation detector based on glass materials that exploits the Cherenkov phenomenon.

  7. EMCCD-Based High Resolution Dynamic X-Ray Detector for Neurovascular Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, P.; Vasan, S.N. Swetadri; Jain, A.; Panse, A.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed and developed from the discrete component level a high resolution dynamic detector for neurovascular interventions. The heart of the detector is a 1024 × 1024 pixel electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) with a pixel size of 13 × 13 μm2, bonded to a fiber optic plate (FOP), and optically coupled to a 350 μm micro-columnar CsI(TI) scintillator via a 3.3:1 fiber optic taper (FOT). The detector provides x-ray images of 9 cycles/mm resolution at 15 frames/sec and real time live video at 30 frames/sec with binning at a lower resolution, both independent of gain applied to EMCCD, as needed for region-of-interest (ROI) image guidance during neurovascular interventions. PMID:22256144

  8. Image dynamic range test and evaluation of Gaofen-2 dual cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Gan, Fuping; Wei, Dandan

    2015-12-01

    In order to fully understand the dynamic range of Gaofen-2 satellite data and support the data processing, application and next satellites development, in this article, we evaluated the dynamic range by calculating some statistics such as maximum ,minimum, average and stand deviation of four images obtained at the same time by Gaofen-2 dual cameras in Beijing area; then the maximum ,minimum, average and stand deviation of each longitudinal overlap of PMS1,PMS2 were calculated respectively for the evaluation of each camera's dynamic range consistency; and these four statistics of each latitudinal overlap of PMS1,PMS2 were calculated respectively for the evaluation of the dynamic range consistency between PMS1 and PMS2 at last. The results suggest that there is a wide dynamic range of DN value in the image obtained by PMS1 and PMS2 which contains rich information of ground objects; in general, the consistency of dynamic range between the single camera images is in close agreement, but also a little difference, so do the dual cameras. The consistency of dynamic range between the single camera images is better than the dual cameras'.

  9. Plasmonic substrates for multiplexed protein microarrays with femtomolar sensitivity and broad dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Tabakman, Scott M.; Lau, Lana; Robinson, Joshua T.; Price, Jordan; Sherlock, Sarah P.; Wang, Hailiang; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhuo; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Jarrell, Justin A.; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2012-01-01

    Protein chips are widely used for high-throughput proteomic analysis, but to date, the low sensitivity and narrow dynamic range have limited their capabilities in diagnostics and proteomics. Here we present protein microarrays on a novel nanostructured, plasmonic gold film with near-infrared fluorescence enhancement of up to 100-fold, extending the dynamic range of protein detection by three orders of magnitude towards the fM regime. We employ plasmonic protein microarrays for the early detection of a cancer biomarker, carcinoembryonic antigen, in the sera of mice bearing a xenograft tumour model. Further, we demonstrate a multiplexed autoantigen array for human autoantibodies implicated in a range of autoimmune diseases with superior signal-to-noise ratios and broader dynamic range compared with commercial nitrocellulose and glass substrates. The high sensitivity, broad dynamic range and easy adaptability of plasmonic protein chips presents new opportunities in proteomic research and diagnostics applications. PMID:21915108

  10. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Isobe, M; Ogawa, K; Miyake, H; Hayashi, H; Kobuchi, T; Nakano, Y; Watanabe, K; Uritani, A; Misawa, T; Nishitani, T; Tomitaka, M; Kumagai, T; Mashiyama, Y; Ito, D; Kono, S; Yamauchi, M; Takeiri, Y

    2014-11-01

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10(9) counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10(16) n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design. PMID:25430293

  11. Evaluation of some wide dynamic range readout systems for photoelectric integrating spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, M. L.; Gordon, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    Five types of electronic circuits commonly used for readout of currents from photomultiplier tubes were evaluated. This evaluation was conducted to define the experimental limits of achieving the widest possible dynamic range of light detection and concentration measurements in spectrochemical analysis. The circuits evaluated included the photon-counting technique and four dc circuits. These circuits displayed a dynamic range from 3 to about 4.5 decades within a repeatability criterion of 1 percent, or better. The maximum dynamic range allowed by the photomultiplier tube in this application was estimated to be about 6 decades.

  12. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, M. Takeiri, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T.; Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A.; Misawa, T.; Nishitani, T.; Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    2014-11-15

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10{sup 9} counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10{sup 16} n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  13. Characterisation of a counting imaging detector for electron detection in the energy range 10-20 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, G.; Sikharulidze, I.; Matheson, J.; Derbyshire, G.; Kirkland, A. I.; Abrahams, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    As part of a feasibility study into the use of novel electron detector for X-ray photoelectron emission microscopes (XPEEM) and related methods, we have characterised the imaging performance of a counting Medipix 2 readout chip bump bonded to a Silicon diode array sensor and directly exposed to electrons in the energy range 10-20 keV. Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) and Noise Power Spectra (NPS) are presented, demonstrating very good performance for the case of electrons with an energy of 20 keV. Significant reductions in DQE are observed for electrons with energy of 15 keV and less, down to levels of 20% for electrons of 10 keV.

  14. Absorbance detector for capillary electrophoresis based on light-emitting diodes and photodiodes for the deep-ultraviolet range.

    PubMed

    Bui, Duy Anh; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-11-20

    A new absorbance detector for capillary electrophoresis featuring relatively high intensity light-emitting diodes as radiation sources and photodiodes for the deep-UV range was developed. The direct relationship of absorbance values and concentrations was obtained by emulating Lambert-Beer's law with the application of a beam splitter to obtain a reference signal and a log-ratio amplifier circuitry. The performance of the cell was investigated at 255 nm with the detection of sulfanilic, 4-nitrobenzoic, 4-hydroxybenzoic and 4-aminobenzoic acid and the indirect detection of acetate, propionate, butyrate and caproate using benzoate as the displacement dye molecule. Vanillic acid, L-tyrosine and DL-tryptophan as well as the sulfonamides sulfamerazine, sulfathiazole and sulfamethazine were determined at 280 nm. Good linearities over 3 orders of magnitude were obtained. The noise level recorded was as low as 50 μAU and the drift typically <200 μAU/5 min. PMID:26091783

  15. Verification of proton range, position, and intensity in IMPT with a 3D liquid scintillator detector system

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, L.; Poenisch, F.; Sahoo, N.; Robertson, D.; Lee, A.; Gillin, M. T.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) using spot scanned proton beams relies on the delivery of a large number of beamlets to shape the dose distribution in a highly conformal manner. The authors have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator to measure the spatial location, intensity, and depth of penetration (energy) of the proton beamlets in near real-time. Methods: The detector system consists of a 20 × 20 × 20 cc liquid scintillator (LS) material in a light tight enclosure connected to a CCD camera. This camera has a field of view of 25.7 by 19.3 cm and a pixel size of 0.4 mm. While the LS is irradiated, the camera continuously acquires images of the light distribution produced inside the LS. Irradiations were made with proton pencil beams produced with a spot-scanning nozzle. Pencil beams with nominal ranges in water between 9.5 and 17.6 cm were scanned to irradiate an area of 10 × 10 cm square on the surface of the LS phantom. Image frames were acquired at 50 ms per frame. Results: The signal to noise ratio of a typical Bragg peak was about 170. Proton range measured from the light distribution produced in the LS was accurate to within 0.3 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured range was 0.6 mm. Lateral position of the measured pencil beam was accurate to within 0.4 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured lateral position was 0.8 mm; however, the accuracy of this measurement could be improved by correcting light scattering artifacts. Intensity of single proton spots were measured with precision ranging from 3 % for the smallest spot intensity (0.005 MU) to 0.5 % for the largest spot (0.04 MU). Conclusions: Our LS detector system has been shown to be capable of fast, submillimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume. This system could be used for beam range, intensity and position verification in IMPT. PMID:22380355

  16. Verification of proton range, position, and intensity in IMPT with a 3D liquid scintillator detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, L.; Poenisch, F.; Sahoo, N.; Robertson, D.; Lee, A.; Gillin, M. T.; Mohan, R.; Beddar, S.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) using spot scanned proton beams relies on the delivery of a large number of beamlets to shape the dose distribution in a highly conformal manner. The authors have developed a 3D system based on liquid scintillator to measure the spatial location, intensity, and depth of penetration (energy) of the proton beamlets in near real-time. Methods: The detector system consists of a 20 x 20 x 20 cc liquid scintillator (LS) material in a light tight enclosure connected to a CCD camera. This camera has a field of view of 25.7 by 19.3 cm and a pixel size of 0.4 mm. While the LS is irradiated, the camera continuously acquires images of the light distribution produced inside the LS. Irradiations were made with proton pencil beams produced with a spot-scanning nozzle. Pencil beams with nominal ranges in water between 9.5 and 17.6 cm were scanned to irradiate an area of 10 x 10 cm square on the surface of the LS phantom. Image frames were acquired at 50 ms per frame. Results: The signal to noise ratio of a typical Bragg peak was about 170. Proton range measured from the light distribution produced in the LS was accurate to within 0.3 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured range was 0.6 mm. Lateral position of the measured pencil beam was accurate to within 0.4 mm on average. The largest deviation seen between the nominal and measured lateral position was 0.8 mm; however, the accuracy of this measurement could be improved by correcting light scattering artifacts. Intensity of single proton spots were measured with precision ranging from 3 % for the smallest spot intensity (0.005 MU) to 0.5 % for the largest spot (0.04 MU). Conclusions: Our LS detector system has been shown to be capable of fast, submillimeter spatial localization of proton spots delivered in a 3D volume. This system could be used for beam range, intensity and position verification in IMPT.

  17. How to enhance the dynamic range of excitatory-inhibitory excitable networks.

    PubMed

    Pei, Sen; Tang, Shaoting; Yan, Shu; Jiang, Shijin; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhiming

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the collective dynamics of excitatory-inhibitory excitable networks in response to external stimuli. How to enhance the dynamic range, which represents the ability of networks to encode external stimuli, is crucial to many applications. We regard the system as a two-layer network (E layer and I layer) and explore the criticality and dynamic range on diverse networks. Interestingly, we find that phase transition occurs when the dominant eigenvalue of the E layer's weighted adjacency matrix is exactly 1, which is only determined by the topology of the E layer. Meanwhile, it is shown that the dynamic range is maximized at a critical state. Based on theoretical analysis, we propose an inhibitory factor for each excitatory node. We suggest that if nodes with high inhibitory factors are cut out from the I layer, the dynamic range could be further enhanced. However, because of the sparseness of networks and passive function of inhibitory nodes, the improvement is relatively small compared to the original dynamic range. Even so, this provides a strategy to enhance the dynamic range. PMID:23005787

  18. Dynamic Range Adaptation to Sound Level Statistics in the Auditory Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bo; Wang, Grace I.; Dean, Isabel; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    The auditory system operates over a vast range of sound pressure levels (100–120 dB) with nearly constant discrimination ability across most of the range, well exceeding the dynamic range of most auditory neurons (20–40 dB). Dean et al. (Nat. Neurosci. 8:1684, 2005) have reported that the dynamic range of midbrain auditory neurons adapts to the distribution of sound levels in a continuous, dynamic stimulus by shifting towards the most frequently occurring level. Here we show that dynamic range adaptation, distinct from classic firing rate adaptation, also occurs in primary auditory neurons in anesthetized cats for tone and noise stimuli. Specifically, the range of sound levels over which firing rates of auditory-nerve (AN) fibers grows rapidly with level shifts nearly linearly with the most probable levels in a dynamic sound stimulus. This dynamic range adaptation was observed for fibers with all characteristic frequencies and spontaneous discharge rates. As in the midbrain, dynamic range adaptation improved the precision of level coding by the AN fiber population for the prevailing sound levels in the stimulus. However, dynamic range adaptation in the AN was weaker than in the midbrain, and not sufficient (0.25 dB/dB on average for broadband noise) to prevent a significant degradation of the precision of level coding by the AN population above 60 dB SPL. These findings suggest that adaptive processing of sound levels first occurs in the auditory periphery and is enhanced along the auditory pathway. PMID:19889991

  19. Ultrafast Optical Beam Deflection in a Planar Waveguide for High Dynamic Range Recording at Picosecond Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantos, C H; Heebner, J E

    2008-07-02

    We report the latest performance of an ultrafast, all-optical beam deflector based on a prism array imprinted in a planar waveguide. The deflector enables single-shot, high dynamic range optical recording with picosecond resolution.

  20. How interactions between animal movement and landscape processes modify range dynamics and extinction risk

    EPA Science Inventory

    Range dynamics models now incorporate many of the mechanisms and interactions that drive species distributions. However, connectivity continues to be studied using overly simple distance-based dispersal models with little consideration of how the individual behavior of dispersin...

  1. Dynamic Range of Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers in Multimode Links

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.L.T.; Dalal, R.V.; Ram, R.J.; Choquette, K.D.

    1999-07-07

    The authors report spurious free dynamic range measurements of 850nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers in short multimode links for radio frequency communication. For a 27m fiber link, the dynamic range at optimal bias was greater than 95dB-Hz{sup 2/3} for modulation frequencies between 1 and 5.5 GHz, which exceeds the requirements for antenna remoting in microcellular networks. In a free space link, they have measured the highest dynamic range in an 850nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser of 113dB-Hz{sup 2/3} at 900MHz. We have also investigated the effects of modal noise and differential mode delay on the dynamic range for longer lengths of fiber.

  2. The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces the impact of count rate loss with photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Scott S; Pelc, Norbert J

    2014-06-01

    Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) offer several advantages compared to standard energy-integrating x-ray detectors, but also face significant challenges. One key challenge is the high count rates required in CT. At high count rates, PCXDs exhibit count rate loss and show reduced detective quantum efficiency in signal-rich (or high flux) measurements. In order to reduce count rate requirements, a dynamic beam-shaping filter can be used to redistribute flux incident on the patient. We study the piecewise-linear attenuator in conjunction with PCXDs without energy discrimination capabilities. We examined three detector models: the classic nonparalyzable and paralyzable detector models, and a 'hybrid' detector model which is a weighted average of the two which approximates an existing, real detector (Taguchi et al 2011 Med. Phys. 38 1089-102). We derive analytic expressions for the variance of the CT measurements for these detectors. These expressions are used with raw data estimated from DICOM image files of an abdomen and a thorax to estimate variance in reconstructed images for both the dynamic attenuator and a static beam-shaping ('bowtie') filter. By redistributing flux, the dynamic attenuator reduces dose by 40% without increasing peak variance for the ideal detector. For non-ideal PCXDs, the impact of count rate loss is also reduced. The nonparalyzable detector shows little impact from count rate loss, but with the paralyzable model, count rate loss leads to noise streaks that can be controlled with the dynamic attenuator. With the hybrid model, the characteristic count rates required before noise streaks dominate the reconstruction are reduced by a factor of 2 to 3. We conclude that the piecewise-linear attenuator can reduce the count rate requirements of the PCXD in addition to improving dose efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction depends on the detector, with paralyzable detectors showing much greater benefit than nonparalyzable detectors. PMID

  3. The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces the impact of count rate loss with photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-06-01

    Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) offer several advantages compared to standard energy-integrating x-ray detectors, but also face significant challenges. One key challenge is the high count rates required in CT. At high count rates, PCXDs exhibit count rate loss and show reduced detective quantum efficiency in signal-rich (or high flux) measurements. In order to reduce count rate requirements, a dynamic beam-shaping filter can be used to redistribute flux incident on the patient. We study the piecewise-linear attenuator in conjunction with PCXDs without energy discrimination capabilities. We examined three detector models: the classic nonparalyzable and paralyzable detector models, and a ‘hybrid’ detector model which is a weighted average of the two which approximates an existing, real detector (Taguchi et al 2011 Med. Phys. 38 1089-102 ). We derive analytic expressions for the variance of the CT measurements for these detectors. These expressions are used with raw data estimated from DICOM image files of an abdomen and a thorax to estimate variance in reconstructed images for both the dynamic attenuator and a static beam-shaping (‘bowtie’) filter. By redistributing flux, the dynamic attenuator reduces dose by 40% without increasing peak variance for the ideal detector. For non-ideal PCXDs, the impact of count rate loss is also reduced. The nonparalyzable detector shows little impact from count rate loss, but with the paralyzable model, count rate loss leads to noise streaks that can be controlled with the dynamic attenuator. With the hybrid model, the characteristic count rates required before noise streaks dominate the reconstruction are reduced by a factor of 2 to 3. We conclude that the piecewise-linear attenuator can reduce the count rate requirements of the PCXD in addition to improving dose efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction depends on the detector, with paralyzable detectors showing much greater benefit than nonparalyzable detectors.

  4. The piecewise-linear dynamic attenuator reduces the impact of count rate loss with photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) offer several advantages compared to standard, energy-integrating x-ray detectors but also face significant challenges. One key challenge is the high count rates required in CT. At high count rates, PCXDs exhibit count rate loss and show reduced detective quantum efficiency in signal-rich (or high flux) measurements. In order to reduce count rate requirements, a dynamic beam-shaping filter can be used to redistribute flux incident on the patient. We study the piecewise-linear attenuator in conjunction with PCXDs without energy discrimination capabilities. We examined three detector models: the classic nonparalyzable and paralyzable detector models, and a “hybrid” detector model which is a weighted average of the two which approximates an existing, real detector (Taguchi et al, Med Phys 2011). We derive analytic expressions for the variance of the CT measurements for these detectors. These expressions are used with raw data estimated from DICOM image files of an abdomen and a thorax to estimate variance in reconstructed images for both the dynamic attenuator and a static beam-shaping (“bowtie”) filter. By redistributing flux, the dynamic attenuator reduces dose by 40% without increasing peak variance for the ideal detector. For non-ideal PCXDs, the impact of count rate loss is also reduced. The nonparalyzable detector shows little impact from count rate loss, but with the paralyzable model, count rate loss leads to noise streaks that can be controlled with the dynamic attenuator. With the hybrid model, the characteristic count rates required before noise streaks dominate the reconstruction are reduced by a factor of two to three. We conclude that the piecewise-linear attenuator can reduce the count rate requirements of the PCXD in addition to improving dose efficiency. The magnitude of this reduction depends on the detector, with paralyzable detectors showing much greater benefit than nonparalyzable detectors. PMID

  5. Estimation of low dynamic range images from single Bayer image using exposure look-up table for high dynamic range image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Hyoung; Kyung, Wang-Jun; Lee, Cheol-Hee; Ha, Yeong-Ho

    2011-01-01

    High dynamic range(HDR) imaging is a technique to represent the wider range of luminance from the lightest and darkest area of an image than normal digital imaging techniques. These techniques merge multiple images, called as LDR(low dynamic range) or SDR(standard dynamic range) images which have proper luminance with different exposure steps, to cover the entire dynamic range of real scenes. In the initial techniques, a series of acquisition process for LDR images according to exposure steps are required. However, several acquisition process of LDR images induce ghost artifact for HDR images due to moving objects. Recent researches have tried to reduce the number of LDR images with optimal exposure steps to eliminate the ghost artifacts. Nevertheless, they still require more than three times of acquisition processes, resulting ghosting artifacts. In this paper, we propose an HDR imaging from a single Bayer image with arbitrary exposures without additional acquisition processes. This method first generates new LDR images which are corresponding to each average luminance from user choices, based on Exposure LUTs(look-up tables). Since the LUTs contains relationship between uniform-gray patches and their average luminances according to whole exposure steps in a camera, new exposure steps for any average luminance can be easily estimated by applying average luminance of camera-output image and corresponding exposure step to LUTs. Then, objective LDR images are generated with new exposure steps from the current input image. Additionally, we compensate the color generation of saturated area by considering different sensitivity of each RGB channel from neighbor pixels in the Bayer image. Resulting HDR images are then merged by general method using captured images and estimated images for comparison. Observer's preference test shows that HDR images from the proposed method provides similar appearance with the result images using captured images.

  6. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor with large dynamic range by adaptive spot search method.

    PubMed

    Shinto, Hironobu; Saita, Yusuke; Nomura, Takanori

    2016-07-10

    A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) that consists of a microlens array and an image sensor has been used to measure the wavefront aberrations of human eyes. However, a conventional SHWFS has finite dynamic range depending on the diameter of the each microlens. The dynamic range cannot be easily expanded without a decrease of the spatial resolution. In this study, an adaptive spot search method to expand the dynamic range of an SHWFS is proposed. In the proposed method, spots are searched with the help of their approximate displacements measured with low spatial resolution and large dynamic range. By the proposed method, a wavefront can be correctly measured even if the spot is beyond the detection area. The adaptive spot search method is realized by using the special microlens array that generates both spots and discriminable patterns. The proposed method enables expanding the dynamic range of an SHWFS with a single shot and short processing time. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of a conventional SHWFS by optical experiments. Furthermore, the dynamic range of the proposed method is quantitatively evaluated by numerical simulations. PMID:27409319

  7. WE-D-BRF-03: Proton Beam Range Verification with a Single Prompt Gamma-Ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, J; Testa, M; Cascio, E; Bortfeld, T; Lu, H; Seco, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present an experimental study of a novel range verification method for scanned and scattered proton beams. Methods: A detection system consisting of an actively shielded lanthanum(III)bromide scintillator and a one-sided lead collimator was used to measure prompt gamma-rays emitted during the delivery of proton beams to a water phantom and an anthropomorphic head phantom. The residual proton range at the collimator position was determined by comparing gamma-ray intensities while the proton energy was modulated to the distal end of the target. We used a clinical field to deliver a 50 cGy dose to a 12 cm diameter target in the water phantom and to a 175 cc tumor-shaped target in the head phantom. The detector signals were acquired with a custom data acquisition system enabling energy and time-of-flight discrimination of prompt gamma-rays. Results: Range deviations were detected with a statistical accuracy of ± 0.2 mm and ± 1.4 mm at 90% confidence level, respectively for the water and head phantom. We obtained a time resolution of 1 ns FWHM and an energy resolution < 2% FWHM for the main gamma lines from proton-induced nuclear reactions with carbon and oxygen. This allowed for an accurate separation of the prompt gamma-rays from neutron-induced background. Conclusion: Proton range deviations can be detected with millimeter accuracy using a single prompt gamma-ray measurement point acquired during the delivery of a few proton energy layers to the distal part of the target. The method is also feasible in the presence of background radiation from passively scattered proton beam delivery.

  8. Experimental verification of ion range calculation in a treatment planning system using a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Ackermann, Benjamin; Ecker, Swantje; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2014-07-01

    Heavy ion-beam therapy is a highly precise radiation therapy exploiting the characteristic interaction of ions with matter. The steep dose gradient of the Bragg curve allows the irradiation of targets with high-dose and a narrow dose penumbra around the target, in contrast to photon irradiation. This, however, makes heavy ion-beam therapy very sensitive to minor changes in the range calculation of the treatment planning system, as it has a direct influence on the outcome of the treatment. Our previous study has shown that ion radiography with an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector allows the measurement of the water equivalent thickness (WET) of an imaging object with good accuracy and high spatial resolution. In this study, the developed imaging technique is used to measure the WET distribution of a patient-like phantom, and these results are compared to the WET calculation of the treatment planning system. To do so, a measured two-dimensional map of the WET of an anthropomorphic phantom was compared to WET distributions based on x-ray computed tomography images as used in the treatment planning system. It was found that the WET maps agree well in the overall shape and two-dimensional distribution of WET values. Quantitatively, the ratio of the two-dimensional WET maps shows a mean of 1.004 with a standard deviation of 0.022. Differences were found to be concentrated at high WET gradients. This could be explained by the Bragg-peak degradation, which is measured in detail by ion radiography with the flat-panel detector, but is not taken into account in the treatment planning system. Excluding pixels exhibiting significant Bragg-peak degradation, the mean value of the ratio was found to be 1.000 with a standard deviation of 0.012. Employment of the amorphous silicon flat-panel detector for WET measurements allows us to detect uncertainties of the WET determination in the treatment planning process. This makes the investigated technique a very helpful tool to study

  9. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichao; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Huang, Tianxuan; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Jiamin; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Huabin; Song, Tianming; Yi, Rongqing; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2010-07-01

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector.

  10. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhichao; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Huang, Tianxuan; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Jiamin; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Huabin; Song, Tianming; Yi, Rongqing; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2010-07-01

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector. PMID:20687719

  11. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhichao; Guo Liang; Jiang Xiaohua; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Yang Jiamin; Li Sanwei; Zhao Xuefeng; Du Huabin; Song Tianming; Yi Rongqing; Liu Yonggang; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun; Zheng Jian

    2010-07-15

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector.

  12. Achieving a Linear Dose Rate Response in Pulse-Mode Silicon Photodiode Scintillation Detectors Over a Wide Range of Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Lewis

    2014-02-01

    We are developing a new dose calibrator for nuclear pharmacies that can measure radioactivity in a vial or syringe without handling it directly or removing it from its transport shield “pig”. The calibrator's detector comprises twin opposing scintillating crystals coupled to Si photodiodes and current-amplifying trans-resistance amplifiers. Such a scheme is inherently linear with respect to dose rate over a wide range of radiation intensities, but accuracy at low activity levels may be impaired, beyond the effects of meager photon statistics, by baseline fluctuation and drift inevitably present in high-gain, current-mode photodiode amplifiers. The work described here is motivated by our desire to enhance accuracy at low excitations while maintaining linearity at high excitations. Thus, we are also evaluating a novel “pulse-mode” analog signal processing scheme that employs a linear threshold discriminator to virtually eliminate baseline fluctuation and drift. We will show the results of a side-by-side comparison of current-mode versus pulse-mode signal processing schemes, including perturbing factors affecting linearity and accuracy at very low and very high excitations. Bench testing over a wide range of excitations is done using a Poisson random pulse generator plus an LED light source to simulate excitations up to ˜106 detected counts per second without the need to handle and store large amounts of radioactive material.

  13. High Dynamic Velocity Range Particle Image Velocimetry Using Multiple Pulse Separation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Persoons, Tim; O’Donovan, Tadhg S.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic velocity range of particle image velocimetry (PIV) is determined by the maximum and minimum resolvable particle displacement. Various techniques have extended the dynamic range, however flows with a wide velocity range (e.g., impinging jets) still challenge PIV algorithms. A new technique is presented to increase the dynamic velocity range by over an order of magnitude. The multiple pulse separation (MPS) technique (i) records series of double-frame exposures with different pulse separations, (ii) processes the fields using conventional multi-grid algorithms, and (iii) yields a composite velocity field with a locally optimized pulse separation. A robust criterion determines the local optimum pulse separation, accounting for correlation strength and measurement uncertainty. Validation experiments are performed in an impinging jet flow, using laser-Doppler velocimetry as reference measurement. The precision of mean flow and turbulence quantities is significantly improved compared to conventional PIV, due to the increase in dynamic range. In a wide range of applications, MPS PIV is a robust approach to increase the dynamic velocity range without restricting the vector evaluation methods. PMID:22346564

  14. Dynamical phase transitions and Loschmidt echo in the infinite-range XY model.

    PubMed

    Žunkovič, Bojan; Silva, Alessandro; Fabrizio, Michele

    2016-06-13

    We compare two different notions of dynamical phase transitions in closed quantum systems. The first is identified through the time-averaged value of the equilibrium-order parameter, whereas the second corresponds to non-analyticities in the time behaviour of the Loschmidt echo. By exactly solving the dynamics of the infinite-range XY model, we show that in this model non-analyticities of the Loschmidt echo are not connected to standard dynamical phase transitions and are not robust against quantum fluctuations. Furthermore, we show that the existence of either of the two dynamical transitions is not necessarily connected to the equilibrium quantum phase transition. PMID:27140975

  15. Dynamic Range for Speech Materials in Korean, English, and Mandarin: A Cross-Language Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, In-Ki; Kates, James M.; Arehart, Kathryn H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify whether differences in dynamic range (DR) are evident across the spoken languages of Korean, English, and Mandarin. Method: Recorded sentence-level speech materials were used as stimuli. DR was quantified using different definitions of DR (defined as the range in decibels from the highest to the…

  16. Mass composition sensitivity of combined arrays of water cherenkov and scintillation detectors in the EeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Javier G.; Engel, Ralph; Roth, Markus

    2016-02-01

    We consider an array of scintillation detectors combined with an array of water Cherenkov detectors designed to simultaneously measure the cosmic-ray primary mass composition and energy spectrum at energies around 1EeV. In this work we investigate the sensitivity to primary mass composition of such combined arrays. The water Cherenkov detectors are arranged in a triangular grid with fixed 750m spacing and the configuration of the scintillation detectors is changed to study the impact of different configurations on the sensitivity to mass composition. We show that the performance for composition determination can be compared favorably to that of fluorescence measurements after the difference in duty cycles is considered.

  17. Statistical treatment of photon/electron counting: extending the linear dynamic range from the dark count rate to saturation.

    PubMed

    Kissick, David J; Muir, Ryan D; Simpson, Garth J

    2010-12-15

    An experimentally simple photon counting method is demonstrated providing 7 orders of magnitude in linear dynamic range (LDR) for a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. In conventional photon/electron counting methods, the linear range is dictated by the agreement between the binomially distributed measurement of counted events and the underlying Poisson distribution of photons/electrons. By explicitly considering the log-normal probability distribution in voltage transients as a function of the number of photons present and the Poisson distribution of photons, observed counts for a given threshold can be related to the mean number of photons well beyond the conventional limit. Analytical expressions are derived relating counts and photons that extend the linear range to an average of ∼11 photons arriving simultaneously with a single threshold. These expressions can be evaluated numerically for multiple thresholds extending the linear range to the saturation point of the PMT. The peak voltage distributions are experimentally shown to follow a Poisson weighted sum of log-normal distributions that can all be derived from the single photoelectron voltage peak-height distribution. The LDR that results from this method is compared to conventional single photon counting (SPC) and to signal averaging by analog to digital conversion (ADC). PMID:21114249

  18. Radiation damage resistance of AlGaN detectors for applications in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Barkusky, Frank; Peth, Christian; Bayer, Armin; Mann, Klaus; John, Joachim; Malinowski, Pawel E.

    2009-09-15

    We report on the fabrication of aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) Schottky-photodiode-based detectors. AlGaN layers were grown using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on Si(111) wafers. The diodes were characterized at a wavelength of 13.5 nm using a table-top extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation source, consisting of a laser-produced xenon plasma and a Schwarzschild objective. The responsivity of the diodes was tested between EUV energies ranging from 320 nJ down to several picojoules. For low fluences, a linear responsivity of 7.14 mAs/J could be determined. Saturation starts at approximately 1 nJ, merging into a linear response of 0.113 mAs/J, which could be attributed to the photoeffect on the Au electrodes on top of the diode. Furthermore, degradation tests were performed up to an absolute dose of 3.3x10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN photodiodes were compared to commercially available silicon-based photodetectors. For AlGaN diodes, responsivity does not change even for the highest EUV dose, whereas the response of the Si diode decreases linearly to {approx}93% after 2x10{sup 19} photons/cm{sup 2}.

  19. High dynamic range imaging pipeline: perception-motivated representation of visual content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantiuk, Rafal; Krawczyk, Grzegorz; Mantiuk, Radoslaw; Seidel, Hans-Peter

    2007-02-01

    The advances in high dynamic range (HDR) imaging, especially in the display and camera technology, have a significant impact on the existing imaging systems. The assumptions of the traditional low-dynamic range imaging, designed for paper print as a major output medium, are ill suited for the range of visual material that is shown on modern displays. For example, the common assumption that the brightest color in an image is white can be hardly justified for high contrast LCD displays, not to mention next generation HDR displays, that can easily create bright highlights and the impression of self-luminous colors. We argue that high dynamic range representation can encode images regardless of the technology used to create and display them, with the accuracy that is only constrained by the limitations of the human eye and not a particular output medium. To facilitate the research on high dynamic range imaging, we have created a software package (http://pfstools.sourceforge.net/) capable of handling HDR data on all stages of image and video processing. The software package is available as open source under the General Public License and includes solutions for high quality image acquisition from multiple exposures, a range of tone mapping algorithms and a visual difference predictor for HDR images. Examples of shell scripts demonstrate how the software can be used for processing single images as well as video sequences.

  20. Impacts of land cover data selection and trait parameterisation on dynamic modelling of species' range expansion.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Risto K; Bocedi, Greta; Kuussaari, Mikko; Heliölä, Janne; Leikola, Niko; Pöyry, Juha; Travis, Justin M J

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic models for range expansion provide a promising tool for assessing species' capacity to respond to climate change by shifting their ranges to new areas. However, these models include a number of uncertainties which may affect how successfully they can be applied to climate change oriented conservation planning. We used RangeShifter, a novel dynamic and individual-based modelling platform, to study two potential sources of such uncertainties: the selection of land cover data and the parameterization of key life-history traits. As an example, we modelled the range expansion dynamics of two butterfly species, one habitat specialist (Maniola jurtina) and one generalist (Issoria lathonia). Our results show that projections of total population size, number of occupied grid cells and the mean maximal latitudinal range shift were all clearly dependent on the choice made between using CORINE land cover data vs. using more detailed grassland data from three alternative national databases. Range expansion was also sensitive to the parameterization of the four considered life-history traits (magnitude and probability of long-distance dispersal events, population growth rate and carrying capacity), with carrying capacity and magnitude of long-distance dispersal showing the strongest effect. Our results highlight the sensitivity of dynamic species population models to the selection of existing land cover data and to uncertainty in the model parameters and indicate that these need to be carefully evaluated before the models are applied to conservation planning. PMID:25265281

  1. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography. PMID:27294264

  2. A fast large dynamic range shaping amplifier for particle detector front-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, Angelo; Delaurenti, Paolo

    2007-03-01

    The paper describes a fast shaping amplifier with rail-to-rail output swing. The circuit is based on a CMOS operational amplifier with a class AB output stage. A baseline holder, incorporating a closed-loop unity gain buffer with slew rate limitation, performs the AC coupling with the preamplifier and guarantees a baseline shift smaller than 3 mV for unipolar output pulses of 3 V and 10 MHz rate.

  3. Note: All-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter with improved dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Hwang, Chorng-Sii; Lin, Yi; Chen, Guan-Hong

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an all-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter (TDC) using the offset error cancellation circuitry to widen its dynamic range and to improve its accuracy. Although the TDC based on a pulse-shrinking mechanism can achieve a sub-gate resolution without circuit complexity, it possesses an undesired offset error that results in a nonzero lower bound appeared in its dynamic range and then affects its accuracy. The proposed cancellation circuitry for eliminating the offset error consists of a time adder with a delay line and a time subtractor with an identical delay line. The experimental TDC is implemented on Xilinx field programmable gate arrays and it also functions successfully in improving its dynamic range. PMID:27131720

  4. Large dynamic range optical vector analyzer based on optical single-sideband modulation and Hilbert transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Min; Pan, Shilong; Zhao, Yongjiu

    2016-07-01

    A large dynamic range optical vector analyzer (OVA) based on optical single-sideband modulation is proposed and demonstrated. By dividing the optical signal after optical device under test into two paths, reversing the phase of one swept sideband using a Hilbert transformer in one path, and detecting the two signals from the two paths with a balanced photodetector, the measurement errors induced by the residual -1st-order sideband and the high-order sidebands can be eliminated and the dynamic range of the measurement is increased. In a proof-of-concept experiment, the stimulated Brillouin scattering and a fiber Bragg grating are measured by OVAs with and without the Hilbert transform and balanced photodetection. Results show that about 40-dB improvement in the measurement dynamic range is realized by the proposed OVA.

  5. Note: All-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter with improved dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chi; Hwang, Chorng-Sii; Lin, Yi; Chen, Guan-Hong

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an all-digital pulse-shrinking time-to-digital converter (TDC) using the offset error cancellation circuitry to widen its dynamic range and to improve its accuracy. Although the TDC based on a pulse-shrinking mechanism can achieve a sub-gate resolution without circuit complexity, it possesses an undesired offset error that results in a nonzero lower bound appeared in its dynamic range and then affects its accuracy. The proposed cancellation circuitry for eliminating the offset error consists of a time adder with a delay line and a time subtractor with an identical delay line. The experimental TDC is implemented on Xilinx field programmable gate arrays and it also functions successfully in improving its dynamic range.

  6. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Wei; Hao, Xiaolei; Chen, Yongju; Yu, Shaogang; Xu, Songpo; Wang, Yanlan; Sun, Renping; Lai, Xuanyang; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; He, Xiantu; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends.

  7. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Wei; Hao, XiaoLei; Chen, YongJu; Yu, ShaoGang; Xu, SongPo; Wang, YanLan; Sun, RenPing; Lai, XuanYang; Wu, ChengYin; Gong, QiHuang; He, XianTu; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends. PMID:27256904

  8. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Quan, Wei; Hao, XiaoLei; Chen, YongJu; Yu, ShaoGang; Xu, SongPo; Wang, YanLan; Sun, RenPing; Lai, XuanYang; Wu, ChengYin; Gong, QiHuang; He, XianTu; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends. PMID:27256904

  9. Wide dynamic range microwave planar coupled ring resonator for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarifi, Mohammad Hossein; Daneshmand, Mojgan

    2016-06-01

    A highly sensitive, microwave-coupled ring resonator with a wide dynamic range is studied for use in sensing applications. The resonator's structure has two resonant rings and, consequently, two resonant frequencies, operating at 2.3 and 2.45 GHz. Inductive and capacitive coupling mechanisms are explored and compared to study their sensing performance. Primary finite element analysis and measurement results are used to compare the capacitive and inductive coupled ring resonators, demonstrating sensitivity improvements of up to 75% and dynamic range enhancement up to 100% in the capacitive coupled structure. In this work, we are proposing capacitive coupled planar ring resonators as a wide dynamic range sensing platform for liquid sensing applications. This sensing device is well suited for low-cost, real-time low-power, and CMOS compatible sensing technologies.

  10. A high-dynamic range ROIC for SLS and other IR focal planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petilli, Eugene; Stern, Ken; TeWinkle, Scott

    2014-06-01

    In many high dynamic range applications, Sigma-Delta modulator (SDM) architectures have displaced most other architectures for analog to digital conversion (ADC). SDMs have not typically been applied to ROIC applications due to the interaction of spatial discontinuities and the temporal bandwidth limitation of the SDM. By using a novel serpentine readout sequence, we have reduced the temporal bandwidth and enabled application of SDM technology for high dynamic range Focal Plane Arrays (FPA). In addition, it is reconfigurable on-the-fly for a power vs. Signal to Noise plus Distortion Ratio (SNDR) tradeoff without "binning" or reducing the pixel pitch. This technique has been applied to enable low power foveal imaging. This reconfigurable ADC has been coupled with a low noise extended dynamic range photodiode input stages.

  11. Uncertainty-based Estimation of the Secure Range for ISO New England Dynamic Interchange Adjustment

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Wu, Di; Hou, Zhangshuan; Sun, Yannan; Maslennikov, S.; Luo, Xiaochuan; Zheng, T.; George, S.; Knowland, T.; Litvinov, E.; Weaver, S.; Sanchez, E.

    2014-04-14

    The paper proposes an approach to estimate the secure range for dynamic interchange adjustment, which assists system operators in scheduling the interchange with neighboring control areas. Uncertainties associated with various sources are incorporated. The proposed method is implemented in the dynamic interchange adjustment (DINA) tool developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for ISO New England. Simulation results are used to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Application of microscopic image dynamic range enhancement in sputum smear tuberculosis intelligent examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ping; Luo, Nian; Song, Chen-jie

    2009-07-01

    The bacteriological microscopic examination of sputum smear for tuberculosis is the most important means of diagnosis and experiments for tuberculosis. Through micro-imaging systems, machine vision systems, digital image processing and computer pattern recognition technology, dynamic intelligent recognition and counting of TB-DNA could be realized. However, the dynamic range of CCD image sensor is limited. The information of TB-DNA could not be fully recorded on microscopic image. In this paper, an effective method to extend the image dynamic range through merging multiple exposure images is proposed. The microscopic images of the same scene with different exposure are taken by rotating the disk-shaped optical grads attenuator that installed under the objective lens of microscopic system to control the illumination. These different exposure images are processed firstly to get irradiance response function of the imaging system, and then the high dynamic range microscopic image (HDRMI) could be obtained. Through the mapping algorithm the dynamic range of HDRMI is compressed in order to been displayed on the general display devices, which not only highlight the feature information of bacillus but also maintain the overall contrast of original microscopic image. The method proposed can effectively express the image information of the bright areas and dark areas in the scenes and enhance the image details and color characteristics. The quality of micro-imaging systems is improved. It is proved that the method proposed in the paper can enhance the resolution and stability of the TB image recognition through the experiment.

  13. High-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging with spectral domain phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yangzhi; Ding, Zhihua; Shen, Yi; Chen, Zhiyan; Zhao, Chen; Ni, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Spectral domain phase microscopy for high-sensitive and broad-dynamic-range quantitative phase imaging is presented. The phase retrieval is realized in the depth domain to maintain a high sensitivity, while the phase information obtained in the spectral domain is exploited to extend the dynamic range of optical path difference. Sensitivity advantage of phase retrieved in the depth domain over that in the spectral domain is thoroughly investigated. The performance of the proposed depth domain phase based approach is illustrated by phase imaging of a resolution target and an onion skin. PMID:24216799

  14. Echo-acoustic flow dynamically modifies the cortical map of target range in bats.

    PubMed

    Bartenstein, Sophia K; Gerstenberg, Nadine; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating bats use the delay between their sonar emissions and the reflected echoes to measure target range, a crucial parameter for avoiding collisions or capturing prey. In many bat species, target range is represented as an orderly organized map of echo delay in the auditory cortex. Here we show that the map of target range in bats is dynamically modified by the continuously changing flow of acoustic information perceived during flight ('echo-acoustic flow'). Combining dynamic acoustic stimulation in virtual space with extracellular recordings, we found that neurons in the auditory cortex of the bat Phyllostomus discolor encode echo-acoustic flow information on the geometric relation between targets and the bat's flight trajectory, rather than echo delay per se. Specifically, the cortical representation of close-range targets is enlarged when the lateral passing distance of the target decreases. This flow-dependent enlargement of target representation may trigger adaptive behaviours such as vocal control or flight manoeuvres. PMID:25131175

  15. Echo-acoustic flow dynamically modifies the cortical map of target range in bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartenstein, Sophia K.; Gerstenberg, Nadine; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2014-08-01

    Echolocating bats use the delay between their sonar emissions and the reflected echoes to measure target range, a crucial parameter for avoiding collisions or capturing prey. In many bat species, target range is represented as an orderly organized map of echo delay in the auditory cortex. Here we show that the map of target range in bats is dynamically modified by the continuously changing flow of acoustic information perceived during flight (‘echo-acoustic flow’). Combining dynamic acoustic stimulation in virtual space with extracellular recordings, we found that neurons in the auditory cortex of the bat Phyllostomus discolor encode echo-acoustic flow information on the geometric relation between targets and the bat’s flight trajectory, rather than echo delay per se. Specifically, the cortical representation of close-range targets is enlarged when the lateral passing distance of the target decreases. This flow-dependent enlargement of target representation may trigger adaptive behaviours such as vocal control or flight manoeuvres.

  16. Microcavity light emitters and microbolometer detectors for gas monitoring in the 2-5 μm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottin, Eric; Ballet, Philippe; Levy, Francois; Mathieu, L.; Ouvrier-Buffet, Jean Louis; Rothman, J.; Yon, Jean Jacques; Hadji, Emmanuel; Picard, Emmanuel

    2005-03-01

    A sensor based on selective optical absorption allows monitoring of hazardous engine exhaust emissions such as gaseous hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. The IR components presented here offer the potential to develop a compact, fast and selective sensor reaching the technical and cost requirements for on-board automotive applications. Optical gas monitoring requires light sources above 3 μm since most of the gas species have their fundamental absorption peaks between 3 and 6 μm. We report here on resonant microcavity light sources emitting at room temperature between 3 and 5 μm. The emitter combines a CdxHg1-xTe light emitting heterostructure and two dielectric multilayered mirrors. It is optically pumped by a commercial III-V laser diode. The principle of the resonant microcavity emitter allows tailoring of the emission wavelength and the line width to fit the absorption band of a specific gas, ensuring a very good selectivity between species. Moreover, this kind of emitter allows fast modulation enabling high detectivity and short response time. We report performances of light sources in the range 3 - 5 μm allowing the detection of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Association of emitters peaking at different characteristic wavelengths with a single broad band detector allows designing of an optical sensor for several gas species. Sensitivity and time response issues have been characterized: detection of less than 50 ppm of CH4 on a 15 cm path has been demonstrated on synthetic gas; analysis of exhaust gases from a vehicle has allowed the resolution of a cylinder time. This optical sensor offers the potential of various on-board automotive applications.

  17. Real-time dynamic range and signal to noise enhancement in beam-scanning microscopy by integration of sensor characteristics, data acquisition hardware, and statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Kissick, David J; Muir, Ryan D; Sullivan, Shane Z; Oglesbee, Robert A; Simpson, Garth J

    2013-02-14

    Despite the ubiquitous use of multi-photon and confocal microscopy measurements in biology, the core techniques typically suffer from fundamental compromises between signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range (LDR). In this study, direct synchronous digitization of voltage transients coupled with statistical analysis is shown to allow S/N approaching the theoretical maximum throughout an LDR spanning more than 8 decades, limited only by the dark counts of the detector on the low end and by the intrinsic nonlinearities of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector on the high end. Synchronous digitization of each voltage transient represents a fundamental departure from established methods in confocal/multi-photon imaging, which are currently based on either photon counting or signal averaging. High information-density data acquisition (up to 3.2 GB/s of raw data) enables the smooth transition between the two modalities on a pixel-by-pixel basis and the ultimate writing of much smaller files (few kB/s). Modeling of the PMT response allows extraction of key sensor parameters from the histogram of voltage peak-heights. Applications in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are described demonstrating S/N approaching the shot-noise limit of the detector over large dynamic ranges. PMID:24817799

  18. Real-time dynamic range and signal to noise enhancement in beam-scanning microscopy by integration of sensor characteristics, data acquisition hardware, and statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissick, David J.; Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-02-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of multi-photon and confocal microscopy measurements in biology, the core techniques typically suffer from fundamental compromises between signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range (LDR). In this study, direct synchronous digitization of voltage transients coupled with statistical analysis is shown to allow S/N approaching the theoretical maximum throughout an LDR spanning more than 8 decades, limited only by the dark counts of the detector on the low end and by the intrinsic nonlinearities of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector on the high end. Synchronous digitization of each voltage transient represents a fundamental departure from established methods in confocal/multi-photon imaging, which are currently based on either photon counting or signal averaging. High information-density data acquisition (up to 3.2 GB/s of raw data) enables the smooth transition between the two modalities on a pixel-by-pixel basis and the ultimate writing of much smaller files (few kB/s). Modeling of the PMT response allows extraction of key sensor parameters from the histogram of voltage peak-heights. Applications in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are described demonstrating S/N approaching the shot-noise limit of the detector over large dynamic ranges.

  19. Feasible muscle activation ranges based on inverse dynamics analyses of human walking.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Cole S; Sohn, M Hongchul; Allen, Jessica L; Ting, Lena H

    2015-09-18

    Although it is possible to produce the same movement using an infinite number of different muscle activation patterns owing to musculoskeletal redundancy, the degree to which observed variations in muscle activity can deviate from optimal solutions computed from biomechanical models is not known. Here, we examined the range of biomechanically permitted activation levels in individual muscles during human walking using a detailed musculoskeletal model and experimentally-measured kinetics and kinematics. Feasible muscle activation ranges define the minimum and maximum possible level of each muscle's activation that satisfy inverse dynamics joint torques assuming that all other muscles can vary their activation as needed. During walking, 73% of the muscles had feasible muscle activation ranges that were greater than 95% of the total muscle activation range over more than 95% of the gait cycle, indicating that, individually, most muscles could be fully active or fully inactive while still satisfying inverse dynamics joint torques. Moreover, the shapes of the feasible muscle activation ranges did not resemble previously-reported muscle activation patterns nor optimal solutions, i.e. static optimization and computed muscle control, that are based on the same biomechanical constraints. Our results demonstrate that joint torque requirements from standard inverse dynamics calculations are insufficient to define the activation of individual muscles during walking in healthy individuals. Identifying feasible muscle activation ranges may be an effective way to evaluate the impact of additional biomechanical and/or neural constraints on possible versus actual muscle activity in both normal and impaired movements. PMID:26300401

  20. Dynamic magnetic shield for the CLAS12 central TOF detector photomultiplier tubes

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-01

    The Central Time-of-Flight detector for the Jefferson Laboratory 12-GeV upgrade is being designed with linear-focused photomultiplier tubes that require a robust magnetic shield against the CLAS12 main 5-T solenoid fringe fields of 100 mT (1 kG). Theoretical consideration of a ferromagnetic cylinder in an axial field has demonstrated that its shielding capability decreases with increasing length. This observation has been confirmed with finite element analysis using Poisson model software. Several shields composed of coaxial ferromagnetic cylinders have been studied. All difficulties caused by saturation effects were overcome with a novel dynamical shield, which utilizes a demagnetizing solenoid between the shielding cylinders. Basic dynamical shields for ordinary linear-focused 2-in. photomultiplier tubes were designed and tested both with models and experimental prototypes at different external field and demagnetizing current values. Our shield design reduces the 1 kG external axial field by a factor of 5000.

  1. A Supra-Thermal Energetic Particle detector (STEP) for composition measurements in the range approximately 20 keV/nucleon to 1 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    A detector system is described, employing a time-of-flight versus residual energy technique which allows measurement of particle composition (H-Fe), energy spectral and anisotropies in an energy range unaccessible with previously flown sensors. Applications of this method to measurements of the solar wind ion composition are discussed.

  2. A supra-thermal energetic particle detector /STEP/ for composition measurements in the range of about 20 keV/nucleon to 1 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1981-01-01

    A novel detector system is described, employing a time-of-flight versus residual energy technique which allows measurement of particle composition (H-Fe), energy spectra and anisotropies in an energy range unaccessible with previously flown sensors. Applications of this method to measurements of the solar wind ion composition are also discussed.

  3. Maximizing Sensory Dynamic Range by Tuning the Cortical State to Criticality

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shree Hari; Hoang, Thanh T.; McClanahan, Kylie; Grady, Stephen K.; Shew, Woodrow L.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of interactions among neurons can manifest as dramatic changes in the state of population dynamics in cerebral cortex. How such transitions in cortical state impact the information processing performed by cortical circuits is not clear. Here we performed experiments and computational modeling to determine how somatosensory dynamic range depends on cortical state. We used microelectrode arrays to record ongoing and whisker stimulus-evoked population spiking activity in somatosensory cortex of urethane anesthetized rats. We observed a continuum of different cortical states; at one extreme population activity exhibited small scale variability and was weakly correlated, the other extreme had large scale fluctuations and strong correlations. In experiments, shifts along the continuum often occurred naturally, without direct manipulation. In addition, in both the experiment and the model we directly tuned the cortical state by manipulating inhibitory synaptic interactions. Our principal finding was that somatosensory dynamic range was maximized in a specific cortical state, called criticality, near the tipping point midway between the ends of the continuum. The optimal cortical state was uniquely characterized by scale-free ongoing population dynamics and moderate correlations, in line with theoretical predictions about criticality. However, to reproduce our experimental findings, we found that existing theory required modifications which account for activity-dependent depression. In conclusion, our experiments indicate that in vivo sensory dynamic range is maximized near criticality and our model revealed an unanticipated role for activity-dependent depression in this basic principle of cortical function. PMID:26623645

  4. Maximizing Sensory Dynamic Range by Tuning the Cortical State to Criticality.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Shree Hari; Hoang, Thanh T; McClanahan, Kylie; Grady, Stephen K; Shew, Woodrow L

    2015-12-01

    Modulation of interactions among neurons can manifest as dramatic changes in the state of population dynamics in cerebral cortex. How such transitions in cortical state impact the information processing performed by cortical circuits is not clear. Here we performed experiments and computational modeling to determine how somatosensory dynamic range depends on cortical state. We used microelectrode arrays to record ongoing and whisker stimulus-evoked population spiking activity in somatosensory cortex of urethane anesthetized rats. We observed a continuum of different cortical states; at one extreme population activity exhibited small scale variability and was weakly correlated, the other extreme had large scale fluctuations and strong correlations. In experiments, shifts along the continuum often occurred naturally, without direct manipulation. In addition, in both the experiment and the model we directly tuned the cortical state by manipulating inhibitory synaptic interactions. Our principal finding was that somatosensory dynamic range was maximized in a specific cortical state, called criticality, near the tipping point midway between the ends of the continuum. The optimal cortical state was uniquely characterized by scale-free ongoing population dynamics and moderate correlations, in line with theoretical predictions about criticality. However, to reproduce our experimental findings, we found that existing theory required modifications which account for activity-dependent depression. In conclusion, our experiments indicate that in vivo sensory dynamic range is maximized near criticality and our model revealed an unanticipated role for activity-dependent depression in this basic principle of cortical function. PMID:26623645

  5. Absolute detection efficiency of a microchannel plate detector to X rays in the 1-100 KeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burginyon, Gary A.; Jacoby, Barry A.; Wobser, James K.; Ernst, Richard; Ancheta, Dione S.; Tirsell, Kenneth G.

    1993-02-01

    There is little information in the literature on the performance of working micro-channel plate (MCP) detectors at high x-ray energies. We have measured the absolute efficiency of a microchannel-plate-intensified, subnanosecond, one dimensional imaging x-ray detector developed at LLNL in the 1 to 100 keV range and at 1.25 MeV. The detector consists of a gold photocathode deposited on the front surface of the MCP (optimized for Ni K(subscript (alpha) ) x rays) to convert x rays to electrons, an MCP to amplify the electrons, and a fast In:CdS phosphor that converts the electron's kinetic energy to light. The phosphor is coated on a fiber-optic faceplate to transmit the light out of the vacuum system. Electrostatic focusing electrodes compress the electron current out of the MCP in one dimension while preserving spatial resolution in the other. The calibration geometry, dictated by a recent experiment, required grazing incidence x rays (15.6 degree(s)) onto the MCP detector in order to maximize deliverable current. The experiment also used a second detector made up of 0.071 in. thick BC422 plastic scintillator material from the Bicron Corporation. We compare the absolute efficiencies of these two detectors in units of optical W/cm(superscript 2) into 4 (pi) per x ray W/cm(superscript 2) incident. At 7.47 keV and 900 volts MCP bias, the MCP detector delivers approximately 1400 times more light than the scintillator detector.

  6. The Contribution of Matched Envelope Dynamic Range to the Binaural Benefits in Simulated Bilateral Electric Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fei; Wong, Lena L. N.; Qiu, Jianxin; Liu, Yehai; Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of envelope dynamic-range mismatch on the intelligibility of Mandarin speech in noise by simulated bilateral electric hearing. Method: Noise-vocoded Mandarin speech, corrupted by speech-shaped noise at 5 and 0 dB signal-to-noise ratios, was presented unilaterally or bilaterally to 10 normal-hearing…

  7. Method and apparatus of high dynamic range image sensor with individual pixel reset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadid-Pecht, Orly (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor); Fossum, Eric R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A wide dynamic range image sensor provides individual pixel reset to vary the integration time of individual pixels. The integration time of each pixel is controlled by column and row reset control signals which activate a logical reset transistor only when both signals coincide for a given pixel.

  8. Density matrix renormalization group with efficient dynamical electron correlation through range separation

    SciTech Connect

    Hedegård, Erik Donovan Knecht, Stefan; Reiher, Markus; Kielberg, Jesper Skau; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2015-06-14

    We present a new hybrid multiconfigurational method based on the concept of range-separation that combines the density matrix renormalization group approach with density functional theory. This new method is designed for the simultaneous description of dynamical and static electron-correlation effects in multiconfigurational electronic structure problems.

  9. Dynamic range evaluation of linear permanent magnet machine through design parameters estimation and continuous motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Dae-Joon; Lee, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seok-Myeong

    2008-04-01

    In the case of the manufactured linear permanent magnet synchronous machines (PMLSMs), dynamic range evaluation for system efficiency and performance limits is difficult to accomplish because of the moving length restriction with mover and the absence of interface between the design field and control field. To solve this problem, this paper presents a dynamic analysis based on design parameters by magnetic field analysis of the linear PM machine. And then, maximum operating range of the system is estimated considering the control method of a fixed dc-link voltage of the inverter. This analysis is verified from the dynamic experiments through continuous progressive motion of the manufactured disk-type PMLSM by current control.

  10. Numerical analysis for finite-range multitype stochastic contact financial market dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen

    2015-04-01

    In an attempt to reproduce and study the dynamics of financial markets, a random agent-based financial price model is developed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamic system, in which the interaction and dispersal of different types of investment attitudes in a stock market are imitated by viruses spreading. With different parameters of birth rates and finite-range, the normalized return series are simulated by Monte Carlo simulation method and numerical studied by power-law distribution analysis and autocorrelation analysis. To better understand the nonlinear dynamics of the return series, a q-order autocorrelation function and a multi-autocorrelation function are also defined in this work. The comparisons of statistical behaviors of return series from the agent-based model and the daily historical market returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index indicate that the proposed model is a reasonable qualitative explanation for the price formation process of stock market systems.

  11. Fractional quantum mechanics on networks: Long-range dynamics and quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Riascos, A P; Mateos, José L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the quantum transport on networks with a temporal evolution governed by the fractional Schrödinger equation. We generalize the dynamics based on continuous-time quantum walks, with transitions to nearest neighbors on the network, to the fractional case that allows long-range displacements. By using the fractional Laplacian matrix of a network, we establish a formalism that combines a long-range dynamics with the quantum superposition of states; this general approach applies to any type of connected undirected networks, including regular, random, and complex networks, and can be implemented from the spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix. We study the fractional dynamics and its capacity to explore the network by means of the transition probability, the average probability of return, and global quantities that characterize the efficiency of this quantum process. As a particular case, we explore analytically these quantities for circulant networks such as rings, interacting cycles, and complete graphs. PMID:26651751

  12. Numerical analysis for finite-range multitype stochastic contact financial market dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen

    2015-04-15

    In an attempt to reproduce and study the dynamics of financial markets, a random agent-based financial price model is developed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamic system, in which the interaction and dispersal of different types of investment attitudes in a stock market are imitated by viruses spreading. With different parameters of birth rates and finite-range, the normalized return series are simulated by Monte Carlo simulation method and numerical studied by power-law distribution analysis and autocorrelation analysis. To better understand the nonlinear dynamics of the return series, a q-order autocorrelation function and a multi-autocorrelation function are also defined in this work. The comparisons of statistical behaviors of return series from the agent-based model and the daily historical market returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index indicate that the proposed model is a reasonable qualitative explanation for the price formation process of stock market systems.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics of Bose-Einstein Condensates with Long-Range Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wunner, G.; Cartarius, H.; Fabcic, T.; Koeberle, P.; Main, J.; Schwidder, T.

    2008-11-13

    The motto of this paper is: Let's face Bose-Einstein condensation through nonlinear dynamics. We do this by choosing variational forms of the condensate wave functions (of given symmetry classes), which convert the Bose-Einstein condensates via the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation into Hamiltonian systems that can be studied using the methods of nonlinear dynamics. We consider in particular cold quantum gases where long-range interactions between the neutral atoms are present, in addition to the conventional short-range contact interaction, viz. gravity-like interactions, and dipole-dipole interactions. The results obtained serve as a useful guide in the search for nonlinear dynamics effects in numerically exact quantum calculations for Bose-Einstein condensates. A main result is the prediction of the existence of stable islands as well as chaotic regions for excited states of dipolar condensates, which could be checked experimentally.

  14. Fractional quantum mechanics on networks: Long-range dynamics and quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riascos, A. P.; Mateos, José L.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the quantum transport on networks with a temporal evolution governed by the fractional Schrödinger equation. We generalize the dynamics based on continuous-time quantum walks, with transitions to nearest neighbors on the network, to the fractional case that allows long-range displacements. By using the fractional Laplacian matrix of a network, we establish a formalism that combines a long-range dynamics with the quantum superposition of states; this general approach applies to any type of connected undirected networks, including regular, random, and complex networks, and can be implemented from the spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix. We study the fractional dynamics and its capacity to explore the network by means of the transition probability, the average probability of return, and global quantities that characterize the efficiency of this quantum process. As a particular case, we explore analytically these quantities for circulant networks such as rings, interacting cycles, and complete graphs.

  15. Structure and dynamics of model colloidal clusters with short-range attractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the structure and dynamics of small isolated N -particle clusters interacting via short-ranged Morse potentials. "Ideally prepared ensembles" obtained via exact enumeration studies of sticky hard-sphere packings serve as reference states allowing us to identify key statistical-geometrical properties and to quantitatively characterize how nonequilibrium ensembles prepared by thermal quenches at different rates T ˙ differ from their equilibrium counterparts. Studies of equilibrium dynamics show nontrivial temperature dependence: nonexponential relaxation indicates both glassy dynamics and differing stabilities of degenerate clusters with different structures. Our results should be useful for extending recent experimental studies of small colloidal clusters to examine both equilibrium relaxation dynamics at fixed T and a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena.

  16. Uncertainty in predicting range dynamics of endemic alpine plants under climate warming.

    PubMed

    Hülber, Karl; Wessely, Johannes; Gattringer, Andreas; Moser, Dietmar; Kuttner, Michael; Essl, Franz; Leitner, Michael; Winkler, Manuela; Ertl, Siegrun; Willner, Wolfgang; Kleinbauer, Ingrid; Sauberer, Norbert; Mang, Thomas; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Dullinger, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Correlative species distribution models have long been the predominant approach to predict species' range responses to climate change. Recently, the use of dynamic models is increasingly advocated for because these models better represent the main processes involved in range shifts and also simulate transient dynamics. A well-known problem with the application of these models is the lack of data for estimating necessary parameters of demographic and dispersal processes. However, what has been hardly considered so far is the fact that simulating transient dynamics potentially implies additional uncertainty arising from our ignorance of short-term climate variability in future climatic trends. Here, we use endemic mountain plants of Austria as a case study to assess how the integration of decadal variability in future climate affects outcomes of dynamic range models as compared to projected long-term trends and uncertainty in demographic and dispersal parameters. We do so by contrasting simulations of a so-called hybrid model run under fluctuating climatic conditions with those based on a linear interpolation of climatic conditions between current values and those predicted for the end of the 21st century. We find that accounting for short-term climate variability modifies model results nearly as differences in projected long-term trends and much more than uncertainty in demographic/dispersal parameters. In particular, range loss and extinction rates are much higher when simulations are run under fluctuating conditions. These results highlight the importance of considering the appropriate temporal resolution when parameterizing and applying range-dynamic models, and hybrid models in particular. In case of our endemic mountain plants, we hypothesize that smoothed linear time series deliver more reliable results because these long-lived species are primarily responsive to long-term climate averages. PMID:27061825

  17. Acute effect of static and dynamic stretching on hip dynamic range of motion during instep kicking in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Abu Osman, Noor A; Yusof, Ashril

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static and dynamic stretching within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip dynamic range of motion (DROM) during instep kicking in professional soccer players. The kicking motions of dominant legs were captured from 18 professional adult male soccer players (height: 180.38 ± 7.34 cm; mass: 69.77 ± 9.73 kg; age: 19.22 ± 1.83 years) using 4 3-dimensional digital video cameras at 50 Hz. Hip DROM at backward, forward, and follow-through phases (instep kick phases) after different warm-up protocols consisting of static, dynamic, and no-stretching on 3 nonconsecutive test days were captured for analysis. During the backswing phase, there was no difference in DROM after the dynamic stretching compared with the static stretching relative to the no-stretching method. There was a significant difference in DROM after the dynamic stretching compared with the static stretching relative to the no-stretching method during (a) the forward phase with p < 0.03, (b) the follow-through phase with p < 0.01, and (c) all phases with p < 0.01. We concluded that professional soccer players can perform a higher DROM of the hip joint during the instep kick after dynamic stretching incorporated in warm-ups, hence increasing the chances of scoring and injury prevention during soccer games. PMID:21358428

  18. Generalised optical differentiation wavefront sensor: a sensitive high dynamic range wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Haffert, S Y

    2016-08-22

    Current wavefront sensors for high resolution imaging have either a large dynamic range or a high sensitivity. A new kind of wavefront sensor is developed which can have both: the Generalised Optical Differentiation wavefront sensor. This new wavefront sensor is based on the principles of optical differentiation by amplitude filters. We have extended the theory behind linear optical differentiation and generalised it to nonlinear filters. We used numerical simulations and laboratory experiments to investigate the properties of the generalised wavefront sensor. With this we created a new filter that can decouple the dynamic range from the sensitivity. These properties make it suitable for adaptive optic systems where a large range of phase aberrations have to be measured with high precision. PMID:27557179

  19. Long-range micro-pulse aerosol lidar at 1.5  μm with an upconversion single-photon detector.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haiyun; Shentu, Guoliang; Shangguan, Mingjia; Xia, Xiuxiu; Jia, Xiaodong; Wang, Chong; Zhang, Jun; Pelc, Jason S; Fejer, M M; Zhang, Qiang; Dou, Xiankang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-04-01

    A micro-pulse lidar at eye-safe wavelength is constructed based on an upconversion single-photon detector. The ultralow-noise detector enables using integration technique to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the atmospheric backscattering even at daytime. With pulse energy of 110 μJ, pulse repetition rate of 15 kHz, optical antenna diameter of 100 mm and integration time of 5 min, a horizontal detection range of 7 km is realized. In the demonstration experiment, atmospheric visibility over 24 h is monitored continuously, with results in accordance with the weather forecasts. PMID:25831389

  20. Development of patient collation system by kinetic analysis for chest dynamic radiogram with flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2006-03-01

    In the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) environment, it is important that all images be stored in the correct location. However, if information such as the patient's name or identification number has been entered incorrectly, it is difficult to notice the error. The present study was performed to develop a system of patient collation automatically for dynamic radiogram examination by a kinetic analysis, and to evaluate the performance of the system. Dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained by using a modified flat panel detector system. Our computer algorithm developed in this study was consisted of two main procedures, kinetic map imaging processing, and collation processing. Kinetic map processing is a new algorithm to visualize a movement for dynamic radiography; direction classification of optical flows and intensity-density transformation technique was performed. Collation processing consisted of analysis with an artificial neural network (ANN) and discrimination for Mahalanobis' generalized distance, those procedures were performed to evaluate a similarity of combination for the same person. Finally, we investigated the performance of our system using eight healthy volunteers' radiographs. The performance was shown as a sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity and specificity for our system were shown 100% and 100%, respectively. This result indicated that our system has excellent performance for recognition of a patient. Our system will be useful in PACS management for dynamic chest radiography.

  1. Real-time modulated nanoparticle separation with an ultra-large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Zeming, Kerwin Kwek; Thakor, Nitish V; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles exhibit size-dependent properties which make size-selective purification of proteins, DNA or synthetic nanoparticles essential for bio-analytics, clinical medicine, nano-plasmonics and nano-material sciences. Current purification methods of centrifugation, column chromatography and continuous-flow techniques suffer from particle aggregation, multi-stage process, complex setups and necessary nanofabrication. These increase process costs and time, reduce efficiency and limit dynamic range. Here, we achieve an unprecedented real-time nanoparticle separation (51-1500 nm) using a large-pore (2 μm) deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) device. No external force fields or nanofabrication are required. Instead, we investigated innate long-range electrostatic influences on nanoparticles within a fluid medium at different NaCl ionic concentrations. In this study we account for the electrostatic forces beyond Debye length and showed that they cannot be assumed as negligible especially for precise nanoparticle separation methods such as DLD. Our findings have enabled us to develop a model to simultaneously quantify and modulate the electrostatic force interactions between nanoparticle and micropore. By simply controlling buffer solutions, we achieve dynamic nanoparticle size separation on a single device with a rapid response time (<20 s) and an enlarged dynamic range (>1200%), outperforming standard benchtop centrifuge systems. This novel method and model combines device simplicity, isolation precision and dynamic flexibility, opening opportunities for high-throughput applications in nano-separation for industrial and biological applications. PMID:26575003

  2. Comparison of radiation damage parameter values for the widely used semiconductor gamma detector materials in wide energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkut, Turgay; Korkut, Hatun

    2014-04-01

    Number of displaced atoms (NDA) values for 3 different semiconductor detector materials (Ge, Si, and GaAs) was reviewed at 26 different primary energies emitted from 9 radiation sources (241Am, 133Ba, 109Cd, 57Co, 60Co, 137Cs, 152Eu, 55Fe and 153Gd) widely used in the literature. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to simulate interactions between X-gamma rays and semiconductor detector materials. Germanium has the highest average NDA value in the studied three semiconductors.

  3. Coupled range dynamics of brood parasites and their hosts responding to climate and vegetation changes.

    PubMed

    Péron, Guillaume; Altwegg, Res; Jamie, Gabriel A; Spottiswoode, Claire N

    2016-09-01

    As populations shift their ranges in response to global change, local species assemblages can change, setting the stage for new ecological interactions, community equilibria and evolutionary responses. Here, we focus on the range dynamics of four avian brood parasite species and their hosts in southern Africa, in a context of bush encroachment (increase in woody vegetation density in places previously occupied by savanna-grassland mosaics) favouring some species at the expense of others. We first tested whether hosts and parasites constrained each other's ability to expand or maintain their ranges. Secondly, we investigated whether range shifts represented an opportunity for new host-parasite and parasite-parasite interactions. We used multispecies dynamic occupancy models with interactions, fitted to citizen science data, to estimate the contribution of interspecific interactions to range shifts and to quantify the change in species co-occurrence probability over a 25-year period. Parasites were able to track their hosts' range shifts. We detected no deleterious effect of the parasites' presence on either the local population viability of host species or the hosts' ability to colonize newly suitable areas. In the recently diversified indigobird radiation (Vidua spp.), following bush encroachment, the new assemblages presented more potential opportunities for speciation via host switch, but also more potential for hybridization between extant lineages, also via host switch. Multispecies dynamic occupancy models with interactions brought new insights into the feedbacks between range shifts, biotic interactions and local demography: brood parasitism had little detected impact on extinction or colonization processes, but inversely the latter processes affected biotic interactions via the modification of co-occurrence patterns. PMID:27155344

  4. Long-Range Correlations in Stride Intervals May Emerge from Non-Chaotic Walking Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jooeun; Hogan, Neville

    2013-01-01

    Stride intervals of normal human walking exhibit long-range temporal correlations. Similar to the fractal-like behaviors observed in brain and heart activity, long-range correlations in walking have commonly been interpreted to result from chaotic dynamics and be a signature of health. Several mathematical models have reproduced this behavior by assuming a dominant role of neural central pattern generators (CPGs) and/or nonlinear biomechanics to evoke chaos. In this study, we show that a simple walking model without a CPG or biomechanics capable of chaos can reproduce long-range correlations. Stride intervals of the model revealed long-range correlations observed in human walking when the model had moderate orbital stability, which enabled the current stride to affect a future stride even after many steps. This provides a clear counterexample to the common hypothesis that a CPG and/or chaotic dynamics is required to explain the long-range correlations in healthy human walking. Instead, our results suggest that the long-range correlation may result from a combination of noise that is ubiquitous in biological systems and orbital stability that is essential in general rhythmic movements. PMID:24086274

  5. How interactions between animal movement and landscape processes modify local range dynamics and extinction risk.

    PubMed

    Fordham, Damien A; Shoemaker, Kevin T; Schumaker, Nathan H; Akçakaya, H Reşit; Clisby, Nathan; Brook, Barry W

    2014-05-01

    Forecasts of range dynamics now incorporate many of the mechanisms and interactions that drive species distributions. However, connectivity continues to be simulated using overly simple distance-based dispersal models with little consideration of how the individual behaviour of dispersing organisms interacts with landscape structure (functional connectivity). Here, we link an individual-based model to a niche-population model to test the implications of this omission. We apply this novel approach to a turtle species inhabiting wetlands which are patchily distributed across a tropical savannah, and whose persistence is threatened by two important synergistic drivers of global change: predation by invasive species and overexploitation. We show that projections of local range dynamics in this study system change substantially when functional connectivity is modelled explicitly. Accounting for functional connectivity in model simulations causes the estimate of extinction risk to increase, and predictions of range contraction to slow. We conclude that models of range dynamics that simulate functional connectivity can reduce an important source of bias in predictions of shifts in species distributions and abundances, especially for organisms whose dispersal behaviours are strongly affected by landscape structure. PMID:24806426

  6. How interactions between animal movement and landscape processes modify local range dynamics and extinction risk

    PubMed Central

    Fordham, Damien A.; Shoemaker, Kevin T.; Schumaker, Nathan H.; Akçakaya, H. Reşit; Clisby, Nathan; Brook, Barry W.

    2014-01-01

    Forecasts of range dynamics now incorporate many of the mechanisms and interactions that drive species distributions. However, connectivity continues to be simulated using overly simple distance-based dispersal models with little consideration of how the individual behaviour of dispersing organisms interacts with landscape structure (functional connectivity). Here, we link an individual-based model to a niche-population model to test the implications of this omission. We apply this novel approach to a turtle species inhabiting wetlands which are patchily distributed across a tropical savannah, and whose persistence is threatened by two important synergistic drivers of global change: predation by invasive species and overexploitation. We show that projections of local range dynamics in this study system change substantially when functional connectivity is modelled explicitly. Accounting for functional connectivity in model simulations causes the estimate of extinction risk to increase, and predictions of range contraction to slow. We conclude that models of range dynamics that simulate functional connectivity can reduce an important source of bias in predictions of shifts in species distributions and abundances, especially for organisms whose dispersal behaviours are strongly affected by landscape structure. PMID:24806426

  7. CMOS Amperometric ADC With High Sensitivity, Dynamic Range and Power Efficiency for Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Boling, C Sam; Mason, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Airborne pollutants are a leading cause of illness and mortality globally. Electrochemical gas sensors show great promise for personal air quality monitoring to address this worldwide health crisis. However, implementing miniaturized arrays of such sensors demands high performance instrumentation circuits that simultaneously meet challenging power, area, sensitivity, noise and dynamic range goals. This paper presents a new multi-channel CMOS amperometric ADC featuring pixel-level architecture for gas sensor arrays. The circuit combines digital modulation of input currents and an incremental Σ∆ ADC to achieve wide dynamic range and high sensitivity with very high power efficiency and compact size. Fabricated in 0.5 [Formula: see text] CMOS, the circuit was measured to have 164 dB cross-scale dynamic range, 100 fA sensitivity while consuming only 241 [Formula: see text] and 0.157 [Formula: see text] active area per channel. Electrochemical experiments with liquid and gas targets demonstrate the circuit's real-time response to a wide range of analyte concentrations. PMID:27352395

  8. Preference limits of the visual dynamic range for ultra high quality and aesthetic conveyance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Scott; Kunkel, Timo; Sun, Xing; Farrell, Suzanne; Crum, Poppy

    2013-03-01

    A subjective study was conducted to investigate the preferred maximum and minimum display luminances in order to determine the dynamic ranges for future displays. Two studies address the diffuse reflective regions, and a third study tested preferences of highlight regions. Preferences, as opposed to detection thresholds, were studied to provide results more directly relevant to the viewing of entertainment or art. Test images were specifically designed to test these limits without the perceptual conflicts that usually occur in these types of studies. For the diffuse range, we found a display with a dynamic range having luminances between 0.1 and 650 cd/m2 matches the average preferences. However, to satisfy 90% of the population, a dynamic range from 0.005 and ~3,000 cd/m2 is needed. Since a display should be able to produce values brighter than the diffuse white maximum, as in specular highlights and emissive sources, the highlight study concludes that even the average preferred maximum luminance for highlight reproduction is ~4,000 cd/m2.

  9. Spatio-temporal variation of biotic factors underpins contemporary range dynamics of congeners.

    PubMed

    Naujokaitis-Lewis, Ilona; Fortin, Marie-Josée

    2016-03-01

    Species' ranges are complex often exhibiting multidirectional shifts over space and time. Despite the strong fingerprint of recent historical climate change on species' distributions, biotic factors such as loss of vegetative habitat and the presence of potential competitors constitute important yet often overlooked drivers of range dynamics. Furthermore, short-term changes in environmental conditions can influence the underlying processes of local extinction and local colonization that drive range shifts, yet are rarely considered at broad scales. We used dynamic state-space occupancy models to test multiple hypotheses of the relative importance of major drivers of range shifts of Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera) and Blue-winged Warblers (V. cyanoptera) between 1983 and 2012 across North America: warming temperatures; habitat changes; and occurrence of congeneric species, used here as proxy for biotic interactions. Dynamic occupancies for both species were most influenced by spatial relative to temporal variation in temperature and habitat. However, temporal variation in temperature anomalies and biotic interactions remained important. The two biotic factors considered, habitat change and biotic interactions, had the largest relative effect on estimated extinction rates followed by abiotic temperature anomalies. For the Golden-winged Warbler, the predicted presence of the Blue-winged Warbler, a hypothesized competitor, most influenced extinction probabilities, contributing to evidence supporting its role in site-level species replacement. Given the overall importance of biotic factors on range-wide dynamic occupancies, their consideration alongside abiotic factors should not be overlooked. Our results suggest that warming compounds the negative effect of habitat loss emphasizing species' need for habitat to adapt to a changing climate. Notably, even closely related species exhibited individual responses to abiotic and biotic factors considered. PMID

  10. Comparison of multialkali and GaAs photocathode detectors for Joint European Torus edge light detection and ranging Thomson scattering profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kempenaars, M.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak has two light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering systems, one for the core and one dedicated to the edge T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles. The LIDAR scheme is unique to JET and is envisaged for use on ITER. The system's spatial resolution is defined by the convolution product of its components: laser pulse duration, detector response time, and digitizer speed. The original multialkali photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers dictated the response time, resulting in a 12 cm spatial resolution along the line of sight. In the edge LIDAR system, this is improved by aligning the line of sight with the flux surfaces, thus improving the effective spatial resolution to 2 cm depending on the plasma configuration. To meet demands for better edge gradient resolution, an upgrade to higher quantum efficiency detectors was proposed. Four GaAs photocathode detectors have been procured, two of which surpass expectations. These detectors are shown to have a more than two times higher effective quantum efficiency and their response time is at least twice as fast as the multialkali detectors. Combined with a fast digitizer this improves the spatial resolution by a factor of two, down to one centimeter effective, depending on plasma configuration.

  11. The dynamic time-over-threshold method for multi-channel APD based gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, T.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2015-03-01

    t- Recent advances in manufacturing technology have enabled the use of multi-channel pixelated detectors in gamma-ray imaging applications. When obtaining gamma-ray measurements, it is important to obtain pulse height information in order to avoid unnecessary events such as scattering. However, as the number of channels increases, more electronics are needed to process each channel's signal, and the corresponding increases in circuit size and power consumption can result in practical problems. The time-over-threshold (ToT) method, which has recently become popular in the medical field, is a signal processing technique that can effectively avoid such problems. However, ToT suffers from poor linearity and its dynamic range is limited. We therefore propose a new ToT technique called the dynamic time-over-threshold (dToT) method [4]. A new signal processing system using dToT and CR-RC shaping demonstrated much better linearity than that of a conventional ToT. Using a test circuit with a new Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG) scintillator and an avalanche photodiode, the pulse height spectra of 137Cs and 22Na sources were measured with high linearity. Based on these results, we designed a new application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for this multi-channel dToT system, measured the spectra of a 22Na source, and investigated the linearity of the system.

  12. A transportable source of gamma rays with discrete energies and wide range for calibration and on-site testing of gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja, Carlos; Slavicek, Tomas; Kroupa, Martin; Owens, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Janout, Zdenek; Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Valach, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact and transportable wide energy range, gamma-ray station for the calibration of gamma-ray sensitive devices. The station was specifically designed for the on-site testing and calibration of gamma-ray sensitive spacecraft payloads, intended for space flight on the BepiColombo and SoIar Orbiter missions of the European Space Agency. The source is intended to serve as a calibrated reference for post test center qualification of integrated payload instruments and for preflight evaluation of scientific radiation sensors. Discrete gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV-9 MeV are produced in the station with reasonable intensity using a radionuclide neutron source and 100 l of distilled water with 22 kg salt dissolved. The gamma-rays generated contain many discrete lines conveniently evenly distributed over the entire energy range. The neutron and gamma-ray fields have been simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. Results of the numerical calculations are given in the form of neutron and gamma-ray spectra as well as dose equivalent rate. The dose rate was also determined directly by dedicated dosemetric measurements. The gamma-ray field produced in the station was characterized using a conventional HPGe detector. The application of the station is demonstrated by measurements taken with a flight-qualified LaBr3:Ce scintillation detector. Gamma-ray spectra acquired by both detectors are presented. The minimum measuring times for calibration of the flight-version detector, was between 2 and 10 min (up to 6.2 MeV) and 20-30 min (up to 8 MeV), when the detector was placed at a distance 2-5 m from the station.

  13. On the spatial range of validity of the gas dynamic model in the magnetosheath of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T. L.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    In the past, the global solar wind interaction with Venus has been treated with gas dynamic models which, while successful in modeling some of the global characteristics of the interaction, do not include the magnetic barrier in a self-consistent manner. This magnetic barrier is formed in the inner magnetosheath where it transfers solar wind momentum flux to the obstacle via magnetic pressure. In this study, we examine the extent to which the gas dynamic fluid approximation describes the magnetic field in the dayside Venus magnetosheath by comparing with two gas dynamic models, one which matches the observed ionopause location and one which matches the bow shock location. We find that each model predicts the field profile reasonably well in the vicinity of the matched bow shock or ionopause, but neither model provides an adequate model over the entire range from the ionopause to the bow shock.

  14. Non-Linearity in Wide Dynamic Range CMOS Image Sensors Utilizing a Partial Charge Transfer Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shafie, Suhaidi; Kawahito, Shoji; Halin, Izhal Abdul; Hasan, Wan Zuha Wan

    2009-01-01

    The partial charge transfer technique can expand the dynamic range of a CMOS image sensor by synthesizing two types of signal, namely the long and short accumulation time signals. However the short accumulation time signal obtained from partial transfer operation suffers of non-linearity with respect to the incident light. In this paper, an analysis of the non-linearity in partial charge transfer technique has been carried, and the relationship between dynamic range and the non-linearity is studied. The results show that the non-linearity is caused by two factors, namely the current diffusion, which has an exponential relation with the potential barrier, and the initial condition of photodiodes in which it shows that the error in the high illumination region increases as the ratio of the long to the short accumulation time raises. Moreover, the increment of the saturation level of photodiodes also increases the error in the high illumination region. PMID:22303133

  15. A 4MP high-dynamic-range, low-noise CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Cheng; Liu, Yang; Li, Jing; Zhou, Quan; Chang, Yuchun; Wang, Xinyang

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a 4 Megapixel high dynamic range, low dark noise and dark current CMOS image sensor, which is ideal for high-end scientific and surveillance applications. The pixel design is based on a 4-T PPD structure. During the readout of the pixel array, signals are first amplified, and then feed to a low- power column-parallel ADC array which is already presented in [1]. Measurement results show that the sensor achieves a dynamic range of 96dB, a dark noise of 1.47e- at 24fps speed. The dark current is 0.15e-/pixel/s at -20oC.

  16. Note: Increasing dynamic range of digital-to-analog converter using a superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Masakazu

    2014-10-15

    Responses of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) are periodically dependent on magnetic flux coupling to its superconducting ring and the period is a flux quantum (Φ{sub o} = h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). Using this periodicity, we had proposed a digital to analog converter using a SQUID (SQUID DAC) of first generation with linear current output, interval of which corresponded to Φ{sub o}. Modification for increasing dynamic range by interpolating within each interval is reported. Linearity of the interpolation was also based on the quantum periodicity. A SQUID DAC with dynamic range of about 1.4 × 10{sup 7} was created as a demonstration.

  17. High dynamic range infrared images detail enhancement based on local edge preserving filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qiong; Wang, Yuehuan; Bai, Kun

    2016-07-01

    In the field of infrared (IR) image processing, displaying a high dynamic range (HDR) image on a low dynamic range display equipment with a natural visual effect, clear details on local areas and less artifacts is an important issue. In this paper, we present a new approach to display HDR IR images with contrast enhancement. First, the local edge-preserving filter (LEPF) is utilized to separate the image into a base layer and detail layer(s). After the filtering procedure, we use an adaptive Gamma transformation to adjust the gray distribution of the base layer, and stretch the detail layer based on a human visual effect principle. Then, we recombine the detail layer and base layer to obtain the enhance output. Finally, we adjust the luminance of output by applying multiple exposure fusion method. The experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method can provide a significant performance in terms of enhancing details and less artifacts than the state of the arts.

  18. Folded multiple-capture: an architecture for high dynamic range disturbance-tolerant focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavusi, Sam; El Gamal, Abbas

    2004-08-01

    Earlier studies have shown that multiple capture can achieve high SNR, but cannot satisfy the high dynamic range (HDR) and high speed requirements of the Vertically-Integrated-Sensor-Array (VISA) project. Synchronous self-reset, on the other hand, can achieve these requirements, but suffers from poor SNR. Extended counting can achieve high dynamic range at high frame rate and with good SNR, but at the expense of high power consumption. The paper proposes a new HDR focal plane array architecture, denoted by folded-multiple capture (FMC), which by combining features of the synchronous self-reset and multiple capture schemes, can satisfy the VISA requirements at a fraction of the power dissipation and with more robustness to device variations than extended counting. The architecture is also capable of detecting subframe disturbances, e.g., due to laser jamming, and correcting for it.

  19. Enhanced Dynamic Range in N-SQUID Lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddins, A.; Levenson-Falk, E. M.; Toyli, D. M.; Vijay, R.; Minev, Z.; Siddiqi, I.

    2014-03-01

    Simultaneously providing high gain and nearly quantum-limited noise performance, superconducting parametric amplifiers (paramps) have been used successfully for high fidelity qubit readout, quantum feedback, and microwave quantum optics experiments. The Lumped Josephson Parametric Amplifier (LJPA) consists of a capacitively shunted SQUID coupled to a transmission line to form a nonlinear resonator. Like other paramps employing a resonant circuit, the LJPA's dynamic range-a potentially key ingredient for multiplexing-is limited. Simple theory predicts that the dynamic range can be increased without any reduction in bandwidth or gain by distributing the resonator nonlinearity over a series array of SQUIDs. We fabricated such array devices with up to 5 SQUIDs and observed a clear increase in the critical power for bifurcation about which parametric gain occurs. We discuss in detail amplifier performance as a function of the number of SQUIDs in the array. This research was supported by the Army Research Office under a QCT grant.

  20. A General Strategy for the Semisynthesis of Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensor Proteins with Increased Dynamic Range.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lin; Prifti, Efthymia; Johnsson, Kai

    2016-04-27

    We demonstrate how a combination of self-labeling protein tags and unnatural amino acid technology permits the semisynthesis of ratiometric fluorescent sensor proteins with unprecedented dynamic range in vitro and on live cells. To generate such a sensor, a binding protein is labeled with a fluorescent competitor of the analyte using SNAP-tag in conjugation with a second fluorophore that is positioned in vicinity of the binding site of the binding protein using unnatural amino acid technology. Binding of the analyte by the sensor displaces the tethered fluorescent competitor from the binding protein and disrupts fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the two fluorophores. Using this design principle, we generate a ratiometric fluorescent sensor protein for methotrexate that exhibits large dynamic ranges both in vitro (ratio changes up to 32) and on cell surfaces (ratio change of 13). The performance of these semisynthetic sensor proteins makes them attractive for applications in basic research and diagnostics. PMID:27071001

  1. Dynamic range control of electrode pad current in well logging tools

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson Jr., W. M.; Angehrn, J. A.

    1985-04-30

    In apparatus for investigating earth formations traversed by a borehole, improved methods and apparatus are provided for achieving dynamic range control of formation measurements. In one embodiment adapted to formation resistivity measurements, a well logging tool moving through a borehole emits a current into the adjacent earth formation, and a corresponding measurement voltage correlative to the resistivity is sampled at discrete elevations as the tool traverses the borehole. An average of these voltage measurements is formed. When the magnitude of this average exceeds or drops below a predetermined range, the magnitude of the survey voltage is decreased or increased respectively by a discrete amount.

  2. Best dynamic wavelength range for shock detection via blood vessel density pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Saiko, Gennadiy; Douplik, Alexandre

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a non-invasive or minimally invasive medical diagnostic modality. Still challenges in noninvasive tools for early shock detection are unresolved especially in spatial resolution and broad range of sampling wavelength for reduced-/ oxy-hemoglobin concentrations detection from tissue sample. To minimize these limitations, we have developed a novel method based on spatially and spectrally resolved diffuse reflectance for shock detection. This study was performed to pick up best dynamic wavelength range sets to detect fine vessel density pattern modulation for shock detection.

  3. Static FBG strain sensor with high resolution and large dynamic range by dual-comb spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoya; Ozawa, Akira; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensor with optical frequency combs. To precisely characterize the optical response of the FBG when strain is applied, dual-comb spectroscopy is used. Highly sensitive dual-comb spectroscopy of the FBG enabled strain measurements with a resolution of 34 nε. The optical spectral bandwidth of the measurement exceeds 1 THz. Compared with conventional FBG strain sensor using a continuous-wave laser that requires rather slow frequency scanning with a limited range, the dynamic range and multiplexing capability are significantly improved by using broadband dual-comb spectroscopy. PMID:23669971

  4. High-Dynamic-Range Single-Shot Cross-Correlator Based on an Optical Pulse Replicator

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrer, C.; Bromage, J.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2008-09-05

    The operation of a single-shot cross-correlator based on a pulse replicator is described. The correlator uses a discrete sequence of sampling pulses that are nonlinearly mixed with the pulse under test. The combination of a high reflector and partial reflector replicates an optical pulse by multiple internal reflections and generates a sequence of spatially displaced and temporally delayed sampling pulses. This principle is used in a cross-correlator characterizing optical pulses at 1053 nm. A dynamic range higher than 60 dB is obtained over a temporal range larger than 200 ps.

  5. Determination of metal ions by fluorescence anisotropy exhibits a broad dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Maliwal, Badri P.; Fierke, Carol A.

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that metal ions free in solution may be determined at low levels by fluorescence anisotropy (polarization) measurements. Anisotropy measurements enjoy the advantages of wavelength ratiometric techniques for determining metal ions such as calcium, because anisotropy measurements are ratiometric as well. Furthermore, fluorescence anisotropy may be imaged in the microscope. An advantage of anisotropy not demonstrated for wavelength ratiometric approaches using indicators such as Fura-2 and Indo-1 is that under favorable circumstances anisotropy-based determinations exhibit a much broader dynamic range in metal ion concentration. Determinations of free Zn(II) in the picomolar range are demonstrated.

  6. Incongruent range dynamics between co-occurring Asian temperate tree species facilitated by life history traits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Peng; Yan, Xiao-Ling; Muir, Graham; Dai, Qiong-Yan; Koch, Marcus A; Fu, Cheng-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Postglacial expansion to former range limits varies substantially among species of temperate deciduous forests in eastern Asia. Isolation hypotheses (with or without gene flow) have been proposed to explain this variance, but they ignore detailed population dynamics spanning geological time and neglect the role of life history traits. Using population genetics to uncover these dynamics across their Asian range, we infer processes that formed the disjunct distributions of Ginkgo biloba and the co-occurring Cercidiphyllum japonicum (published data). Phylogenetic, coalescent, and comparative data suggest that Ginkgo population structure is regional, dichotomous (to west-east refugia), and formed ˜51 kya, resulting from random genetic drift during the last glaciation. This split is far younger than the north-south population structure of Cercidiphyllum (~1.89 Mya). Significant (recent) unidirectional gene flow has not homogenized the two Ginkgo refugia, despite 2Nm > 1. Prior to this split, gene flow was potentially higher, resulting in conflicting support for a priori hypotheses that view isolation as an explanation for the variation in postglacial range limits. Isolation hypotheses (with or without gene flow) are thus not necessarily mutually exclusive due to temporal variation of gene flow and genetic drift. In comparison with Cercidiphyllum, the restricted range of Ginkgo has been facilitated by uncompetitive life history traits associated with seed ecology, highlighting the importance of both demography and lifetime reproductive success when interpreting range shifts. PMID:27069572

  7. Dynamic Electrothermal Model of a Sputtered Thermopile Thermal Radiation Detector for Earth Radiation Budget Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weckmann, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a program sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aimed at evaluating the global energy balance. Current scanning radiometers used for CERES consist of thin-film thermistor bolometers viewing the Earth through a Cassegrain telescope. The Thermal Radiation Group, a laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is currently studying a new sensor concept to replace the current bolometer: a thermopile thermal radiation detector. This next-generation detector would consist of a thermal sensor array made of thermocouple junction pairs, or thermopiles. The objective of the current research is to perform a thermal analysis of the thermopile. Numerical thermal models are particularly suited to solve problems for which temperature is the dominant mechanism of the operation of the device (through the thermoelectric effect), as well as for complex geometries composed of numerous different materials. Feasibility and design specifications are studied by developing a dynamic electrothermal model of the thermopile using the finite element method. A commercial finite element-modeling package, ALGOR, is used.

  8. Proposed satellite laser ranging and very long baseline interferometry sites for crustal dynamics investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D.; Allenby, R. J.; Frey, H. V.

    1979-01-01

    Recommendations are presented for a global network of 125 sites for geodetic measurements by satellite laser ranging and very long baseline interferometry. The sites were proposed on the basis of existing facilities and scientific value for investigation of crustal dynamics as related to earthquake hazards. Tectonic problems are discussed for North America peripheral regions and for the world. The sites are presented in tables and maps, with bibliographic references.

  9. A visibility matching tone reproduction operator for high dynamic range scenes

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, G.W.; Rushmeier, H.; Piatko, C.

    1997-01-15

    The authors present a tone reproduction operator that preserves visibility in high dynamic range scenes. The method introduces a new histogram adjustment technique, based on the population of local adaptation luminances in a scene. To match subjective viewing experience, the method incorporates models for human contrast sensitivity, glare, spatial acuity and color sensitivity. They compare the results to previous work and present examples the techniques applied to lighting simulation and electronic photography.

  10. Roles of Long-Range Tertiary Interactions in Limiting Dynamics of the Tetrahymena Group I Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of mutating the long-range tertiary contacts of the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme on the dynamics of its substrate helix (referred to as P1) and on catalytic activity. Dynamics were assayed by fluorescence anisotropy of the fluorescent base analogue, 6-methyl isoxanthopterin, incorporated into the P1 helix, and fluorescence anisotropy and catalytic activity were measured for wild type and mutant ribozymes over a range of conditions. Remarkably, catalytic activity correlated with P1 anisotropy over 5 orders of magnitude of activity, with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. The functional and dynamic effects from simultaneous mutation of the two long-range contacts that weaken P1 docking are cumulative and, based on this RNA’s topology, suggest distinct underlying origins for the mutant effects. Tests of mechanistic predictions via single molecule FRET measurements of rate constants for P1 docking and undocking suggest that ablation of the P14 tertiary interaction frees P2 and thereby enhances the conformational space explored by the undocked attached P1 helix. In contrast, mutation of the metal core tertiary interaction disrupts the conserved core into which the P1 helix docks. Thus, despite following a single correlation, the two long-range tertiary contacts facilitate P1 helix docking by distinct mechanisms. These results also demonstrate that a fluorescence anisotropy probe incorporated into a specific helix within a larger RNA can report on changes in local helical motions as well as differences in more global dynamics. This ability will help uncover the physical properties and behaviors that underlie the function of RNAs and RNA/protein complexes. PMID:24738560

  11. Dynamic Range Enhancement of High-Speed Electrical Signal Data via Non-Linear Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laun, Matthew C. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for high-speed compression of dynamic electrical signal waveforms to extend the measuring capabilities of conventional measuring devices such as oscilloscopes and high-speed data acquisition systems are discussed. Transfer function components and algorithmic transfer functions can be used to accurately measure signals that are within the frequency bandwidth but beyond the voltage range and voltage resolution capabilities of the measuring device.

  12. Thermal-wave radar: a novel subsurface imaging modality with extended depth-resolution dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Nima; Mandelis, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Combining the ideas behind linear frequency modulated continuous wave radars and frequency domain photothermal radiometry (PTR), a novel PTR method is introduced. Analytical solutions to the heat diffusion problem for both opaque and transparent solids are provided. Simulations and experimental results suggest a significant improvement in the dynamic range when using the thermal-wave radar (TWR) instead of conventional PTR. A practical TWR image resolution augmentation method is proposed. PMID:19334943

  13. Dynamic range compression/expansion of light beams by photorefractive crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor); Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which greatly reduces the intensity of bright portions of an image while only moderately reducing the brightness of dimmer portions of the image, to thereby compress the range of light intensities to facilitate detection of the image. The apparatus includes a light detector device formed by a chip of photorefractive material. A 2-D array of light beams from an object to be detected passes through a beam splitter to form two arrays of light beams. The two arrays are directed at different angles against a surface of the chip of photorefractive material, the two arrays of light beams forming coincident images on the surface. One of the 2-D arrays of beams emerging from an opposite surface of the chip has a lower range of intensities, to facilitate detection of the object despite very bright spots in its image. The other array of light beams emerging from the chip has a greater range of intensities than the unprocessed image of the object.

  14. Personal solar UV exposure measurements employing modified polysulphone with an extended dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Alfio V; Kimlin, Michael G

    2004-05-01

    Polysulphone dosimeters using a simple to use filter have been developed and tested to provide an extended dynamic measurement range of personal solar UV exposures over an extended period (3 to 6 days). At a Southern Hemisphere subtropical site (27.6 degrees S, 151.9 degrees E), the dynamic range of the filtered polysulphone allowed measurements of erythemal exposures to approximately 100 minimum erythemal dose (MED) for a change in optical absorbance at 330 nm (deltaA330) of 0.35. In comparison, unfiltered polysulphone dosimeters were exposed to approximately 8 MED for the same deltaA330. The error associated with the use of the filtered polysulphone dosimeters is of the order of +/-15%, compared with +/-10% of the unfiltered variety. The developed filtered polysulphone dosimeter system allowed the measurement of erythemal UV exposures over 3 to 6 days at a subtropical site without the need to replace the dosimeters because of saturation. The results show that longer-term measurement programs of personal solar UV have been made more feasible with the use of these polysulphone dosimeters with an extended dynamic range compared with unfiltered polysulphone dosimeters. PMID:15191049

  15. Linear response range characterization and in vivo application of laser speckle imaging of blood flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bernard; Ramírez-San-Juan, Julio C.; Lotfi, Justin; Nelson, J. S.

    2006-07-01

    Noninvasive blood flow imaging can provide critical information on the state of biological tissue and the efficacy of approaches to treat disease. With laser speckle imaging (LSI), relative changes in blood flow are typically reported, with the assumption that the measured values are on a linear scale. A linear relationship between the measured and actual flow rate values has been suggested. The actual flow rate range, over which this linear relationship is valid, is unknown. Herein we report the linear response range and velocity dynamic range (VDR) of our LSI instrument at two relevant camera integration times. For integration times of 1 and 10 ms, the best case VDR was 80 and 60 dB, respectively, and the worst case VDR was 20 and 50 dB. The best case VDR values were similar to those reported in the literature for optical Doppler tomography. We also demonstrate the potential of LSI for monitoring blood flow dynamics in the rodent dorsal skinfold chamber model. These findings imply that LSI can provide accurate wide-field maps of microvascular blood flow rate dynamics and highlight heterogeneities in flow response to the application of exogenous agents.

  16. Expansion of dynamic range in Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor using dual microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinto, Hironobu; Saita, Yusuke; Nomura, Takanori

    2015-12-01

    A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (SHWFS) which consists of a microlens array and an image sensor has been used to measure the wavefront aberrations in various fields owing to its advantages such as simple configuration. However, a conventional SHWFS has the finite dynamic range. The dynamic range cannot be expanded without sacrificing the spatial resolution and the sensitivity in a conventional SHWFS. In this study, the SHWFS using a dual microlens array to solve the problem is proposed. In the proposed method, an astigmatic microlens is arranged at the center of a group of 2 x 2 spherical microlenses. A pattern image including spots and linear patterns is obtained at the focal plane by the dual microlens array. The pattern image can be separated into two images as if two microlens array with different diameter were used by discriminating spots from linear patterns with the pattern matching technique. The proposed method enables to expand the dynamic range of an SHWFS by using the separated two images. The performance of the proposed method is confirmed by the numerical simulation for measuring a spherical wave.

  17. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    PubMed

    George Abraham, Bobin; Sarkisyan, Karen S; Mishin, Alexander S; Santala, Ville; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Karp, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM). PMID:26237400

  18. Chroma sampling and modulation techniques in high dynamic range video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Krishnan, Madhu; Topiwala, Pankaj

    2015-09-01

    High Dynamic Range and Wide Color Gamut (HDR/WCG) Video Coding is an area of intense research interest in the engineering community, for potential near-term deployment in the marketplace. HDR greatly enhances the dynamic range of video content (up to 10,000 nits), as well as broadens the chroma representation (BT.2020). The resulting content offers new challenges in its coding and transmission. The Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) of the International Standards Organization (ISO) is currently exploring coding efficiency and/or the functionality enhancements of the recently developed HEVC video standard for HDR and WCG content. FastVDO has developed an advanced approach to coding HDR video, based on splitting the HDR signal into a smoothed luminance (SL) signal, and an associated base signal (B). Both signals are then chroma downsampled to YFbFr 4:2:0 signals, using advanced resampling filters, and coded using the Main10 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard, which has been developed jointly by ISO/IEC MPEG and ITU-T WP3/16 (VCEG). Our proposal offers both efficient coding, and backwards compatibility with the existing HEVC Main10 Profile. That is, an existing Main10 decoder can produce a viewable standard dynamic range video, suitable for existing screens. Subjective tests show visible improvement over the anchors. Objective tests show a sizable gain of over 25% in PSNR (RGB domain) on average, for a key set of test clips selected by the ISO/MPEG committee.

  19. Long-range correlations improve understanding of the influence of network structure on contact dynamics.

    PubMed

    Peyrard, N; Dieckmann, U; Franc, A

    2008-05-01

    Models of infectious diseases are characterized by a phase transition between extinction and persistence. A challenge in contemporary epidemiology is to understand how the geometry of a host's interaction network influences disease dynamics close to the critical point of such a transition. Here we address this challenge with the help of moment closures. Traditional moment closures, however, do not provide satisfactory predictions close to such critical points. We therefore introduce a new method for incorporating longer-range correlations into existing closures. Our method is technically simple, remains computationally tractable and significantly improves the approximation's performance. Our extended closures thus provide an innovative tool for quantifying the influence of interaction networks on spatially or socially structured disease dynamics. In particular, we examine the effects of a network's clustering coefficient, as well as of new geometrical measures, such as a network's square clustering coefficients. We compare the relative performance of different closures from the literature, with or without our long-range extension. In this way, we demonstrate that the normalized version of the Bethe approximation-extended to incorporate long-range correlations according to our method-is an especially good candidate for studying influences of network structure. Our numerical results highlight the importance of the clustering coefficient and the square clustering coefficient for predicting disease dynamics at low and intermediate values of transmission rate, and demonstrate the significance of path redundancy for disease persistence. PMID:18262579

  20. The dynamic range paradox: a central auditory model of intensity change detection.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrew J R; Reiss, Joshua D

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we use empirical loudness modeling to explore a perceptual sub-category of the dynamic range problem of auditory neuroscience. Humans are able to reliably report perceived intensity (loudness), and discriminate fine intensity differences, over a very large dynamic range. It is usually assumed that loudness and intensity change detection operate upon the same neural signal, and that intensity change detection may be predicted from loudness data and vice versa. However, while loudness grows as intensity is increased, improvement in intensity discrimination performance does not follow the same trend and so dynamic range estimations of the underlying neural signal from loudness data contradict estimations based on intensity just-noticeable difference (JND) data. In order to account for this apparent paradox we draw on recent advances in auditory neuroscience. We test the hypothesis that a central model, featuring central adaptation to the mean loudness level and operating on the detection of maximum central-loudness rate of change, can account for the paradoxical data. We use numerical optimization to find adaptation parameters that fit data for continuous-pedestal intensity change detection over a wide dynamic range. The optimized model is tested on a selection of equivalent pseudo-continuous intensity change detection data. We also report a supplementary experiment which confirms the modeling assumption that the detection process may be modeled as rate-of-change. Data are obtained from a listening test (N = 10) using linearly ramped increment-decrement envelopes applied to pseudo-continuous noise with an overall level of 33 dB SPL. Increments with half-ramp durations between 5 and 50,000 ms are used. The intensity JND is shown to increase towards long duration ramps (p<10(-6)). From the modeling, the following central adaptation parameters are derived; central dynamic range of 0.215 sones, 95% central normalization, and a central loudness JND

  1. Calibration of spectral responsivity of IR detectors in the range from 0.6 μm to 24 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, Vyacheslav B.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Hanssen, Leonard M.; Larason, Thomas C.

    2016-05-01

    We report the upgraded performance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) facility for spectral responsivity calibrations of infrared (IR) detectors in both radiant power and irradiance measurement modes. The extension of the wavelength range of the previous scale, below 0.8 μm and above 19 μm in radiant power mode as well as above 5.3 μm in irradiance mode, became available as a result of multiple improvements. The calibration facility was optimized for low-level radiant flux. A significantly reduced noise-equivalent-power and a relatively constant spectral response were achieved recently on newly developed pyroelectric detectors. Also, an efficient optical geometry was developed for calibration of the spectral irradiance responsivity without using an integrating sphere. Simultaneously, the upgrade and maintenance of the NIST transfer standards, with an extended spectral range, were supported by spectral reflectance measurements of a transfer standard pyroelectric detector using a custom integrating sphere and a Fourier transform spectrometer. The sphere reflectance measurements performed in a relative mode were compared to a bare gold-coated mirror reference, separately calibrated at the Fourier transform Infrared Spectrophotometry facility to 18 μm. Currently, the reflectance data for the pyroelectric standard, available in the range up to 30 μm, are supporting the absolute power responsivity scale by the propagation of the reflectance curve to the absolute tie-spectrum in the overlapping range. Typical examples of working standard pyroelectric-, Si-, MCT-, InSb- and InGaAs- detectors are presented and their optimal use for scale dissemination is analyzed.

  2. Orders of Magnitude Extension of the Effective Dynamic Range of TDC-Based TOFMS Data Through Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipsen, Andreas; Ebbels, Timothy M. D.

    2014-10-01

    In a recent article, we derived a probability distribution that was shown to closely approximate that of the data produced by liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) instruments employing time-to-digital converters (TDCs) as part of their detection system. The approach of formulating detailed and highly accurate mathematical models of LC/MS data via probability distributions that are parameterized by quantities of analytical interest does not appear to have been fully explored before. However, we believe it could lead to a statistically rigorous framework for addressing many of the data analytical problems that arise in LC/MS studies. In this article, we present new procedures for correcting for TDC saturation using such an approach and demonstrate that there is potential for significant improvements in the effective dynamic range of TDC-based mass spectrometers, which could make them much more competitive with the alternative analog-to-digital converters (ADCs). The degree of improvement depends on our ability to generate mass and chromatographic peaks that conform to known mathematical functions and our ability to accurately describe the state of the detector dead time—tasks that may be best addressed through engineering efforts.

  3. Optimizing the dynamic range extension of a radiochromic film dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Soares, Christopher G.; Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2009-02-15

    The authors present a radiochromic film dosimetry protocol for a multicolor channel radiochromic film dosimetry system consisting of the external beam therapy (EBT) model GAFCHROMIC film and the Epson Expression 1680 flat-bed document scanner. Instead of extracting only the red color channel, the authors are using all three color channels in the absorption spectrum of the EBT film to extend the dynamic dose range of the radiochromic film dosimetry system. By optimizing the dose range for each color channel, they obtained a system that has both precision and accuracy below 1.5%, and the optimized ranges are 0-4 Gy for the red channel, 4-50 Gy for the green channel, and above 50 Gy for the blue channel.

  4. Universal threshold for the dynamical behavior of lattice systems with long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, Romain; Kastner, Michael

    2013-04-26

    Dynamical properties of lattice systems with long-range pair interactions, decaying like 1/r(α) with the distance r, are investigated, in particular the time scales governing the relaxation to equilibrium. Upon varying the interaction range α, we find evidence for the existence of a threshold at α=d/2, dependent on the spatial dimension d, at which the relaxation behavior changes qualitatively and the corresponding scaling exponents switch to a different regime. Based on analytical as well as numerical observations in systems of vastly differing nature, ranging from quantum to classical, from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic, and including a variety of lattice structures, we conjecture this threshold and some of its characteristic properties to be universal. PMID:23679698

  5. Slow dynamics in many-body quantum systems with long range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Lea; Perez-Bernal, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    In recent experiments with ion traps the range of the interactions between spins-1/2 can be controlled. In the limit of infinite-range interaction the system may be described by the Lipkin model, which exhibits an excited state quantum phase transition (ESQPT). The latter corresponds to a singularity in the spectrum that occurs at the ground state and propagates to higher energies as the control parameter increases beyond the ground state critical point. We show that the evolution of an initial state with energy close to the ESQPT critical point may be extremely slow. This result is surprising, since the dynamics is usually expected to be very fast in systems with long-range interactions. This behavior is justified with the analysis of the structures of the eigenstates. This work was supported by the NSF Grant No. DMR-1147430.

  6. Low-background-rate detector for ions in the 5- to 50-keV energy range to be used for radioisotope dating with a small cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry in tandem Van de Graaff accelerators has proven successful for radioisotope dating small samples. Small, inexpensive cyclotrons serving this purpose would make the technique accessible to more researchers and inexpensive enough to compare many small samples. To this end, VC Berkeley is developing a 20-cm-diameter, 30- to 40-keV cyclotron dedicated to high-sensitivity radioisotope dating, initially for /sup 14/C. At this energy, range and dE/dx methods of particle identification are impossible. Thus arises the difficult problem of reliably detecting 30- to 40-keV /sup 14/C at 10/sup -1/ counts/sec in the high-background environment of the cyclotron, where lower energy ions, electrons, and photons bombard the detector at much higher rates. To meet this challenge, an inexpensive, generally useful ion detector was developed that allows dark-count rates below 10/sup -4/ counts/sec and excellent background suppression. With the cyclotron tuned near the /sup 13/CH background peak, to the frequency for /sup 14/C, the detector suppresses the background to 6 x 10/sup -4/ counts/sec. For each /sup 14/C ion, the detector's grazing-incidence Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ conversion dynode emits about 20 secondary electrons, which are independently multiplied in separate pores of a microchannel plate. The output signal is proportional to the number of secondary electrons, allowing pulse-height discrimination of background.

  7. Detectors for X-ray diffraction and scattering: a user's overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brügemann, Lutz; Gerndt, Ekkehard K. E.

    2004-09-01

    An overview of the applications of X-ray detectors to material research is given. Four experimental techniques and their specific detector requirements are described. Detector types are classified and critical parameters described in the framework of X-ray diffraction and X-ray scattering experiments. The article aims at building a bridge between detector end-users and detector developers. It gives limits of critical detector parameters, like angular resolution, energy resolution, dynamic range, and active area.

  8. Numerical analysis for finite-range multitype stochastic contact financial market dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ge; Wang, Jun; Fang, Wen

    2015-04-01

    In an attempt to reproduce and study the dynamics of financial markets, a random agent-based financial price model is developed and investigated by the finite-range multitype contact dynamic system, in which the interaction and dispersal of different types of investment attitudes in a stock market are imitated by viruses spreading. With different parameters of birth rates and finite-range, the normalized return series are simulated by Monte Carlo simulation method and numerical studied by power-law distribution analysis and autocorrelation analysis. To better understand the nonlinear dynamics of the return series, a q-order autocorrelation function and a multi-autocorrelation function are also defined in this work. The comparisons of statistical behaviors of return series from the agent-based model and the daily historical market returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index indicate that the proposed model is a reasonable qualitative explanation for the price formation process of stock market systems. PMID:25933659

  9. Implementing Molecular Dynamics for Hybrid High Performance Computers - 1. Short Range Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W Michael; Wang, Peng; Plimpton, Steven J; Tharrington, Arnold N

    2011-01-01

    The use of accelerators such as general-purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs) have become popular in scientific computing applications due to their low cost, impressive floating-point capabilities, high memory bandwidth, and low electrical power requirements. Hybrid high performance computers, machines with more than one type of floating-point processor, are now becoming more prevalent due to these advantages. In this work, we discuss several important issues in porting a large molecular dynamics code for use on parallel hybrid machines - 1) choosing a hybrid parallel decomposition that works on central processing units (CPUs) with distributed memory and accelerator cores with shared memory, 2) minimizing the amount of code that must be ported for efficient acceleration, 3) utilizing the available processing power from both many-core CPUs and accelerators, and 4) choosing a programming model for acceleration. We present our solution to each of these issues for short-range force calculation in the molecular dynamics package LAMMPS. We describe algorithms for efficient short range force calculation on hybrid high performance machines. We describe a new approach for dynamic load balancing of work between CPU and accelerator cores. We describe the Geryon library that allows a single code to compile with both CUDA and OpenCL for use on a variety of accelerators. Finally, we present results on a parallel test cluster containing 32 Fermi GPGPUs and 180 CPU cores.

  10. Dynamic chest radiography with a flat-panel detector (FPD): ventilation-perfusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Fujimura, M.; Yasui, M.; Tsuji, S.; Hayashi, N.; Okamoto, H.; Nanbu, Y.; Matsui, O.

    2011-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation and blood flow are reflected in dynamic chest radiographs as changes in X-ray translucency, i.e., pixel values. This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) study based on the changes in pixel value. Sequential chest radiographs of a patient with ventilation-perfusion mismatch were obtained during respiration using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system. The lung area was recognized and average pixel value was measured in each area, tracking and deforming the region of interest. Inter-frame differences were then calculated, and the absolute values were summed in each respiratory phase. The results were visualized as ventilation, blood flow, V/Q ratio distribution map and compared to distribution of radioactive counts on ventilation and perfusion scintigrams. In the results, abnormalities were appeared as a reduction of changes in pixel values, and a correlation was observed between the distribution of changes in pixel value and those of radioactivity counts (Ventilation; r=0.78, Perfusion; r=0.77). V/Q mismatch was also indicated as mismatch of changes in pixel value, and a correlation with V/Q calculated by radioactivity counts (r=0.78). These results indicated that the present method is potentially useful for V/Q study as an additional examination in conventional chest radiography.

  11. Dynamic Equilibria of Short-Range Electrostatic Interactions at Molecular Interfaces of Protein-DNA Complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanying; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandarashvili, Levani; Nguyen, Dan; Montgomery Pettitt, B; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-07-16

    Intermolecular ion pairs (salt bridges) are crucial for protein-DNA association. For two protein-DNA complexes, we demonstrate that the ion pairs of protein side-chain NH3+ and DNA phosphate groups undergo dynamic transitions between distinct states in which the charged moieties are either in direct contact or separated by water. While the crystal structures of the complexes show only the solvent-separated ion pair (SIP) state for some interfacial lysine side chains, our NMR hydrogen-bond scalar coupling data clearly indicate the presence of the contact ion pair (CIP) state for the same residues. The 0.6-μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations confirm dynamic transitions between the CIP and SIP states. This behavior is consistent with our NMR order parameters and scalar coupling data for the lysine side chains. Using the MD trajectories, we also analyze the free energies of the CIP-SIP equilibria. This work illustrates the dynamic nature of short-range electrostatic interactions in DNA recognition by proteins. PMID:26207171

  12. Role of Long-Range Protein Dynamics in Different Thymidylate Synthase Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Abeysinghe, Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase (ecTSase) showed that a highly conserved residue, Y209, that is located 8 Å away from the reaction site, plays a key role in the protein’s dynamics. Those crystallographic studies indicated that Y209W mutant is a structurally identical but dynamically altered relative to the wild type (WT) enzyme, and that its turnover catalytic rate governed by a slow hydride-transfer has been affected. The most challenging test of an examination of a fast chemical conversion that precedes the rate-limiting step has been achieved here. The physical nature of both fast and slow C-H bond activations have been compared between the WT and mutant by means of observed and intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and their temperature dependence. The findings indicate that the proton abstraction step has not been altered as much as the hydride transfer step. Additionally, the comparison indicated that other kinetic steps in the TSase catalyzed reaction were substantially affected, including the order of the substrate binding. Enigmatically, although Y209 is H-bonded to 3'-OH of 2'-deoxyuridine-5'-mono­phosphate (dUMP), its altered dynamics is more pronounced on the binding of the remote cofactor, (6R)-N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (CH2H4folate), revealing the importance of long-range dynamics of the enzymatic complex and its catalytic function. PMID:25837629

  13. Dynamic model with scale-dependent coefficients in the viscous range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneveau, C.; Lund, T. S.

    1996-01-01

    The standard dynamic procedure is based on the scale-invariance assumption that the model coefficient C is the same at the grid and test-filter levels. In many applications this condition is not met, e.g. when the filter-length, delta, approaches the Kolmogorov scale, and C(delta approaches eta) approaches O. Using a priori tests, we show that the standard dynamic model yields the coefficient corresponding to the test-filter scale (alpha delta) instead of the grid-scale (delta). Several approaches to account for scale dependence are examined and/or tested in large eddy simulation of isotropic turbulence: (a) take the limit alpha approaches 1; (b) solve for two unknown coefficients C(Delta) and C(alpha delta) in the least-square-error formulation; (c) the 'bi-dynamic model', in which two test-filters (e.g. at scales 2(delta) and 4(delta) are employed to gain additional information on possible scale-dependence of the coefficient, and an improved estimate for the grid-level coefficient is obtained by extrapolation, (d) use theoretical predictions for the ratio C(alpha delta)/C(delta) and dynamically solve for C(delta). None of these options is found to be entirely satisfactory, although the last approach appears applicable to the viscous range.

  14. Dynamic Equilibria of Short-Range Electrostatic Interactions at Molecular Interfaces of Protein–DNA Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Intermolecular ion pairs (salt bridges) are crucial for protein–DNA association. For two protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that the ion pairs of protein side-chain NH3+ and DNA phosphate groups undergo dynamic transitions between distinct states in which the charged moieties are either in direct contact or separated by water. While the crystal structures of the complexes show only the solvent-separated ion pair (SIP) state for some interfacial lysine side chains, our NMR hydrogen-bond scalar coupling data clearly indicate the presence of the contact ion pair (CIP) state for the same residues. The 0.6-μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations confirm dynamic transitions between the CIP and SIP states. This behavior is consistent with our NMR order parameters and scalar coupling data for the lysine side chains. Using the MD trajectories, we also analyze the free energies of the CIP–SIP equilibria. This work illustrates the dynamic nature of short-range electrostatic interactions in DNA recognition by proteins. PMID:26207171

  15. Role of long-range protein dynamics in different thymidylate synthase catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Abeysinghe, Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase (ecTSase) showed that a highly conserved residue, Y209, that is located 8 Å away from the reaction site, plays a key role in the protein's dynamics. Those crystallographic studies indicated that Y209W mutant is a structurally identical but dynamically altered relative to the wild type (WT) enzyme, and that its turnover catalytic rate governed by a slow hydride-transfer has been affected. The most challenging test of an examination of a fast chemical conversion that precedes the rate-limiting step has been achieved here. The physical nature of both fast and slow C-H bond activations have been compared between the WT and mutant by means of observed and intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and their temperature dependence. The findings indicate that the proton abstraction step has not been altered as much as the hydride transfer step. Additionally, the comparison indicated that other kinetic steps in the TSase catalyzed reaction were substantially affected, including the order of the substrate binding. Enigmatically, although Y209 is H-bonded to 3'-OH of 2'-deoxyuridine-5'-mono-phosphate (dUMP), its altered dynamics is more pronounced on the binding of the remote cofactor, (6R)-N5,N10-methylene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate (CH2H4folate), revealing the importance of long-range dynamics of the enzymatic complex and its catalytic function. PMID:25837629

  16. Acute Effects of Different Agonist and Antagonist Stretching Arrangements on Static and Dynamic Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, stretching exercises are considered as basic components of warm up aiming to prepare the musculoskeletal system for performance and to prevent injuries. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different agonist and antagonist stretching arrangements within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip static (SROM) and dynamic range of motion (DROM). Materials and Methods: Sixty trained male subjects (Mean ± SD: height, 177.38 ± 6.92 cm; body mass, 68.4 ± 10.22 kg; age, 21.52 ± 1.17 years) volunteered to participate in this study. SROM was measured by V-sit test and DROM captured by a motion analysis system before and after (i) static stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (SFSE), (ii) dynamic stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (DFDE), (iii) static stretching for the hip flexors and dynamic stretching for hip extensors (SFDE), and (iv) dynamic stretching for the hip flexors and static stretching for hip extensors (DFSE). Results: DFSE showed a significantly higher increase in DROM and SROM than the remainder of the stretching protocols (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between DFDE with SFSE and SFDE (P < 0.05) and SFSE showed significant increase as compared to SFDE (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, DFSE is probably the best stretching arrangement due to producing more post activation potentiation on agonist muscles and less muscle stiffness in antagonist muscles. PMID:26715975

  17. Computationally Efficient Truncated Nuclear Norm Minimization for High Dynamic Range Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul; Lam, Edmund Y

    2016-09-01

    Matrix completion is a rank minimization problem to recover a low-rank data matrix from a small subset of its entries. Since the matrix rank is nonconvex and discrete, many existing approaches approximate the matrix rank as the nuclear norm. However, the truncated nuclear norm is known to be a better approximation to the matrix rank than the nuclear norm, exploiting a priori target rank information about the problem in rank minimization. In this paper, we propose a computationally efficient truncated nuclear norm minimization algorithm for matrix completion, which we call TNNM-ALM. We reformulate the original optimization problem by introducing slack variables and considering noise in the observation. The central contribution of this paper is to solve it efficiently via the augmented Lagrange multiplier (ALM) method, where the optimization variables are updated by closed-form solutions. We apply the proposed TNNM-ALM algorithm to ghost-free high dynamic range imaging by exploiting the low-rank structure of irradiance maps from low dynamic range images. Experimental results on both synthetic and real visual data show that the proposed algorithm achieves significantly lower reconstruction errors and superior robustness against noise than the conventional approaches, while providing substantial improvement in speed, thereby applicable to a wide range of imaging applications. PMID:27352392

  18. A regional density distribution based wide dynamic range algorithm for infrared camera systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gyuhee; Kim, Yongsung; Joung, Shichang; Shin, Sanghoon

    2014-10-01

    Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) imaging system has been widely used for both military and civilian purposes. Military applications include target acquisition and tracking, night vision system. Civilian applications include thermal efficiency analysis, short-ranged wireless communication, weather forecasting and other various applications. The dynamic range of FLIR imaging system is larger than one of commercial display. Generally, auto gain controlling and contrast enhancement algorithm are applied to FLIR imaging system. In IR imaging system, histogram equalization and plateau equalization is generally used for contrast enhancement. However, they have no solution about the excessive enhancing when luminance histogram has been distributed in specific narrow region. In this paper, we proposed a Regional Density Distribution based Wide Dynamic Range algorithm for Infrared Camera Systems. Depending on the way of implementation, the result of WDR is quite different. Our approach is single frame type WDR algorithm for enhancing the contrast of both dark and white detail without loss of bins of histogram with real-time processing. The significant change in luminance caused by conventional contrast enhancement methods may introduce luminance saturation and failure in object tracking. Proposed method guarantees both the effective enhancing in contrast and successive object tracking. Moreover, since proposed method does not using multiple images on WDR, computation complexity might be significantly reduced in software / hardware implementation. The experimental results show that proposed method has better performance compared with conventional Contrast enhancement methods.

  19. Extending the Dynamic Range in Metabolomics Experiments by Automatic Correction of Peaks Exceeding the Detection Limit.

    PubMed

    Lisec, Jan; Hoffmann, Friederike; Schmitt, Clemens; Jaeger, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    Metabolomics, the analysis of potentially all small molecules within a biological system, has become a valuable tool for biomarker identification and the elucidation of biological processes. While metabolites are often present in complex mixtures at extremely different concentrations, the dynamic range of available analytical methods to capture this variance is generally limited. Here, we show that gas chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-MS), a state of the art analytical technology applied in metabolomics analyses, shows an average linear range (LR) of 2.39 orders of magnitude for a set of 62 metabolites from a representative compound mixture. We further developed a computational tool to extend this dynamic range on average by more than 1 order of magnitude, demonstrated with a dilution series of the compound mixture, using robust and automatic reconstruction of intensity values exceeding the detection limit. The tool is freely available as an R package (CorrectOverloadedPeaks) from CRAN ( https://cran.r-project.org/ ) and can be incorporated in a metabolomics data processing pipeline facilitating large screening assays. PMID:27377477

  20. Territoriality and home-range dynamics in meerkats, Suricata suricatta: a mechanistic modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Andrew W; Lewis, Mark A; Gall, Gabriella; Manser, Marta B; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2015-01-01

    Multiple approaches exist to model patterns of space use across species, among them resource selection analysis, statistical home-range modelling and mechanistic movement modelling. Mechanistic home-range models combine the benefits of these approaches, describing emergent territorial patterns based on fine-scale individual- or group-movement rules and incorporating interactions with neighbours and the environment. These models have not, to date, been extended to dynamic contexts. Using mechanistic home-range models, we explore meerkat (Suricata suricatta) territorial patterns, considering scent marking, direct group interactions and habitat selection. We also extend the models to accommodate dynamic aspects of meerkat territoriality (territory development and territory shift). We fit models, representing multiple working hypotheses, to data from a long-term meerkat study in South Africa, and we compare models using Akaike's and Bayesian Information Criteria. Our results identify important features of meerkat territorial patterns. Notably, larger groups do not seem to control larger territories, and groups apparently prefer dune edges along a dry river bed. Our model extensions capture instances in which 1) a newly formed group interacts more strongly with its parent groups over time and 2) a group moves its territory core out of aversive habitat. This extends our mechanistic modelling framework in previously unexplored directions. PMID:24995457

  1. Inferring host range dynamics from comparative data: the protozoan parasites of new world monkeys.

    PubMed

    Waxman, David; Weinert, Lucy A; Welch, John J

    2014-07-01

    Uncovering the ecological determinants of parasite host range is a central goal of comparative parasitology and infectious disease ecology. But while parasites are often distributed nonrandomly across the host phylogeny, such patterns are difficult to interpret without a genealogy for the parasite samples and without knowing what sorts of ecological dynamics might lead to what sorts of nonrandomness. We investigated inferences from comparative data, using presence/absence records from protozoan parasites of the New World monkeys. We first demonstrate several distinct types of phylogenetic signal in these data, showing, for example, that parasite species are clustered on the host tree and that closely related host species harbor similar numbers of parasite species. We then show that all of these patterns can be generated by a single, simple dynamical model, in which parasite host range changes more rapidly than host speciation/extinction and parasites preferentially colonize uninfected host species that are closely related to their existing hosts. Fitting this model to data, we then estimate its parameters. Finally, we caution that quite different ecological processes can lead to similar signatures but show how phylogenetic variation in host susceptibility can be distinguished from a tendency for parasites to colonize closely related hosts. Our new process-based analyses, which estimate meaningful parameters, should be useful for inferring the determinants of parasite host range and transmission success. PMID:24921601

  2. An Analog Gamma Correction Scheme for High Dynamic Range CMOS Logarithmic Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  3. Simulation of Heavy Lift Airship dynamics over large ranges of incidence and speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. B.; Jex, H. R.; Ringland, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear, multibody, six-degrees-of-freedom digital simulation has been developed to study generic Heavy Lift Airship (HLA) dynamics and control. The basic aerodynamic functions developed to model the hull, tail, and rotor loads continuously over all incidence ranges are reviewed and applied to a Quadrotor HLA with a low fineness ratio hull and a small vee-tail. Trim calculations for a test vehicle suggest control power deficiencies in crosswind stationkeeping for the unloaded vehicle. Gust responses show the importance of correctly calculating loads due to accelerated relative motion of air and hull. Numerically linearized dynamics for the test vehicle show the existence of a divergent yaw mode, and an oscillatory pitch mode whose stability characteristics are sensitive to flight speed. A considerable improvement in the vehicle's stability and response results from a simple multi-axis closed-loop control system operating on the rotors and propeller blades.

  4. An analog gamma correction scheme for high dynamic range CMOS logarithmic image sensors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan; Pan, Xiaofang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Wu, Huisi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel analog gamma correction scheme with a logarithmic image sensor dedicated to minimize the quantization noise of the high dynamic applications is presented. The proposed implementation exploits a non-linear voltage-controlled-oscillator (VCO) based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) to perform the gamma correction during the analog-to-digital conversion. As a result, the quantization noise does not increase while the same high dynamic range of logarithmic image sensor is preserved. Moreover, by combining the gamma correction with the analog-to-digital conversion, the silicon area and overall power consumption can be greatly reduced. The proposed gamma correction scheme is validated by the reported simulation results and the experimental results measured for our designed test structure, which is fabricated with 0.35 μm standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process. PMID:25517692

  5. In-medium short-range dynamics of nucleons: Recent theoretical and experimental advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atti, Claudio Ciofi degli

    2015-08-01

    The investigation of in-medium short-range dynamics of nucleons, usually referred to as the study of short-range correlations (SRCs), is a key issue in nuclear and hadronic physics. As a matter of fact, even in the simplified assumption that the nucleus could be described as a system of protons and neutrons interacting via effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, several non trivial problems arise concerning the description of in-medium (NN short-range dynamics, namely: (i) the behavior of the NN interaction at short inter-nucleon distances in medium cannot be uniquely constrained by the experimental NN scattering phase shifts due to off-shell effects; (ii) by rigorous renormalization group (RG) techniques entire families of phase equivalent interactions differing in the short-range part can be derived; (iii) the in-medium NN interaction may be, in principle, different from the free one; (iv) when the short inter-nucleon separation is of the order of the nucleon size, the question arises of possible effects from quark and gluon degrees of freedom. For more than fifty years, experimental evidence of SRCs has been searched by means of various kinds of nuclear reactions, without however convincing results, mainly because the effects of SRCs arise from non observable quantities, like, e.g., the momentum distributions, and have been extracted from observable cross sections where short- and long-range effects, effects from nucleonic and non nucleonic degrees of freedom, and effects from final state interaction, could not be unambiguously separated out. Recent years, however, were witness of new progress in the field: from one side, theoretical and computational progress has allowed one to solve ab initio the many-nucleon non relativistic Schrödinger equation in terms of realistic NN interactions, obtaining realistic microscopic wave functions, unless the case of parametrized wave functions used frequently in the past, moreover the development of advanced treatments

  6. In-line process control for laser welding of titanium by high dynamic range ratio pyrometry and plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Baselt, T.; Rudek, F.; Maschke, R.; Basan, F.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    The production of complex titanium components for various industries using laser welding processes has received growing attention in recent years. It is important to know whether the result of the cohesive joint meets the quality requirements of standardization and ultimately the customer requirements. Erroneous weld seams can have fatal consequences especially in the field of car manufacturing and medicine technology. To meet these requirements, a real-time process control system has been developed which determines the welding quality through a locally resolved temperature profile. By analyzing the resulting weld plasma received data is used to verify the stability of the laser welding process. The determination of the temperature profile is done by the detection of the emitted electromagnetic radiation from the material in a range of 500 nm to 1100 nm. As detectors, special high dynamic range CMOS cameras are used. As the emissivity of titanium depends on the wavelength, the surface and the angle of radiation, measuring the temperature is a problem. To solve these a special pyrometer setting with two cameras is used. That enables the compensation of these effects by calculating the difference between the respective pixels on simultaneously recorded images. Two spectral regions with the same emissivity are detected. Therefore the degree of emission and surface effects are compensated and canceled out of the calculation. Using the spatially resolved temperature distribution the weld geometry can be determined and the laser process can be controlled. The active readjustment of parameters such as laser power, feed rate and inert gas injection increases the quality of the welding process and decreases the number of defective goods.

  7. Maturity of lumped element kinetic inductance detectors for space-borne instruments in the range between 80 and 180 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, A.; Benoit, A.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Coiffard, G.; D'Addabbo, A.; Goupy, J.; Le Sueur, H.; Macías-Pérez, J.; Monfardini, A.

    2016-07-01

    This work intends to give the state-of-the-art of our knowledge of the performance of lumped element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) at millimetre wavelengths (from 80 to 180 GHz). We evaluate their optical sensitivity under typical background conditions that are representative of a space environment and their interaction with ionising particles. Two LEKID arrays, originally designed for ground-based applications and composed of a few hundred pixels each, operate at a central frequency of 100 and 150 GHz (Δν/ν about 0.3). Their sensitivities were characterised in the laboratory using a dedicated closed-cycle 100 mK dilution cryostat and a sky simulator, allowing for the reproduction of realistic, space-like observation conditions. The impact of cosmic rays was evaluated by exposing the LEKID arrays to alpha particles (241Am) and X sources (109Cd), with a read-out sampling frequency similar to those used for Planck HFI (about 200 Hz), and also with a high resolution sampling level (up to 2 MHz) to better characterise and interpret the observed glitches. In parallel, we developed an analytical model to rescale the results to what would be observed by such a LEKID array at the second Lagrangian point. We show that LEKID arrays behave adequately in space-like conditions with a measured noise equivalent power close to the cosmic microwave background photon noise and an impact of cosmic rays smaller with respect to those observed with Planck satellite detectors.

  8. Method of Improving a Digital Image as a Function of its Dynamic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodell, Glenn (Inventor); Jobson, Daniel J. (Inventor); Rahman, Zia-ur (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention is a method of processing a digital image that is initially represented by digital data indexed to represent position on a display. The digital data is indicative of an intensity value I(sub i)(x,y) for each position (x,y) in each i-th spectral band. A classification of the image based on its dynamic range is then defined in each of the image's S spectral bands. The intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band is adjusted to generate an adjusted intensity value for each position in each i-th spectral band in accordance with SIGMA (sup n)(sub n=1) W(sub n)(log I (sub i)(x,y) - log[I(sub i)(x,y)*F(sub n)(x,y)]), i=1,...,S where W(sub n) is a weighting factor, "*" is the convolution operator and S is the total number of unique spectral bands. For each n, the function F(sub n)(x,y) is a unique surround function applied to each position (x,y) and N is the total number of unique surround functions. Each unique surround function is scaled to improve some aspect of the digital image, e.g., dynamic range compression, color constancy, and lightness rendition. The adjusted intensity value to each position in each i-th spectral band of the image is then filtered with a filter function that is based on the dynamic range classification of the image.

  9. Bayer patterned high dynamic range image reconstruction using adaptive weighting function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hee; Lee, Suk Ho; Song, Ki Sun; Kang, Moon Gi

    2014-12-01

    It is not easy to acquire a desired high dynamic range (HDR) image directly from a camera due to the limited dynamic range of most image sensors. Therefore, generally, a post-process called HDR image reconstruction is used, which reconstructs an HDR image from a set of differently exposed images to overcome the limited dynamic range. However, conventional HDR image reconstruction methods suffer from noise factors and ghost artifacts. This is due to the fact that the input images taken with a short exposure time contain much noise in the dark regions, which contributes to increased noise in the corresponding dark regions of the reconstructed HDR image. Furthermore, since input images are acquired at different times, the images contain different motion information, which results in ghost artifacts. In this paper, we propose an HDR image reconstruction method which reduces the impact of the noise factors and prevents ghost artifacts. To reduce the influence of the noise factors, the weighting function, which determines the contribution of a certain input image to the reconstructed HDR image, is designed to adapt to the exposure time and local motions. Furthermore, the weighting function is designed to exclude ghosting regions by considering the differences of the luminance and the chrominance values between several input images. Unlike conventional methods, which generally work on a color image processed by the image processing module (IPM), the proposed method works directly on the Bayer raw image. This allows for a linear camera response function and also improves the efficiency in hardware implementation. Experimental results show that the proposed method can reconstruct high-quality Bayer patterned HDR images while being robust against ghost artifacts and noise factors.

  10. Adaptive uniform grayscale coded aperture design for high dynamic range compressive spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Nelson; Rueda, Hoover; Arguello, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is an important area with many applications in surveillance, agriculture and medicine. The disadvantage of conventional spectroscopy techniques is that they collect the whole datacube. In contrast, compressive spectral imaging systems capture snapshot compressive projections, which are the input of reconstruction algorithms to yield the underlying datacube. Common compressive spectral imagers use coded apertures to perform the coded projections. The coded apertures are the key elements in these imagers since they define the sensing matrix of the system. The proper design of the coded aperture entries leads to a good quality in the reconstruction. In addition, the compressive measurements are prone to saturation due to the limited dynamic range of the sensor, hence the design of coded apertures must consider saturation. The saturation errors in compressive measurements are unbounded and compressive sensing recovery algorithms only provide solutions for bounded noise or bounded with high probability. In this paper it is proposed the design of uniform adaptive grayscale coded apertures (UAGCA) to improve the dynamic range of the estimated spectral images by reducing the saturation levels. The saturation is attenuated between snapshots using an adaptive filter which updates the entries of the grayscale coded aperture based on the previous snapshots. The coded apertures are optimized in terms of transmittance and number of grayscale levels. The advantage of the proposed method is the efficient use of the dynamic range of the image sensor. Extensive simulations show improvements in the image reconstruction of the proposed method compared with grayscale coded apertures (UGCA) and adaptive block-unblock coded apertures (ABCA) in up to 10 dB.

  11. Finite-N corrections to Vlasov dynamics and the range of pair interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, Andrea; Joyce, Michael; Morand, Jules

    2014-12-01

    We explore the conditions on a pair interaction for the validity of the Vlasov equation to describe the dynamics of an interacting N -particle system in the large N limit. Using a coarse graining in phase space of the exact Klimontovich equation for the N -particle system, we evaluate, neglecting correlations of density fluctuations, the scalings with N of the terms describing the corrections to the Vlasov equation for the coarse-grained one-particle phase space density. Considering a generic interaction with radial pair force F (r ) , with F (r ) ˜1 /rγ at large scales, and regulated to a bounded behavior below a "softening" scale ɛ , we find that there is an essential qualitative difference between the cases γ d , i.e., depending on the the integrability at large distances of the pair force. In the former case, the corrections to the Vlasov dynamics for a given coarse-grained scale are essentially insensitive to the softening parameter ɛ , while for γ >d the amplitude of these terms is directly regulated by ɛ , and thus by the small scale properties of the interaction. This corresponds to a simple physical criterion for a basic distinction between long-range (γ ≤d ) and short-range (γ >d ) interactions, different from the canonical one (γ ≤d +1 or γ >d +1 ) based on thermodynamic analysis. This alternative classification, based on purely dynamical considerations, is relevant notably to understanding the conditions for the existence of so-called quasistationary states in long-range interacting systems.

  12. Short-range order and dynamics of atoms in liquid gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Mokshin, A. V. Khusnutdinoff, R. M.; Novikov, A. G.; Blagoveshchenskii, N. M.; Puchkov, A. V.

    2015-11-15

    The features of the microscopic structure, as well as one-particle and collective dynamics of liquid gallium in the temperature range from T = 313 to 1273 K, are studied on the p = 1.0 atm isobar. Detailed analysis of the data on diffraction of neutrons and X-rays, as well as the results of atomic dynamics simulation, lead to some conclusions about the structure. In particular, for preset conditions, gallium is in the equilibrium liquid phase showing no features of any stable local crystalline clusters. The pronounced asymmetry of the principle peak of the static structure factor and the characteristic “shoulder” in its right-hand part appearing at temperatures close to the melting point, which are clearly observed in the diffraction data, are due to the fact that the arrangement of the nearest neighbors of an arbitrary atom in the system is estimated statistically from the range of correlation length values and not by a single value as in the case of simple liquids. Compactly located dimers with a very short bond make a significant contribution to the statistics of nearest neighbors. The temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient calculated from atomic dynamics simulation agrees well with the results obtained from experimental spectra of the incoherent scattering function. Interpolation of the temperature dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient on a logarithmic scale reveals two linear regions with a transition temperature of about 600 K. The spectra of the dynamic structure factor and spectral densities of the local current calculated by simulating the atomic dynamics indicate the existence of acoustic vibrations with longitudinal and transverse polarizations in liquid gallium, which is confirmed by experimental data on inelastic scattering of neutrons and X-rays. It is found that the vibrational density of states is completely reproduced by the generalized Debye model, which makes it possible to decompose the total vibrational motion into

  13. Evaluation of High Dynamic Range Photography as a Luminance Mapping Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Inanici, Mehlika; Galvin, Jim

    2004-12-30

    The potential, limitations, and applicability of the High Dynamic Range (HDR) photography technique is evaluated as a luminance mapping tool. Multiple exposure photographs of static scenes are taken with a Nikon 5400 digital camera to capture the wide luminance variation within the scenes. The camera response function is computationally derived using the Photosphere software, and is used to fuse the multiple photographs into HDR images. The vignetting effect and point spread function of the camera and lens system is determined. Laboratory and field studies have shown that the pixel values in the HDR photographs can correspond to the physical quantity of luminance with reasonable precision and repeatability.

  14. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Mishra, S; Behera, R; Poornima; Dasgupta, K

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz(1/2) @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity. PMID:26133825

  15. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S. E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  16. Evaluation of adaptive dynamic range optimization in adverse listening conditions for cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Hussnain; Hazrati, Oldooz; Tobey, Emily A.; Hansen, John H. L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Adaptive Dynamic Range Optimization (ADRO) on speech identification for cochlear implant (CI) users in adverse listening conditions. In this study, anechoic quiet, noisy, reverberant, noisy reverberant, and reverberant noisy conditions are evaluated. Two scenarios are considered when modeling the combined effects of reverberation and noise: (a) noise is added to the reverberant speech, and (b) noisy speech is reverberated. CI users were tested in different listening environments using IEEE sentences presented at 65 dB sound pressure level. No significant effect of ADRO processing on speech intelligibility was observed. PMID:25190428

  17. Visual sensitivity correlated tone reproduction for low dynamic range images in the compression field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geun-Young; Lee, Sung-Hak; Kwon, Hyuk-Ju; Sohng, Kyu-Ik

    2014-11-01

    An image toning method for low dynamic range image compression is presented. The proposed method inserts tone mapping into JPEG baseline instead of postprocessing. First, an image is decomposed into detail, base, and surrounding components in terms of the discrete cosine transform coefficients. Subsequently, a luminance-adaptive tone mapping based on the human visual sensitivity properties is applied. In addition, compensation modules are added to enhance the visually sensitive factors, such as saturation, sharpness, and gamma. A comparative study confirms that the transmitted compression images have good image quality.

  18. Evaluation of adaptive dynamic range optimization in adverse listening conditions for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussnain; Hazrati, Oldooz; Tobey, Emily A; Hansen, John H L

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Adaptive Dynamic Range Optimization (ADRO) on speech identification for cochlear implant (CI) users in adverse listening conditions. In this study, anechoic quiet, noisy, reverberant, noisy reverberant, and reverberant noisy conditions are evaluated. Two scenarios are considered when modeling the combined effects of reverberation and noise: (a) noise is added to the reverberant speech, and (b) noisy speech is reverberated. CI users were tested in different listening environments using IEEE sentences presented at 65 dB sound pressure level. No significant effect of ADRO processing on speech intelligibility was observed. PMID:25190428

  19. Note: An X-ray powder diffractometer with a wide scattering-angle range of 72° using asymmetrically positioned one-dimensional detectors.

    PubMed

    Katsuya, Yoshio; Song, Chulho; Tanaka, Masahiko; Ito, Kimihiko; Kubo, Yoshimi; Sakata, Osami

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray powder diffractometer has been developed for a time-resolved measurement without the requirement of a scattering angle (2θ) scan. Six one-dimensional detector modules are asymmetrically arranged in a vertical line at a designed distance of 286.5 mm. A detector module actually covers a diffraction angle of about 12° with an angular resolution of 0.01°. A diffracted intensity pattern is simultaneously recorded in a 2θ angular range from 1.63° to 74.37° in a "one shot" measurement. We tested the performance of the diffractometer with reference CeO2 powders and demonstrated diffraction measurements from an operating lithium-air battery. PMID:26827367

  20. Note: An X-ray powder diffractometer with a wide scattering-angle range of 72° using asymmetrically positioned one-dimensional detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuya, Yoshio; Song, Chulho; Tanaka, Masahiko; Ito, Kimihiko; Kubo, Yoshimi; Sakata, Osami

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray powder diffractometer has been developed for a time-resolved measurement without the requirement of a scattering angle (2θ) scan. Six one-dimensional detector modules are asymmetrically arranged in a vertical line at a designed distance of 286.5 mm. A detector module actually covers a diffraction angle of about 12° with an angular resolution of 0.01°. A diffracted intensity pattern is simultaneously recorded in a 2θ angular range from 1.63° to 74.37° in a "one shot" measurement. We tested the performance of the diffractometer with reference CeO2 powders and demonstrated diffraction measurements from an operating lithium-air battery.

  1. A wide dynamic range laser rangefinder with cm-level resolution based on AGC amplifier structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feihu; Gong, Ke; Huo, Yujing

    2012-03-01

    A pulsed time-of-flight (TOF) laser rangefinder with a pulsed laser diode and an avalanche photo diode (APD) receiver is constructed and tested. Trigged by an avalanche transistor, the laser diode can emit a periodic pulse with rise time of ˜2 ns. A new structure with auto gain control (AGC) circuits both in the pre-amplifier and the post-amplifier is presented. Through this technology, not only the dynamic range of the receiver is extended, but also the walk error of timing discriminators is reduced. Large measurement range from 5 m to 500 m is achieved without any cooperative target. The single-shot precision is 3 cm for the weakest signal. Compared with previous laser rangefinders, the complexity of this system is greatly simplified.

  2. Effects of pulse rate on threshold and dynamic range in Clarion cochlear-implant users (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreft, Heather A.; Donaldson, Gail S.; Nelson, David A.

    2004-05-01

    The effects of pulse rate on absolute threshold (THS), maximum acceptable loudness (MAL), and dynamic range (DR) were evaluated in 15 Clarion cochlear implant users. A wider range of pulse rates was assessed than in previous studies, and subjects with both standard and perimodiolar electrode arrays were tested. THS and MAL decreased with pulse rate, and DR increased with pulse rate, for pulse rates between 200 and 6500 pulses per second (pps). However, slopes of THS-vs-pulse rate and MAL-vs-pulse rate functions became shallower above 3250 pps. Subjects with standard electrode arrays had similar THSs as subjects with perimodiolar electrode arrays at all pulse rates. In contrast, subjects with standard arrays had significantly higher MALs and larger DRs than subjects with perimodiolar arrays, and these differences became larger with increasing pulse rate.

  3. Stretching and bending dynamics in triatomic ultralong-range Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fey, Christian; Kurz, Markus; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-07-01

    We investigate polyatomic ultralong-range Rydberg molecules consisting of three ground-state atoms bound to a Rydberg atom via s - and p -wave interactions. By employing the finite basis set representation of the unperturbed Rydberg electron Green's function we reduce the computational effort to solve the electronic problem substantially. This method is subsequently applied to determine the potential energy surfaces of triatomic systems in electronic s - and p -Rydberg states. Their molecular geometry and resulting vibrational structure are analyzed within an adiabatic approach that separates the vibrational bending and stretching dynamics. This procedure yields information on the radial and angular arrangement of the nuclei and indicates in particular that kinetic couplings between bending and stretching modes induce a linear structure in triatomic l =0 ultralong-range Rydberg molecules.

  4. A nonrecursive 'Order N' preconditioned conjugate gradient/range space formulation of MDOF dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurdila, A. J.; Menon, R.; Sunkel, John

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses the requirements of present-day mechanical system simulations of algorithms that induce parallelism on a fine scale and of transient simulation methods which must be automatically load balancing for a wide collection of system topologies and hardware configurations. To this end, a combination range space/preconditioned conjugage gradient formulation of multidegree-of-freedon dynamics is developed, which, by employing regular ordering of the system connectivity graph, makes it possible to derive an extremely efficient preconditioner from the range space metric (as opposed to the system coefficient matrix). Because of the effectiveness of the preconditioner, the method can achieve performance rates that depend linearly on the number of substructures. The method, termed 'Order N' does not require the assembly of system mass or stiffness matrices, and is therefore amenable to implementation on work stations. Using this method, a 13-substructure model of the Space Station was constructed.

  5. Dynamic techniques for studies of secular variations in position from ranging to satellites. [using laser range measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Agreen, R. W.; Dunn, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Satellite laser range measurements were applied to the study of latitude variation arising from polar motion, and the solid-earth and ocean tidal distortion of the earth's gravity field. Experiments involving two laser tracking stations were conducted. The relative location of one station with respect to the other was determined by performing simultaneous range measurements to a satellite from two stations several hundred kilometers apart. The application of this technique to the San Andreas Fault Experiment in California is discussed. Future capabilities of spacecraft equipped with laser retroreflectors include: (1) determination of the product of the earth's mass and gravitational constant; (2) measurement of crustal and tectonic motions; (3) determination of the elastic response of the solid-earth tidal forces; (4) measurement of the amplitudes and phase of certain components of the ocean tides; and (5) self-monitoring of the latitude and height variations of the tracking station.

  6. Quercus suber range dynamics by ecological niche modelling: from the Last Interglacial to present time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessella, Federico; Simeone, Marco Cosimo; Schirone, Bartolomeo

    2015-07-01

    Ecological Niche Modelling (ENM) is widely used to depict species potential occurrence according to environmental variables under different climatic scenarios. We tested the ENM approach to infer past range dynamics of cork oak, a keystone species of the Mediterranean Biome, from 130 ka to the present time. Hindcasting implications would deal with a better species risk assessment and conservation management for the future. We modelled present and past occurrence of cork oak using seven ENM algorithms, starting from 63,733 spatially unique presence points at 30 arc-second resolution. Fourteen environmental variables were used and four time slices were considered (Last Interglacial, Last Glacial Maximum, mid-Holocene and present time). A threshold-independent evaluation of the goodness-of-fit of the models was evaluated by means of ROC curve and fossil or historical evidences were used to validate the results. Four weighted average maps depicted the dynamics of area suitability for cork oak in the last 130 ka. The derived species autoecology allowed its long-term occurrence in the Mediterranean without striking range reduction or shifting. Fossil and historical post-processing validation support the modelled past spatial extension and a neglected species presence at Levantine until the recent time. Despite the severe climatic oscillation since the Last Glacial Maximum, cork oak potential distribution area experienced limited range changes, confirming its strong link with the Mediterranean Basin. The ecological amplitude of Quercus suber could be therefore adopted as a reference to trace the Mediterranean bioclimate area. A better knowledge of the past events of Mediterranean vegetation, a wider range of study species and environmental determinants are essential to inform us about its current state, its sensitivity to human impact and the potential responses to future changes.

  7. Population dynamics can be more important than physiological limits for determining range shifts under climate change.

    PubMed

    Fordham, Damien A; Mellin, Camille; Russell, Bayden D; Akçakaya, Reşit H; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Aiello-Lammens, Matthew E; Caley, Julian M; Connell, Sean D; Mayfield, Stephen; Shepherd, Scoresby A; Brook, Barry W

    2013-10-01

    Evidence is accumulating that species' responses to climate changes are best predicted by modelling the interaction of physiological limits, biotic processes and the effects of dispersal-limitation. Using commercially harvested blacklip (Haliotis rubra) and greenlip abalone (Haliotis laevigata) as case studies, we determine the relative importance of accounting for interactions among physiology, metapopulation dynamics and exploitation in predictions of range (geographical occupancy) and abundance (spatially explicit density) under various climate change scenarios. Traditional correlative ecological niche models (ENM) predict that climate change will benefit the commercial exploitation of abalone by promoting increased abundances without any reduction in range size. However, models that account simultaneously for demographic processes and physiological responses to climate-related factors result in future (and present) estimates of area of occupancy (AOO) and abundance that differ from those generated by ENMs alone. Range expansion and population growth are unlikely for blacklip abalone because of important interactions between climate-dependent mortality and metapopulation processes; in contrast, greenlip abalone should increase in abundance despite a contraction in AOO. The strongly non-linear relationship between abalone population size and AOO has important ramifications for the use of ENM predictions that rely on metrics describing change in habitat area as proxies for extinction risk. These results show that predicting species' responses to climate change often require physiological information to understand climatic range determinants, and a metapopulation model that can make full use of this data to more realistically account for processes such as local extirpation, demographic rescue, source-sink dynamics and dispersal-limitation. PMID:23907833

  8. Adaptive digital fringe projection technique for high dynamic range three-dimensional shape measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Gao, Jian; Mei, Qing; He, Yunbo; Liu, Junxiu; Wang, Xingjin

    2016-04-01

    It is a challenge for any optical method to measure objects with a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured fringe pattern images, leading to phase and measurement errors. This paper presents a new adaptive digital fringe projection technique which avoids image saturation and has a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement of objects that has a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Compared to previous high dynamic range 3-D scan methods using many exposures and fringe pattern projections, which consumes a lot of time, the proposed technique uses only two preliminary steps of fringe pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns, by adaptively adjusting the pixel-wise intensity of the projected fringe patterns based on the saturated pixels in the captured images of the surface being measured. For the bright regions due to high surface reflectivity and high illumination by the ambient light and surfaces interreflections, the projected intensity is reduced just to be low enough to avoid image saturation. Simultaneously, the maximum intensity of 255 is used for those dark regions with low surface reflectivity to maintain high SNR. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can achieve higher 3-D measurement accuracy across a surface with a large range of reflectivity variation. PMID:27137056

  9. X-ray Dust Halos Seen With Extreme Dynamic Range: What Do We Learn?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Randall

    2008-03-01

    The exquisite angular resolution available with Chandra should allow precision measurements of faint diffuse emission surrounding bright sources, such as the X-ray scattering halos created by interstellar dust. However, the ACIS CCDs suffer from pileup when observing bright sources, and this creates difficulties when trying to extract the scattered halo near the source. The initial study of the X-ray halo around GX13+1 using only the ACIS-I detector done by Smith, Edgar & Shafer (2002) suffered from a lack of sensitivity within 50'' of the source, limiting what conclusions could be drawn. To address this problem, observations of GX13+1 were obtained with the Chandra HRC-I and simultaneously with the RXTE PCA. Combined with the existing ACIS-I data, this allowed measurements of the X-ray halo between 2-1000''. After considering a range of dust models, each assumed to be smoothly distributed with or without a dense cloud along the line of sight, the results show that there is no evidence in this data for a dense cloud near the source, as suggested by Xiang et al. 2005. Finally, although no model leads to formally acceptable results, the Weingartner & Draine (2001) and nearly all of the composite grain models from Zubko, Dwek & Arendt (2004) give poor fits. I thank Dr. Michael Juda of the HRC-I team for providing significant assistance; this work was supported by Chandra Observing Grant GO56144X.

  10. Coarsening dynamics in condensing zero-range processes and size-biased birth death chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatuviriyapornchai, Watthanan; Grosskinsky, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Zero-range processes with decreasing jump rates are well known to exhibit a condensation transition under certain conditions on the jump rates, and the dynamics of this transition continues to be a subject of current research interest. Starting from homogeneous initial conditions, the time evolution of the condensed phase exhibits an interesting coarsening phenomenon of mass transport between cluster sites characterized by a power law. We revisit the approach in Godrèche (2003 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 36 6313) to derive effective single site dynamics which form a nonlinear birth death chain describing the coarsening behavior. We extend these results to a larger class of parameter values, and introduce a size-biased version of the single site process, which provides an effective tool to analyze the dynamics of the condensed phase without finite size effects and is the main novelty of this paper. Our results are based on a few heuristic assumptions and exact computations, and are corroborated by detailed simulation data.

  11. Dynamics of mtDNA introgression during species range expansion: insights from an experimental longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Mastrantonio, V; Porretta, D; Urbanelli, S; Crasta, G; Nascetti, G

    2016-01-01

    Introgressive hybridization represents one of the long-lasting debated genetic consequences of species range expansion. Mitochondrial DNA has been shown to heavily introgress between interbreeding animal species that meet in new sympatric areas and, often, asymmetric introgression from local to the colonizing populations has been observed. Disentangling among the evolutionary and ecological processes that might shape this pattern remains difficult, because they continuously act across time and space. In this context, long-term studies can be of paramount importance. Here, we investigated the dynamics of mitochondrial introgression between two mosquito species (Aedes mariae and Ae. zammitii ) during a colonization event that started in 1986 after a translocation experiment. By analyzing 1,659 individuals across 25 years, we showed that introgression occurred earlier and at a higher frequency in the introduced than in the local species, showing a pattern of asymmetric introgression. Throughout time, introgression increased slowly in the local species, becoming reciprocal at most sites. The rare opportunity to investigate the pattern of introgression across time during a range expansion along with the characteristics of our study-system allowed us to support a role of demographic dynamics in determining the observed introgression pattern. PMID:27460445

  12. A high dynamic range current dosimeter for space ionization radiation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sheng-jie; Wei, Zhi-yong; Fang, Mei-hua; Chen, Guo-yun; Zhang, Zi-xia; Huang, San-bo

    2011-08-01

    A dosimeter for space ionization radiation field is developed, energy deposited in the sensitivity volume of ionization chamber induces an output current signal as weak as 10-14A, and the dynamic range of the signal is very high. Now, an ionization chamber is designed and a variable gain current feedback preamp module is designed for the weak output current amplification is connected to output of the ionization chamber anode. The amplifier module includes I-V converter with T shaped resistance net, zero correct circuit, low pass filter, voltage linear amplifier circuit, gain control circuit and voltage output circuit. A complete analysis of this current preamp with respect to its circuit structure, dynamic properties, its equivalent input noise and the temperature effect is given. The effects of stray impedances on the behavior of the current feedback preamp are taken into account and the techniques necessary to achieve an optimum stable electrometer, with respect to noise, Dc drift, leakage currents, are applied. Experiments show that the energy of dosimeter deposited in the sensitivity volume of ionization chamber induces an output current signal as weak as 10-14A, the current preamp can detect weak current effectively with the range from 100fA to 10μA through switchable gain.

  13. The research on measurement technology of high dynamic range laser focal spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengzhou; Hu, Bingliang; Yin, Qinye; Cao, Shikang; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    In order to obtain the far-field distribution of high dynamic range laser focal spot, the mathematical model of schlieren method to measure the far-field focal spot was proposed, and the traditional schlieren reconstructed algorithm was optimized in many aspects in this paper. First of all, the mathematical model which used to measure the far-field focal spot was created, the amplificatory coefficient K of the main lobe intensity and amplificatory coefficient b of the laser spot area were selected ; Secondly, the two important parameters were calibrated and the accurate main lobe spot and side lobe spot were captured by the integrated diagnostic beam fast automatic alignment system; Finally, the schlieren reconstructed algorithm was optimized by circle fitting method to calculate side lobe image center and weighted average method to fuse the joint image edge, and the error of traditional schlieren reconstruction method for side lobe center was reduced and the obvious joint mark of reconstructed image was eliminated completely. The method had been applied in a certain laser driver parameter measurement integrated diagnostic system to measure far-field laser focal spot. The experimental results show that the method can measure the far-field distribution of high dynamic range laser focal spot exactly on the condition that the parameter of mathematical model is calibrated accurately and the reconstructed algorithm of schlieren measure is optimized excellently.

  14. Inter-Layer Prediction of Color in High Dynamic Range Image Scalable Compression.

    PubMed

    Le Pendu, Mikael; Guillemot, Christine; Thoreau, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a color inter-layer prediction (ILP) method for scalable coding of high dynamic range (HDR) video content with a low dynamic range (LDR) base layer. Relying on the assumption of hue preservation between the colors of an HDR image and its LDR tone mapped version, we derived equations for predicting the chromatic components of the HDR layer given the decoded LDR layer. Two color representations are studied. In a first encoding scheme, the HDR image is represented in the classical Y'CbCr format. In addition, a second scheme is proposed using a colorspace based on the CIE u'v' uniform chromaticity scale diagram. In each case, different prediction equations are derived based on a color model ensuring the hue preservation. Our experiments highlight several advantages of using a CIE u'v'-based colorspace for the compression of HDR content, especially in a scalable context. In addition, our ILP scheme using this color representation improves on the state-of-the-art ILP method, which directly predicts the HDR layer u'v' components by computing the LDR layers u'v' values of each pixel. PMID:27244738

  15. High-dynamic-range texture compression for rendering systems of different capacities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Lu, Yan; Wu, Feng; Li, Shipeng; Tardif, John

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for high-dynamic-range (HDR) texture compression (TC) suitable for rendering systems of different capacities. Based on the previously proposed DHTC scheme, we first work out an improved joint-channel compression framework, which is robust and flexible enough to provide compressed HDR textures at different bit rates. Then, two compressed HDR texture formats based on the proposed framework are developed. The 8 bpp format is of near lossless visual quality, improving upon known state-of-the-art algorithms. And, to our knowledge, the 4 bpp format is the first workable 4 bpp solution with good quality. We also show that HDR textures in the proposed 4 bpp and 8 bpp formats can compose a layered architecture in the texture consumption pipeline, to significantly save the memory bandwidth and storage in real-time rendering. In addition, the 8 bpp format can also be used to handle traditional low dynamic range (LDR) RGBA textures. Our scheme exhibits a practical solution for compressing HDR textures at different rates and LDR textures with alpha maps. PMID:19910661

  16. Dynamics of mtDNA introgression during species range expansion: insights from an experimental longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Mastrantonio, V.; Porretta, D.; Urbanelli, S.; Crasta, G.; Nascetti, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introgressive hybridization represents one of the long-lasting debated genetic consequences of species range expansion. Mitochondrial DNA has been shown to heavily introgress between interbreeding animal species that meet in new sympatric areas and, often, asymmetric introgression from local to the colonizing populations has been observed. Disentangling among the evolutionary and ecological processes that might shape this pattern remains difficult, because they continuously act across time and space. In this context, long-term studies can be of paramount importance. Here, we investigated the dynamics of mitochondrial introgression between two mosquito species (Aedes mariae and Ae. zammitii ) during a colonization event that started in 1986 after a translocation experiment. By analyzing 1,659 individuals across 25 years, we showed that introgression occurred earlier and at a higher frequency in the introduced than in the local species, showing a pattern of asymmetric introgression. Throughout time, introgression increased slowly in the local species, becoming reciprocal at most sites. The rare opportunity to investigate the pattern of introgression across time during a range expansion along with the characteristics of our study-system allowed us to support a role of demographic dynamics in determining the observed introgression pattern. PMID:27460445

  17. Dynamic range limits in field determination of fluorescence using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudyk, Wayne; Pohlig, Kenneth

    1991-03-01

    Prior work has reported on the usefulness of fiber optic sensors in detection of aromatic organic ground water contaminants such as the benzene toluene ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) fraction of petroleum fuels. Our device is essentially a laser fluorimeter using fiber optic sensors for in-situ measurements. Both field and laboratory work have exhibited limits in the dynamic response range of fluorescence signal versus concentration when excitation occurs in the ultraviolet (266 nm). Potential causes of the observed shallow fluorescence versus concentration response include self-absorption at high concentration and stray light or electronic noise at low concentrations. The observed wide dynamic range resulting from visible excitation (532 nm) is used as a basis for comparison with UV performance. Selfabsorption phenomena are evident from the data at high contaminant concentration but practical applications more often are concerned with low concentrations. Lower limits of detection observed in UV excitation experiments are evaluated as to the possible sources of stray light including fiber luminescence coupling between the excitation and collection fibers in the sensor elastic scattering and reflection signals in the excitation module and spectral impurities in the laser excitation light from the laser flashlamp. Coupling and fiber luminescence in the sensor have been evaluated and resolved the excitation module has been redesigned to reduce potential scattering and the laser source continues to be investigated. 1 . LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE TECHNIQUE Our research group has been

  18. Radiometric calibration method for large aperture infrared system with broad dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Chang, Songtao; Zhu, Wei

    2015-05-20

    Infrared radiometric measurements can acquire important data for missile defense systems. When observation is carried out by ground-based infrared systems, a missile is characterized by long distance, small size, and large variation of radiance. Therefore, the infrared systems should be manufactured with a larger aperture to enhance detection ability and calibrated at a broader dynamic range to extend measurable radiance. Nevertheless, the frequently used calibration methods demand an extended-area blackbody with broad dynamic range or a huge collimator for filling the system's field stop, which would greatly increase manufacturing costs and difficulties. To overcome this restriction, a calibration method based on amendment of inner and outer calibration is proposed. First, the principles and procedures of this method are introduced. Then, a shifting strategy of infrared systems for measuring targets with large fluctuations of infrared radiance is put forward. Finally, several experiments are performed on a shortwave infrared system with Φ400  mm aperture. The results indicate that the proposed method cannot only ensure accuracy of calibration but have the advantage of low cost, low power, and high motility. Hence, it is an effective radiometric calibration method in the outfield. PMID:26192499

  19. Simultaneous broadband laser ranging and photonic Doppler velocimetry for dynamic compression experiments.

    PubMed

    La Lone, B M; Marshall, B R; Miller, E K; Stevens, G D; Turley, W D; Veeser, L R

    2015-02-01

    A diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure both the distance and velocity of rapidly moving surfaces in dynamic compression experiments, specifically non-planar experiments where integrating the velocity in one direction does not always give the material position accurately. The diagnostic is constructed mainly from fiber-optic telecommunications components. The distance measurement is based on a technique described by Xia and Zhang [Opt. Express 18, 4118 (2010)], which determines the target distance every 20 ns and is independent of the target speed. We have extended the full range of the diagnostic to several centimeters to allow its use in dynamic experiments, and we multiplexed it with a photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) system so that distance and velocity histories can be measured simultaneously using one fiber-optic probe. The diagnostic was demonstrated on a spinning square cylinder to show how integrating a PDV record can give an incorrect surface position and how the ranging diagnostic described here obtains it directly. The diagnostic was also tested on an explosive experiment where copper fragments and surface ejecta were identified in both the distance and velocity signals. We show how the distance measurements complement the velocity data. Potential applications are discussed. PMID:25725828

  20. Host-Range Dynamics of Cochliobolus lunatus: From a Biocontrol Agent to a Severe Environmental Threat

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Bengyella; Waikhom, Sayanika Devi; Roy, Pranab; Bhardwaj, Pardeep Kumar; Sharma, Chandradev K.; Singh, Mohendro Wakambam; Talukdar, Narayan Chandra

    2014-01-01

    We undertook an investigation to advance understanding of the host-range dynamics and biocontrol implications of Cochliobolus lunatus in the past decade. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L) farms were routinely surveyed for brown-to-black leaf spot disease caused by C. lunatus. A biphasic gene data set was assembled and databases were mined for reported hosts of C. lunatus in the last decade. The placement of five virulent strains of C. lunatus causing foliar necrosis of potato was studied with microscopic and phylogenetic tools. Analysis of morphology showed intraspecific variations in stromatic tissues among the virulent strains causing foliar necrosis of potato. A maximum likelihood inference based on GPDH locus separated C. lunatus strains into subclusters and revealed the emergence of unclustered strains. The evolving nutritional requirement of C. lunatus in the last decade is exhibited by the invasion of vertebrates, invertebrates, dicots, and monocots. Our results contribute towards a better understanding of the host-range dynamics of C. lunatus and provide useful implications on the threat posed to the environment when C. lunatus is used as a mycoherbicide. PMID:24987680

  1. Simultaneous broadband laser ranging and photonic Doppler velocimetry for dynamic compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M. Marshall, B. R.; Miller, E. K.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Veeser, L. R.

    2015-02-15

    A diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure both the distance and velocity of rapidly moving surfaces in dynamic compression experiments, specifically non-planar experiments where integrating the velocity in one direction does not always give the material position accurately. The diagnostic is constructed mainly from fiber-optic telecommunications components. The distance measurement is based on a technique described by Xia and Zhang [Opt. Express 18, 4118 (2010)], which determines the target distance every 20 ns and is independent of the target speed. We have extended the full range of the diagnostic to several centimeters to allow its use in dynamic experiments, and we multiplexed it with a photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) system so that distance and velocity histories can be measured simultaneously using one fiber-optic probe. The diagnostic was demonstrated on a spinning square cylinder to show how integrating a PDV record can give an incorrect surface position and how the ranging diagnostic described here obtains it directly. The diagnostic was also tested on an explosive experiment where copper fragments and surface ejecta were identified in both the distance and velocity signals. We show how the distance measurements complement the velocity data. Potential applications are discussed.

  2. Context-dependent JPEG backward-compatible high-dynamic range image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2013-10-01

    High-dynamic range (HDR) imaging is expected, together with ultrahigh definition and high-frame rate video, to become a technology that may change photo, TV, and film industries. Many cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering both HDR images and video are already available in the market. The popularity and full-public adoption of HDR content is, however, hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of low-dynamic range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate the wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR with commonly used legacy technologies for storage, rendering, and compression of video and images are necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms are developed for generating viewable LDR content from HDR, there is no consensus of which algorithm to use and under which conditions. We, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrate the dependency of the perceptual quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on the context: environmental factors, display parameters, and image content itself. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to deal with HDR images also. An architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG is proposed. A simple implementation of lossy compression demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed architecture compared with the state-of-the-art HDR image compression.

  3. System gamma as a function of image- and monitor-dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Kane, David; Bertalmío, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    System gamma is the end-to-end exponent that describes the relationship between the relative luminance values at capture and the reproduced image. The system gamma preferred by subjects is known to vary with the background luminance condition and the image in question. We confirm the previous two findings using an image database with both high and low dynamic range images (from 102 to 107), but also find that the preferred system gamma varies with the dynamic range of the monitor (CRT, LCD, or OLED). We find that the preferred system gamma can be predicted in all conditions and for all images by a simple model that searches for the value that best flattens the lightness distribution, where lightness is modeled as a power law of onscreen luminance. To account for the data, the exponent must vary with the viewing conditions. The method presented allows the inference of lightness perception in natural scenes without direct measurement and makes testable predictions for how lightness perception varies with the viewing condition and the distribution of luminance values in a scene. The data from this paper has been made available online. PMID:27271806

  4. Quantum spin dynamics and entanglement in systems with long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Ana M.

    One of the fundamental goals of modern quantum sciences is to learn how to control and manipulate non-equilibrium many-body systems and use them to make powerful and improved quantum devices, materials and technologies. However, out-of-equilibrium systems are complex, typically strongly correlated and entangled, and thus to model them we are in an urgent need of new methodologies. In this talk I will discuss new theoretical methods that we have developed to investigate emergent non-equilibrium phenomena in driven-dissipative spin systems interacting via long-range interactions. I will show we can capture the dynamics of correlations and entanglement in close systems and the interplay between dissipation and entanglement in open quantum systems including spin-boson models. As a specific application I will discuss the use of our methods to model the spin dynamics exhibited by arrays of trapped ions with controllable long-range interactions. I will show that our predictions are consistent with recent experimental measurements. I will also discuss new protocols to diagnostic and characterize entanglement based on well-established NMR protocols This work is supported by NSF, ARO, AFOSR-MURI, and NIST.

  5. Using wavelet fusion approach at panchromatic imagery to achieve dynamic range compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Hung-Sen; Hsu, Chau-Yun; Hsu, Yuan Hung

    2008-10-01

    The image fusion technique is to maximize the information in images at same area or object taken by different sensors. It enhances unapparent features at each image and wildly applied at remote sensing, medical image, machine vision, and military identification. In remote sensing, the latest sensors usually provide 11-bit panchromatic data which compose more radiometric information; however the standard visual equipment can only produce 8-bit resolution content that limits the analysis of imagery on the screen or paper. This paper shows how to preserve the original 11-bit information after the DRA (Dynamic Range Adjustment) approaches and keep the output from color distortion during the following pan/multi-spectrum image fusion process. We propose a good dynamic range compression method converting the original IKONOS panchromatic image into high, low luminance and typical linear stretched images and using wavelet fusion to enhance the radiometric visualization and keeping good correlation with the multi-spectrum images in order to produce fine pan-sharpened product.

  6. Dynamic range improvement of broadband microwave photonic links using a linearized single-sideband modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Zhao, Shanghong; Zhu, Zihang; Li, Yongjun; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Yun

    2015-09-01

    A novel linearized single-sideband modulator is proposed and demonstrated to generate optical single-sideband (OSSB) signal and improve the dynamic range of microwave photonic links. The modulator is composed of a dual-electrode Mach-Zehnder modulator (DEMZM) lying on the top branch and a phase shifter (PS) lying on the bottom branch. By optimizing the optical power split ratio of the linearized modulator and the phase shift of the PS, the third-order inter-modulation distortion (IMD3) can be efficiently suppressed while the second-order distortion components are eliminated simultaneously. It is a multi-octave linearization technique which can be applied for broadband systems. Simulation results show that, the linearized modulator can provide a spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) of 130 dB for a bandwidth of 1 Hz at the received optical power of 2 dBm assuming shot noise is the dominant noise contribution, which is 22 dB higher than the conventional DEMZM. The effects of the finite extinction ratio of modulator, the phase deviation of PS and the dispersion of fiber on the linearization performance are also investigated.

  7. High dynamic range CMOS image sensor with pixel level ADC and in-situ image enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harton, Austin V.; Ahmed, Mohamed I.; Beuhler, Allyson; Castro, Francisco; Dawson, Linda M.; Herold, Barry W.; Kujawa, Gregory; Lee, King F.; Mareachen, Russell D.; Scaminaci, Tony J.

    2005-03-01

    We describe a CMOS image sensor with pixel level analog to digital conversion (ADC) having high dynamic range (>100db) and the capability of performing many image processing functions at the pixel level during image capture. The sensor has a 102x98 pixel array and is implemented in a 0.18um CMOS process technology. Each pixel is 15.5um x15.5um with 15% fill factor and is comprised of a comparator, two 10 bit memory registers and control logic. A digital to analog converter and system processor are located off-chip. The photodetector produces a photocurrent yielding a photo-voltage proportional to the impinging light intensity. Once the photo-voltage is less than a predetermined global reference voltage; a global code value is latched into the pixel data buffer. This process prevents voltage saturation resulting in high dynamic range imaging. Upon completion of image capture, a digital representation of the image exists at the pixel array, thereby, allowing image data to be accessed in a parallel fashion from the focal plane array. It is demonstrated that by appropriate variation of the global reference voltage with time, it is possible to perform, during image capture, thresholding and image enhancement operations, such as, contrast stretching in a parallel manner.

  8. The Effects of Dynamic Range of Motion Exercises and Static Stretching on Strength and Range of Motion of the Hip Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanetzke, Carol A.

    The effects of Dynamic Range of Motion (D'ROM) exercises and static stretch on hip flexibility and hip strength were examined. One hundred one male and female college students were divided into three groups: D'ROM, static stretch (ST), and control (C). All subjects were measured before and after treatment for hip flexibility and strength. Two…

  9. Estimating indices of range shifts in birds using dynamic models when detection is imperfect.

    PubMed

    Clement, Matthew J; Hines, James E; Nichols, James D; Pardieck, Keith L; Ziolkowski, David J

    2016-10-01

    There is intense interest in basic and applied ecology about the effect of global change on current and future species distributions. Projections based on widely used static modeling methods implicitly assume that species are in equilibrium with the environment and that detection during surveys is perfect. We used multiseason correlated detection occupancy models, which avoid these assumptions, to relate climate data to distributional shifts of Louisiana Waterthrush in the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data. We summarized these shifts with indices of range size and position and compared them to the same indices obtained using more basic modeling approaches. Detection rates during point counts in BBS surveys were low, and models that ignored imperfect detection severely underestimated the proportion of area occupied and slightly overestimated mean latitude. Static models indicated Louisiana Waterthrush distribution was most closely associated with moderate temperatures, while dynamic occupancy models indicated that initial occupancy was associated with diurnal temperature ranges and colonization of sites was associated with moderate precipitation. Overall, the proportion of area occupied and mean latitude changed little during the 1997-2013 study period. Near-term forecasts of species distribution generated by dynamic models were more similar to subsequently observed distributions than forecasts from static models. Occupancy models incorporating a finite mixture model on detection - a new extension to correlated detection occupancy models - were better supported and may reduce bias associated with detection heterogeneity. We argue that replacing phenomenological static models with more mechanistic dynamic models can improve projections of future species distributions. In turn, better projections can improve biodiversity forecasts, management decisions, and understanding of global change biology. PMID:26990459

  10. Adaptive exposure estimation for high dynamic range imaging applied to natural scenes and daylight skies.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Valero, Eva M; Hernández-Andrés, Javier

    2015-02-01

    Digital imaging of natural scenes and optical phenomena present on them (such as shadows, twilights, and crepuscular rays) can be a very challenging task because of the range spanned by the radiances impinging on the capture system. We propose a novel method for estimating the set of exposure times (bracketing set) needed to capture the full dynamic range of a scene with high dynamic range (HDR) content. The proposed method is adaptive to scene content and to any camera response and configuration, and it works on-line since the exposure times are estimated as the capturing process is ongoing. Besides, it requires no a priori information about scene content or radiance values. The resulting bracketing sets are minimal in the default method settings, but the user can set a tolerance for the maximum percentage of pixel population that is underexposed or saturated, which allows for a higher number of shots if a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the HDR scene is desired. This method is based on the use of the camera response function that is needed for building the HDR radiance map by stitching together several differently exposed low dynamic range images of the scene. The use of HDR imaging techniques converts our digital camera into a tool for measuring the relative radiance outgoing from each point of the scene, and for each color channel. This is important for accurate characterization of optical phenomena present in the atmosphere while not suffering any loss of information due to its HDR. We have compared our method with the most similar one developed so far [IEEE Trans. Image Process.17, 1864 (2008)]. Results of the experiments carried out for 30 natural scenes show that our proposed method equals or outperforms the previously developed best approach, with less shots and shorter exposure times, thereby asserting the advantage of being adaptive to scene content for exposure time estimation. As we can also tune the balance between capturing time and the SNR in

  11. Neuronal long-range temporal correlations and avalanche dynamics are correlated with behavioral scaling laws.

    PubMed

    Palva, J Matias; Zhigalov, Alexander; Hirvonen, Jonni; Korhonen, Onerva; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus; Palva, Satu

    2013-02-26

    Scale-free fluctuations are ubiquitous in behavioral performance and neuronal activity. In time scales from seconds to hundreds of seconds, psychophysical dynamics and the amplitude fluctuations of neuronal oscillations are governed by power-law-form long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs). In millisecond time scales, neuronal activity comprises cascade-like neuronal avalanches that exhibit power-law size and lifetime distributions. However, it remains unknown whether these neuronal scaling laws are correlated with those characterizing behavioral performance or whether neuronal LRTCs and avalanches are related. Here, we show that the neuronal scaling laws are strongly correlated both with each other and with behavioral scaling laws. We used source reconstructed magneto- and electroencephalographic recordings to characterize the dynamics of ongoing cortical activity. We found robust power-law scaling in neuronal LRTCs and avalanches in resting-state data and during the performance of audiovisual threshold stimulus detection tasks. The LRTC scaling exponents of the behavioral performance fluctuations were correlated with those of concurrent neuronal avalanches and LRTCs in anatomically identified brain systems. The behavioral exponents also were correlated with neuronal scaling laws derived from a resting-state condition and with a similar anatomical topography. Finally, despite the difference in time scales, the scaling exponents of neuronal LRTCs and avalanches were strongly correlated during both rest and task performance. Thus, long and short time-scale neuronal dynamics are related and functionally significant at the behavioral level. These data suggest that the temporal structures of human cognitive fluctuations and behavioral variability stem from the scaling laws of individual and intrinsic brain dynamics. PMID:23401536

  12. A and B Ring Wakes in High Dynamic Range Radio Maps of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, L. A.; Crull, E. M.; Dunn, D. E.

    2004-11-01

    We have made new total intensity and polarized images at 3.6 cm wavelength of Saturn near maximum ring tilt (26.3 degrees). These Very Large Array maps have higher dynamic range than previous ones, and reveal a variety of new features. The total intensity of the A ring can be traced accurately over the full range of azimuth and shows clearly the features predicted by Dunn et al. (2004, Icarus, 171, 183) in wake simulations: strong east-west asymmetry on the far side of the rings, but not on the near. To our surprise, the inner portion of the B ring shows the same asymmetry signature, although with reduced amplitude. Furthermore, the same portion of the B ring shows asymmetry as it passes in front of the planet, a signature of wakes we have previously found in the A ring. (This was not seen in previous images, for which the B ring was too foreshortened to allow any direct transmission.) Taken together, this is the first evidence of wakes in this portion of the rings. This is not inconsistent with dynamical simulations, however, which show less organized but recognizable wakes at this radius. We will discuss quantitative implications for wake parameters in both rings based on modeling of the data with our simrings radiative transfer code. The polarized intensity map allows us to trace the strength and orientation of the polarized light over the full range of ring azimuths as well. The result is qualitatively consistent with polarization produced perpendicular to the source-ring-observer plane, with greatest strength at 90 degree scattering angle. In particular, the pattern of observed polarization position angle is consistent with light dominated by single scattering of light from the southern hemisphere (diffusely reflected light). This work was supported in part by a grant from Research Corporation.

  13. Prediction skill of the Madden and Julian Oscillation in dynamical extended range forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C.; Waliser, D. E.; Schemm, J.-K. E.; Lau, W. K. M.

    The Madden and Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the most prominent mode of intraseasonal variations in the tropical region. It plays an important role in climate variability and has a significant influence on medium-to-extended ranges weather forecasting in the tropics. This study examines the forecast skill of the oscillation in a set of recent dynamical extended range forecasts (DERF) experiments performed by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The present DERF experiments were done with the reanalysis version of the medium range forecast (MRF) model and include 50-day forecasts, initialized once-a-day (0Z) with reanalyses fields, for the period between 1 January, 1985, and 31 December, 1989. The MRF model shows large mean errors in representing intraseasonal variations of the large-scale circulation, especially over the equatorial eastern Pacific Ocean. A diagnostic analysis has considered the different phases of the MJO and the associated forecast skill of the MRF model. Anomaly correlations on the order of 0.3 to 0.4 indicate that skillful forecasts extend out to 5 to 7 days lead-time. Furthermore, the results show a slight increase in the forecast skill for periods when convective anomalies associated with the MJO are intense. By removing the mean errors, the analysis shows systematic errors in the representation of the MJO with weaker than observed upper level zonal circulations. The examination of the climate run of the MRF model shows the existence of an intraseasonal oscillation, although less intense (50-70%) and with faster (nearly twice as fast) eastward propagation than the observed MJO. The results indicate that the MRF model likely has difficulty maintaining the MJO, which impacts its forecast. A discussion of future work to improve the representation of the MJO in dynamical models and assess its prediction is presented.

  14. Infrared detectors and lasers operating in the 3-12 μm range using band-gap engineered structures with type II band-gap alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Venkataraman; Little, John W.; Tober, Richard L.

    2006-02-01

    The Type II broken band-gap alignment in semiconductor structures wherein the conduction band minimum is in one semiconductor (e.g., InAs) and the valence band maximum is in another (e.g., GaInSb) offers certain unique advantages which can be utilized to realize band-gap engineered novel quantum electro-optic devices such as lasers and detectors. The advantages of the type II structures include reduced Auger recombination, extending the effective band-gap energy of materials wherein type I band-gap alignment would give rise to difficulties such as miscibility gap. In this paper we describe the work carried out at the Army Research Laboratory on type II semiconductor quantum electro-optic devices such as IR lasers and detectors operating in the 3-12 μm range. Specifically we will cover the progress made in GaSb based type II strained layer superlattice IR detectors and Interband Cascade IR Lasers. We will also present our recent work in self-assembled quantum dots which have type II band-gap alignment with the matrix material in which the dots are embedded.

  15. A low background-rate detector for ions in the 5 to 50 keV energy range to be used for radioisotope dating with a small cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, P.G.

    1986-11-25

    Accelerator mass spectrometry in tandem Van de Graaff accelerators has proven successful for radioisotope dating small samples. We are developing a 20 cm diameter 30 to 40 keV cyclotron dedicated to high-sensitivity radioisotope dating, initially for /sup 14/C. At this energy, range and dE/dx methods of particle identification are impossible. Thus arises the difficult problem of reliably detecting 30 to 40 keV /sup 14/C at 10/sup -2/ counts/sec in the high background environment of the cyclotron, where lower energy ions, electrons, and photons bombard the detector at much higher rates. We have developed and tested an inexpensive, generally useful ion detector that allows dark-count rates below 10/sup -4/ counts/sec and excellent background suppression. With the cyclotron tuned near the /sup 13/CH background peak, to the frequency for /sup 14/C, the detector suppresses the background to 6 x 10/sup -4/ counts/sec. For each /sup 14/C ion the detectors grazing-incidence Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ conversion dynode emits about 20 secondary electrons, which are independently multiplied in separate pores of a microchannel plate. The output signal is proportional to the number of secondary electrons, allowing pulse-height discrimination of background. We have successfully tested the detector with positive /sup 12/C, /sup 23/Na, /sup 39/K, /sup 41/K, /sup 85/Rb, /sup 87/Rb, and /sup 133/Cs at 5 to 40 keV, and with 36 keV negative /sup 12/C and /sup 13/CH. It should detect ions and neutrals of all species, at energies above 5 keV, with good efficiency and excellent background discrimination. Counting efficiency and background discrimination improve with higher ion energy. The detector can be operated at least up to 2 x 10/sup -7/ Torr and be repeatedly exposed to air. The maximum rate is 10/sup 6.4/ ions/sec in pulse counting mode and 10/sup 9.7/ ions/sec in current integrating mode.

  16. Dynamic method as a simple approach for wide range pH measurements using optodes.

    PubMed

    Safavi, A; Banazadeh, A R

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, a flow system equipped with an optode has been suggested for wide range pH measurements. Triacetyl cellulose was used as the optode membrane in which different pH indicators were immobilized. For extending the pH range, the dynamic response rather than the steady-state response of the optode was measured. Since diffusion is the main process governing the system response, different parameters having influence on diffusion of the analyte into the membrane were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, wide range pH determination (up to 11 pH units) is simply achieved regardless of the pKa of the pH indicator immobilized in the membrane. To validate the application of the method different indicators with different structures and pKa values were tested and the results were all confirming the precision and accuracy of the method. The suggested method also has combined advantages of flow systems together with inherent advantages of kinetic systems. PMID:17386563

  17. Neuronal Avalanches Imply Maximum Dynamic Range in Cortical Networks at Criticality

    PubMed Central

    Shew, Woodrow L.; Yang, Hongdian; Petermann, Thomas; Roy, Rajarshi

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous neuronal activity is a ubiquitous feature of cortex. Its spatiotemporal organization reflects past input and modulates future network output. Here we study whether a particular type of spontaneous activity is generated by a network that is optimized for input processing. Neuronal avalanches are a type of spontaneous activity observed in superficial cortical layers in vitro and in vivo with statistical properties expected from a network operating at “criticality.” Theory predicts that criticality and, therefore, neuronal avalanches are optimal for input processing, but until now, this has not been tested in experiments. Here, we use cortex slice cultures grown on planar microelectrode arrays to demonstrate that cortical networks that generate neuronal avalanches benefit from a maximized dynamic range, i.e., the ability to respond to the greatest range of stimuli. By changing the ratio of excitation and inhibition in the cultures, we derive a network tuning curve for stimulus processing as a function of distance from criticality in agreement with predictions from our simulations. Our findings suggest that in the cortex, (1) balanced excitation and inhibition establishes criticality, which maximizes the range of inputs that can be processed, and (2) spontaneous activity and input processing are unified in the context of critical phenomena. PMID:20007483

  18. Long-range dynamic polarization potentials for 11Be projectiles on 64Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, W. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Choi, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the effects of the long-range dynamic polarization (LRDP) potential, which consists of the Coulomb dipole excitation (CDE) potential and the long-range nuclear (LRN) potential, for the 11Be projectile on 64Zn. To study these effects, we perform a χ2 analysis of an optical model including the LRDP potential as well as a conventional short-range nuclear (SRN) potential. To take these effects into account, we argue that both the CDE and LRN potentials are essential to explaining the experimental values of PE, which is the ratio of the elastic scattering cross section to the Rutherford cross section. The Coulomb and nuclear parts of the LRDP potential are found to contribute to a strong absorption effect. Strong absorption occurs because the real part of the CDE and LRN potentials lowers the barrier, and the imaginary part of the CDE and LRN potentials removes the flux from the elastic channel in the 11Be+64Zn system. Finally, we extract the total reaction cross section σR including the inelastic, breakup, and fusion cross sections. The contribution of the inelastic scattering by the first excited state at ɛx1 st=0.32 MeV (1 /2-) is found to be relatively large and cannot be ignored. In addition, our results are shown to agree quite well with the experimental breakup reaction cross section by using a fairly large radius parameter.

  19. Long range tensor correlations in charge and parity projected fermionic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bacca, Sonia; Feldmeier, Hans; Neff, Thomas

    2008-10-15

    Within the framework of fermionic molecular dynamics a method is developed to better account for long-range tensor correlations in nuclei when working with a single Slater determinant. Single-particle states with mixed isospin and broken parity build up an intrinsic Slater determinant, which is then charge and parity projected. By minimizing the energy of this many-body state with respect to the parameters of the single-particle states and projecting afterward on angular momentum, ground-state energies are obtained that are systematically lower than corresponding Hartree-Fock results. The realistic Argonne V18 potential is used and short-range correlations are treated with the unitary correlation operator method. Comparison with exact few-body calculations shows that in {sup 4}He about one-fifth of the correlation energy from long-range correlations are accounted for. These correlations, which extend over the whole nucleus, are visualized with the isospin and spin-isospin density of the intrinsic state. The divergence of the spin-isospin density, the source for pion fields, turns out to be of dipole nature.

  20. Continuous monitoring of the dynamical Casimir effect with a damped detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, A. S. M.; Dodonov, V. V.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the problem of photon creation from vacuum inside an ideal cavity with harmonically vibrating walls in the resonance case, taking into account the interaction between the resonant field mode and a detector, modeled by a quantum damped harmonic oscillator. The frequency of wall vibrations is chosen to be exactly twice the cavity normal frequency. The field and detector modes are supposed to be initially in thermal quantum states with different temperatures. We analyze different regimes of excitation, characterized by the competition of three parameters: the modulation depth of the time-dependent cavity eigenfrequency, the cavity-detector coupling strength, and the detector damping coefficient. We show that statistical properties of the detector quantum state (variances of the photon numbers, photon distribution function, and the degree of quadrature squeezing) can be quite different from that of the field mode. In addition, the mean number of quanta in the detector mode increases with some time delay, compared with the field mode.

  1. Averaging of Replicated Pulses for Enhanced-Dynamic-Range Single-Shot Measurement of Nanosecond Optical Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Marciante, J.R.; Donaldson, W.R.; Roides, R.G.

    2007-10-04

    Measuring optical pulse shapes beyond the dynamic range of oscilloscopes is achieved by temporal pulse stacking in a low-loss, passive, fiber-optic network. Optical pulses are averaged with their time-delayed replicas without introducing additional noise or jitter, allowing for high-contrast pulse-shape measurements of single-shot events. A dynamic-range enhancement of three bits is experimentally demonstrated and compared with conventional multi-shot averaging. This technique can be extended to yield an increase of up to seven bits of additional dynamic range over nominal oscilloscope performance.

  2. Driver steering dynamics measured in car simulator under a range of visibility and roadmaking conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.; Mcruer, D. T.

    1977-01-01

    A simulation experiment was conducted to determine the effect of reduced visibility on driver lateral (steering) control. The simulator included a real car cab and a single lane road image projected on a screen six feet in front of the driver. Simulated equations of motion controlled apparent car lane position in response to driver steering actions, wind gusts, and road curvature. Six drivers experienced a range of visibility conditions at various speeds with assorted roadmaking configurations (mark and gap lengths). Driver describing functions were measured and detailed parametric model fits were determined. A pursuit model employing a road curvature feedforward was very effective in explaining driver behavior in following randomly curving roads. Sampled-data concepts were also effective in explaining the combined effects of reduced visibility and intermittent road markings on the driver's dynamic time delay. The results indicate the relative importance of various perceptual variables as the visual input to the driver's steering control process is changed.

  3. Low-frequency predictability of the Dynamical Extended-Range Forecast Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nogues-Peagle, Julia; Rodgers, Dennis A.; Mo, Kingtse C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze data from the Dynamical Extended-Range Forecast Experiment conducted from January 1986 to March 1987, and to evaluate differences between analysis and forecasts with emphasis on the tropical 30-50-day oscillation. The diagnostic toll used is the projection of analysis and forecast data onto the normal modes of a primitive equation model. Examination of zonal-wind anomalies in the tropics shows that the forecast model predicts propagation of intraseasonal variations more accurately for slow propagation rates. The forecast amplitude is generally weaker than the analyzed amplitude. Analyzed kinetic energy and error fields exhibit similar horizontal scales for internal and external modes. External Rossby-mode components maximize in the extratropics while Rossby internal modes exhibit patterns that extend over the entire globe.

  4. Ultra-sensitive all-fibre photothermal spectroscopy with large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wei; Cao, Yingchun; Yang, Fan; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2015-01-01

    Photothermal interferometry is an ultra-sensitive spectroscopic means for trace chemical detection in gas- and liquid-phase materials. Previous photothermal interferometry systems used free-space optics and have limitations in efficiency of light-matter interaction, size and optical alignment, and integration into photonic circuits. Here we exploit photothermal-induced phase change in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic bandgap fibre, and demonstrate an all-fibre acetylene gas sensor with a noise equivalent concentration of 2 p.p.b. (2.3 × 10(-9) cm(-1) in absorption coefficient) and an unprecedented dynamic range of nearly six orders of magnitude. The realization of photothermal interferometry with low-cost near infrared semiconductor lasers and fibre-based technology allows a class of optical sensors with compact size, ultra sensitivity and selectivity, applicability to harsh environment, and capability for remote and multiplexed multi-point detection and distributed sensing. PMID:25866015

  5. Increase of the dynamic range of catchup experiments by high-pass filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    The release-catchup shock experiment is an important tool for measuring the speed of sound in compressed matter. The catchup of the release wave to the leading shock is sensitively detected optically, through an indicating fluid which produces light approximately to the 4th power of the shock pressure. However, this sensitivity demands a dynamic range which exceeds the capabilities of our digitizer. The catchup signature lies at the top of a flat pulse, thus any signal clipping is a catastrophic loss of data. We have invented a simple and accurate method for recording the catchup signature that is insensitive to signal clipping. A high pass circuit prior to the digitizer is used with post experiment integration. The insensitivity to clipping allows recording the catchup signature at higher gain, and thus with an improved signal to noise ratio.

  6. Inter-annual variability influences the eco-evolutionary dynamics of range-shifting

    PubMed Central

    Bocedi, Greta; Dytham, Calvin; Travis, Justin M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the eco-evolutionary dynamics of species under rapid climate change is vital for both accurate forecasting of biodiversity responses and for developing effective management strategies. Using an individual-based model we demonstrate that the presence and form (colour) of inter-annual variability in environmental conditions can impact the evolution of dispersal during range shifts. Under stable climate, temporal variability typically results in higher dispersal. However, at expanding margins, inter-annual variability actually inhibits the evolution of higher emigration propensities by disrupting the spatial sorting and natural selection processes. These results emphasize the need for future theoretical studies, as well as predictive modelling, to account for the potential impacts of inter-annual variability. PMID:24498572

  7. Quantum control and long-range quantum correlations in dynamical Casimir arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassi, Roberto; De Liberato, Simone; Garziano, Luigi; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Savasta, Salvatore

    2015-07-01

    The recent observation of the dynamical Casimir effect in a modulated superconducting waveguide, culminating thirty years of worldwide research, empowered the quantum technology community with a tool to create entangled photons on chip. In this work we show how, going beyond the single waveguide paradigm using a scalable array, it is possible to create multipartite nonclassical states, with the possibility to control the long-range quantum correlations of the emitted photons. In particular, our finite-temperature theory shows how maximally entangled NOON states can be engineered in a realistic setup. The results presented here open the way to new kinds of quantum fluids of light, arising from modulated vacuum fluctuations in linear systems.

  8. Synchronous digitization for high dynamic range lock-in amplification in beam-scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Muir, Ryan D; Sullivan, Shane Z; Oglesbee, Robert A; Simpson, Garth J

    2014-03-01

    Digital lock-in amplification (LIA) with synchronous digitization (SD) is shown to provide significant signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range advantages in beam-scanning microscopy measurements using pulsed laser sources. Direct comparisons between SD-LIA and conventional LIA in homodyne second harmonic generation measurements resulted in S/N enhancements consistent with theoretical models. SD-LIA provided notably larger S/N enhancements in the limit of low light intensities, through the smooth transition between photon counting and signal averaging developed in previous work. Rapid beam scanning instrumentation with up to video rate acquisition speeds minimized photo-induced sample damage. The corresponding increased allowance for higher laser power without sample damage is advantageous for increasing the observed signal content. PMID:24689588

  9. Boundary driven Kawasaki process with long-range interaction: dynamical large deviations and steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourragui, Mustapha; Orlandi, Enza

    2013-01-01

    A particle system with a single locally-conserved field (density) in a bounded interval with different densities maintained at the two endpoints of the interval is under study here. The particles interact in the bulk through a long-range potential parametrized by β⩾0 and evolve according to an exclusion rule. It is shown that the empirical particle density under the diffusive scaling solves a quasilinear integro-differential evolution equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The associated dynamical large deviation principle is proved. Furthermore, when β is small enough, it is also demonstrated that the empirical particle density obeys a law of large numbers with respect to the stationary measures (hydrostatic). The macroscopic particle density solves a non-local, stationary, transport equation.

  10. Ultra-sensitive all-fibre photothermal spectroscopy with large dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei; Cao, Yingchun; Yang, Fan; Ho, Hoi Lut

    2015-01-01

    Photothermal interferometry is an ultra-sensitive spectroscopic means for trace chemical detection in gas- and liquid-phase materials. Previous photothermal interferometry systems used free-space optics and have limitations in efficiency of light–matter interaction, size and optical alignment, and integration into photonic circuits. Here we exploit photothermal-induced phase change in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic bandgap fibre, and demonstrate an all-fibre acetylene gas sensor with a noise equivalent concentration of 2 p.p.b. (2.3 × 10−9 cm−1 in absorption coefficient) and an unprecedented dynamic range of nearly six orders of magnitude. The realization of photothermal interferometry with low-cost near infrared semiconductor lasers and fibre-based technology allows a class of optical sensors with compact size, ultra sensitivity and selectivity, applicability to harsh environment, and capability for remote and multiplexed multi-point detection and distributed sensing. PMID:25866015

  11. Fast measurement of automotive headlamps based on high dynamic range imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsien-Huang P; Lee, Yi-Ping; Chang, Shih-Hsin

    2012-10-01

    The headlamp of the automobile is a very important device for the safety of driving in the dark. Therefore, the distribution of the light designed to provide forward and lateral illumination needs to meet the requirements of various regulations. Traditional measurement of the distribution has been based on a point-by-point approach using a goniophotometer. In this paper, an imaging photometer is developed by combining a regular digital camera and a high dynamic range imaging technique to achieve faster and more complete measurement of the entire distribution. The experimental results indicate that errors of the measurements are within 10% of the true values, which is better than the 20% requirements of the industry. PMID:23033105

  12. Clock signal requirement for high-frequency, high dynamic range acquisition systems

    SciTech Connect

    Viscor, Ivo; Halamek, Josef; Villa, Marco

    2005-11-15

    Analog-to-digital converters (ADC's) are increasingly replacing mixers in frequency conversion schemes. To achieve superior performances, in terms of bandwidth and dynamic range, a nearly ideal ADC clock is needed, with a spectral purity higher than the reference signal of the classical mixing scheme. These requirements of spectral purity for the ADC clock are discussed by analyzing in detail the nonuniform sampling process and by characterizing an actual acquisition system. The effect of clock phase imperfections on the output is proportional to the input frequency over sampling frequency ratio. Moreover, at the output we may have a multiple folding of the phase jitter spectrum. These effects are illustrated by three sets of measurements performed using our system: transfer of spurious clock components, aliasing of these components, and transfer of clock phase noise.

  13. Endoscopic system for automated high dynamic range inspection of moving periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Rothe, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    In the current paper an advanced endoscopic system for high resolution and high dynamic range inspection of periodic structures in rotating machines is presented. We address the system architecture, short time illumination, special optical problems, such as excluding the specular reflex, image processing, forward velocity prediction and metrological image processing. There are several special requirements to be met, such as the thermal stability above 100°C, robustness of the image field, illumination in view direction and the separation of metallic surface diffuse scatter. To find a compromise between image resolution and frame rate, an external sensor system was applied for synchronization with the moving target. The system originally was intended for inspection of thermal engines, but turned out to be of a more general use. Beside the theoretical part and dimensioning issues, practical examples and measurement results are included.

  14. Intermediate range order dynamics - key to understanding of the glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russina, Margarita; Mezei, Ferenc

    2000-03-01

    Introducing a new experimental approach allowed us to extend the study of the collective dynamics to the length scale of intermediate range order in the model glass former Ca-K-NO 3 (CKN) using time-of-flight (NEAT/BENSC) and spin-echo (InLL/ILL) technique. Our results provide for the first time direct experimental evidence that the β-process is of relaxational nature and corresponds to fast heterogeneous flow of groups of atoms.We did not observe any sign of the sharp singularity of the effective Debye-Waller factor, which could be an indication of the mode coupling theory critical temperature (Gotze, Z. Phys. 60 (1985) 195; Gotze and Sjogren, Rep. Progr. Phys. 55 (1992) 242).

  15. Synchronous digitization for high dynamic range lock-in amplification in beam-scanning microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-03-15

    Digital lock-in amplification (LIA) with synchronous digitization (SD) is shown to provide significant signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range advantages in beam-scanning microscopy measurements using pulsed laser sources. Direct comparisons between SD-LIA and conventional LIA in homodyne second harmonic generation measurements resulted in S/N enhancements consistent with theoretical models. SD-LIA provided notably larger S/N enhancements in the limit of low light intensities, through the smooth transition between photon counting and signal averaging developed in previous work. Rapid beam scanning instrumentation with up to video rate acquisition speeds minimized photo-induced sample damage. The corresponding increased allowance for higher laser power without sample damage is advantageous for increasing the observed signal content.

  16. Dynamic simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions with screened long-range hydrodynamic interactions: Algorithm and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Tadashi; Chow, Edmond; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions exert a critical effect on the dynamics of macromolecules. As the concentration of macromolecules increases, by analogy to the behavior of semidilute polymer solutions or the flow in porous media, one might expect hydrodynamic screening to occur. Hydrodynamic screening would have implications both for the understanding of macromolecular dynamics as well as practical implications for the simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions, e.g., in cells. Stokesian dynamics (SD) is one of the most accurate methods for simulating the motions of N particles suspended in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number, in that it considers both far-field and near-field hydrodynamic interactions. This algorithm traditionally involves an O(N3) operation to compute Brownian forces at each time step, although asymptotically faster but more complex SD methods are now available. Motivated by the idea of hydrodynamic screening, the far-field part of the hydrodynamic matrix in SD may be approximated by a diagonal matrix, which is equivalent to assuming that long range hydrodynamic interactions are completely screened. This approximation allows sparse matrix methods to be used, which can reduce the apparent computational scaling to O(N). Previously there were several simulation studies using this approximation for monodisperse suspensions. Here, we employ newly designed preconditioned iterative methods for both the computation of Brownian forces and the solution of linear systems, and consider the validity of this approximation in polydisperse suspensions. We evaluate the accuracy of the diagonal approximation method using an intracellular-like suspension. The diffusivities of particles obtained with this approximation are close to those with the original method. However, this approximation underestimates intermolecular correlated motions, which is a trade-off between accuracy and computing efficiency. The new method makes it possible to perform large-scale and

  17. Dynamic simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions with screened long-range hydrodynamic interactions: Algorithm and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tadashi; Chow, Edmond; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions exert a critical effect on the dynamics of macromolecules. As the concentration of macromolecules increases, by analogy to the behavior of semidilute polymer solutions or the flow in porous media, one might expect hydrodynamic screening to occur. Hydrodynamic screening would have implications both for the understanding of macromolecular dynamics as well as practical implications for the simulation of concentrated macromolecular solutions, e.g., in cells. Stokesian dynamics (SD) is one of the most accurate methods for simulating the motions of N particles suspended in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number, in that it considers both far-field and near-field hydrodynamic interactions. This algorithm traditionally involves an O(N3) operation to compute Brownian forces at each time step, although asymptotically faster but more complex SD methods are now available. Motivated by the idea of hydrodynamic screening, the far-field part of the hydrodynamic matrix in SD may be approximated by a diagonal matrix, which is equivalent to assuming that long range hydrodynamic interactions are completely screened. This approximation allows sparse matrix methods to be used, which can reduce the apparent computational scaling to O(N). Previously there were several simulation studies using this approximation for monodisperse suspensions. Here, we employ newly designed preconditioned iterative methods for both the computation of Brownian forces and the solution of linear systems, and consider the validity of this approximation in polydisperse suspensions. We evaluate the accuracy of the diagonal approximation method using an intracellular-like suspension. The diffusivities of particles obtained with this approximation are close to those with the original method. However, this approximation underestimates intermolecular correlated motions, which is a trade-off between accuracy and computing efficiency. The new method makes it possible to perform large-scale and

  18. An LC-IMS-MS Platform Providing Increased Dynamic Range for High-Throughput Proteomic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Livesay, Eric A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Danielson, William F.; Prior, David C.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2010-01-01

    A high-throughput approach and platform using 15 minute reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography (RPLC) separations in conjunction with ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) measurements was evaluated for the rapid analysis of complex proteomics samples. To test the separation quality of the short LC gradient, a sample was prepared by spiking twenty reference peptides at varying concentrations from 1 ng/mL to 10 µg/mL into a tryptic digest of mouse blood plasma and analyzed with both a LC-Linear Ion Trap Fourier Transform (FT) MS and LC-IMS-TOF MS. The LC-FT MS detected thirteen out of the twenty spiked peptides that had concentrations ≥100 ng/mL. In contrast, the drift time selected mass spectra from the LC-IMS-TOF MS analyses yielded identifications for nineteen of the twenty peptides with all spiking levels present. The greater dynamic range of the LC-IMS-TOF MS system could be attributed to two factors. First, the LC-IMS-TOF MS system enabled drift time separation of the low concentration spiked peptides from the high concentration mouse peptide matrix components, reducing signal interference and background, and allowing species to be resolved that would otherwise be obscured by other components. Second, the automatic gain control (AGC) in the linear ion trap of the hybrid FT MS instrument limits the number of ions that are accumulated to reduce space charge effects and achieve high measurement accuracy, but in turn limits the achievable dynamic range compared to the IMS-TOF instrument. PMID:20000344

  19. Mechanisms determining the dynamic range of the bullfrog olfactory receptor cell.

    PubMed

    Tomaru, Akihiro; Kurahashi, Takashi

    2005-04-01

    Spike discharges of single olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were recorded with the whole cell patch-clamp method applied to slice preparation. In parallel, activities of transduction channels were measured under the voltage-clamp condition. When cells were stimulated by odorants, 54 out of 306 cells exhibited inward current responses (10 mM cineole in the puffer pipette). The amplitude of the inward current was dependent on the stimulus period, reflecting the time integration for the stimulus dose, and the relation could be fitted by the Hill equation. Under the current-clamp condition, current injection induced spike discharges. In cells showing repetitive firings, the firing frequency was dependent on the amount of injected current. The relation was fitted by the Michaelis-Menten equation showing saturation. When cells were responsive to the odorant and had abilities to discharge repetitive spikes, the depolarizing responses were accompanied by repetitive spikes. In those cells, the spike frequency was dose-dependent, expressing saturation similar to the result obtained by current injection. Since both transduction channel and spike generative steps expressed saturation in their dose dependences, we explored what step(s) actually determines saturation in ORC signaling processes. By examining dose-response relations of both the current and spikes in the same cells, saturating dose was found to be dependent largely on that of the transduction step. This suggests that the dynamic range is fundamentally determined by the transduction system. In addition, a simple model derived from the nonlinearity of the plasma membrane could explain that a critical level of dynamic range was, at least in part, modified by the membrane nonlinearity. PMID:15548631

  20. High-resolution full-field optical coherence tomography using high dynamic range image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong-Hoï, A.; Claveau, R.; Montgomery, P. C.; Serio, B.; Uhring, W.; Anstotz, F.; Flury, M.

    2016-04-01

    Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) based on white-light interference microscopy, is an emerging noninvasive imaging technique for characterizing biological tissue or optical scattering media with micrometer resolution. Tomographic images can be obtained by analyzing a sequence of interferograms acquired with a camera. This is achieved by scanning an interferometric microscope objectives along the optical axis and performing appropriate signal processing for fringe envelope extraction, leading to three-dimensional imaging over depth. However, noise contained in the images can hide some important details or induce errors in the size of these details. To firstly reduce temporal and spatial noise from the camera, it is possible to apply basic image post processing methods such as image averaging, dark frame subtraction or flat field division. It has been demonstrate that this can improve the quality of microscopy images by enhancing the signal to noise ratio. In addition, the dynamic range of images can be enhanced to improve the contrast by combining images acquired with different exposure times or light intensity. This can be made possible by applying a hybrid high dynamic range (HDR) technique, which is proposed in this paper. High resolution tomographic analysis is thus performed using a combination of the above-mentioned image processing techniques. As a result, the lateral resolution of the system can be improved so as to approach the diffraction limit of the microscope as well as to increase the power of detection, thus enabling new sub-diffraction sized structures contained in a transparent layer, initially hidden by the noise, to be detected.

  1. Particle Motion Analysis Reveals Nanoscale Bond Characteristics and Enhances Dynamic Range for Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Visser, Emiel W A; van IJzendoorn, Leo J; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-03-22

    Biofunctionalized colloidal particles are widely used as labels in bioanalytical assays, lab-on-chip devices, biophysical research, and in studies on live biological systems. With detection resolution going down to the level of single particles and single molecules, understanding the nature of the interaction of the particles with surfaces and substrates becomes of paramount importance. Here, we present a comprehensive study of motion patterns of colloidal particles maintained in close proximity to a substrate by short molecular tethers (40 nm). The motion of the particles (500-1000 nm) was optically tracked with a very high localization accuracy (below 3 nm). A surprisingly large variation in motion patterns was observed, which can be attributed to properties of the particle-molecule-substrate system, namely the bond number, the nature of the bond, particle protrusions, and substrate nonuniformities. Experimentally observed motion patterns were compared to numerical Monte Carlo simulations, revealing a close correspondence between the observed motion patterns and properties of the molecular system. Particles bound via single tethers show distinct disc-, ring-, and bell-shaped motion patterns, where the ring- and bell-shaped patterns are caused by protrusions on the particle in the direct vicinity of the molecular attachment point. Double and triple tethered particles exhibit stripe-shaped and triangular-shaped motion patterns, respectively. The developed motion pattern analysis allows for discrimination between particles bound by different bond types, which opens the possibility to improve the limit of detection and the dynamic range of bioanalytical assays, with a projected increase of dynamic range by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. PMID:26913834

  2. A high dynamic range power sensor based on GaAs MMIC process and MEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhenxiang; Liao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a high dynamic range power sensor based on GaAs process and MEMS technology. The proposed sensor consisted of the terminating-type sensor and the coupling-type sensor. The former measures low power while the latter is for high power detection. This device is designed and fabricated by GaAs MMIC process. In order to optimize microwave performance, impedance compensating technology by increasing the slot width of the CPW transmission line is developed. Related calculation and simulation are also presented in this paper. The microwave performance test reveals that the return loss is close to -28 dB@8 GHz, -27 dB@10 GHz and -26 dB@12 GHz, respectively. The microwave power response experiment is investigated from 1 mW to 150 mW. For the incident power less than 100 mW, the terminating-type sensor operates and the measured sensitivity is about 0.095 mV/mW@8 GHz, 0.088 mV/mW@10 GHz and 0.084 mV/mW@12 GHz, respectively. Related lumped equivalent circuit models of the loaded resistors are developed to explain the loss induced by the frequency of the signal. For the incident power with the improved dynamic range from 100 mW to 150 mW, the coupling-type sensor is adopted and the measured sensitivity is about 9.2 μV/mW@8 GHz, 8.6 μV/mW@8 GHz and 9.0 μV/mW@12 GHz, respectively.

  3. Dynamics and physical interpretation of quasistationary states in systems with long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Filho, T. M.; Amato, M. A.; Santana, A. E.; Figueiredo, A.; Steiner, J. R.

    2014-03-01

    The time evolution of the one-particle distribution function of an N-particle classical Hamiltonian system with long-range interactions satisfies the Vlasov equation in the limit of infinite N. In this paper we present a new derivation of this result using a different approach allowing a discussion of the role of interparticle correlations on the system dynamics. Otherwise for finite N collisional corrections must be introduced. This has allowed a quite comprehensive study of the quasistationary states (QSSs) though many aspects of the physical interpretations of these states still remain unclear. In this paper a proper definition of time scale for long time evolution is discussed, and several numerical results are presented for different values of N. Previous reports indicate that the lifetimes of the QSS scale as N1.7 or even the system properties scale with exp(N). However, preliminary results presented here indicates that time scale goes as N2 for a different type of initial condition. We also discuss how the form of the interparticle potential determines the convergence of the N-particle dynamics to the Vlasov equation. The results are obtained in the context of the following models: the Hamiltonian mean field, the Self-gravitating ring model, and one- and two-dimensional systems of gravitating particles. We have also provided information of the validity of the Vlasov equation for finite N.

  4. An Adaptive Scheme for Robot Localization and Mapping with Dynamically Configurable Inter-Beacon Range Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-01-01

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption. PMID:24776938

  5. An adaptive scheme for robot localization and mapping with dynamically configurable inter-beacon range measurements.

    PubMed

    Torres-González, Arturo; Martinez-de Dios, Jose Ramiro; Ollero, Anibal

    2014-01-01

    This work is motivated by robot-sensor network cooperation techniques where sensor nodes (beacons) are used as landmarks for range-only (RO) simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). This paper presents a RO-SLAM scheme that actuates over the measurement gathering process using mechanisms that dynamically modify the rate and variety of measurements that are integrated in the SLAM filter. It includes a measurement gathering module that can be configured to collect direct robot-beacon and inter-beacon measurements with different inter-beacon depth levels and at different rates. It also includes a supervision module that monitors the SLAM performance and dynamically selects the measurement gathering configuration balancing SLAM accuracy and resource consumption. The proposed scheme has been applied to an extended Kalman filter SLAM with auxiliary particle filters for beacon initialization (PF-EKF SLAM) and validated with experiments performed in the CONET Integrated Testbed. It achieved lower map and robot errors (34% and 14%, respectively) than traditional methods with a lower computational burden (16%) and similar beacon energy consumption. PMID:24776938

  6. Dynamic range reduction and contrast adjustment of infrared images in surveillance scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Alessandro; Acito, Nicola; Diani, Marco; Corsini, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    The high thermal sensitivity of modern infrared (IR) cameras allows us to distinguish objects with small temperature variations. In comparison with the dynamics of standard displays, the sensed IR images have a high dynamic range (HDR). In this context, suitable techniques to display HDR images are required in order to improve the visibility of the details without introducing distortions. In the recent literature of IR image processing, a common framework to perform HDR image visualization relies on DR reduction (DRR) with a cascaded processing for local contrast adjustment (CA). In this work, a novel method, named cluster-based DRR and contrast adjustment (CDCA) is introduced for the visualization of IR images. The CDCA method is composed of two cascaded steps: (1) DRR clustering-based approach and (2) a CA module specifically designed to account for IR image features. The effectiveness of the introduced technique is analyzed using IR images of surveillance scenarios collected in different operating conditions. The results are compared with those given by other IR-HDR visualization methods and show the benefits of the proposed CDCA in terms of details enhancement, robustness against the horizon effect and presence of hot objects.

  7. REVIEW ARTICLE: From single photons to milliwatt radiant power—electron storage rings as radiation sources with a high dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Roman; Thornagel, Reiner; Ulm, Gerhard

    2010-10-01

    The spectral radiant intensity of synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings can be calculated from basic electrodynamic relations (Schwinger equation) and it is directly proportional to the stored electron beam current, i.e. the number of stored electrons. With the necessary equipment installed to measure and control the electron beam current over a wide dynamic range, the radiant intensity of the synchrotron radiation can be adjusted accordingly without changing the spectrum. This is done, e.g., at the Metrology Light Source (MLS), the dedicated electron storage ring of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The MLS is operated as a primary radiation source standard from the near IR up to the soft x-ray region and its operational parameters can be adjusted and accurately measured in a wide range: the electron beam current can be varied from 1 pA (one stored electron) up to 200 mA and thus the radiant intensity can be changed by more than 11 decades. The photon flux or radiant power for typical angular acceptances can thus be varied from single photons to milliwatts. This is a very powerful tool, e.g., for the characterization of the linearity of the response of radiation detectors or for the calibration of photon counting detectors. In this article we present an overview of past, current and possible future activities exploiting this feature.

  8. Spectral and spatial characteristics of x-ray film detectors in the wavelength range 20--150 {angstrom}

    SciTech Connect

    Fedin, D.A.; Fedorchuk, R.V.; Koshevoi, M.O.; Lukjantsev, I.V.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.; Gullikson, E.

    1995-12-31

    Investigations of spectral sensitivity, contrast coefficient, and spatial resolution of widely used x-ray films have been undertaken at the P.N. Lebedev Institute. A description of experimental methodologies and results are presented. These studies were carried out using synchrotron radiation in the range of 20--150 {angstrom}. Spectral sensitivity and contrast coefficient dependencies on wavelength for Kodak 10106, DEF, RAR2490, and TPF films and spatial resolution for Kodak 10106 and RAR2490 films are presented and discussed.

  9. Multiple conformational states of the hammerhead ribozyme, broad time range of relaxation and topology of dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Menger, Marcus; Eckstein, Fritz; Porschke, Dietmar

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of a hammerhead ribozyme was analyzed by measurements of fluorescence-detected temperature jump relaxation. The ribozyme was substituted at different positions by 2-aminopurine (2-AP) as fluorescence indicator; these substitutions do not inhibit catalysis. The general shape of relaxation curves reported from different positions of the ribozyme is very similar: a fast decrease of fluorescence, mainly due to physical quenching, is followed by a slower increase of fluorescence due to conformational relaxation. In most cases at least three relaxation time constants in the time range from a few microseconds to ~200 ms are required for fitting. Although the relaxation at different positions of the ribozyme is similar in general, suggesting a global type of ribozyme dynamics, a close examination reveals differences, indicating an individual local response. For example, 2-AP in a tetraloop reports mainly the local loop dynamics known from isolated loops, whereas 2-AP located at the core, e.g. at the cleavage site or its vicinity, also reports relatively large amplitudes of slower components of the ribozyme dynamics. A variant with an A→G substitution in domain II, resulting in an inactive form, leads to the appearance of a particularly slow relaxation process (τ ≈200 ms). Addition of Mg2+ ions induces a reduction of amplitudes and in most cases a general increase of time constants. Differences between the hammerhead variants are clearly demonstrated by subtraction of relaxation curves recorded under corresponding conditions. The changes induced in the relaxation response by Mg2+ are very similar to those induced by Ca2+. The relaxation data do not provide any evidence for formation of Mg2+-inner sphere complexes in hammerhead ribozymes, because a Mg2+-specific relaxation effect was not visible. However, a Mg2+-specific effect was found for a dodeca-riboadenylate substituted with 2-AP, showing that the fluorescence of 2-AP is able to indicate inner sphere

  10. Secondary sympatry caused by range expansion informs on the dynamics of microendemism in a biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Nattier, Romain; Grandcolas, Philippe; Elias, Marianne; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Jourdan, Hervé; Couloux, Arnaud; Robillard, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Islands are bounded areas where high endemism is explained either by allopatric speciation through the fragmentation of the limited amount of space available, or by sympatric speciation and accumulation of daughter species. Most empirical evidence point out the dominant action of allopatric speciation. We evaluate this general view by looking at a case study where sympatric speciation is suspected. We analyse the mode, tempo and geography of speciation in Agnotecous, a cricket genus endemic to New Caledonia showing a generalized pattern of sympatry between species making sympatric speciation plausible. We obtained five mitochondrial and five nuclear markers (6.8 kb) from 37 taxa corresponding to 17 of the 21 known extant species of Agnotecous, and including several localities per species, and we conducted phylogenetic and dating analyses. Our results suggest that the diversification of Agnotecous occurred mostly through allopatric speciation in the last 10 Myr. Highly microendemic species are the most recent ones (<2 Myr) and current sympatry is due to secondary range expansion after allopatric speciation. Species distribution should then be viewed as a highly dynamic process and extreme microendemism only as a temporary situation. We discuss these results considering the influence of climatic changes combined with intricate soil diversity and mountain topography. A complex interplay between these factors could have permitted repeated speciation events and range expansion. PMID:23139758

  11. Exploring the Dynamic Range of the Kinetic Exclusion Assay in Characterizing Antigen-Antibody Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Christine; Abdiche, Yasmina N.; Stone, Donna M.; Collier, Sierra; Lindquist, Kevin C.; Pinkerton, Alanna C.; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are often engineered or selected to have high on-target binding affinities that can be challenging to determine precisely by most biophysical methods. Here, we explore the dynamic range of the kinetic exclusion assay (KinExA) by exploiting the interactions of an anti-DKK antibody with a panel of DKK antigens as a model system. By tailoring the KinExA to each studied antigen, we obtained apparent equilibrium dissociation constants (KD values) spanning six orders of magnitude, from approximately 100 fM to 100 nM. Using a previously calibrated antibody concentration and working in a suitable concentration range, we show that a single experiment can yield accurate and precise values for both the apparent KD and the apparent active concentration of the antigen, thereby increasing the information content of an assay and decreasing sample consumption. Orthogonal measurements obtained on Biacore and Octet label-free biosensor platforms further validated our KinExA-derived affinity and active concentration determinations. We obtained excellent agreement in the apparent affinities obtained across platforms and within the KinExA method irrespective of the assay orientation employed or the purity of the recombinant or native antigens. PMID:22558410

  12. Exploring the dynamics of phase separation in colloid-polymer mixtures with long range attraction.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Juan; Bailey, Arthur E; Frisken, Barbara J

    2016-06-28

    We have studied the kinetics of phase separation and gel formation in a low-dispersity colloid - non-adsorbing polymer system with long range attraction using small-angle light scattering. This system exhibits two-phase and three-phase coexistence of gas, liquid and crystal phases when the strength of attraction is between 2 and 4kBT and gel phases when the strength of attraction is increased. For those samples that undergo macroscopic phase separation, whether to gas-crystal, gas-liquid or gas-liquid-crystal coexistence, we observe dynamic scaling of the structure factor and growth of a characteristic length scale that behaves as expected for phase separation in fluids. In samples that gel, the power law associated with the growth of the dominant length scale is not equal to 1/3, but appears to depend mainly on the strength of attraction, decreasing from 1/3 for samples near the coexistence region to 1/27 at 8kBT, over a wide range of colloid and polymer concentrations. PMID:27242183

  13. Long-range order and dynamic structure factor of a nematic under a thermal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, R. F.; Híjar, H.

    2006-03-01

    We use a fluctuating hydrodynamic approach to calculate the orientation fluctuations correlation functions of a thermotropic nematic liquid crystal in a nonequilibrium state induced by a stationary heat flux. Since in this nonequilibrium stationary state the hydrodynamic fluctuations evolve on three widely separated times scales, we use a time-scale perturbation procedure in order to partially diagonalize the hydrodynamic matrix. The wave number and frequency dependence of these orientation correlation functions is evaluated and their explicit functional form on position is also calculated analytically in and out of equilibrium. We show that for both states these correlations are long-ranged. This result shows that indeed, even in equilibrium there is long-range orientational order in the nematic, consistently with the well known properties of these systems.We also calculate the dynamic structure of the fluid in both states for a geometry consistent with light scattering experiments. We find that as with isotropic simple fluids, the external temperature gradient introduces an asymmetry in the spectrum shifting its maximum by an amount proportional to the magnitude of the gradient. This effect may be of the order of 7 per cent. Also, the width at half height may decrease by a factor of about 10 per cent. Since to our knowledge there are no experimental results available in the literature to compare with, the predictions of our model calculation remains to be assessed.

  14. Nonlinear analysis and dynamic compensation of stylus scanning measurement with wide range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Heiyang; Liu, Xiaojun; Lu, Wenlong

    2011-12-01

    Surface topography is an important geometrical feature of a workpiece that influences its quality and functions such as friction, wearing, lubrication and sealing. Precision measurement of surface topography is fundamental for product quality characterizing and assurance. Stylus scanning technique is a widely used method for surface topography measurement, and it is also regarded as the international standard method for 2-D surface characterizing. Usually surface topography, including primary profile, waviness and roughness, can be measured precisely and efficiently by this method. However, by stylus scanning method to measure curved surface topography, the nonlinear error is unavoidable because of the difference of horizontal position of the actual measured point from given sampling point and the nonlinear transformation process from vertical displacement of the stylus tip to angle displacement of the stylus arm, and the error increases with the increasing of measuring range. In this paper, a wide range stylus scanning measurement system based on cylindrical grating interference principle is constructed, the originations of the nonlinear error are analyzed, the error model is established and a solution to decrease the nonlinear error is proposed, through which the error of the collected data is dynamically compensated.

  15. Nonlinear mapping of the luminance in dual-layer high dynamic range displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, Gabriele; Ramponi, Giovanni; Bonfiglio, Silvio; Albani, Luigi

    2009-02-01

    It has long been known that the human visual system (HVS) has a nonlinear response to luminance. This nonlinearity can be quantified using the concept of just noticeable difference (JND), which represents the minimum amplitude of a specified test pattern an average observer can discern from a uniform background. The JND depends on the background luminance following a threshold versus intensity (TVI) function. It is possible to define a curve which maps physical luminances into a perceptually linearized domain. This mapping can be used to optimize a digital encoding, by minimizing the visibility of quantization noise. It is also commonly used in medical applications to display images adapting to the characteristics of the display device. High dynamic range (HDR) displays, which are beginning to appear on the market, can display luminance levels outside the range in which most standard mapping curves are defined. In particular, dual-layer LCD displays are able to extend the gamut of luminance offered by conventional liquid crystals towards the black region; in such areas suitable and HVS-compliant luminance transformations need to be determined. In this paper we propose a method, which is primarily targeted to the extension of the DICOM curve used in medical imaging, but also has a more general application. The method can be modified in order to compensate for the ambient light, which can be significantly greater than the black level of an HDR display and consequently reduce the visibility of the details in dark areas.

  16. Unattended real-time re-establishment of visibility in high dynamic range video and stills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidi, B.

    2014-05-01

    We describe a portable unattended persistent surveillance system that corrects for harsh illumination conditions, where bright sun light creates mixed contrast effects, i.e., heavy shadows and washouts. These effects result in high dynamic range scenes, where illuminance can vary from few luxes to a 6 figure value. When using regular monitors and cameras, such wide span of illuminations can only be visualized if the actual range of values is compressed, leading to the creation of saturated and/or dark noisy areas and a loss of information in these areas. Images containing extreme mixed contrast cannot be fully enhanced from a single exposure, simply because all information is not present in the original data. The active intervention in the acquisition process is required. A software package, capable of integrating multiple types of COTS and custom cameras, ranging from Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) data links to digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLR), is described. Hardware and software are integrated via a novel smart data acquisition algorithm, which communicates to the camera the parameters that would maximize information content in the final processed scene. A fusion mechanism is then applied to the smartly acquired data, resulting in an enhanced scene where information in both dark and bright areas is revealed. Multi-threading and parallel processing are exploited to produce automatic real time full motion corrected video. A novel enhancement algorithm was also devised to process data from legacy and non-controllable cameras. The software accepts and processes pre-recorded sequences and stills, enhances visible, night vision, and Infrared data, and successfully applies to night time and dark scenes. Various user options are available, integrating custom functionalities of the application into intuitive and easy to use graphical interfaces. The ensuing increase in visibility in surveillance video and intelligence imagery will expand the performance and

  17. Maternal effects and range expansion: a key factor in a dynamic process?

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Renée A.

    2009-01-01

    generated in newly colonized populations. More generally, these results suggest that, as a key source of variation in colonizing phenotypes, maternal effects are of crucial importance for understanding the dynamics of range expansion. PMID:19324612

  18. Requirements on high resolution detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, A.

    1997-02-01

    For a number of microtomography applications X-ray detectors with a spatial resolution of 1 {mu}m are required. This high spatial resolution will influence and degrade other parameters of secondary importance like detective quantum efficiency (DQE), dynamic range, linearity and frame rate. This note summarizes the most important arguments, for and against those detector systems which could be considered. This article discusses the mutual dependencies between the various figures which characterize a detector, and tries to give some ideas on how to proceed in order to improve present technology.

  19. Dynamical orbital effects of general relativity on the satellite-to-satellite range and range-rate in the GRACE mission: A sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2012-08-01

    We numerically investigate the impact of the General Theory of Relativity (GTR) on the orbital part of the satellite-to-satellite range ρ and range-rate ρ˙ of the twin GRACE A/B spacecrafts through their post-Newtonian (PN) dynamical equations of motion integrated in an Earth-centered frame over a time span ΔP=1d. The present-day accuracies in measuring the GRACE biased range and range-rate are σρ˜1-10μm,σ˜0.1-1μms-1. The GTR range and range-rate effects turn out to be Δρ=80μm and Δρ˙=0.012μms-1 (1PN gravitomagnetic), and Δρ=6000μm and Δρ˙=10μms-1 (1PN gravitoelectric). It turns out that the range shifts Δρ corresponding to the GTR-induced time delays Δt on the propagation of the electromagnetic waves linking the GRACE spacecrafts are either negligible (1PN gravitomagnetic) or smaller (1PN gravitoelectric) than the orbital effects by about 1 order of magnitude over ΔP=1d. We also compute the dynamical range and range-rate perturbations caused by the first six zonal harmonic coefficients Jℓ,ℓ=2,3,4,5,6,7 of the classical multipolar expansion of the geopotential to evaluate their aliasing impact on the relativistic effects. Conversely, we quantitatively, and preliminarily, assess the possible a-priori "imprinting" of GTR itself, not solved-for in all the GRACE-based Earth's gravity models produced so far, on the low degree zonals of the geopotential. The present sensitivity analysis can also be extended, in principle, to different orbital configurations in order to design a suitable dedicated mission able to accurately measure GTR. Moreover, it may be the starting point for more refined numerical investigations concerning the actual measurability of the relativistic effects involving, e.g., a simulation of full GRACE data, including GTR itself, and the consequent parameters' estimation. Finally, also other non-classical dynamical features of motion, caused by, e.g., modified models of gravity, may be considered in further studies.

  20. Extrasynaptic Glutamate Receptor Activation as Cellular Bases for Dynamic Range Compression in Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate, for a brief period of time. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly non-linear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials) are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of “loud sounds” (i.e., strong glutamatergic inputs) and amplify “quiet sounds” (i.e., glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation). Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP

  1. MO-A-BRD-01: An Investigation of the Dynamic Response of a Novel Acousto-Optic Liquid Crystal Detector for Full-Field Transmission Ultrasound Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, J.R.; La Riviere, P.J.; Sandhu, J.S.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the dynamic response of a novel acousto-optic (AO) liquid crystal detector for high-resolution transmission ultrasound breast imaging. Transient and steady-state lesion contrast were investigated to identify optimal transducer settings for our prototype imaging system consistent with the FDA limits of 1 W/cm{sup 2} and 50 J/cm{sup 2} on the incident acoustic intensity and the transmitted acoustic energy flux density. Methods: We have developed a full-field transmission ultrasound breast imaging system that uses monochromatic plane-wave illumination to acquire projection images of the compressed breast. The acoustic intensity transmitted through the breast is converted into a visual image by a proprietary liquid crystal detector operating on the basis of the AO effect. The dynamic response of the AO detector in the absence of an imaged breast was recorded by a CCD camera as a function of the acoustic field intensity and the detector exposure time. Additionally, a stereotactic needle biopsy breast phantom was used to investigate the change in opaque lesion contrast with increasing exposure time for a range of incident acoustic field intensities. Results: Using transducer voltages between 0.3 V and 0.8 V and exposure times of 3 minutes, a unique one-to-one mapping of incident acoustic intensity to steady-state optical brightness in the AO detector was observed. A transfer curve mapping acoustic intensity to steady-state optical brightness shows a high-contrast region analogous to the linear portion of the Hurter-Driffield curves of radiography. Using transducer voltages between 1 V and 1.75 V and exposure times of 90 s, the lesion contrast study demonstrated increasing lesion contrast with increasing breast exposure time and acoustic field intensity. Lesion-to-background contrast on the order of 0.80 was observed. Conclusion: Maximal lesion contrast in our prototype system can be obtained using the highest acoustic field intensity and the

  2. Wide range bandgap modulation based on ZnO-based alloys and fabrication of solar blind UV detectors with high rejection ratio.

    PubMed

    Su, Longxing; Zhu, Yuan; Yong, Dingyu; Chen, Mingming; Ji, Xu; Su, Yuquan; Gui, Xuchun; Pan, Bicai; Xiang, Rong; Tang, Zikang

    2014-08-27

    Theoretical calculations on formation energies of MgZnO, BeZnO and BeMgZnO alloys are presented. The ternary alloy MgZnO (BeZnO) is found to be unstable with high Mg (Be) contents. However, the quaternary system BeMgZnO is predicted to be stable with small Be/Mg atom ratio. Subsequently, a wurtzite Be0.17Mg0.54Zn0.29O alloy with a bandgap of 5.15 eV has been acquired experimentally. Its bandgap is in the middle of solar blind region and thus it is an ideal material for realizing a high rejection ratio solar blind ultraviolet (UV) detector, which has long been a problem. A metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structured solar blind UV detector based on this material is then fabricated, realizing a much higher rejection ratio than reported MgZnO-based detectors. One more interesting thing is, as a complicated quaternary system, BeMgZnO can maintain its crystal quality in a wide compositional range, which is not happening in MgZnO and BeZnO. To get some microscopic insight into the Be-Mg mutual stabilizing mechanism, more calculations on the lattice constants of BeZnO and MgZnO alloys, and the coordination preference of Be ions in alloy were conducted. The a-axis lattice compensation and 4-fold coordination preference of Be atom are confirmed the major origins for Be-Mg mutual stabilizing in ZnO lattice. PMID:25089951

  3. Psychophysical evaluation of the image quality of a dynamic flat-panel digital x-ray image detector using the threshold contrast detail detectability (TCDD) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Andrew G.; Cowen, Arnold R.; Bruijns, Tom J. C.

    1999-05-01

    We are currently in an era of active development of the digital X-ray imaging detectors that will serve the radiological communities in the new millennium. The rigorous comparative physical evaluations of such devices are therefore becoming increasingly important from both the technical and clinical perspectives. The authors have been actively involved in the evaluation of a clinical demonstration version of a flat-panel dynamic digital X-ray image detector (or FDXD). Results of objective physical evaluation of this device have been presented elsewhere at this conference. The imaging performance of FDXD under radiographic exposure conditions have been previously reported, and in this paper a psychophysical evaluation of the FDXD detector operating under continuous fluoroscopic conditions is presented. The evaluation technique employed was the threshold contrast detail detectability (TCDD) technique, which enables image quality to be measured on devices operating in the clinical environment. This approach addresses image quality in the context of both the image acquisition and display processes, and uses human observers to measure performance. The Leeds test objects TO[10] and TO[10+] were used to obtain comparative measurements of performance on the FDXD and two digital spot fluorography (DSF) systems, one utilizing a Plumbicon camera and the other a state of the art CCD camera. Measurements were taken at a range of detector entrance exposure rates, namely 6, 12, 25 and 50 (mu) R/s. In order to facilitate comparisons between the systems, all fluoroscopic image processing such as noise reduction algorithms, were disabled during the experiments. At the highest dose rate FDXD significantly outperformed the DSF comparison systems in the TCDD comparisons. At 25 and 12 (mu) R/s all three-systems performed in an equivalent manner and at the lowest exposure rate FDXD was inferior to the two DSF systems. At standard fluoroscopic exposures, FDXD performed in an equivalent

  4. Signal enhancement in optical projection tomography via virtual high dynamic range imaging of single exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yujie; Dong, Di; Shi, Liangliang; Wang, Jun; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a mesoscopic scale optical imaging technique for specimens between 1mm and 10mm. OPT has been proven to be immensely useful in a wide variety of biological applications, such as developmental biology and pathology, but its shortcomings in imaging specimens containing widely differing contrast elements are obvious. The longer exposure for high intensity tissues may lead to over saturation of other areas, whereas a relatively short exposure may cause similarity with surrounding background. In this paper, we propose an approach to make a trade-off between capturing weak signals and revealing more details for OPT imaging. This approach consists of three steps. Firstly, the specimens are merely scanned in 360 degrees above a normal exposure but non-overexposure to acquire the projection data. This reduces the photo bleaching and pre-registration computation compared with multiple different exposures in conventional high dynamic range (HDR) imaging method. Secondly, three virtual channels are produced for each projection image based on the histogram distribution to simulate the low, normal and high exposure images used in the traditional HDR technology in photography. Finally, each virtual channel is normalized to the full gray scale range and three channels are recombined into one image using weighting coefficients optimized by a standard eigen-decomposition method. After applying our approach on the projection data, filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm is carried out for 3-dimentional reconstruction. The neonatal wild-type mouse paw has been scanned to verify this approach. Results demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  5. Myosin-Va and dynamic actin oppose microtubules to drive long-range organelle transport.

    PubMed

    Evans, Richard D; Robinson, Christopher; Briggs, Deborah A; Tooth, David J; Ramalho, Jose S; Cantero, Marta; Montoliu, Lluis; Patel, Shyamal; Sviderskaya, Elena V; Hume, Alistair N

    2014-08-01

    In animal cells, microtubule and actin tracks and their associated motors (dynein, kinesin, and myosin) are thought to regulate long- and short-range transport, respectively. Consistent with this, microtubules extend from the perinuclear centrosome to the plasma membrane and allow bidirectional cargo transport over long distances (>1 μm). In contrast, actin often comprises a complex network of short randomly oriented filaments, suggesting that myosin motors move cargo short distances. These observations underpin the "highways and local roads" model for transport along microtubule and actin tracks. The "cooperative capture" model exemplifies this view and suggests that melanosome distribution in melanocyte dendrites is maintained by long-range transport on microtubules followed by actin/myosin-Va-dependent tethering. In this study, we used cell normalization technology to quantitatively examine the contribution of microtubules and actin/myosin-Va to organelle distribution in melanocytes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that microtubules are essential for centripetal, but not centrifugal, transport. Instead, we find that microtubules retard a centrifugal transport process that is dependent on myosin-Va and a population of dynamic F-actin. Functional analysis of mutant proteins indicates that myosin-Va works as a transporter dispersing melanosomes along actin tracks whose +/barbed ends are oriented toward the plasma membrane. Overall, our data highlight the role of myosin-Va and actin in transport, and not tethering, and suggest a new model in which organelle distribution is determined by the balance between microtubule-dependent centripetal and myosin-Va/actin-dependent centrifugal transport. These observations appear to be consistent with evidence coming from other systems showing that actin/myosin networks can drive long-distance organelle transport and positioning. PMID:25065759

  6. Extended-Range High-Resolution Dynamical Downscaling over a Continental-Scale Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, S. Z.; Separovic, L.; Yu, W.; Fernig, D.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution mesoscale simulations, when applied for downscaling meteorological fields over large spatial domains and for extended time periods, can provide valuable information for many practical application scenarios including the weather-dependent renewable energy industry. In the present study, a strategy has been proposed to dynamically downscale coarse-resolution meteorological fields from Environment Canada's regional analyses for a period of multiple years over the entire Canadian territory. The study demonstrates that a continuous mesoscale simulation over the entire domain is the most suitable approach in this regard. Large-scale deviations in the different meteorological fields pose the biggest challenge for extended-range simulations over continental scale domains, and the enforcement of the lateral boundary conditions is not sufficient to restrict such deviations. A scheme has therefore been developed to spectrally nudge the simulated high-resolution meteorological fields at the different model vertical levels towards those embedded in the coarse-resolution driving fields derived from the regional analyses. A series of experiments were carried out to determine the optimal nudging strategy including the appropriate nudging length scales, nudging vertical profile and temporal relaxation. A forcing strategy based on grid nudging of the different surface fields, including surface temperature, soil-moisture, and snow conditions, towards their expected values obtained from a high-resolution offline surface scheme was also devised to limit any considerable deviation in the evolving surface fields due to extended-range temporal integrations. The study shows that ensuring large-scale atmospheric similarities helps to deliver near-surface statistical scores for temperature, dew point temperature and horizontal wind speed that are better or comparable to the operational regional forecasts issued by Environment Canada. Furthermore, the meteorological fields

  7. Orthostatic stress is necessary to maintain the dynamic range of cardiovascular control in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisch, J. F.; Wolfram, G.; Beck, L.; Drummer, C.; Stormer, I.; Buckey, J.; Blomqvist, G.

    2000-01-01

    In the upright position, gravity fills the low-pressure systems of human circulation with blood and interstitial fluid in the sections below the diaphragm. Without gravity one pressure component in the vessels disappears and the relationship between hydrostatic pressure and oncotic pressure, which regulates fluid passage across the capillary endothelium in the terminal vascular bed, shifts constantly. The visible consequences of this are a puffy face and "bird" legs. The plasma volume shrinks in space and the range of cardiovascular control is reduced. When they stand up for the first time after landing, 30-50% of astronauts suffer from orthostatic intolerance. It remains unclear whether microgravity impairs cardiovascular reflexes, or whether it is the altered volume status that causes the cardiovascular instability following space flight. Lower body negative pressure was used in several space missions to stimulate the cardiovascular reflexes before, during and after a space flight. The results show that cardiovascular reflexes are maintained in microgravity. However, the astronauts' volume status changed in space, towards a volume-retracted state, as measurements of fluid-regulating hormones have shown. It can be hypothesized that the control of circulation and body fluid homeostasis in humans is adapted to their upright posture in the Earth's gravitational field. Autonomic control regulates fluid distribution to maintain the blood pressure in that posture, which most of us have to cope with for two-thirds of the day. A determined amount of interstitial volume is necessary to maintain the dynamic range of cardiovascular control in the upright posture; otherwise orthostatic intolerance may occur more often.

  8. A nonrecursive order N preconditioned conjugate gradient: Range space formulation of MDOF dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurdila, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    While excellent progress has been made in deriving algorithms that are efficient for certain combinations of system topologies and concurrent multiprocessing hardware, several issues must be resolved to incorporate transient simulation in the control design process for large space structures. Specifically, strategies must be developed that are applicable to systems with numerous degrees of freedom. In addition, the algorithms must have a growth potential in that they must also be amenable to implementation on forthcoming parallel system architectures. For mechanical system simulation, this fact implies that algorithms are required that induce parallelism on a fine scale, suitable for the emerging class of highly parallel processors; and transient simulation methods must be automatically load balancing for a wider collection of system topologies and hardware configurations. These problems are addressed by employing a combination range space/preconditioned conjugate gradient formulation of multi-degree-of-freedom dynamics. The method described has several advantages. In a sequential computing environment, the method has the features that: by employing regular ordering of the system connectivity graph, an extremely efficient preconditioner can be derived from the 'range space metric', as opposed to the system coefficient matrix; because of the effectiveness of the preconditioner, preliminary studies indicate that the method can achieve performance rates that depend linearly upon the number of substructures, hence the title 'Order N'; and the method is non-assembling. Furthermore, the approach is promising as a potential parallel processing algorithm in that the method exhibits a fine parallel granularity suitable for a wide collection of combinations of physical system topologies/computer architectures; and the method is easily load balanced among processors, and does not rely upon system topology to induce parallelism.

  9. Validation of Long Range Wind Lidar for Atmospheric Dynamics Studies during inter comparison campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquet, M.; Cariou, J. P.; Lolli, S.; Sauvage, L.; Parmentier, R.

    2009-09-01

    To fully understand atmospheric dynamics, climate studies, energy transfer and weather prediction, the wind field is one of the most important atmospheric state variables. Studies indicate that a global determination of the tropospheric wind field to an accuracy of 0.5 m/s is critical for improved numerical weather forecasting. LEOSPHERE recently developed a long range compact, eye safe and transportable wind Lidar capable to fully determine locally the wind field in real time in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The WLS70 is a new generation wind Lidar developed for meteorological applications. The Lidar is derived from the commercial Windcube™ widely used by the wind industry and has been modified increasing the range up to 2 km. In this paper are presented results of the inter comparison measurement campaigns EUCAARI, LUAMI and WAVES in which the WLS70 participated together with both up-to-date active and passive ground-based remote-sensing systems for providing high-quality meteorological parameters reference or ground-truth e.g. to satellite sensors. In May 2008, the first WLS70 prototype started retrieving vertical wind speed profiles during the EUCAARI campaign at Cabauw, the Netherlands. First results were very promising with vertical profiles up to 2km showing high frequency updrafts and downdrafts in the boundary layer. From November 2008 to January 2009, a WLS70 was deployed in Germany, together with an EZ Lidar™ ALS450, in the frame of the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparison (LUAMI) campaign. During 62 days, the WLS70 Lidar retrieved 24/24 hours vertical profiles of the 3 wind components, putting in evidence wind shears and veers, as well as gusts and high frequency convective effects with the raise of the mixing layer or with incoming rain fronts. In-cloud and multilayer measurements are also available allowing a large range of additional investigations such as cloud-aerosol interactions or cloud droplet activation. From March to May

  10. X-, γ, β-ray detector windows of composite material replacing beryllium in the 4.2-420 K temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbert, J. N.; Testard, O. A.

    1986-10-01

    A new multilayer composite material has been elaborated to produce windows with a good vacuum tightness and high nuclear radiation transmission. This material can advantageously substitute beryllium, because of the difficulties associated with the fabrication of thin laminated beryllium windows without chemical impurities, because of the lack of resistance to atmospheric corrosion and the high cost of these windows. The composite windows are made of thin high purity aluminium barriers (0.15-0.56 μm total thickness) interleaved in structural polyimid films (down to 56 μm total thickness). Its main physical properties are: yield stress (1.2×10 8 Pa), temperature range ( 1ˇK to 420 K) . helium gas porosity (10 -3 cm 3(STP) m -2 atm -1 d -1), optically opaque. The X or γ-ray transmission performance tests have been compared with those for beryllium. They show that the standard multi-interlaminar barrier (MIB) material of 168 μm thickness is equivalent to 500 μm Be for energies lower than 10 keV and to 200 μm Be for energies higher than 100 keV. The windows thus developed have a modular aspect and adapt themselves to various specifications (cryostats, scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, X-ray proportional counters, etc.).

  11. Dynamic compensation of the Silver self-powered neutron detector in the ramp program at the OSIRIS reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Moulin, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Silver self-powered neutron detector (SPND) is a common detector used in the ramp program at the OSIRIS reactor. The Silver SPND signal is a reference during steady states, but its response is too slow for monitoring transient tests. In order to compensate for the inherent time delay a mathematical processing method of the Silver SPND signal was developed. Based on a convolution-type resolution of the kinetics equations, a dynamic compensation algorithm can be used for transient conditions as well as steady state conditions. A computer program reconstructs, in real-time, the dynamic neutron flux sensed by the Silver detector from the current measured between the emitter and the collector of the SPND. Although this method decreases slightly the signal-to-noise ratio, it maintains the SPND`s characteristics and reduces the response time from about 10 minutes to less than 4 seconds for a step change in flux. This provides for prompt and accurate measurement of fuel rod power during ramp experiments in the OSIRIS reactor. This development makes the Silver SPND very suitable for many on-line monitoring applications.

  12. a Multi-Beam Radio Transient Detector with Real-Time De-Dispersion Over a Wide DM Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, N.; D'Addario, L.; Navarro, R.; Trinh, J.

    Isolated, short dispersed pulses of radio emission of unknown origin have been reported and there is strong interest in wide-field, sensitive searches for such events. To achieve high sensitivity, large collecting area is needed and dispersion due to the interstellar medium should be removed. To survey a large part of the sky in reasonable time, a telescope that forms multiple simultaneous beams is desirable. We have developed a novel FPGA-based transient search engine that is suitable for these circumstances. It accepts short-integration-time spectral power measurements from each beam of the telescope, performs incoherent de-dispersion simultaneously for each of a wide range of dispersion measure (DM) values, and automatically searches the de-dispersed time series for pulse-like events. If the telescope provides buffering of the raw voltage samples of each beam, then our system can provide trigger signals to allow data in those buffers to be saved when a tentative detection occurs; this can be done with a latency of tens of ms, and only the buffers for beams with detections need to be saved. In one version of our implementation, intended for the ASKAP array of 36 antennas (currently under construction in Australia), 36 beams are simultaneously de-dispersed for 448 different DMs with an integration time of 1.0 ms. In the absence of such a multi-beam telescope, we have built a second version that handles up to 6 beams at 0.1 ms integration time and 512 DMs. We have deployed and tested this at a 34-m antenna of the Deep Space Network in Goldstone, California. A third version that processes up to 6 beams at an integration time of 2.0 ms and 1,024 DMs has been built and deployed at the Murchison Widefield Array telescope.

  13. A packaged Schottky diode as detector, harmonic mixer, and harmonic generator in the 25 500 GHz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goy, P.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes experimental results obtained with a packaged GaAs Schottky barrier diode in contact with a coaxial connector and placed across waveguides for bands Ka, V, E, W or F. Among the microwave sources used for calibration were 9 carcinotrons in the frequency interval 51 490 GHz. As soon as the frequency F is above the waveguide cut-off frequency, the different characteristics do not depend critically on the waveguide size for V, E, W and F bands. The video detection sensitivity, of several 100 mV/mW at 50 GHz and below, decreases as F-4 in the range 51 500 GHz. Coupling an X-band centimeter frequency via the coaxial connector and a millimeter frequency via the waveguide permits harmonic mixing in the diode. Between 36 and 490 GHz, the harmonic mixing number varies from 3 up to the very large value 40 with conversion losses from 18 to 88 dB. The minimum detectable signal in the 100 kHz band can be as low as -90 dBm at 80 GHz. A noticeable millimeter power is available at the waveguide output from injected centimeter power by harmonic generation. Starting for instance with 100 mW around 11.5 GHz, we have measured 0.1 mW at 80 GHz and 0.1 μW at 230 GHz. To illustrate the possibility of creating usable millimeter and submillimeter wave without heavy equipment (such as carcinotrons or millimeter klystron) we report spectroscopic experiments in Rydberg atoms. Resonances have been observed up to 340 GHz by harmonic generation (28th harmonic) from an X-band klystron).

  14. Nd:YAG thin-disk laser with large dynamic range unstable resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jianli; Yu, Yi; An, Xiangchao; Gao, Qingsong; Tang, Chun

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, based on the self-reproduction condition of laser wavefront curvature, the influences of disk defocus on laser parameters can be calculated. The laser-pumping overlapping efficiency will decrease by 9%; the magnification will rise to 2.3, and the intra-cavity loss will be high to 30% due to a laser beam size mismatch when each disk has focal length of -100 m in a positive-branch confocal unstable resonator containing four disks with magnification of 1.8. Therefore, the optical conversion efficiency and stability will be reduced significantly. Several methods defocus compensation of are compared, it can be found that inserting variable-focus lens in resonant is useful in large dynamic range. In experiment, the defocus values are measured in different pumping power. A lens group, used for compensate components according to the single pass probe, is carefully designed. Under this compensation, the pulse energy can be maintained in 10 J from 1 Hz to 100 Hz. The output power can be improved 2.33 times compared to non-compensation condition.

  15. Extending the dynamic range of transcription factor action by translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Thomas R; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Bialek, William; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-02-01

    A crucial step in the regulation of gene expression is binding of transcription factor (TF) proteins to regulatory sites along the DNA. But transcription factors act at nanomolar concentrations, and noise due to random arrival of these molecules at their binding sites can severely limit the precision of regulation. Recent work on the optimization of information flow through regulatory networks indicates that the lower end of the dynamic range of concentrations is simply inaccessible, overwhelmed by the impact of this noise. Motivated by the behavior of homeodomain proteins, such as the maternal morphogen Bicoid in the fruit fly embryo, we suggest a scheme in which transcription factors also act as indirect translational regulators, binding to the mRNA of other regulatory proteins. Intuitively, each mRNA molecule acts as an independent sensor of the input concentration, and averaging over these multiple sensors reduces the noise. We analyze information flow through this scheme and identify conditions under which it outperforms direct transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the dual role of homeodomain proteins is not just a historical accident, but a solution to a crucial physics problem in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26986359

  16. Extending the dynamic range of transcription factor action by translational regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Bialek, William; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-02-01

    A crucial step in the regulation of gene expression is binding of transcription factor (TF) proteins to regulatory sites along the DNA. But transcription factors act at nanomolar concentrations, and noise due to random arrival of these molecules at their binding sites can severely limit the precision of regulation. Recent work on the optimization of information flow through regulatory networks indicates that the lower end of the dynamic range of concentrations is simply inaccessible, overwhelmed by the impact of this noise. Motivated by the behavior of homeodomain proteins, such as the maternal morphogen Bicoid in the fruit fly embryo, we suggest a scheme in which transcription factors also act as indirect translational regulators, binding to the mRNA of other regulatory proteins. Intuitively, each mRNA molecule acts as an independent sensor of the input concentration, and averaging over these multiple sensors reduces the noise. We analyze information flow through this scheme and identify conditions under which it outperforms direct transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the dual role of homeodomain proteins is not just a historical accident, but a solution to a crucial physics problem in the regulation of gene expression.

  17. Extending the Dynamic Range of the Ion Trap by Differential Mobility Filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adam B.; Coy, Stephen L.; Kafle, Amol; Glick, James; Nazarov, Erkinjon; Vouros, Paul

    2013-09-01

    A miniature, planar, differential ion mobility spectrometer (DMS) was interfaced to an LCQ classic ion trap to conduct selective ion filtration prior to mass analysis in order to extend the dynamic range of the trap. Space charge effects are known to limit the functional ion storage capacity of ion trap mass analyzers and this, in turn, can affect the quality of the mass spectral data generated. This problem is further exacerbated in the analysis of mixtures where the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions results in premature trap saturation with non-targeted species, thereby reducing the number of parent ions that may be used to conduct MS/MS experiments for quantitation or other diagnostic studies. We show that conducting differential mobility-based separations prior to mass analysis allows the isolation of targeted analytes from electrosprayed mixtures preventing the indiscriminate introduction of matrix ions and premature trap saturation with analytically unrelated species. Coupling these two analytical techniques is shown to enhance the detection of a targeted drug metabolite from a biological matrix. In its capacity as a selective ion filter, the DMS can improve the analytical performance of analyzers such as quadrupole (3D or linear) and ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) ion traps that depend on ion accumulation.

  18. Non-equilibrium entropy and dynamics in a system with long-range interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha Filho, T. M.

    2016-05-01

    We extend the core-halo approach of Levin et al (2014 Phys. Rep. 535, 1) for the violent relaxation of long-range interacting system with a waterbag initial condition, in the case of a widely studied Hamiltonian mean field model. The Gibbs entropy maximization principle is considered with the constraints of energy conservation and of coarse-grained Casimir invariants of the Vlasov equation. The core-halo distribution function depends only on the one-particle mean-field energy, as is expected from the Jeans theorem, and depends on a set of parameters which in our approach is completely determined without having to solve an envelope equation for the contour of the initial state, as required in the original approach. We also show that a different ansatz can be used for the core-halo distribution with similar results. This work also reveals a link between a parametric resonance causing the non-equilibrium phase transition in the model, a dynamical property, and a discontinuity of the (non-equilibrium) entropy of the system.

  19. Acoustical correlates of performance on a dynamic range compression discrimination task

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Andrew T.; Gallun, Frederick J.; Souza, Pamela E.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic range compression is widely used to reduce the difference between the most and least intense portions of a signal. Such compression distorts the shape of the amplitude envelope of a signal, but it is unclear to what extent such distortions are actually perceivable by listeners. Here, the ability to distinguish between compressed and uncompressed versions of a noise vocoded sentence was initially measured in listeners with normal hearing while varying the threshold, ratio, attack, and release parameters. This narrow condition was selected in order to characterize perception under the most favorable listening conditions. The average behavioral sensitivity to compression was highly correlated to several acoustical indices of modulation depth. In particular, performance was highly correlated to the Euclidean distance between the modulation spectra of the uncompressed and compressed signals. Suggesting that this relationship is not restricted to the initial test conditions, the correlation remained largely unchanged both (1) when listeners with normal hearing were tested using a time-compressed version of the original signal, and (2) when listeners with impaired hearing were tested using the original signal. If this relationship generalizes to more ecologically valid conditions, it will provide a straightforward method for predicting the detectability of compression-induced distortions. PMID:23967944

  20. A parallel unbalanced digitization architecture to reduce the dynamic range of multiple signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallérian, Mathieu; HuÅ£u, Florin; Villemaud, Guillaume; Miscopein, Benoît; Risset, Tanguy

    2016-05-01

    Technologies employed in urban sensor networks are permanently evolving, and thus the gateways employed to collect data in such kind of networks have to be very flexible in order to be compliant with the new communication standards. A convenient way to do that is to digitize all the received signals in one shot and then to digitally perform the signal processing, as it is done in software-defined radio (SDR). All signals can be emitted with very different features (bandwidth, modulation type, and power level) in order to respond to the various propagation conditions. Their difference in terms of power levels is a problem when digitizing them together, as no current commercial analog-to-digital converter (ADC) can provide a fine enough resolution to digitize this high dynamic range between the weakest possible signal in the presence of a stronger signal. This paper presents an RF front end receiver architecture capable of handling this problem by using two ADCs of lower resolutions. The architecture is validated through a set of simulations using Keysight's ADS software. The main validation criterion is the bit error rate comparison with a classical receiver.