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Sample records for detector efficiency calibration

  1. Quantum Efficient Detectors for Use in Absolute Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, Jessica; Eastwood, Michael; Pavri, Betina; Raney, James

    1998-01-01

    The trap or quantum efficient detector has a quantum efficiency of greater than 0.98 for the region from 450 to 900 nm. The region of flattest response is from 600 to 900 nm. The QED consists of three windowless Hamamatsu silicon detectors. The QED was mounted below AVIRIS to monitor the Spectralon panel for changes in radiance during radiometric calibration. The next step is to permanently mount the detector to AVIRIS and monitor the overall radiance of scenes along with calibration.

  2. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  3. Absolute Efficiency Calibration of a Beta-Gamma Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Lidey, Lance S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2013-04-10

    Abstract- Identification and quantification of nuclear events such as the Fukushima reactor failure and nuclear explosions rely heavily on the accurate measurement of radioxenon releases. One radioxenon detection method depends on detecting beta-gamma coincident events paired with a stable xenon measurement to determine the concentration of a plume. Like all measurements, the beta-gamma method relies on knowing the detection efficiency for each isotope measured. Several methods are commonly used to characterize the detection efficiency for a beta-gamma detector. The most common method is using a NIST certified sealed source to determine the efficiency. A second method determines the detection efficiencies relative to an already characterized detector. Finally, a potentially more accurate method is to use the expected sample to perform an absolute efficiency calibration; in the case of a beta-gamma detector, this relies on radioxenon gas samples. The complication of the first method is it focuses only on the gamma detectors and does not offer a solution for determining the beta efficiency. The second method listed is not similarly constrained, however it relies on another detector to have a well-known efficiency calibration. The final method using actual radioxenon samples to make an absolute efficiency determination is the most desirable, but until recently it was not possible to produce all four isotopically pure radioxenon. The production, by University of Texas (UT), of isotopically pure radioxenon has allowed the beta-gamma detectors to be calibrated using the absolute efficiency method. The first four radioxenon isotope calibration will be discussed is this paper.

  4. Coincidence corrected efficiency calibration of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aucott, T.

    2015-04-20

    The authors present a reliable method to calibrate the full-energy efficiency and the coincidence correction factors using a commonly-available mixed source gamma standard. This is accomplished by measuring the peak areas from both summing and non-summing decay schemes and simultaneously fitting both the full-energy efficiency, as well as the total efficiency, as functions of energy. By using known decay schemes, these functions can then be used to provide correction factors for other nuclides not included in the calibration standard.

  5. New approach for calibration the efficiency of HpGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Hamzah, S.; Siong, W. B.; Elias, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    This work evaluates the efficiency calibrating of HpGe detector coupled with Canberra GC3018 with Genie 2000 software and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C with Gamma Vision software; available at Neutron activation analysis laboratory in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The efficiency calibration curve was constructed from measurement of an IAEA, standard gamma-point sources set composed by 214Am, 57Co, 133Ba, 152Eu, 137Cs and 60Co. The efficiency calibrations were performed for three different geometries: 5, 10 and 15 cm distances from the end cap detector. The polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points. The efficiency equation was established from the known fitted parameters which allow for the efficiency evaluation at particular energy of interest. The study shows that significant deviations in the efficiency, depending on the source-detector distance and photon energy.

  6. New approach for calibration the efficiency of HpGe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Alnour, I. A.; Wagiran, H.; Ibrahim, N.; Hamzah, S.; Siong, W. B.; Elias, M. S.

    2014-02-12

    This work evaluates the efficiency calibrating of HpGe detector coupled with Canberra GC3018 with Genie 2000 software and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C with Gamma Vision software; available at Neutron activation analysis laboratory in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The efficiency calibration curve was constructed from measurement of an IAEA, standard gamma–point sources set composed by {sup 214}Am, {sup 57}Co, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co. The efficiency calibrations were performed for three different geometries: 5, 10 and 15 cm distances from the end cap detector. The polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points. The efficiency equation was established from the known fitted parameters which allow for the efficiency evaluation at particular energy of interest. The study shows that significant deviations in the efficiency, depending on the source-detector distance and photon energy.

  7. SRAM Detector Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soli, G. A.; Blaes, B. R.; Beuhler, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    Custom proton sensitive SRAM chips are being flown on the BMDO Clementine missions and Space Technology Research Vehicle experiments. This paper describes the calibration procedure for the SRAM proton detectors and their response to the space environment.

  8. HST/WFC3 UVIS Detector: Dark, Charge Transfer Efficiency, and Point Spread Function Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Anderson, Jay; Baggett, Sylvia; Bowers, Ariel; MacKenty, John W.; Sahu, Kailash C.

    2015-08-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that was installed during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. As one of two channels available on WFC3, the UVIS detector is comprised of two e2v CCDs and is sensitive to ultraviolet and visible light. Here we provide updates to the characterization and monitoring of the UVIS performance and stability. We present the long-term growth of the dark current and the hot pixel population, as well as the evolution of Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE). We also discuss updates to the UVIS dark calibration products, which are used to correct for dark current in science images. We examine the impacts of CTE losses and outline some techniques to mitigate CTE effects during and after observation by use of post-flash and pixel-based CTE corrections. Finally, we summarize an investigation of WFC3/UVIS Point Spread Functions (PSFs) and their potential use for characterizing the focus of the instrument.

  9. 226Ra as a standard source for efficiency calibration of Ge(Li) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farouk, M. A.; Al-Soraya, A. M.

    1982-09-01

    The relative intensities of gamma-rays resulting from the decay of 226Ra in equilibrium with its short-lived daughters have been measured using two different high resolution Ge(Li) detectors. The accuracy of the measurements does not exceed 2.5%. The most intense components of gamma-rays from thin 226Ra are recommended for use as a calibration standard Ge(Li) detectors in the energy range from 186 keV to 3.050 MeV.

  10. Optical detector calibrator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, James P. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An optical detector calibrator system simulates a source of optical radiation to which a detector to be calibrated is responsive. A light source selected to emit radiation in a range of wavelengths corresponding to the spectral signature of the source is disposed within a housing containing a microprocessor for controlling the light source and other system elements. An adjustable iris and a multiple aperture filter wheel are provided for controlling the intensity of radiation emitted from the housing by the light source to adjust the simulated distance between the light source and the detector to be calibrated. The geared iris has an aperture whose size is adjustable by means of a first stepper motor controlled by the microprocessor. The multiple aperture filter wheel contains neutral density filters of different attenuation levels which are selectively positioned in the path of the emitted radiation by a second stepper motor that is also controlled by the microprocessor. An operator can select a number of detector tests including range, maximum and minimum sensitivity, and basic functionality. During the range test, the geared iris and filter wheel are repeatedly adjusted by the microprocessor as necessary to simulate an incrementally increasing simulated source distance. A light source calibration subsystem is incorporated in the system which insures that the intensity of the light source is maintained at a constant level over time.

  11. Calibration Analyses and Efficiency Studies for the Anti Coincidence Detector on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Kachulis, Chris; /Yale U. /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    The Anti Coincidence Detector (ACD) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope provides charged particle rejection for the Large Area Telescope (LAT). We use two calibrations used by the ACD to conduct three studies on the performance of the ACD. We examine the trending of the calibrations to search for damage and find a timescale over which the calibrations can be considered reliable. We also calculated the number of photoelectrons counted by a PMT on the ACD from a normal proton. Third, we calculated the veto efficiencies of the ACD for two different veto settings. The trends of the calibrations exhibited no signs of damage, and indicated timescales of reliability for the calibrations of one to two years. The number of photoelectrons calculated ranged from 5 to 25. Large errors in the effect of the energy spectrum of the charged particles caused these values to have very large errors of around 60 percent. Finally, the veto efficiencies were found to be very high at both veto values, both for charged particles and for the lower energy backsplash spectrum. The Anti Coincidence Detector (ACD) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope is a detector system built around the silicon strip tracker on the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The purpose of the ACD is to provide charged particle rejection for the LAT. To do this, the ACD must be calibrated correctly in flight, and must be able to efficiently veto charged particle events while minimizing false vetoes due to 'backsplash' from photons in the calorimeter. There are eleven calibrations used by the ACD. In this paper, we discuss the use of two of these calibrations to preform three studies on the performance of the ACD. The first study examines trending of the calibrations to check for possible hardware degradation. The second study uses the calibrations to explore the efficiency of an on-board hardware veto. The third study uses the calibrations to calculate the number of photoelectrons seen by each PMT when a minimum ionizing

  12. Wavelength-scanning calibration of detection efficiency of single photon detectors by direct comparison with a photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee Jung; Park, Seongchong; Park, Hee Su; Hong, Kee Suk; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Heonoh; Cha, Myoungsik; Seb Moon, Han

    2016-04-01

    We present a practical calibration method of the detection efficiency (DE) of single photon detectors (SPDs) in a wide wavelength range from 480 nm to 840 nm. The setup consists of a GaN laser diode emitting a broadband luminescence, a tunable bandpass filter, a beam splitter, and a switched integrating amplifier which can measure the photocurrent down to the 100 fA level. The SPD under test with a fibre-coupled beam input is directly compared with a reference photodiode without using any calibrated attenuator. The relative standard uncertainty of the DE of the SPD is evaluated to be from 0.8% to 2.2% varying with wavelength (k  =  1).

  13. Electron-Photon Coincidence Calibration Of Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.

    1988-01-01

    Absolute and relative detector efficiencies measured. Apparatus uses coincidence-counting techniques to measure efficiency of ultraviolet or vacuum ultraviolet detector at very low radiation intensity. Crossed electron and atomic beams generate photons used to calibrate photon detector. Pulses from electron counter and photon detector(s) processed by standard coincidence-counting techniques. Used to calibrate other detectors or make absolute measurements of incident photon fluxes.

  14. Validation of an efficiency calibration procedure for a coaxial n-type and a well-type HPGe detector used for the measurement of environmental radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morera-Gómez, Yasser; Cartas-Aguila, Héctor A.; Alonso-Hernández, Carlos M.; Nuñez-Duartes, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    To obtain reliable measurements of the environmental radionuclide activity using HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detectors, the knowledge of the absolute peak efficiency is required. This work presents a practical procedure for efficiency calibration of a coaxial n-type and a well-type HPGe detector using experimental and Monte Carlo simulations methods. The method was performed in an energy range from 40 to 1460 keV and it can be used for both, solid and liquid environmental samples. The calibration was initially verified measuring several reference materials provided by the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). Finally, through the participation in two Proficiency Tests organized by IAEA for the members of the ALMERA network (Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity) the validity of the developed procedure was confirmed. The validation also showed that measurement of 226Ra should be conducted using coaxial n-type HPGe detector in order to minimize the true coincidence summing effect.

  15. Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction for large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in soccer-ball and castle geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anil Kumar, G.; Mazumdar, I.; Gothe, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    Efficiency calibration and coincidence summing correction have been performed for two large arrays of NaI(Tl) detectors in two different configurations. They are, a compact array of 32 conical detectors of pentagonal and hexagonal shapes in soccer-ball geometry and an array of 14 straight hexagonal NaI(Tl) detectors in castle geometry. Both of these arrays provide a large solid angle of detection, leading to considerable coincidence summing of gamma rays. The present work aims to understand the effect of coincidence summing of gamma rays while determining the energy dependence of efficiencies of these two arrays. We have carried out extensive GEANT4 simulations with radio-nuclides that decay with a two-step cascade, considering both arrays in their realistic geometries. The absolute efficiencies have been simulated for gamma energies from 700 to 2800 keV using four different double-photon emitters, namely, 60Co, 46Sc, 94Nb and 24Na. The efficiencies so obtained have been corrected for coincidence summing using the method proposed by Vidmar et al. [11]. The simulations have also been carried out for the same energies assuming mono-energetic point sources, for comparison. Experimental measurements have also been carried out using calibrated point sources of 137Cs and 60Co. The simulated and the experimental results are found to be in good agreement. This demonstrates the reliability of the correction method [11] for efficiency calibration of two large arrays in very different configurations.

  16. Thermistor mount efficiency calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1980-05-01

    Thermistor mount efficiency calibration is accomplished by use of the power equation concept and by complex signal-ratio measurements. A comparison of thermistor mounts at microwave frequencies is made by mixing the reference and the reflected signals to produce a frequency at which the amplitude and phase difference may be readily measured.

  17. An exponential model for HPGe detector efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-06-11

    Interest in reducing the labor-intensive requirements for calibrating HPGe detectors has resulted in various efficiency models. The present study examines a method for predicting the efficiencies over ranges of sample geometries, whereby only a few measurements are required. The method has been appraised against extensive HPGe calibrations, and has been used for a ``nondestructive`` calibration for samples from a NASA satellite.

  18. An exponential model for HPGe detector efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1991-06-11

    Interest in reducing the labor-intensive requirements for calibrating HPGe detectors has resulted in various efficiency models. The present study examines a method for predicting the efficiencies over ranges of sample geometries, whereby only a few measurements are required. The method has been appraised against extensive HPGe calibrations, and has been used for a nondestructive'' calibration for samples from a NASA satellite.

  19. Development of an absolute method for efficiency calibration of a coaxial HPGe detector for large volume sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Ramírez, Pablo C.

    2015-09-01

    In this work an absolute method for the determination of the full energy peak efficiency of a gamma spectroscopy system for voluminous sources is presented. The method was tested for a high-resolution coaxial HPGe detector and cylindrical homogeneous volume source. The volume source is represented by a set of point sources filling its volume. We found that the absolute efficiency of a volume source can be determined as the average over its volume of the absolute efficiency of each point source. Experimentally, we measure the intrinsic efficiency as a function upon source-detector position. Then, considering the solid angle and the attenuations of the gamma rays emitted to the detector by each point source, considered as embedded in the source matrix, the absolute efficiency for each point source inside of the volume was determined. The factor associate with the solid angle and the self-attenuation of photons in the sample was deduced from first principles without any mathematical approximation. The method was tested by determining the specific activity of 137Cs in cylindrical homogeneous sources, using IAEA reference materials with specific activities between 14.2 Bq/kg and 9640 Bq/kg at the moment of the experimentation. The results obtained shown a good agreement with the expected values. The relative difference was less than 7% in most of the cases. The main advantage of this method is that it does not require of the use of expensive and hard to produce standard materials. In addition it does not require of matrix effect corrections, which are the main cause of error in this type of measurements, and it is easy to implement in any nuclear physics laboratory.

  20. The ATLAS Inner Detector commissioning and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Dos Santos Pedrosa, F. Baltasar; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Harpaz, S. Behar; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ami, S. Ben; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernabéu, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Budick, B.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G. D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernandez, A. M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J. D.; Chapman, J. W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D. G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S. L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N. J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Côté, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S. J.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G. L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A. R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Castro Faria Salgado, P. E.; de Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de Mora, L.; de Oliveira Branco, M.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D. 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U.; Moa, T.; Moed, S.; Moeller, V.; Mönig, K.; Möser, N.; Mohr, W.; Mohrdieck-Möck, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molina-Perez, J.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Moore, R. W.; Herrera, C. Mora; Moraes, A.; Morais, A.; Morel, J.; Morello, G.; Moreno, D.; Llácer, M. Moreno; Morettini, P.; Morii, M.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morozov, S. V.; Morris, J. D.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Müller, T. A.; Muenstermann, D.; Muir, A.; Munwes, Y.; Garcia, R. Murillo; Murray, W. J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Nakatsuka, H.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nash, M.; Nation, N. R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nderitu, S. K.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T. K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Nicquevert, B.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nožička, M.; Nugent, I. M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.-E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olchevski, A. G.; Oliveira, M.; Damazio, D. Oliveira; Garcia, E. Oliver; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Ortega, E. O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Ottersbach, J. P.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Oyarzun, A.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J. D.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Park, S. J.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Peak, L. S.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M. I.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Peng, H.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Codina, E. Perez; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Reale, V. Perez; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Pleier, M.-A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommès, K.; Ponsot, P.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Potter, K. P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z. L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R. R.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J. G.; Roda, C.; Dos Santos, D. Roda; Rodriguez, D.; Garcia, Y. Rodriguez; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L. P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M. S.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schamov, A. G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schönig, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J. W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shank, J. T.; Shao, Q. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R. D. St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D. A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X. H.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y. D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T. N.; Tripiana, M. F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.-W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J. M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T. T.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weber, M. D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S. R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H. H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, M. G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B. M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Della Porta, G. Zevi; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zutshi, V.

    2010-12-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector is a composite tracking system consisting of silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes in a 2 T magnetic field. Its installation was completed in August 2008 and the detector took part in data-taking with single LHC beams and cosmic rays. The initial detector operation, hardware commissioning and in-situ calibrations are described. Tracking performance has been measured with 7.6 million cosmic-ray events, collected using a tracking trigger and reconstructed with modular pattern-recognition and fitting software. The intrinsic hit efficiency and tracking trigger efficiencies are close to 100%. Lorentz angle measurements for both electrons and holes, specific energy-loss calibration and transition radiation turn-on measurements have been performed. Different alignment techniques have been used to reconstruct the detector geometry. After the initial alignment, a transverse impact parameter resolution of 22.1±0.9 μm and a relative momentum resolution σ p / p=(4.83±0.16)×10-4 GeV-1× p T have been measured for high momentum tracks.

  1. Muon Energy Calibration of the MINOS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Paul S.

    2004-09-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to search for conclusive evidence of neutrino oscillations and to measure the oscillation parameters precisely. MINOS comprises two iron tracking calorimeters located at Fermilab and Soudan. The Calibration Detector at CERN is a third MINOS detector used as part of the detector response calibration programme. A correct energy calibration between these detectors is crucial for the accurate measurement of oscillation parameters. This thesis presents a calibration developed to produce a uniform response within a detector using cosmic muons. Reconstruction of tracks in cosmic ray data is discussed. This data is utilized to calculate calibration constants for each readout channel of the Calibration Detector. These constants have an average statistical error of 1.8%. The consistency of the constants is demonstrated both within a single run and between runs separated by a few days. Results are presented from applying the calibration to test beam particles measured by the Calibration Detector. The responses are calibrated to within 1.8% systematic error. The potential impact of the calibration on the measurement of oscillation parameters by MINOS is also investigated. Applying the calibration reduces the errors in the measured parameters by {approx} 10%, which is equivalent to increasing the amount of data by 20%.

  2. Calibration of the Super-Kamiokande detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Hayato, Y.; Iida, T.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koshio, Y.; Marti, Ll.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Obayashi, Y.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Takenaga, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Ueno, K.; Wendell, R. A.; Yokozawa, T.; Irvine, T. J.; Kaji, H.; Kajita, T.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K. P.; Nishimura, Y.; Okumura, K.; McLachlan, T.; Labarga, L.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Berkman, S.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Goldhaber, M.; Bays, K.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hill, J.; Keig, W. E.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Hong, N.; Akiri, T.; Albert, J. B.; Himmel, A.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Huang, K.; Ieki, K.; Ikeda, M.; Kikawa, T.; Kubo, H.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Otani, M.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyake, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Tacik, R.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Taylor, I.; Yanagisawa, C.; Idehara, Y.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Yamaguchi, R.; Yano, T.; Kuno, Y.; Kim, S. B.; Yang, B. S.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; de Perio, P.; Konaka, A.; Wilking, M. J.; Chen, S.; Heng, Y.; Sui, H.; Yang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhenwei, Y.; Connolly, K.; Dziomba, M.; Wilkes, R. J.

    2014-02-01

    Procedures and results on hardware-level detector calibration in Super-Kamiokande (SK) are presented in this paper. In particular, we report improvements made in our calibration methods for the experimental phase IV in which new readout electronics have been operating since 2008. The topics are separated into two parts. The first part describes the determination of constants needed to interpret the digitized output of our electronics so that we can obtain physical numbers such as photon counts and their arrival times for each photomultiplier tube (PMT). In this context, we developed an in situ procedure to determine high-voltage settings for PMTs in large detectors like SK, as well as a new method for measuring PMT quantum efficiency and gain in such a detector. The second part describes modeling of the detector in Monte Carlo simulations, including, in particular, the optical properties of the water target and their variability over time. Detailed studies on water quality are also presented. As a result of this work, we have achieved a precision sufficient for physics analyses over a wide energy range (from a few MeV to above 1 TeV). For example, charge determination was at the level of 1%, and the timing resolution was 2.1 ns at the one-photoelectron charge level and 0.5 ns at the 100-photoelectron charge level.

  3. Absolute calibration of the Auger fluorescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauleo, P.; Brack, J.; Garrard, L.; Harton, J.; Knapik, R.; Meyhandan, R.; Rovero, A.C.; Tamashiro, A.; Warner, D.

    2005-07-01

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the combined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  4. Sensitivity calibration of an imaging extreme ultraviolet spectrometer-detector system for determining the efficiency of broadband extreme ultraviolet sources

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, S.; Roedel, C.; Bierbach, J.; Paz, A. E.; Foerster, E.; Paulus, G. G.; Krebs, M.; Haedrich, S.; Limpert, J.; Kuschel, S.; Wuensche, M.; Hilbert, V.; Zastrau, U.

    2013-02-15

    We report on the absolute sensitivity calibration of an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectrometer system that is frequently employed to study emission from short-pulse laser experiments. The XUV spectrometer, consisting of a toroidal mirror and a transmission grating, was characterized at a synchrotron source in respect of the ratio of the detected to the incident photon flux at photon energies ranging from 15.5 eV to 99 eV. The absolute calibration allows the determination of the XUV photon number emitted by laser-based XUV sources, e.g., high-harmonic generation from plasma surfaces or in gaseous media. We have demonstrated high-harmonic generation in gases and plasma surfaces providing 2.3 {mu}W and {mu}J per harmonic using the respective generation mechanisms.

  5. Astrophysical calibration of gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitkin, M.; Messenger, C.; Wright, L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a method to assess the validity of gravitational-wave detector calibration through the use of gamma-ray bursts as standard sirens. Such signals, as measured via gravitational-wave observations, provide an estimated luminosity distance that is subject to uncertainties in the calibration of the data. If a host galaxy is identified for a given source then its redshift can be combined with current knowledge of the cosmological parameters yielding the true luminosity distance. This will then allow a direct comparison with the estimated value and can validate the accuracy of the original calibration. We use simulations of individual detectable gravitational-wave signals from binary neutron star (BNS) or neutron star-black hole systems, which we assume to be found in coincidence with short gamma-ray bursts, to estimate any discrepancy in the overall scaling of the calibration for detectors in the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo network. We find that the amplitude scaling of the calibration for the LIGO instruments could on average be confirmed to within ˜10 % for a BNS source within 100 Mpc. This result is largely independent of the current detector calibration method and gives an uncertainty that is competitive with that expected in the current calibration procedure. Confirmation of the calibration accuracy to within ˜20 % can be found with BNS sources out to ˜500 Mpc .

  6. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

  7. High efficiency photoionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1984-01-31

    A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

  8. Thoughts on VCD-145 Detector Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W V

    2005-02-10

    In 1980, Don Smith requested that the EG&G Detector Group in North Las Vegas provide a summary of calibrated sensitivities for the VCD-145 detector. The &sired information was provided in a memorandum from Sam Egdorf (Reference 1). A memo from Brent Davis issued a week later described the effect on VCD-145 detector sensitivity that resulted from changing the thickness of the stainless steel entrance window (Reference 2). This memo is intended first to effectively archive those two references, and second to record thoughts about the significance of their contents. Reference 1 lists a total of 118 calibrated values for 80 different VCD-145 detectors, from 1977 to 1980. With only four exceptions, all of the serial numbers from V004 to V087 were included. The earlier calibrations were for detectors with 1-mil entrance windows, and the later ones were for detectors with 2-mil entrance windows. Three of the earlier units were calibrated at both thicknesses by temporarily placing an extra 1-mil sheet of stainless steel across the window. Altogether six different collimator diameters were used, from 60 mm to 95 mm. Some units were calibrated for more than one collimator diameter, and 14 were at some point designated as backup detectors for a second event. Reference 2 describes the effect of window thickness on calibrated sensitivity. Quoting that reference: ''To demonstrate that the sensitivity decrease is solely a function of the window thickness, a standard VCD-145 detector with a 0.001-inch thick window was calibrated with the {sup 60}Co source. Then without changing detector or geometry, a 0.001 -inch thick stainless steel foil (same material as that of the window) was placed directly in front of the detector window, effectively making a 0.002-inch thick entrance window. The detector was again calibrated. This technique was repeated until the detector had an entrance window equivalent to 0.010-inches thick.'' There are multiple reasons to suspect that the accuracy of

  9. MINERνA neutrino detector calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Cheryl

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA is a neutrino scattering experiment that uses Fermilab’s NuMI beamline. Its goal is to measure cross-sections for neutrino scattering from different nuclei. Precise knowledge of these cross-sections is vital for current and future neutrino oscillation experiments. In order to measure these values to a high degree of accuracy, it is essential that the detector be carefully calibrated. Here, we describe in-situ calibration and cross-checks.

  10. Calibration of the GLAST Burst Monitor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kienlin, Andreas von; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Lichti, Giselher G.; Steinle, Helmut; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Krumrey, Michael; Gerlach, Martin; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Bhat, Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will augment the capabilities of GLAST for the detection of cosmic gamma-ray bursts by extending the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) towards lower energies by 2 BGO-detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV) and 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV). The physical detector response of the GBM instrument for GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground calibration measurements, performed extensively with the individual detectors at the MPE in 2005. All flight and spare detectors were irradiated with calibrated radioactive sources in the laboratory (from 14 keV to 4.43 MeV). The energy/channel-relations, the dependences of energy resolution and effective areas on the energy and the angular responses were measured. Due to the low number of emission lines of radioactive sources below 100 keV, calibration measurements in the energy range from 10 keV to 60 keV were performed with the X-ray radiometry working group of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY synchrotron radiation facility, Berlin.

  11. Calibration of the GLAST Burst Monitor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Lichti, Giselher G.; Steinle, Helmut; Krumrey, Michael; Gerlach, Martin; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Diehl, Roland; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R.Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-11-29

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will augment the capabilities of GLAST for the detection of cosmic gamma-ray bursts by extending the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) towards lower energies by 2 BGO-detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV) and 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV). The physical detector response of the GBM instrument for GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground calibration measurements, performed extensively with the individual detectors at the MPE in 2005. All flight and spare detectors were irradiated with calibrated radioactive sources in the laboratory (from 14 keV to 4.43 MeV). The energy/channel-relations, the dependences of energy resolution and effective areas on the energy and the angular responses were measured. Due to the low number of emission lines of radioactive sources below 100 keV, calibration measurements in the energy range from 10 keV to 60 keV were performed with the X-ray radiometry working group of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the BESSY synchrotron radiation facility, Berlin.

  12. A new experimental procedure for determination of photoelectric efficiency of a NaI(Tl) detector used for nuclear medicine liquid waste monitoring with traceability to a reference standard radionuclide calibrator.

    PubMed

    Ceccatelli, A; Campanella, F; Ciofetta, G; Marracino, F M; Cannatà, V

    2010-02-01

    To determine photopeak efficiency for (99m)Tc of the NaI(Tl) detector used for liquid waste monitoring at the Nuclear Medicine Unit of IRCCS Paediatric Hospital Bambino Gesù in Rome, a specific experimental procedure, with traceability to primary standards, was developed. Working with the Italian National Institute for Occupational Prevention and Safety, two different calibration source geometries were employed and the detector response dependence on geometry was investigated. The large percentage difference (almost 40%) between the two efficiency values obtained showed that geometrical effects cannot be neglected. PMID:19914080

  13. WFC3/UVIS Dark Current Calibration and Detector Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Biretta, John A.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Anderson, Jay; MacKenty, John W.; WFC3 Team

    2015-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is a fourth-generation imaging instrument that was installed during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. The WFC3/UVIS detector, comprised of two e2v CCDs, exhibits an inherent dark current (in the absence of any illumination) presently measured at ~6 e-/hr. In addition, detector degradation due to on-orbit radiation damage generates a continuously increasing though small population of hot pixels (dark current exceeding 54 e-/hr, ~4% of each chip) as well as 'sink' pixels (pixels which contain a large number of charge traps). We present the procedures and results of the WFC3/UVIS dark calibration, which provides calibration files used as a correction for these detector characteristics. We discuss the impacts that Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses and detector post-flashing have on the hot pixel population and overall calibration, as well as the plans for flagging the 'sink' pixels in the calibration pipeline. Finally, we discuss various improvements to the calibration procedure that will increase the accuracy of dark current and hot pixel measurements.

  14. Energy calibration of the fly's eye detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, S.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    The methods used to calibrate the Fly's eye detector to evaluate the energy of EAS are discussed. The energy of extensive air showers (EAS) as seen by the Fly's Eye detector are obtained from track length integrals of observed shower development curves. The energy of the parent cosmic ray primary is estimated by applying corrections to account for undetected energy in the muon, neutrino and hadronic channels. Absolute values for E depend upon the measurement of shower sizes N sub e(x). The following items are necessary to convert apparent optical brightness into intrinsical optical brightness: (1) an assessment of those factors responsible for light production by the relativistic electrons in an EAS and the transmission of light thru the atmosphere, (2) calibration of the optical detection system, and (3) a knowledge of the trajectory of the shower.

  15. Calibration of a detector for nonlinear chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Asnin, Leonid; Galinada, Wilmer; Gotmar, Gustaf; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-06-01

    In many studies of nonlinear or preparative chromatography, chromatographic signals must be recorded for relatively concentrated solutions and the detectors, that are designed for analytical applications and are highly sensitive, must be used under such experimental conditions that their responses are often nonlinear. Then, a calibration curve is needed to derive the actual concentration profiles of the eluates from the measured detector response. It becomes necessary to derive a relationship between the concentration of the eluent and the detector signal at any given time. The simplest approach consists in preparing a series of solutions of known concentrations and in flushing them successively through the detector cell, recording the height of the plateau response obtained. However, this method requires relatively large amounts of the pure solutes being studied and these are not always available or they may be most costly, although these solutions can be recovered. We describe and validate an alternative procedure providing this calibration from a series of peaks recorded upon the injection of increasingly large pulses of the studied compound.

  16. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  17. Application of PHOTON simulation software on calibration of HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, J.; Puzovic, J.; Todorovic, D.; Rajacic, M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the major difficulties in gamma spectrometry of voluminous environmental samples is the efficiency calibration of the detectors used for the measurement. The direct measurement of different calibration sources, containing isolated γ-ray emitters within the energy range of interest, and subsequent fitting to a parametric function, is the most accurate and at the same time most complicated and time consuming method of efficiency calibration. Many other methods are developed in time, some of them using Monte Carlo simulation. One of such methods is a dedicated and user-friendly program PHOTON, developed to simulate the passage of photons through different media with different geometries. This program was used for efficiency calibration of three HPGe detectors, readily used in Laboratory for Environment and Radiation Protection of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade, Serbia. The simulation produced the spectral response of the detectors for fixed energy and for different sample geometries and matrices. Thus obtained efficiencies were compared to the values obtained by the measurement of the secondary reference materials and to the results obtained by GEANT4 simulation, in order to establish whether the simulated values agree with the experimental ones. To further analyze the results, a realistic measurement of the materials provided by the IAEA within different interlaboratory proficiency tests, was performed. The activities obtained using simulated efficiencies were compared to the reference values provided by the organizer. A good agreement in the mid energy section of the spectrum was obtained, while for low energies the lack of some parameters in the simulation libraries proved to produce unacceptable discrepancies.

  18. The laser calibration system of the TOP detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benettoni, M.; Gaz, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Posocco, M.; Sartori, P.; Stroili, R.; Torassa, E.; Mussa, R.; Tamponi, U.

    2015-07-01

    The TOP detector at the Belle II Experiment is a particle identification detector, devoted mainly to the separation of charged pions and kaons. The charged particles emit Cherenkov photons when traversing a quartz radiator and these photons are converted inside micro-channel plates photomultipliers. The time of arrival and position of the photoelectrons, detected with excellent spatial and time resolution, are used to reconstruct the angle of the Cherenkov light emitted by the charged particle. The monitoring of the time stability and the measurement of the quantum efficiency of the photomultipliers are performed with a laser calibration system, with a target time resolution better than 50 ps. The system is a combination of a picosecond laser source, long single mode fibers, fiber bundles, and microlenses, which are needed to illuminate all the channels of the photomultipliers. A detailed description of the laser calibration system and its properties is given.

  19. Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ringdal, F; Harris, D B; Dodge, D; Gibbons, S J

    2009-07-23

    extend detection to lower magnitudes. This year we addressed a problem long known to limit the acceptance of correlation detectors in practice: the labor intensive development of templates. For example, existing design methods cannot keep pace with rapidly unfolding aftershock sequences. We successfully built and tested an object-oriented framework (as described in our 2005 proposal) for autonomous calibration of waveform correlation detectors for an array. The framework contains a dynamic list of detectors of several types operating on a continuous array data stream. The list has permanent detectors: beam forming power (STA/LTA) detectors which serve the purpose of detecting signals not yet characterized with a waveform template. The framework also contains an arbitrary number of subspace detectors which are launched automatically using the waveforms from validated power detections as templates. The implementation is very efficient such that the computational cost of adding subspace detectors was low. The framework contains a supervisor that oversees the validation of power detections, and periodically halts the processing to revise the portfolio of detectors. The process of revision consists of collecting the waveforms from all detections, performing cross-correlations pairwise among all waveforms, clustering the detections using correlations as a distance measure, then creating a new subspace detector from each cluster. The collection of new subspace detectors replaces the existing portfolio and processing of the data stream resumes. This elaborate scheme was implemented to prevent proliferation of closely-related subspace detectors. The method performed very well on several simple sequences: 2005 'drumbeat' events observed locally at Mt. St. Helens, and the 2003 Orinda, CA aftershock sequence. Our principal test entailed detection of the aftershocks of the San Simeon earthquake using the NVAR array; in this case, the system automatically detected and categorized

  20. Calibration of Micro Channel Plate Detector Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekat, S.; Kypreos, T.; Moore, J.; Gay, D.; Wiedenhoever, I.

    2004-10-01

    Two position-sensitive micro-channel plate (MCP) detector systems have been assembled and tested at the University of North Florida. These detectors track heavy-ions in Florida State University's radioactive beam facility, RESOLUT. Plans for the systems were supplied by C. J. Gross and D. Shapira of ORNL. Each system consists of an aluminized 0.9-micron Mylar foil facing a 40-mm diameter MCP sensor head with a resistive anode encoder (RAE). Delta electrons emitted as a heavy ion passes through the foil are accelerated toward the sensor head by an electric field. The divergence of the electrons is limited by a magnetic field from a NdFeB magnet which is coaxial with and behind the sensor head. A digital oscilloscope has been programmed to convert amplified and shaped pulses from the RAE into position coordinates. Calibration experiments were performed with the foil replaced by an aluminum grid of 1 mm wide strips. Using alpha particles from a ^241Am source incident on the grid, optimum operating parameters were established by resolving aluminum strips separated by 1 mm.

  1. Characterization and Calibration of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösel, Philipp; ATLAS Muon Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Resistive strip Micromegas detectors have been tested extensively as small detectors of about 10×10 cm2 in size and they work reliably at high rates of 100 kHz/cm2 and above. Tracking resolution well below 100 μm has been observed for 100 GeV muons and pions. Micromegas detectors are meanwhile proposed as large area muon precision trackers of 2-3 m2 in size. To investigate possible differences between small and large detectors, a 1 m2 detector with 2048 resistive strips at a pitch of 450 μm was studied in the LMU Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility (CRMF) using two 4×2.2 m2 large Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for cosmic muon reference tracking. A segmentation of the resistive strip anode plane in 57.6 mm×93 mm large areas has been realized by the readout of 128 strips with one APV25 chip each and by eleven 93 mm broad trigger scintillators placed along the readout strips. This allows for mapping of homogeneity in pulse height and efficiency, determination of signal propagation along the 1 m long anode strips and calibration of the position of the anode strips.

  2. An MLC calibration method using a detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Thomas A.; Kahler, Darren; Simon, William E.; Fox, Christopher; Li, Jonathan; Palta, Jatinder; Liu, Chihray

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The authors have developed a quantitative calibration method for a multileaf collimator (MLC) which measures individual leaf positions relative to the MLC backup jaw on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Methods: The method utilizes a commercially available two-axis detector array (Profiler 2; Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL). To calibrate the MLC bank, its backup jaw is positioned at the central axis and the opposing jaw is retracted to create a half-beam configuration. The position of the backup jaws field edge is then measured with the array to obtain what is termed the radiation defined reference line. The positions of the individual leaf ends relative to this reference line are then inferred by the detector response in the leaf end penumbra. Iteratively adjusting and remeasuring the leaf end positions to within specifications completes the calibration. Using the backup jaw as a reference for the leaf end positions is based on three assumptions: (1) The leading edge of an MLC leaf bank is parallel to its backup jaw's leading edge, (2) the backup jaw position is reproducible, and (3) the measured radiation field edge created by each leaf end is representative of that leaf's position. Data from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) were used in a similar analysis to check the results obtained with the array. Results: The relative leaf end positions measured with the array differed from those measured with the EPID by an average of 0.11 {+-}0.09 mm per leaf. The maximum leaf positional change measured with the Profiler 2 over a 3 month period was 0.51 mm. A leaf positional accuracy of {+-}0.4 mm is easily attainable through the iterative calibration process. The method requires an average of 40 min to measure both leaf banks. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that the Profiler 2 is an effective tool for efficient and quantitative MLC quality assurance and calibration.

  3. The LED calibration system of the SPHERE-2 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, R. A.; Bonvech, E. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Podgrudkov, D. A.; Roganova, T. M.

    2016-04-01

    An absolute calibration method for the PMT mosaic used in the SPHERE-2 experiment is presented. The method is based on the relative calibration of all PMTs in the mosaic to a single stable PMT, incorporated in it, during each measurement event and subsequent absolute calibration of that single PMT using a known stable light source. The results of the SPHERE-2 detector PMTs calibration are presented and are discussed.

  4. Using standard calibrated geometries to characterize a coaxial high purity germanium gamma detector for Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, E. R. van der Dendooven, P.; Brandenburg, S.

    2014-06-15

    A detector model optimization procedure based on matching Monte Carlo simulations with measurements for two experimentally calibrated sample geometries which are frequently used in radioactivity measurement laboratories results in relative agreement within 5% between simulated and measured efficiencies for a high purity germanium detector. The optimization procedure indicated that the increase in dead layer thickness is largely responsible for a detector efficiency decrease in time. The optimized detector model allows Monte Carlo efficiency calibration for all other samples of which the geometry and bulk composition is known. The presented method is a competitive and economic alternative to more elaborate detector scanning methods and results in a comparable accuracy.

  5. Design and thermal analysis of electrically calibrated pyroelectric detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiumei; Ding, Jieying; Ma, Xueliang; Yu, Yuehua; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2012-01-01

    A finite element model was set up by ANSYS to optimize the structure of an electrically calibrated detector and simulate the thermal diffusivity. High-performance relaxor-based ferroelectric crystals were selected as the detector materials. Gold-black was selected as the black coating on the surface of the calibrated pyroelectric detector. The finite element model was set up by ANSYS and the geometry model was meshed appropriately. The optimized structure stood out from the several feasible structures. The simulation results showed that the differences of Δ T on the top surface of PMN-PT crystal between radiant and electrical heating decrease with the increase of sensitive area. The sensitive area of the detector is 10 mm × 10 mm and the entrance aperture is ∅ 8 mm. In this condition, the differences of Δ T are 1.20%. An electrically calibrated pyroelectric detector was fabricated according to the simulation results.

  6. Energy calibration of a multilayer photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The job of energy calibration was broken into three parts: gain normalization of all equivalent elements; determination of the functions for conversion of pulse height to energy; and gain stabilization. It is found that calorimeter experiments are no better than their calibration systems - calibration errors will be the major source of error at high energies. Redundance is found to be necessary - the system should be designed such that every element could be replaced during the life of the experiment. It is found to be important to have enough data taken during calibration runs and during the experiment to be able to sort out where the calibration problems were after the experiment is over. Each layer was normalized independently with electrons, and then the pulse height to energy conversion was determined with photons. The primary method of gain stabilization used the light flasher system. (LEW)

  7. Calibration of particle detectors for secondary cosmic rays using gamma-ray beams from thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Hovsepyan, G.

    2015-09-01

    After observation of hundreds of Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs) we measure energy spectra of particles originated in clouds and directed towards Earth. We use these "beams" for calibration of cosmic ray detectors located beneath the clouds at an altitude of 3200 m at Mount Aragats in Armenia. The calibrations of particle detectors with fluxes of TGE gamma rays are in good agreement with simulation results and allow estimation of the energy thresholds and efficiencies of numerous particle detectors used for studying galactic and solar cosmic rays.

  8. Use and calibration of Rosemount ice detectors for meteorological research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claffey, K. J.; Jones, K. F.; Ryerson, C. C.

    Vibrating probe ice detectors made by Rosemount Inc., are used by many researchers for measuring atmospheric icing rates and cloud liquid water contents. The vibration frequency of the probe decreases as ice accretes on it, until the probe is deiced at a factory-set frequency. Rosemount ice detectors are favored because they are readily available, easy to install and simple to operate. They are designed to be used as warning systems for incipient aircraft and antenna icing, and not as precisely calibrated scientific instruments. Calibration cannot be user adjusted, but it can be measured and must be periodically checked if the ice detector is to be used in scientific studies. We briefly describe three models of Rosemount ice detectors that CRREL has used. Methods for collecting and processing the data from these ice detectors are described and evaluated. Procedures developed at CRREL for calibrating Rosemount detectors against a rotating multicylinder in natural icing conditions are presented. Results of calibrations of two model 872B12 Rosemount ice detectors with the rotating multicylinder are presented and discussed. Use of the ice detector record to calculate cloud liquid water content is described.

  9. Calibration Techniques of the XENON1T Dark Matter Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienaar, Jacques; Xenon Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The XENON1T experiment will probe new parameter spaces in direct dark matter searches. The successful operation of such a detector requires several calibration techniques to accurately reconstruct the position and energies of events within the active volume. 220Rn is introduced into the detector itself, through re-circulation of gaseous Xe, for use as an internal calibration sources. The decay of 220Rn and its daughters provides both high-energy alpha particles as well as a low-energy beta spectrum that can be used to calibrate the detector. Mono-energetic 2.5 MeV neutrons, allow for the in-situ calibration of the charge yield of nuclear recoil events within the detector, using double scatter events to reconstruct the deposited energy at the first scatter. Accurately positioned external Compton sources allow to determine the performance of fiducialization, as well as an insitu calibration of the charge yield of electronic recoils. This talk will present the calibration systems of the XENON1T detector.

  10. Calibration analysis software for the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramaglia, Maria Elena

    2016-07-01

    The calibration of the ATLAS Pixel Detector at LHC fulfils two main purposes: to tune the front-end configuration parameters for establishing the best operational settings and to measure the tuning performance through a subset of scans. An analysis framework has been set up in order to take actions on the detector given the outcome of a calibration scan (e.g. to create a mask for disabling noisy pixels). The software framework to control all aspects of the Pixel Detector scans and analyses is called calibration console. The introduction of a new layer, equipped with new FE-I4 chips, required an update of the console architecture. It now handles scans and scan analyses applied together to chips with different characteristics. An overview of the newly developed calibration analysis software will be presented, together with some preliminary results.

  11. Beowulf - Beta-Gamma Detector Calibration Graphical User Interface

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.

    2009-09-21

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has demonstrated significant advancement in using beta-gamma coincidence detectors to detect a wide range of radioxenon isotopes. To obtain accurate activities with the detector it must be properly calibrated by measuring a series of calibration gas samples. The data is analyzed to create the calibration block used in the International Monitoring System file format. Doing the calibration manually has proven to be tedious and prone to errors, requiring a high degree of expertise. The Beowulf graphical user interface (GUI) is a software application that encompasses several components of the calibration task and generates a calibration block, as well as, a detailed report describing the specific calibration process used. This additional document can be used as a Quality assurance certificate to assist in auditing the calibration. This paper consists of two sections. Section 1 will describe the capabilities of Beowulf and section 2 will be a representative report generated or the 137Cs calibration and quality assurance source.

  12. Calibration of the solar neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caccianiga, Barbara; Re, Alessandra Carlotta

    2016-04-01

    Calibrations have been crucial for the success of solar neutrino experiments. In this contribution we review the calibration strategies adopted by different solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we will emphasize their common critical aspects and their main differences. In order to do so, we will schematically divide the solar neutrino experiments in two groups: those based on radiochemical techniques, i.e. Homestake, Gallex/GNO, SAGE and those based on real-time techniques i.e. Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, SNO, Borexino and KamLAND.

  13. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: detector spectral response effects on thermal emissive band calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will be aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) to supply data needed for operational weather forecasts and long-term climate variability studies, which depend on high quality data. Unlike the heritage operational GOES systems that have two or four detectors per band, ABI has hundreds of detectors per channel requiring calibration coefficients for each one. This increase in number of detectors poses new challenges for next generation sensors as each detector has a unique spectral response function (SRF) even though only one averaged SRF per band is used operationally to calibrate each detector. This simplified processing increases computational efficiency. Using measured system-level SRF data from pre-launch testing, we have the opportunity to characterize the calibration impact using measured SRFs, both per detector and as an average of detector-level SRFs similar to the operational version. We calculated the spectral response impacts for the thermal emissive bands (TEB) theoretically, by simulating the ABI response viewing an ideal blackbody and practically, with the measured ABI response to an external reference blackbody from the pre-launch TEB calibration test. The impacts from the practical case match the theoretical results using an ideal blackbody. The observed brightness temperature trends show structure across the array with magnitudes as large as 0.1 K for and 12 (9.61 µm), and 0.25 K for band 14 (11.2 µm) for a 300 K blackbody. The trends in the raw ABI signal viewing the blackbody support the spectral response measurements results, since they show similar trends in bands 12 (9.61µm), and 14 (11.2 µm), meaning that the spectral effects dominate the response differences between detectors for these bands. We further validated these effects using the radiometric bias calculated between calibrations using the external blackbody and

  14. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    Mc Fee, Matthew C.; Kirkham, Tim J.; Johnson, Tippi H.

    1994-01-01

    A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

  15. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

  16. Calibration of the neutron detectors for the cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Dyer, G.; Rougk, J.; Kim, I.; McCormick, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2012-06-15

    Three types of neutron detectors (plastic scintillation detectors, indium activation detectors, and CR-39 track detectors) were calibrated for the measurement of 2.45 MeV DD fusion neutron yields from the deuterium cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser. A Cf-252 neutron source and 2.45 MeV fusion neutrons generated from laser-cluster interaction were used as neutron sources. The scintillation detectors were calibrated such that they can detect up to 10{sup 8} DD fusion neutrons per shot in current mode under high electromagnetic pulse environments. Indium activation detectors successfully measured neutron yields as low as 10{sup 4} per shot and up to 10{sup 11} neutrons. The use of a Cf-252 neutron source allowed cross calibration of CR-39 and indium activation detectors at high neutron yields ({approx}10{sup 11}). The CR-39 detectors provided consistent measurements of the total neutron yield of Cf-252 when a modified detection efficiency of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} was used. The combined use of all three detectors allowed for a detection range of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 11} neutrons per shot.

  17. Fielding and calibration issues for diamond photoconducting detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.; Ruggles, L.E.; Pepping, R.E.; Breeze, S.F.; McGurn, J.S.; Struve, K.W.

    1996-12-01

    Diamond photoconducting detectors are routinely fielded as soft x-ray diagnostics on Sandia`s Saturn facility. We have developed an improved detector mount that provides a 200-ps time response, is easily cleanable, and is very rugged. In addition, we have developed a new, fast insertion unit to apply bias voltage to the detectors. Absolute calibration of the PCDs is carried out either at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source or on Sandia`s laser calibration facility. We are now fielding diamond elements that have the dimensions 1x3x0.5 nun and 1x1xO.5 mm. We are neutron damaging some of the 1x1xO.5-mm detectors to reduce their sensitivity. We can tailor PCD sensitivity by adjusting element size and neutron damage level.

  18. A New Method for Electronic Recoil Calibration in Liquid Noble Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmullin, Sean

    2014-03-01

    Calibration of next-generation liquid noble dark matter detectors present new challenges because radiation from external sources will not probe the entire target, owing to its large volume and high stopping power. For electronic recoil calibration in particular, a proposed solution is to dissolve a source of low-energy β-electrons directly into the liquid. A particularly promising candidate is 212Pb, a daughter of 220Rn. We have acquired a custom-made source of electrodeposited 228Th that efficiently emanates the desired 220Rn. Details of recent measurements of mixing 220Rn and its daughters in a liquid xenon detector and future prospects will be presented.

  19. Calibration of low-level beta-gamma coincidence detector systems for xenon isotope detection.

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, K; Wieslander, J S E; Auer, M; Gheddou, A

    2016-03-01

    The beta-gamma coincidence detector systems used for the measurement of the CTBT-relevant xenon isotopes (Xe-131m, Xe-133m, Xe-133 and Xe-135) in the International Monitoring System network and in the On-Site Inspection are reviewed. These detectors typically consist of a well-type or bore-through NaI crystal into which a measurement cell, serving also as a sample container, is inserted. This work describes the current calibration procedure for energy, resolution and efficiency, implementation challenges, availability and uncertainties of the specific nuclear decay data and the path forward to full calibration validation using GEANT4. PMID:26702548

  20. Mathematical calibration of Ge detectors, and the instruments that use them

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, F.L.; Young, B.

    1997-11-01

    Efficiency calibrations for Ge detectors are typically done with the use of multiple energy calibrations sources which are added to a bulk matrix intended to simulate the measurement sample, and then deposited in the sample container. This is rather easy for common laboratory samples. Bu, even there, for many environmental samples, waste assay samples, and operational health physics samples, accurate calibrations are difficult. For these situations, various mathematical corrections or direct calibration techniques are used at Canberra. EML has pioneered the use of mathematical calibrations following source-based detector characterization measurements for in situ measurements of environmental fallout. Canberra has expanded this by the use of MCNP for the source measurements required in EML. For other calibration situations, MCNP was used directly, as the primary calibration method. This is demonstrated to be at least as accurate as source based measurements, and probably better. Recently, a new method [ISOCS] has been developed and is nearing completion. This promises to be an easy to use calibration software that can be used by the customer for in situ gamma spectroscopy to accurately measure many large sized samples, such as boxes, drums, pipes, or to calibrate small laboratory-type samples. 8 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Double Chooz Neutron Detection Efficiency with Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pi-Jung

    2012-03-01

    The Double Chooz experiment is designed to search for a non-vanishing mixing angle theta13 with unprecedented sensitivity. The first results obtained with the far detector only indicate a non-zero value of theta13. The Double Chooz detector system consists of a main detector, an outer veto system and a number of calibration systems. The main detector consists of a series of concentric cylinders. The target vessel, a liquid scintillator loaded with 0.1% Gd, is surrounded by the gamma-catcher, a non-loaded liquid scintillator. A buffer region of non-scintillating liquid surrounds the gamma-catcher and serves to decrease the level of accidental background. There is the Inner Veto region outside the buffer. The experiment is calibrated with light sources, radioactive point sources, cosmics and natural radioactivity. The radio-isotopes sealed in miniature capsules are deployed in the target and the gamma-catcher. Neutron detection efficiency is one of the major systematic components in the measurement of anti-neutrino disappearance. An untagged 252Cf source was used to determine fractions of neutron captures on Gd, neutron capture time systematic and neutron delayed energy systematic. The details will be explained in the talk.

  2. The calibration unit and detector system tests for MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelz, A.; Bauer, S. M.; Biswas, I.; Fechner, T.; Hahn, T.; Olaya, J.-C.; Popow, E.; Roth, M. M.; Streicher, O.; Weilbacher, P.; Bacon, R.; Laurent, F.; Laux, U.; Lizon, J. L.; Loupias, M.; Reiss, R.; Rupprecht, G.

    2010-07-01

    The Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) is an integral-field spectrograph for the ESO Very Large Telescope. After completion of the Final Design Review in 2009, MUSE is now in its manufacture and assembly phase. To achieve a relative large field-of-view with fine spatial sampling, MUSE features 24 identical spectrograph-detector units. The acceptance tests of the detector sub-systems, the design and manufacture of the calibration unit and the development of the Data Reduction Software for MUSE are under the responsibility of the AIP. The optical design of the spectrograph implies strict tolerances on the alignment of the detector systems to minimize aberrations. As part of the acceptance testing, all 24 detector systems, developed by ESO, are mounted to a MUSE reference spectrograph, which is illuminated by a set of precision pinholes. Thus the best focus is determined and the image quality of the spectrograph-detector subsystem across wavelength and field angle is measured.

  3. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-15

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a {sup 6}Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m{sup 2}, is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security.

  4. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a 6Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m2, is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security.

  5. Efficient scalable solid-state neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Moses, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    We report on scalable solid-state neutron detector system that is specifically designed to yield high thermal neutron detection sensitivity. The basic detector unit in this system is made of a (6)Li foil coupled to two crystalline silicon diodes. The theoretical intrinsic efficiency of a detector-unit is 23.8% and that of detector element comprising a stack of five detector-units is 60%. Based on the measured performance of this detector-unit, the performance of a detector system comprising a planar array of detector elements, scaled to encompass effective area of 0.43 m(2), is estimated to yield the minimum absolute efficiency required of radiological portal monitors used in homeland security. PMID:26133869

  6. Time-of-flight calibration of a 6Li glass epithermal neutron detector

    PubMed

    Livingston; Saleh; Block; Brand

    2000-10-01

    The curing of Portland cement concrete involves the conversion of water from a free to a bound state. The process can be monitored nondestructively by measuring the shift in the neutron energy spectrum in the epithermal range (0.025-1 eV). A tuned array of 6Li glass detectors has been constructed with varying efficiencies over the epithermal energy range. To determine the efficiency of each detector as a function of neutron energy, it is necessary to calibrate it against a reference neutron spectrum. This was accomplished using a time-of-flight approach with a pulsed neutron beam produced at the Gaerttner LINAC Laboratory at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. With a neutron flight path of 25 m it was possible to determine the neutron detector efficiencies to an energy resolution of 11 microeV. The data showed good agreement with the detector design calculations. PMID:11003519

  7. In-place HEPA (high efficiency, particulate air) filter testing at Hanford: Operating experiences, calibrations, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, D.S.; Decelis, D.G.

    1989-10-01

    High Efficiency, Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters provide a minimum of 99.97% removal efficiency for particles greater than or equal to .3 microns in diameter. Each HEPA filter installation at Hanford is, at specified intervals, functionally tested for leaks. The test procedure involves a dioctylphthalate (DOP) smoke generator and a calibrated airborne particle detector. The DOP generator produces smoke of a known quantitative particle size distribution upstream of the filter. The airborne particle detector is first placed upstream, and then downstream of the filter to determine percent penetration. The smoke generator is characterized using a calibrated laser spectrometer, and the particle detector is calibrated using a calibrated picoammeter. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  8. The plastic scintillator detector calibration circuit for DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haibo; Kong, Jie; Zhao, Hongyun; Su, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The Dark Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is being constructed as a scientific satellite to observe high energy cosmic rays in space. Plastic scintillator detector array (PSD), developed by Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMPCAS), is one of the most important parts in the payload of DAMPE which is mainly used for the study of dark matter. As an anti-coincidence detector, and a charged-particle identification detector, the PSD has a total of 360 electronic readout channels, which are distributed at four sides of PSD using four identical front end electronics (FEE). Each FEE reads out 90 charge signals output by the detector. A special calibration circuit is designed in FEE. FPGA is used for on-line control, enabling the calibration circuit to generate the pulse signal with known charge. The generated signal is then sent to the FEE for calibration and self-test. This circuit mainly consists of DAC, operation amplifier, analog switch, capacitance and resistance. By using controllable step pulse, the charge can be coupled to the charge measuring chip using the small capacitance. In order to fulfill the system's objective of large dynamic range, the FEE is required to have good linearity. Thus, the charge-controllable signal is needed to do sweep test on all channels in order to obtain the non-linear parameters for off-line correction. On the other hand, the FEE will run on the satellite for three years. The changes of the operational environment and the aging of devices will lead to parameter variation of the FEE, highlighting the need for regular calibration. The calibration signal generation circuit also has a compact structure and the ability to work normally, with the PSD system's voltage resolution being higher than 0.6%.

  9. Segmented Detector Calibration Techniques for the PROSPECT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davee, Daniel; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    PROSPECT will make the most precise measurement of the 235U anti-neutrino spectrum to date and search for eV-scale sterile neutrinos. The proposed detector is composed of 120 6Li loaded liquid scintillator filled cells, and uses Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) ν + p -->e+ + n to detect reactor anti-neutrinos. Because the positron produced in IBD carries most of the ν energy, the response throughout the entire segmented detector to electron-like energy depositions must be determined with high precision via an extensive calibration program. To this end the detector is designed to allow for the insertion of both optical and radioactive sources to test each performance of cell individually without changing the optical response. In addition to these measures, cosmogenic sources will be used to probe energy response of the detector at high energies.

  10. Calibration of the active radiation detector for Spacelab-One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The flight models of the active radiation detector (ARD) for the ENV-01 environmental monitor were calibrated using gamma radiation. Measured sensitivities of the ion chambers were 6.1 + or - 0.3 micron rad per count for ARD S/N1, and 10.4 + or - 0.5 micron rad per count for ARD S/N2. Both were linear over the measured range 0.10 to 500 m/rad hour. The particle counters (proportional counters) were set to respond to approximately 85% of minimum ionizing particles of unit charge passing through them. These counters were also calibrated in the gamma field.

  11. Introduction to a calibration facility for hard X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xu; Li, XinQiao; Xie, YaNing; Liu, CongZhan; Zhang, Shu; Wu, JinJie; Zhang, Jian; Li, XuFang; Zhang, YiFei; Li, Bing; Hu, HongLiang; Chen, YuPeng; Jiang, Wei; Li, ZeShu

    2014-12-01

    This paper introduces the current configuration of the Hard X-ray Calibration Facility (HXCF) in 2014, which is used to calibrate the high energy X-ray detectors that will be onboard the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT) satellite, China's first astronomy satellite. The HXCF consists of an X-ray tube, a skid platform system, a double crystal monochromator, a "T" structure mechanism, a collimator, an adjustable beam, a background shielding box, as well as the box of the control system. The HXCF covers 15-100 keV energy band and has a high fraction of monochromatic light (exceeding 92 % at 15-100 keV) and good monochromaticity (1‰ level). The flux of the monochromatic light is around 104 photons cm-2 s-1. This HXCF could be used to calibrate the energy linearities, the energy resolutions and detection efficiencies of hard X-ray detectors.

  12. Construction, calibration, and testing of a four-detector photopolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, R. M. A.; Masetti, E.; Elminyawi, I. M.; Grosz, F. G.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-controlled four-detector photopolarimeter (FDP) has been constructed using four windowless planar-diffused Si photodiodes, operational amplifiers, an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter, and a personal computer with peripherals. A nonplanar light path is selected with incidence angles at the first three detectors of ˜65° and with rotations of ˜45° between the successive planes of incidence. The last detector, which is coated for minimum reflectance, intercepts the beam at a small angle and the residual light it reflects is dumped. A 1-mW He-Ne laser beam (λ=632.8 nm) passes through the polarizing optics of an ellipsometer to provide the polarization states needed for calibration and testing. With an optimum set of calibration states, the instrument matrix A is determined. The FDP is subsequently tested and found to correctly measure the normalized Stokes parameters of a large number of states with an average absolute error of ˜0.01, which is attributed to imperfections in the calibration optics. This first prototype instrument has a precision of ˜0.2%.

  13. Calibration of a PEM detector with depth of interactionmeasurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.-C.; Huber, J.S.; Moses, W.W.; Choong, W.-S.; Maltz, J.S.

    2004-06-03

    We present an in situ calibration technique for the LBNL positron emission mammography (PEM) detector module that is capable of measuring depth of interaction (DOI). The detector module consists of 64LSO crystals coupled on one end to a single photomultiplier tube (PMT) and on the opposite end to a 64 pixel array of silicon photodiodes (PD). The PMT provides an accurate timing pulse, the PDs identify the crystal of interaction, the sum provides a total energy signal and the /splGamma/=PD/(PD+PMT) ratio determines the depth of interaction. We calibrate using the /sup 176/Lu natural background radiation of the LSO crystals. We determine the relative gain (K) of the PMT and PD by minimizing the asymmetry of the /spl Gamma/ distribution. We determine the depth dependence from the width of the /spl Gamma/ distribution with optimal K. The performance of calibrated detector modules is evaluated by averaging results from 12 modules. The energy resolution is a function of depth ranging from 24 percent FWHM at the PD end to 51 percent FWHM at the PMT end, and the DOI resolution ranges from 6 mm FWHM at the PD end to 11 mm FWHM at the PMT end.

  14. Calorimetric calibration of pyroelectric gamma-radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Strakovskaya, R.Y.; Sras', A.G.

    1985-07-01

    A method has been devised for calibrating a pyroelectric dosimeter, which is based on comparing the readings obtained with it in a gamma-ray beam with the readings of an integral calorimeter under stationary conditions, with the latter previously calibrated from Joule heat. The calorimeter used was in the form of a closed shell, whose overall thermo-emf was independent of the spatial distribution of the heat sources in it, the value being proportional to the integral heat flux through the shell. Measurements were made not only with a quasiisotropic radiation field but also in directed fields. The overall error in calibrating the pyroelectric detectors by this method was less than or equal to plus or minus 10%.

  15. Extrapolated HPGe efficiency estimates based on a single calibration measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma spectroscopists often must analyze samples with geometries for which their detectors are not calibrated. The effort to experimentally recalibrate a detector for a new geometry can be quite time consuming, causing delay in reporting useful results. Such concerns have motivated development of a method for extrapolating HPGe efficiency estimates from an existing single measured efficiency. Overall, the method provides useful preliminary results for analyses that do not require exceptional accuracy, while reliably bracketing the credible range. The estimated efficiency {element_of} for a uniform sample in a geometry with volume V is extrapolated from the measured {element_of}{sub 0} of the base sample of volume V{sub 0}. Assuming all samples are centered atop the detector for maximum efficiency, {element_of} decreases monotonically as V increases about V{sub 0}, and vice versa. Extrapolation of high and low efficiency estimates {element_of}{sub h} and {element_of}{sub L} provides an average estimate of {element_of} = 1/2 [{element_of}{sub h} + {element_of}{sub L}] {plus_minus} 1/2 [{element_of}{sub h} {minus} {element_of}{sub L}] (general) where an uncertainty D{element_of} = 1/2 ({element_of}{sub h} {minus} {element_of}{sub L}] brackets limits for a maximum possible error. The {element_of}{sub h} and {element_of}{sub L} both diverge from {element_of}{sub 0} as V deviates from V{sub 0}, causing D{element_of} to increase accordingly. The above concepts guided development of both conservative and refined estimates for {element_of}.

  16. In-situ calibration of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, H.W.; Palladino, R.W.; Barnes, C.W.; Diesso, M.; Felt, J.S.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Ku, L.P.; Liu, Q.P.; Motley, R.W.; Murphy, H.B.; Murphy, J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Roberts, J.A.; Saito, T.; Strachan, J.D.; Waszazak, R.J.; Young, K.

    1990-03-01

    We report results of the TFTR fission detector calibration performed in December 1988. A NBS-traceable, remotely controlled {sup 252}Cf neutron source was moved toroidally through the TFTR vacuum vessel. Detection efficiencies for two {sup 235}U detectors were measured for 930 locations of the neutron point source in toroidal scans at 16 different major radii and vertical heights. These scans effectively simulated the volume-distributed plasma neutron source, and the volume-integrated detection efficiency was found to be insensitive to plasma position. The Campbell mode is useful due to its large overlap with the count rate mode and large dynamic range. The resulting absolute plasma neutron source calibration has an uncertainty of {plus minus} 13%. 21 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Understanding The GLAST Burst Monitor Detector Calibration: A Detailed Simulation Of The Calibration Including The Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Steinle, Helmut; Kienlin, Andreas von; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Lichti, Giselher; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Kippen, R. Marc; Hoover, Andrew S.

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is the secondary instrument on NASA's next Gamma-ray mission GLAST. It will enhance the capabilities of GLAST by locating and detecting cosmic gamma-ray bursts at lower energies by the use of 12 NaI detectors (energy range 10 keV to 1 MeV) and 2 BGO-detectors (energy range 150 keV to 30 MeV). GBM was built in a close collaboration between the MPE and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The angular and energy response of each GBM detector has been calibrated using various radioactive sources at different incidence angles relative to the detector in a laboratory environment at the MPE in 2005. To facilitate the understanding of the reconstruction of the detector response, a detailed simulation of the whole laboratory environment and the setup of the calibration source were performed. A modified version of the CERN GEANT 4 simulation software (provided by collaborators at the Los Alamos National Laboratory) was used.

  18. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  19. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2014-01-27

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  20. Using 220Rn to calibrate liquid noble gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Yamashita, M.; Takeda, A.; Kishimoto, K.; Moriyama, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we describe 220Rn calibration source that was developed for liquid noble gas detectors. The key advantage of this source is that it can provide 212Bi-212 Po consecutive events, which enables us to evaluate the vertex resolution of a detector at low energy by comparing low-energy events of 212Bi and corresponding higher-energy α-rays from 212Po. Since 220Rn is a noble gas, a hot metal getter can be used when introduced using xenon as the carrier gas. In addition, no long-life radioactive isotopes are left behind in the detector after the calibration is complete; this has clear advantage over the use of 222Rn which leaves longlife radioactivity, i.e., 210Pb. Using a small liquid xenon test chamber, we developed a system to introduce 220Rn via the xenon carrier gas; we demonstrated the successful introduction of 6 × 102 220Rn atoms in our test environment.

  1. CALET Data Processing and On-Orbit Detector Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaoka, Yoichi

    2016-07-01

    The CALET (CALorimetric Electron Telescope), launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in August 2015 and accumulating scientific data since October 2015, aims at long duration observations of high-energy cosmic rays onboard the ISS. The CALET detector features the very thick calorimeter of 30 radiation-length which consists of imaging and total absorption calorimeters (IMC and TASC respectively). It will directly measure the cosmic-ray electron spectrum in the energy range of 1 GeV-20 TeV with 2% energy resolution. In addition, the instrument has capabilities to measure the spectra of gamma-rays, protons and nuclei well into the TeV range. Precise pointing direction is determined with an attached Advanced Stellar Camera (ASC). To operate the CALET onboard ISS, the CALET Ground Support Equipment (CALET-GSE) and Waseda CALET Operations Center (WCOC) have been established at JAXA and Waseda Univ., respectively. Scientific operations of CALET are planned in the WCOC taking into account the orbital variations of geomagnetic rigidity cutoff. Scheduled command sequence is utilized to control CALET observation mode on orbit. A calibration data trigger mode, such as recording pedestal and penetrating particle events, a low-energy electron trigger mode operating at high geomagnetic latitude, and other dedicated trigger modes are scheduled around the ISS orbit while maintaining the maximum exposure to high-energy electrons. Scientific raw data called CALET Level 0 data are generated from raw telemetry packets in the CALET-GSE on an hourly basis by correcting time-order and by completing the data set using stored data taken during loss of real-time telemetry downlink. Level 0 data are processed to CALET Level 1 data in the WCOC by interpreting all the raw packets and building cosmic-ray event data as well as house keeping data. Level 1 data are then distributed to the collaboration for scientific data analysis. Level 1 data analysis is focused on the detector

  2. A new method for internal calibration of nuclear track detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oda, K.; Csige, I.; Henke, R. P.; Benton, E. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new technique is proposed for an internal calibration of a two-layer detector assembly. Spatially coincident pairs of conical tracks on one surface and overetched tracks on the adjacent surface are selected for measurement. Both the etch rate ratio and the particle range can be obtained from the minor and major diameters of the elliptical track and the radii of the circular tracks for two etching steps. This technique was applied to CR-39 detectors exposed to fast neutrons and those flown on a high altitude balloon in order to evaluate the proton response. An improvement by using multi-step etching was also carried out. It was found that not only a single set of the etch rate ratio and the range but also the response curve could be estimated in an extended region by analyzing combined growth curves.

  3. New libraries for simulating neutron scattering in dark matter detector calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan E.

    2014-03-01

    Dark matter detectors require calibrations of their energy scale and efficiency to detect nuclear recoils in the 1-50 keV range. Most calibrations use neutron scattering and require mcnp or geant4 simulations of neutron propagation through the detector. For most nuclei heavier than 16O, these simulation libraries ignore the contribution of resolved resonances to the neutron elastic differential cross section. For many isotopes and neutron energies of importance to dark matter detection, this invalid assumption can severely distort simulated nuclear recoil spectra. The correct angular distributions can be calculated from the resonance parameters using R-matrix formalism. A set of neutron scattering libraries with high-resolution angular distributions for mcnp and geant4 of 19F, 40Ar, 50,52Cr, 56Fe, 136Xe, and 206,207,208Pb is presented. An mcnpx library for simulating the production of low-energy neutrons in the 9Be(γ,n)8Be reaction is also presented. Example dark matter detector calibrations are simulated with the new libraries showing how detector sensitivity could be overestimated by factors of 2 by relying on existing mcnp and geant4 libraries.

  4. The Absolute Calibration of the HiRes Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. N.; Thomas, S. B.; HiRes Collaboration

    2003-07-01

    The HiRes experiment studies ultra high energy cosmic rays using the air fluorescence technique. The experiment uses large mirrors that collect the fluorescence light and fo cus it onto arrays of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs measure the intensity and time of arrival of the collected light. Our primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs uses a high stability (<1%) portable light source. This source is transferred from the lab to the field where it is employed as a standard candle to calibrate the 64 detectors (>16,000 PMTs). To determine the absolute response it is necessary to understand the absolute light output of this source. We have measured the source irradiance using a hybrid photo dio de system, two NIST calibrated photo-dio des, and by observing the photo electron statistics of the PMTs. 2. Introduction The goal of the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) project is to study cosmic rays at the highest energies. An ultra high energy cosmic ray entering the earth's atmosphere collides with atmospheric nuclei triggering the development of an Extensive Air Shower (EAS). The EAS emits fluorescence light as it develops. HiRes uses the air fluorescence signal to measure properties of the primary cosmic ray particle. The fundamental detector elements in HiRes are photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The light from an EAS is collected by large mirrors and fo cused into cameras each consisting of 256 PMTs [1]. Routine monitoring and calibration of the PMTs and associated electronics are crucial to the proper interpretation of the data. The primary system for in situ calibration of the PMTs involves the use of a high stability portable xenon flash lamp. The Roving Xenon Flasher (RXF) offers several advantages. The pulse-to-pulse variation in intensity is very small ˜0.3% and the stability over a night is better than 2%. The emission spectrum of the RXF is sufficiently broad to allow calibration over a wide range of wavelengths. It is also readily transported

  5. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  6. PMT calibration of a scintillation detector using primary scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, E. D. C.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Yahlali, N.; Pérez, J.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Martínez Lema, G.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J.; Monteiro, C. M. B.

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the calibration of PMTs in scintillation detectors, inducing single electron response on the PMT from primary scintillation produced by x-ray interaction. The results agree with those obtained by the commonly used single electron response (SER) method, which uses LED light pulses to induce the PMT SER. The use of the primary scintillation for PMT calibration will be convenient in situations where the PMT is already in situ, when it becomes difficult or even impossible to apply the SER method, e.g. in commercial sealed scintillator/PMT devices. Furthermore, we have experimentally investigated the possibility of fitting the high-charge tail of the PMT SER pulse-height distribution to an exponential function, inferring the PMT gain from the inverse of the exponent. The results of the exponential fit method agree with those obtained by the SER method for pulse-height distributions resulting from an average number of around 1.0 photoelectrons reaching the first dynode per light/scintillation pulse. The SER method has higher precision and, therefore, is used in a larger number of applications. Nevertheless, the exponential fit method will be useful in situations where the single photoelectron peak is under the background or noise peak and it may present an alternative, simple way, for relative gain calibration of PMT arrays as well as for monitoring the PMT gain variations.

  7. Dose Calibration of the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, C.

    2015-01-01

    The ISS-RAD instrument has been fabricated by Southwest Research Institute and delivered to NASA for flight to the ISS in late 2015 or early 2016. ISS-RAD is essentially two instruments that share a common interface to ISS. The two instruments are the Charged Particle Detector (CPD), which is very similar to the MSL-RAD detector on Mars, and the Fast Neutron Detector (FND), which is a boron-loaded plastic scintillator with readout optimized for the 0.5 to 10 MeV energy range. As the FND is completely new, it has been necessary to develop methodology to allow it to be used to measure the neutron dose and dose equivalent. This talk will focus on the methods developed and their implementation using calibration data obtained in quasi-monoenergetic (QMN) neutron fields at the PTB facility in Braunschweig, Germany. The QMN data allow us to determine an approximate response function, from which we estimate dose and dose equivalent contributions per detected neutron as a function of the pulse height. We refer to these as the "pSv per count" curves for dose equivalent and the "pGy per count" curves for dose. The FND is required to provide a dose equivalent measurement with an accuracy of ?10% of the known value in a calibrated AmBe field. Four variants of the analysis method were developed, corresponding to two different approximations of the pSv per count curve, and two different implementations, one for real-time analysis onboard ISS and one for ground analysis. We will show that the preferred method, when applied in either real-time or ground analysis, yields good accuracy for the AmBe field. We find that the real-time algorithm is more susceptible to chance-coincidence background than is the algorithm used in ground analysis, so that the best estimates will come from the latter.

  8. Fermi GBM: Main detector-level calibration results

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, E.; Kienlin, A. von; Lichti, G.; Steinle, H.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Fishman, G. J.; Horst, A. J. van der; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Hoover, A. S.; Kippen, R. M.; Krumrey, M.; Gerlach, M.

    2009-05-25

    One of the scientific objectives of NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was designed to detect and localize bursts for the Fermi mission. By means of an array of 12 NaI(Tl)(8 keV to 1 MeV) and two BGO (0.2 to 40 MeV) scintillation detectors, GBM extends the energy range (20 MeV to >300 GeV) of Fermi's main instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), into the traditional range of current GRB databases. The physical detector response of the GBM instrument to GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground individual detector calibration measurements. We present the principal instrument properties, which have been determined as a function of energy and angle, including the channel-energy relation, the energy resolution and the effective area.

  9. (Test, calibrate, and prepare a BGO photon detector system)

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, T.C.

    1990-10-19

    The traveler spent the year at CERN primarily to test, calibrate, and prepare a BGO photon detector system for use in the August 1990 run of WA80 with sulfur beams and for use in future planned runs with an expanded BGO detector. The BGO was used in test-beam runs in December 1989 and April--May 1990 and in the August data-taking run. The Midrapidity Calorimeters (MIRAC) were also prepared in a new geometry for the August run with a new transverse energy trigger. The traveler also continued to refine and carry out simulations of photon detector systems in present and future planned photon detection experiments. The traveler participated in several WA80 collaboration meetings, which were held at CERN throughout the period of stay. Invited talks were presented at the Workshop on High Resolution Electromagnetic Calorimetry in Stockholm, Sweden, November 9--11, 1989, and at the International Workshop on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, and Expert Systems for High-Energy and Nuclear Physics at Lyon, France, March 19--24, 1990. The traveler participated in an experiment to measure particle--particle correlations at 30-MeV/nucleon incident energies at the SARA facility in Grenoble from November 11--24, 1989.

  10. Calibration of diffusion barrier charcoal detectors using a semi-empirical expression.

    PubMed

    Montero Cabrera, M E; Sujo, L Colmenero; Villalba, L; Peinado, J Sáenz; Jiménez, A Cano; Miranda, A López; Peraza, E F Herrera

    2003-10-01

    Several calibration settings of diffusion barrier charcoal canister (DBCC) detectors for measuring radon concentration in air were studied. A set of functions and graphs were developed for relations between radon concentration in air and adsorbed activity in DBCC, when calibrated in small chambers. Both the integration time for 10% of DBCC of a batch, and the radon adsorption coefficient for the activated charcoal used in these detectors, were determined. Thus, a semi-empirical expression for detector calibration was applied. PMID:14522237

  11. Traceable calibration of a fibre-coupled superconducting nano-wire single photon detector using characterized synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ingmar; Klein, Roman M.; Werner, Lutz

    2014-12-01

    Radiometric calibrations of fibre-coupled single photon detectors are experiencing growing demand, especially at the telecommunication wavelengths. In this paper, the radiometric calibration of a fibre-coupled superconducting nano-wire single photon detector at the telecom wavelength 1.55 µm by means of well-characterized synchrotron radiation is described. This substitution method is based on the unique properties of synchrotron radiation and the Metrology Light Source, the dedicated electron storage ring of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, and is suitable for fibre-coupled single photon detectors. The Metrology Light Source is used as a light source with a high dynamic range of the radiant power to bridge the radiometric gap occurring in the transition from radiant power measurements and the counting of photons with single photon detectors. Very low uncertainties below 2% have been achieved in the measurement of the detection efficiency of a fibre-coupled superconducting nano-wire single photon detector.

  12. True coincidence summing correction and mathematical efficiency modeling of a well detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäderström, H.; Mueller, W. F.; Atrashkevich, V.; Adekola, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    True coincidence summing (TCS) occurs when two or more photons are emitted from the same decay of a radioactive nuclide and are detected within the resolving time of the gamma ray detector. TCS changes the net peak areas of the affected full energy peaks in the spectrum and the nuclide activity is rendered inaccurate if no correction is performed. TCS is independent of the count rate, but it is strongly dependent on the peak and total efficiency, as well as the characteristics of a given nuclear decay. The TCS effects are very prominent for well detectors because of the high efficiencies, and make accounting for TCS a necessity. For CANBERRA's recently released Small Anode Germanium (SAGe) well detector, an extension to CANBERRA's mathematical efficiency calibration method (In Situ Object Calibration Software or ISOCS, and Laboratory SOurceless Calibration Software or LabSOCS) has been developed that allows for calculation of peak and total efficiencies for SAGe well detectors. The extension also makes it possible to calculate TCS corrections for well detectors using the standard algorithm provided with CANBERRAS's Spectroscopy software Genie 2000. The peak and total efficiencies from ISOCS/LabSOCS have been compared to MCNP with agreements within 3% for peak efficiencies and 10% for total efficiencies for energies above 30 keV. A sample containing Ra-226 daughters has been measured within the well and analyzed with and without TCS correction and applying the correction factor shows significant improvement of the activity determination for the energy range 46-2447 keV. The implementation of ISOCS/LabSOCS for well detectors offers a powerful tool for efficiency calibration for these detectors. The automated algorithm to correct for TCS effects in well detectors makes nuclide specific calibration unnecessary and offers flexibility in carrying out gamma spectral analysis.

  13. FOUR PI CALIBRATION AND MODELING OF A BARE GERMANIUM DETECTOR IN A CYLINDRICAL FIELD SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R.; Young, J.

    2011-04-29

    In reference 1 the authors described {gamma}-ray holdup assay of a Mossbauer spectroscopy instrument where they utilized two axial symmetric cylindrical shell acquisitions and two disk source acquisitions to determine Am-241 and Np-237 contamination. The measured contents of the two species were determined using a general detector efficiency calibration taken from a 12-inch point source.2 The authors corrected the raw spectra for container absorption as well as for geometry corrections to transform the calibration curve to the applicable axial symmetric cylindrical source - and disk source - of contamination. The authors derived the geometry corrections with exact calculus that are shown in equations (1) and (2) of our Experimental section. A cylindrical shell (oven source) acquisition configuration is described in reference 3, where the authors disclosed this configuration to gain improved sensitivity for holdup measure of U-235 in a ten-chamber oven. The oven was a piece of process equipment used in the Savannah River Plant M-Area Uranium Fuel Fabrication plant for which a U-235 holdup measurement was necessary for its decontamination and decommissioning in 2003.4 In reference 4 the authors calibrated a bare NaI detector for these U-235 holdup measurements. In references 5 and 6 the authors calibrated a bare HpGe detector in a cylindrical shell configuration for improved sensitivity measurements of U-235 in other M-Area process equipment. Sensitivity was vastly improved compared to a close field view of the sample, with detection efficiency of greater than 1% for the 185.7-keV {gamma}-ray from U-235. In none of references 3 - 7 did the authors resolve the exact calculus descriptions of the acquisition configurations. Only the empirical efficiency for detection of the 185.7-keV photon from U-235 decay was obtained. Not until the 2010 paper of reference 1 did the authors derive a good theoretical description of the flux of photons onto the front face of a detector

  14. Efficient nucleus detector in histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Vink, J P; Van Leeuwen, M B; Van Deurzen, C H M; De Haan, G

    2013-02-01

    In traditional cancer diagnosis, (histo)pathological images of biopsy samples are visually analysed by pathologists. However, this judgment is subjective and leads to variability among pathologists. Digital scanners may enable automated objective assessment, improved quality and reduced throughput time. Nucleus detection is seen as the corner stone for a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. In this paper, we propose an efficient nucleus detector designed with machine learning. We applied colour deconvolution to reconstruct each applied stain. Next, we constructed a large feature set and modified AdaBoost to create two detectors, focused on different characteristics in appearance of nuclei. The proposed modification of AdaBoost enables inclusion of the computational cost of each feature during selection, thus improving the computational efficiency of the resulting detectors. The outputs of the two detectors are merged by a globally optimal active contour algorithm to refine the border of the detected nuclei. With a detection rate of 95% (on average 58 incorrectly found objects per field-of-view) based on 51 field-of-view images of Her2 immunohistochemistry stained breast tissue and a complete analysis in 1 s per field-of-view, our nucleus detector shows good performance and could enable a range of applications in automated assessment of (histo)pathological images. PMID:23252774

  15. The development of an electrochemical technique for in situ calibrating of combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Lantz, J. B.; Schubert, F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A program to determine the feasibility of performing in situ calibration of combustible gas detectors was successfully completed. Several possible techniques for performing the in situ calibration were proposed. The approach that showed the most promise involved the use of a miniature water vapor electrolysis cell for the generation of hydrogen within the flame arrestor of a combustible gas detector to be used for the purpose of calibrating the combustible gas detectors. A preliminary breadboard of the in situ calibration hardware was designed, fabricated and assembled. The breadboard equipment consisted of a commercially available combustible gas detector, modified to incorporate a water vapor electrolysis cell, and the instrumentation required for controlling the water vapor electrolysis and controlling and calibrating the combustible gas detector. The results showed that operation of the water vapor electrolysis at a given current density for a specific time period resulted in the attainment of a hydrogen concentration plateau within the flame arrestor of the combustible gas detector.

  16. An Efficient Ant-Based Edge Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydın, Doğan

    An efficient ant-based edge detector is presented. It is based on the distribution of ants on an image, ants try to find possible edges by using a state transition function based on 5x5 edge structures. Visual comparisons show that the proposed method gives finer details and thinner edges at lesser computational times when compared to earlier ant-based approaches. When compared to standard edge detectors, it shows robustness to Gaussian and Salt & Pepper noise and provides finer details than others with same parameter set in both clear and noisy images.

  17. Calibration of an in-situ BEGe detector using semi-empirical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Agrafiotis, K; Karfopoulos, K L; Anagnostakis, M J

    2011-08-01

    In the case of a nuclear or radiological accident a rapid estimation of the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the potential radioactive pollution is needed. For aerial releases the radioactive pollutants are finally deposited on the ground forming a surface source. In this case, in-situ γ-ray spectrometry is a powerful tool for the determination of ground pollution. In this work, the procedure followed at the Nuclear Engineering Department of the National Technical University of Athens (NED-NTUA) for the calibration of an in-situ Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector, for the determination of gamma-emitting radionuclides deposited on the ground surface, is presented. BEGe detectors due to their technical characteristics are suitable for the analysis of photons in a wide energy region. Two different techniques were applied for the full-energy peak efficiency calibration of the BEGe detector in the energy region 60-1600 keV: Full-energy peak efficiencies determined using the two methods agree within statistical uncertainties. PMID:21193317

  18. Calibration of well-type NaI(Tl) detector using a point sources measured out the detector well at different axial distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouda, M. M.; Badawi, M. S.; El-Khatib, A. M.; Mohamed, M. M.; Thabet, A. A.; Abbas, M. I.

    2015-03-01

    The high efficiency of well-type detector is one of its important advantages, when it is used to determine the low level activity of radiation in many different fields. In the present work the full-energy peak efficiency of 3"× 3" NaI(Tl) well-type scintillation detector was calculated. The calculations were based on the efficiency transfer principle and a new straightforward analytical definition to compute the effective solid angle between a point source and the detector surfaces Moreover, the effective solid angle ratio subtended by the well-type detector and a point source located out the detector cavity at various distances was calculated, the attenuation of the photon by the source-detector system [detectorendcap,deadlayer and holder material] was considered and determined. This method is easily useful in setting up the efficiency calibration curve for well-type detectors when the source is outside. The computed efficiency values are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental data obtained in the case of radiating γ -ray standard point sources.

  19. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Tobin, , M.

    2016-07-01

    An automatic real-time alignment and calibration strategy of the LHCb detector was developed for the Run II. Thanks to the online calibration, tighter event selection criteria can be used in the trigger. Furthermore, the online calibration facilitates the use of hadronic particle identification using the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors at the trigger level. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from both the operational and physics performance points of view. Specific challenges of this novel configuration are discussed, as well as the working procedures of the framework and its performance.

  20. Capabilities, Calibration, and Impact of the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitgab, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In the current NASA crew radiation health risk assessment framework, estimates for the neutron contributions to crew radiation exposure largely rely on simulated data with sizeable uncertainties due to the lack of experimental measurements inside the ISS. Integrated in the ISS-RAD instrument, the ISS-RAD Fast Neutron Detector (FND) will deploy to the ISS on one of the next cargo supply missions. Together with the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector, the FND will perform, for the first time, routine and precise direct neutron measurements inside the ISS between 0.5 and 80 MeV. The measurements will close the NASA Medical Operations Requirement to monitor neutrons inside the ISS and impact crew radiation health risk assessments by reducing uncertainties on the neutron contribution to crew exposure, enabling more efficient mission planning. The presentation will focus on the FND detection mechanism, calibration results and expectations about the FND's interaction with the mixed radiation field inside the ISS.

  1. Determination of spectrometer-detector parameters from calibration spectra and the use of the parameters in spectrometer calibrations.

    PubMed

    Holy, John A

    2004-10-01

    The grating equation is used to generate quadratic calibration equations for multichannel detectors with perpendicular and tilted focal planes. The quadratic coefficients are not independent and contain terms that are used to solve for spectrometer-detector parameters. The parameters can be calculated from a quadratic fit at one spectrometer position, but more accurate values can be obtained from quadratic fits at two spectrometer positions. The calculations show that the detector focal plane is tilted by about two degrees. Once values for the spectrometer-detector parameters are obtained from calibrations using at least three lines at one or two spectrometer positions, only one calibration line at any spectrometer position is required to obtain accuracies on the order of 0.1 cm(-1) over a several thousand wavenumber range. The main cause of spectrometer drift is a change in the diffraction angle and/or the spectrometer included angle. This drift is almost totally compensated by the one-line calibration, which adjusts the diffraction angle. A neon pen lamp is used to generate the calibration spectra. Using standard air wavelengths compared to true wavelengths can produce calibration errors of 0.1 to 0.6 cm(-1); the magnitude depends on local conditions and how the laser wavelength is treated. PMID:18070401

  2. The determination of the efficiency of a Compton suppressed HPGe detector using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    McNamara, A L; Heijnis, H; Fierro, D; Reinhard, M I

    2012-04-01

    A Compton suppressed high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector is well suited to the analysis of low levels of radioactivity in environmental samples. The difference in geometry, density and composition of environmental calibration standards (e.g. soil) can contribute to excessive experimental uncertainty to the measured efficiency curve. Furthermore multiple detectors, like those used in a Compton suppressed system, can add complexities to the calibration process. Monte Carlo simulations can be a powerful complement in calibrating these types of detector systems, provided enough physical information on the system is known. A full detector model using the Geant4 simulation toolkit is presented and the system is modelled in both the suppressed and unsuppressed mode of operation. The full energy peak efficiencies of radionuclides from a standard source sample is calculated and compared to experimental measurements. The experimental results agree relatively well with the simulated values (within ∼5 - 20%). The simulations show that coincidence losses in the Compton suppression system can cause radionuclide specific effects on the detector efficiency, especially in the Compton suppressed mode of the detector. Additionally since low energy photons are more sensitive to small inaccuracies in the computational detector model than high energy photons, large discrepancies may occur at energies lower than ∼100 keV. PMID:22304994

  3. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σE = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  4. Low-temperature light detectors: Neganov-Luke amplification and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaila, C.; Ciemniak, C.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Gütlein, A.; Kemmer, J.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Pfister, S.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Sivers, M. v.; Strauss, R.; Westphal, W.; Wiest, F.

    2012-09-01

    The simultaneous measurement of phonons and scintillation light induced by incident particles in a scintillating crystal such as CaWO4 is a powerful technique for the active rejection of background induced by γ's and β's and even neutrons in direct Dark Matter searches. However, ≲1% of the energy deposited in a CaWO4 crystal is detected as light. Thus, very sensitive light detectors are needed for an efficient event-by-event background discrimination. Due to the Neganov-Luke effect, the threshold of low-temperature light detectors based on semiconducting substrates can be improved significantly by drifting the photon-induced electron-hole pairs in an applied electric field. We present measurements with low-temperature light detectors based on this amplification mechanism. The Neganov-Luke effect makes it possible to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of our light detectors by a factor of ˜9 corresponding to an energy threshold of ˜21 eV. We also describe a method for an absolute energy calibration using a light-emitting diode.

  5. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S. Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D.; Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-07-15

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  6. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mirfayzi, S R; Kar, S; Ahmed, H; Krygier, A G; Green, A; Alejo, A; Clarke, R; Freeman, R R; Fuchs, J; Jung, D; Kleinschmidt, A; Morrison, J T; Najmudin, Z; Nakamura, H; Norreys, P; Oliver, M; Roth, M; Vassura, L; Zepf, M; Borghesi, M

    2015-07-01

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil. PMID:26233373

  7. Calibration with MCNP of NaI detector for the determination of natural radioactivity levels in the field.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, Giorgia; Tositti, Laura; Mostacci, Domiziano; Baré, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    In view of assessing natural radioactivity with on-site quantitative gamma spectrometry, efficiency calibration of NaI(Tl) detectors is investigated. A calibration based on Monte Carlo simulation of detector response is proposed, to render reliable quantitative analysis practicable in field campaigns. The method is developed with reference to contact geometry, in which measurements are taken placing the NaI(Tl) probe directly against the solid source to be analyzed. The Monte Carlo code used for the simulations was MCNP. Experimental verification of the calibration goodness is obtained by comparison with appropriate standards, as reported. On-site measurements yield a quick quantitative assessment of natural radioactivity levels present ((40)K, (238)U and (232)Th). On-site gamma spectrometry can prove particularly useful insofar as it provides information on materials from which samples cannot be taken. PMID:26913974

  8. Instructions for calibrating gamma detectors using the Canberra-Nuclear Data Genie Gamma Spectroscopy System

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    A straight forward protocol provides a way to guide the calibration of a gamma detector for a particular geometry and material. Several programs have used the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to count a variety of large environmental samples contained in several unique geometries. The equipment and calibration requirements needed to analyze these types of samples are explained. This document describes the calibration protocol that has been developed and describes how it is used to calibrate the detectors.

  9. Absolute calibration of photostimulable image plate detectors used as (0.5-20 MeV) high-energy proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Mancić, A; Fuchs, J; Antici, P; Gaillard, S A; Audebert, P

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the absolute calibration of photostimulable image plates (IPs) used as proton detectors is presented. The calibration is performed in a wide range of proton energies (0.5-20 MeV) by exposing simultaneously the IP and calibrated detectors (radiochromic films and solid state detector CR39) to a source of broadband laser-accelerated protons, which are spectrally resolved. The final result is a calibration curve that enables retrieving the proton number from the IP signal. PMID:18681694

  10. Calibration of diffusion barrier charcoal detectors and application to radon sampling in dwellings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, M. E. M.; Sujo, L. C.; Villalba, L.; Peinado, J. S.; Jimenez, A. C.; Baca, A. M.; Gandara, S. D.; Villalobos, M. R.; Miranda, A. L.; Peraza, E. F. H.

    2003-10-01

    Some calibration conditions of diffusion barrier charcoal canister (DBCC) detectors for measuring radon concentration in air were studied. A series of functional expressions and graphs were developed to describe relationship between radon concentration in air and the activity adsorbed in DBCC, when placed in small chambers. A semi-empirical expression for the DBCC calibration was obtained, based on the detector integration time and the adsorption coefficient of radon on activated charcoal. Both, the integration time for 10% of DBCC of the same batch, and the adsorption coefficient of radon for the activated charcoal used in these detectors, were experimentally determined. Using these values as the calibration parameters, a semi-empirical calibration function was used for the interpretation of the radon activities in the detectors used for sampling more than 200 dwellings in the major cities of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico.

  11. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  12. Calibration and Readiness of the ISS-RAD Charged Particle Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, R.

    2015-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is an intravehicular energetic particle detector designed to measure a broad spectrum of charged particle and neutron radiation unique to the ISS radiation environment. In this presentation, a summary of calibration and readiness of the RAD Sensor Head (RSH) - also referred to as the Charged Particle Detector (CPD) - for ISS will be presented. Calibration for the RSH consists of p, He, C, O, Si, and Fe ion data collected at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) and Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). The RSH consists of four detectors used in measuring the spectroscopy of charged particles - A, B, C, and D; high-energy neutral particles and charged particles are measured in E; and the last detector - F - is an anti-coincidence detector. A, B, and C are made from Si; D is made from BGO; E and F are made from EJ260XL plastic scintillator.

  13. A highly efficient neutron time-of-flight detector for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, N.; Yamaguchi, K.; Yamagajo, T.; Nakano, T.; Kasai, T.; Urano, T.; Azechi, H.; Nakai, S.; Iida, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed the highly efficient neutron detector system MANDALA for the inertial-confinement-fusion experiment. The MANDALA system consists of 842 elements plastic scintillation detectors and data acquisition electronics. The detection level is the yield of 1.2×105 for 2.5 MeV and 1×105 for 14.1 MeV neutrons (with 100 detected hits). We have calibrated the intrinsic detection efficiencies of the detector elements using a neutron generator facility. Timing calibration and integrity test of the system were also carried out with a 60Co γ ray source. MANDALA system was applied to the implosion experiments at the GEKKO XII laser facility. The integrity test was carried out by implosion experiments.

  14. Energy Calibration of a CdTe Photon Counting Spectral Detector with Consideration of its Non-Convergent Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Seok; Kang, Dong-Goo; Jin, Seung Oh; Kim, Insoo; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Fast and accurate energy calibration of photon counting spectral detectors (PCSDs) is essential for their biomedical applications to identify and characterize bio-components or contrast agents in tissues. Using the x-ray tube voltage as a reference for energy calibration is known to be an efficient method, but there has been no consideration in the energy calibration of non-convergent behavior of PCSDs. We observed that a single pixel mode (SPM) CdTe PCSD based on Medipix-2 shows some non-convergent behaviors in turning off the detector elements when a high enough threshold is applied to the comparator that produces a binary photon count pulse. More specifically, the detector elements are supposed to stop producing photon count pulses once the threshold reaches a point of the highest photon energy determined by the tube voltage. However, as the x-ray exposure time increases, the threshold giving 50% of off pixels also increases without converging to a point. We established a method to take account of the non-convergent behavior in the energy calibration. With the threshold-to-photon energy mapping function established by the proposed method, we could better identify iodine component in a phantom consisting of iodine and other components. PMID:27077856

  15. Energy Calibration of a CdTe Photon Counting Spectral Detector with Consideration of its Non-Convergent Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Seok; Kang, Dong-Goo; Jin, Seung Oh; Kim, Insoo; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2016-01-01

    Fast and accurate energy calibration of photon counting spectral detectors (PCSDs) is essential for their biomedical applications to identify and characterize bio-components or contrast agents in tissues. Using the x-ray tube voltage as a reference for energy calibration is known to be an efficient method, but there has been no consideration in the energy calibration of non-convergent behavior of PCSDs. We observed that a single pixel mode (SPM) CdTe PCSD based on Medipix-2 shows some non-convergent behaviors in turning off the detector elements when a high enough threshold is applied to the comparator that produces a binary photon count pulse. More specifically, the detector elements are supposed to stop producing photon count pulses once the threshold reaches a point of the highest photon energy determined by the tube voltage. However, as the x-ray exposure time increases, the threshold giving 50% of off pixels also increases without converging to a point. We established a method to take account of the non-convergent behavior in the energy calibration. With the threshold-to-photon energy mapping function established by the proposed method, we could better identify iodine component in a phantom consisting of iodine and other components. PMID:27077856

  16. Calibration method for spectral responsivity of infrared detector based on blackbody at multiple temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. F.; Shao, Z. F.; Wu, Y. Q.

    2015-08-01

    The spectral responsivity is one of the most important technical indicators of infrared detector which has an important significance for radiation thermometry and emissivity measurement. Using a blackbody radiation at multiple temperatures, the calibration for spectral responsivity of the infrared detector is proposed. With the Planck's law, the spectral radiance of blackbody at the different temperature is calculated. The detector captures the radiation and generates output values each of those is the function of spectral responsivity, spectral radiance and environmental radiation. Calibration equation is established by means of the calculated radiance and output values. By solving the equations based on principle of least squares, the calibration of spectral responsivity is implemented. From the comparison experiment of measuring the radiance of blackbody at 850K, radiance value measured by the MCT detector has a good consistency with the theoretical data.

  17. Calibration of modified Liulin detector for cosmic radiation measurements on-board aircraft.

    PubMed

    Kyselová, D; Ambrožová, I; Krist, P; Kubančák, J; Uchihori, Y; Kitamura, H; Ploc, O

    2015-06-01

    The annual effective doses of aircrew members often exceed the limit of 1 mSv for the public due to the increased level of cosmic radiation at the flight altitudes, and thus, it is recommended to monitor them. Aircrew dosimetry is usually performed using special computer programs mostly based on results of Monte Carlo simulations. Contemporary, detectors are used mostly for validation of these computer codes, verification of effective dose calculations and for research purposes. One of such detectors is active silicon semiconductor deposited energy spectrometer Liulin. Output quantities of measurement with the Liulin detector are the absorbed dose in silicon D and the ambient dose equivalent H*(10); to determine it, two calibrations are necessary. The purpose of this work was to develop a calibration methodology that can be used to convert signal from the detector to D independently on calibration performed at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility in Chiba, Japan. PMID:25979744

  18. TU-F-18A-05: An X-Ray Fluorescence Technique for Energy Calibration of Photon-Counting Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, H; Cho, H; Molloi, S; Barber, W; Iwanczyk, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration of a Si strip photon-counting detector by using the x-ray fluorescence technique. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on Si strips. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing Ag, I, Ba, and Gd, were placed in small plastic aliquots with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known energies for materials. The energy resolution was derived from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the fluorescence peaks. In addition, the angular dependence of the recorded fluorescence spectra was studied at 30°, 60°, and 120°. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The recorded pulse height was calibrated with respect to photon energy and the gain and offset values were calculated to be 7.0 mV/keV and −69.3 mV, respectively. Negligible variation in energy calibration was observed among the four energy thresholds. The variation among different pixels was estimated to be approximately 1 keV. The energy resolution of the detector was estimated to be 7.9% within the investigated energy range. Conclusion: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the detector. The proposed x-ray fluorescence technique provides an accurate and efficient way to calibrate the energy response of a photon-counting detector.

  19. Calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors and the effect on measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gookin, Ben

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a high-energy cosmic ray observatory located in Malargue, Mendoza, Argentina. It is used to probe the highest energy particles in the Universe, with energies greater than 1018 eV, which strike the Earth constantly. The observatory uses two techniques to observe the air shower initiated by a cosmic ray: a surface detector composed of an array of more than 1600 water Cherenkov tanks covering 3000 km2, and 27 nitrogen fluorescence telescopes overlooking this array. The Cherenkov detectors run all the time and therefore have high statistics on the air showers. The fluorescence detectors run only on clear moonless nights, but observe the longitudinal development of the air shower and make a calorimetric measure of its energy. The energy measurement from the the fluorescence detectors is used to cross calibrate the surface detectors, and makes the measurements made by the Auger Observatory surface detector highly model-independent. The calibration of the fluorescence detectors is then of the utmost importance to the measurements of the Observatory. Described here are the methods of the absolute and multi-wavelength calibration of the fluorescence detectors, and improvements in each leading to a reduction in calibration uncertainties to 4% and 3.5%, respectively. Also presented here are the effects of introducing a new, and more detailed, multi-wavelength calibration on the fluorescence detector energy estimation and the depth of the air shower maximum measurement, leading to a change of 1+-0.03% in the absolute energy scale at 1018 eV, and a negligible change in the measurement on shower maximum.

  20. Application and calibration of a simple position detector for a dust accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Katharina A.; Srama, Ralf; Auer, Siegfried; Bugiel, Sebastian; Grün, Eberhard; Kempf, Sascha; Xie, Jianfeng

    2013-11-01

    A newly developed position sensitive detector was implemented in the beam line of the Heidelberg dust accelerator. By charge induction, the detector enables the position of a dust particle to be determined without affecting its motion. The detector consists of four pairs of parallel plates, connected to a single common charge amplifier. The charge induced on the plates varies as a function of the dust particle trajectory, producing simple, easily interpreted signals. Using a segmented target installed in the beam line for a second independent measure of the trajectory, the position detector has been calibrated, allowing the detector signal to be mapped to a dust particle position. The resulting calibration curve indicates that the detector's position accuracy is approximately 0.14 mm, based on an average SNR of 700 for dust particles passing through the centre of the detector. The minimum dust charge for reliable detection was found to be about 1.1 fC. A detector simulation was used to produce a calibration curve that confirms the experimental results.

  1. Evaluation of ANGLE(R), a code for calculating HPGe detector efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Homan, Victoria M

    2010-10-25

    This paper evaluates the ANGLE(reg sign) software package, an advanced efficiency calibration software for high purity germanium detectors that is distributed by ORTEC(reg sign). ANGLE(reg sign) uses a semi-empirical approach, by way of the efficiency transfer method, based on the calculated effective solid angle. This approach would have an advantage over the traditional relative and stochastic methods by decreasing the chances for systematic errors and reducing sensitivity to uncertainties in detector parameters. For experimental confirmation, a closed-end coaxial HPGe detector was used with sample geometries frequently encountered at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The results obtained were sufficient for detector-source configurations which included intercepting layers of plexiglass and carbon graphite, but somewhat insufficient for bare source configurations.

  2. Development of an in situ calibration technique for combustible gas detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumar, J. W.; Wynveen, R. A.; Lance, N., Jr.; Lantz, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an in situ calibration procedure for combustible gas detectors (CGD). The CGD will be a necessary device for future space vehicles as many subsystems in the Environmental Control/Life Support System utilize or produce hydrogen (H2) gas. Existing calibration techniques are time-consuming and require support equipment such as an environmental chamber and calibration gas supply. The in situ calibration procedure involves utilization of a water vapor electrolysis cell for the automatic in situ generation of a H2/air calibration mixture within the flame arrestor of the CGD. The development effort concluded with the successful demonstration of in situ span calibrations of a CGD.

  3. Testing and Calibration of Novel Detectors for Nuclear and Plasma Physics Diagnostic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zaheer; Haugh, Mike; Tellinghuisen, Jim; Glebov, Vladimir; Roberts, Sam; Stoeckl, Christian; Sangster, Craig

    2008-10-01

    Calibrated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond diodes, X-ray diodes (XRDs), and PIN diodes are used in nuclear and plasma physics diagnostic experiments, such as those conducted at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Calibrations of these diodes are conducted at the OMEGA Laser at the Lab for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester, as well as at the Titan Laser in the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. The OMEGA Laser is a 30-kilojoule one-nanosecond system designed for inertial confinement fusion and nuclear physics research. The Titan Laser is a picosecond system designed for plasma and X-ray studies. In addition, National Security Technologies, LLC, (NSTec) has built a new hard X-ray calibration facility (the ``HEX Laboratory''), where X-ray detector systems are also calibrated. In this paper we will present our methods of absolute and relative calibration, results of calibration, and the capabilities of the HEX Laboratory.

  4. Establishing a standard calibration methodology for MOSFET detectors in computed tomography dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L.; Kaufman, R. A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: The use of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors for patient dosimetry has increased by {approx}25% since 2005. Despite this increase, no standard calibration methodology has been identified nor calibration uncertainty quantified for the use of MOSFET dosimetry in CT. This work compares three MOSFET calibration methodologies proposed in the literature, and additionally investigates questions relating to optimal time for signal equilibration and exposure levels for maximum calibration precision. Methods: The calibration methodologies tested were (1) free in-air (FIA) with radiographic x-ray tube, (2) FIA with stationary CT x-ray tube, and (3) within scatter phantom with rotational CT x-ray tube. Each calibration was performed at absorbed dose levels of 10, 23, and 35 mGy. Times of 0 min or 5 min were investigated for signal equilibration before or after signal read out. Results: Calibration precision was measured to be better than 5%-7%, 3%-5%, and 2%-4% for the 10, 23, and 35 mGy respective dose levels, and independent of calibration methodology. No correlation was demonstrated for precision and signal equilibration time when allowing 5 min before or after signal read out. Differences in average calibration coefficients were demonstrated between the FIA with CT calibration methodology 26.7 {+-} 1.1 mV cGy{sup -1} versus the CT scatter phantom 29.2 {+-} 1.0 mV cGy{sup -1} and FIA with x-ray 29.9 {+-} 1.1 mV cGy{sup -1} methodologies. A decrease in MOSFET sensitivity was seen at an average change in read out voltage of {approx}3000 mV. Conclusions: The best measured calibration precision was obtained by exposing the MOSFET detectors to 23 mGy. No signal equilibration time is necessary to improve calibration precision. A significant difference between calibration outcomes was demonstrated for FIA with CT compared to the other two methodologies. If the FIA with a CT calibration methodology was used to create calibration

  5. Understanding the detector behavior through Montecarlo and calibration studies in view of the SOX measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminata, A.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cribier, M.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, T.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jonquères, N.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Veyssiere, C.; Vishneva, A.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    Borexino is an unsegmented neutrino detector operating at LNGS in central Italy. The experiment has shown its performances through its unprecedented accomplishments in the solar and geoneutrino detection. These performances make it an ideal tool to accomplish a state- of-the-art experiment able to test the existence of sterile neutrinos (SOX experiment). For both the solar and the SOX analysis, a good understanding of the detector response is fundamental. Consequently, calibration campaigns with radioactive sources have been performed over the years. The calibration data are of extreme importance to develop an accurate Monte Carlo code. This code is used in all the neutrino analyses. The Borexino-SOX calibration techniques and program and the advances on the detector simulation code in view of the start of the SOX data taking are presented. 1

  6. Compton-edge-based energy calibration of double-sided silicon strip detectors in Compton camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hee; Park, Jin Hyung; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Ju Hahn; Lee, Chun Sik; Sung Lee, Jae

    2011-05-01

    Accurate energy calibration of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) is very important, but challenging for high-energy photons. In the present study, the calibration was improved by considering the Compton edge additionally to the existing low-energy calibration points. The result, indeed, was very encouraging. The energy-calibration errors were dramatically reduced, from, on average, 15.5% and 16.9% to 0.47% and 0.31% for the 356 (133Ba) and 662 keV (137Cs) peaks, respectively. The imaging resolution of a double-scattering-type Compton camera using DSSDs as the scatterer detectors, for a 22Na point-like source, also was improved, by ˜9%.

  7. Calibration of PICO Bubble Chamber Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Miaotianzi; PICO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PICO Collaboration builds bubble chambers for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter. I will present the suite of calibration experiments performed to measure the sensitivity of these chambers to nuclear recoils (the expected WIMP signal) and to gamma rays (a common background to the WIMP signal). These calibrations include measurements with a 10-ml C3F8 bubble chamber at Northwestern University and with a 30-ml C3F8 bubble chamber deployed in the University of Montreal's tandem Van de Graaf facility, giving the bubble chamber response to a variety of gamma rays, broad-spectrum neutron sources, and mono-energetic low energy neutrons. I will compare our measured sensitivities to those predicted by a simple thermodynamic model and will show how the results impact our ability to detect dark matter, with a focus on light WIMP searches. Supported by DOE Grant: DE-SC0012161.

  8. Satellite Calibration With LED Detectors at Mud Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiller, Jonathan D.

    2005-01-01

    Earth-monitoring instruments in orbit must be routinely calibrated in order to accurately analyze the data obtained. By comparing radiometric measurements taken on the ground in conjunction with a satellite overpass, calibration curves are derived for an orbiting instrument. A permanent, automated facility is planned for Mud Lake, Nevada (a large, homogeneous, dry lakebed) for this purpose. Because some orbiting instruments have low resolution (250 meters per pixel), inexpensive radiometers using LEDs as sensors are being developed to array widely over the lakebed. LEDs are ideal because they are inexpensive, reliable, and sense over a narrow bandwidth. By obtaining and averaging widespread data, errors are reduced and long-term surface changes can be more accurately observed.

  9. Calibration of a DSSSD detector with radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Guadilla, V.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Rubio, B.

    2013-06-10

    The energy calibration of a DSSSD is carried out with the spectra produced by a {sup 207}Bi conversion electron source, a {sup 137}Cs gamma source and a {sup 239}Pu/{sup 241}Am/{sup 244}Cm triple alpha source, as well as employing a precision pulse generator in the whole dynamic range. Multiplicity and coincidence of signals in different strips for the same event are also studied.

  10. Calibration and monitoring of the air fluorescence detector for the Telescope Array experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuno, H.; Azuma, R.; Fukushima, M.; Higashide, Y.; Inoue, N.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kawana, S.; Murano, Y.; Ogio, S.; Sakurai, N.; Sagawa, H.; Shibata, T.; Takeda, M.; Taketa, A.; Tameda, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Udo, S.; Yoshida, S.; Telescope Array Collaboration

    The air fluorescence detectors (FDs) of the Telescope Array (TA) experiment have been constructed in a dessert of Utah, USA. We can measure the longitudinal developments of EASs directly with the FDs by detecting air fluorescence lights and determine the primary energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. In order for accurate observation and measurements of EASs, elaborate detector calibrations and monitoring systems are required. We will present the result of calibration and monitoring systems for the reflectance and curvature radius of segment mirrors, the characteristics of PMT (absolute gain, linearity, temperature dependence of gain), and the uniformity of the camera surface, etc.

  11. On the calibration of a single channel cosmic ray particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrabi, A. H.; Alghamdi, A. S.; Alotaibi, R.; Almutari, M. M.; Garawi, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    Cosmic Ray (CR) variation measurements have been extensively conducted using different type of detectors sensing different components of CR and at different locations around the world. We have constructed and, operated a single channel muon detector in the central part of Saudi Arabia. The main goal of this detector is to record the intensity of cosmic rays on different time scales and investigate their correlations with environment parameters. This detector is expected to fill the gap between neutron monitors and muon telescopes that exist around the world. In this paper, the technical aspects of this detector will be briefly discussed. Calibration procedures conducted to characterize and improve its performance will be detailed. These include the effect of the detector geometry and the internal surface coating.

  12. Timing calibration and synchronization of surface and fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, P.; Bellido, J.; Bertou, Xavier; Covault, C.E.; Fick, B.E.; Gemmeke, H.; Kleifges, M.; Mostafa, M.; Menshikov, A.; Meyer, F.; Pryke, C.; Sommers, P.; Vanderpan, E.; Vernotte, F.; Wiencke, L.

    2005-08-01

    Reconstruction of cosmic ray arrival directions for Surface Detectors (SD) and Fluorescence Detectors (FD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory requires accurate timing (25 nanoseconds or better) between measurements at individual detectors and instrument triggers. Timing systems for both SD and FD are based on Motorola Oncore UT+ GPS receivers installed into custom-built time-tagging circuits that are calibrated in the laboratory to a statistical precision of better than 15 ns. We describe timing calibration and synchronization methods applied in the field for both the SD and the FD systems in four areas: (1) checks of timing offsets within the SD using co-located station pairs and timing residuals on reconstructed showers, (2) calibration within the FD using a custom-build LED calibration system, (3) calibration between SD and FD using laser signals fed simultaneously into an SD station and across the FD via the Central Laser Facility (CLF), and (4) studies of synchronization between FD and SD through the analysis of events detected by both systems, called hybrid events. These hybrid events allow for a much more accurate reconstruction of the shower and for relatively tight constraints on timing calibration offsets. We demonstrate that statistical and systematic timing uncertainties have no significant impact on the event reconstruction.

  13. Calibration of the LIGO gravitational wave detectors in the fifth science run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Aronsson, M.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Atkinson, D. E.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Behnke, B.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bondarescu, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Boyle, M.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cain, J.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Costa, C. A.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Daudert, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, A.; Daw, E. J.; Dayanga, T.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dergachev, V.; Derosa, R.; Desalvo, R.; Devanka, P.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Palma, I.; Díaz, M.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dueck, J.; Dumas, J.-C.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Finn, L. S.; Flanigan, M.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Garofoli, J. A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Graef, C.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hall, P.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hoyland, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kozak, D.; Krause, T.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Kuehn, G.; Kullman, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lang, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Li, J.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mak, C.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIvor, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Merill, L.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Miller, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nolting, D.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Ogin, G. H.; Oldenburg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Pareja, M.; Patel, P.; Pathak, D.; Pedraza, M.; Pekowsky, L.; Penn, S.; Peralta, C.; Perreca, A.; Pickenpack, M.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Predoi, V.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Radke, T.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rankins, B.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Röver, C.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Sakosky, M.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sancho de La Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santostasi, G.; Saraf, S.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Singer, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Stein, A. J.; Stein, L. C.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Szokoly, G. P.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C. I.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tseng, K.; Turner, L.; Ugolini, D.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vaishnav, B.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Veltkamp, C.; Villar, A. E.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Wei, P.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yu, P. P.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2010-12-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) is a network of three detectors built to detect local perturbations in the space-time metric from astrophysical sources. These detectors, two in Hanford, WA and one in Livingston, LA, are power-recycled Fabry-Perot Michelson interferometers. In their fifth science run (S5), between November 2005 and October 2007, these detectors accumulated one year of triple coincident data while operating at their designed sensitivity. In this paper, we describe the calibration of the instruments in the S5 data set, including measurement techniques and uncertainty estimation.

  14. Reproducibility and calibration of MMC-based high-resolution gamma detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bates, C. R.; Pies, C.; Kempf, S.; Hengstler, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Enss, C.; Friedrich, S.

    2016-07-15

    Here, we describe a prototype γ-ray detector based on a metallic magnetic calorimeter with an energy resolution of 46 eV at 60 keV and a reproducible response function that follows a simple second-order polynomial. The simple detector calibration allows adding high-resolution spectra from different pixels and different cool-downs without loss in energy resolution to determine γ-ray centroids with high accuracy. As an example of an application in nuclear safeguards enabled by such a γ-ray detector, we discuss the non-destructive assay of 242Pu in a mixed-isotope Pu sample.

  15. Reproducibility and calibration of MMC-based high-resolution gamma detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, C. R.; Pies, C.; Kempf, S.; Hengstler, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Enss, C.; Friedrich, S.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a prototype γ-ray detector based on a metallic magnetic calorimeter with an energy resolution of 46 eV at 60 keV and a reproducible response function that follows a simple second-order polynomial. The simple detector calibration allows adding high-resolution spectra from different pixels and different cool-downs without loss in energy resolution to determine γ-ray centroids with high accuracy. As an example of an application in nuclear safeguards enabled by such a γ-ray detector, we discuss the non-destructive assay of 242Pu in a mixed-isotope Pu sample.

  16. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  17. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition,more » comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.« less

  18. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-15

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  19. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors.

    PubMed

    Waugh, C J; Rosenberg, M J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule. PMID:26026524

  20. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-01

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  1. Quantum efficiency test set up performances for NIR detector characterization at ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, P.-E.; Duvet, L.; De Wit, F.; Beaufort, T.; Blommaert, S.; Butler, B.; Van Duinkerken, G.; ter Haar, J.; Heijnen, J.; van der Luijt, K.; Smit, H.; Viale, T.

    2014-07-01

    The Payload Technology Validation Section (Future mission preparation Office) at ESTEC is in charge of specific mission oriented validation activities, for science and robotic exploration missions, aiming at reducing development risks in the implementation phase. These activities take place during the early mission phases or during the implementation itself. In this framework, a test set up to characterize the quantum efficiency of near infrared detectors has been developed. The first detector to be tested will an HAWAII-2RG detector with a 2.5μm cut off, it will be used as commissioning device in preparation to the tests of prototypes European detectors developed under ESA funding. The capability to compare on the same setup detectors from different manufacturers will be a unique asset for the future mission preparation office. This publication presents the performances of the quantum efficiency test bench to prepare measurements on the HAWAII-2RG detector. A SOFRADIR Saturn detector has been used as a preliminary test vehicle for the bench. A test set up with a lamp, chopper, monochromator, pinhole and off axis mirrors allows to create a spot of 1mm diameter between 700nm and 2.5μm.The shape of the beam has been measured to match the rms voltage read by the Merlin Lock -in amplifier and the amplitude of the incoming signal. The reference detectors have been inter-calibrated with an uncertainty up to 3 %. For the measurement with HAWAII-2RG detector, the existing cryostat [1] has been modified to adapt cold black baffling, a cold filter wheel and a sapphire window. An statistic uncertainty of +/-2.6% on the quantum efficiency on the detector under test measurement is expected.

  2. GEANT4 calibration of gamma spectrometry efficiency for measurements of airborne radioactivity on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2014-11-01

    A simple method of efficiency calibration for gamma spectrometry was performed. This method, which focused on measuring airborne radioactivity collected on filter paper, was based on Monte Carlo simulations using the toolkit GEANT4. Experimentally, the efficiency values of an HPGe detector were calculated for a multi-gamma disk source. These efficiency values were compared to their counterparts produced by a computer code that simulated experimental conditions. Such comparison revealed biases of 24, 10, 1, 3, 7, and 3% for the radionuclides (photon energies in keV) of Ce (166), Sn (392), Cs (662), Co (1,173), Co (1,333), and Y (1,836), respectively. The output of the simulation code was in acceptable agreement with the experimental findings, thus validating the proposed method. PMID:25271933

  3. A digitally calibrated CMOS RMS power detector for RF automatic gain control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taotao, Yan; Hui, Wang; Jinbo, Li; Jianjun, Zhou

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a digitally calibrated CMOS wideband radio frequency (RF) root-mean-square (RMS) power detector for high accuracy RF automatic gain control (AGC). The proposed RMS power detector demonstrates accurate power detection in the presence of process, supply voltage, and temperature (PVT) variations by employing a digital calibration scheme. It also consumes low power and occupies a small chip area. The measurement results show that the scheme improves the accuracy of the detector to better than 0.3 dB over the PVT variations and wide operating frequency range from 0.2 to 0.8 GHz. Implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS process and occupying a small die area of 263 × 214 μm2, the proposed digitally calibrated CMOS RMS power detector only consumes 1.6 mA in power detection mode and 2.1 mA in digital calibration mode from a 1.8 V supply voltage.

  4. Automatic and robust calibration of optical detector arrays for biomedical diffuse optical spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Jiang, Shudong; DiFlorio-Alexander, Roberta; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    The design and testing of a new, fully automated, calibration approach is described. The process was used to calibrate an image-guided diffuse optical spectroscopy system with 16 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), but can be extended to any large array of optical detectors and associated imaging geometry. The design goals were accomplished by developing a routine for robust automated calibration of the multi-detector array within 45 minutes. Our process was able to characterize individual detectors to a median norm of the residuals of 0.03 V for amplitude and 4.4 degrees in phase and achieved less than 5% variation between all the detectors at the 95% confidence interval for equivalent measurements. Repeatability of the calibrated data from the imaging system was found to be within 0.05 V for amplitude and 0.2 degrees for phase, and was used to evaluate tissue-simulating phantoms in two separate imaging geometries. Spectroscopic imaging of total hemoglobin concentration was recovered to within 5% of the true value in both cases. Future work will focus on streamlining the technology for use in a clinical setting with expectations of achieving accurate quantification of suspicious lesions in the breast. PMID:23082277

  5. Automatic and robust calibration of optical detector arrays for biomedical diffuse optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mastanduno, Michael A; Jiang, Shudong; Diflorio-Alexander, Roberta; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-10-01

    The design and testing of a new, fully automated, calibration approach is described. The process was used to calibrate an image-guided diffuse optical spectroscopy system with 16 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), but can be extended to any large array of optical detectors and associated imaging geometry. The design goals were accomplished by developing a routine for robust automated calibration of the multi-detector array within 45 minutes. Our process was able to characterize individual detectors to a median norm of the residuals of 0.03 V for amplitude and 4.4 degrees in phase and achieved less than 5% variation between all the detectors at the 95% confidence interval for equivalent measurements. Repeatability of the calibrated data from the imaging system was found to be within 0.05 V for amplitude and 0.2 degrees for phase, and was used to evaluate tissue-simulating phantoms in two separate imaging geometries. Spectroscopic imaging of total hemoglobin concentration was recovered to within 5% of the true value in both cases. Future work will focus on streamlining the technology for use in a clinical setting with expectations of achieving accurate quantification of suspicious lesions in the breast. PMID:23082277

  6. A likelihood method to cross-calibrate air-shower detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembinski, Hans Peter; Kégl, Balázs; Mariş, Ioana C.; Roth, Markus; Veberič, Darko

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed statistical treatment of the energy calibration of hybrid air-shower detectors, which combine a surface detector array and a fluorescence detector, to obtain an unbiased estimate of the calibration curve. The special features of calibration data from air showers prevent unbiased results, if a standard least-squares fit is applied to the problem. We develop a general maximum-likelihood approach, based on the detailed statistical model, to solve the problem. Our approach was developed for the Pierre Auger Observatory, but the applied principles are general and can be transferred to other air-shower experiments, even to the cross-calibration of other observables. Since our general likelihood function is expensive to compute, we derive two approximations with significantly smaller computational cost. In the recent years both have been used to calibrate data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We demonstrate that these approximations introduce negligible bias when they are applied to simulated toy experiments, which mimic realistic experimental conditions.

  7. High-Energy Calibration of a BGO detector of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kienlin, Andreas von; Steinle, Helmut; Fishman, Gerald J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Godfrey, Gary L.

    2007-07-12

    The understanding of the instrumental response of the GLAST Burst Monitor BGO detectors at energies above the energy range which is accessible by common laboratory radiation sources (< 4.43 MeV), is important, especially for the later cross-calibration with the LAT response in the overlap region between {approx} 20 MeV to 30 MeV. In November 2006 the high-energy calibration of the GBM-BGO spare detector was performed at the small Van-de-Graaff accelerator at SLAC. High-energy gamma-rays from excited 8Be* (14.6 MeV and 17.5 MeV) and 16O* (6.1 MeV) were generated through (p, {gamma})-reactions by irradiating a LiF-target. For the calibration at lower energies radioactive sources were used. The results, including spectra, the energy/channel-relation and the dependence of energy resolution are presented.

  8. High-Energy Calibration of a BGO Detector of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Fishman, Gerald J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Godfrey, Gary L.; Steinle, Helmut; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2011-11-30

    The understanding of the instrumental response of the GLAST Burst Monitor BGO detectors at energies above the energy range which is accessible by common laboratory radiation sources (< 4.43 MeV), is important, especially for the later cross-calibration with the LAT response in the overlap region between {approx}20 MeV to 30 MeV. In November 2006 the high-energy calibration of the GBM-BGO spare detector was performed at the small Van-de-Graaff accelerator at SLAC. High-energy gamma-rays from excited {sup 8}Be* (14.6 MeV and 17.5 MeV) and {sup 16}O* (6.1 MeV) were generated through (p, {gamma})-reactions by irradiating a LiF-target. For the calibration at lower energies radioactive sources were used. The results, including spectra, the energy/channel-relation and the dependence of energy resolution are presented.

  9. Hard X-ray Detector Calibrations for the FOXSI Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, A.; Glesener, L.; Buitrago Casas, J. C.; Han, R.; Ishikawa, S. N.; Christe, S.; Krucker, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the study of high-energy solar flares, detailed X-ray images and spectra of the Sun are required. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment is used to test direct-focusing X-ray telescopes and Double-sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSD) for solar flare study and to further understand coronal heating. The measurement of active region differential emission measures, flare temperatures, and possible quiet-Sun emission requires a precisely calibrated spectral response. This poster describes recent updates in the calibration of FOXSI's DSSDs based on new calibration tests that were performed after the second flight. The gain for each strip was recalculated using additional radioactive sources. Additionally, the varying strip sensitivity across the detectors was investigated and based on these measurements, the flight images were flatfielded. These improvements lead to more precise X-ray data for future FOXSI flights and show promise for these new technologies in imaging the Sun.

  10. Flat-Field Calibration of CCD Detector for Long TraceProfilers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Franck, Keith D.; Irick, Steve C.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison,Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-07-31

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasersrequires x-ray optical systems with extremely high-performance,generally, of diffraction limited quality. Fabrication and use of suchoptics requires highly accurate metrology. In the present paper, wediscuss a way to improve the performance of the Long Trace Profiler(LTP), a slope measuring instrument widely used at synchrotron facilitiesto characterize x-ray optics at high-spatial-wavelengths fromapproximately 2 mm to 1 m. One of the major sources of LTP systematicerror is the detector. For optimal functionality, the detector has topossess the smallest possible pixel size/spacing, a fast method ofshuttering, and minimal non-uniformity of pixel-to-pixel photoresponse.While the first two requirements are determined by choice of detector,the non-uniformity of photoresponse of typical detectors such as CCDcameras is around 2-3 percent. We describe a flat-field calibration setupspecially developed for calibration of CCD camera photo-response and darkcurrent with an accuracy of better than 0.5 percent. Such accuracy isadequate for use of a camera as a detector for an LTP with performance of~;0.1 microradian (rms). We also present the design details of thecalibration system and results of calibration of a DALSA CCD camera usedfor upgrading our LTP-II instrument at the ALS Optical MetrologyLaboratory.

  11. Mathematical efficiency calibration with uncertain source geometries using smart optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Menaa, N.; Mirolo, L.

    2011-07-01

    The In Situ Object Counting Software (ISOCS), a mathematical method developed by CANBERRA, is a well established technique for computing High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector efficiencies for a wide variety of source shapes and sizes. In the ISOCS method, the user needs to input the geometry related parameters such as: the source dimensions, matrix composition and density, along with the source-to-detector distance. In many applications, the source dimensions, the matrix material and density may not be well known. Under such circumstances, the efficiencies may not be very accurate since the modeled source geometry may not be very representative of the measured geometry. CANBERRA developed an efficiency optimization software known as 'Advanced ISOCS' that varies the not well known parameters within user specified intervals and determines the optimal efficiency shape and magnitude based on available benchmarks in the measured spectra. The benchmarks could be results from isotopic codes such as MGAU, MGA, IGA, or FRAM, activities from multi-line nuclides, and multiple counts of the same item taken in different geometries (from the side, bottom, top etc). The efficiency optimization is carried out using either a random search based on standard probability distributions, or using numerical techniques that carry out a more directed (referred to as 'smart' in this paper) search. Measurements were carried out using representative source geometries and radionuclide distributions. The radionuclide activities were determined using the optimum efficiency and compared against the true activities. The 'Advanced ISOCS' method has many applications among which are: Safeguards, Decommissioning and Decontamination, Non-Destructive Assay systems and Nuclear reactor outages maintenance. (authors)

  12. A high-efficiency focusing Cherenkov radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.; Moran, M.J.; Hall, J. ); Graser, M. )

    1992-03-01

    A new design uses advanced technology to produce an efficient, high-bandwidth Cherenkov detector for relativistic charged particles. The detector consists of a diamond-lathe machined ultraviolet-grade Lucite radiator, a parabolic focusing mirror, and a photodiode with an S-20 cathode. This article discusses some details of the detector design and describes preliminary measurements of its response characteristics. The data show the detector to have an overall gain of {approx}76 signal electrons per incident electron and a photodiode-limited response time of {approx}450 ps.

  13. A software for simulation of efficiency of HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiem, L. H.; Trong, T. D.

    2015-05-01

    Computer software named GE_EFF for calculation of detection efficiency of High Purity Ge detectors recently developed by us is presented. A Monte-Carlo method has been used for simulation. The software has been written in Visual Basic language. The calculated efficiencies for our detectors are in agreement with the measured values using a standard γ-ray sources. The software has been used at our laboratory of Institute of Physics for gamma radiation measurements.

  14. Calibration tests on magnetic tape lightning current detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    The low cost, passive, peak lightning current detector (LCD) invented at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center, uses magnetic audio recording tape to sense the magnitude of the peak magnetic field around a conductor carrying lightning currents. Test results show that the length of audio tape erased was linearly related to the peak simulated lightning currents in a round conductor. Accuracies of + or - 10% were shown for measurements made using a stopwatch readout technique to determine the amount of tape erased by the lightning current. The stopwatch technique is a simple, low cost means of obtaining LCD readouts and can be used in the field to obtain immediate results. Where more accurate data are desired, the tape is played and the output recorded on a strip chart, oscilloscope, or some other means so that measurements can be made on that recording. Conductor dimensions, tape holder dimensions, and tape formulation must also be considered to obtain a more accurate result. If the shape of the conductor is other than circular (i.e., angle, channel, H-beam), an analysis of the magnetic field is required to use an LCD, especially at low current levels.

  15. HST/WFC3: new capabilities, improved IR detector calibrations, and long-term performance stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John W.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Brammer, Gabriel; Hilbert, Bryan; Long, Knox S.; McCullough, Peter; Riess, Adam G.

    2014-08-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) is the most used instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Providing a broad range of high quality imaging capabilities from 200 to 1700mn using Silicon CCD and HgCdTe IR detectors, WFC3 is fulfilling both our expectations and its formal requirements. With the re-establishment of the observatory level "spatial scan" capability, we have extended the scientific potential ofWFC3 in multiple directions. These controlled scans, often in combination with low resolution slit-less spectroscopy, enable extremely high precision differential photometric measurements of transiting exo-planets and direct measurement of sources considerably brighter than originally anticipated. In addition, long scans permit the measurement of the separation of star images to accuracies approaching 25 micro-arc seconds (a factor of 10 better than prior FGS or imaging measurements) enables direct parallax observations out to 4 kilo-parsecs. In addition, we have employed this spatial scan capability to both assess and improve the mid­ spatial frequency flat field calibrations. WFC3 uses a Teledyne HgCdTe 1014xl014 pixel Hawaii-lR infrared detector array developed for this mission. One aspect of this detector with implications for many types of science observations is the localized trapping of charge. This manifests itself as both image persistence lasting several hours and as an apparent response variation with photon arrival rate over a large dynamic range. Beyond a generally adopted observing strategy of obtaining multiple observations with small spatial offsets, we have developed a multi-parameter model that accounts for source flux, accumulated signal level, and decay time to predict image persistence at the pixel level. Using a running window through the entirety of the acquired data, we now provide observers with predictions for each individual exposure within several days of its acquisition. Ongoing characterization of the sources on infrared background and

  16. High efficiency neutron sensitive amorphous silicon pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1993-11-01

    A multi-layer a-Si:H based thermal neutron detector was designed, fabricated and simulated by Monte Carlo method. The detector consists of two PECVD deposited a-Si:H pin detectors interfaced with coated layers of Gd, as a thermal neutron converter. Simulation results indicate that a detector consisting of 2 Gd films with thicknesses of 2 and 4 {mu}m, sandwiched properly with two layers of sufficiently thick ({approximately}30{mu}m) amorphous silicon diodes, has the optimum parameters. The detectors have an intrinsic efficiency of about 42% at a threshold setting of 7000 electrons, with an expected average signal size of {approximately}12000 electrons which is well above the noise. This efficiency will be further increased to nearly 63%, if we use Gd with 50% enrichment in {sup 157}Gd. We can fabricate position sensitive detectors with spatial resolution of 300 {mu}m with gamma sensitivity of {approximately}1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}. These detectors are highly radiation resistant and are good candidates for use in various application, where high efficiency, high resolution, gamma insensitive position sensitive neutron detectors are needed.

  17. Efficiency Calibration for Environmental Gamma Spectrometry Using GATE.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2016-06-01

    This work investigated the utility of performing efficiency calibration for environmental gamma spectrometry using the Monte Carlo based, free of charge GATE toolbox. The validity of this approach was tested by comparing output efficiency values of an in-house developed GATE-based program with experimental measurements covering various geometries and primary photon energies. The results of this comparison revealed relative deviations within ±20%, thus validating the employed computational approach. Moreover, the GATE-based method was able to predict quantities that are generally difficult to measure experimentally, such as the number of interactions preceding full energy absorption. These computationally obtained predictions were found to be in agreement with theory. PMID:27115226

  18. Next Generation Beta Decay Studies: Refinements in Detector System Calibration and Response Function Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutz, Kenneth

    2013-10-01

    High precision β-decay studies provide constraints on extensions to the standard model of particle physics. In order to continue to provide competitive limits with LHC measurements for new tensor and scalar interactions, the uncertainties in neutron and nuclear β-decay studies must be pushed to the 0.1% level and below. In order to control the systematic errors in particle detection at these levels, new detector systems (highly-segmented, large area, thick Si detectors) are being implemented. In order to realize gains in detector response, new capabilities must be developed to calibrate the detectors and characterize their response function. As an alternative to conventional sources mounted on thin foils, an electron beam provides a regular grid of calibration and detector response measurements which are essentially unperturbed by scattering effects. We have developed a 1 MeV electron accelerator that will deliver electrons in a tunable range covering the energy spectrum of neutron β-decay. We present our efforts to implement this accelerator as well as our development of thin backing foils and detector systems in this poster.

  19. Calibrations for Charged Particle Tracking with the GlueX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staib, Michael; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Two gas detectors comprise the tracking system for the GlueX experiment, the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) and the Forward Drift Chamber (FDC). The CDC is a cylindrical straw-tube detector covering polar angles between 6° and 168°, delivering spatial resolution of ~150 μm. The FDC is a Cathode Strip Chamber consisting of four packages, each with six alternating layers of anode wires and cathode strips. The FDC is designed to track forward-going charged particles with polar angles between 1° and 20° with a spatial resolution of ~200 μm. Both tracking detectors record timing information and energy loss measurements useful for particle identification. During Fall 2014 and Spring 2015, the first photon beam was delivered on target for commissioning of the GlueX detector in Hall-D at Jefferson Lab. These data are currently being used in a large effort to calibrate the individual detector subsystems to achieve design performance. Methods and results for calibrations of each of the tracking detectors are presented. Techniques for alignment of the tracking system using a combination of cosmic rays and beam data is discussed. Finally, some early results of physics measurements including charged final-state particles are presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  20. Hit efficiency study of CMS prototype forward pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dongwook; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the author describes the measurement of the hit efficiency of a prototype pixel device for the CMS forward pixel detector. These pixel detectors were FM type sensors with PSI46V1 chip readout. The data were taken with the 120 GeV proton beam at Fermilab during the period of December 2004 to February 2005. The detectors proved to be highly efficient (99.27 {+-} 0.02%). The inefficiency was primarily located near the corners of the individual pixels.

  1. Detective quantum efficiency of electron area detectors in electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    McMullan, G.; Chen, S.; Henderson, R.; Faruqi, A.R.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in detector design has created the need for a careful side-by-side comparison of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and resolution-dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of existing electron detectors with those of detectors based on new technology. We present MTF and DQE measurements for four types of detector: Kodak SO-163 film, TVIPS 224 charge coupled device (CCD) detector, the Medipix2 hybrid pixel detector, and an experimental direct electron monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) detector. Film and CCD performance was measured at 120 and 300 keV, while results are presented for the Medipix2 at 120 keV and for the MAPS detector at 300 keV. In the case of film, the effects of electron backscattering from both the holder and the plastic support have been investigated. We also show that part of the response of the emulsion in film comes from light generated in the plastic support. Computer simulations of film and the MAPS detector have been carried out and show good agreement with experiment. The agreement enables us to conclude that the DQE of a backthinned direct electron MAPS detector is likely to be equal to, or better than, that of film at 300 keV. PMID:19497671

  2. Calibration of semiconductor detectors in the 200-8500 keV range at VNIIM.

    PubMed

    Tereshchenko, Evgeny E; Moiseev, Nikolay

    2012-09-01

    At the ionising radiation department of the D.I. Mendeleyev Institute for Metrology, a semiconductor detector was calibrated in the energy range 200-8500 keV using (n,2γ) and (n,γ) reactions. Separate cylindrical targets (77 mm diameter and 10mm height) were made from mercuric sulphate, sodium chloride and metallic titanium. A (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source, placed in 150 mm diameter polyethylene ball, was used to generate thermal neutrons. The optimal target dimensions were determined taking into account the thermal neutron cross-sections and gamma-radiation attenuations in the target materials. The influence of the background radiation induced by neutrons from the walls, floors and ceilings was also taken into account. The shapes of the efficiency curves for point and volume sources in the 200-8500 keV range have been investigated. The experimental results are in good agreement with Monte-Carlo calculations. The emission rate of the 6.13 MeV photons from a (238)Pu-(13)C source was determined with an expanded uncertainty, U(c), of 10% (k=2). PMID:22512978

  3. Absolute calibration of TFTR neutron detectors for D-T plasma operation

    SciTech Connect

    Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D.; Johnson, D.W.; Medley, S.S.; Young, K.M.; Barnes, C.W.

    1995-03-01

    The two most sensitive TFTR fission-chamber detectors were absolutely calibrated in situ by a D-T neutron generator ({approximately}5 {times} 10{sup 7} n/s) rotated once around the torus in each direction, with data taken at about 45 positions. The combined uncertainty for determining fusion neutron rates, including the uncertainty in the total neutron generator output ({plus_minus}9%), counting statistics, the effect of coil coolant, detector stability, cross-calibration to the current mode or log Campbell mode and to other fission chambers, and plasma position variation, is about {plus_minus}13%. The NE-451 (ZnS) scintillators and {sup 4}He proportional counters that view the plasma in up to 10 collimated sightlines were calibrated by scanning. the neutron generator radially and toroidally in the horizontal midplane across the flight tubes of 7 cm diameter. Spatial integration of the detector responses using the calibrated signal per unit chord-integrated neutron emission gives the global neutron source strength with an overall uncertainty of {plus_minus}14% for the scintillators and {plus_minus}15% for the {sup 4}He counters.

  4. Calibration of Cherenkov detectors for monoenergetic photon imaging in active interrogation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, P. B.; Erickson, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Active interrogation of cargo containers using monoenergetic photons offers a rapid and low-dose approach to search for shielded special nuclear materials. Cherenkov detectors can be used for imaging of the cargo provided that gamma ray energies used in interrogation are well resolved, as the case in 11B(d,n-γ)12C reaction resulting in 4.4 MeV and 15.1 MeV photons. While an array of Cherenkov threshold detectors reduces low energy background from scatter while providing the ability of high contrast transmission imaging, thus confirming the presence of high-Z materials, these detectors require a special approach to energy calibration due to the lack of resolution. In this paper, we discuss the utility of Cherenkov detectors for active interrogation with monoenergetic photons as well as the results of computational and experimental studies of their energy calibration. The results of the studies with sources emitting monoenergetic photons as well as complex gamma ray spectrum sources, for example 232Th, show that calibration is possible as long as the energies of photons of interest are distinct.

  5. Efficiency Calibration for Measuring the 12C(n, 2n)11C Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Thomas; Gula, August; Vincett, Laurel; Yuly, Mark; Padalino, Stephen; Russ, Megan; Bienstock, Mollie; Simone, Angela; Ellison, Drew; Desmitt, Holly; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean; Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    One possible inertial confinement fusion diagnostic involves tertiary neutron activation via the 12C(n, 2n)11C reaction. A recent experiment to measure this reaction cross-section involved coincidence counting the annihilation gamma rays produced by the positron decay of 11C. This requires an accurate value for the full-peak coincidence efficiency of the NaI detector system. The GEANT 4 toolkit was used to develop a Monte Carlo simulation of the detector system which can be used to calculate the required efficiencies. For validation, simulation predictions have been compared with the results of two experiments. In the first, full-peak coincidence positron annihilation efficiencies were measured for 22Na decay positrons that annihilate in a small plastic scintillator. In the second, a NIST-calibrated 68Ge source was used. A comparison of calculated with measured efficiencies, as well as 12C(n, 2n)11C cross sections are presented. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  6. Energy calibration of the pixels of spectral X-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Walsh, Michael F; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-03-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have developed a technique for calibrating the energy response of individual pixels using X-ray fluorescence generated by metallic targets directly irradiated with polychromatic X-rays, and additionally γ-rays from (241)Am. This technique was used to measure the energy response of individual pixels in CdTe-Medipix3RX by characterizing noise performance, threshold dispersion, gain variation and spectral resolution. The comparison of these two techniques shows the energy difference of 1 keV at 59.5 keV which is less than the spectral resolution of the detector (full-width at half-maximum of 8 keV at 59.5 keV). Both techniques can be used as quality control tools in a pre-clinical multi-energy CT scanner using spectral X-ray detectors. PMID:25051546

  7. A laser diode based system for calibration of fast time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; de Bari, A.; Rossella, M.

    2016-05-01

    A system based on commercially available items, such as a laser diode, emitting in the visible range ~ 400 nm, and multimode fiber patches, fused fiber splitters and optical switches may be assembled, for time calibration of multi-channels time-of-flight (TOF) detectors with photomultipliers' (PMTs') readout. As available laser diode sources have unfortunately limited peak power, the main experimental problem is the tight light power budget of such a system. In addition, while the technology for fused fiber splitters is common in the Telecom wavelength range (λ ~ 850, 1300–1500 nm), it is not easily available in the visible one. Therefore, extensive laboratory tests had to be done on purpose, to qualify the used optical components, and a full scale timing calibration prototype was built. Obtained results show that with such a system, a calibration resolution (σ) in the range 20–30 ps may be within reach. Therefore, fast multi-channels TOF detectors, with timing resolutions in the range 50–100 ps, may be easily calibrated in time. Results on tested optical components may be of interest also for time calibration of different light detection systems based on PMTs, as the ones used for detection of the vacuum ultraviolet scintillation light emitted by ionizing particles in large LAr TPCs.

  8. Efficiency and Gamma Sensitivity of a Lithium Glass Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Adam; Rees, Lawrence; Czirr, Bart; Hoggan, Margarita

    2010-10-01

    Neutron detectors are used in national security applications for detecting potential radioactive material entering the country. Due to the shortage of Helium-3 for neutron detectors, Lithium-6 glass scintillators could be a good material for a replacement detector. Lithium-6 has a large neutron capture cross section, which gives high neutron detection rates. Our detector is based on the fact that neutrons are captured by Lithium-6 which rapidly decays into an alpha particle and triton. Those particles induce scintillation in the glass scintillator and are detected in a photomultiplier tube. The orientation of the plastic and Lithium-6 glass changes the efficiency of the detector. Monte Carlo for Neutral Particles (MCNP) calculations have shown that increasing amounts of plastic provide more efficient neutron detection and that placing a layer of glass in the front of the detector is the ideal configuration. Homeland Security requires that a replacement for Helium-3 detectors must have low gamma sensitivity and high neutron detection efficiency. We are measuring the absolute gamma sensitivity of various arrangements of glass and plastic scintillator. Our goal is to meet the Department of Homeland Security requirement for gamma sensitivity of one part in 10,000.

  9. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C.; Di Domizio, S.; Castellano, M. G.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-31

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm{sup 2} are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ{sub E} = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  10. On-orbit calibration of soft X-ray detector on Chang'E-2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hong; Peng, Wen-Xi; Wang, Huan-Yu; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Guo, Dong-Ya

    2015-10-01

    The X-ray spectrometer is one of the satellite payloads on the Chang'E-2 satellite. The soft X-ray detector is one of the devices on the X-ray spectrometer, designed to detect the major rock-forming elements within the 0.5-10 keV range on the lunar surface. In this paper, energy linearity and energy resolution calibration is done using a weak 55Fe source. Temperature and time effects are found not to give a large error. The total uncertainty of calibration is estimated to be within 5% after correction. Supported by National Science Foundation of Ministry of Education

  11. Precision calibration of calorimeter electronics in the D0 liquid argon/uranium particle detector

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, D.L.

    1991-12-01

    The ability to cross calibrate thousands of channels of detector electronics is of prime importance. This paper will describe the system used to deliver and distribute a 300 nanosecond pulse across 50,000 channels of electronics with better than 0.25% difference between channels from a location more than 200 feet away. The system is used for both cross calibration and functionality checking, (i.e., missing channels). Design of a fixed width pulse generator of high stability is presented as a key ingredient in the system`s overall performance. In addition, the design of a controlled impedance distribution system is discussed. 2 refs.

  12. High efficiency proportional neutron detector with solid liner internal structures

    DOEpatents

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Holcomb, David Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2014-08-05

    A tube-style neutron detector, a panel-style neutron detector incorporating a plurality of tube-style neutron detectors, and a panel-style neutron detector including a plurality of anode wires are provided. A plurality of channels is provided in a neutron detector such that each channel has an inner surface of a coating layer including a neutron-absorbing material. A wire anode is provided at end of each channel so that electrons generated by a charged daughter particle generated by a neutron are collected to detect a neutron-matter interaction. Moderator units can be incorporated into a neutron detector to provide improved detection efficiencies and/or to determine neutron energy spectrum. Gas-based proportional response from the neutron detectors can be employed for special nuclear material (SNM) detection. This neutron detector can provide similar performance to .sup.3He-based detectors without requiring .sup.3He and without containing toxic, flammable, or high-pressure materials.

  13. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-04-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV. PMID:26773821

  14. Experimental and MC determination of HPGe detector efficiency in the 40-2754 keV energy range for measuring point source geometry with the source-to-detector distance of 25 cm.

    PubMed

    Dryak, Pavel; Kovar, Petr

    2006-01-01

    A precise model of a 40% relative efficiency p-type HPGe detector was created for photon detection efficiency calculation using the MCNP code. All detector parameters were determined by different experiments. No experimental calibration points were used for the modification of detector parameters. The model was validated by comparing calculated and experimental full energy peak efficiencies in the 40-2754 keV energy range, for point-source geometry with the source-to-detector distance of 25 cm. PMID:16564693

  15. Proton calibration of low energy neutron detectors containing (6)LiF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present calibrations is to measure the proton response of the detectors with accelerated beams having energies within the region of maximum intensities in the trapped proton spectrum encountered in near-Earth orbit. This response is compared with the responses of the spaceflight detectors when related to proton exposures. All of the spaceflight neutron measurements have been accompanied by TLD absorbed doses measurements in close proximity within the spacecraft. For purposes of comparison, the spaceflight TLD doses are assumed to be proton doses.

  16. Gamma spectrometry efficiency calibration using Monte Carlo methods to measure radioactivity of 137Cs in food samples.

    PubMed

    Alrefae, T

    2014-12-01

    A simple method of efficiency calibration for gamma spectrometry was performed. This method, which focused on measuring the radioactivity of (137)Cs in food samples, was based on Monte Carlo simulations available in the free-of-charge toolkit GEANT4. Experimentally, the efficiency values of a high-purity germanium detector were calculated for three reference materials representing three different food items. These efficiency values were compared with their counterparts produced by a computer code that simulated experimental conditions. Interestingly, the output of the simulation code was in acceptable agreement with the experimental findings, thus validating the proposed method. PMID:24214912

  17. Pyroelectric neutron generator for calibration of neutrino and dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Ionidi, V. Y.; Ivashchuk, O. O.; Kubankin, A. S.; Oleinik, A. N.; Shchagin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Pyroelectric crystals, such as LiNbO3 or LiTaO3 being under influence of a temperature gradient can produce an electric field up to 105 kV/cm. It was experimentally confirmed that a crystal installed in a chamber with a residual gas pressure of about 1 mTorr could be used to generate X-Ray radiation with an energy up to 100 keV The same setup could be used to generate s 2.45 MeV neutrons if the target is deuterated and residual gas is D2. Due to such properties as On/Off mode of operation and the absence of radioactive materials, pyroelectric neutron generators seem to be a promising tool for calibration of neutrino and dark matter and other low background detectors. We propose the application of the controlled pyroelectric neutron generator for calibration of such detectors.

  18. Analysis of the influence of germanium dead layer on detector calibration simulation for environmental radioactive samples using the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, J.; Pascual, A.; Zarza, I.; Serradell, V.; Ortiz, J.; Ballesteros, L.

    2003-01-01

    Germanium crystals have a dead layer that causes a decrease in efficiency, since the layer is not useful for detection, but strongly attenuates photons. The thickness of this inactive layer is not well known due to the existence of a transition zone where photons are increasingly absorbed. Therefore, using data provided by manufacturers in the detector simulation model, some strong discrepancies appear between calculated and measured efficiencies. The Monte Carlo method is applied to simulate the calibration of a HP Ge detector in order to determine the total inactive germanium layer thickness and the active volume that are needed in order to obtain the minimum discrepancy between estimated and experimental efficiency. Calculations and measurements were performed for all of the radionuclides included in a standard calibration gamma cocktail solution. A Marinelli beaker was considered for this analysis, as it is one of the most commonly used sample container for environmental radioactivity measurements. Results indicated that a good agreement between calculated and measured efficiencies is obtained using a value for the inactive germanium layer thickness equal to approximately twice the value provided by the detector manufacturer. For all energy peaks included in the calibration, the best agreement with experimental efficiency was found using a combination of a small thickness of the inactive germanium layer and a small detection active volume.

  19. A high efficiency annular dark field detector for STEM.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, E J; Thomas, M G

    1996-01-01

    A new high efficiency annular dark field (ADF) detector for an HB501 STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) has been constructed and tested. This detector uses a single crystal YAP scintillator and a solid quartz light pipe extending from the scintillator (inside the vacuum) to the photomultiplier tube (outside the vacuum). A factor of approximately 100 improvement in signal relative to the original detector has been obtained. This has substantially improved the signal to noise ratio in the recorded high resolution ADF-STEM images. PMID:22666919

  20. ( sup 6 Li, sup 6 He) measurements as an alternative calibration for solar neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Aschenauer, E.; Dennert, H.; Eyrich, W.; Lehmann, A.; Moosburger, M.; Wirth, H. ); Gils, H.J.; Rebel, H.; Zagromski, S. )

    1991-12-01

    The ({sup 6}Li,{sup 6}He) reaction was studied on the nuclei {sup 37}Cl and {sup 71}Ga at {ital E}{sub 6Li}=156 MeV at extreme forward angles including zero degree. Gamow-Teller strength and the corresponding {ital B}(GT) values were extracted. It is shown that these measurements provide an alternative method to calibrate solar neutrino detectors.

  1. Dosimetric calibration of solid state detectors with low energy β sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Pia Toni, Maria; Capote, Roberto; Pena, Juan; Pasciuti, Katia; Bovi, Maurizio; Perrone, Franco; Azario, Luigi; Lazzeri, Mauro; Gaudino, Diego; Piermattei, Angelo

    2008-01-01

    A PTW Optidos plastic scintillation and a PTW natural diamond detectors were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water with β fields produced by 90Sr + 90Y and 85Kr reference sources. Each source was characterized at the Italian National Metrological Institute - the Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti of ENEA (ENEA-INMRI) - for two different series, 1 and 2, of ISO reference β-particle radiation fields. Beam flattening filters were used for the series 1 β fields to give uniform absorbed dose rates over a large area at a source-to-reference plane distance of 30 cm. The series 2 β fields were produced at source-to-reference plane distance of 10 cm, without the beam flattening filters, in order to obtain higher absorbed dose rates. The reference absorbed dose rate values were directly determined by the Italian national standard for β-particle dosimetry (a PTW extrapolation ionization chamber) for the series 1 β fields and by a calibrated transfer standard chamber, (a Capintec thin fixed-volume parallel plate ionization chamber) for the series 2 β fields. Finally the two solid state detectors were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water with the series 2 β field. The expanded uncertainties of the calibration coefficients obtained for the plastic scintillation dosimeter were 10% and 12% (2SD) for the 90Sr + 90Y and the 85Kr sources, respectively. The expanded uncertainties obtained for the diamond dosimeter were 10% (2SD) and 16% (2SD) for the 90Sr + 90Y and the 85Kr sources, respectively. The good results obtained with the 90Sr + 90Y and the 85Kr β sources encourage to implement this procedure to calibrate this type of detectors at shorter distances and with other β sources of interest in brachytherapy, for example the 106Ru source.

  2. Characterization of responses and comparison of calibration factor for commercial MOSFET detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bharanidharan, Ganesan; Manigandan, Durai; Devan, Krishnamurthy; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Gopishankar, Natanasabapathi; Ganesh, Tharmar; Joshi, Rakeshchander; Rath, Gourakishore; Velmurugan, Jagadeesan; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu . E-mail: sganesan@annauniv.edu

    2005-01-01

    A commercial metal oxide silicon field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter of model TN502-RD has been characterized for its linearity, reproducibility, field size dependency, dose rate dependency, and angular dependency for Cobalt-60 ({sup 6}Co), 6-MV, and 15-MV beam energies. The performance of the MOSFET clearly shows that it is highly reproducible, independent of field size and dose rate. Furthermore, MOSFET has a very high degree of linearity, with r-value > 0.9 for all 3 energies. The calibration factor for 2 similar MOSFET detectors of model TN502-RD were also estimated and compared for all 3 energies. The calibration factor between the 2 similar MOSFET detectors shows a variation of about 1.8% for {sup 6}Co and 15 MV, and for 6 MV it shows variation of about 2.5%, indicating that calibration should be done whenever a new MOSFET is used. However, the detector shows considerable angular dependency of about 8.8% variation. This may be due to the variation in radiation sensitivity between flat and bubble sides of the MOSFET, and indicates that positional care must be taken while using MOSFET for stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetric applications.

  3. X-ray detector calibration at CEA/Bruyères-le-Châtel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, L.; Stemmler, P.; Ban, G.; Villette, B.; Frotté, V.; Bizeuil, C.; Boutin, J.-Y.; Nazet, C.

    1996-02-01

    At CEA/Bruyères-le-Châtel (Service CEM), there are facilities to calibrate X-ray detectors from 200 eV to 100 keV, with an accuracy of 4% at high energies ( E > 3 keV). The source is the direct radiation from the X-ray tubes [C Kα (277 eV) to Ti KαKβ (4.51/4.93 keV)] or fluorescence emission from secondary targets [Mg Kα (1.25 keV) to U Kα (98 keV)]. In addition, calibrations are carried out with the synchrotron radiation of the Super-ACO storage ring (LURE-Orsay), by selecting the monoenergetic beams with a double crystal monochromator which is tunable between 0.8 and 8 keV. The resolution is better than 1 eV. This last tool is very useful in the study of the absorption edges of the detector compounds (for example, Si K-edge and Ar K-edge). Some examples are presented of results obtained between 1 and 50 keV, with special reference to high flux detectors such as gold photocathodes and silicon avalanche photodiodes. Thick silicon photodiodes (for the high energy range) were also calibrated.

  4. Calibration of radiation detectors in the ultraviolet region between 972 and 2500 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclenahan, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    The development of experimental setups and procedures is considered for calibrating photosensitive devices in the spectral range 1022 to 2500 A for which no direct calibration techniques exist. An indirect technique that uses a sodium salicylate detector calibrated outside this range was developed for use as a secondary standard. The primary standard was a xenon-filled ionization chamber, which is an absolute standard over the wavelength interval 972 to 1022 A. Measurements made by this method were checked at 1470 A with a xenon lamp and at 2537 A with a mercury arc lamp and a 0.5 m blaze monochromator with a grating blazed at 2000 A. The overall accuracy of the measurements was + or - 40 percent or better.

  5. A Novel Nuclear Recoil Calibration in the LUX Detector Using a D-D Neutron Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbus, James; LUX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. I will describe a novel calibration of nuclear recoils (NR) in liquid xenon (LXe) performed in-situ in the LUX detector using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced by a D-D neutron generator. This technique was used to measure the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to < 1 keV recoil energy with an absolute determination of the deposited energy. The LUX Qy result is a factor of × 5 lower in energy compared to any other previous measurement in the field, and provides a significant improvement in calibration uncertainties. We also present a measurement of the NR light yield in LXe (Leff) to recoil energies as low as ~ 2 keV using the LUX D-D data. The Leff result is also lower in energy with smaller uncertainties than has been previously achieved. These absolute, ultra-low energy calibrations of the NR signal yields in LXe are a clear confirmation of the detector response used for the first LUX WIMP search analysis. Strategies for extending this calibration technique to even lower energies and smaller uncertainties will be discussed.

  6. Coincidence Efficiency of Sodium Iodide Detectors for Positron Annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Thomas; Vincett, Laurel; Yuly, Mark; Padalino, Stephen; Russ, Megan; Bienstock, Mollie; Simone, Angela; Ellison, Drew; Desmitt, Holly; Sangster, Craig; Regan, Sean

    2014-10-01

    One possible diagnostic technique for characterizing inertial confinement fusion reactions uses tertiary neutron activation of 12C via the 12C(n, 2n)11C reaction. A recent experiment to measure this cross section involved counting the positron annihilation gamma rays from the 11C decay by using sodium iodide detectors in coincidence. To determine the number of 11C decays requires an accurate value for the full-peak coincidence efficiency for the detector system. A new technique has been developed to measure this coincidence efficiency by detecting the positron prior to its annihilation, and vetoing events in which decay gamma rays other than the 511 keV annihilation gamma rays could enter the detectors. Measurements and simulation results for the absolute coincidence total and full-peak efficiencies are presented. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  7. Measurement of Yields and Fluctuations using Background and Calibration Data from the LUX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Evan; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector is a 350-kg liquid xenon (LXe) time-projection chamber designed for the direct detection of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. LUX operates on the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. Monoenergetic electronic recoil (ER) peaks in the WIMP search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the LUX detector have been used to measure ER light and charge yields in LXe between 5.2 keV and 662 keV. The energy resolution of the LUX detector at these energies will also be presented. Recombination fluctuations are observed to follow a linear dependence on the number of ions for the energies in this study, and this dependence is consistent with low-energy measurements made with a tritium beta source in the LUX detector. Using these results and additional measurements of the recoil bands from tritium and D-D neutron calibrations, I will compare recombination fluctuations in LXe response to electronic and nuclear recoils. The presenter is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program. The SCGSR program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the DOE under contract DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  8. Calibration of the E Si detector in a DE-E telescope with a ^212Pb pin source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ka Pang

    2012-10-01

    In nuclear physics experiments, telescopes composed of two or more large area silicon strip detectors are used to identify charged particles. To use the energy loss method for particle identification, a thin (˜0.065mm) silicon detector (DE) is mounted in front of a thicker E detector (˜1.5 mm). The DE Si detector can be calibrated with 8.785, 6.778, 6.288, 5.685 and 5.423 MeV alpha particles emitted from a ^228Th source. However, this method cannot be used to calibrate the E detector as the alpha particles cannot penetrate the front DE detector. We have developed a method to calibrate the E detector by inserting a small irradiated dowel pin between the two Si detectors. The pin source is electroplated with ^212Pb nuclei which emit alpha particles with 8.785 MeV, 6.090 and 6.051 MeV. Insertion of the dowel pin is designed and guided so that the head of the pin lies near the center of the detector at a distance of 2.72 mm away from the surface of the E detector. In addition to providing two strong alpha peaks for calibrations, the close distance and high pixilation of the E detector allows accurate determination of the front dead layer of the E Si strip detector. This technique has been implemented successfully in calibrating the E Si detectors in the NSCL High Resolution Array (HiRA) consisting of 20 closely pack DE-E-CsI telescopes.

  9. A calibration method for the measurement of IR detector spectral responses using a FTIR spectrometer equipped with a DTGS reference cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravrand, Olivier; Wlassow, J.; Bonnefond, L.

    2014-07-01

    Various high performance IR detectors are today available on the market from QWIPs to narrow gap semiconductor photodiodes, which exhibit various spectral features. In the astrophysics community, the knowledge of the detector spectral shape is of first importance. This quantity (spectral QE or response) is usually measured by means of a monochromator followed by an integrating sphere and compared to a calibrated reference detector. This approach is usually very efficient in the visible range, where all optical elements are very well known, particularly the reference detector. This setup is also widely used in the near IR (up to 3μm) but as the wavelength increases, it becomes less efficient. For instance, the internal emittance of integrating spheres in the IR, and the bad knowledge of reference detectors for longer wavelengths tend to degrade the measurement reliability. Another approach may therefore be considered, using a Fourier transform IR spectrometer (FTIR). In this case, as opposed to the monochromator, the tested detector is not in low flux condition, the incident light containing a mix of different wavelengths. Therefore, the reference detector has to be to be sensitive (and known) in the whole spectral band of interest, because it will sense all those wavelengths at the same time. A popular detector used in this case is a Deuterated Triglycine Sulfate thermal detector (DTGS). Being a pyro detetector, the spectral response of such a detector is very flat, mainly limited by its window. However, the response of such a detector is very slow, highly depending on the temporal frequency of the input signal. Moreover, being a differential detector, it doesn't work in DC. In commercial FTIR spectrometers, the source luminance is usually continuously modulated by the moving interferometer, and the result is that the interferogram mixes optical spectral information (optical path difference) and temporal variations (temporal frequency) so that the temporal

  10. Calibration measurements on the DEPFET Detectors for the MIXS instrument on BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, P.; Aschauer, F.; Aschauer, S.; Bähr, A.; Bergbauer, B.; Hilchenbach, M.; Krumrey, M.; Laubis, C.; Lauf, T.; Lechner, P.; Lutz, G.; Scholze, F.; Soltau, H.; Stefanescu, A.; Strüder, L.; Treis, J.

    2014-11-01

    The Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (MIXS) will be launched on board of the 5th ESA cornerstone mission BepiColombo. The two channel instrument MIXS is dedicated to the exploration of the elemental composition of the mercurian surface by imaging x-ray spectroscopy of the elemental fluorescence lines. One of the main scientific goals of MIXS is to provide spatially resolved elemental abundance maps of key rock-forming elements. MIXS will be the successor of the XRS instrument, which is currently orbiting Mercury on board of NASAs satellite MESSENGER. MIXS will provide unprecedented spectral and spatial resolution due to its innovative detector and optics concepts. The MIXS target energy band ranges from 0.5 to 7 keV and allows to directly access the Fe-L line at 0.7 keV, which was not accessible to previous missions. In addition, the high spectroscopic resolution of FWHM ≤ 200 eV at the reference energy of 1 keV after one year in Mercury orbit, allows to separate the x-ray fluorescence emission lines of important elements like Mg (1.25 keV) and Al (1.49 keV) without the need for any filter. The detectors for the energy and spatially resolved detection of x-rays for both channels are identical DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel FET) active pixel detectors. We report on the calibration of the MIXS flight and flight spare detector modules at the PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt) beamlines at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Each detector was calibrated at least at 10 discrete energies in the energy range from 0.5 to 10 keV. The excellent spectroscopic performance of all three detector modules was verified.

  11. Broad-band efficiency calibration of ITER bolometer prototypes using Pt absorbers on SiN membranes.

    PubMed

    Meister, H; Willmeroth, M; Zhang, D; Gottwald, A; Krumrey, M; Scholze, F

    2013-12-01

    The energy resolved efficiency of two bolometer detector prototypes for ITER with 4 channels each and absorber thicknesses of 4.5 μm and 12.5 μm, respectively, has been calibrated in a broad spectral range from 1.46 eV up to 25 keV. The calibration in the energy range above 3 eV was performed against previously calibrated silicon photodiodes using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by five different beamlines of Physikalische Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron storage rings BESSY II and Metrology Light Source in Berlin. For the measurements in the visible range, a setup was realised using monochromatized halogen lamp radiation and a calibrated laser power meter as reference. The measurements clearly demonstrate that the efficiency of the bolometer prototype detectors in the range from 50 eV up to ≈6 keV is close to unity; at a photon energy of 20 keV the bolometer with the thick absorber detects 80% of the photons, the one with the thin absorber about 50%. This indicates that the detectors will be well capable of measuring the plasma radiation expected from the standard ITER scenario. However, a minimum absorber thickness will be required for the high temperatures in the central plasma. At 11.56 keV, the sharp Pt-L3 absorption edge allowed to cross-check the absorber thickness by fitting the measured efficiency to the theoretically expected absorption of X-rays in a homogeneous Pt-layer. Furthermore, below 50 eV the efficiency first follows the losses due to reflectance expected for Pt, but below 10 eV it is reduced further by a factor of 2 for the thick absorber and a factor of 4 for the thin absorber. Most probably, the different histories in production, storage, and operation led to varying surface conditions and additional loss channels. PMID:24387428

  12. Broad-band efficiency calibration of ITER bolometer prototypes using Pt absorbers on SiN membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, H.; Willmeroth, M.; Zhang, D.; Gottwald, A.; Krumrey, M.; Scholze, F.

    2013-12-01

    The energy resolved efficiency of two bolometer detector prototypes for ITER with 4 channels each and absorber thicknesses of 4.5 μm and 12.5 μm, respectively, has been calibrated in a broad spectral range from 1.46 eV up to 25 keV. The calibration in the energy range above 3 eV was performed against previously calibrated silicon photodiodes using monochromatized synchrotron radiation provided by five different beamlines of Physikalische Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron storage rings BESSY II and Metrology Light Source in Berlin. For the measurements in the visible range, a setup was realised using monochromatized halogen lamp radiation and a calibrated laser power meter as reference. The measurements clearly demonstrate that the efficiency of the bolometer prototype detectors in the range from 50 eV up to ≈6 keV is close to unity; at a photon energy of 20 keV the bolometer with the thick absorber detects 80% of the photons, the one with the thin absorber about 50%. This indicates that the detectors will be well capable of measuring the plasma radiation expected from the standard ITER scenario. However, a minimum absorber thickness will be required for the high temperatures in the central plasma. At 11.56 keV, the sharp Pt-L3 absorption edge allowed to cross-check the absorber thickness by fitting the measured efficiency to the theoretically expected absorption of X-rays in a homogeneous Pt-layer. Furthermore, below 50 eV the efficiency first follows the losses due to reflectance expected for Pt, but below 10 eV it is reduced further by a factor of 2 for the thick absorber and a factor of 4 for the thin absorber. Most probably, the different histories in production, storage, and operation led to varying surface conditions and additional loss channels.

  13. Existing NaI detectors; an efficient alternative to He-3 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwally, Walid A.

    2014-11-01

    Neutron detectors are important in various fields of research, safeguards, security, medicine, and industry. The most common methods for detecting neutrons involve utilization of the 10B(n,α), 6Li(n,α), or 3He(n,p) reactions; with the He-3 filled proportional counters being the most widely used because of their high detection efficiency and good gamma ray discrimination. However these counters have severe drawbacks in terms of detector size and scarcity of He-3. The aim of this work is to investigate an alternative neutron detection method by using a boron lining with existing NaI detectors and compare the results with those obtained from a He-3 detector. The results show a good sensitivity of the boron-lined NaI detector to neutrons at different source locations and a considerable improvement in efficiency compared to He-3 detectors. On top of this the NaI detectors are used to detect the gamma rays from the surrounding source and interacting media.

  14. Cross-calibration of neutron detectors for deuterium-tritium operation in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.C.; Jassby, D.L.; Roquemore, A.L.; Strachan, J.D.; Barnes, C.W.; Duong, H.H.; Heidbrink, W.E.; Ruskov, E.; Loughlin, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    During the initial deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR, neutron emission was measured with {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fission chambers, silicon surface barrier diodes, spatially collimated {sup 4}He proportional counters and ZnS scintillators, and a variety of elemental activation foils. The activation foils, {sup 4}He counters and silicon diodes can discriminate between 14 MeV and 2.5 MeV neutrons. The other detectors respond to both DD and DT neutrons but are more sensitive to the latter. The proportional counters, scintillators, and some of the fission chambers were calibrated absolutely, using a 14-MeV neutron generator positioned at numerous locations inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. Although the directly calibrated systems were saturated during the highest power deuterium-tritium operation, they allowed cross-calibration of less sensitive fission chambers and silicon diodes. The estimated absolute accuracy of the uncertainty-weighted mean of these cross-calibrations, combined with an independent calibration derived from activation foil determinations of total neutron yield, is {plus_minus}7%.

  15. Nuclear Recoil Calibrations in the LUX Detector Using Direct and Backscattered D-D Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhyne, Casey; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. I will discuss the latest calibration of the nuclear recoil (NR) response in liquid xenon (LXe), performed in-situ in the LUX detector using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced via the Adelphi Technologies, Inc. DD108 D-D neutron generator. The calibration measured the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to 0.7 keVnr recoil energy with an absolute determination of deposited energy and the NR light yield in LXe (Ly) to recoil energies of 1.1 keVnr, both of which improve upon all previous measurements. I will then focus in depth on the extension of this calibration using a new technique for generating a beam of sub-300 keV quasi-mono-energetic neutrons via the backscatter of 2.45 MeV neutrons off a deuterium-based reflector. Current simulations work optimizing the technique, its advantages, and its impact on future research will be discussed, including the extension of the NR Qy calibration down to 0.14 keVnr, an independent NR Ly calibration, and an a priori estimate of the expected 8B solar neutrino-nucleus coherent scattering signal in the upcoming LUX-ZEPLIN experiment.

  16. A method for establishing absolute full-energy peak efficiency and its confidence interval for HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan, U.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Starosta, K.; Williams, J.; Voss, P.

    2015-12-01

    A method is proposed for establishing the absolute efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector including the confidence interval in the energy range of 79.6-3451.2 keV. The calibrations were accomplished with the 133Ba, 60Co, 56Co and 152Eu point-like radioactive sources with only the 60Co source being activity calibrated to an accuracy of 2% at the 90% confidence level. All data sets measured from activity calibrated and uncalibrated sources were fit simultaneously using the linearized least squares method. The proposed fit function accounts for scaling of the data taken with activity uncalibrated sources to the data taken with the high accuracy activity calibrated source. The confidence interval for the fit was found analytically using the covariance matrix. Accuracy of the fit was below 3.5% at the 90% confidence level in the 79.6-3451.2 keV energy range.

  17. Resonant infrared detector with substantially unit quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam (Inventor); Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A resonant infrared detector includes an infrared-active layer which has first and second parallel faces and which absorbs radiation of a given wavelength. The detector also includes a first tuned reflective layer, disposed opposite the first face of the infrared-active layer, which reflects a specific portion of the radiation incident thereon and allows a specific portion of the incident radiation at the given wavelength to reach the infrared-active layer. A second reflective layer, disposed opposite the second face of the infrared-active layer, reflects back into the infrared-active layer substantially all of the radiation at the given wavelength which passes through the infrared-active layer. The reflective layers have the effect of increasing the quantum efficiency of the infrared detector relative to the quantum efficiency of the infrared-active layer alone.

  18. Determination of the Quantum Efficiency of a Light Detector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2008-01-01

    The "quantum efficiency" (QE) is an important property of a light detector. This quantity can be determined in the undergraduate physics laboratory. The experimentally determined QE of a silicon photodiode appeared to be in reasonable agreement with expected values. The experiment confirms the quantum properties of light and seems to be a useful…

  19. Bayesian calibration of coarse-grained forces: Efficiently addressing transferability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrone, Paul N.; Rosch, Thomas W.; Phelan, Frederick R.

    2016-04-01

    Generating and calibrating forces that are transferable across a range of state-points remains a challenging task in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics. In this work, we present a coarse-graining workflow, inspired by ideas from uncertainty quantification and numerical analysis, to address this problem. The key idea behind our approach is to introduce a Bayesian correction algorithm that uses functional derivatives of CG simulations to rapidly and inexpensively recalibrate initial estimates f0 of forces anchored by standard methods such as force-matching. Taking density-temperature relationships as a running example, we demonstrate that this algorithm, in concert with various interpolation schemes, can be used to efficiently compute physically reasonable force curves on a fine grid of state-points. Importantly, we show that our workflow is robust to several choices available to the modeler, including the interpolation schemes and tools used to construct f0. In a related vein, we also demonstrate that our approach can speed up coarse-graining by reducing the number of atomistic simulations needed as inputs to standard methods for generating CG forces.

  20. An improved method of energy calibration for position-sensitive silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Huang, Tian-Heng; Liu, Zhong; Ding, Bing; Yang, Hua-Bin; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ma, Long; Yu, Lin; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Gan, Zai-Guo; Xiao-Hong, Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors is achieved by parabolic fitting in the traditional method, where the systematic variations of vertex and curvature of the parabola with energy must be considered. In this paper we extend the traditional method in order to correct the fitting function, simplify the procedure of calibration and improve the experimental data quality. Instead of a parabolic function as used in the traditional method, a new function describing the relation of position and energy is introduced. The energy resolution of the 8.088 MeV α decay of 213Rn is determined to be about 87 keV (FWHM), which is better than the result of the traditional method, 104 keV (FWHM). The improved method can be applied to the energy calibration of resistive charge division-based position-sensitive silicon detectors with various performances. Supported by ‘100 Person Project’ of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405224 and 11435014)

  1. Means and method for calibrating a photon detector utilizing electron-photon coincidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An arrangement for calibrating a photon detector particularly applicable for the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet regions is based on electron photon coincidence utilizing crossed electron beam atom beam collisions. Atoms are excited by electrons which lose a known amount of energy and scatter with a known remaining energy, while the excited atoms emit photons of known radiation. Electrons of the known remaining energy are separated from other electrons and are counted. Photons emitted in a direction related to the particular direction of scattered electrons are detected to serve as a standard. Each of the electrons is used to initiate the measurements of a time interval which terminates with the arrival of a photon exciting the photon detector. Only the number of time intervals related to the coincidence correlation and of electrons scattered in the particular direction with the known remaining energy and photons of a particular radiation level emitted due to the collisions of such scattered electrons are counted. The detector calibration is related to the number of counted electrons and photons.

  2. Development of a new method for measurement of neutron detector efficiency up to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kornilov, N. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Massey, T. N.; Brient, C. E.; Carter, D. E.; O'Donnell, J. E.; Bateman, F. B.; Carlson, A. D.; Haight, R. C.; Boukharouba, N.

    2014-09-03

    A new approach to neutron detector efficiency has been taken. A neutron detector has been calibrated with a 252Cf source at low energy. The calibration can be extended to energies above 8 MeV based on the 252Cf results. The techniques uses the fact that the cross section for a symmetric reaction with nucleus of atomic number A yielding a final nucleus with atomic number (2A-1) and a neutron A + A → (2A – 1) + n. This reaction must be symmetric about 90° in the center-of-mass system. Furthermore, the laboratory energies for the neutrons at the paired energies differ substantially. Thus, an efficiency known at one of the two angles can be used to determine the efficiency to higher energies or, for a negative Q, to lower neutron energies.

  3. Development of a new method for measurement of neutron detector efficiency up to 20 MeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kornilov, N. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Massey, T. N.; Brient, C. E.; Carter, D. E.; O'Donnell, J. E.; Bateman, F. B.; Carlson, A. D.; Haight, R. C.; Boukharouba, N.

    2014-09-03

    A new approach to neutron detector efficiency has been taken. A neutron detector has been calibrated with a 252Cf source at low energy. The calibration can be extended to energies above 8 MeV based on the 252Cf results. The techniques uses the fact that the cross section for a symmetric reaction with nucleus of atomic number A yielding a final nucleus with atomic number (2A-1) and a neutron A + A → (2A – 1) + n. This reaction must be symmetric about 90° in the center-of-mass system. Furthermore, the laboratory energies for the neutrons at the paired energies differmore » substantially. Thus, an efficiency known at one of the two angles can be used to determine the efficiency to higher energies or, for a negative Q, to lower neutron energies.« less

  4. Calibrating an optical scanner for quality assurance of large area radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadzhinova, A.; Hildén, T.; Berdova, M.; Lauhakangas, R.; Heino, J.; Tuominen, E.; Franssila, S.; Hæggström, E.; Kassamakov, I.

    2014-11-01

    A gas electron multiplier (GEM) is a particle detector used in high-energy physics. Its main component is a thin copper-polymer-copper sandwich that carries Ø =70  ±  5 µm holes. Quality assurance (QA) is needed to guarantee both long operating life and reading fidelity of the GEM. Absence of layer defects and conformity of the holes to specifications is important. Both hole size and shape influence the detector’s gas multiplication factor and hence affect the collected data. For the scanner the required lateral measurement tolerance is ± 5 µm. We calibrated a high aspect ratio optical scanning system (OSS) to allow ensuring the quality of large GEM foils. For the calibration we microfabricated transfer standards, which were imaged with the OSS and which were compared to corresponding scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The calibration fulfilled the ISO/IEC 17025 and UKAS M3003 requirements: the calibration factor was 1.01  ±  0.01, determined at 95% confidence level across a 950  ×  950 mm2 area. The proposed large-scale scanning technique can potentially be valuable in other microfabricated products too.

  5. Calibration Scheme for Large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays Based on Readout Frequency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisigello, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Murugesan, V.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground-based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over a wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal with respect to the KID resonant circle. Fundamentally, this phase change is due to a shift in the KID resonance frequency, in turn due to a radiation induced change in the quasiparticle number in the superconducting resonator. We show that the shift in resonant frequency can be determined from the phase shift by using KID phase versus frequency dependence using a previously measured resonant frequency. Working in this calculated resonant frequency, we gain near linearity and constant calibration to a constant optical signal applied in a wide range of operating points on the resonance and readout powers. This calibration method has three particular advantages: first, it is fast enough to be used to calibrate large arrays, with pixel counts in the thousands of pixels; second, it is based on data that are already necessary to determine KID positions; third, it can be done without applying any optical source in front of the array.

  6. Calibration Scheme for Large Kinetic Inductance Detector Arrays Based on Readout Frequency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisigello, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Murugesan, V.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) provides a way to build large ground-based sub-mm instruments such as NIKA and A-MKID. For such instruments, therefore, it is important to understand and characterize the response to ensure good linearity and calibration over a wide dynamic range. We propose to use the MKID readout frequency response to determine the MKID responsivity to an input optical source power. A signal can be measured in a KID as a change in the phase of the readout signal with respect to the KID resonant circle. Fundamentally, this phase change is due to a shift in the KID resonance frequency, in turn due to a radiation induced change in the quasiparticle number in the superconducting resonator. We show that the shift in resonant frequency can be determined from the phase shift by using KID phase versus frequency dependence using a previously measured resonant frequency. Working in this calculated resonant frequency, we gain near linearity and constant calibration to a constant optical signal applied in a wide range of operating points on the resonance and readout powers. This calibration method has three particular advantages: first, it is fast enough to be used to calibrate large arrays, with pixel counts in the thousands of pixels; second, it is based on data that are already necessary to determine KID positions; third, it can be done without applying any optical source in front of the array.

  7. Quantitative carbon detector (QCD) for calibration-free, high-resolution characterization of complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Maduskar, Saurabh; Teixeira, Andrew R; Paulsen, Alex D; Krumm, Christoph; Mountziaris, T J; Fan, Wei; Dauenhauer, Paul J

    2015-01-21

    Current research of complex chemical systems, including biomass pyrolysis, petroleum refining, and wastewater remediation requires analysis of large analyte mixtures (>100 compounds). Quantification of each carbon-containing analyte by existing methods (flame ionization detection) requires extensive identification and calibration. In this work, we describe an integrated microreactor system called the Quantitative Carbon Detector (QCD) for use with current gas chromatography techniques for calibration-free quantitation of analyte mixtures. Combined heating, catalytic combustion, methanation and gas co-reactant mixing within a single modular reactor fully converts all analytes to methane (>99.9%) within a thermodynamic operable regime. Residence time distribution of the QCD reveals negligible loss in chromatographic resolution consistent with fine separation of complex mixtures including cellulose pyrolysis products. PMID:25387003

  8. Optimal Design of Calibration Signals in Space Borne Gravitational Wave Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nofrarias, Miquel; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Gibert, Ferran; Armano, Michele; Audley, Heather; Danzmann, Karsten; Diepholz, Ingo; Dolesi, Rita; Ferraioli, Luigi; Thorpe, James I.

    2014-01-01

    Future space borne gravitational wave detectors will require a precise definition of calibration signals to ensure the achievement of their design sensitivity. The careful design of the test signals plays a key role in the correct understanding and characterization of these instruments. In that sense, methods achieving optimal experiment designs must be considered as complementary to the parameter estimation methods being used to determine the parameters describing the system. The relevance of experiment design is particularly significant for the LISA Pathfinder mission, which will spend most of its operation time performing experiments to characterize key technologies for future space borne gravitational wave observatories. Here we propose a framework to derive the optimal signals in terms of minimum parameter uncertainty to be injected to these instruments during its calibration phase. We compare our results with an alternative numerical algorithm which achieves an optimal input signal by iteratively improving an initial guess. We show agreement of both approaches when applied to the LISA Pathfinder case.

  9. An original calibration technique for soft x-ray detectors and its use in the Tore Supra tomographic systema)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazon, D.; Pacella, D.; Malard, P.; Garnier, D.; Romano, A.; Bouchand, C.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes in detail the recent progresses which have been made in Tore Supra for developing a new technique of calibration of the soft x-ray (SXR) detectors in the range 1-30keV. The diode response as a function of the flux of photons resulted accurately linear over almost three orders of magnitude. Apart from a limited number of deficient detectors, promptly replaced with new ones, the spread of the diode responses (84 detectors) is about 20% total of the average value. It allowed the derivation of the calibration factor for each detector of the tomography system. The effect of the environmental temperature, in the range 15°-40°, has also been studied, revealing that up to 35° the linearity of diode response and these calibration factors remain constant. It demonstrates the capability of discriminating slight and localized changes in the two dimensional spatial distribution of the SXR intensity.

  10. High-efficiency neutron detectors and methods of making same

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Klann, Raymond

    2007-01-16

    Neutron detectors, advanced detector process techniques and advanced compound film designs have greatly increased neutron-detection efficiency. One embodiment of the detectors utilizes a semiconductor wafer with a matrix of spaced cavities filled with one or more types of neutron reactive material such as 10B or 6LiF. The cavities are etched into both the front and back surfaces of the device such that the cavities from one side surround the cavities from the other side. The cavities may be etched via holes or etched slots or trenches. In another embodiment, the cavities are different-sized and the smaller cavities extend into the wafer from the lower surfaces of the larger cavities. In a third embodiment, multiple layers of different neutron-responsive material are formed on one or more sides of the wafer. The new devices operate at room temperature, are compact, rugged, and reliable in design.

  11. Efficiency and spatial resolution of the CASCADE thermal neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhli, M.; Allmendinger, F.; Häußler, W.; Schröder, T.; Klein, M.; Meven, M.; Schmidt, U.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the CASCADE project - a detection system, which has been designed for the purposes of neutron Spin Echo spectroscopy and which is continuously further developed and adapted to various applications. It features 2D spatially resolved detection of thermal neutrons at high rates. The CASCADE detector is composed of a stack of solid 10B coated Gas Electron Multiplier foils, which serve both as a neutron converter and as an amplifier for the primary ionization deposited in the standard counting gas environment. This multi-layer setup efficiently increases the detection efficiency and by extracting the signal of the charge traversing the stack the conversion layer can be identified allowing a precise determination of the time-of-flight. The spatial resolution is found by optical contrast determination to be σ =(1.39 ± 0.05) mm and by divergence corrected aperture measurements σ =(1.454 ± 0.007) mm , which is in agreement with the simulated detector model. Furthermore this enabled to investigate and describe the non-Gaussian resolution function. At the HEiDi diffractometer the absolute detection efficiency has been studied. At 0.6 Å for the 6 layer detector, which is currently part of the RESEDA spectrometer, an efficiency of 7.8% has been measured, which by means of Monte Carlo simulations translates to (21.0±1.5)% for thermal neutrons at 1.8 Å and (46.9±3.3)% at 5.4 Å.

  12. NORSAR Final Scientific Report Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2009-04-16

    meet this challenge, we have examined two strategies: (1) use of subspace detectors, a multi-dimensional extension of correlators, which allow representation and detection of signals exhibiting some degree of variation; and (2) autonomous calibration of many subspace and correlation detectors in an adaptive detection framework, subject to analyst review. Because correlation detectors are relatively new to seismology, a significant amount of research on how to tune these detectors has been needed to address later calibration efforts that will arise as they are adopted for operational use. We have approached these challenges by carrying out a number of case studies, encompassing various monitoring scenarios such as earthquake aftershock sequences and swarms, recurring mining explosions, other types of explosions, and rockbursts. We have studied several different geographical regions (the European Arctic, Central Asia, and the western United States). We have drawn on available Ground Truth data in assessing the results of the various processing schemes. In all cases, we have benefited from the high-quality seismic arrays or networks available in these regions, and we have thus been able to evaluate the performance of array-based correlation processing under a variety of conditions. The main results of the project are summarized as follows: (1) Array-based waveform correlation has been demonstrated to lower significantly detection thresholds in comparison with standard single-channel waveform correlation. (2) Frequency-wavenumber analysis of the correlation traces on a small-aperture array provides an effective method for screening out a certain category of false alarms, and can therefore be used to improve detector sensitivity by lowering the threshold for automatic array detection. (3) We have developed and tested a framework for autonomous correlation detection. The framework comprises a set of conventional (STA/LTA) detectors on a collection of array beams, augmented

  13. Absolute calibration of soft x-ray detectors (photocathodes, XUV photodiodes, thinned CCD, ...) with the synchrotron radiation of SUPER ACO at the LURE, Orsay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdin, C.; Troussel, P.; Bourgade, J. L.; Le Guern, F.; Mens, A.; Schirmann, D.; Dalmasso, J. M.; Gontier, D.; Mazataud, D.

    1994-10-01

    To interpret the experimental results in laser matter interaction experiments, the absolute spectral response of soft x-ray detectors is often needed. For this purpose CEL-V uses calibration lines of synchrotron radiation of SUPER-ACO at the LURE. The energy of output photons can be selected from 50 eV to 1000 eV. The output photon flux is absolutely calibrated with a bolometer or a soft x-ray photodiode. Then we measure the response of the studied detector installed at the same location. Measurements of quantum efficiencies of photocathodes (Al and CsI on Al) and of the response of a thinned CCD are presented versus photon energy.

  14. Calibration of photomultiplier tubes for the fluorescence detector of telescope array experiment using a Rayleigh scattered laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawana, Shingo; Sakurai, Nobuyuki; Fujii, Toshihiro; Fukushima, Masaki; Inoue, Naoya; Matthews, John N.; Ogio, Shoichi; Sagawa, Hiroyuki; Taketa, Akimichi; Takita, Masato; Thomas, Stan B.; Tokuno, Hisao; Tsunesada, Yoshiki; Udo, Shigeharu; Wiencke, Lawrence R.

    2012-07-01

    We performed photometric calibration of the PhotoMultiplier Tube (PMT) and readout electronics used for the new fluorescence detectors of the Telescope Array (TA) experiment using Rayleigh scattered photons from a pulsed nitrogen laser beam. The experimental setup, measurement procedure, and results of calibration are described. The total systematic uncertainty of the calibration is estimated to be 7.2%. An additional uncertainty of 3.7% is introduced by the transport of the calibrated PMTs from the laboratory to the TA experimental site.

  15. Investigation of the quantum efficiency of optical heterodyne detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchman, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency response and quantum efficiency of optical photodetectors for heterodyne receivers is investigated. The measurements utilized two spectral lines from the output of two lasers as input to the photodetectors. These lines are easily measurable in power and frequency and hence serve as known inputs. By measuring the output current of the photodetector the quantum efficiency is determined as a function of frequency separation between the two input signals. An investigation of the theoretical basis and accuracy of this type of measurement relative to similar measurements utilizing risetime is undertaken. A theoretical study of the heterodyne process in photodetectors based on semiconductor physics is included so that higher bandwidth detectors may be designed. All measurements are made on commercially available detectors and manufacturers' specifications for normal photodetector operation are compared to the measured heterodyne characteristics.

  16. Data encoding efficiency in pixel detector readout with charge information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Wang, Xinkang

    2016-04-01

    The average minimum number of bits needed for lossless readout of a pixel detector is calculated, in the regime of interest for particle physics where only a small fraction of pixels have a non-zero value per frame. This permits a systematic comparison of the readout efficiency of different encoding implementations. The calculation is compared to the number of bits used by the FE-I4 pixel readout chip of the ATLAS experiment.

  17. Roadmap for High Efficiency Solid-State Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R; Cheung, C; Reinhardt, C; Wang, T

    2005-07-12

    Solid-state thermal neutron detectors are generally fabricated in a planar configuration by coating a layer of neutron-to-alpha converter material onto a semiconductor. The as-created alpha particles in the material are expected to impinge the semiconductor and create electron-hole pairs which provide the electrical signal. These devices are limited in efficiency to a range near (2-5%)/cm{sup 2} due to the conflicting thickness requirements of the converter layer. In this case, the layer is required to be thick enough to capture the incoming neutron flux while at the same time adequately thin to allow the alpha particles to reach the semiconductor. A three dimensional matrix structure has great potential to satisfy these two requirements in one device. Such structures can be realized by using PIN diode pillar elements to extend in the third dimension with the converter material filling the rest of the matrix. Our strategy to fabricate this structure is based on both ''top-down'' and ''bottom-up'' approaches. The ''top down'' approach employs high-density plasma etching techniques, while the ''bottom up'' approach draws on the growth of nanowires by chemical vapor deposition. From our simulations for structures with pillar diameters from 2 {micro}m down to 100 nm, the detector efficiency is expected to increase with a decrease in pillar size. Moreover, in the optimized configuration, the detector efficiency could be higher than 75%/cm{sup 2}. Finally, the road map for the relationship between detector diameter and efficiency will be outlined.

  18. Radiometric calibration of the vacuum-ultraviolet spectrograph SUMER on the SOHO spacecraft with the B detector.

    PubMed

    Schühle, U; Curdt, W; Hollandt, J; Feldman, U; Lemaire, P; Wilhelm, K

    2000-01-20

    The Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) vacuum-ultraviolet spectrograph was calibrated in the laboratory before the integration of the instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft in 1995. During the scientific operation of the SOHO it has been possible to track the radiometric calibration of the SUMER spectrograph since March 1996 by a strategy that employs various methods to update the calibration status and improve the coverage of the spectral calibration curve. The results for the A Detector were published previously [Appl. Opt. 36, 6416 (1997)]. During three years of operation in space, the B detector was used for two and one-half years. We describe the characteristics of the B detector and present results of the tracking and refinement of the spectral calibration curves with it. Observations of the spectra of the stars alpha and rho Leonis permit an extrapolation of the calibration curves in the range from 125 to 149.0 nm. Using a solar coronal spectrum observed above the solar disk, we can extrapolate the calibration curves by measuring emission line pairs with well-known intensity ratios. The sensitivity ratio of the two photocathode areas can be obtained by registration of many emission lines in the entire spectral range on both KBr-coated and bare parts of the detector's active surface. The results are found to be consistent with the published calibration performed in the laboratory in the wavelength range from 53 to 124 nm. We can extrapolate the calibration outside this range to 147 nm with a relative uncertainty of ?30% (1varsigma) for wavelengths longer than 125 nm and to 46.5 nm with 50% uncertainty for the short-wavelength range below 53 nm. PMID:18337910

  19. Towards monolithic scintillator based TOF-PET systems: practical methods for detector calibration and operation.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on thick monolithic scintillator crystals can achieve spatial resolutions  <2 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and coincidence resolving times (CRTs) better than 200 ps FWHM. Moreover, they provide high sensitivity and depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. While these are excellent characteristics for clinical time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET), the application of monolithic scintillators has so far been hampered by the lengthy and complex procedures needed for position- and time-of-interaction estimation. Here, the algorithms previously developed in our group are revised to make the calibration and operation of a large number of monolithic scintillator detectors in a TOF-PET system practical. In particular, the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method for x,y-position estimation is accelerated with an algorithm that quickly preselects only the most useful reference events, reducing the computation time for position estimation by a factor of ~200 compared to the previously published k-NN 1D method. Also, the procedures for estimating the DOI and time of interaction are revised to enable full detector calibration by means of fan-beam or flood irradiations only. Moreover, a new technique is presented to allow the use of events in which some of the photosensor pixel values and/or timestamps are missing (e.g. due to dead time), so as to further increase system sensitivity. The accelerated methods were tested on a monolithic scintillator detector specifically developed for clinical PET applications, consisting of a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO : Ce crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array. This resulted in a spatial resolution of 1.7 mm FWHM, an average DOI resolution of 3.7 mm FWHM, and a CRT of 214 ps. Moreover, the possibility of using events missing the information of up to 16 out of 64 photosensor pixels is shown. This results in only a small

  20. Towards monolithic scintillator based TOF-PET systems: practical methods for detector calibration and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on thick monolithic scintillator crystals can achieve spatial resolutions  <2 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) and coincidence resolving times (CRTs) better than 200 ps FWHM. Moreover, they provide high sensitivity and depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. While these are excellent characteristics for clinical time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET), the application of monolithic scintillators has so far been hampered by the lengthy and complex procedures needed for position- and time-of-interaction estimation. Here, the algorithms previously developed in our group are revised to make the calibration and operation of a large number of monolithic scintillator detectors in a TOF-PET system practical. In particular, the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method for x,y-position estimation is accelerated with an algorithm that quickly preselects only the most useful reference events, reducing the computation time for position estimation by a factor of ~200 compared to the previously published k-NN 1D method. Also, the procedures for estimating the DOI and time of interaction are revised to enable full detector calibration by means of fan-beam or flood irradiations only. Moreover, a new technique is presented to allow the use of events in which some of the photosensor pixel values and/or timestamps are missing (e.g. due to dead time), so as to further increase system sensitivity. The accelerated methods were tested on a monolithic scintillator detector specifically developed for clinical PET applications, consisting of a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO : Ce crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array. This resulted in a spatial resolution of 1.7 mm FWHM, an average DOI resolution of 3.7 mm FWHM, and a CRT of 214 ps. Moreover, the possibility of using events missing the information of up to 16 out of 64 photosensor pixels is shown. This results in only a small

  1. Online calibration of neutrino liquid scintillator detectors above 10 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurnov, A. S.; Gromov, M. B.; Shamarin, A. F.

    2016-02-01

    Online calibration of neutrino liquid scintillator detector at energies above 10 MeV is very important for study of such rare process as supernova and for correct calculation of backgrounds if spectral properties is the focus of researches. The traditional procedure implies the usage of radioactive sources with well-known spectral properties but such approach is limited by available radioactive sources, upper possible energies (∼10-11 MeV) and dangerous for ultra low background environment of modern detectors. The approach we propose is based on simulation of events with controllable UV double LED pulser. The LED's main wavelength fits the scintillator excitation wavelength. This technique allows to simulate physical events within the detector in very wide energy range from a few hundred keV to about 50 MeV. Additional studies like pile-up analysis can be performed due to double-LEDs scheme which generates two delayed signals with different adjustable amplitudes. The delay time is also adjustable parameter.

  2. Efficient Calibration of Categorical Parameter Distributions using Subspace Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khambhammettu, P.; Renard, P.; Doherty, J.

    2014-12-01

    Categorical parameter distributions are common-place in hydrogeological systems consisting of rock-types / aquifer materials with distinct properties, eg: sand channels in a clay matrix. Model calibration is difficult in such systems because the inverse problem is hindered by the discontinuities in the parameter space. In this paper, we present two approaches based on sub-space methods to generate categorical parameter distributions of aquifer parameters that meet calibration constraints (eg:- measured water level data, gradients) while honoring prior geological constraints. In the first approach, the prior geological information and acceptable parameter distributions are encapsulated in a simple object-based model. In the second approach, a Multiple-Point Statistics simulator is used to represent the prior geological information. Sub-space methods in conjunction with dynamic pilot points are then employed to explore the parameter space and determine the parameter combinations that optimally honor geologic and calibration constraints. Using a simple aquifer system, we demonstrate that the new approach is capable of quickly generating multiple multiple parameter distributions that honor both geological and calibration constraints. We also explore the underlying parameter and predictive uncertainty using Null Space Monte Carlo techniques.

  3. Calibration experiments of 3He neutron detectors for analyzing neutron emissivity in the hot-ion mode on the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohagura, J.; Cho, T.; Hirata, M.; Watanabe, H.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Yoshida, M.; Ito, H.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yatsu, K.; Miyoshi, S.; Ogura, K.; Kondoh, T.; Nishitani, T.; Kwon, M.; England, A. C.

    2003-03-01

    Under the international fusion cooperating research, 3He neutron detectors in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror are calibrated by the use of a 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron source (8.96×104 n/s). The calibration experiments are carried out with a "rail system" placed along the magnetic axis of the GAMMA 10 central-cell region, where hot ions in the plasma experiments with the bulk temperatures of ˜10 keV are produced. As compared to a previous neutron monitoring system with a BF3 detector in GAMMA 10, the present 3He systems are designed with about two orders-of-magnitude higher neutron-counting efficiency for analyzing a neutron emissivity from the plasmas in a single plasma discharge alone. Two 3He systems are installed near the middle and the end of the central cell so as to identify the central-cell hot-ion axial profile. The filling pressure of 3He, the effective length, and the diameter of the detector are designed as 5 bar, 300 mm, and 50 mm, respectively. The detector output spectra are carefully analyzed by the use of a preamplifier, a shaping amplifier, as well as a multichannel analyzer for each 3He detector. In the present article, the neutron-counting data from the two 3He detectors due to the on-axis 252Cf scan are interpreted in terms of the d-2 intensity dependence (d being the distance between the detector and the neutron source) as well as the effects of the central-cell magnetic coils and the other machine structural components.

  4. Calibration of spectral responsivity of IR detectors in the range from 0.6 μm to 24 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobedov, Vyacheslav B.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Hanssen, Leonard M.; Larason, Thomas C.

    2016-05-01

    We report the upgraded performance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) facility for spectral responsivity calibrations of infrared (IR) detectors in both radiant power and irradiance measurement modes. The extension of the wavelength range of the previous scale, below 0.8 μm and above 19 μm in radiant power mode as well as above 5.3 μm in irradiance mode, became available as a result of multiple improvements. The calibration facility was optimized for low-level radiant flux. A significantly reduced noise-equivalent-power and a relatively constant spectral response were achieved recently on newly developed pyroelectric detectors. Also, an efficient optical geometry was developed for calibration of the spectral irradiance responsivity without using an integrating sphere. Simultaneously, the upgrade and maintenance of the NIST transfer standards, with an extended spectral range, were supported by spectral reflectance measurements of a transfer standard pyroelectric detector using a custom integrating sphere and a Fourier transform spectrometer. The sphere reflectance measurements performed in a relative mode were compared to a bare gold-coated mirror reference, separately calibrated at the Fourier transform Infrared Spectrophotometry facility to 18 μm. Currently, the reflectance data for the pyroelectric standard, available in the range up to 30 μm, are supporting the absolute power responsivity scale by the propagation of the reflectance curve to the absolute tie-spectrum in the overlapping range. Typical examples of working standard pyroelectric-, Si-, MCT-, InSb- and InGaAs- detectors are presented and their optimal use for scale dissemination is analyzed.

  5. High quantum efficiency S-20 photocathodes in photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, D. A.; DeFazio, J.; Duarte Pinto, S.; Glazenborg, R.; Kernen, E.

    2016-04-01

    Based on conventional S-20 processes, a new series of high quantum efficiency (QE) photocathodes has been developed that can be specifically tuned for use in the ultraviolet, blue or green regions of the spectrum. The QE values exceed 30% at maximum response, and the dark count rate is found to be as low as 30 Hz/cm2 at room temperature. This combination of properties along with a fast temporal response makes these photocathodes ideal for application in photon counting detectors, which is demonstrated with an MCP photomultiplier tube for single and multi-photoelectron detection.

  6. Gamma-spectrometric uranium age-dating using intrinsic efficiency calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Cong Tam; Zsigrai, József

    2006-01-01

    A non-destructive, gamma-spectrometric method for uranium age-dating is presented which is applicable to material of any physical form and geometrical shape. It relies on measuring the daughter/parent activity ratio 214Bi/234U by low-background, high-resolution gamma-spectrometry using intrinsic efficiency calibration. The method does not require the use of any reference materials nor the use of an efficiency calibrated geometry.

  7. Optimal design of calibration signals in space-borne gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrarias, Miquel; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Gibert, Ferran; Armano, Michele; Audley, Heather; Danzmann, Karsten; Diepholz, Ingo; Dolesi, Rita; Ferraioli, Luigi; Ferroni, Valerio; Hewitson, Martin; Hueller, Mauro; Inchauspe, Henri; Jennrich, Oliver; Korsakova, Natalia; McNamara, Paul W.; Plagnol, Eric; Thorpe, James I.; Vetrugno, Daniele; Vitale, Stefano; Wass, Peter; Weber, William J.

    2016-05-01

    Future space-borne gravitational wave detectors will require a precise definition of calibration signals to ensure the achievement of their design sensitivity. The careful design of the test signals plays a key role in the correct understanding and characterization of these instruments. In that sense, methods achieving optimal experiment designs must be considered as complementary to the parameter estimation methods being used to determine the parameters describing the system. The relevance of experiment design is particularly significant for the LISA Pathfinder mission, which will spend most of its operation time performing experiments to characterize key technologies for future space-borne gravitational wave observatories. Here we propose a framework to derive the optimal signals—in terms of minimum parameter uncertainty—to be injected into these instruments during the calibration phase. We compare our results with an alternative numerical algorithm which achieves an optimal input signal by iteratively improving an initial guess. We show agreement of both approaches when applied to the LISA Pathfinder case.

  8. Low energy response of the NICER detectors and "threshold efficiency" effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigozhin, Gregory; Doty, John; LaMarr, Beverly; Malonis, Andrew; Remillard, Ronald A.; Scholze, Frank; Laubis, Christian; Krumrey, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is an instrument that is planned to be installed on the International Space Station in 2016 to study time-resolved spectra of the rapidly changing celestial ojects. The focal plane of the instrument consists of 56 Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). Signal from each SDD is fed to shaping amplifiers and triggering circuits that determine both amplitude and time of arrival for each "event".Zero crossing timing circuit is used in order to suppress energy dependent "time walk". That is done with a chain producing a derivative of the shaped signal, and the same chain detects threshold crossings marking the arrival of an X-ray photon. Higher noise of the differentiated signal leads to a somewhat extended band of signal amplitudes close to the threshold value, for which detection efficiency is less than 100%. Detection efficiency in this area affects the low energy portion of the detector response, and is very well described by an error function. We will present accurate measurements of this effect, show the consequences for the instrument quantum efficiency and the shape of the response function and will describe the calibration procedures that would allow selection of optimal threshold values for each observation.

  9. Computationally efficient calibration of WATCLASS Hydrologic models using surrogate optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamali, M.; Ponnambalam, K.; Soulis, E. D.

    2007-07-01

    In this approach, exploration of the cost function space was performed with an inexpensive surrogate function, not the expensive original function. The Design and Analysis of Computer Experiments(DACE) surrogate function, which is one type of approximate models, which takes correlation function for error was employed. The results for Monte Carlo Sampling, Latin Hypercube Sampling and Design and Analysis of Computer Experiments(DACE) approximate model have been compared. The results show that DACE model has a good potential for predicting the trend of simulation results. The case study of this document was WATCLASS hydrologic model calibration on Smokey-River watershed.

  10. A Study for Efficient Methods of System Calibration between Optical and Range Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, W.; Kim, C.; Kim, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, interests in 3D indoor modeling and positioning have been growing. Data fusion by using different sensors data is one of the 3D model producing methods. For a data fusion between two kinds of sensors, precise system calibration is essential. If relative geometric location of each sensor can be accurately measured with a system-calibration, it is possible to locate a pixel that corresponds to the same object in two different images, and thus, produce a more precise data-fusion. Purpose of this study is finding more efficient method of system calibration between optical and range sensor. For this purpose, experiment was designed by considering following variables, i) system calibration method, ii) testbed type, iii) and distance data(whether use it or not). So, In this study, test-bed for system calibration was designed by considering the characteristics of sensors. Also, precise simulation was done to find efficient method of system calibration, and its results were reflected in real experiment. Results of simulation show that the bundle adjustment method is more efficient than single photo resection in system calibration between range and optical sensors. And the most efficient case was when using i) the bundle adjustment with ii) the simulated data set which were obtained between 2m to 4m away from the test-bed. These results of simulation were reflected in real system calibration. Finally, real system calibration were performed and its results were compared to results of simulation. And accuracy of system calibration was evaluated by producing fusion data between range and optical sensors.

  11. An efficient circle detector not relying on edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jia; Huang, Panfeng; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Accurate and efficient detection of circular modules fixed on non-cooperative target is a key technology for Tethered Space Robot. This paper presents an efficient circle detector based on region-growing of gradient and histogram distribution of Euclidean distance. Region-growing of gradient is applied to generate arc support regions from single point. And the corresponding square fitting areas are defined to accelerate the detection and decrease storage. A histogram is then used to count frequency of the distances that participates in the accumulator and the parameters of each circle are acquired. Finally, a verification strategy of circular integrity is designed to test the detection results. We have tested our algorithm on 35 images dealing with kinds of circles and ellipses. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to detect circular objects under occlusion, image noises and moderate shape deformations with a good precision.

  12. Calculation of the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, L.P.; Hendel, H.W.; Liew, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    Neutron transport simulations have been carried out to calculate the absolute detection efficiency of a moderated /sup 235/U neutron detector which is used on the TFTR as a part of the primary fission detector diagnostic system for measuring fusion power yields. Transport simulations provide a means by which the effects of variations in various shielding and geometrical parameters can be explored. These effects are difficult to study in calibration experiments. The calculational model, benchmarked against measurements, can be used to complement future detector calibrations, when the high level of radioactivity resulting from machine operation may severely restrict access to the tokamak. We present a coupled forward-adjoint algorithm, employing both the deterministic and Monte Carlo sampling methods, to model the neutron transport in the complex tokamak and detector geometries. Sensitivities of the detector response to the major and minor radii, and angular anisotropy of the neutron emission are discussed. A semi-empirical model based on matching the calculational results with a small set of experiments produces good agreement (+-15%) for a wide range of source energies and geometries. 20 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Optic detectors calibration for measuring ultra-high energy extensive air showers Cherenkov radiation by 532 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knurenko, Stanislav; Petrov, Igor; Egorov, Yuri

    2015-08-01

    Calibration of a PMT matrix is crucial for the treatment of the data obtained with Cherenkov tracking detector. Furthermore, due to high variability of the aerosol abundance in the atmosphere depending on season, weather etc. A constant monitoring of the atmospheric transparency is required during the measurements. For this purpose, besides traditional methods, a station for laser atmospheric probing is used.

  14. Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Hans-Joachim

    Commercial spectrographic systems are usually supplied with some wave-length calibration, but it is essential that the experimenter performs his own calibration for reliable measurements. A number of sources emitting well-known emission lines are available, and the best values of their wavelengths may be taken from data banks accessible on the internet. Data have been critically evaluated for many decades by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the USA [13], see also p. 3. Special data bases have been established by the astronomy and fusion communities (Appendix B).

  15. Performance and Calibration of H2RG Detectors and SIDECAR ASICs for the RATIR Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Ori D.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Rapchun, David A.; Klein, Christopher R.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Bloom, Josh; de Diego, Jos A.; Simn Farah, Alejandro D.; Gehrels, Neil A.; Georgiev, Leonid; Gonzlez-Hernandez, J. Jess; Lee, William H.; Loose, Markus; Lotkin, Gennadiy; Moseley, Samuel H.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Richer, Michael G.; Robinson, Frederick D.; Romn-Zuniga, Carols; Samuel, Mathew V.; Sparr, Leroy M.; Watson, Alan M.

    2012-01-01

    The Reionization And Transient Infra,.Red (RATIR) camera has been built for rapid Gamma,.Ray Burst (GRE) followup and will provide simultaneous optical and infrared photometric capabilities. The infrared portion of this camera incorporates two Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG detectors, controlled by Teledyne's SIDECAR ASICs. While other ground-based systems have used the SIDECAR before, this system also utilizes Teledyne's JADE2 interface card and IDE development environment. Together, this setup comprises Teledyne's Development Kit, which is a bundled solution that can be efficiently integrated into future ground-based systems. In this presentation, we characterize the system's read noise, dark current, and conversion gain.

  16. Field calibration of PADC track etch detectors for local neutron dosimetry in man using different radiation qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen; Boschung, Markus; Mayer, Sabine; Clasie, Benjamin; Kry, Stephen F.; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-12-01

    In order to quantify the dose from neutrons to a patient for contemporary radiation treatment techniques, measurements inside phantoms, representing the patient, are necessary. Published reports on neutron dose measurements cover measurements performed free in air or on the surface of phantoms and the doses are expressed in terms of personal dose equivalent or ambient dose equivalent. This study focuses on measurements of local neutron doses inside a radiotherapy phantom and presents a field calibration procedure for PADC track etch detectors. An initial absolute calibration factor in terms of Hp(10) for personal dosimetry is converted into neutron dose equivalent and additional calibration factors are derived to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence for different radiation therapy beam qualities and depths in the phantom. The neutron spectra used for the calculation of the calibration factors are determined in different depths by Monte Carlo simulations for the investigated radiation qualities. These spectra are used together with the energy dependent response function of the PADC detectors to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence. The resulting total calibration factors are 0.76 for a photon beam (in- and out-of-field), 1.00 (in-field) and 0.84 (out-of-field) for an active proton beam and 1.05 (in-field) and 0.91 (out-of-field) for a passive proton beam, respectively. The uncertainty for neutron dose measurements using this field calibration method is less than 40%. The extended calibration procedure presented in this work showed that it is possible to use PADC track etch detectors for measurements of local neutron dose equivalent inside anthropomorphic phantoms by accounting for spectral changes in the neutron fluence.

  17. Verification of Absolute Calibration of Quantum Efficiency for LSST CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Rebecca; Chiang, James; Cinabro, David; Gilbertson, Woodrow; Haupt, justine; Kotov, Ivan; Neal, Homer; Nomerotski, Andrei; O'Connor, Paul; Stubbs, Christopher; Takacs, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We describe a system to measure the Quantum Efficiency in the wavelength range of 300nm to 1100nm of 40x40 mm n-channel CCD sensors for the construction of the 3.2 gigapixel LSST focal plane. The technique uses a series of instruments to create a very uniform flux of photons of controllable intensity in the wavelength range of interest across the face of the sensor. This allows the absolute Quantum Efficiency to be measured with an accuracy in the 1% range. This system will be part of a production facility at Brookhaven National Lab for the basic components of the LSST camera.

  18. Pure sources and efficient detectors for optical quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielnicki, Kevin

    Over the last sixty years, classical information theory has revolutionized the understanding of the nature of information, and how it can be quantified and manipulated. Quantum information processing extends these lessons to quantum systems, where the properties of intrinsic uncertainty and entanglement fundamentally defy classical explanation. This growing field has many potential applications, including computing, cryptography, communication, and metrology. As inherently mobile quantum particles, photons are likely to play an important role in any mature large-scale quantum information processing system. However, the available methods for producing and detecting complex multi-photon states place practical limits on the feasibility of sophisticated optical quantum information processing experiments. In a typical quantum information protocol, a source first produces an interesting or useful quantum state (or set of states), perhaps involving superposition or entanglement. Then, some manipulations are performed on this state, perhaps involving quantum logic gates which further manipulate or entangle the intial state. Finally, the state must be detected, obtaining some desired measurement result, e.g., for secure communication or computationally efficient factoring. The work presented here concerns the first and last stages of this process as they relate to photons: sources and detectors. Our work on sources is based on the need for optimized non-classical states of light delivered at high rates, particularly of single photons in a pure quantum state. We seek to better understand the properties of spontaneous parameteric downconversion (SPDC) sources of photon pairs, and in doing so, produce such an optimized source. We report an SPDC source which produces pure heralded single photons with little or no spectral filtering, allowing a significant rate enhancement. Our work on detectors is based on the need to reliably measure single-photon states. We have focused on

  19. The Charge Transfer Efficiency and Calibration of WFPC2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2000-01-01

    A new determination of WFPC2 photometric corrections is presented, using HSTphot reduction of the WFPC2 Omega Centauri and NGC 2419 observations from January 1994 through March 2000 and a comparison with ground-based photometry. No evidence is seen for any position-independent photometric offsets (the "long-short anomaly"); all systematic errors appear to be corrected with the CTE and zero point solution. The CTE loss time dependence is determined to be very significant in the Y direction, causing time-independent CTE solutions to be valid only for a small range of times. On average, the present solution produces corrections similar to Whitmore, Heyer, & Casertano, although with an improved functional form that produces less scatter in the residuals and determined with roughly a year of additional data. In addition to the CTE loss characterization, zero point corrections are also determined as functions of chip, gain, filter, and temperature. Of interest, there are chip-to-chip differences of order 0.01 - 0.02 magnitudes relative to the Holtzman et al. calibrations, and the present study provides empirical zero point determinations for the non-standard filters such as the frequently-used F450W, F606W, and F702W.

  20. Cross calibration of telescope optical throughput efficiencies using reconstructed shower energies for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. M. W.; Parsons, R. D.; Hofmann, W.; Bernlöhr, K.

    2016-02-01

    For reliable event reconstruction of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs), calibration of the optical throughput efficiency is required. Within current facilities, this is achieved through the use of ring shaped images generated by muons. Here, a complementary approach is explored, achieving cross calibration of elements of IACT arrays through pairwise comparisons between telescopes, focussing on its applicability to the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). Intercalibration of telescopes of a particular type using eventwise comparisons of shower image amplitudes has previously been demonstrated to recover the relative telescope optical responses. A method utilising the reconstructed energy as an alternative to image amplitude is presented, enabling cross calibration between telescopes of varying types within an IACT array. Monte Carlo studies for two plausible CTA layouts have shown that this calibration procedure recovers the relative telescope response efficiencies at the few per cent level.

  1. Development and calibration of fine collimators for the ASTRO-H Soft Gamma-ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, T.; Kimura, D.; Fukazawa, Y.; Furui, S.; Goto, K.; Hayashi, T.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kawano, T.; Kitamura, Y.; Shirakawa, H.; Tanabe, T.; Makishima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakazawa, K.; Fukuyama, T.; Ichinohe, Y.; Ishimura, K.; Ohta, M.; Sato, T.; Takahashi, T.; Uchida, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Ishibashi, K.; Sakanobe, K.; Matsumoto, H.; Miyazawa, T.; Mori, H.; Sakai, M.; Tajima, H.

    2014-07-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is a Si/CdTe Compton telescope surrounded by a thick BGO active shield and is scheduled to be onboard the ASTRO-H satellite when it is launched in 2015. The SGD covers the energy range from 40 to 600 keV with high sensitivity, which allows us to study nonthermal phenomena in the universe. The SGD uses a Compton camera with the narrow field-of-view (FOV) concept to reduce the non-Xray background (NXB) and improve the sensitivity. Since the SGD is essentially a nonimaging instrument, it also has to cope with the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) within the FOV. The SGD adopts passive shields called "fine collimators" (FCs) to restrict the FOV to <= 0.6° for low-energy photons (<= 100 keV), which reduces contamination from CXB to less than what is expected due to NXB. Although the FC concept was already adopted by the Hard X-ray Detector onboard Suzaku, FCs for the SGD are about four times larger in size and are technically more difficult to operate. We developed FCs for the SGD and confirmed that the prototypes function as required by subjecting them to an X-ray test and environmental tests, such as vibration tests. We also developed an autocollimator system, which uses visible light to determine the transmittance and the optical axis, and calibrated it against data from the X-ray test. The acceptance tests of flight models started in December 2013: five out of six FCs were deemed acceptable, and one more unit is currently being produced. The activation properties were studied based on a proton-beam test and the results were used to estimate the in-orbit NXB.

  2. Monte Carlo Simulations for the Purpose of Efficiency Curve Calibration for the Fastscan Whole Body Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Hannah Robyn

    In order to be able to qualify and quantify radiation exposure in terms of dose, a Fastscan whole body counter must be calibrated correctly. Current calibration methods do not take the full range of body types into consideration when creating efficiency curve calibrations. The goal of this work is the creation of a Monte Carlo (MCNP) model, that allows the simulation of efficiency curves for a diverse population of subjects. Models were created for both the Darlington and the Pickering Fastscan WBCs, and the simulations were benchmarked against experimental results with good agreement. The Pickering Fastscan was found to have agreement to within +/-9%, and the Darlington Fastscan had agreement to within +/-11%. Further simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of increased body fat on the detected activity, as well as locating the position of external contamination using front/back ratios of activity. Simulations were also conducted to create efficiency calibrations that had good agreement with the manufacturer's efficiency curves. The work completed in this thesis can be used to create efficiency calibration curves for unique body compositions in the future.

  3. Calibration of relative sensitivity factors for impact ionization detectors with high-velocity silicate microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, Katherina; Trieloff, Mario; Hillier, Jon K.; Guglielmino, Massimo; Postberg, Frank; Srama, Ralf; Kempf, Sascha; Blum, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Impact ionization mass spectrometers, e.g., the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft can quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of impacting particles, if the ionization efficiencies of the elements to be quantified are appropriately calibrated. Although silicates are an abundant dust species inside and outside the Solar System, an experimental calibration was not available for elements typically found in silicates. We performed such a calibration by accelerating orthopyroxene dust of known composition with a modified Van de Graaff accelerator to velocities of up to 37.9 km s-1 and subsequent analyses by a high resolution impact ionization mass spectrometer, the Large Area Mass Analyzer (LAMA). The orthopyroxene dust, prepared from a natural rock sample, contains ∼90% orthopyroxene and ∼10% additional mineral species, such as clinopyroxene, spinel, amphibole, olivine and glasses, which are present as impurities within the orthopyroxene, due to inclusion or intergrowth. Hence, the dust material can be regarded as a multi-mineral mixture. After analyses, we find that most particle data cluster at a composition ascribed to pure orthopyroxene. Some data scatter is caused by stochastic effects, other data scatter is caused by the chemically different mineral impurities. Our data indicate that these minor mineral phases can be recognized within a multi-mineral mixture. Here, for the first time, we present experimentally derived relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) for impact ionization mass spectroscopy of silicates, enabling the quantitative determination of the composition of cosmic dust grains. Orthopyroxene data were used to infer RSFs for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe and K, for particles with radii ranging from 0.04 μm to 0.2 μm and velocities between 19 and 37.9 km s-1, impacting on a Rh-target.

  4. Patient-dependent count-rate adaptive normalization for PET detector efficiency with delayed-window coincidence events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Ye, Hongwei; Xia, Ting; Asma, Evren; Winkler, Mark; Gagnon, Daniel; Wang, Wenli

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative PET imaging is widely used in clinical diagnosis in oncology and neuroimaging. Accurate normalization correction for the efficiency of each line-of- response is essential for accurate quantitative PET image reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a normalization calibration method by using the delayed-window coincidence events from the scanning phantom or patient. The proposed method could dramatically reduce the ‘ring’ artifacts caused by mismatched system count-rates between the calibration and phantom/patient datasets. Moreover, a modified algorithm for mean detector efficiency estimation is proposed, which could generate crystal efficiency maps with more uniform variance. Both phantom and real patient datasets are used for evaluation. The results show that the proposed method could lead to better uniformity in reconstructed images by removing ring artifacts, and more uniform axial variance profiles, especially around the axial edge slices of the scanner. The proposed method also has the potential benefit to simplify the normalization calibration procedure, since the calibration can be performed using the on-the-fly acquired delayed-window dataset.

  5. Patient-dependent count-rate adaptive normalization for PET detector efficiency with delayed-window coincidence events.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaofeng; Ye, Hongwei; Xia, Ting; Asma, Evren; Winkler, Mark; Gagnon, Daniel; Wang, Wenli

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative PET imaging is widely used in clinical diagnosis in oncology and neuroimaging. Accurate normalization correction for the efficiency of each line-of- response is essential for accurate quantitative PET image reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a normalization calibration method by using the delayed-window coincidence events from the scanning phantom or patient. The proposed method could dramatically reduce the 'ring' artifacts caused by mismatched system count-rates between the calibration and phantom/patient datasets. Moreover, a modified algorithm for mean detector efficiency estimation is proposed, which could generate crystal efficiency maps with more uniform variance. Both phantom and real patient datasets are used for evaluation. The results show that the proposed method could lead to better uniformity in reconstructed images by removing ring artifacts, and more uniform axial variance profiles, especially around the axial edge slices of the scanner. The proposed method also has the potential benefit to simplify the normalization calibration procedure, since the calibration can be performed using the on-the-fly acquired delayed-window dataset. PMID:26086713

  6. Ultra-low Energy Calibration of LUX detector using 127Xe Electron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dongqing; Large Underground Xenon (LUX) Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. We present an absolute calibration of the liquid xenon electron recoil (ER) charge yield and fluctuations over an energy range 190 eVee to 33.2 keVee using low energy 127 Xe electron capture decay events from the LUX 85-day first WIMP search dataset. The sequence of gamma and X-ray cascade associated with 127 I produce clearly identified 2-vertex events in the LUX detector. We observe the K (33.2 keVee), L (5.2 keVee), M (1.1 keVee), and N (190 eVee) shell cascade events and verifiy the relative ratio of observed events for each shell. We extract both the mean and sigma of the charge signal yields (Qy) associated with the K, L, M, and N shell events. The N shell cascade analysis includes single extracted electron events, and represents the lowest energy ER in-situ measurements that have been explored in Xe.

  7. High-accuracy X-ray detector calibration based on cryogenic radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Müller, P.

    2010-06-01

    Cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs) are absolute thermal detectors, based on the equivalence of electrical power and radiant power. Their core piece is a cavity absorber, which is typically made of copper to achieve a short response time. At higher photon energies, the use of copper prevents the operation of ESRs due to increasing transmittance. A new absorber design for hard X-rays has been developed at the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The Monte Carlo simulation code Geant4 was applied to optimize its absorptance for photon energies of up to 60 keV. The measurement of the radiant power of monochromatized synchrotron radiation was achieved with relative standard uncertainties of less than 0.2 %, covering the entire photon energy range of three beamlines from 50 eV to 60 keV. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation of high spectral purity is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes against the ESR for photon energies up to 60 keV with relative standard uncertainties below 0.3 %. For some silicon photodiodes, the photocurrent is not linear with the incident radiant power.

  8. Calibration of the Tagger Detectors with GlueX Commissioning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Alexander; Sparks, Nathan; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The GlueX experiment at Jefferson Lab uses a linearly polarized photon beam to search for mesons with gluonic excitations and measure their spectrum and couplings. This polarized photon beam will be created using a 12 GeV electron beam incident on a 20 μm thick diamond radiator, where it undergoes coherent bremsstrahlung to produce an intensity enhancement in the region of 9 GeV with a linear polarization around 40 %. The energy of the photon is inferred by analyzing the post-bremsstrahlung electron energy in the tagging spectrometer. A highly segmented tagging detector called the tagger microscope will intercept the electrons in the region of the coherent peak 8.4-9.0 GeV photon energy. These electrons are incident on a two-dimensional array of scintillating fibers which are read out using multi-photon pixel counters (MPPC). Post-bremsstrahlung electrons outside of the coherent peak region corresponding to photon energies of 3.0-11.8 GeV are incident on a hodoscope of plastic scintillators which are read out by photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The calibration results for the tagger microscope and hodoscope using commissioning data will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  9. 2D wavelet-analysis-based calibration technique for flat-panel imaging detectors: application in cone beam volume CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Rongfeng; Conover, David L.

    1999-05-01

    The application of the newly developed flat panel x-ray imaging detector in cone beam volume CT has attracted increasing interest recently. Due to an imperfect solid state array manufacturing process, however, defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image unavoidably exist in all kinds of flat panel x-ray imaging detectors, which will cause severe streak and ring artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image and severely degrade image quality. A calibration technique, in which the artifacts resulting from the defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image can be reduced significantly, is presented in this paper. The detection of defective elements is distinctively based upon two-dimensional (2D) wavelet analysis. Because of its inherent localizability in recognizing singularities or discontinuities, wavelet analysis possesses the capability of detecting defective elements over a rather large x-ray exposure range, e.g., 20% to approximately 60% of the dynamic range of the detector used. Three-dimensional (3D) images of a low-contrast CT phantom have been reconstructed from projection images acquired by a flat panel x-ray imaging detector with and without calibration process applied. The artifacts caused individually by defective elements, gain non-uniformity and offset image have been separated and investigated in detail, and the correlation with each other have also been exposed explicitly. The investigation is enforced by quantitative analysis of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the image uniformity of the cone beam reconstruction image. It has been demonstrated that the ring and streak artifacts resulting from the imperfect performance of a flat panel x-ray imaging detector can be reduced dramatically, and then the image qualities of a cone beam reconstruction image, such as contrast resolution and image uniformity are improved significantly. Furthermore, with little modification, the calibration technique presented here is also applicable

  10. CALIBRATION AND TESTING OF A LARGE-AREA FAST-NEUTRON DIRECTIONAL DETECTOR.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER,P.E.

    2007-05-16

    We have developed a new directional fast-neutron detector based on double proton recoil in two separated planes of plastic scintillators with position-sensitive readout. This method allows the energy spectrum of the neutrons to be measured by a combination of peak amplitude in the first plane and time of flight to the second plane. The planes are made up of 1-m long, 10-cm high paddles with photomultipliers at both ends, so that the location of an event along the paddle can be estimated from the time delay between the optical pulses detected at the two ends. The direction of the scattered neutron can be estimated from the locations of two time-correlated events in the two planes, and the energy lost in the first scattering event can be estimated from the pulse amplitude in the first plane. The direction of the incident neutron can then be determined to lie on a cone whose angle is determined by the kinematic equations. The superposition of many such cones generates an image that indicates the presence of a localized source. Setting upper and lower limits on the time of flight allows discrimination between gamma rays, muons and neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the expected angular resolution and efficiency. These models show that the lower energy limit for useful directional events is about 100 keV, because lower energy neutrons are likely to scatter more than once in the first plane. Placing a shadow bar in front of the detector provides an alternative way to obtain the direction to a point source, which may require fewer events. This method also can provide dual capability as a directional gamma detector.

  11. Time- and Computation-Efficient Calibration of MEMS 3D Accelerometers and Gyroscopes

    PubMed Central

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2014-01-01

    We propose calibration methods for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes that are efficient in terms of time and computational complexity. The calibration process for both sensors is simple, does not require additional expensive equipment, and can be performed in the field before or between motion measurements. The methods rely on a small number of defined calibration measurements that are used to obtain the values of 12 calibration parameters. This process enables the static compensation of sensor inaccuracies. The values detected by the 3D sensor are interpreted using a generalized 3D sensor model. The model assumes that the values detected by the sensor are equal to the projections of the measured value on the sensor sensitivity axes. Although this finding is trivial for 3D accelerometers, its validity for 3D gyroscopes is not immediately apparent; thus, this paper elaborates on this latter topic. For an example sensor device, calibration parameters were established using calibration measurements of approximately 1.5 min in duration for the 3D accelerometer and 2.5 min in duration for the 3D gyroscope. Correction of each detected 3D value using the established calibration parameters in further measurements requires only nine addition and nine multiplication operations. PMID:25123469

  12. An efficient camera calibration technique offering robustness and accuracy over a wide range of lens distortion.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Taufiqur; Krouglicof, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    In the field of machine vision, camera calibration refers to the experimental determination of a set of parameters that describe the image formation process for a given analytical model of the machine vision system. Researchers working with low-cost digital cameras and off-the-shelf lenses generally favor camera calibration techniques that do not rely on specialized optical equipment, modifications to the hardware, or an a priori knowledge of the vision system. Most of the commonly used calibration techniques are based on the observation of a single 3-D target or multiple planar (2-D) targets with a large number of control points. This paper presents a novel calibration technique that offers improved accuracy, robustness, and efficiency over a wide range of lens distortion. This technique operates by minimizing the error between the reconstructed image points and their experimentally determined counterparts in "distortion free" space. This facilitates the incorporation of the exact lens distortion model. In addition, expressing spatial orientation in terms of unit quaternions greatly enhances the proposed calibration solution by formulating a minimally redundant system of equations that is free of singularities. Extensive performance benchmarking consisting of both computer simulation and experiments confirmed higher accuracy in calibration regardless of the amount of lens distortion present in the optics of the camera. This paper also experimentally confirmed that a comprehensive lens distortion model including higher order radial and tangential distortion terms improves calibration accuracy. PMID:21843988

  13. EFFICIENCY STUDY OF A LEGe DETECTOR SYSTEM FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF 241Am IN SKULL AT CIEMAT WHOLE BODY COUNTER.

    PubMed

    Pérez López, B; Navarro, J F; López Ponte, M A; Nogueira, P

    2016-09-01

    (241)Am incorporation due to an incident or chronic exposure causes an internal dose, which can be evaluated from the total activity of this isotope in the skeleton several months after the intake. For this purpose, it is necessary to perform in vivo measurements of this bone-seeker radionuclide in appropriate counting bone geometries with very low attenuation of surrounded tissue and to extrapolate to total activity in the skeleton (ICRP 89, Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values. 2001. 265). The work here presented refers to direct measurements of americium in the Cohen skull phantom at the CIEMAT Whole Body Counter (WBC) using low-energy germanium (LEGe) detectors inside a shielding room. The main goal was to determinate the most adequate head counting geometry for the in vivo detection of americium in the bone. The calibration of the in vivo LEGe system was performed with four detectors with 2 cm of distance to Cohen phantom. Two geometries were measured, on junction of frontal to parietal bones and frontal bone. The efficiencies are very similar in both geometries, the preferred counting geometry is the most comfortable for the person, with the LEGe detectors in the highest part of the frontal bone, near the junction with the parietal bone, CIEMAT WBC participated in a skull intercomparison exercise organised by WG7 of EURADOS (European Radiation Dosimetry Group e.V.). Efficiencies using three different skull phantoms were obtained. Measurements were performed for different head counting positions, four of them in the plane of symmetry and others over the temporal bone. The detector was placed in parallel with the calibration phantom at a distance of 1 cm. The main gamma emission of (241)Am, 59.5 keV (36 %), was used for comparing efficiency values. The lower efficiency was obtained over the frontal and occipital bones. Measurement with one LEGe detector over the parietal bone is the most efficient. The

  14. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  15. Absolute photometric calibration of detectors to 0.3 mmag using amplitude-stabilized lasers and a helium-cooled absolute radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Laser sources whose intensity is determined with a cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer are described. Detectors are then calibrated against this known flux, with an overall error of 0.028 percent (0.3 mmag). Ongoing research has produced laser intensity stabilizers with flicker and drift of less than 0.01 percent. Recently, the useful wavelength limit of these stabilizers have been extended to 1.65 microns by using a new modular technology and InGaAs detector systems. Data from Si photodiode calibration using the method of Zalewski and Geist are compared against an absolute cavity radiometer calibration as an internal check on the calibration system.

  16. Determination of TFTR far-field neutron detector efficiencies by local neutron flux spectrum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, D. L.; Ascione, G.; Kugel, H. W.; Roquemore, A. L.; Barcelo, T. W.; Kumar, A.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron detectors have often been located on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) test cell floor 3 m or more from the vacuum vessel for ease of detector access, to reduce radiation damage, minimize count saturation problems, and to avoid high magnetic fields. These detectors include Si surface-barrier diodes, fission chambers, natural diamond detectors, and T2 production in a moderated 3He cell. To evaluate the performance of these detectors during deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation, we determined the neutron flux spectrum incident on the principal detector enclosure using nuclide sample sets containing Al, Ti, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni, Zr, Nb, In, and Au activation foils. Foils were installed and then removed after ample exposure to TFTR D-T neutrons. High efficiency, high purity Ge detectors were used for gamma spectroscopy of the irradiated foils. The incident neutron fluence and spectral distribution were unfolded from the measured results, and used to derive absolute detector efficiencies.

  17. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  18. Calibration of far-IR and sub-mm detectors traceable to the international system of units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ralf; Gutschwager, Berndt; Monte, Christian; Steiger, Andreas; Hollandt, Jörg

    2010-09-01

    Precision power measurement of electromagnetic radiation is required to establish metrological applications, e.g. remote sensing. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), as the national metrology institute of Germany, has started to determine the spectral responsivity of detectors for THz radiation. In this work, the THz spectral range denotes the wavelength range from 60 μm to 300 μm, corresponding to 5 THz to 1 THz, which is traditionally the overlap between far-IR and the sub-mm range. Traceability of power measurement to the international system of units (SI) has been missing in the THz region in the past. The PTB establishes this traceability by using two complementary optical approaches, source- and detector-based radiometry. Both methods have been successfully prototyped. These primary investigations led to the design of a new measurement facility for the determination of THz radiant power and the responsivity calibration of THz detectors traceable to the SI.

  19. Calibration of the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) detector in star experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanazi, Norah

    an ideal detector for heavy flavor studies. The HFT consists of three subsystems, each deploying a different silicon technology. In the heart of HFT there are two layers of 400 thin silicon pixel sensors, each sensor having about one million individual pixels. The HFT is used to extend the tracks reconstructed in the Time Projection Chamber towards the event vertex, increasing at the same time their pointing resolution from a few millimeters down to about 30 microns. The achieved resolution allow us to fully reconstruct the heavy flavor hadron's decay vertex. In this Thesis we present work and results on HFT calibration issues using a sample of the first data taken with HFT, the Run14 data set. We will focus on event vertex resolution, alignment, particle identification and selection, and track pointing resolution. We also compare our results with previous analyses and the design goals of HFT.

  20. A novel method to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yiping; Yao, Rutao; Ma, Tianyu

    2008-12-01

    The detection of depth-of-interaction (DOI) is a critical detector capability to improve the PET spatial resolution uniformity across the field-of-view and will significantly enhance, in particular, small bore system performance for brain, breast, and small animal imaging. One promising technique of DOI detection is to use dual-ended-scintillator readout that uses two photon sensors to detect scintillation light from both ends of a scintillator array and estimate DOI based on the ratio of signals (similar to Anger logic). This approach needs a careful DOI function calibration to establish accurate relationship between DOI and signal ratios, and to recalibrate if the detection condition is shifted due to the drift of sensor gain, bias variations, or degraded optical coupling, etc. However, the current calibration method that uses coincident events to locate interaction positions inside a single scintillator crystal has severe drawbacks, such as complicated setup, long and repetitive measurements, and being prone to errors from various possible misalignments among the source and detector components. This method is also not practically suitable to calibrate multiple DOI functions of a crystal array. To solve these problems, a new method has been developed that requires only a uniform flood source to irradiate a crystal array without the need to locate the interaction positions, and calculates DOI functions based solely on the uniform probability distribution of interactions over DOI positions without knowledge or assumption of detector responses. Simulation and experiment have been studied to validate the new method, and the results show that the new method, with a simple setup and one single measurement, can provide consistent and accurate DOI functions for the entire array of multiple scintillator crystals. This will enable an accurate, simple, and practical DOI function calibration for the PET detectors based on the design of dual-ended-scintillator readout. In

  1. A novel method to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Yiping; Yao Rutao; Ma Tianyu

    2008-12-15

    The detection of depth-of-interaction (DOI) is a critical detector capability to improve the PET spatial resolution uniformity across the field-of-view and will significantly enhance, in particular, small bore system performance for brain, breast, and small animal imaging. One promising technique of DOI detection is to use dual-ended-scintillator readout that uses two photon sensors to detect scintillation light from both ends of a scintillator array and estimate DOI based on the ratio of signals (similar to Anger logic). This approach needs a careful DOI function calibration to establish accurate relationship between DOI and signal ratios, and to recalibrate if the detection condition is shifted due to the drift of sensor gain, bias variations, or degraded optical coupling, etc. However, the current calibration method that uses coincident events to locate interaction positions inside a single scintillator crystal has severe drawbacks, such as complicated setup, long and repetitive measurements, and being prone to errors from various possible misalignments among the source and detector components. This method is also not practically suitable to calibrate multiple DOI functions of a crystal array. To solve these problems, a new method has been developed that requires only a uniform flood source to irradiate a crystal array without the need to locate the interaction positions, and calculates DOI functions based solely on the uniform probability distribution of interactions over DOI positions without knowledge or assumption of detector responses. Simulation and experiment have been studied to validate the new method, and the results show that the new method, with a simple setup and one single measurement, can provide consistent and accurate DOI functions for the entire array of multiple scintillator crystals. This will enable an accurate, simple, and practical DOI function calibration for the PET detectors based on the design of dual-ended-scintillator readout. In

  2. An efficient calibration method for SQUID measurement system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Li; Shu-Lin, Zhang; Chao-Xiang, Zhang; Xiang-Yan, Kong; Xiao-Ming, Xie

    2016-06-01

    For a practical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based measurement system, the Tesla/volt coefficient must be accurately calibrated. In this paper, we propose a highly efficient method of calibrating a SQUID magnetometer system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils. The Tesla/volt coefficient is regarded as the magnitude of a vector pointing to the normal direction of the pickup coil. By applying magnetic fields through a three-dimensional Helmholtz coil, the Tesla/volt coefficient can be directly calculated from magnetometer responses to the three orthogonally applied magnetic fields. Calibration with alternating current (AC) field is normally used for better signal-to-noise ratio in noisy urban environments and the results are compared with the direct current (DC) calibration to avoid possible effects due to eddy current. In our experiment, a calibration relative error of about 6.89 × 10‑4 is obtained, and the error is mainly caused by the non-orthogonality of three axes of the Helmholtz coils. The method does not need precise alignment of the magnetometer inside the Helmholtz coil. It can be used for the multichannel magnetometer system calibration effectively and accurately. Project supported by the “Strategic Priority Research Program (B)” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB04020200) and the Shanghai Municipal Science and Technology Commission Project, China (Grant No. 15DZ1940902).

  3. Study of Transport Behavior and Conversion Efficiency in Pillar Structured Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolic, R

    2007-04-26

    Room temperature, high efficiency and scalable radiation detectors can be realized by manipulating materials at the micro scale. With micro-semiconductor-pillars, we will advance the thermal neutron detection efficiency of semiconductor detectors to over 70% with 50 mm in detector thickness. New material science, new transport behavior, neutron to alpha conversion dynamics and their relationship with neutron detection will be discovered with the proposed structures.

  4. Spectral Efficiency and Resolution of Si(Li)-Detectors for Photon Energies between 0.3 keV and 5 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, F.; Tegeler, E.; Wende, B.

    1986-01-01

    The spectral efficiencies of energy dispersive Si(Li) photon counters have been measured using the storage ring BESSY as a radiometric standard source of extremely low photon flux of the order of 1 photon/(s eV). The detectors were irradiated with white synchrotron radia-tion when the storage ring was operated with only about 5 electrons stored. For energy calibration and measurement of the energy resolution X-ray emission lines excited by a 55-Fe source were used. Towards lower photon energies the efficiency is drastically decreased by the building-up of an ice-layer on the permanently cooled detector. By this surface contamination also the energy resolution of the detector is affected. The performance of detector can be recovered by a warming-up procedure.

  5. Patient-specific stopping power calibration for proton therapy planning based on single-detector proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doolan, P. J.; Testa, M.; Sharp, G.; Bentefour, E. H.; Royle, G.; Lu, H.-M.

    2015-03-01

    A simple robust optimizer has been developed that can produce patient-specific calibration curves to convert x-ray computed tomography (CT) numbers to relative stopping powers (HU-RSPs) for proton therapy treatment planning. The difference between a digitally reconstructed radiograph water-equivalent path length (DRRWEPL) map through the x-ray CT dataset and a proton radiograph (set as the ground truth) is minimized by optimizing the HU-RSP calibration curve. The function of the optimizer is validated with synthetic datasets that contain no noise and its robustness is shown against CT noise. Application of the procedure is then demonstrated on a plastic and a real tissue phantom, with proton radiographs produced using a single detector. The mean errors using generic/optimized calibration curves between the DRRWEPL map and the proton radiograph were 1.8/0.4% for a plastic phantom and -2.1/ - 0.2% for a real tissue phantom. It was then demonstrated that these optimized calibration curves offer a better prediction of the water equivalent path length at a therapeutic depth. We believe that these promising results are suggestive that a single proton radiograph could be used to generate a patient-specific calibration curve as part of the current proton treatment planning workflow.

  6. Modeling Study of a Proposed Field Calibration Source Using K-40 and High-Z Targets for Sodium Iodide Detectors.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jeremy; Marianno, Craig; Kallenbach, Gene; Trevino, Jose

    2016-06-01

    Calibration sources based on the primordial isotope potassium-40 (K) have reduced controls on the source's activity due to its terrestrial ubiquity and very low specific activity. Potassium-40's beta emissions and 1,460.8 keV gamma ray can be used to induce K-shell fluorescence x rays in high-Z metals between 60 and 80 keV. A gamma ray calibration source that uses potassium chloride salt and a high-Z metal to create a two-point calibration for a sodium iodide field gamma spectroscopy instrument is thus proposed. The calibration source was designed in collaboration with the Sandia National Laboratory using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code. Two methods of x-ray production were explored. First, a thin high-Z layer (HZL) was interposed between the detector and the potassium chloride-urethane source matrix. Second, bismuth metal powder was homogeneously mixed with a urethane binding agent to form a potassium chloride-bismuth matrix (KBM). The bismuth-based source was selected as the development model because it is inexpensive, nontoxic, and outperforms the high-Z layer method in simulation. Based on the MCNPX studies, sealing a mixture of bismuth powder and potassium chloride into a thin plastic case could provide a light, inexpensive field calibration source. PMID:27115223

  7. Optical relative calibration and stability monitoring for the Auger fluorescence detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aramo, Carla; Brack, J.; Caruso, R.; D'Urso, D.; Fazio, D.; Fonte, R.; Gemmeke, H.; Kleifges, M.; Knapik, R.; Insolia, A.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Menshikov, A.; Miller, W.; Privitera, P.; Rodriguez Martino, J.

    2005-07-01

    The stability of the fluorescence telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory is monitored with the optical relative calibration setup. Optical fibers distribute light pulses to three different diffuser groups within the optical system. The total charge per pulse is measured for each pixel and compared with reference calibration measurements. This allows monitoring the short and long term stability with respect of the relative timing between pixels and the relative gain for each pixel. The designs of the LED calibration unit (LCU) and of the Xenon flash lamp used for relative calibration, are described and their capabilities to monitor the stability of the telescope performances are studied. We report the analysis of relative calibration data recorded during 2004. Fluctuations in the relative calibration constants provide a measure of the stability of the FD.

  8. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-07

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of {epsilon} = A{Epsilon}{sup a}+B{Epsilon}{sup b}, where {epsilon} is efficiency, {Epsilon} is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a ''knee'' at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  9. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-01

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of ɛ = AΕa+BΕb, where ɛ is efficiency, Ε is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a "knee" at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  10. The efficiency calibration and development of environmental correction factors for an in situ high-resolution gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    A Gamma Spectroscopy Logging System (GSLS) has been developed to study sub-surface radionuclide contamination. Absolute efficiency calibration of the GSLS was performed using simple cylindrical borehole geometry. The calibration source incorporated naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) that emitted photons ranging from 186-keV to 2,614-keV. More complex borehole geometries were modeled using commercially available shielding software. A linear relationship was found between increasing source thickness and relative photon fluence rates at the detector. Examination of varying porosity and moisture content showed that as porosity increases, relative photon fluence rates increase linearly for all energies. Attenuation effects due to iron, water, PVC, and concrete cylindrical shields were found to agree with previous studies. Regression analyses produced energy-dependent equations for efficiency corrections applicable to spectral gamma-ray well logs collected under non-standard borehole conditions.

  11. An investigation of the Eigenvalue Calibration Method (ECM) using GASP for non-imaging and imaging detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyne, Gillian; Lara, David; Hallinan, Gregg; Redfern, Michael; Shearer, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Polarised light from astronomical targets can yield a wealth of information about their source radiation mechanisms, and about the geometry of the scattered light regions. Optical observations, of both the linear and circular polarisation components, have been impeded due to non-optimised instrumentation. The need for suitable observing conditions and the availability of luminous targets are also limiting factors. The science motivation of any instrument adds constraints to its operation such as high signal-to-noise (SNR) and detector readout speeds. These factors in particular lead to a wide range of sources that have yet to be observed. The Galway Astronomical Stokes Polarimeter (GASP) has been specifically designed to make observations of these sources. GASP uses division of amplitude polarimeter (DOAP) (Compain and Drevillon Appl. Opt. 37, 5938-5944, 1998) to measure the four components of the Stokes vector (I, Q, U and V) simultaneously, which eliminates the constraints placed upon the need for moving parts during observation, and offers a real-time complete measurement of polarisation. Results from the GASP calibration are presented in this work for both a 1D detector system, and a pixel-by-pixel analysis on a 2D detector system. Following Compain et al. (Appl. Opt. 38, 3490-3502 1999) we use the Eigenvalue Calibration Method (ECM) to measure the polarimetric limitations of the instrument for each of the two systems. Consequently, the ECM is able to compensate for systematic errors introduced by the calibration optics, and it also accounts for all optical elements of the polarimeter in the output. Initial laboratory results of the ECM are presented, using APD detectors, where errors of 0.2 % and 0.1° were measured for the degree of linear polarisation (DOLP) and polarisation angle (PA) respectively. Channel-to-channel image registration is an important aspect of 2-D polarimetry. We present our calibration results of the measured Mueller matrix of each sample

  12. A Novel Technique for Accurate Intensity Calibration of Area X-ray Detectors at Almost Arbitrary Energy.

    PubMed

    Moy, J P; Hammersley, A P; Svensson, S O; Thompson, A; Brown, K; Claustre, L; Gonzalez, A; McSweeney, S

    1996-01-01

    A novel intensity uniformity calibration method for area X-ray detectors is described. In diffraction experiments, amorphous lithium glass plates, containing doping elements chosen for their K edges just below the energy of the main beam, replace the crystallographic samples for the calibration measurement. The fluorescent emission excited by the X-ray beam is almost isotropic. It has exactly the same geometry as the diffracted radiation, and can be obtained at the same wavelength by proper selection of the element and excitation energy. A sample 2theta scan allows the emission distribution as a function of angle to be characterized with an accuracy of a fraction of a percent. This allows a flat-field correction of similar accuracy. The quality of crystallographic data collected with an X-ray image intensifier/CCD detector was significantly improved by flat-field correction using an Sr-doped lithium tetraborate glass. This technique can be applied to X-ray energies from 5 to 50 KeV; the calibration sample is small, stable and easily handled. PMID:16702651

  13. Detector calibration of the Indian cosmic ray experiment (IONS) in Space-Shuttle Spacelab-13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgaprasad, N.; Yadav, J. S.; Biswas, S.

    1985-01-01

    In the Indian cosmic ray experiment (IONS) in Spacelab-3 the intention is to study nuclei up to iron in low energy cosmic rays, using CR-39 (DOP) detectors. CR-39 (DOP) was exposed to He4, C12, O16, Ne20, Si28, Ar40, Cr52 and Fe56 accelerated beams from various accelerator facilities available around the world. Different beam energies and exposure angles were used. From these exposures, the charge resolution and energy resolution for the detector in the region of interest were studied. The effect of pre-annealing and depth on the response of our detector was studied. For isotopic resolution, exposed the detector samples were exposed to Ne2O and Ne22 accelerated beams. Samples of CR-39 (DOP) exposed to different accelerated heavy ions were kept in the detector module to take into account the effect of ambient conditions on detector response during the flight.

  14. Efficient calibration of a distributed pde-based hydrological model using grid coarsening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Gunten, D.; Wöhling, T.; Haslauer, C.; Merchán, D.; Causapé, J.; Cirpka, O. A.

    2014-11-01

    Partial-differential-equation based integrated hydrological models are now regularly used at catchment scale. They rely on the shallow water equations for surface flow and on the Richards' equations for subsurface flow, allowing a spatially explicit representation of properties and states. However, these models usually come at high computational costs, which limit their accessibility to state-of-the-art methods of parameter estimation and uncertainty quantification, because these methods require a large number of model evaluations. In this study, we present an efficient model calibration strategy, based on a hierarchy of grid resolutions, each of them resolving the same zonation of subsurface and land-surface units. We first analyze which model outputs show the highest similarities between the original model and two differently coarsened grids. Then we calibrate the coarser models by comparing these similar outputs to the measurements. We finish the calibration using the fully resolved model, taking the result of the preliminary calibration as starting point. We apply the proposed approach to the well monitored Lerma catchment in North-East Spain, using the model HydroGeoSphere. The original model grid with 80,000 finite elements was complemented with two other model variants with approximately 16,000 and 10,000 elements, respectively. Comparing the model results for these different grids, we observe differences in peak discharge, evapotranspiration, and near-surface saturation. Hydraulic heads and low flow, however, are very similar for all tested parameter sets, which allows the use of these variables to calibrate our model. The calibration results are satisfactory and the duration of the calibration has been greatly decreased by using different model grid resolutions.

  15. Simulation of germanium detector calibration using the Monte Carlo method: comparison between point and surface source models.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, J; Burgos, M C; Zarza, I; Gallardo, S

    2005-01-01

    Simulation of detector calibration using the Monte Carlo method is very convenient. The computational calibration procedure using the MCNP code was validated by comparing results of the simulation with laboratory measurements. The standard source used for this validation was a disc-shaped filter where fission and activation products were deposited. Some discrepancies between the MCNP results and laboratory measurements were attributed to the point source model adopted. In this paper, the standard source has been simulated using both point and surface source models. Results from both models are compared with each other as well as with experimental measurements. Two variables, namely, the collimator diameter and detector-source distance have been considered in the comparison analysis. The disc model is seen to be a better model as expected. However, the point source model is good for large collimator diameter and also when the distance from detector to source increases, although for smaller sizes of the collimator and lower distances a surface source model is necessary. PMID:16604596

  16. In situ calibration of micro-photoionization detectors in a multi-dimensional micro-gas chromatography system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiwon; Zhou, Menglian; Zhu, Hongbo; Nidetz, Robert; Kurabayashi, Katsuo; Fan, Xudong

    2016-06-20

    A photoionization detector (PID) is widely used as a gas chromatography (GC) detector. By virtue of its non-destructive nature, multiple PIDs can be used in multi-dimensional GC. However, different PIDs have different responsivities towards the same chemical compound with the same concentration or mass due to different aging conditions of the PID lamps and windows. Here, we carried out a systematic study regarding the response of 5 Krypton μPIDs in a 1 × 4-channel 2-dimensional μGC system to 7 different volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with the ionization potential ranging from 8.45 eV to 10.08 eV and the concentration ranging from ∼1 ng to ∼2000 ng. We used one of the PIDs as the reference detector and calculated the calibration factor for each of the remaining 4 PIDs against the first PID, which we found is quite uniform regardless of the analyte, its concentration, or chromatographic peak width. Based on the above observation, we were able to quantitatively reconstruct the coeluted peaks in the first dimension using the signal obtained with a PID array in the second dimension. Our work will enable rapid and in situ calibration of PIDs in a GC system using a single analyte at a single concentration. It will also lead to the development of multi-channel multi-dimensional GC where multiple PIDs are employed. PMID:27152367

  17. Development of A Self Biased High Efficiency Solid-State Neutron Detector for MPACT Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara; Jian-Qiang Lu, James

    2013-09-03

    Neutron detection is an important aspect of materials protection, accounting, and control for transmutation (MPACT). Currently He-3 filled thermal neutron detectors are utilized in many applications; these detectors require high-voltage bias for operation, which complicates the system when multiple detectors are used. In addition, due to recent increase in homeland security activity and the nuclear renaissance, there is a shortage of He-3, and these detectors become more expensive. Instead, cheap solid-state detectors that can be mass produced like any other computer chips will be developed. The new detector does not require a bias for operation, has low gamma sensitivity, and a fast response. The detection system is based on a honeycomb-like silicon device, which is filled with B-10 as the neutron converter; while a silicon p-n diode (i.e., solar cell type device) formed on the thin silicon wall of the honeycomb structure detects the energetic charged particles emitted from the B-10 conversion layer. Such a detector has ~40% calculated thermal neutron detection efficiency with an overall detector thickness of about 200 ?m. Stacking of these devices allows over 90% thermal neutron detection efficiency. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a high-efficiency, low-noise, self-powered solid-state neutron detector system based on the promising results of the existing research program. A prototype of this solid-state neutron detector system with sufficient detector size (up to 8-inch diam., but still portable and inexpensive) and integrated with interface electronics (e.g., preamplifier) will be designed, fabricated, and tested as a coincidence counter for MPACT applications. All fabrications proposed are based on silicon-compatible processing; thus, an extremely cheap detector system could be massively produced like any other silicon chips. Such detectors will revolutionize current neutron detection systems by providing a solid-state alternative to

  18. A new automated and precise calibration method for gamma level gauges with rod detector arrangement.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, Reza Gholipour; Taheri, Ali; Olfateh, Ali; Islami, Seyyedeh Zahra

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-ray liquid level gauging is of particular importance in several industries. Industrial vessels, tanks, and reactors, which work at high temperatures and pressures, usually have thick metal walls up to 20cm. These factors make it impossible to know the exact level of liquid or fluid while the system is operating. For this reason, the calibration process of the gamma level gauges is difficult as it is impossible to gain access to the inside of the vessels, which is important during the calibration process. In this study, a new auto-calibration method was proposed for the aforementioned situations. PMID:26974485

  19. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm. PMID:25362445

  20. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  1. Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, John K.; Rice, Blake B.; McNeil, Walter J.; Solomon, Clell J.; Patterson, Eric L.; Bellinger, Steven L.

    2010-12-21

    Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

  2. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidgunst, C.; Ritter, D.; Lang, E.

    2007-09-15

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  3. ANGLE v2.1—New version of the computer code for semiconductor detector gamma-efficiency calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, S.; Dlabac, A.; Mihaljevic, N.

    2010-10-01

    New version of the commercially available ANGLE software for semiconductor detector gamma-efficiency calculations is presented. ANGLE allows for accurate determination of the activities of gamma spectroscopic samples for which no "replicate" standard exists, in terms of geometry and matrix. A semi-empirical ("efficiency transfer") approach is applied, based on the effective solid angle calculations. Advantages of both absolute (Monte Carlo) and relative (calibrated-source-based) methods are combined—while minimizing potential for systematic errors in the former and reducing practical limitations of the latter. ANGLE is broadly applicable, accounting for most of counting arrangements in gamma-spectrometry practice (in respect to detector types and configuration, source shapes and volumes, matrix composition, source-to-detector distance, etc.). Besides the years of practical utilization in many gamma-spectrometry laboratories, accuracy of the software is successfully tested in a recent IAEA-organized intercomparison exercise—ANGLE scored 0.65% average deviation from the exercise mean for E γ>20keV energies.

  4. Hydrological modeling in alpine catchments: sensing the critical parameters towards an efficient model calibration.

    PubMed

    Achleitner, S; Rinderer, M; Kirnbauer, R

    2009-01-01

    For the Tyrolean part of the river Inn, a hybrid model for flood forecast has been set up and is currently in its test phase. The system is a hybrid system which comprises of a hydraulic 1D model for the river Inn, and the hydrological models HQsim (Rainfall-runoff-discharge model) and the snow and ice melt model SES for modeling the rainfall runoff form non-glaciated and glaciated tributary catchment respectively. Within this paper the focus is put on the hydrological modeling of the totally 49 connected non-glaciated catchments realized with the software HQsim. In the course of model calibration, the identification of the most sensitive parameters is important aiming at an efficient calibration procedure. The indicators used for explaining the parameter sensitivities were chosen specifically for the purpose of flood forecasting. Finally five model parameters could be identified as being sensitive for model calibration when aiming for a well calibrated model for flood conditions. In addition two parameters were identified which are sensitive in situations where the snow line plays an important role. PMID:19759453

  5. How effective and efficient are multiobjective evolutionary algorithms at hydrologic model calibration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Reed, P.; Wagener, T.

    2005-11-01

    This study provides a comprehensive assessment of state-of-the-art evolutionary multiobjective optimization (EMO) tools' relative effectiveness in calibrating hydrologic models. The relative computational efficiency, accuracy, and ease-of-use of the following EMO algorithms are tested: Epsilon Dominance Nondominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm-II (ɛ-NSGAII), the Multiobjective Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis algorithm (MOSCEM-UA), and the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm 2 (SPEA2). This study uses three test cases to compare the algorithms' performances: (1) a standardized test function suite from the computer science literature, (2) a benchmark hydrologic calibration test case for the Leaf River near Collins, Mississippi, and (3) a computationally intensive integrated model application in the Shale Hills watershed in Pennsylvania. A challenge and contribution of this work is the development of a methodology for comprehensively comparing EMO algorithms that have different search operators and randomization techniques. Overall, SPEA2 is an excellent benchmark algorithm for multiobjective hydrologic model calibration. SPEA2 attained competitive to superior results for most of the problems tested in this study. ɛ-NSGAII appears to be superior to MOSCEM-UA and competitive with SPEA2 for hydrologic model calibration.

  6. Use of internal scintillator radioactivity to calibrate DOI function of a PET detector with a dual-ended-scintillator readout

    SciTech Connect

    Bircher, Chad; Shao Yiping

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) detectors that use a dual-ended-scintillator readout to measure depth-of-interaction (DOI) must have an accurate DOI function to provide the relationship between DOI and signal ratios to be used for detector calibration and recalibration. In a previous study, the authors used a novel and simple method to accurately and quickly measure DOI function by irradiating the detector with an external uniform flood source; however, as a practical concern, implementing external uniform flood sources in an assembled PET system is technically challenging and expensive. In the current study, therefore, the authors investigated whether the same method could be used to acquire DOI function from scintillator-generated (i.e., internal) radiation. The authors also developed a method for calibrating the energy scale necessary to select the events within the desired energy window. Methods: The authors measured the DOI function of a PET detector with lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) scintillators. Radiation events originating from the scintillators' internal Lu-176 beta decay were used to measure DOI functions which were then compared with those measured from both an external uniform flood source and an electronically collimated external point source. The authors conducted these studies with several scintillators of differing geometries (1.5 x 1.5 and 2.0 x 2.0 mm{sup 2} cross-section area and 20, 30, and 40 mm length) and various surface finishes (mirror-finishing, saw-cut rough, and other finishes in between), and in a prototype array. Results: All measured results using internal and external radiation sources showed excellent agreement in DOI function measurement. The mean difference among DOI values for all scintillators measured from internal and external radiation sources was less than 1.0 mm for different scintillator geometries and various surface finishes. Conclusions: The internal radioactivity of LYSO scintillators can be used

  7. Efficient Calibration of Computationally Intensive Groundwater Models through Surrogate Modelling with Lower Levels of Fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, S.; Anderson, D.; Martin, P.; MacMillan, G.; Tolson, B.; Gabriel, C.; Zhang, B.

    2012-12-01

    Many sophisticated groundwater models tend to be computationally intensive as they rigorously represent detailed scientific knowledge about the groundwater systems. Calibration (model inversion), which is a vital step of groundwater model development, can require hundreds or thousands of model evaluations (runs) for different sets of parameters and as such demand prohibitively large computational time and resources. One common strategy to circumvent this computational burden is surrogate modelling which is concerned with developing and utilizing fast-to-run surrogates of the original computationally intensive models (also called fine models). Surrogates can be either based on statistical and data-driven models such as kriging and neural networks or simplified physically-based models with lower fidelity to the original system (also called coarse models). Fidelity in this context refers to the degree of the realism of a simulation model. This research initially investigates different strategies for developing lower-fidelity surrogates of a fine groundwater model and their combinations. These strategies include coarsening the fine model, relaxing the numerical convergence criteria, and simplifying the model geological conceptualisation. Trade-offs between model efficiency and fidelity (accuracy) are of special interest. A methodological framework is developed for coordinating the original fine model with its lower-fidelity surrogates with the objective of efficiently calibrating the parameters of the original model. This framework is capable of mapping the original model parameters to the corresponding surrogate model parameters and also mapping the surrogate model response for the given parameters to the original model response. This framework is general in that it can be used with different optimization and/or uncertainty analysis techniques available for groundwater model calibration and parameter/predictive uncertainty assessment. A real-world computationally

  8. How effective and efficient are multiobjective evolutionary algorithms at hydrologic model calibration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Reed, P.; Wagener, T.

    2006-05-01

    This study provides a comprehensive assessment of state-of-the-art evolutionary multiobjective optimization (EMO) tools' relative effectiveness in calibrating hydrologic models. The relative computational efficiency, accuracy, and ease-of-use of the following EMO algorithms are tested: Epsilon Dominance Nondominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm-II (ɛ-NSGAII), the Multiobjective Shuffled Complex Evolution Metropolis algorithm (MOSCEM-UA), and the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm 2 (SPEA2). This study uses three test cases to compare the algorithms' performances: (1) a standardized test function suite from the computer science literature, (2) a benchmark hydrologic calibration test case for the Leaf River near Collins, Mississippi, and (3) a computationally intensive integrated surface-subsurface model application in the Shale Hills watershed in Pennsylvania. One challenge and contribution of this work is the development of a methodology for comprehensively comparing EMO algorithms that have different search operators and randomization techniques. Overall, SPEA2 attained competitive to superior results for most of the problems tested in this study. The primary strengths of the SPEA2 algorithm lie in its search reliability and its diversity preservation operator. The biggest challenge in maximizing the performance of SPEA2 lies in specifying an effective archive size without a priori knowledge of the Pareto set. In practice, this would require significant trial-and-error analysis, which is problematic for more complex, computationally intensive calibration applications. ɛ-NSGAII appears to be superior to MOSCEM-UA and competitive with SPEA2 for hydrologic model calibration. ɛ-NSGAII's primary strength lies in its ease-of-use due to its dynamic population sizing and archiving which lead to rapid convergence to very high quality solutions with minimal user input. MOSCEM-UA is best suited for hydrologic model calibration applications that have small parameter sets

  9. Development of a high-count-rate neutron detector with position sensitivity and high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.; Sandoval, J.

    1996-10-01

    While the neutron scattering community is bombarded with hints of new technologies that may deliver detectors with high-count-rate capability, high efficiency, gamma-ray insensitivity, and high resolution across large areas, only the time-tested, gas-filled {sup 3}He and scintillation detectors are in widespread use. Future spallation sources with higher fluxes simply must exploit some of the advanced detector schemes that are as yet unproved as production systems. Technologies indicating promise as neutron detectors include pixel arrays of amorphous silicon, silicon microstrips, microstrips with gas, and new scintillation materials. This project sought to study the competing neutron detector technologies and determine which or what combination will lead to a production detector system well suited for use at a high-intensity neutron scattering source.

  10. Efficient Soft-Input Soft-Output MIMO Chase Detectors for Arbitrary Number of Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, Ahmad; Jalloul, Louay M.-A.

    2015-08-01

    We present novel soft-input soft-output (SISO) multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) detectors based on the Chase detection principle [1] in the context of iterative and decoding (IDD). The proposed detector complexity is linear in the signal modulation constellation size and the number of spatial streams. Two variants of the SISO detector are developed, referred to as SISO B-Chase and SISO L-Chase. An efficient method is presented that uses the decoder output to modulate the signal constellation decision boundaries inside the detector leading to the SISO detector architecture. The performance of these detectors significantly improves with just a few number of IDD iterations. The effect of transmit and receive antenna correlation is simulated. For the high-correlation case, the superiority of SISO B-Chase over the SISO L-Chase is demonstrated.

  11. A novel 3D detector configuration enabling high quantum efficiency, low crosstalk, and low output capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurola, A.; Marochkin, V.; Tuuva, T.

    2016-03-01

    The benefits of pixelated planar direct conversion semiconductor radiation detectors comprising a thick fully depleted substrate are that they offer low crosstalk, small output capacitance, and that the planar configuration simplifies manufacturing. In order to provide high quantum efficiency for high energy X-rays and Gamma-rays such a radiation detector should be as thick as possible. The maximum thickness and thus the maximum quantum efficiency has been limited by the substrate doping concentration: the lower the substrate doping the thicker the detector can be before reaching the semiconductor material's electric breakdown field. Thick direct conversion semiconductor detectors comprising vertical three-dimensional electrodes protruding through the substrate have been previously proposed by Sherwood Parker in order to promote rapid detection of radiation. An additional advantage of these detectors is that their thickness is not limited by the substrate doping, i.e., the size of the maximum electric field value in the detector does not depend on detector thickness. However, the thicker the substrate of such three dimensional detectors is the larger the output capacitance is and thus the larger the output noise is. In the novel direct conversion pixelated radiation detector utilizing a novel three dimensional semiconductor architecture, which is proposed in this work, the detector thickness is not limited by the substrate doping and the output capacitance is small and does not depend on the detector thickness. In addition, by incorporating an additional node to the novel three-dimensional semiconductor architecture it can be utilized as a high voltage transistor that can deliver current across high voltages. Furthermore, it is possible to connect a voltage difference of any size to the proposed novel three dimensional semiconductor architecture provided that it is thick enough—this is a novel feature that has not been previously possible for semiconductor

  12. Towards high efficiency solid-state thermal and fast neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danon, Y.; Clinton, J.; Huang, K. C.; LiCausi, N.; Dahal, R.; Lu, J. J. Q.; Bhat, I.

    2012-03-01

    Variety of applications of fast neutron detection utilize thermal neutron detectors and moderators. Examples include homeland security applications such as portal monitors and nuclear safeguards which employ passive systems for detection of fissile materials. These applications mostly rely on gas filled detectors such as 3He, BF3 or plastic scintillators and require high voltage for operation. Recently there was considerable progress in the development of solid-state neutron detectors. These operate by detection of charged particles emitted from neutron interactions with a converter material. In order to increase neutron detection efficiency to a usable level, the thickness of the converter material must exceed the range of the charged particles in the converter, which limits the efficiency of planar detectors to several percent. To overcome this limitation three dimensional structured solid-state devices are considered where the converter can be thicker but still allow the charged particles to escape into the semiconductor. In the research described here this was accomplished by a semiconductor device that resembles a honeycomb with hexagonal holes and thin silicon walls filled with the converter material. Such design can theoretically achieve about 45% thermal neutron detection efficiency, experimentally about 21% was observed with a partially filled detector. Such detectors can be fabricated in variety of sizes enabling designs of directional fast neutron detectors. Other converter materials that allow direct detection of fast neutrons were also considered by both simulation and experiments. Because the semiconductor thickness is less than a few hundred microns, the efficiency of these detectors to γ-ray(s) is very low. With further developments these new solid-state neutron detectors can replace gas ionization based detectors in most applications.

  13. Possibility of absolute calibration of analog detectors by using parametric downconversion: a systematic study

    SciTech Connect

    Brida, Giorgio; Genovese, Marco; Ruo-Berchera, Ivano; Chekhova, Maria; Penin, Alexander

    2006-10-15

    Prompted by the need for various studies ranging from quantum information to foundations of quantum mechanics, we systematically study the possibility of the absolute calibration of analog photodetectors based on the properties of parametric amplifiers. Our results show that such a method can be effectively developed with interesting possible applications in metrology.

  14. Enhanced Calibration Method of Silver Detector to Use in a Plasma Focus Device of Low Yield

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, Jose; Soto, Leopoldo; Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel

    2010-08-04

    In this work, a calibration method based only in the use of a continuous neutron source as reference is presented. After the silver foil reached activation steady state, the neutron source was removed. The accumulated were analyzed by the method of linear least squares.

  15. Note: Fast neutron efficiency in CR-39 nuclear track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallaro, S.

    2015-03-15

    CR-39 samples are commonly employed for fast neutron detection in fusion reactors and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. The literature reported efficiencies are strongly depending on experimental conditions and, in some cases, highly dispersed. The present note analyses the dependence of efficiency as a function of various parameters and experimental conditions in both the radiator-assisted and the stand-alone CR-39 configurations. Comparisons of literature experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations and optimized efficiency values are shown and discussed.

  16. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Freeman, C G; Fiksel, G; Stoeckl, C; Sinenian, N; Canfield, M J; Graeper, G B; Lombardo, A T; Stillman, C R; Padalino, S J; Mileham, C; Sangster, T C; Frenje, J A

    2011-07-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW. PMID:21806176

  17. Calibration of a Thomson parabola ion spectrometer and Fujifilm imaging plate detectors for protons, deuterons, and alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, C. G.; Fiksel, G.; Stoeckl, C.; Sinenian, N.; Canfield, M. J.; Graeper, G. B.; Lombardo, A. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Padalino, S. J.; Mileham, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Frenje, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    A Thomson parabola ion spectrometer has been designed for use at the Multiterawatt (MTW) laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. This device uses parallel electric and magnetic fields to deflect particles of a given mass-to-charge ratio onto parabolic curves on the detector plane. Once calibrated, the position of the ions on the detector plane can be used to determine the particle energy. The position dispersion of both the electric and magnetic fields of the Thomson parabola was measured using monoenergetic proton and alpha particle beams from the SUNY Geneseo 1.7 MV tandem Pelletron accelerator. The sensitivity of Fujifilm BAS-TR imaging plates, used as a detector in the Thomson parabola, was also measured as a function of the incident particle energy over the range from 0.6 MeV to 3.4 MeV for protons and deuterons and from 0.9 MeV to 5.4 MeV for alpha particles. The device was used to measure the energy spectrum of laser-produced protons at MTW.

  18. Modeling electric fields inside the LUX detector in 3D using 83mKr calibration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvrznikova, Lucie; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber designed for the direct detection of weakly interacting massive particles, a leading dark matter candidate. LUX operates on the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. Weekly calibrations using a homogeneous injection of a monoenergetic 83mKr source enable us to monitor xenon within the active region. For this project, a 3D model of the electric fields inside the LUX detector was created using COMSOL Multiphysics software. A simulation of electrons drifting in the detector then produces a set of computational predictions. These are then reconciled with the 83mKr data to confirm the accuracy of the field model. The result of this work is a more accurate understanding of the electric field inside the active region. This model, in conjuction with these methods, may now be used to study other phenomena such as possible surface charge buildup in detector materials.

  19. Nondestructive characterization of radioactive waste drums by gamma spectrometry: a Monte Carlo technique for efficiency calibration.

    PubMed

    Tzika, Faidra; Savidou, Anastasia; Stamatelatos, Ion E

    2007-11-01

    A semi-empirical non-destructive technique to assay radioactive waste drums is presented. The technique is based on gamma spectrometry performed using a portable NaI detector and Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP code in order to derive the gamma ray detector efficiency for the volume source. The derivation of detector efficiency was performed assuming homogeneous distribution of the source activity within the matrix material. Moreover, the MCNP model was used to examine the effect of inhomogeneities in activity distribution, variation of matrix material density, and drum filling height on the accuracy of the technique, and to estimate the measurement bias. The technique was verified by estimating radioactivity levels in 25 drums containing ion exchange resin waste, and comparing the results of the non-destructive method against the analytical results of samples obtained from each drum. Satisfactory agreement between the two assay techniques was observed. The discussed technique represents a cost effective technology that can be used to assay low-activity, low-density waste drums provided the contribution to the gamma ray spectrum can be resolved. PMID:18049246

  20. A Sensitized Emission Based Calibration of FRET Efficiency for Probing the Architecture of Macromolecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Ajit; Chen, Renjie; Lawrimore, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Macromolecular machines participate in almost every cell biological function. These machines can take the form of well-defined protein structures such as the kinetochore, or more loosely organized protein assemblies like the endocytic coat. The protein architecture of these machines-the arrangement of multiple copies of protein subunits at the nanoscale, is necessary for understanding their cell biological function and biophysical mechanism. Defining this architecture in vivo presents a major challenge. High density of protein molecules within macromolecular machines severely limits the effectiveness of super-resolution microscopy. However, this density is ideal for Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), which can determine the proximity between neighboring molecules. Here, we present a simple FRET quantitation scheme that calibrates a standard epifluorescence microscope for measuring donor-acceptor separations. This calibration can be used to deduce FRET efficiency fluorescence intensity measurements. This method will allow accurate determination of FRET efficiency over a wide range of values and FRET pair number. It will also allow dynamic FRET measurements with high spatiotemporal resolution under cell biological conditions. Although the poor maturation efficiency of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins presents a challenge, we show that its effects can be alleviated. To demonstrate this methodology, we probe the in vivo architecture of the γ-Tubulin Ring. Our technique can be applied to study the architecture and dynamics of a wide range of macromolecular machines. PMID:24319499

  1. Calibration of impact ionization dust detectors with porous or fluffy dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Hillier, J. K.; Bugiel, S.; Srama, R.; Armes, S. P.; Fielding; L. A.; Lovett, J. R.; Grün, E.

    2013-07-01

    Impact ionization instruments like the ones flying on Cassini, Galileo, Helios and Ulysses have been calibrated using compact particles made of conductive materials like iron, or of minerals (like Olivine, Orthopyroxene, Magnetite, Pyrite) coated with a thin layer of conductive material. These calibrations were performed by shooting cosmic dust analogues with hypervelocity speeds from 1 to 80 km/s onto the flight spares of these instruments, using the Van de Graaff dust accelerator facility in Heidelberg. Here, we perform first measurements with Cassini CDA of the influence of the density of these dust particles on the resulting signal by, for a given impact speed, comparing signals from micron-sized particles made of compact PPy-coated silica to those from (PPy-coated) hollow silica spheres. The degree of impact ionization depends on the ratio of the densities of the target material and the impactor material and hence, different signals may result from impacts with diffe! rent density or porosity.

  2. Calibration Telescope System of CWD NEVOD as a Detector of Electron and Muon Components of EAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelchakov, M. B.; Bogdanov, A. G.; Zadeba, E. A.; Khokhlov, S. S.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Shulzhenko, I. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.

    The paper describes the system of calibration telescopes as a part of the experimental complex NEVOD. The setup operation parameters were analysed during experimental series from 01/06/2013 to 21/01/2015. The technique of the charged particle local density spectrum reconstruction is described. The results of the local density spectrum measurements are presented for the EAS electron and muon components in different energy ranges of primary cosmic rays.

  3. Note: fast neutron efficiency in CR-39 nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, S

    2015-03-01

    CR-39 samples are commonly employed for fast neutron detection in fusion reactors and in inertial confinement fusion experiments. The literature reported efficiencies are strongly depending on experimental conditions and, in some cases, highly dispersed. The present note analyses the dependence of efficiency as a function of various parameters and experimental conditions in both the radiator-assisted and the stand-alone CR-39 configurations. Comparisons of literature experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations and optimized efficiency values are shown and discussed. PMID:25832287

  4. Ground calibrations of the X-ray detector system of the Solar Intensity X-ray Spectrometer (SIXS) on board BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huovelin, Juhani; Lehtolainen, Arto; Genzer, Maria; Korpela, Seppo; Esko, Eero; Andersson, Hans

    2014-05-01

    SIXS includes X-ray and particle detector systems for the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO). Its task is to monitor the direct solar X-rays and energetic particles in a wide field of view in the energy range of 1-20 keV (X-rays), 0.1-3 MeV (electrons) and 1-30 MeV (protons). The main purpose of these measurements is to provide quantitative information on the high energy radiation incident on Mercury's surface which causes the X-ray glow of the planet measured by the MIXS instrument. The X-ray and particle measurements of SIXS are also useful for investigations of the solar corona and the magnetosphere of Mercury. The ground calibrations of the X-ray detectors of the SIXS flight model were carried out in the X-ray laboratory of the Helsinki University during May and June 2012. The aim of the ground calibrations was to characterize the performance of the SIXS instrument's three High-Purity Silicon PIN X-ray detectors and verify that they fulfil their scientific performance requirements. The calibrations included the determination of the beginning of life energy resolution at different operational temperatures, determination of the detector's sensitivity within the field of view as a function of the off-axis and roll angles, pile-up tests for determining the speed of the read out electronics, measurements of the low energy threshold of the energy scale, a cross-calibration with the SMART-1 XSM flight spare detector, and the determination of the temperature dependence of the energy scale. An X-ray tube and the detectors' internal Ti coated 55Fe calibration sources were used as primary X-ray sources. In addition, two external fluorescence sources were used as secondary X-ray sources in the determination of the energy resolutions and in the comparison calibration with the SMART-1 XSM. The calibration results show that the detectors fulfill all of the scientific performance requirements. The ground calibration data combined with the instrument house-keeping data

  5. Efficient data transmission from silicon wafer strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Lackner, K.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sharp, D.H.; Winter, L.; Ziock, H.J.

    1991-12-31

    An architecture for on-wafer processing is proposed for central silicon-strip tracker systems as they are currently designed for high energy physics experiments at the SSC, and for heavy ion experiments at RHIC. The data compression achievable with on-wafer processing would make it possible to transmit all data generated to the outside of the detector system. A set of data which completely describes the state of the wafer for low occupancy events and which contains important statistical information for more complex events can be transmitted immediately. This information could be used in early trigger decisions. Additional data packages which complete the description of the state of the wafer vary in size and are sent through a second channel. By buffering this channel the required bandwidth can be kept far below the peak data rates which occur in rate but interesting events. 18 refs.

  6. Efficiency of Moderated Neutron Lithium Glass Detectors Using Monte Carlo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Brian

    2011-10-01

    Due to national security concerns over the smuggling of special nuclear materials and the small supply of He-3 for use in neutron detectors, there is a great need for a new kind of neutron detector. Using Monte Carlo techniques I have been studying the use of lithium glass in varying configurations for neutron detectors. My research has included the effects of using a detector with two thin sheets of lithium at varying distances apart. I have also researched the effects of varying amounts of shielding a californium source with varying amounts of water. This is important since shielding would likely be used to make nuclear material more difficult to detect. The addition of one sheet of lithium-6 glass on the front surface of the detector significantly improves the efficiency for the detection of neutrons from a moderated fission source.

  7. Calibration of STUD+ parameters to achieve optimally efficient broadband adiabatic decoupling in a single transient

    PubMed

    Bendall; Skinner

    1998-10-01

    To provide the most efficient conditions for spin decoupling with least RF power, master calibration curves are provided for the maximum centerband amplitude, and the minimum amplitude for the largest cycling sideband, resulting from STUD+ adiabatic decoupling applied during a single free induction decay. The principal curve is defined as a function of the four most critical experimental input parameters: the maximum amplitude of the RF field, RFmax, the length of the sech/tanh pulse, Tp, the extent of the frequency sweep, bwdth, and the coupling constant, Jo. Less critical parameters, the effective (or actual) decoupled bandwidth, bweff, and the sech/tanh truncation factor, beta, which become more important as bwdth is decreased, are calibrated in separate curves. The relative importance of nine additional factors in determining optimal decoupling performance in a single transient are considered. Specific parameters for efficient adiabatic decoupling can be determined via a set of four equations which will be most useful for 13C decoupling, covering the range of one-bond 13C1H coupling constants from 125 to 225 Hz, and decoupled bandwidths of 7 to 100 kHz, with a bandwidth of 100 kHz being the requirement for a 2 GHz spectrometer. The four equations are derived from a recent vector model of adiabatic decoupling, and experiment, supported by computer simulations. The vector model predicts an inverse linear relation between the centerband and maximum sideband amplitudes, and it predicts a simple parabolic relationship between maximum sideband amplitude and the product JoTp. The ratio bwdth/(RFmax)2 can be viewed as a characteristic time scale, tauc, affecting sideband levels, with tauc approximately Tp giving the most efficient STUD+ decoupling, as suggested by the adiabatic condition. Functional relationships between bwdth and less critical parameters, bweff and beta, for efficient decoupling can be derived from Bloch-equation calculations of the inversion profile

  8. Detection efficiency calibration of single-photon silicon avalanche photodiodes traceable using double attenuator technique

    PubMed Central

    López, Marco; Hofer, Helmuth; Kück, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A highly accurate method for the determination of the detection efficiency of a silicon single-photon avalanche diode (Si-SPAD) is presented. This method is based on the comparison of the detected count rate of the Si-SPAD compared to the photon rate determined from a calibrated silicon diode using a modified attenuator technique, in which the total attenuation is measured in two attenuation steps. Furthermore, a validation of this two-step method is performed using attenuators of higher transmittance. The setup is a tabletop one, laser-based, and fully automated. The measurement uncertainty components are determined and analyzed in detail. The obtained standard measurement uncertainty is < 0.5%. Main contributions are the transmission of the neutral density filters used as attenuators and the spectral responsivity of the calibrated analog silicon diode. Furthermore, the dependence of the detection efficiency of the Si-SPAD on the mean photon number of the impinging laser radiation with Poissonian statistics is investigated. PMID:25892852

  9. An efficient calibration procedure for correction of drift in EMI survey data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delefortrie, Samuël; De Smedt, Philippe; Saey, Timothy; Van De Vijver, Ellen; Van Meirvenne, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Frequency domain electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors with a small coil separation are used for near-surface surveys in a variety of domains. Regardless of the application, the instrument response(s) may suffer from a drift, meaning that a response at one given location may vary over time, despite no appreciable changes above or underneath the surface. Drift is unwanted as it may introduce global trends or abrupt changes in EMI data not related to the underground. In this paper, the effects of drift on the quadrature and in-phase responses of a ground-based system are researched by evaluating several multi-receiver EMI datasets. First, a stationary recording illustrates the need for a versatile drift compensation. For area surveys we propose an efficient drift correction procedure. To start, a calibration line that crosses the entire survey area within a short time frame is recorded. An approach to account for spatial offset between sensor midpoint and global navigation satellite system antenna is also detailed given the bearing it has on accurate localization. The residuals of coincident calibration and survey data can then be used to model and subtract the drift from the sensor data. This is performed by applying outlier detection and removal, followed by curve fitting of the comparison data. The developed procedure allows a near continuous evaluation of drift, without the need for ancillary data and is time efficient. The approach is shown to be suitable for various survey setups and drift effects.

  10. Quantum efficiency of a double quantum dot microwave photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement; Vavilov, Maxim

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we study charge transfer through a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting cavity subject to a microwave field. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and determine the optimal parameter regime for complete absorption of radiation and efficient conversion of microwave photons to electric current. For experimentally available DQD systems, we show that the cavity-coupled DQD operates as a photon-to-charge converter with quantum efficiencies up to 80% C.W. acknowledges support by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program.

  11. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, J.; Casoli, P.; Chappert, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  12. CHANTI: a fast and efficient charged particle veto detector for the NA62 experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.; Capussela, T.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Mirra, M.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Roscilli, L.; Vanzanella, A.; Corradi, G.; Tagnani, D.; Paglia, U.

    2016-03-01

    The design, construction and test of a charged particle detector made of scintillation counters read by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) is described. The detector, which operates in vacuum and is used as a veto counter in the NA62 experiment at CERN, has a single channel time resolution of 1.14 ns, a spatial resolution of ~2.5 mm and an efficiency very close to 1 for penetrating charged particles.

  13. A quick technique to improve the geometry characterisation of aged HPGe detectors for MC code efficiency calculation.

    PubMed

    Moser, H; Maringer, F J

    2016-03-01

    During the EMRP JRP MetroMETAL project a detector image of an aged HPGe gamma-ray detector was created for MC efficiency calculation. Using the nominal construction parameters of the detector, the simulation showed unacceptably high deviations from the assured activity values. This paper describes an optimisation of a virtual detector to obtain better results using limited resources and offers comparisons of efficiency values of point and voluminous sources calculated by LABSOCS® and PENELOPE 2011. PMID:26688355

  14. Quantum efficiency performances of the NIR European Large Format Array detectors tested at ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouzet, P.-E.; Duvet, L.; de Wit, F.; Beaufort, T.; Blommaert, S.; Butler, B.; Van Duinkerken, G.; ter Haar, J.; Heijnen, J.; van der Luijt, K.; Smit, H.

    2015-10-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 10/12/2015, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 10/23/2015. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. The Payload Technology Validation Section (SRE-FV) at ESTEC has the goal to validate new technology for future or on-going mission. In this framework, a test set up to characterize the quantum efficiency of near-infrared (NIR) detectors has been created. In the context of the NIR European Large Format Array ("LFA"), 3 deliverables detectors coming from SELEX-UK/ATC (UK) on one side, and CEA/LETI- CEA/IRFU-SOFRADIR (FR) on the other side were characterized. The quantum efficiency of an HAWAII-2RG detector from Teledyne was as well measured. The capability to compare on the same setup detectors from different manufacturers is a unique asset for the future mission preparation office. This publication will present the quantum efficiency results of a HAWAII-2RG detector from Teledyne with a 2.5um cut off compared to the LFA European detectors prototypes developed independently by SELEX-UK/ATC (UK) on one side, and CEA/LETI- CEA/IRFU-SOFRADIR (FR) on the other side.

  15. Calibration and GEANT4 Simulations of the Phase II Proton Compute Tomography (pCT) Range Stack Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Uzunyan, S. A.; Blazey, G.; Boi, S.; Coutrakon, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, E.; Kalnins, J.; Zutshi, V.; Ford, R.; Rauch, J. E.; Rubinov, P.; Sellberg, G.; Wilson, P.; Naimuddin, M.

    2015-12-29

    Northern Illinois University in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and Delhi University has been designing and building a proton CT scanner for applications in proton treatment planning. The Phase II proton CT scanner consists of eight planes of tracking detectors with two X and two Y coordinate measurements both before and after the patient. In addition, a range stack detector consisting of a stack of thin scintillator tiles, arranged in twelve eight-tile frames, is used to determine the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of each track through the patient. The X-Y coordinates and WEPL are required input for image reconstruction software to find the relative (proton) stopping powers (RSP) value of each voxel in the patient and generate a corresponding 3D image. In this Note we describe tests conducted in 2015 at the proton beam at the Central DuPage Hospital in Warrenville, IL, focusing on the range stack calibration procedure and comparisons with the GEANT~4 range stack simulation.

  16. More efficient evolutionary strategies for model calibration with watershed model for demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, J. S.; Skahill, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    Evolutionary strategies allow automatic calibration of more complex models than traditional gradient based approaches, but they are more computationally intensive. We present several efficiency enhancements for evolution strategies, many of which are not new, but when combined have been shown to dramatically decrease the number of model runs required for calibration of synthetic problems. To reduce the number of expensive model runs we employ a surrogate objective function for an adaptively determined fraction of the population at each generation (Kern et al., 2006). We demonstrate improvements to the adaptive ranking strategy that increase its efficiency while sacrificing little reliability and further reduce the number of model runs required in densely sampled parts of parameter space. Furthermore, we include a gradient individual in each generation that is usually not selected when the search is in a global phase or when the derivatives are poorly approximated, but when selected near a smooth local minimum can dramatically increase convergence speed (Tahk et al., 2007). Finally, the selection of the gradient individual is used to adapt the size of the population near local minima. We show, by incorporating these enhancements into the Covariance Matrix Adaption Evolution Strategy (CMAES; Hansen, 2006), that their synergetic effect is greater than their individual parts. This hybrid evolutionary strategy exploits smooth structure when it is present but degrades to an ordinary evolutionary strategy, at worst, if smoothness is not present. Calibration of 2D-3D synthetic models with the modified CMAES requires approximately 10%-25% of the model runs of ordinary CMAES. Preliminary demonstration of this hybrid strategy will be shown for watershed model calibration problems. Hansen, N. (2006). The CMA Evolution Strategy: A Comparing Review. In J.A. Lozano, P. Larrañga, I. Inza and E. Bengoetxea (Eds.). Towards a new evolutionary computation. Advances in estimation of

  17. A detector response function design in pinhole SPECT including geometrical calibration

    PubMed Central

    El Bitar, Z; Huesman, R H; Buchko, R; Bekaert, Virgile; Brasse, David; Gullberg, G T

    2014-01-01

    Clinical single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) equipped with pinhole collimators have a magnification factor that results in high spatial resolution images for small animal imaging. Using Monte Carlo simulations to model the acquisition process and the propagation of the photons from their point of emission to their detection point then integrating the model into an iterative reconstruction algorithm improves the signal-to-noise ratio, the contrast and the spatial resolution in the reconstructed images. However, pinhole SPECT systems are known to be very sensitive to geometrical misalignments. Geometrical misalignments are defined as the radial or axial shift of the collimator pinhole and/or twist and tilt of the detector heads and are introduced in the system each time the collimation device is changed (pinhole to parallel holes or vice versa). In this work, we present a flexible detector response function table (DRFT) design that takes into account the geometrical misalignments and avoids performing new Monte Carlo simulations for each exam in order to calculate a geometrical study-dependent system matrix. The utilization of the DRFT for the calculation of the system matrix speeds up its computation time by two orders of magnitude making it acceptable for preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:23492938

  18. Practical attacks on decoy-state quantum-key-distribution systems with detector efficiency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Yangyang; Gao, Ming; Wang, Weilong; Li, Chaobo; Ma, Zhi

    2015-05-01

    To the active-basis-choice decoy-state quantum-key-distribution systems with detector efficiency mismatch, we present a modified attack strategy, which is based on the faked states attack, with quantum nondemolition measurement ability to restress the threat of detector efficiency mismatch. Considering that perfect quantum nondemolition measurement ability doesn't exist in real life, we also propose a practical attack strategy using photon number resolving detectors. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation results show that, without changing the channel, our attack strategies are serious threats to decoy-state quantum-key-distribution systems. The eavesdropper may get some information about the secret key without causing any alarms. Besides, the lower bound of detector efficiency mismatch to run our modified faked states attack successfully with perfect quantum nondemolition measurement ability is also given out, which provides the producers of quantum-key-distribution systems with a reference and can be treated as the approximate secure bound of detector efficiency mismatch in decoy-state quantum-key-distribution systems.

  19. Design of broadband high-efficiency superconducting-nanowire single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redaelli, L.; Bulgarini, G.; Dobrovolskiy, S.; Dorenbos, S. N.; Zwiller, V.; Monroy, E.; Gérard, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper several designs to maximize the absorption efficiency of superconducting-nanowire single-photon detectors are investigated. Using a simple optical cavity consisting of a gold mirror and a SiO2 layer, the absorption efficiency can be boosted to over 97%: this result is confirmed experimentally by the realization of an NbTiN-based detector having an overall system detection efficiency of 85% at 1.31 μm. Calculations show that by sandwiching the nanowire between two dielectric Bragg reflectors, unity absorption (>99.9%) could be reached at the peak wavelength for optimized structures. To achieve broadband high efficiency, a different approach is considered: a waveguide-coupled detector. The calculations performed in this work show that, by correctly dimensioning the waveguide and the nanowire, polarization-insensitive detectors absorbing more than 95% of the injected photons over a wavelength range of several hundred nm can be designed. We propose a detector design making use of GaN/AlN waveguides, since these materials allow lattice-matched epitaxial deposition of Nb(Ti)N films and are transparent on a very wide wavelength range.

  20. Efficient nanoplasmonic antennas for fabricating single protein molecule detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sharmistha; Dantham, Venkata Ramanaiah; Hussain, Sahid

    2015-06-01

    Real time (label-free) detection and sizing of single protein molecule at its natural state is "holy grail" in biosensing field. This non-destructive technique is useful for predicting the dangerous diseases at very early-stage. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of efficient nanoplasmonic antennas, which could be useful to fabricate an ultrasensitive nanoplasmonic-whispering gallery mode hybrid microresonator for the real time detection and sizing of single protein molecule. This hybrid microresonator could be easily converted as an ultrasensitive single molecule biosensor by anchoring suitable anti-bodies on the surface of the plasmonic nanoantenna.

  1. NHEXAS PHASE I ARIZONA STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR OPERATION, CALIBRATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE SENTEX SCENTOGUN PORTABLE PHOTOIONIZATION DETECTOR (UA-F-4.1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to describe the procedures for the operation, calibration, and maintenance of the Sentex Scentogun portable photoionization detector (PID). The sampling Scentogun was used to collect volatile organic compound (VOC) levels during the Arizona NHEXAS proj...

  2. Absolute detection efficiency of a microchannel plate detector to X rays in the 1-100 KeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burginyon, Gary A.; Jacoby, Barry A.; Wobser, James K.; Ernst, Richard; Ancheta, Dione S.; Tirsell, Kenneth G.

    1993-02-01

    There is little information in the literature on the performance of working micro-channel plate (MCP) detectors at high x-ray energies. We have measured the absolute efficiency of a microchannel-plate-intensified, subnanosecond, one dimensional imaging x-ray detector developed at LLNL in the 1 to 100 keV range and at 1.25 MeV. The detector consists of a gold photocathode deposited on the front surface of the MCP (optimized for Ni K(subscript (alpha) ) x rays) to convert x rays to electrons, an MCP to amplify the electrons, and a fast In:CdS phosphor that converts the electron's kinetic energy to light. The phosphor is coated on a fiber-optic faceplate to transmit the light out of the vacuum system. Electrostatic focusing electrodes compress the electron current out of the MCP in one dimension while preserving spatial resolution in the other. The calibration geometry, dictated by a recent experiment, required grazing incidence x rays (15.6 degree(s)) onto the MCP detector in order to maximize deliverable current. The experiment also used a second detector made up of 0.071 in. thick BC422 plastic scintillator material from the Bicron Corporation. We compare the absolute efficiencies of these two detectors in units of optical W/cm(superscript 2) into 4 (pi) per x ray W/cm(superscript 2) incident. At 7.47 keV and 900 volts MCP bias, the MCP detector delivers approximately 1400 times more light than the scintillator detector.

  3. Quantum Efficiency for Electron-Hole Pair Generation by Infrared Irradiation in Germanium Cryogenic Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domange, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Olivieri, E.; Chapellier, M.; Dumoulin, L.

    2009-12-01

    A study is made of the quantum efficiency of a coplanar grid ionization/heat Ge detector operated at cryogenic temperatures for dark matter search. Carrier generation is performed with infra-red LEDs of different wavelengths (1.30, 1.45, and 1.65 μm) near the optical bandgap of germanium. The corresponding quantum efficiency is obtained from an analysis of the Joule (Luke-Neganov) effect. This investigation is part of a program to optimize the reset procedure of the detectors in the Edelweiss-II dark matter search experiment at the Modane Underground Laboratory.

  4. Evaluating the Efficiency of a Multi-core Aware Multi-objective Optimization Tool for Calibrating the SWAT Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Zong, Z.; Zhao, K.; Thomson, A. M.

    2012-08-20

    The efficiency of calibrating physically-based complex hydrologic models is a major concern in the application of those models to understand and manage natural and human activities that affect watershed systems. In this study, we developed a multi-core aware multi-objective evolutionary optimization algorithm (MAMEOA) to improve the efficiency of calibrating a worldwide used watershed model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)). The test results show that MAMEOA can save about 1-9%, 26-51%, and 39-56% time consumed by calibrating SWAT as compared with sequential method by using dual-core, quad-core, and eight-core machines, respectively. Potential and limitations of MAMEOA for calibrating SWAT are discussed. MAMEOA is open source software.

  5. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  6. Low-cost fabrication of high efficiency solid-state neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia-Woei; Huang, Kuan-Chih; Weltz, Adam; English, Erik; Hella, Mona M.; Dahal, Rajendra; Lu, James J.-Q.; Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara B.

    2016-05-01

    The development of high-efficiency solid state thermal neutron detectors at low cost is critical for a wide range of civilian and defense applications. The use of present neutron detector system for personal radiation detection is limited by the cost, size, weight and power requirements. Chip scale solid state neutron detectors based on silicon technology would provide significant benefits in terms of cost, volume, and allow for wafer level integration with charge preamplifiers and readout electronics. In this paper, anisotropic wet etching of (110) silicon wafers was used to replace deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to produce microstructured neutron detectors with lower cost and compatibility with mass production. Deep trenches were etched by 30 wt% KOH at 85°C with a highest etch ratio of (110) to (111). A trench-microstructure thermal neutron detector described by the aforementioned processes was fabricated and characterized. The detector—which has a continuous p+-n junction diode—was filled with enriched boron (99% of 10B) as a neutron converter material. The device showed a leakage current of ~ 6.7 × 10-6 A/cm2 at -1V and thermal neutron detection efficiency of ~16.3%. The detector uses custom built charge pre-amplifier, a shaping amplifier, and an analogto- digital converter (ADC) for data acquisition.

  7. Geometric efficiency for a circular detector and a ring source of arbitrary orientation and position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, John T.

    2011-06-01

    Two distinct axisymmetric radiation vector potentials are derived for a circular ring source, both of which are given in terms of elliptic integrals. In combination with Stokes's theorem these potentials reduce the surface integral for the geometric efficiency of a ring source and a general detector to a line integral, though only a circular detector is analyzed in detail here. One of the potentials is bounded as the axis of symmetry is approached and it can also be expressed as an integral of Bessel functions. It is used to derive the ring source analogue of Ruby's formula and its noncoaxial generalization. A trigonometric integral is given for the general noncoaxial case and closed form solutions are given for the coaxial case and the case where the ring source is in the detector plane. Numerical data is given for these cases. The second potential is singular along the entire ring axis and Stokes's theorem must be modified when using it whenever the ring axis intersects the detector or its boundary. This potential is used to derive a trigonometric integral for the geometric efficiency of the ring source and a circular detector in the general case where the source and the detector have arbitrary relative position and angular orientation. Numerical data is given for selected geometric parameters when the planes of the ring and disk are perpendicular and for the general case. The intersection of some results for point source radiation vector potentials with vector potentials arising in diffraction theory is given in an Appendix.

  8. Ratio of germanium detector peak efficiencies at photon energies of 4.4 and 11.7 MeV: Experiment versus simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Spencer; Iliadis, Christian; Cesaratto, John; Champagne, Art; Downen, Lori; Ivanovic, Marija; Kelley, John; Longland, Richard; Newton, Joseph R.; Rusev, Gencho; Tonchev, Anton P.

    2010-06-01

    Full-energy peak efficiencies of germanium detectors are frequently investigated at γ-ray energies below 4 MeV using calibrated radioactive sources, while very accurate peak efficiencies for higher photon energies are essentially non-existent. Peak efficiencies in the energy range of Eγ=4-12 MeV are crucial for a number of applications, including nuclear astrophysics measurements of fusion reactions and resonance fluorescence experiments. We report on a novel method, using the 163 keV resonance in the B11(p,γ)C12 reaction, of measuring accurately the ratio of full-energy peak efficiencies at 4.44 and 11.66 MeV. We derive this ratio for three different detector-target distances (3, 12 and 26 cm) directly from measured peak intensities and demonstrate that corrections are small ( γ-ray branching ratios, angular correlations, coincidence summing). Our measured full-energy peak efficiency ratios have a precision of 1.4-1.6%. Another important goal of our study was to determine to what precision full-energy peak efficiencies at high γ-ray energies can be predicted using the simulation codes Geant3 and Geant4. We imaged our detector using computed tomography and radiographs in order to extract reliable detector crystal dimensions. Based on these results, extensive computer simulations are performed. We find that the simulation results agree with the measured peak efficiency ratios within an uncertainty of 1.6% for Geant4 and 2.6% for Geant3. Our results are useful for assigning uncertainties when peak efficiencies are extrapolated from low energy data to high energies based on simulations only.

  9. SuperTIGER scintillator detector calibration with 30 GeV/nucleon Pb and its fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    The SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) long-duration balloon instrument has measured the abundances of galactic cosmic-ray elements to provide sensitive tests and clarification of the OB-association model of Galactic cosmic-ray origins. More than 600 nuclei with atomic number Z > 30 were observed on its first flight and the abundances of nuclei have been determined with clear individual element resolution and high statistical precision for 30 <= Z <= 40. From November 25 to December 01, 2015, a beamtest was carried out at CERN with fixed energy 30 GeV/nucleon Pb and its fragments to measure the saturation response of the scintillator detectors, which are essential to determine the abundances of nuclei with atomic number Z > 40. The beamtest results have been used to optimize the Geant4 simulation to represent the flight data, and will be used to interpret the flight data to extend the abundance determination to about _{60}Nd. SuperTIGER was developed by Washington University in St. Louis, NASA Goddard Flight Center, the California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the University of Minnesota.

  10. Thicker, more efficient superconducting strip-line detectors for high throughput macromolecules analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Casaburi, A.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Zen, N.; Ohkubo, M.; Pagano, S.

    2011-01-10

    Fast detectors with large area are required in time-of-flight mass spectrometers for high throughput analysis of biological molecules. We fabricated and characterized subnanosecond 1x1 mm{sup 2} NbN superconducting strip-line detectors. The influence of the strip-line thickness on the temporal characteristics and efficiency of the detector for the impacts of keV accelerated molecules is investigated. We find that the increase of thickness improves both efficiency and response time. In the thicker sample we achieved a rise time of 380 ps, a fall time of 1.38 ns, and a higher count rate. The physics involved in this behavior is investigated.

  11. High quantum-efficiency photon-number-resolving detector for photonic on-chip information processing.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Brice; Mennea, Paolo L; Lita, Adriana E; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Kolthammer, W Steven; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Spring, Justin B; Humphreys, Peter C; Mirin, Richard P; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo

    2013-09-23

    The integrated optical circuit is a promising architecture for the realization of complex quantum optical states and information networks. One element that is required for many of these applications is a high-efficiency photon detector capable of photon-number discrimination. We present an integrated photonic system in the telecom band at 1550 nm based on UV-written silica-on-silicon waveguides and modified transition-edge sensors capable of number resolution and over 40 % efficiency. Exploiting the mode transmission failure of these devices, we multiplex three detectors in series to demonstrate a combined 79 % ± 2 % detection efficiency with a single pass, and 88 % ± 3 % at the operating wavelength of an on-chip terminal reflection grating. Furthermore, our optical measurements clearly demonstrate no significant unexplained loss in this system due to scattering or reflections. This waveguide and detector design therefore allows the placement of number-resolving single-photon detectors of predictable efficiency at arbitrary locations within a photonic circuit - a capability that offers great potential for many quantum optical applications. PMID:24104153

  12. A transportable source of gamma rays with discrete energies and wide range for calibration and on-site testing of gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja, Carlos; Slavicek, Tomas; Kroupa, Martin; Owens, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Janout, Zdenek; Kralik, Miloslav; Solc, Jaroslav; Valach, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact and transportable wide energy range, gamma-ray station for the calibration of gamma-ray sensitive devices. The station was specifically designed for the on-site testing and calibration of gamma-ray sensitive spacecraft payloads, intended for space flight on the BepiColombo and SoIar Orbiter missions of the European Space Agency. The source is intended to serve as a calibrated reference for post test center qualification of integrated payload instruments and for preflight evaluation of scientific radiation sensors. Discrete gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV-9 MeV are produced in the station with reasonable intensity using a radionuclide neutron source and 100 l of distilled water with 22 kg salt dissolved. The gamma-rays generated contain many discrete lines conveniently evenly distributed over the entire energy range. The neutron and gamma-ray fields have been simulated by Monte Carlo calculations. Results of the numerical calculations are given in the form of neutron and gamma-ray spectra as well as dose equivalent rate. The dose rate was also determined directly by dedicated dosemetric measurements. The gamma-ray field produced in the station was characterized using a conventional HPGe detector. The application of the station is demonstrated by measurements taken with a flight-qualified LaBr3:Ce scintillation detector. Gamma-ray spectra acquired by both detectors are presented. The minimum measuring times for calibration of the flight-version detector, was between 2 and 10 min (up to 6.2 MeV) and 20-30 min (up to 8 MeV), when the detector was placed at a distance 2-5 m from the station.

  13. Calibration of a Thomson scattering diagnostic for fluctuation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, H. D.; Borchardt, M. T.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Falkowski, A. F.; Holly, D. J.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.

    2008-10-15

    Detailed calibrations of the Madison Symmetric Torus polychromator Thomson scattering system have been made suitable for electron temperature fluctuation measurements. All calibrations have taken place focusing on accuracy, ease of use and repeatability, and in situ measurements wherever possible. Novel calibration processes have been made possible with an insertable integrating sphere (ISIS), using an avalanche photodiode (APD) as a reference detector and optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Discussed are a novel in situ spatial calibration with the use of the ISIS, the use of an APD as a reference detector to streamline the APD calibration process, a standard dc spectral calibration, and in situ pulsed spectral calibration made possible with a combination of an OPO as a light source, the ISIS, and an APD used as a reference detector. In addition a relative quantum efficiency curve for the APDs is obtained to aid in uncertainty analysis.

  14. SU-E-T-298: Small Field Total Scatter Factors Using a Commercial Scintillator Detector: Calibration Parameters Are Not Independent of Field Size

    SciTech Connect

    Jornet, N; Carrasco de Fez, P; Jordi, O; Latorre-Musoll, A; Eudaldo, T; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Ribas Morales, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy in total scatter factor (Sc,p) determination for small fields using commercial plastic scintillator detector (PSD). The manufacturer's spectral discrimination method to subtract Cerenkov light from the signal is discussed. Methods: Sc,p for field sizes ranging from 0.5 to 10 cm were measured using PSD Exradin (Standard Imaging) connected to two channel electrometer measuring the signals in two different spectral regions to subtract the Cerenkov signal from the PSD signal. A Pinpoint ionisation chamber 31006 (PTW) and a non-shielded semiconductor detector EFD (Scanditronix) were used for comparison. Measures were performed for a 6 MV X-ray beam. The Sc,p are measured at 10 cm depth in water for a SSD=100 cm and normalized to a 10'10 cm{sup 2} field size at the isocenter. All detectors were placed with their symmetry axis parallel to the beam axis.We followed the manufacturer's recommended calibration methodology to subtract the Cerenkov contribution to the signal as well as a modified method using smaller field sizes. The Sc,p calculated by using both calibration methodologies were compared. Results: Sc,p measured with the semiconductor and the PinPoint detectors agree, within 1.5%, for field sizes between 10'10 and 1'1 cm{sup 2}. Sc,p measured with the PSD using the manufacturer's calibration methodology were systematically 4% higher than those measured with the semiconductor detector for field sizes smaller than 5'5 cm{sup 2}. By using a modified calibration methodology for smalls fields and keeping the manufacturer calibration methodology for fields larger than 5'5cm{sup 2} field Sc,p matched semiconductor results within 2% field sizes larger than 1.5 cm. Conclusion: The calibration methodology proposed by the manufacturer is not appropriate for dose measurements in small fields. The calibration parameters are not independent of the incident radiation spectrum for this PSD. This work was partially financed by grant 2012 of

  15. Bragg Magnifier: High-efficiency, High-resolution X-ray Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Stampanoni, Marco; Groso, Amela; Abela, Rafael; Borchert, Gunther

    2007-01-19

    X-ray computer microtomography is a powerful tool for non-destructive examinations in medicine, biology, and material sciences. The resolution of the presently used detector systems is restricted by scintillator properties, optical light transfer, and charge-coupled-device (CCD) granularity, which impose a practical limit of about one micrometer spatial resolution at detector efficiencies of a few percent. A recently developed detector, called Bragg Magnifier, achieves a breakthrough in this respect, satisfying the research requirements of an efficient advance towards the submicron range. The Bragg Magnifier uses the properties of asymmetric Bragg diffraction to increase the cross section of the diffracted X-ray beam. Magnifications up to 100x100 can be achieved even at hard X-rays energies (>20 keV). In this way the influence of the detector resolution can be reduced accordingly and the efficiency increased. Such a device has been developed and successfully integrated into the Tomography Station of the Materials Science Beamline of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). The device can be operated at energies ranging from 17.5 keV up to 22.75 keV, reaching theoretical pixel sizes of 140 nm.

  16. High optical efficiency and photon noise limited sensitivity of microwave kinetic inductance detectors using phase readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R. M. J.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Endo, A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Baryshev, A. M.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate photon noise limited performance in both phase and amplitude readout in microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) consisting of NbTiN and Al, down to 100 fW of optical power. We simulate the far field beam pattern of the lens-antenna system used to couple radiation into the MKID and derive an aperture efficiency of 75%. This is close to the theoretical maximum of 80% for a single-moded detector. The beam patterns are verified by a detailed analysis of the optical coupling within our measurement setup.

  17. High optical efficiency and photon noise limited sensitivity of microwave kinetic inductance detectors using phase readout

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, R. M. J. Endo, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C.; Baryshev, A. M.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate photon noise limited performance in both phase and amplitude readout in microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) consisting of NbTiN and Al, down to 100 fW of optical power. We simulate the far field beam pattern of the lens-antenna system used to couple radiation into the MKID and derive an aperture efficiency of 75%. This is close to the theoretical maximum of 80% for a single-moded detector. The beam patterns are verified by a detailed analysis of the optical coupling within our measurement setup.

  18. Effects of the interstrip gap on the efficiency and response of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Forneris, J.; Grassi, L.; Acosta, L.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Grilj, V.; Jakic, M.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Milin, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Stanko, D.; Tokic, V.; Uroic, M.; Zadro, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work the effects of the segmentation of the electrodes of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are investigated. In order to characterize the response of the DSSSDs we perform a first experiment by using tandem beams of different energies directly sent on the detector and a second experiment by mean of a proton microbeam. Results show that the effective width of the inter-strip region and the efficiency for full energy detection, varies with both detected energy and bias voltage. The experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by a simplified model based on the Shockley-Ramo-Gunn framework.

  19. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550 nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10−19 W/Hz−1/2 range and the timing jitter is as low as 35 ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms. PMID:26061283

  20. Geometrical and total efficiencies of CdZnTe rectangular parallelepiped detector using arbitrary positioned point, plane, and volumetric sources.

    PubMed

    Hamzawy, A; Badawi, Mohamed S; Thabet, Abouzeid A; Gouda, Mona M; El-Khatib, Ahmed M; Abbas, Mahmoud I

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-ray detectors are widely used in many fields like environmental measurements, medicine, space science, and industry, where the detector geometrical, total, photopeak efficiencies and peak-to-total ratio could be required. The calculation of the detector efficiency depends mainly on the value of the geometrical efficiency, which depends on the solid angle subtended by the source-detector system. The present work introduces a direct analytical method to calculate the geometrical and total efficiencies of CdZnTe gamma-ray detector using off-axis isotropic radiating γ-ray [point, disk, and cylindrical] sources. To test the validity of the present work, the results are compared with some published data and also to prove how much it is important to determine the efficiency of difficult gamma-ray detection arrangement. PMID:26931896

  1. Geometrical and total efficiencies of CdZnTe rectangular parallelepiped detector using arbitrary positioned point, plane, and volumetric sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzawy, A.; Badawi, Mohamed S.; Thabet, Abouzeid A.; Gouda, Mona M.; El-Khatib, Ahmed M.; Abbas, Mahmoud I.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-ray detectors are widely used in many fields like environmental measurements, medicine, space science, and industry, where the detector geometrical, total, photopeak efficiencies and peak-to-total ratio could be required. The calculation of the detector efficiency depends mainly on the value of the geometrical efficiency, which depends on the solid angle subtended by the source-detector system. The present work introduces a direct analytical method to calculate the geometrical and total efficiencies of CdZnTe gamma-ray detector using off-axis isotropic radiating γ-ray [point, disk, and cylindrical] sources. To test the validity of the present work, the results are compared with some published data and also to prove how much it is important to determine the efficiency of difficult gamma-ray detection arrangement.

  2. First measurement of efficiency and precision of CCD detectors for high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, R.; Damerell, C. J. S.; English, R. L.; Gillman, A. R.; Lintern, A. L.; Watts, S. J.; Wickens, F. J.

    1983-08-01

    It has been known for some time that a 2-dimensional charge-coupled device (CCD) might be used for detecting high energy particles with high precision and excellent 2-track resolution. Such detectors could be used to distinguish between prompt tracks and decay products in events producing short-lived particles (heavy leptons, charm, beauty etc.). We now present results in which (for the first time) a telescope of CCD detectors has been operated in a beam of high energy particles. The main results are that even these early detectors have excellent performance characteristics, namely efficiency for track detection of 98±2% per plane, spatial resolution of 4.3 μm and 6.1 μm in two orthogonal directions and 2-track resolution of 40 μm in space.

  3. Study of anomalous charge collection efficiency in heavily irradiated silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuž, M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous charge collection efficiency observed in heavily irradiated silicon strip detectors operated at high bias voltages has been studied in terms of a simple model and experimentally using 25 ns shaping electronics and transient current technique (TCT) with edge-on laser injection. The model confirmed qualitatively the explanation by electron impact ionization in the high electric field close to the strips, but failed in the quantitative description of the collected charge. First results on a Hamamatsu strip detector irradiated to 5×1015 neq/cm2 and operated at bias voltages in excess of 1000 V exhibit charge collection similar to what obtained on Micron devices. TCT tests with local charge injection by a laser confirm the validity of a linear extrapolation of trapping to very high fluences and reveal significant charge collection from the non-depleted volume of the detector.

  4. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de; Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A.; Sahin, D.; Driessen, E. F. C.

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  5. Absolute intensity calibration of the Wendelstein 7-X high efficiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiche, Albert; Biel, Wolfgang; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Burhenn, Rainer

    2008-09-01

    The new high effiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer (HEXOS) system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X is now mounted for testing and adjustment at the tokamak experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR). One part of the testing phase was the intensity calibration of the two double spectrometers which in total cover a spectral range from 2.5 to 160.0 nm with overlap. This work presents the current intensity calibration curves for HEXOS and describes the method of calibration. The calibration was implemented with calibrated lines of a hollow cathode light source and the branching ratio technique. The hollow cathode light source provides calibrated lines from 16 up to 147 nm. We could extend the calibrated region in the spectrometers down to 2.8 nm by using the branching line pairs emitted by an uncalibrated pinch extreme ultraviolet light source as well as emission lines from boron and carbon in TEXTOR plasmas. In total HEXOS is calibrated from 2.8 up to 147 nm, which covers most of the observable wavelength region. The approximate density of carbon in the range of the minor radius from 18 to 35 cm in a TEXTOR plasma determined by simulating calibrated vacuum ultraviolet emission lines with a transport code was 5.5×1017 m-3 which corresponds to a local carbon concentration of 2%.

  6. Gamma-ray detection efficiency of the microchannel plate installed as an ion detector in the low energy particle instrument onboard the GEOTAIL satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Yoshikawa, I.; Yoshioka, K.; Terasawa, T.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2007-03-15

    A microchannel plate (MCP) assembly has been used as an ion detector in the low energy particle (LEP) instrument onboard the magnetospheric satellite GEOTAIL. Recently the MCP assembly has detected gamma rays emitted from an astronomical object and has been shown to provide unique information of gamma rays if they are intense enough. However, the detection efficiency for gamma rays was not measured before launch, and therefore we could not analyze the LEP data quantitatively. In this article, we report the gamma-ray detection efficiency of the MCP assembly. The measured efficiencies are 1.29%{+-}0.71% and 0.21%{+-}0.14% for normal incidence 60 and 662 keV gamma rays, respectively. The incident angle dependence is also presented. Our calibration is crucial to study high energy astrophysical phenomena by using the LEP.

  7. Detective quantum efficiency of an amorphous selenium detector to megavoltage radiation.

    PubMed

    Mah, D; Rawlinson, J A; Rowlands, J A

    1999-05-01

    The spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE(f)) of a high-resolution selenium-based imaging system has been measured at megavoltage energies. These results have been compared with theoretical calculations. The imaging system was a video tube with a 5 microm amorphous selenium (a-Se) target which was irradiated by 1.25 MeV gamma-rays. The modulation transfer function (MTF) decreased rapidly with spatial frequency (determined by spread of electrons in the build-up material) while the noise power spectrum was constant as a function of spatial frequency. The DQE obtained from these MTF and noise power measurements was compared with a Monte Carlo model of the pulse height spectrum of the detector. The DQE(0) model accounted for the interaction of x rays with the detector as well as the energy-dependent gain (charge generated/energy deposition). Good agreement between the calculated and measured DQE(0) was found. The model was also used to estimate the DQE(f) of a metal plate + a-Se detector which was compared with a metal plate + phosphor system of the same mass thickness. The DQE(f) s of both detectors are very similar, indicating that the choice of which detector is better will be based upon criteria other than DQE(f), such as read-out approach, ease of manufacture or sensitivity. PMID:10368025

  8. Using a superconducting tunnel junction detector to measure the secondary electron emission efficiency for a microchannel plate detector bombarded by large molecular ions

    PubMed

    Westmacott; Frank; Labov; Benner

    2000-01-01

    An energy-sensitive superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector was used to measure the secondary electron emission efficiency, epsilon(e), for a microchannel plate (MCP) detector bombarded by large (up to 66 kDa), slow moving (<40 km/s) molecular ions. The method used is new and provides a more direct procedure for measuring the efficiency of secondary electron emission from a surface. Both detectors were exposed simultaneously to nearly identical ion fluxes. By exposing only a small area of the MCP detector to ions, such that the area exposed was effectively the same as the size of the STJ detector, the number of ions detected with each detector were directly comparable. The STJ detector is 100% efficient for detecting ions in the energy regime investigated and therefore it can be used to measure the detection efficiency and secondary electron emission efficiency of the MCP. The results are consistent with measurements made by other groups and provide further characterization of the loss in sensitivity noted previously when MCP detectors have been used to detect high-mass ions. Individual molecular ions of mass 66 kDa with 30 keV kinetic energy were measured to have about a 5% probability of producing one or more electrons when impacting the MCP. When ion energy was reduced to 10 keV, the detection probability decreased to 1 %. The secondary electron yield was calculated from the secondary electron emission efficiency and found to scale linearly with the mass of the impinging molecular ion and to about the fourth power of ion velocity. Secondary electrons were observed for primary ion impacts >5 km/s, regardless of mass, and no evidence of a velocity (detection) threshold was observed. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:11006596

  9. High photopeak efficiency gamma-ray detector for upcoming Laue Lens missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. J.; Dean, A. J.; Bird, A. J.

    2006-06-01

    We present the design for a new detector configuration, specifically tailored to suit the needs of prospective Laue Lens Gamma-ray astronomy missions in the 10keV to 1MeV energy range. A Laue Lens uses transmission diffraction through crystal planes to focus the incoming gamma-rays. Diffraction is highly energy dependant and in order to recreate high resolution images, very accurate measurements of the total energy of the incident photon are necessary, as well as good spatial resolution. The aim is to absorb all the Compton scattered products of the incoming photons. The design uses a cavity geometry with the main germanium pixilated imaging detector embedded position sensitive cavity. The germanium is then enclosed in a veto to reduce background and to clean the imaging of unwanted non-photopeak events. This allows the majority of backscattered photons to be captured producing a detector with a photopeak efficiency of ~90% at 511keV and millimetric spatial resolution. The detector system has the added advantage that it functions extremely efficiently as a gamma-ray polarimeter.

  10. An efficient, movable single-particle detector for use in cryogenic ultra-high vacuum environments

    SciTech Connect

    Spruck, Kaija; Becker, Arno; Fellenberger, Florian; Grieser, Manfred; Hahn, Robert von; Klinkhamer, Vincent; Vogel, Stephen; Wolf, Andreas; Krantz, Claude; Novotný, Oldřich; Schippers, Stefan

    2015-02-15

    A compact, highly efficient single-particle counting detector for ions of keV/u kinetic energy, movable by a long-stroke mechanical translation stage, has been developed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik (Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, MPIK). Both, detector and translation mechanics, can operate at ambient temperatures down to ∼10 K and consist fully of ultra-high vacuum compatible, high-temperature bakeable, and non-magnetic materials. The set-up is designed to meet the technical demands of MPIK’s Cryogenic Storage Ring. We present a series of functional tests that demonstrate full suitability for this application and characterise the set-up with regard to its particle detection efficiency.

  11. Segmented phosphors: MEMS-based high quantum efficiency detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Amit; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Li, Yixin; Su, Zhong; Wang, Yi; Yamamoto, Jin; Zhao, Qihua; Du, Hong; Daniel, Jurgen; Street, Robert

    2005-02-01

    Current electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) based on active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) technology use a metal plate+phosphor screen combination for x-ray conversion. As a result, these devices face a severe trade-off between x-ray quantum efficiency (QE) and spatial resolution, thus, significantly limiting their imaging performance. In this work, we present a novel detector design for indirect detection-based AMFPI EPIDs that aims to circumvent this trade-off. The detectors were developed using micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based fabrication techniques and consist of a grid of up to approximately 2 mm tall, optically isolated cells of a photoresist material, SU-8. The cells are dimensionally matched to the pixels of the AMFPI array, and packed with a scintillating phosphor. In this paper, various design considerations for such detectors are examined. An empirical evaluation of three small-area (approximately 7 x 7 cm2) prototype detectors is performed in order to study the effects of two design parameters--cell height and phosphor packing density, both of which are important determinants of the imaging performance. Measurements of the x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) were performed under radiotherapy conditions (6 MV), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was determined for each prototype SU-8 detector. In addition, theoretical calculations using Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the QE of each detector, as well as the inherent spatial resolution due to the spread of absorbed energy. The results of the present studies were compared with corresponding measurements published in an earlier study using a Lanex Fast-B phosphor screen coupled to an indirect detection array of the same design. The SU-8 detectors exhibit up to 3 times higher QE, while achieving spatial resolution comparable or superior to Lanex Fast-B. However, the DQE performance of these early prototypes is

  12. A new measurement of the neutron detection efficiency for the NaI Crystal Ball detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martemianov, M.; Kulikov, V.; Demissie, B. T.; Marinides, Z.; Akondi, C. S.; Annand, J. R. M.; Arends, H. J.; Beck, R.; Borisov, N.; Braghieri, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Cherepnya, S.; Collicott, C.; Costanza, S.; Downie, E. J.; Dieterle, M.; Ferretti Bondy, M. I.; Fil'kov, L. V.; Garni, S.; Glazier, D. I.; Glowa, D.; Gradl, W.; Gurevich, G.; Hornidge, D.; Huber, G. M.; Kaeser, A.; Kashevarov, V. L.; Keshelashvili, I.; Kondratiev, R.; Korolija, M.; Krusche, B.; Lazarev, A.; Linturi, J. M.; Lisin, V.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Manley, D. M.; Martel, P. P.; Middleton, D. G.; Miskimen, R.; Mushkarenkov, A.; Neganov, A.; Neiser, A.; Oberle, M.; Ostrick, M.; Ott, P.; Otte, P. B.; Oussena, B.; Pedroni, P.; Polonski, A.; Prakhov, S.; Ron, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Sarty, A.; Schott, D. M.; Schumann, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Steffen, O.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strub, Th.; Supek, I.; Thiel, M.; Thomas, A.; Unverzagt, M.; Usov, Yu. A.; Wagner, S.; Watts, D. P.; Wettig, J.; Werthmüller, D.; Witthauer, L.; Wolfes, M.

    2015-04-01

    We report on a measurement of the neutron detection efficiency in NaI crystals in the Crystal Ball detector obtained from a study of single π0 photoproduction on deuterium using the tagged photon beam at the Mainz Microtron. The results were obtained up to a neutron energy of 400 MeV . They are compared to previous measurements made more than 15 years ago at the pion beam at the BNL AGS.

  13. B Flavor Tagging Calibration and Search for B(s) Oscillations in Semileptonic Decays with the CDF Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Giurgiu, Gavril A

    2005-09-01

    In this thesis we present a search for oscillations of B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons using semileptonic B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decays. Data were collected with the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDFII) from events produced in collisions of 980 GeV protons and antiprotons accelerated in the Tevatron ring. The total proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy is 1.96 TeV. The Tevatron is the unique source in the world for B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons, to be joined by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN after 2007. We establish a lower limit on the B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s} > 7.7 ps{sup -1} at 95% Confidence Level. We also present a multivariate tagging algorithm that identifies semileptonic B {yields} {mu}X decays of the other B mesons in the event. Using this muon tagging algorithm as well as opposite side electron and jet charge tagging algorithms, we infer the B{sub s}{sup 0} flavor at production. The tagging algorithms are calibrated using high statistics samples of B{sup 0} and B{sup +} semileptonic B{sup 0/+} {yields} D{ell}{nu} decays. The oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub d} in semileptonic B{sup 0} {yields} D{ell}{nu} decays is measured to be {Delta}m{sub d} = (0.501 {+-} 0.029(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.)) ps{sup -1}.

  14. Note: Determining the detection efficiency of excited neutral atoms by a microchannel plate detector

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Ben; Zohrabi, M.; Hayes, D.; Ablikim, U.; Jochim, Bethany; Severt, T.; Carnes, K. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2015-04-15

    We present a method for determining the detection efficiency of neutral atoms relative to keV ions. Excited D* atoms are produced by D{sub 2} fragmentation in a strong laser field. The fragments are detected by a micro-channel plate detector either directly as neutrals or as keV ions following field ionization and acceleration by a static electric field. Moreover, we propose a new mechanism by which neutrals are detected. We show that the ratio of the yield of neutrals and ions can be related to the relative detection efficiency of these species.

  15. Calibration and operational data for a compact photodiode detector useful for monitoring the location of moving sources of positron emitting radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, M. G.; Dehnel, M. P.; Johansson, S.; Rajander, J.; Solin, O.; Theroux, J.; Stewart, T. M.; Christensen, T.; Hollinger, C.

    2013-04-01

    D-Pace has developed a compact cost-effective gamma detector system based on technology licensed from TRIUMF [1]. These photodiode detectors are convenient for detecting the presence of positron emitting radioisotopes, particularly for the case of transport of radioisotopes from a PET cyclotron to hotlab, or from one location to another in an automated radiochemistry processing unit. This paper describes recent calibration experiments undertaken at the Turku PET Centre for stationary and moving sources of F18 and C11 in standard setups. The practical diagnostic utility of using several of these devices to track the transport of radioisotopes from the cyclotron to hotlab is illustrated. For example, such a detector system provides: a semi-quantitative indication of total activity, speed of transport, location of any activity lost en route and effectiveness of follow-up system flushes, a means of identifying bolus break-up, feedback useful for deciding when to change out tubing.

  16. Calibration and operational data for a compact photodiode detector useful for monitoring the location of moving sources of positron emitting radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Marsland, M. G.; Dehnel, M. P.; Theroux, J.; Christensen, T.; Hollinger, C.; Johansson, S.; Rajander, J.; Solin, O.; Stewart, T. M.

    2013-04-19

    D-Pace has developed a compact cost-effective gamma detector system based on technology licensed from TRIUMF. These photodiode detectors are convenient for detecting the presence of positron emitting radioisotopes, particularly for the case of transport of radioisotopes from a PET cyclotron to hotlab, or from one location to another in an automated radiochemistry processing unit. This paper describes recent calibration experiments undertaken at the Turku PET Centre for stationary and moving sources of F18 and C11 in standard setups. The practical diagnostic utility of using several of these devices to track the transport of radioisotopes from the cyclotron to hotlab is illustrated. For example, such a detector system provides: a semi-quantitative indication of total activity, speed of transport, location of any activity lost en route and effectiveness of follow-up system flushes, a means of identifying bolus break-up, feedback useful for deciding when to change out tubing.

  17. Detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon-counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable novel energy-dependent imaging methods. Similar to conventional detectors, optimizing image SPC quality will require systems that produce the highest possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This paper builds on the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) framework to develop a comprehensive description of the DQE of SPC detectors that implement adaptive binning. Methods: The DQE of SPC systems can be described using the CSA approach by propagating the probability density function (PDF) of the number of image-forming quanta through simple quantum processes. New relationships are developed to describe PDF transfer through serial and parallel cascades to accommodate scatter reabsorption. Results are applied to hypothetical silicon and selenium-based flat-panel SPC detectors including the effects of reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons from photoelectric and Compton interactions, stochastic conversion of x-ray energy to secondary quanta, depth-dependent charge collection, and electronic noise. Results are compared with a Monte Carlo study. Results: Depth-dependent collection efficiency can result in substantial broadening of photopeaks that in turn may result in reduced DQE at lower x-ray energies (20–45 keV). Double-counting interaction events caused by reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons may result in falsely inflated image signal-to-noise ratio and potential overestimation of the DQE. Conclusions: The CSA approach is extended to describe signal and noise propagation through photoelectric and Compton interactions in SPC detectors, including the effects of escape and reabsorption of emission/scatter photons. High-performance SPC systems can be achieved but only for certain combinations of secondary conversion gain, depth-dependent collection efficiency, electronic noise, and reabsorption characteristics.

  18. Quantum efficiency of Si Hybrid CMOS detectors in the soft X-ray band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieskorn, Zachary; Bongiorno, Stephen; Burrows, David; Falcone, Abraham; Griffith, Christopher; Nikoleyczik, Jonathan; Wells, Mark; PSU X-ray Instrumentation Group Team

    2015-04-01

    X-ray sensitive Si Hybrid CMOS detectors (HCDs) will potentially replace X-ray CCDs in the focal planes of future X-ray observatories. HCDs improve on the performance of CCDs in numerous areas: faster read out time, windowed read out mode, less susceptibility to radiation & micrometeoroid damage, and lower power consumption. Understanding the detector quantum efficiency (QE) is critical for estimating the sensitivity of an X-ray instrument. We report on the QE for multiple energies in the soft X-ray band of four HCDs based on the Teledyne Imaging Sensors HyViSITM detectors. These detectors have Al optical blocking filters deposited directly on the Si substrate; these filters vary in thickness from 180 - 1000 Å. We estimate the QE with a 1D slab absorption model and find good agreement between the model and our results across an energy range from 0.677 - 8.05 keV. This work was supported by NASA Grants NNG05WC10G, NNX08AI64G, and NNX11AF98G.

  19. Detective quantum efficiency: a standard test to ensure optimal detector performance and low patient exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escartin, Terenz R.; Nano, Tomi F.; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2016-03-01

    The detective quantum efficiency (DQE), expressed as a function of spatial frequency, describes the ability of an x-ray detector to produce high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) images. While regulatory and scientific communities have used the DQE as a primary metric for optimizing detector design, the DQE is rarely used by end users to ensure high system performance is maintained. Of concern is that image quality varies across different systems for the same exposures with no current measures available to describe system performance. Therefore, here we conducted an initial DQE measurement survey of clinical x-ray systems using a DQE-testing instrument to identify their range of performance. Following laboratory validation, experiments revealed that the DQE of five different systems under the same exposure level (8.0 μGy) ranged from 0.36 to 0.75 at low spatial frequencies, and 0.02 to 0.4 at high spatial frequencies (3.5 cycles/mm). Furthermore, the DQE dropped substantially with decreasing detector exposure by a factor of up to 1.5x in the lowest spatial frequency, and a factor of 10x at 3.5 cycles/mm due to the effect of detector readout noise. It is concluded that DQE specifications in purchasing decisions, combined with periodic DQE testing, are important factors to ensure patients receive the health benefits of high-quality images for low x-ray exposures.

  20. Simulations for Light Collection Efficiency (Jlab Hall C 12 GeV Kaon Aerogel Detector)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothgeb, Laura

    2011-10-01

    Studying the additional flavor degree of freedom in charged kaon production allows for an unexampled insight into the transition from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom in exclusive processes and specifically the reaction mechanism underlying strangeness production. This unique opportunity has gone greatly unexplored, however, because of the challenges posed by the experimental factors. One of these challenges is determining a method of separation for kaons from pion and proton backgrounds at high momenta. The simplest and most cost-effective solution is the implementation of a kaon aerogel Cherenkov detector. At the Catholic University of America, we are building such a detector for use in the 12GeV Hall C Super High Momentum Spectrometer at Jefferson Lab. The detector will use photo multiplier tubes to collect the Cherenkov radiation given off by the aerogel and convert that signal into analyzable data that will be used to determine the form factor of the kaon, which will yield a greater understanding of the internal structure of the proton. In this presentation I will present the results from the simulations carried out to optimize the aerogel coverage and study the effect of light guides on the efficiency of the detector. Supported in part by NSF grants PHY 1019521 and 1039446.

  1. The effect of a compression paddle on energy response, calibration and measurement with mammographic dosimeters using ionization chambers and solid-state detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourdakis, C. J.; Boziari, A.; Koumbouli, E.

    2009-02-01

    A compression paddle is always used in mammography x-ray examinations, in order to improve image quality and reduce patient doses. Although clinical dose measurements should be performed with the paddle to interfere with the x-ray beam, calibration of mammography dosimeters is performed free in air without the presence of the paddle. The paddle hardens the x-ray beam, which has an impact on a dosimeter performance, particularly on high-energy-dependent detectors. Due to the paddle, clinical mammography x-ray systems may exhibit beams with HVL values exceeding those of the IEC 61267 RQR-M series qualities at which dosimeters are usually calibrated. In this study, the influence of the paddle in mammography dosimetry is examined, in Mo/Mo anode/filter x-ray qualities. PMMA slabs of 1, 2 and 3 mm thickness and Al foils of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 mm thicknesses were used to simulate the paddles, producing beams with HVL values from 0.28 up to 0.43 mmAl. In these qualities, four solid-state (ST) detectors and three ionizations chambers (IC) were calibrated in terms of Kair and NK and kQ were deduced. The results showed that all IC and two modern-type ST dosimeters have a flat energy response in the above HVL range (less than 3%), so their calibration factor at RQR-M2 quality could be safely used for clinical measurements. Two other ST dosimeters exhibit up to 20% energy response, so differences up to 15% in dose measurement may be observed if the effect of paddle on their performance is ignored. Finally, the need of additional mammographic calibration qualities to the existing IEC 61267 RQR-M series is examined and discussed.

  2. The effect of a compression paddle on energy response, calibration and measurement with mammographic dosimeters using ionization chambers and solid-state detectors.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, C J; Boziari, A; Koumbouli, E

    2009-02-21

    A compression paddle is always used in mammography x-ray examinations, in order to improve image quality and reduce patient doses. Although clinical dose measurements should be performed with the paddle to interfere with the x-ray beam, calibration of mammography dosimeters is performed free in air without the presence of the paddle. The paddle hardens the x-ray beam, which has an impact on a dosimeter performance, particularly on high-energy-dependent detectors. Due to the paddle, clinical mammography x-ray systems may exhibit beams with HVL values exceeding those of the IEC 61267 RQR-M series qualities at which dosimeters are usually calibrated. In this study, the influence of the paddle in mammography dosimetry is examined, in Mo/Mo anode/filter x-ray qualities. PMMA slabs of 1, 2 and 3 mm thickness and Al foils of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 mm thicknesses were used to simulate the paddles, producing beams with HVL values from 0.28 up to 0.43 mmAl. In these qualities, four solid-state (ST) detectors and three ionizations chambers (IC) were calibrated in terms of Kair and N(K) and k(Q) were deduced. The results showed that all IC and two modern-type ST dosimeters have a flat energy response in the above HVL range (less than 3%), so their calibration factor at RQR-M2 quality could be safely used for clinical measurements. Two other ST dosimeters exhibit up to 20% energy response, so differences up to 15% in dose measurement may be observed if the effect of paddle on their performance is ignored. Finally, the need of additional mammographic calibration qualities to the existing IEC 61267 RQR-M series is examined and discussed. PMID:19168939

  3. Evaluation of the relative TL efficiency of the thermoluminescent detectors to heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Sądel, M; Bilski, P; Swakoń, J; Weber, A

    2016-01-01

    The relative thermoluminescence efficiency, η, is in general not constant but depends on ionisation density. Evaluation of the η is therefore important especially for correct interpretation of measurements of densely ionising radiation doses in proton radiotherapy or in space dosimetry. The correct determination of the η is not always straightforward especially when more strongly ionising radiation is to be measured. In the present work, the process of calculation of the η based on two kinds of heavy charged particles was studied. Several factors which may influence the value of the η and their significance for the final result were discussed. These include for example non-uniform deposition of the dose within the detector volume, self-attenuation of thermoluminescent light, choice of the reference radiation, etc. The presented approach was applied to the experimental results of η of LiF:Mg,Ti detectors irradiated with two kinds of heavy charged particles, protons and alpha particles. PMID:25656042

  4. Design of a polarization-insensitive superconducting nanowire single photon detector with high detection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Xu, Ruiying; Zhu, Guanghao; Jin, Biaobing; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) deliver superior performance over their competitors in the near-infrared regime. However, these detectors have an intrinsic polarization dependence on the incident wave because of their one-dimensional meander structure. In this paper, we propose an approach to eliminate the polarization sensitivity of SNSPDs by using near-field optics to increase the absorption of SNSPDs under transverse magnetic (TM) illumination. In addition, an optical cavity is added to our SNSPD to obtain nearly perfect absorption of the incident wave. Numerical simulations show that the maximum absorption of a designed SNSPD can reach 96% at 1550 nm, and indicate that the absorption difference between transverse electric (TE) and TM polarization is less than 0.5% across a wavelength window of 300 nm. Our work provides the first demonstration of the possibility of designing a polarization-insensitive and highly efficient SNSPD without performing device symmetry improvements. PMID:26948672

  5. Design of a polarization-insensitive superconducting nanowire single photon detector with high detection efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Xu, Ruiying; Zhu, Guanghao; Jin, Biaobing; Kang, Lin; Xu, Weiwei; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2016-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs) deliver superior performance over their competitors in the near-infrared regime. However, these detectors have an intrinsic polarization dependence on the incident wave because of their one-dimensional meander structure. In this paper, we propose an approach to eliminate the polarization sensitivity of SNSPDs by using near-field optics to increase the absorption of SNSPDs under transverse magnetic (TM) illumination. In addition, an optical cavity is added to our SNSPD to obtain nearly perfect absorption of the incident wave. Numerical simulations show that the maximum absorption of a designed SNSPD can reach 96% at 1550 nm, and indicate that the absorption difference between transverse electric (TE) and TM polarization is less than 0.5% across a wavelength window of 300 nm. Our work provides the first demonstration of the possibility of designing a polarization-insensitive and highly efficient SNSPD without performing device symmetry improvements. PMID:26948672

  6. Noise-free high-efficiency photon-number-resolving detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Danna; Lita, Adriana E.; Miller, Aaron J.; Nam, Sae Woo

    2005-06-15

    High-efficiency optical detectors that can determine the number of photons in a pulse of monochromatic light have applications in a variety of physics studies, including post-selection-based entanglement protocols for linear optics quantum computing and experiments that simultaneously close the detection and communication loopholes of Bell's inequalities. Here we report on our demonstration of fiber-coupled, noise-free, photon-number-resolving transition-edge sensors with 88% efficiency at 1550 nm. The efficiency of these sensors could be made even higher at any wavelength in the visible and near-infrared spectrum without resulting in a higher dark-count rate or degraded photon-number resolution.

  7. SU-E-I-67: X-Ray Fluorescence for Energy Response Calibration of a Photon Counting Detector: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, H; Ding, H; Ziemer, B; Molloi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of energy calibration and energy response characterization of a photon counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was done to investigate the influence of various geometric components on the x-ray fluorescence measurement. Different materials, sizes, and detection angles were simulated using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) Monte Carlo package. Simulations were conducted using 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The fluorescence material was placed 300 mm away from both the x-ray source and the detector. For angular dependence measurement, the distance was decreased to 30 mm to reduce the simulation time. Compound materials, containing silver, barium, gadolinium, hafnium, and gold in cylindrical shape, were simulated. The object size varied from 5 to 100 mm in diameter. The angular dependence of fluorescence and scatter were simulated from 20° to 170° with an incremental step of 10° to optimize the fluorescence to scatter ratio. Furthermore, the angular dependence was also experimentally measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., MA) to validate the simulation results. Results: The detection angle between 120° to 160° resulted in more optimal x-ray fluorescence to scatter ratio. At a detection angle of 120°, the object size did not have a significant effect on the fluorescence to scatter ratio. The experimental results of fluorescence angular dependence are in good agreement with the simulation results. The Kα and Kβ peaks of five materials could be identified. Conclusion: The simulation results show that the x-ray fluorescence procedure has the potential to be used for detector energy calibration and detector response characteristics by using the optimal system geometry.

  8. High-speed and high-efficiency travelling wave single-photon detectors embedded in nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, W.H.P.; Schuck, C.; Minaeva, O.; Li, M.; Goltsman, G.N.; Sergienko, A.V.; Tang, H.X.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast, high-efficiency single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after elements in modern quantum optics and quantum communication. However, imperfect modal matching and finite photon absorption rates have usually limited their maximum attainable detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate superconducting nanowire detectors atop nanophotonic waveguides, which enable a drastic increase of the absorption length for incoming photons. This allows us to achieve high on-chip single-photon detection efficiency up to 91% at telecom wavelengths, repeatable across several fabricated chips. We also observe remarkably low dark count rates without significant compromise of the on-chip detection efficiency. The detectors are fully embedded in scalable silicon photonic circuits and provide ultrashort timing jitter of 18 ps. Exploiting this high temporal resolution, we demonstrate ballistic photon transport in silicon ring resonators. Our direct implementation of a high-performance single-photon detector on chip overcomes a major barrier in integrated quantum photonics. PMID:23271658

  9. Potential of combining iterative reconstruction with noise efficient detector design: aggressive dose reduction in head CT

    PubMed Central

    Bender, B; Schabel, C; Fenchel, M; Ernemann, U; Korn, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: With further increase of CT numbers and their dominant contribution to medical exposure, there is a recent quest for more effective dose control. While reintroduction of iterative reconstruction (IR) has proved its potential in many applications, a novel focus is placed on more noise efficient detectors. Our purpose was to assess the potential of IR in combination with an integrated circuit detector (ICD) for aggressive dose reduction in head CT. Methods: Non-contrast low-dose head CT [190 mAs; weighted volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), 33.2 mGy] was performed in 50 consecutive patients, using a new noise efficient detector and IR. Images were assessed in terms of quantitative and qualitative image quality and compared with standard dose acquisitions (320 mAs; CTDIvol, 59.7 mGy) using a conventional detector and filtered back projection. Results: By combining ICD and IR in low-dose examinations, the signal to noise was improved by about 13% above the baseline level in the standard-dose control group. Both, contrast-to-noise ratio (2.02 ± 0.6 vs 1.88 ± 0.4; p = 0.18) and objective measurements of image sharpness (695 ± 84 vs 705 ± 151 change in Hounsfield units per pixel; p = 0.79) were fully preserved in the low-dose group. Likewise, there was no significant difference in the grading of several subjective image quality parameters when both noise-reducing strategies were used in low-dose examinations. Conclusion: Combination of noise efficient detector with IR allows for meaningful dose reduction in head CT without compromise of standard image quality. Advances in knowledge: Our study demonstrates the feasibility of almost 50% dose reduction in head CT dose (1.1 mSv per scan) through combination of novel dose-reducing strategies. PMID:25827204

  10. Methods for calibrating the gain and offset of the DSSC detector for the European XFEL using X-ray line sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlee, S.; Weidenspointner, G.; Moch, D.; Kuster, M.; Porro, M.

    2016-01-01

    The DSSC (DEPFET Sensor with Signal Compression) will be a silicon based, 2d 1 Mpx imaging detector for the European X-ray Free Electron Laser Facility (XFEL.EU) in Hamburg, Germany. The DSSC is foreseen for soft X-radiation from 0.5 keV up to 6 keV . Driven by its scientific requirements, the design goals of the detector system are single photon detection, high dynamic range and a high frame rate of up to 4.5 MHz. Signal compression and amplification will be performed in the silicon sensor pixels yielding a low signal noise. Utilizing an in-pixel active filtering stage and an 8/9-bit ADC, the detector will provide parallel read-out of all pixels. In order to calibrate offset and gain, the procedure currently under investigation relies on determining peak positions in measurements with calibration line sources such as 55Fe. Here the status of studies of the stability and performance of a parameterized fit function designed for this task will be presented.

  11. The Role of Mathematical Methods in Efficiency Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation in Gamma Based Non-Destructive Assay - 12311

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, R.; Nakazawa, D.

    2012-07-01

    Mathematical methods are being increasingly employed in the efficiency calibration of gamma based systems for non-destructive assay (NDA) of radioactive waste and for the estimation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU). Recently, ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) released a standard guide for use of modeling passive gamma measurements. This is a testimony to the common use and increasing acceptance of mathematical techniques in the calibration and characterization of NDA systems. Mathematical methods offer flexibility and cost savings in terms of rapidly incorporating calibrations for multiple container types, geometries, and matrix types in a new waste assay system or a system that may already be operational. Mathematical methods are also useful in modeling heterogeneous matrices and non-uniform activity distributions. In compliance with good practice, if a computational method is used in waste assay (or in any other radiological application), it must be validated or benchmarked using representative measurements. In this paper, applications involving mathematical methods in gamma based NDA systems are discussed with several examples. The application examples are from NDA systems that were recently calibrated and performance tested. Measurement based verification results are presented. Mathematical methods play an important role in the efficiency calibration of gamma based NDA systems. This is especially true when the measurement program involves a wide variety of complex item geometries and matrix combinations for which the development of physical standards may be impractical. Mathematical methods offer a cost effective means to perform TMU campaigns. Good practice demands that all mathematical estimates be benchmarked and validated using representative sets of measurements. (authors)

  12. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification

    SciTech Connect

    Baccou, C. Yahia, V.; Labaune, C.; Depierreux, S.; Neuville, C.; Goyon, C.; Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Ducret, J. E.; Boutoux, G.; Rafelski, J.

    2015-08-15

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state.

  13. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification.

    PubMed

    Baccou, C; Yahia, V; Depierreux, S; Neuville, C; Goyon, C; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Ducret, J E; Boutoux, G; Rafelski, J; Labaune, C

    2015-08-01

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state. PMID:26329181

  14. Pixelated detectors and improved efficiency for magnetic imaging in STEM differential phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Krajnak, Matus; McGrouther, Damien; Maneuski, Dzmitry; Shea, Val O'; McVitie, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The application of differential phase contrast imaging to the study of polycrystalline magnetic thin films and nanostructures has been hampered by the strong diffraction contrast resulting from the granular structure of the materials. In this paper we demonstrate how a pixelated detector has been used to detect the bright field disk in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and subsequent processing of the acquired data allows efficient enhancement of the magnetic contrast in the resulting images. Initial results from a charged coupled device (CCD) camera demonstrate the highly efficient nature of this improvement over previous methods. Further hardware development with the use of a direct radiation detector, the Medipix3, also shows the possibilities where the reduction in collection time is more than an order of magnitude compared to the CCD. We show that this allows subpixel measurement of the beam deflection due to the magnetic induction. While the detection and processing is data intensive we have demonstrated highly efficient DPC imaging whereby pixel by pixel interpretation of the induction variation is realised with great potential for nanomagnetic imaging. PMID:27085170

  15. A Calibration Routine for Efficient ETD in Large-Scale Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Christopher M.; Rush, Matthew J. P.; Riley, Nicholas M.; Merrill, Anna E.; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Holden, Dustin D.; Mullen, Christopher; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2015-11-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has been broadly adopted and is now available on a variety of commercial mass spectrometers. Unlike collisional activation techniques, optimal performance of ETD requires considerable user knowledge and input. ETD reaction duration is one key parameter that can greatly influence spectral quality and overall experiment outcome. We describe a calibration routine that determines the correct number of reagent anions necessary to reach a defined ETD reaction rate. Implementation of this automated calibration routine on two hybrid Orbitrap platforms illustrate considerable advantages, namely, increased product ion yield with concomitant reduction in scan rates netting up to 75% more unique peptide identifications in a shotgun experiment.

  16. Parallel Beam Approximation for Calculation of Detection Efficiency of Crystals in PET Detector Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Komarov, Sergey; Song, Tae Yong; Wu, Heyu; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    In this work we propose a parallel beam approximation for the computation of the detection efficiency of crystals in a PET detector array. In this approximation the detection efficiency of a crystal is estimated using the distance between source and the crystal and the pre-calculated detection cross section of the crystal in a crystal array which is calculated for a uniform parallel beam of gammas. The pre-calculated detection cross sections for a few representative incident angles and gamma energies can be used to create a look-up table to be used in simulation studies or practical implementation of scatter or random correction algorithms. Utilizing the symmetries of the square crystal array, the pre-calculated look-up tables can be relatively small. The detection cross sections can be measured experimentally, calculated analytically or simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) approach. In this work we used a MC simulation that takes into account the energy windowing, Compton scattering and factors in the “block effect”. The parallel beam approximation was validated by a separate MC simulation using point sources located at different positions around a crystal array. Experimentally measured detection efficiencies were compared with Monte Carlo simulated detection efficiencies. Results suggest that the parallel beam approximation provides an efficient and accurate way to compute the crystal detection efficiency, which can be used for estimation of random and scatter coincidences for PET data corrections. PMID:25400292

  17. Spectral method for the correction of the Cerenkov light effect in plastic scintillation detectors: A comparison study of calibration procedures and validation in Cerenkov light-dominated situations

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The purposes of this work were: (1) To determine if a spectral method can accurately correct the Cerenkov light effect in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) for situations where the Cerenkov light is dominant over the scintillation light and (2) to develop a procedural guideline for accurately determining the calibration factors of PSDs. Methods: The authors demonstrate, by using the equations of the spectral method, that the condition for accurately correcting the effect of Cerenkov light is that the ratio of the two calibration factors must be equal to the ratio of the Cerenkov light measured within the two different spectral regions used for analysis. Based on this proof, the authors propose two new procedures to determine the calibration factors of PSDs, which were designed to respect this condition. A PSD that consists of a cylindrical polystyrene scintillating fiber (1.6 mm{sup 3}) coupled to a plastic optical fiber was calibrated by using these new procedures and the two reference procedures described in the literature. To validate the extracted calibration factors, relative dose profiles and output factors for a 6 MV photon beam from a medical linac were measured with the PSD and an ionization chamber. Emphasis was placed on situations where the Cerenkov light is dominant over the scintillation light and on situations dissimilar to the calibration conditions. Results: The authors found that the accuracy of the spectral method depends on the procedure used to determine the calibration factors of the PSD and on the attenuation properties of the optical fiber used. The results from the relative dose profile measurements showed that the spectral method can correct the Cerenkov light effect with an accuracy level of 1%. The results obtained also indicate that PSDs measure output factors that are lower than those measured with ionization chambers for square field sizes larger than 25x25 cm{sup 2}, in general agreement with previously published Monte

  18. Estimating calibration equations for predicting Ra-226 soil concentrations using RTRAK in-situ detectors at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Umtra site

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R. O.; Meyer, H. R.; Miller, M. L.; Begley, C.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes a field study conducted at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, UMTRA site to obtain data for calibrating the RTRAK Sodium Iodide (NaI) detectors for estimating concentrations of Ra-226 in surface soil. The statistical analyses indicate that the data are useful for estimating the calibration equations. Several statistical models are used to evaluate which model is best as a basis for the calibration equations. A procedure is provided for using the estimated calibration equations and extensive RTRAK measurements to estimate the average Ra-226 concentration on 100-m/sup 2/ land areas to determine whether additional remedial action is needed. The UMTRA Project office proposes to use the RTRAK for cleanup verification of surface Ra-226 contamination. The system enables 100% coverage of areas having undergone remedial action. The sensitivity of the system enables verification at less than 5 pCi/g averaged over 100 m/sup 2/, as specified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards (40 CFR Part 192). This analysis demonstrates RTRAK's ability to meet reasonable standards of statistical accuracy, using commonly accepted procedures. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a “Violin-Mode” shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-10-15

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect “Violin-Mode” (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a “synthesized split photodiode” detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC “shadow notch” outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing “jitter” at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  20. Monte Carlo efficiency calibration of a neutron generator-based total-body irradiator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing prevalence of obesity world-wide has focused attention on the need for accurate body composition assessments, especially of large subjects. However, many body composition measurement systems are calibrated against a single-sized phantom, often based on the standard Reference Man mode...

  1. Monte carlo efficiency calibration of a neutron generator-based total-body irradiator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increasing prevalence of obesity world-wide has focused attention on the need for accurate body composition assessments, especially of large subjects. However, many body composition measurement systems are calibrated against a single-sized phantom, often based on the standard Reference Man mode...

  2. An efficient lithographic hotspot severity analysis methodology using Calibre PATTERN MATCHING and DRC application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, ZeXi; Du, ChunShan; Hong, Lin; Zhang, LiGuo; Wang, JinYan

    2015-03-01

    As the IC industry moves forward to advanced nodes, especially under 28nm technology, the printability issue is becoming more and more challenging because layouts are more congested with a smaller critical feature size and the manufacturing process window is tighter. Consequently, design-process co-optimization plays an important role in achieving a higher yield in a shorter tape-out time. A great effort has to be made to analyze the process defects and build checking kits to deliver the manufacturing information, by utilizing EDA software, to designers to dig out the potential manufacturing issues and quickly identify hotspots and prioritize how to fix them according to the severity levels. This paper presents a unique hotspot pattern analysis flow that SMIC has built for advanced technology to analyze the potential yield detractor patterns in millions of patterns from real designs and rank them with severity levels related to real fab process. The flow uses Mentor Graphics Calibre® PM (Calibre® Pattern Matching) technology for pattern library creation and pattern clustering; meanwhile it incorporates Calibre® LFD (Calibre® Litho-Friendly Design) technology for accurate simulation-based lithographic hotspot checking. Pattern building, clustering, scoring, ranking and fixing are introduced in detail in this paper.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Pillar Structured Solid State Thermal Neutron Detector Efficiency and Gamma Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, A; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C; Nikolic, R

    2008-06-24

    This work reports numerical simulations of a novel three-dimensionally integrated, {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B) and silicon p+, intrinsic, n+ (PIN) diode micropillar array for thermal neutron detection. The inter-digitated device structure has a high probability of interaction between the Si PIN pillars and the charged particles (alpha and {sup 7}Li) created from the neutron - {sup 10}B reaction. In this work, the effect of both the 3-D geometry (including pillar diameter, separation and height) and energy loss mechanisms are investigated via simulations to predict the neutron detection efficiency and gamma discrimination of this structure. The simulation results are demonstrated to compare well with the measurement results. This indicates that upon scaling the pillar height, a high efficiency thermal neutron detector is possible.

  4. Virtual detector methods for efficiently computing momentum-resolved dissociation and ionization spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Alex; Thumm, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a class of window-transform-based ``virtual detector'' methods for computing momentum-resolved dissociation and ionization spectra by numerically analyzing the motion of nuclear or electronic quantum-mechanical wavepackets at the periphery of their numerical grids. While prior applications of such surface-flux methods considered semi-classical limits to derive ionization and dissociation spectra, we systematically include quantum-mechanical corrections and extensions to higher dimensions, discussing numerical convergence properties and the computational efficiency of our method in comparison with alternative schemes for obtaining momentum distributions. Using the example of atomic ionization by co- and counter-rotating circularly polarized laser pulses, we scrutinize the efficiency of common finite-difference schemes for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in virtual detection and standard Fourier-transformation methods for extracting momentum spectra. Supported by the DoE, NSF, and Alexander von Humboldt foundation.

  5. Minimum length Pb/SCIN detector for efficient cosmic ray identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. David

    1989-01-01

    A study was made of the performance of a minimal length cosmic ray shower detector that would be light enough for space flight and would provide efficient identification of positions and protons. Cosmic ray positions are mainly produced in the decay chain of: Pion yields Muon yields Positron and they provide a measure of the matter density traversed by primary protons. Present positron flux measurements are consistent with the Leaky Box and Halo models for sources of cosmic rays. Abundant protons in the space environment are a significant source of background that would wash out the positron signal. Protons and positrons produced very distictive showers of particles when they enter matter; many studies have been published on their behavior on large calorimeter detectors. The challenge is to determine the minimal material necessary (minimal calorimeter depth) for positive particles identification. The primary instrument for the investigation is the Monte Carlo code GEANT, a library of programs from CERN that can be used to model experimental geometry, detector responses and particle interaction processes. The use of the Monte Carlo approach is crucial since statistical fluctuations in shower shape are significant. Studies conducted during the 1988 summer program showed that straightforward approaches to the problem achieved 85 to 90 percent correct identification, but left a residue of 10 to 15 percent misidentified particles. This percentage improved to a few percent when multiple shower-cut criteria were applied to the data. This summer, the same study was extended to employ several physical and statistical methods of identifying response of the calorimeter and the efficiency of the optimal shower cuts to off-normal incidence particle was determined.

  6. Measuring the X-ray quantum efficiency of a hybrid CMOS detector with 55Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, S. D.; Falcone, A. D.; Prieskorn, Z.; Griffith, C.; Burrows, D. N.

    2015-06-01

    Charge coupled devices (CCDs) are currently the workhorse focal plane arrays operating aboard many orbiting astrophysics X-ray telescopes, e.g. Chandra, XMM-Newton, Swift, and Suzaku. In order to meet the count rate, power, and mission duration requirements defined by next-generation X-ray telescopes, future detectors will need to be read out faster, consume less power, and be more resistant to radiation and micrometeoroid damage than current-generation devices. The hybrid CMOS detector (HCD), a type of active pixel sensor, is currently being developed to meet these requirements. With a design architecture that involves bump bonding two semiconductor substrates together at the pixel level, these devices exhibit both the high read speed and low power consumption of CMOS readout circuitry and the high quantum efficiency (QE) of a deeply depleted silicon absorber. These devices are expected to exhibit the same excellent, high-energy quantum efficiency (QE) as deep-depletion CCDs (QE > 0.9 at 6 keV), while at the same time exhibiting superior readout flexibility, power consumption, and radiation hardness than CCDs. In this work we present a QE model for a Teledyne Imaging Sensors HyViSI HCD, which predicts QE=96% at 55Fe source energies (5.89 and 6.49 keV). We then present a QE measurement of the modeled device at the same energies, which shows QE=97±5% and is in good agreement with the model.

  7. Analysis of factors affecting the light collection efficiency in CT detector: CWO+PIN diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sung W.; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Ho K.; Cho, Gyuseong; Ahn, Seong Kyu; Goh, Sung Min; Lee, Yoon; Park, Jung Byung

    2002-05-01

    The solid-state detector(SSD) for X-CT consists of photodiode coupled to CdWO4$(CWO. It is important to maximize the light collection in respect of a patient's dose, radiation effect and X-ray efficiency. The factors affecting the light collection efficiency are analyzed and optimized by using experimental data and appropriate simulation code. Quantum nomogram is used to investigate the signal propagation characteristics of optimally designed solid-state detector and to ensure at which stage quantum sink occurs. This paper shows that the part of SSD, the CWO of treatment with ground top/ground side yields higher quanta than that of ground top/polish side, which is different from the result of previous studies. We also shows that optimum thickness of SiN passivation and p-layer is 0.12mm and 0.1mm, respectively. From the quantum nomogram calculated for optimal design, it is predicted that the most serious signal degradation occurs at the photodiode.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of a PhosWatch detector using Geant4 for xenon isotope beta-gamma coincidence spectrum profile and detection efficiency calculations.

    PubMed

    Mekarski, P; Zhang, W; Ungar, K; Bean, M; Korpach, E

    2009-10-01

    A simulation tool has been developed using the Geant4 Toolkit to simulate a PhosWatch single channel beta-gamma coincidence detection system consisting of a CsI(Tl)/BC404 Phoswich well detector and pulse shape analysis algorithms implemented digital signal processor. The tool can be used to simulate the detector's response for all the gamma rays and beta particles emitted from (135)Xe, (133m)Xe, (133)Xe, (131m)Xe and (214)Pb. Two- and three-dimensional beta-gamma coincidence spectra from the PhosWatch detector can be produced using the simulation tool. The accurately simulated spectra could be used to calculate system coincidence detection efficiency for each xenon isotope, the corrections for the interference from the various spectral components from radon and xenon isotopes, and system gain calibration. Also, it can generate two- and three-dimensional xenon reference spectra to test beta-gamma coincidence spectral deconvolution analysis software. PMID:19647444

  9. WFC3: UVIS Dark Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Biretta, John A.; Anderson, Jay; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Gunning, Heather C.; MacKenty, John W.

    2014-06-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), a fourth-generation imaging instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), has exhibited excellent performance since its installation during Servicing Mission 4 in May 2009. The UVIS detector, comprised of two e2v CCDs, is one of two channels available on WFC3 and is named for its ultraviolet and visible light sensitivity. We present the various procedures and results of the WFC3/UVIS dark calibration, which monitors the health and stability of the UVIS detector, provides characterization of hot pixels and dark current, and produces calibration files to be used as a correction for dark current in science images. We describe the long-term growth of hot pixels and the impacts that UVIS Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses, postflashing, and proximity to the readout amplifiers have on the population. We also discuss the evolution of the median dark current, which has been slowly increasing since the start of the mission and is currently ~6 e-/hr/pix, averaged across each chip. We outline the current algorithm for creating UVIS dark calibration files, which includes aggressive cosmic ray masking, image combination, and hot pixel flagging. Calibration products are available to the user community, typically 3-5 days after initial processing, through the Calibration Database System (CDBS). Finally, we discuss various improvements to the calibration and monitoring procedures. UVIS dark monitoring will continue throughout and beyond HST’s current proposal cycle.

  10. Efficient Orientation and Calibration of Large Aerial Blocks of Multi-Camera Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karel, W.; Ressl, C.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    Aerial multi-camera platforms typically incorporate a nadir-looking camera accompanied by further cameras that provide oblique views, potentially resulting in utmost coverage, redundancy, and accuracy even on vertical surfaces. However, issues have remained unresolved with the orientation and calibration of the resulting imagery, to two of which we present feasible solutions. First, as standard feature point descriptors used for the automated matching of homologous points are only invariant to the geometric variations of translation, rotation, and scale, they are not invariant to general changes in perspective. While the deviations from local 2D-similarity transforms may be negligible for corresponding surface patches in vertical views of flat land, they become evident at vertical surfaces, and in oblique views in general. Usage of such similarity-invariant descriptors thus limits the amount of tie points that stabilize the orientation and calibration of oblique views and cameras. To alleviate this problem, we present the positive impact on image connectivity of using a quasi affine-invariant descriptor. Second, no matter which hard- and software are used, at some point, the number of unknowns of a bundle block may be too large to be handled. With multi-camera platforms, these limits are reached even sooner. Adjustment of sub-blocks is sub-optimal, as it complicates data management, and hinders self-calibration. Simply discarding unreliable tie points of low manifold is not an option either, because these points are needed at the block borders and in poorly textured areas. As a remedy, we present a straight-forward method how to considerably reduce the number of tie points and hence unknowns before bundle block adjustment, while preserving orientation and calibration quality.

  11. 2.5 Gbps clock data recovery using 1/4th-rate quadricorrelator frequency detector and skew-calibrated multi-phase clock generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tontisirin, S.; Tielert, R.

    2006-09-01

    A Gb/s clock and data recovery (CDR) circuit using 1/4th-rate digital quadricorrelator frequency detector and skew-calibrated multi-phase voltage-controlled oscillator is presented. With 1/4th-rate clock architecture, the coil-free oscillator can have lower operation frequency providing sufficient low-jitter operation. Moreover, it is an inherent 1-to-4 DEMUX. The skew calibration scheme is applied to reduce phase offset in multi-phase clock generator. The CDR with frequency detector can have small loop bandwidth, wide pull-in range and can operate without the need for a local reference clock. This 1/4th-rate CDR is implemented in standard 0.18 μm CMOS technology. It has an active area of 0.7 mm2 and consumes 100 mW at 1.8 V supply. The CDR has low jitter operation in a wide frequency range from 1-2.25 Gb/s. Measurement of Bit-Error Rate is less than 10-12 for 2.25 Gb/s incoming data 27-1 PRBS, jitter peak-to-peak of 0.7 unit interval (UI) modulation at 10 MHz.

  12. Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R. J.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Angel, J. R. P.; Bartko, F.; Mccoy, J.; Ripp, L.; Bohlin, R.; Davidsen, A. F.; Ford, H.

    1982-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) designed for use with The Space Telescope (ST), is currently preparing for instrument assembly, integration, alignment, and calibration. Nearly all optical and detector elements have been completed and calibrated, and selection of flight detectors and all but a few optical elements has been made. Calibration results for the flight detectors and optics are presented, and plans for forthcoming system calibration are briefly described.

  13. An efficient and robust maneuvering mode to calibrate low cost magnetometer for improved heading estimation for pedestrian navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. S.; Siddharth, S.; Syed, Z.; Goodall, C. L.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2013-03-01

    Personal navigation systems intend to provide the navigation information in any environment, indoors and outdoors, and at any time. In outdoor environments, the positioning solution is typically provided by using Global Positioning System (GPS). However, GPS is inaccurate or unavailable in most of indoor environments and therefore other externally-referenced sensing techniques are required. Inertial sensing techniques are used for pedestrian navigation in association with dead reckoning approach. Magnetometers can be used to derive the user's heading by sensing the Earth's magnetic field. In this paper, an efficient and robust maneuvering mode to calibrate low cost magnetometer is recommended for pedestrian navigation applications. Additionally, other maneuvering modes and errors associated with each mode to achieve best estimation for the calibration parameters in the 3D Space are also provided. Also, the effect of using different maneuvering modes (DMM) on the heading estimation for the pedestrian navigation is studied. The results show that the coordinated mode is suitable to perform the calibration process as the unit is rotated in a way to cover the whole 3D space.

  14. On-orbit instrument calibration of CALET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaid, Amir; Calet Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) is a high-energy cosmic ray experiment which will be placed on the International Space Station in 2015. Primary goals of CALET are measurement of cosmic ray electron spectra from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, gamma rays from 10 GeV to 10 TeV, and protons and nuclei from 10 GeV up to 1000 TeV. The detector consists of three main components: a Charge Detector (CHD), Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), and Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC). As CALET is going to work in the ISS orbit space environment, it needs to be calibrated while it is in orbit. Penetrating non-showering protons and helium nuclei are prime candidates for instrument calibration, as they provide a known energy signal for calibrating the detector response. In the present paper, we discuss estimation of CALET's detector efficiency to protons and helium nuclei. Included is a discussion of different galactic cosmic ray and trapped proton models used for flux calculation and simulations performed for detector geometric area and trigger rate calculation. This paper also discusses the importance of the albedo proton flux for the CALET detector calibration. This research was supported by NASA at Louisiana State University under Grant Number NNX11AE01G.

  15. Reducing the Read Noise of H2RG Detector Arrays by more Efficient use of Reference Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Arendt, Richard G.; Fixen, D. J.; Lindler, Don; Loose, Markus; Moseley, S. H.; Wilson, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a process for characterizing the correlation properties of the noise in large two-dimensional detector arrays, and describe an efficient process for its removal. In the case of the 2k x 2k HAWAII-2RG detectors (H2RG) detectors from Teledyne which are being used on the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), we find that we can reduce the read noise by thirty percent. Noise on large spatial scales is dramatically reduced. With this relatively simple process, we provide a performance improvement that is equivalent to a significant increase in telescope collecting area for high resolution spectroscopy with NIRSpec.

  16. Efficient waveguide-integrated tunnel junction detectors at 1.6 mum.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Philip C D; Laibowitz, Robert B; Libsch, Frank R; Labianca, Nancy C; Chiniwalla, Punit P

    2007-12-10

    Near-infrared detectors based on metal-insulator-metal tunnel junctions integrated with planarized silicon nanowire waveguides are presented, which we believe to be the first of their kind. The junction is coupled to the waveguide via a thin-film metal antenna feeding a plasmonic travelling wave structure that includes the tunnel junction. These devices are inherently broadband; the design presented here operates throughout the 1500-1700 nm region. Careful design of the antenna and travelling wave region substantially eliminates losses due to poor mode matching and RC rolloff, allowing efficient operation. The antennas are made from multilayer stacks of gold and nickel, and the active devices are Ni-NiO-Ni edge junctions. The waveguides are made via shallow trench isolation technology, resulting in a planar oxide surface with the waveguides buried a few nanometres beneath.The antennas are fabricated using directional deposition through a suspended Ge shadow mask, using a single level of electron-beam lithography. The waveguides are patterned with conventional 248-nm optical lithography and reactive-ion etching, then planarized using shallow-trench isolation technology. We also present measurements showing overall quantum efficiencies of 6% (responsivity 0.08 A/W at 1.605 mum), thus demonstrating that the previously very low overall quantum efficiencies reported for antenna-coupled tunnel junction devices are due to poor electromagnetic coupling and poor choices of antenna metal, not to any inherent limitations of the technology. PMID:19550928

  17. Optimization of the Efficiency of a Neutron Detector to Measure (α, n) Reaction Cross-Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perello, Jesus; Montes, Fernando; Ahn, Tony; Meisel, Zach; Joint InstituteNuclear Astrophysics Team

    2015-04-01

    Nucleosynthesis, the origin of elements, is one of the greatest mysteries in physics. A recent particular nucleosynthesis process of interest is the charge-particle process (cpp). In the cpp, elements form by nuclear fusion reactions during supernovae. This process of nuclear fusion, (α,n), will be studied by colliding beam elements produced and accelerated at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) to a helium-filled cell target. The elements will fuse with α (helium nuclei) and emit neutrons during the reaction. The neutrons will be detected for a count of fused-elements, thus providing us the probability of such reactions. The neutrons will be detected using the Neutron Emission Ratio Observer (NERO). Currently, NERO's efficiency varies for neutrons at the expected energy range (0-12 MeV). To study (α,n), NERO's efficiency must be near-constant at these energies. Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP6), a software package that simulates nuclear processes, was used to optimize NERO configuration for the experiment. MCNP6 was used to simulate neutron interaction with different NERO configurations at the expected neutron energies. By adding additional 3He detectors and polyethylene, a near-constant efficiency at these energies was obtained in the simulations. With the new NERO configuration, study of the (α,n) reactions can begin, which may explain how elements are formed in the cpp. SROP MSU, NSF, JINA, McNair Society.

  18. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  19. Measurement of the Charge Collection Efficiency After Heavy Non-Uniform Irradiation in BABAR Silicon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Calderini, G.; Forti, F.; Marchiori, G.; Rizzo, G.; Giorgi, M.A.; Bosisio, L.; Dittongo, S.; Campagnari, C.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-03-01

    We have investigated the depletion voltage changes, leakage current increase and charge collection efficiency of a silicon microstrip detector identical to those used in the inner layers of the BABAR Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) after heavy nonuniform irradiation. A full SVT module with the front-end electronics connected has been irradiated with a 0.9 GeV electron beam up to a peak fluence of 3.5 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 2}, well beyond the level causing substrate type inversion. We have irradiated the silicon with a nonuniform profile having {sigma} = 1.4 mm that simulates the conditions encountered in the BABAR experiment by the modules intersecting the horizontal machine plane. The position dependence of the charge collection properties and the depletion voltage have been investigated in detail using a 1060 nm LED and an innovative measuring technique based only on the digital output of the chip.

  20. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Qi, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement.

  1. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  2. Three-dimensional diamond detectors: Charge collection efficiency of graphitic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, S. Parrini, G.; Sciortino, S.; Bellini, M.; Gorelli, F.; Santoro, M.; Corsi, C.

    2013-12-02

    Implementation of 3D-architectures in diamond detectors promises to achieve unreached performances in the radiation-harsh environment of future high-energy physics experiments. This work reports on the collection efficiency under β-irradiation of graphitic 3D-electrodes, created by laser pulses in the domains of nanoseconds (ns-made-sensors) and femtoseconds (fs-made-sensors). Full collection is achieved with the fs-made-sensors, while a loss of 25%–30% is found for the ns-made-sensors. The peculiar behaviour of ns-made sensors has been explained by the presence of a nano-structured sp{sup 3}-carbon layer around the graphitic electrodes, evidenced by micro-Raman imaging, by means of a numerical model of the charge transport near the electrodes.

  3. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  4. High efficiency photon counting detectors for the FAUST Spacelab far ultraviolet astronomy payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Lampton, M.; Bixler, J.; Vallerga, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1987-01-01

    The performances of sealed tube microchannel-plate position sensitive detectors having transmission CsI photocathodes or opaque CsI photocathodes are compared. These devices were developed for the FAUST Spacelab payload to accomplish imaging surveys in the band between 1300 A and 1800 A. It is demonstrated that photocathode quantum efficiencies in excess of 40 percent at 1216 A have been achieved with the transmission and the opaque CsI photocathodes. The effect of the photoelectron trajectory on the spatial resolution is assessed. Spatial resolution of less than 70 microns FWHM has been obtained and is maintained up to event rates of 50,000/sec. Background rates of 0.55 events sq cm per sec have been achieved and low distortion (less than 1 percent) imaging has been demonstrated.

  5. Monte Carlo calculations of the HPGe detector efficiency for radioactivity measurement of large volume environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Azbouche, Ahmed; Belgaid, Mohamed; Mazrou, Hakim

    2015-08-01

    A fully detailed Monte Carlo geometrical model of a High Purity Germanium detector with a (152)Eu source, packed in Marinelli beaker, was developed for routine analysis of large volume environmental samples. Then, the model parameters, in particular, the dead layer thickness were adjusted thanks to a specific irradiation configuration together with a fine-tuning procedure. Thereafter, the calculated efficiencies were compared to the measured ones for standard samples containing (152)Eu source filled in both grass and resin matrices packed in Marinelli beaker. From this comparison, a good agreement between experiment and Monte Carlo calculation results was obtained highlighting thereby the consistency of the geometrical computational model proposed in this work. Finally, the computational model was applied successfully to determine the (137)Cs distribution in soil matrix. From this application, instructive results were achieved highlighting, in particular, the erosion and accumulation zone of the studied site. PMID:25982445

  6. Efficient Photometry In-Frame Calibration (EPIC) Gaussian Corrections for Automated Background Normalization of Rate-Tracked Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesbach, J.; Wetterer, C.; Sydney, P.; Gerber, J.

    Photometric processing of non-resolved Electro-Optical (EO) images has commonly required the use of dark and flat calibration frames that are obtained to correct for charge coupled device (CCD) dark (thermal) noise and CCD quantum efficiency/optical path vignetting effects respectively. It is necessary to account/calibrate for these effects so that the brightness of objects of interest (e.g. stars or resident space objects (RSOs)) may be measured in a consistent manner across the CCD field of view. Detected objects typically require further calibration using aperture photometry to compensate for sky background (shot noise). For this, annuluses are measured around each detected object whose contained pixels are used to estimate an average background level that is subtracted from the detected pixel measurements. In a new photometric calibration software tool developed for AFRL/RD, called Efficient Photometry In-Frame Calibration (EPIC), an automated background normalization technique is proposed that eliminates the requirement to capture dark and flat calibration images. The proposed technique simultaneously corrects for dark noise, shot noise, and CCD quantum efficiency/optical path vignetting effects. With this, a constant detection threshold may be applied for constant false alarm rate (CFAR) object detection without the need for aperture photometry corrections. The detected pixels may be simply summed (without further correction) for an accurate instrumental magnitude estimate. The noise distribution associated with each pixel is assumed to be sampled from a Poisson distribution. Since Poisson distributed data closely resembles Gaussian data for parameterized means greater than 10, the data may be corrected by applying bias subtraction and standard-deviation division. EPIC performs automated background normalization on rate-tracked satellite images using the following technique. A deck of approximately 50-100 images is combined by performing an independent median

  7. HAND-HELD GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER BASED ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY FRISCH-RING CdZnTe DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI,Y.

    2007-05-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution, el% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. This technique facilitates the application of CdZnTe materials for high efficiency gamma-ray detection. A hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8x8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so that detection efficiency is significantly improved. By using the front-end ASICs developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy resolution. The spectrometer includes signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuit, high-voltage module, and USB interface. In this paper, we introduce the details of the system structure and report our test results with it.

  8. TH-C-BRD-05: Reducing Proton Beam Range Uncertainty with Patient-Specific CT HU to RSP Calibrations Based On Single-Detector Proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Doolan, P; Sharp, G; Testa, M; Lu, H-M; Bentefour, E; Royle, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam range uncertainty in proton treatment comes primarily from converting the patient's X-ray CT (xCT) dataset to relative stopping power (RSP). Current practices use a single curve for this conversion, produced by a stoichiometric calibration based on tissue composition data for average, healthy, adult humans, but not for the individual in question. Proton radiographs produce water-equivalent path length (WEPL) maps, dependent on the RSP of tissues within the specific patient. This work investigates the use of such WEPL maps to optimize patient-specific calibration curves for reducing beam range uncertainty. Methods: The optimization procedure works on the principle of minimizing the difference between the known WEPL map, obtained from a proton radiograph, and a digitally-reconstructed WEPL map (DRWM) through an RSP dataset, by altering the calibration curve that is used to convert the xCT into an RSP dataset. DRWMs were produced with Plastimatch, an in-house developed software, and an optimization procedure was implemented in Matlab. Tests were made on a range of systems including simulated datasets with computed WEPL maps and phantoms (anthropomorphic and real biological tissue) with WEPL maps measured by single detector proton radiography. Results: For the simulated datasets, the optimizer showed excellent results. It was able to either completely eradicate or significantly reduce the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) in the WEPL for the homogeneous phantoms (to zero for individual materials or from 1.5% to 0.2% for the simultaneous optimization of multiple materials). For the heterogeneous phantom the RMSE was reduced from 1.9% to 0.3%. Conclusion: An optimization procedure has been designed to produce patient-specific calibration curves. Test results on a range of systems with different complexities and sizes have been promising for accurate beam range control in patients. This project was funded equally by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research

  9. Uneven fringe projection for efficient calibration in high-resolution 3D shape metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zonghua; Towers, Catherine E.; Towers, David P

    2007-08-20

    A novel uneven fringe projection technique is presented whereby nonuniformly spaced fringes are generated at a digital video projector to give evenly spaced fringes in the measurement volume. The proposed technique simplifies the relation between the measured phase and the object's depth independent of pixel position. This method needs just one coefficient set for calibration and depth calculation. With uneven fringe projection the shape data are referenced to a virtual plane instead of a physical reference plane, so an improved measurement with lower uncertainty is achieved. Further,the method can be combined with a radial lens distortion model. The theoretical foundation of the method is presented and experimentally validated to demonstrate the advantages of the uneven fringe projection approach compared with existing methods.Measurement results on a National Physical Laboratory (UK) 'step standard' confirm the measurement uncertainty using the proposed method.

  10. Structural deformation measurement via efficient tensor polynomial calibrated electro-active glass targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gugg, Christoph; Harker, Matthew; O'Leary, Paul

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the physical setup and mathematical modelling of a device for the measurement of structural deformations over large scales, e.g., a mining shaft. Image processing techniques are used to determine the deformation by measuring the position of a target relative to a reference laser beam. A particular novelty is the incorporation of electro-active glass; the polymer dispersion liquid crystal shutters enable the simultaneous calibration of any number of consecutive measurement units without manual intervention, i.e., the process is fully automatic. It is necessary to compensate for optical distortion if high accuracy is to be achieved in a compact hardware design where lenses with short focal lengths are used. Wide-angle lenses exhibit significant distortion, which are typically characterized using Zernike polynomials. Radial distortion models assume that the lens is rotationally symmetric; such models are insufficient in the application at hand. This paper presents a new coordinate mapping procedure based on a tensor product of discrete orthogonal polynomials. Both lens distortion and the projection are compensated by a single linear transformation. Once calibrated, to acquire the measurement data, it is necessary to localize a single laser spot in the image. For this purpose, complete interpolation and rectification of the image is not required; hence, we have developed a new hierarchical approach based on a quad-tree subdivision. Cross-validation tests verify the validity, demonstrating that the proposed method accurately models both the optical distortion as well as the projection. The achievable accuracy is e <= +/-0.01 [mm] in a field of view of 150 [mm] x 150 [mm] at a distance of the laser source of 120 [m]. Finally, a Kolmogorov Smirnov test shows that the error distribution in localizing a laser spot is Gaussian. Consequently, due to the linearity of the proposed method, this also applies for the algorithm's output. Therefore, first

  11. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Zhang, Lu; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-06-29

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 μm. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps. PMID:26191739

  12. The efficiency calibration of the DSS-24 34-meter beam-waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. S.; Britcliffe, M. J.; Franco, M. M.; Stewart, S. R.; Jackson, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave performance testing of the new Deep Space Station (DSS)-24 34-m-diameter antenna was carried out during the summer of 1994. Efficiency measurements were made at the 8.45 GHz (X-band) and 32-GHz (ka-band) frequencies both at the antenna Cassegrian (f1) and beam-waveguide (f3) focal points. In addition, the antenna f3 efficiencies were measured on the DSS-24 operational 2.295-GHz (S-band) and 8.45-Ghz feeds. This article presents the efficiency determinations as a function of elevation angle along with a corresponding error analysis of the measurements. Peak measured gains and efficiencies are tabulated for all frequencies.

  13. Metrological tests of a 200 L calibration source for HPGE detector systems for assay of radioactive waste drums.

    PubMed

    Boshkova, T; Mitev, K

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present test procedures, approval criteria and results from two metrological inspections of a certified large volume (152)Eu source (drum about 200L) intended for calibration of HPGe gamma assay systems used for activity measurement of radioactive waste drums. The aim of the inspections was to prove the stability of the calibration source during its working life. The large volume source was designed and produced in 2007. It consists of 448 identical sealed radioactive sources (modules) apportioned in 32 transparent plastic tubes which were placed in a wooden matrix which filled the drum. During the inspections the modules were subjected to tests for verification of their certified characteristics. The results show a perfect compliance with the NIST basic guidelines for the properties of a radioactive certified reference material (CRM) and demonstrate the stability of the large volume CRM-drum after 7 years of operation. PMID:26640236

  14. Microparticle impact calibration of the Arrayed Large-Area Dust Detectors in INterplanetary space (ALADDIN) onboard the solar power sail demonstrator IKAROS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Takayuki; Cole, Michael J.; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Sunao; Iwai, Takeo; Kobayashi, Masanori; Srama, Ralf; Yano, Hajime

    2014-10-01

    The Arrayed Large-Area Dust Detectors in INterplanetary space (ALADDIN) is an array of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) based dust detectors aboard the solar power sail demonstrator named IKAROS (Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun). The total sensor area of ALADDIN (0.54 m2) is the world's largest among the past PVDF-based dust detectors. IKAROS was launched in May 2010 and then ALADDIN measured cosmic dust impacts for 16 months while orbiting around between 0.7 and 1.1 AU. The main scientific objective of ALADDIN is to reveal number density of ≥10-μm-sized dust in the zodiacal cloud with much higher time-space resolution than that achieved by any past in-situ measurements. The distribution of ≥10-μm-sized dust can be also observed mainly with the light scattering by optical instruments. This paper gives the scientific objectives, the instrumental description, and the results of microparticle impact calibration of ALADDIN conducted in ground laboratories. For the calibration tests we used Van de Graaf accelerators (VdG), two-stage light gas guns (LGG), and a nano-second pulsed Nd:YAG laser (nsPL). Through these experiments, we obtained depolarization charge signal caused by hypervelocity impacts or laser irradiation using the flight spare of 20-μm-thick PVDF sensor and the electronics box of ALADDIN. In the VdG experiment we accelerated iron, carbon, and silver microparticles at 1-30 km/s, while in the LGG experiment we performed to shoot 100's-μm-sized particles of soda-lime glass and stainless steel at 3-7 km/s as single projectile. For interpolation to ≥10-μm size, we irradiated infrared laser at the energy of 15-20 mJ directly onto the PVDF sensor. From the signal analysis, we developed a calibration law for estimation of masses of impacted dust particles. The dynamic range of ALADDIN corresponds from 9×10-14 kg to 2×10-10 kg (4-56 μm in diameter at density of 2.0 g/cm3) at the expected impact velocity of 10 km/s at 1 AU

  15. Calibration of an HPGe detector and self-attenuation correction for 210Pb: Verification by alpha spectrometry of 210Po in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saïdou; Bochud, François; Laedermann, Jean-Pascal; Buchillier, Thierry; Njock Moïse, Kwato; Froidevaux, Pascal

    2007-08-01

    In this work the calibration of an HPGe detector for 210Pb measurement is realised by a liquid standard source and the determination of this radionuclide in solid environmental samples by gamma spectrometry takes into account a correction factor for self-attenuation of its 46.5 keV line. Experimental, theoretical and Monte Carlo investigations are undertaken to evaluate self-attenuation for cylindrical sample geometry. To validate this correction factor, 210Po (at equilibrium with 210Pb) alpha spectrometry procedure using microwave acid digestion under pressure is developed and proposed. The different self-attenuation correction methods are in coherence, and corrected 210Pb activities are in good agreement with the results of 210Po. Finally, self-attenuation corrections are proposed for environmental solid samples whose density ranges between 0.8 and 1.4 g/cm 3 and whose mass attenuation coefficient is around 0.4 cm 2/g.

  16. Efficient Calibration/Uncertainty Analysis Using Paired Complex/Surrogate Models.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Wesley; Doherty, John

    2015-01-01

    The use of detailed groundwater models to simulate complex environmental processes can be hampered by (1) long run-times and (2) a penchant for solution convergence problems. Collectively, these can undermine the ability of a modeler to reduce and quantify predictive uncertainty, and therefore limit the use of such detailed models in the decision-making context. We explain and demonstrate a novel approach to calibration and the exploration of posterior predictive uncertainty, of a complex model, that can overcome these problems in many modelling contexts. The methodology relies on conjunctive use of a simplified surrogate version of the complex model in combination with the complex model itself. The methodology employs gradient-based subspace analysis and is thus readily adapted for use in highly parameterized contexts. In its most basic form, one or more surrogate models are used for calculation of the partial derivatives that collectively comprise the Jacobian matrix. Meanwhile, testing of parameter upgrades and the making of predictions is done by the original complex model. The methodology is demonstrated using a density-dependent seawater intrusion model in which the model domain is characterized by a heterogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity. PMID:25142272

  17. Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Based on High-Efficiency Frisch-Ring Cdznte Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Hossain, A; James, R; DeGeronimo, G; Fried, J; O'Connor, P; Kargar, A; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated both good energy resolution, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency in detecting gamma rays, highlighting the strong potential of CdZnTe materials for such applications. We are designing a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8 times 8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so greatly improving detection efficiency. By using the front-end application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy-resolution. It includes a signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuits, a high-voltage module, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. In this paper, we detail the system's structure and report the results of our tests with it.

  18. Synchrotron radiation calibration of the EUVE variable line-spaced diffraction gratings at the NBS SURF II facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinsky, P.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Miller, A.; Vallerga, J.; Malina, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) has a spectrometer which utilizes variable line-spaced, plane diffraction gratings in the converging beam of a Wolter-Schwarzschild type II mirror. The gratings, microchannel plate detector, and thin film filters have been calibrated with continuum radiation provided by the NBS SURF II facility. These were calibrated in a continuum beam to find edges or other sharp spectral features in the transmission of the filters, quantum efficiency of the microchannel plate detector, and efficiency of the gratings. The details of the calibration procedure and the results of the calibration are presented.

  19. HST/WFC3: Improvements to the UVIS Dark Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Matthew; Baggett, Sylvia M.; WFC3 Team

    2016-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS detector, comprised of two e2v CCDs, exhibits an inherent dark current (in the absence of any illumination) presently measured at ~7 e-/hr and increasing at ~1 e-/hr/yr. Additionally, detector degradation due to on-orbit radiation damage generates a continuously increasing though small population of hot pixels (dark current exceeding 54 e-/hr, currently ~4% of each chip). We present the results of the WFC3/UVIS dark calibration, which provides calibration files used as a correction for these detector characteristics. We also discuss the impacts that Charge Transfer Efficiency (CTE) losses and detector post-flashing have on the hot pixel population, as well as various improvements to the calibration procedure that were introduced in the CALWF3 v3.3 pipeline.

  20. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, makingmore » it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.« less

  1. Intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting nanowire single photon detector in the modified hot spot model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotova, A. N.; Vodolazov, D. Yu

    2014-12-01

    We theoretically study the dependence of the intrinsic detection efficiency (IDE) of a superconducting nanowire single photon detector on the applied current, I, and magnetic field, H. We find that the current, at which the resistive state appears in the superconducting film, depends on the position of the hot spot (a region with suppressed superconductivity around the place where the photon has been absorbed) with respect to the edges of the film. This circumstance leads to inevitable smooth dependence IDE(I) when IDE ˜ 0.05-1, even for a homogenous straight superconducting film and in the absence of fluctuations. For IDE ≲ 0.05, a much sharper current dependence comes from the fluctuation-assisted vortex entry to the hot spot, which is located near the edge of the film. We find that a weak magnetic field strongly affects IDE when the photon detection is connected with fluctuation-assisted vortex entry to the hot spot (IDE \\ll 1), and it weakly affects IDE when the photon detection is connected with the current-induced vortex nucleation in the film with the hot spot (IDE ˜ 0.05-1).

  2. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phasemore » contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. In conclusion, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.« less

  3. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, Timothy J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Yang, Hao; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. In conclusion, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe.

  4. A simulation of a CdTe gamma ray detector based on collection efficiency profiles as determined by lateral IBIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittone, E.; Fizzotti, F.; Lo Giudice, A.; Polesello, P.; Manfredotti, C.

    1999-06-01

    Collection efficiency profiles as determined by the ion beam-induced charge (IBIC) technique have been considered to evaluate the spectroscopic performance of a cadmium telluride (CdTe) nuclear radiation detector. The dependence of such profiles on the applied bias voltage and the shaping time are presented and discussed on the basis of a theoretical model, which is also used to evaluate the electron/hole collection lengths profiles. Experimental collection efficiency profiles were used as input data of the "ISIDE" Monte Carlo programme to simulate the CdTe response to gamma rays produced by 57Co. A systematic investigation of such spectra obtained under different detection conditions shows the effects of non constant collection efficiency profiles and ballistic deficit on the energy resolution of the detector.

  5. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and

  6. Statistical design of mass spectrometry calibration procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.

    1996-11-01

    The main objective of this task was to agree on calibration procedures to estimate the system parameters (i.e., dead-time correction, ion-counting conversion efficiency, and detector efficiency factors) for SAL`s new Finnigan MAT-262 mass spectrometer. SAL will use this mass spectrometer in a clean-laboratory which was opened in December 1995 to measure uranium and plutonium isotopes on environmental samples. The Finnigan MAT-262 mass spectrometer has a multi-detector system with seven Faraday cup detectors and one ion- counter for the measurement of very small signals (e.g. 10{sup -17} Ampere range). ORNL has made preliminary estimates of the system parameters based on SAL`s experimental data measured in late 1994 when the Finnigan instrument was relatively new. SAL generated additional data in 1995 to verify the calibration procedures for estimating the dead-time correction factor, the ion-counting conversion factor and the Faraday cup detector efficiency factors. The system parameters estimated on the present data will have to be reestablished when the Finnigan MAT-262 is moved-to the new clean- laboratory. Different methods will be used to analyzed environmental samples than the current measurement methods being used. For example, the environmental samples will be electroplated on a single filament rather than using the current two filament system. An outline of the calibration standard operating procedure (SOP) is included.

  7. Charge collection efficiency and space charge formation in CdTe gamma and X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matz, R.; Weidner, M.

    1998-02-01

    A new extended model for the charge collection efficiency in CdTe gamma and X ray detectors is presented which allows to derive from apparent experimental gamma spectra of a quasi-monochromatic source, an 241Am source in the present case, not only the μρ products of electrons and holes individually but also the sign, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of the net space charge accumulated in the detector. Resistive CdTe and CdZnTe as well as CdTe Schottky detectors are studied. While the resistive type is stable in time and exhibits higher μτ products, the Schottky type shows space charge accumulation which approaches saturation after about 1 h at several 10 11 cm -3. This is attributed to efficient majority carrier depletion, Fermi level shift, and trap filling. Resistive detectors thus appear optimized to the needs of gamma spectroscopy even at low bias voltage, while Schottky types need higher bias to overcome the space charge. They are suited to both, gamma spectroscopy and X-ray detection in analog current mode, where they operate more stably due ρo the higher bias. From the point of view of materials characterization, gamma spectroscopy with Schottky detectors probes and reveals the trap density near the Fermi level (several 10 12 cm -3 eV -1). We find a basically homogeneous spatial distribution suggesting the trap origin being in crystal growth rather than surface processing. Capture of photogenerated charges in traps is detrimental for current-mode operation under high X-ray flux because delayed emission from traps limits the detector's ability to respond to fast signal changes.

  8. Measuring Transmission Efficiencies Of Mass Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.

    1989-01-01

    Coincidence counts yield absolute efficiencies. System measures mass-dependent transmission efficiencies of mass spectrometers, using coincidence-counting techniques reminiscent of those used for many years in calibration of detectors for subatomic particles. Coincidences between detected ions and electrons producing them counted during operation of mass spectrometer. Under certain assumptions regarding inelastic scattering of electrons, electron/ion-coincidence count is direct measure of transmission efficiency of spectrometer. When fully developed, system compact, portable, and used routinely to calibrate mass spectrometers.

  9. An Efficient Acoustic Density Estimation Method with Human Detectors Applied to Gibbons in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Kidney, Darren; Rawson, Benjamin M.; Borchers, David L.; Stevenson, Ben C.; Marques, Tiago A.; Thomas, Len

    2016-01-01

    Some animal species are hard to see but easy to hear. Standard visual methods for estimating population density for such species are often ineffective or inefficient, but methods based on passive acoustics show more promise. We develop spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) methods for territorial vocalising species, in which humans act as an acoustic detector array. We use SECR and estimated bearing data from a single-occasion acoustic survey of a gibbon population in northeastern Cambodia to estimate the density of calling groups. The properties of the estimator are assessed using a simulation study, in which a variety of survey designs are also investigated. We then present a new form of the SECR likelihood for multi-occasion data which accounts for the stochastic availability of animals. In the context of gibbon surveys this allows model-based estimation of the proportion of groups that produce territorial vocalisations on a given day, thereby enabling the density of groups, instead of the density of calling groups, to be estimated. We illustrate the performance of this new estimator by simulation. We show that it is possible to estimate density reliably from human acoustic detections of visually cryptic species using SECR methods. For gibbon surveys we also show that incorporating observers’ estimates of bearings to detected groups substantially improves estimator performance. Using the new form of the SECR likelihood we demonstrate that estimates of availability, in addition to population density and detection function parameters, can be obtained from multi-occasion data, and that the detection function parameters are not confounded with the availability parameter. This acoustic SECR method provides a means of obtaining reliable density estimates for territorial vocalising species. It is also efficient in terms of data requirements since since it only requires routine survey data. We anticipate that the low-tech field requirements will make this method

  10. An Efficient Acoustic Density Estimation Method with Human Detectors Applied to Gibbons in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Kidney, Darren; Rawson, Benjamin M; Borchers, David L; Stevenson, Ben C; Marques, Tiago A; Thomas, Len

    2016-01-01

    Some animal species are hard to see but easy to hear. Standard visual methods for estimating population density for such species are often ineffective or inefficient, but methods based on passive acoustics show more promise. We develop spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) methods for territorial vocalising species, in which humans act as an acoustic detector array. We use SECR and estimated bearing data from a single-occasion acoustic survey of a gibbon population in northeastern Cambodia to estimate the density of calling groups. The properties of the estimator are assessed using a simulation study, in which a variety of survey designs are also investigated. We then present a new form of the SECR likelihood for multi-occasion data which accounts for the stochastic availability of animals. In the context of gibbon surveys this allows model-based estimation of the proportion of groups that produce territorial vocalisations on a given day, thereby enabling the density of groups, instead of the density of calling groups, to be estimated. We illustrate the performance of this new estimator by simulation. We show that it is possible to estimate density reliably from human acoustic detections of visually cryptic species using SECR methods. For gibbon surveys we also show that incorporating observers' estimates of bearings to detected groups substantially improves estimator performance. Using the new form of the SECR likelihood we demonstrate that estimates of availability, in addition to population density and detection function parameters, can be obtained from multi-occasion data, and that the detection function parameters are not confounded with the availability parameter. This acoustic SECR method provides a means of obtaining reliable density estimates for territorial vocalising species. It is also efficient in terms of data requirements since since it only requires routine survey data. We anticipate that the low-tech field requirements will make this method

  11. Study of the detective quantum efficiency for the kinestatic charge detector as a megavoltage imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2003-06-01

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from relatively poor contrast and spatial resolution compared to diagnostic kilovoltage x-ray imaging due to the dominant Compton scattering in the former. Recently available amorphous silicon/selenium based flat-panel imagers overcome many of the limitations of poor contrast and spatial resolution that affect conventional video based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). An alternative technology is presented here: kinestatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD uses a slot photon beam, high-pressure gas (xenon, 100 atm) and a multi-ion rectangular chamber in scanning mode. An electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning speed with that of the cation drift, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. KCD imaging is characterized by reduced scatter and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of a prototype small field of view KCD detector (384 channels, 0.5 mm spacing) were carried out. Measurements yield DQE[0]=0.19 and DQE[0.5cy/mm]=0.01. KCD imaging is compared to film and commercial EPID systems using phantoms, with the KCD requiring an extremely low dose (0.1 cGy) per image. A proposed cylindrical chamber design with a higher ion-collection depth is expected to further improve image quality (DQE[0]>0.25).

  12. Self-powered micro-structured solid state neutron detector with very low leakage current and high efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Dahal, R.; Huang, K. C.; LiCausi, N.; Lu, J.-Q.; Bhat, I.; Clinton, J.; Danon, Y.

    2012-06-11

    We report on the design, fabrication, and performance of solid-state neutron detector based on three-dimensional honeycomb-like silicon micro-structures. The fabricated detectors use boron filled deep holes with aspect ratio of over 12 and showed a very low leakage current density of {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} at -1 V for device sizes varying from 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 to 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 mm{sup 2}. A thermal neutron detection efficiency of 4.5% {+-} 0.5% with discrimination setting of 500 keV and gamma to neutron sensitivity of (1.1 {+-} 0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} for single layer was measured without external bias for these devices. Monte-Carlo simulation predicts a maximum efficiency of 45% for such devices filled with 95% enriched {sup 10}boron.

  13. Self-powered micro-structured solid state neutron detector with very low leakage current and high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, R.; Huang, K. C.; Clinton, J.; LiCausi, N.; Lu, J.-Q.; Danon, Y.; Bhat, I.

    2012-06-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and performance of solid-state neutron detector based on three-dimensional honeycomb-like silicon micro-structures. The fabricated detectors use boron filled deep holes with aspect ratio of over 12 and showed a very low leakage current density of ˜7 × 10-7 A/cm2 at -1 V for device sizes varying from 2 × 2 to 5 × 5 mm2. A thermal neutron detection efficiency of 4.5% ± 0.5% with discrimination setting of 500 keV and gamma to neutron sensitivity of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10-5 for single layer was measured without external bias for these devices. Monte-Carlo simulation predicts a maximum efficiency of 45% for such devices filled with 95% enriched 10boron.

  14. Novel processing and properties of high efficiency superconducting infrared bolometric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxey, Donovan E.

    1998-12-01

    The work in this dissertation involves the design, fabrication, and analysis of superconducting infrared bolometric detectors. These bolometers have been made from superconducting YBasb2Cusb3Osb{7-delta} (YBCO) deposited on silicon (100) substrates utilizing a buffer layer of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). Thin films of undoped and silver(Ag) doped YBCO, as well as stacked layers of undoped/Ag-doped YBCO have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The microstructure and materials properties of these films have been studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The electrical and transport properties of these films have been investigated using four-point resistance versus temperature measurements. The results of the investigations of the materials and electrical properties of these films show that they are of high quality, and exhibit superconducting characteristics that are conducive for bolometer device applications. For the first time superconducting bolometric detectors have been fabricated using a novel photolithographic and anti-reflective coating (ARC) process. This fabrication process can be used to fabricate any type of device structure that utilizes superconducting YBCO. The use of an anti-reflective coating simplifies the overall device fabrication process and allows this process to be easily integrated with conventional silicon device processing steps. The anti-reflective coating serves as a barrier to moisture and other contaminants that react with YBCO, as well as act as an absorption medium that improves the optical collection efficiency of the device. Optical analysis of these three bolometer device structures has been carried out using a helium neon (HeNe; lambda = 632.8nm) laser. At a bias of 1mA, and chopping frequency of 100Hz; we have measured photoresponse as a function of device temperature, calculated responsivity, and

  15. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  16. Quantum efficiencies of imaging detectors with alkali halide photocathodes. I - Microchannel plates with separate and integral CsI photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements and comparisons have been made of the quantum efficiencies of microchannel plate (MCP) detectors in the far-UV (below 2000-A) wavelength range using CsI photocathodes (a) deposited on the front surfaces of microchannel plates and (b) deposited on solid substrates as opaque photocathodes with the resulting photoelectrons input to microchannel plates. The efficiences were measured in both pulse-counting and photodiode modes of operation. Typical efficiencies are about 15 percent at 1216 A for a CsI-coated MCP compared with 65 percent for an opaque CsI photocathode MCP detector. Special processing has yielded an efficiency as high as 20 percent for a CsI-coated MCP. This may possibly be further improved by optimization of the tilt angle of the MCP channels relative to the front face of the MCP and incident radiation. However, at present there still remains a factor of at least 3 quantum efficiency advantage in the separate opaque CsI photocathode configuration.

  17. High efficiency and rapid response superconducting NbN nanowire single photon detector based on asymmetric split ring metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guanhai; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Shao-Wei Lu, Wei

    2014-06-09

    With asymmetric split ring metamaterial periodically placed on top of the niobium nitride (NbN) nanowire meander, we theoretically propose a kind of metal-insulator-metallic metamaterial nanocavity to enhance absorbing efficiency and shorten response time of the superconducting NbN nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) operating at wavelength of 1550 nm. Up to 99.6% of the energy is absorbed and 96.5% dissipated in the nanowire. Meanwhile, taking advantage of this high efficiency absorbing cavity, we implement a more sparse arrangement of the NbN nanowire of the filling factor 0.2, which significantly lessens the nanowire and crucially boosts the response time to be only 40% of reset time in previous evenly spaced meander design. Together with trapped mode resonance, a standing wave oscillation mechanism is presented to explain the high efficiency and broad bandwidth properties. To further demonstrate the advantages of the nanocavity, a four-pixel SNSPD on 10 μm × 10 μm area is designed to further reduce 75% reset time while maintaining 70% absorbing efficiency. Utilizing the asymmetric split ring metamaterial, we show a higher efficiency and more rapid response SNSPD configuration to contribute to the development of single photon detectors.

  18. HENC performance evaluation and plutonium calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Baca, J.; Pecos, J.M.; Davidson, D.R.; McElroy, R.D.; Brochu, D.B.

    1997-10-01

    The authors have designed a high-efficiency neutron counter (HENC) to increase the plutonium content in 200-L waste drums. The counter uses totals neutron counting, coincidence counting, and multiplicity counting to determine the plutonium mass. The HENC was developed as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between the Department of Energy and Canberra Industries. This report presents the results of the detector modifications, the performance tests, the add-a-source calibration, and the plutonium calibration at Los Alamos National Laboratory (TA-35) in 1996.

  19. The COS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Philip E.; Keyes, C.; Kaiser, M.

    2007-12-01

    The COS calibration pipeline (CALCOS) includes three main components: basic calibration, wavelength calibration, and spectral extraction. Calibration of modes using the far ultraviolet (FUV) and near ultraviolet (NUV) detectors share a common structure, although the individual reference files differ and there are some additional steps for the FUV channel. The pipeline is designed to calibrate data acquired in either ACCUM or time-tag mode. The basic calibration includes pulse-height filtering and geometric correction for FUV, and flat-field, deadtime, and Doppler correction for both detectors. Wavelength calibration can be done either by using separate lamp exposures or by taking several short lamp exposures concurrently with a science exposure. For time-tag data, the latter mode ("tagflash") will allow better correction of potential drift of the spectrum on the detector. One-dimensional spectra will be extracted and saved in a FITS binary table. Separate columns will be used for the flux-calibrated spectrum, error estimate, and the associated wavelengths. CALCOS is written in Python, with some functions in C. It is similar in style to other HST pipeline code in that it uses an association table to specify which files to be included, and the calibration steps to be performed and the reference files to use are specified by header keywords. Currently, in conjunction with the Instrument Definition Team (led by J. Green), the ground-based reference files are being refined, delivered, and tested with the pipeline.

  20. Multigamma-ray calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Massey, T.N.

    1983-05-01

    We have calibrated a self-consistent set of multigamma-ray standards using the automated multi-spectrometry ..gamma..-ray counting facility at LLNL's Nuclear Chemistry Division. Pure sources of long-lived activity were produced by mass separation and/or chemical purification. The sources were counted individually and in combination on several different calibrated spectrometer systems. These systems utilize various detectors ranging from small (x-ray) detectors to large volume high-purity Ge detectors. This has allowed the use of the most ideal individual detector-efficiency characteristics for the determination of the relative ..gamma..-ray intensities. Precise energy measurements, reported earlier (Meyer, 1976) have been performed by an independent method. Both the energy and ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities determined compare well with independently established values such as the recent ICRM intercomparison of /sup 152/Eu. We discuss our investigations aimed at resolving the shape of the efficiency response function up to 10 MeV for large volume Ge(Li) and high-purity Ge detectors. Recent results on the ..gamma..-ray-emission probabilities per decay for /sup 149/Gd and /sup 168/Tm multigamma-ray sources are discussed. For /sup 168/Tm, we deduce a 0.01% ..beta../sup -/ branch to the 87.73-keV level in /sup 168/Yb rather than the previous value which was a factor of 200 greater. In addition, we describe current cooperative efforts aimed at establishing a consistent set of data for short-lived fission products. Included are recent measurements on the bromine fission products with ..gamma.. rays up to 7 MeV.

  1. Technology for radiation efficiency measurement of high-power halogen tungsten lamp used in calibration of high-energy laser energy meter.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji Feng; Hu, Xiao Yang; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Chang, Yan

    2015-03-20

    The calibration method using a high-power halogen tungsten lamp as a calibration source has many advantages such as strong equivalence and high power, so it is very fit for the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. However, high-power halogen tungsten lamps after power-off still reserve much residual energy and continually radiate energy, which is difficult to be measured. Two measuring systems were found to solve the problems. One system is composed of an integrating sphere and two optical spectrometers, which can accurately characterize the radiative spectra and power-time variation of the halogen tungsten lamp. This measuring system was then calibrated using a normal halogen tungsten lamp made of the same material as the high-power halogen tungsten lamp. In this way, the radiation efficiency of the halogen tungsten lamp after power-off can be quantitatively measured. In the other measuring system, a wide-spectrum power meter was installed far away from the halogen tungsten lamp; thus, the lamp can be regarded as a point light source. The radiation efficiency of residual energy from the halogen tungsten lamp was computed on the basis of geometrical relations. The results show that the halogen tungsten lamp's radiation efficiency was improved with power-on time but did not change under constant power-on time/energy. All the tested halogen tungsten lamps reached 89.3% of radiation efficiency at 50 s after power-on. After power-off, the residual energy in the halogen tungsten lamp gradually dropped to less than 10% of the initial radiation power, and the radiation efficiency changed with time. The final total radiation energy was decided by the halogen tungsten lamp's radiation efficiency, the radiation efficiency of residual energy, and the total power consumption. The measuring uncertainty of total radiation energy was 2.4% (here, the confidence factor is two). PMID:25968513

  2. A detector module with highly efficient surface-alpha event rejection operated in CRESST-II Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, R.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Erb, A.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Ferreiro, N.; Gorla, P.; Gütlein, A.; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; Kiefer, M.; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Loebell, J.; Münster, A.; Petricca, F.; Potzel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Reindl, F.; Roth, S.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Scholl, S.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; von Sivers, M.; Stanger, M.; Stodolsky, L.; Strandhagen, C.; Tanzke, A.; Uffinger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Wüstrich, M.; Zöller, A.

    2015-08-01

    The cryogenic dark matter experiment CRESST-II aims at the direct detection of WIMPs via elastic scattering off nuclei in scintillating CaWO crystals. We present a new, highly improved, detector design installed in the current run of CRESST-II Phase 2 with an efficient active rejection of surface-alpha backgrounds. Using CaWO sticks instead of metal clamps to hold the target crystal, a detector housing with fully-scintillating inner surface could be realized. The presented detector (TUM40) provides an excellent threshold of keV and a resolution of keV (at 2.60 keV). With significantly reduced background levels, TUM40 sets stringent limits on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section and probes a new region of parameter space for WIMP masses below 3 GeV/c. In this paper, we discuss the novel detector design and the surface-alpha event rejection in detail.

  3. Improvements in the Low Energy Collection Efficiency of Si(Li) X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox,C.; Fischer, D.; Schwartz, W.; Song, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Soft X-ray beam-line applications are of fundamental importance to material research, and commonly employ high-resolution Si(Li) detectors for energy dispersive spectroscopy. However, the measurement of X-rays below 1 keV is compromised by absorption in the material layers in front of the active crystal and a dead layer at the crystal surface. Various Schottky barrier type contacts were investigated resulting in a 40% reduction of the dead-layer thickness and a factor of two increased sensitivity at carbon K{sub {alpha}} compared to the standard Si(Li) detector. Si(Li) detectors were tested on the U7A soft X-ray beam-line at the National Synchrotron Light Source and on a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  4. Time-resolved singlet-oxygen luminescence detection with an efficient and practical semiconductor single-photon detector

    PubMed Central

    Boso, Gianluca; Ke, Damei; Korzh, Boris; Bouilloux, Jordan; Lange, Norbert; Zbinden, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In clinical applications, such as PhotoDynamic Therapy, direct singlet-oxygen detection through its luminescence in the near-infrared range (1270 nm) has been a challenging task due to its low emission probability and the lack of suitable single-photon detectors. Here, we propose a practical setup based on a negative-feedback avalanche diode detector that is a viable alternative to the current state-of-the art for different clinical scenarios, especially where geometric collection efficiency is limited (e.g. fiber-based systems, confocal microscopy, scanning systems etc.). The proposed setup is characterized with Rose Bengal as a standard photosensitizer and it is used to measure the singlet-oxygen quantum yield of a new set of photosensitizers for site-selective photodynamic therapy. PMID:26819830

  5. Free-running InGaAs single photon detector with 1 dark count per second at 10% efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Korzh, B. Walenta, N.; Lunghi, T.; Gisin, N.; Zbinden, H.

    2014-02-24

    We present a free-running single photon detector for telecom wavelengths based on a negative feedback avalanche photodiode (NFAD). A dark count rate as low as 1 cps was obtained at a detection efficiency of 10%, with an afterpulse probability of 2.2% for 20 μs of deadtime. This was achieved by using an active hold-off circuit and cooling the NFAD with a free-piston stirling cooler down to temperatures of −110 °C. We integrated two detectors into a practical, 625 MHz clocked quantum key distribution system. Stable, real-time key distribution in the presence of 30 dB channel loss was possible, yielding a secret key rate of 350 bps.

  6. Time-resolved singlet-oxygen luminescence detection with an efficient and practical semiconductor single-photon detector.

    PubMed

    Boso, Gianluca; Ke, Damei; Korzh, Boris; Bouilloux, Jordan; Lange, Norbert; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    In clinical applications, such as PhotoDynamic Therapy, direct singlet-oxygen detection through its luminescence in the near-infrared range (1270 nm) has been a challenging task due to its low emission probability and the lack of suitable single-photon detectors. Here, we propose a practical setup based on a negative-feedback avalanche diode detector that is a viable alternative to the current state-of-the art for different clinical scenarios, especially where geometric collection efficiency is limited (e.g. fiber-based systems, confocal microscopy, scanning systems etc.). The proposed setup is characterized with Rose Bengal as a standard photosensitizer and it is used to measure the singlet-oxygen quantum yield of a new set of photosensitizers for site-selective photodynamic therapy. PMID:26819830

  7. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  8. The feasibility of using a photoelectric cigarette smoke detector for energy-efficient air quality control

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.M.; Alevantis, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a smoke sensor to monitor and control cigarette smoke levels in occupied spaces and also to determine whether the use of such a detector could result in energy savings. A smoke detector was built and tested. The experimental results show that the smoke sensor output is a function of cigarette smoke concentration and that the smoke sensor gives a rapid and continuous response. In addition, a computer program that simulates the transient mass and energy interactions in buildings was modified so that the impact of ventilation strategies on indoor air quality and energy consumption could be studied when smokers are present. The results of the numerical modeling for an arbitrary test case show that the use of a smoke sensor to detect cigarette smoke particulates and to control ventilation can allow indoor air quality to be continuously maintained at acceptable levels while minimizing energy consumption.

  9. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-02-07

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  10. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  11. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined detection of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, M.M.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-02-27

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation event count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  12. Swift/BAT Calibration and Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) aboard NASA#s Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer is a large coded aperture gamma-ray telescope consisting of a 2.4 m (8#) x 1.2 m (4#) coded aperture mask supported 1 meter above a 5200 square cm area detector plane containing 32,768 individual 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm CZT detectors. The BAT is now completely assembled and integrated with the Swift spacecraft in anticipation of an October 2004 launch. Extensive ground calibration measurements using a variety of radioactive sources have resulted in a moderately high fidelity model for the BAT spectral and photometric response. This paper describes these ground calibration measurements as well as related computer simulations used to study the efficiency and individual detector properties of the BAT detector array. The creation of a single spectral response model representative of the fully integrated BAT posed an interesting challenge and is at the heart of the public analysis tool #batdrmgen# which computes a response matrix for any given sky position within the BAT FOV. This paper will describe the batdrmgen response generator tool and conclude with a description of the on-orbit calibration plans as well as plans for the future improvements needed to produce the more detailed spectral response model that is required for the construction of an all-sky hard x-ray survey.

  13. Early commissioning calibration data sets for DEAP-3600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, Berta; DEAP Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The DEAP-3600 experiment is a single phase dark matter detector using 1000 kg fiducial mass of liquid argon as scintillating target. An array of 255 high quantum efficiency PMTs detect the argon scintillation light. The experiment is located at SNOLAB, 2 km underground in Ontario, Canada. In February 2015 the PMTs were switched on and data were taken with vacuum and N2 in the detector. Optical and gamma calibration data have been collected to commission the data acquisition hardware and software and characterize the optical properties of the detector.

  14. Energy calibration via correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Daniel; Limousin, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The main task of an energy calibration is to find a relation between pulse-height values and the corresponding energies. Doing this for each pulse-height channel individually requires an elaborated input spectrum with an excellent counting statistics and a sophisticated data analysis. This work presents an easy to handle energy calibration process which can operate reliably on calibration measurements with low counting statistics. The method uses a parameter based model for the energy calibration and concludes on the optimal parameters of the model by finding the best correlation between the measured pulse-height spectrum and multiple synthetic pulse-height spectra which are constructed with different sets of calibration parameters. A CdTe-based semiconductor detector and the line emissions of an 241Am source were used to test the performance of the correlation method in terms of systematic calibration errors for different counting statistics. Up to energies of 60 keV systematic errors were measured to be less than ~ 0.1 keV. Energy calibration via correlation can be applied to any kind of calibration spectra and shows a robust behavior at low counting statistics. It enables a fast and accurate calibration that can be used to monitor the spectroscopic properties of a detector system in near realtime.

  15. The COS Calibration Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, Philip E.; Kaiser, M. E.; Keyes, C. D.; Ake, T. B.; Aloisi, A.; Friedman, S. D.; Oliveira, C. M.; Shaw, B.; Sahnow, D. J.; Penton, S. V.; Froning, C. S.; Beland, S.; Osterman, S.; Green, J.; COS/STIS STScI Team; IDT, COS

    2008-05-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, COS, (Green, J, et al., 2000, Proc SPIE, 4013) will be installed in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) during the next servicing mission. This will be the most sensitive ultraviolet spectrograph ever flown aboard HST. The program (CALCOS) for pipeline calibration of HST/COS data has been developed by the Space Telescope Science Institute. As with other HST pipelines, CALCOS uses an association table to list the data files to be included, and it employs header keywords to specify the calibration steps to be performed and the reference files to be used. COS includes both a cross delay line detector for the far ultraviolet (FUV) and a MAMA detector for the near ultraviolet (NUV). CALCOS uses a common structure for both channels, but the specific calibration steps differ. The calibration steps include pulse-height filtering and geometric correction for FUV, and flat-field, deadtime, and Doppler correction for both detectors. A 1-D spectrum will be extracted and flux calibrated. Data will normally be taken in TIME-TAG mode, recording the time and location of each detected photon, although ACCUM mode will also be supported. The wavelength calibration uses an on-board spectral line lamp. To enable precise wavelength calibration, default operations will simultaneously record the science target and lamp spectrum by executing brief (tag-flash) lamp exposures at least once per external target exposure.

  16. Enhanced quantum efficiency of high-purity silicon imaging detectors by ultralow temperature surface modification using Sb doping

    SciTech Connect

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Elliott, S. Tom; Holland, Stephen E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-12-19

    A low temperature process for Sb doping of silicon has been developed as a backsurface treatment for high-purity n-type imaging detectors. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used to achieve very high dopant incorporation in a thin, surface-confined layer. The growth temperature is kept below 450 deg. C for compatibility with Al-metallized devices. Imaging with MBE-modified 1kx1k charge coupled devices (CCDs) operated in full depletion has been demonstrated. Dark current is comparable to the state-of-the-art process, which requires a high temperature step. Quantum efficiency is improved, especially in the UV, for thin doped layers placed closer to the backsurface. Near 100% internal quantum efficiency has been demonstrated in the ultraviolet for a CCD with a 1.5 nm silicon cap layer.

  17. Enhanced quantum efficiency of high-purity silicon imaging detectors by ultralow temperature surface modification using Sb doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacksberg, Jordana; Hoenk, Michael E.; Elliott, S. Tom; Holland, Stephen E.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2005-01-01

    A low temperature process for Sb doping of silicon has been developed as a backsurface treatment for high-purity n-type imaging detectors. Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used to achieve very high dopant incorporation in a thin, surface-confined layer. The growth temperature is kept below 450 (deg)C for compatibility with Al-metallized devices. Imaging with MBE-modified 1kx1k charge coupled devices (CCDs) operated in full depletion has been demonstrated. Dark current is comparable to the state-of-the-art process, which requires a high temperature step. Quantum efficiency is improved, especially in the UV, for thin doped layers placed closer to the backsurface. Near 100% internal quantum efficiency has been demonstrated in the ultraviolet for a CCD with a 1.5 nm silicon cap layer.

  18. High-efficiency WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors operating at 2.5 K

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, V. B.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.; Korzh, B.; Bussières, F.; Zbinden, H.; Marsili, F.; Shaw, M. D.

    2014-09-22

    We investigate the operation of WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) at 2.5 K, a temperature which is ∼70% of the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub C}) of 3.4 K. We demonstrate saturation of the system detection efficiency at 78 ± 2% at a wavelength of 1310 nm, with a jitter of 191 ps. We find that the jitter at 2.5 K is limited by the noise of the readout and can be improved through the use of cryogenic amplifiers. Operation of SNSPDs with high efficiency at temperatures very close to T{sub C} appears to be a unique property of amorphous WSi.

  19. High-efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors fabricated from MoSi thin-films.

    PubMed

    Verma, V B; Korzh, B; Bussières, F; Horansky, R D; Dyer, S D; Lita, A E; Vayshenker, I; Marsili, F; Shaw, M D; Zbinden, H; Mirin, R P; Nam, S W

    2015-12-28

    We report on MoSi SNSPDs which achieved high system detection efficiency (87.1 ± 0.5% at 1542 nm) at 0.7 K and we demonstrate that these detectors can also be operated with saturated internal efficiency at a temperature of 2.3 K in a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler. We measured a minimum system jitter of 76 ps, maximum count rate approaching 10 MHz, and polarization dependence as low as 3.3 ± 0.1%. The performance of MoSi SNSPDs at 2.3 K is similar to the performance of WSi SNSPDs at < 1 K. The higher operating temperature of MoSi SNSPDs makes these devices promising for widespread use due to the simpler and less expensive cryogenics required for their operation. PMID:26832040

  20. Calibration of X-Ray diffractometer by the experimental comparison method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudka, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    A software for calibrating an X-ray diffractometer with area detector has been developed. It is proposed to search for detector and goniometer calibration models whose parameters are reproduced in a series of measurements on a reference crystal. Reference (standard) crystals are prepared during the investigation; they should provide the agreement of structural models in repeated analyses. The technique developed has been used to calibrate Xcalibur Sapphire and Eos, Gemini Ruby (Agilent) and Apex x8 and Apex Duo (Bruker) diffractometers. The main conclusions are as follows: the calibration maps are stable for several years and can be used to improve structural results, verified CCD detectors exhibit significant inhomogeneity of the efficiency (response) function, and a Bruker goniometer introduces smaller distortions than an Agilent goniometer.

  1. Calibration of X-Ray diffractometer by the experimental comparison method

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P.

    2015-07-15

    A software for calibrating an X-ray diffractometer with area detector has been developed. It is proposed to search for detector and goniometer calibration models whose parameters are reproduced in a series of measurements on a reference crystal. Reference (standard) crystals are prepared during the investigation; they should provide the agreement of structural models in repeated analyses. The technique developed has been used to calibrate Xcalibur Sapphire and Eos, Gemini Ruby (Agilent) and Apex x8 and Apex Duo (Bruker) diffractometers. The main conclusions are as follows: the calibration maps are stable for several years and can be used to improve structural results, verified CCD detectors exhibit significant inhomogeneity of the efficiency (response) function, and a Bruker goniometer introduces smaller distortions than an Agilent goniometer.

  2. Experimental investigation of the radiation shielding efficiency of a MCP detector in the radiation environment near Jupiter's moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Meyer, S.; Lüthi, M.; Lasi, D.; Galli, A.; Piazza, D.; Desorgher, L.; Reggiani, D.; Hajdas, W.; Karlsson, S.; Kalla, L.; Wurz, P.

    2016-09-01

    Neutral Ion Mass spectrometer (NIM) is one of the instruments in the Particle Environmental Package (PEP) designed for the JUICE mission of ESA to the Jupiter system. NIM, equipped with a sensitive MCP ion detector, will conduct detailed measurements of the chemical composition of Jovian icy moons exospheres. To achieve high sensitivity of the instrument, radiation effects due to the high radiation background (high-energy electrons and protons) around Jupiter have to be minimised. We investigate the performance of an Al-Ta-Al composite stack as a potential shielding against high-energy electrons. Experiments were performed at the PiM1 beam line of the High Intensity Proton Accelerator Facilities located at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, Switzerland. The facility delivers a particle beam containing e-, μ- and π- with momentum from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c (Hajdas et al., 2014). The measurements of the radiation environment generated during the interaction of primary particles with the Al-Ta-Al material were conducted with dedicated beam diagnostic methods and with the NIM MCP detector. In parallel, modelling studies using GEANT4 and GRAS suites were performed to identify products of the interaction and predict ultimate fluxes and particle rates at the MCP detector. Combination of experiment and modelling studies yields detailed characterisation of the radiation fields produced by the interaction of the incident e- with the shielding material in the range of the beam momentum from 17.5 to 345 MeV/c. We derived the effective MCP detection efficiency to primary and secondary radiation and effective shielding transmission coefficients to incident high-energy electron beam in the range of applied beam momenta. This study shows that the applied shielding attenuates efficiently high-energy electrons. Nevertheless, owing to nearly linear increase of the bremsstrahlung production rate with incident beam energy, above 130 MeV their detection rates measured by the MCP

  3. Approaching the Ultimate Limits of Communication Efficiency with a Photon-Counting Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris; Moision, Bruce; Dolinar, Samuel J.; Birnbaum, Kevin M.; Divsalar, Dariush

    2012-01-01

    Coherent states achieve the Holevo capacity of a pure-loss channel when paired with an optimal measurement, but a physical realization of this measurement is as of yet unknown, and it is also likely to be of high complexity. In this paper, we focus on the photon-counting measurement and study the photon and dimensional efficiencies attainable with modulations over classical- and nonclassical-state alphabets. We first review the state-of-the-art coherent on-off-keying (OOK) with a photoncounting measurement, illustrating its asymptotic inefficiency relative to the Holevo limit. We show that a commonly made Poisson approximation in thermal noise leads to unbounded photon information efficiencies, violating the conjectured Holevo limit. We analyze two binary-modulation architectures that improve upon the dimensional versus photon efficiency tradeoff achievable with conventional OOK. We show that at high photon efficiency these architectures achieve an efficiency tradeoff that differs from the best possible tradeoff--determined by the Holevo capacity--by only a constant factor. The first architecture we analyze is a coherent-state transmitter that relies on feedback from the receiver to control the transmitted energy. The second architecture uses a single-photon number-state source.

  4. Local detection efficiency of a NbN superconducting single photon detector explored by a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Renema, Jelmer J; Engel, Andreas; van Exter, Martin P; de Dood, Michiel J A

    2015-09-21

    We propose an experiment to directly probe the local response of a superconducting single photon detector using a sharp metal tip in a scattering scanning near-field optical microscope. The optical absorption is obtained by simulating the tip-detector system, where the tip-detector is illuminated from the side, with the tip functioning as an optical antenna. The local detection efficiency is calculated by considering the recently introduced position-dependent threshold current in the detector. The calculated response for a 150 nm wide detector shows a peak close to the edge that can be spatially resolved with an estimated resolution of ∼ 20 nm, using a tip with parameters that are experimentally accessible. PMID:26406688

  5. Segmented crystalline scintillators: An initial investigation of high quantum efficiency detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Amit; Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao Qihua; Li Yixin; Su Zhong; Wang Yi; Yamamoto, Jin; Du Hong; Cunningham, Ian; Klugerman, Misha; Shah, Kanai

    2005-10-15

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) based on indirect detection, active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPIs) have become the technology of choice for geometric verification of patient localization and dose delivery in external beam radiotherapy. However, current AMFPI EPIDs, which are based on powdered-phosphor screens, make use of only {approx}2% of the incident radiation, thus severely limiting their imaging performance as quantified by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) ({approx}1%, compared to {approx}75% for kilovoltage AMFPIs). With the rapidly increasing adoption of image-guided techniques in virtually every aspect of radiotherapy, there exist strong incentives to develop high-DQE megavoltage x-ray imagers, capable of providing soft-tissue contrast at very low doses in megavoltage tomographic and, potentially, projection imaging. In this work we present a systematic theoretical and preliminary empirical evaluation of a promising, high-quantum-efficiency, megavoltage x-ray detector design based on a two-dimensional matrix of thick, optically isolated, crystalline scintillator elements. The detector is coupled with an indirect detection-based active matrix array, with the center-to-center spacing of the crystalline elements chosen to match the pitch of the underlying array pixels. Such a design enables the utilization of a significantly larger fraction of the incident radiation (up to 80% for a 6 MV beam), through increases in the thickness of the crystalline elements, without loss of spatial resolution due to the spread of optical photons. Radiation damage studies were performed on test samples of two candidate scintillator materials, CsI(Tl) and BGO, under conditions relevant to radiotherapy imaging. A detailed Monte Carlo-based study was performed in order to examine the signal, spatial spreading, and noise properties of the absorbed energy for several segmented detector configurations. Parameters studied included scintillator material, septal wall

  6. Operational experience with the ATLAS Pixel Detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapoire, C.; Atlas Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Pixel Detector is the innermost detector of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, providing high-resolution measurements of charged particle tracks in the high radiation environment close to the collision region. This capability is vital for the identification and measurement of proper decay times of long-lived particles such as B-hadrons, and thus vital for the ATLAS physics program. The detector provides hermetic coverage with three cylindrical layers and three layers of forward and backward pixel detectors. It consists of approximately 80 million pixels that are individually read out via chips bump-bonded to 1744 n-in-n silicon substrates. In this paper, results from the successful operation of the Pixel Detector at the LHC will be presented, including monitoring, calibration procedures and detector performance. The detector performance is excellent: 96.2% of the pixels are operational, noise occupancy is sufficiently low and hit efficiency exceed the design specification.

  7. Readout chip for the CMS pixel detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Marco

    2014-11-01

    For the CMS experiment a new pixel detector is planned for installation during the extended shutdown in winter 2016/2017. Among the changes of the detector modified front end electronics will be used for higher efficiency at peak luminosity of the LHC and faster readout. The first prototype versions of the new readout chip have been designed and produced. The results of qualification and calibration for the new chip are presented in this paper.

  8. The detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors using cascaded-systems analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Single-photon counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable new advanced energy-dependent methods. The purpose of this study is to extend cascaded-systems analyses (CSA) to the description of image quality and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of SPC systems. Methods: Point-process theory is used to develop a method of propagating the mean signal and Wiener noise-power spectrum through a thresholding stage (required to identify x-ray interaction events). The new transfer relationships are used to describe the zero-frequency DQE of a hypothetical SPC detector including the effects of stochastic conversion of incident photons to secondary quanta, secondary quantum sinks, additive noise, and threshold level. Theoretical results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations assuming the same detector model. Results: Under certain conditions, the CSA approach can be applied to SPC systems with the additional requirement of propagating the probability density function describing the total number of image-forming quanta through each stage of a cascaded model. Theoretical results including DQE show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo calculations under all conditions considered. Conclusions: Application of the CSA method shows that false counts due to additive electronic noise results in both a nonlinear image signal and increased image noise. There is a window of allowable threshold values to achieve a high DQE that depends on conversion gain, secondary quantum sinks, and additive noise.

  9. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Detector with High Efficiency, Broad Bandwidth, and Highly Symmetric Coupling to Transition Edge Sensor Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E.; Cao, N.; Chuss, D.; Denis, K.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Schneider, G.; Stevenson, T.; Travers, D.; U-yen, K.

    2008-01-01

    Four probe antennas transfer signals from waveguide to microstrip lines. The probes not only provide broadband impedance matching, but also thermally isolate waveguide and detector. In addition, we developed a new photonic waveguide choke joint design, with four-fold symmetry, to suppress power leakage at the interface. We have developed facilities to test superconducting circuit elements using a cryogenic microwave probe station, and more complete systems in waveguide. We used the ring resonator shown below to measure a dielectric loss tangent < 7x10(exp -4) over 10 - 45 GHz. We have combined component simulations to predict the overall coupling from waveguide modes to bolometers. The result below shows the planar circuit and waveguide interface can utilize the high beam symmetry of HE11 circular feedhorns with > 99% coupling efficiency over 30% fractional bandwidth.

  10. New measurement of the Fano factor of mercuric iodide. [astronomical x-ray detector charge collection efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Vallerga, J. V.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Entine, G.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that mercuric iodide (HgI2) shows great promise as a high-resolution X-ray detector for use in X-ray astronomy. Development of mercuric iodide for astronomical work has required investigation of the temperature dependence of the HgI2 crystal parameters such as leakage current, resolution, and mobility of the charge carriers. The first studies in connection with these investigations have led to a new value of the Fano factor of 0.19 + or - 0.03. The best value previously reported was 0.27 measured at room temperature. The new upper limit of 0.19 for the HgI2 Fano factor was determined by cooling the HgI2 crystal and preamp to -20 C. It is concluded that room-temperature energy resolution of HgI2 is not limited by charge generation statistics but rather by collection efficiency.

  11. Characterization measurement of a thick CdTe detector for BNCT-SPECT - detection efficiency and energy resolution.

    PubMed

    Murata, Isao; Nakamura, Soichiro; Manabe, Masanobu; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki; Kato, Itsuro

    2014-06-01

    Author׳s group is carrying out development of BNCT-SPECT with CdTe device, which monitors the therapy effect of BNCT in real-time. From the design calculations, the dimensions were fixed to 1.5×2×30mm(3). For the collimator it was confirmed that it would have a good spatial resolution and simultaneously the number of counts would be acceptably large. After producing the CdTe crystal, the characterization measurement was carried out. For the detection efficiency an excellent agreement between calculation and measurement was obtained. Also, the detector has a very good energy resolution so that gamma-rays of 478keV and 511keV could be distinguished in the spectrum. PMID:24581600

  12. Fabrication of multi-layered absorption structure for high quantum efficiency photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Numata, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Zama, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2009-12-16

    We report on some efforts to improve a quantum efficiency of titanium-based optical superconducting transition edge sensors using the multi-layered absorption structure for maximizing photon absorption in the Ti layer. Using complex refractive index values of each film measured by a Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, we designed and optimized by a simulation code. An absorption measurement of fabricated structure was in good agreement with the design and was higher than 99% at optimized wavelength of 1550 nm.

  13. Measurement of the efficiency of the pattern recognition of tracks generated by ionizing radiation in a TIMEPIX detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asbah, N.; Leroy, C.; Pospisil, S.; Soueid, P.

    2014-05-01

    A hybrid silicon pixelated TIMEPIX detector (256 × 256 square pixels with a pitch of 55 μm) operated in Time Over Threshold (TOT) mode was exposed to radioactive sources and protons after Rutherford Backscattering on a thin gold foil of protons beams delivered by the Tandem Accelerator of the Montreal University. Simultaneous exposure of TIMEPIX to radioactive sources and to protons beams on top of the radioactive sources allowed measurements with different mixed radiation fields of protons, alpha-particles, photons and electrons. All measurements were performed in vacuum. The comparison of the experimental activities (determined from the measurement of the number of tracks left in the device by incoming particles) of the radioactive sources with their expected activities allowed the test of the device efficiency for track recognition. The efficiency of track recognition of incident protons of different energies as a function of the incidence angle was measured. The cluster size left by protons in the device was measured as a function of their incident energy at normal and large (75°) incident angles. The operation of TIMEPIX in TOT mode has allowed a 3D mapping of the charge spreading effect in the whole volume of the silicon sensor. The results of the present measurements demonstrate the TIMEPIX capability of differentiating between different types of particles species from mixed radiation fields and measuring their energy deposition. Single track analysis gives a good precision (significantly better than the 55 μm size of one detector pixel) on the coordinates of the impact point of protons with normal incidence interacting in the TIMEPIX silicon layer.

  14. High-detection efficiency and picosecond timing compact detector modules with red-enhanced SPADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudice, Andrea; Simmerle, Georg; Veronese, Daniele; Biasi, Roberto; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo; Maccagnani, Piera

    2012-06-01

    In the last years many progresses have been made in the field of silicon Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD) thanks to the improvements both in device design and in fabrication technology. Particularly, the Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione of Politecnico di Milano and the CNR-IMM of Bologna have been in the forefront of this research activity by designing and fabricating a new device structure enabling the fabrication of SPADs with red enhanced photon detection efficiency. In this paper we present a compact photon counting and timing module that fills the gap between the high temporal resolution and the high detection efficiency systems. The module exploits Red-Enhanced SPAD technology to attain a Photon Detection Efficiency (PDE) as high as 37% at 800 nm (peak of 58% at 600 nm) while maintaining a temporal resolution of about 100 ps FWHM, even with light diffused across the whole active area. A thermo-electric cooling system guarantees a noise as low as few counts per second for a 50 μm diameter SPAD while a low threshold avalanche pick-up circuit assures a limited shift in the temporal response.

  15. Quantitative analysis and efficiency study of PSD methods for a LaBr3:Ce detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Cang, Jirong; Zeng, Zhi; Yue, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Jianping; Liu, Yinong; Ma, Hao; Li, Junli

    2016-03-01

    The LaBr3:Ce scintillator has been widely studied for nuclear spectroscopy because of its optimal energy resolution (<3%@ 662 keV) and time resolution (~300 ps). Despite these promising properties, the intrinsic radiation background of LaBr3:Ce is a critical issue, and pulse shape discrimination (PSD) has been shown to be an efficient potential method to suppress the alpha background from the 227Ac. In this paper, the charge comparison method (CCM) for alpha and gamma discrimination in LaBr3:Ce is quantitatively analysed and compared with two other typical PSD methods using digital pulse processing. The algorithm parameters and discrimination efficiency are calculated for each method. Moreover, for the CCM, the correlation between the CCM feature value distribution and the total charge (energy) is studied, and a fitting equation for the correlation is inferred and experimentally verified. Using the equations, an energy-dependent threshold can be chosen to optimize the discrimination efficiency. Additionally, the experimental results show a potential application in low-activity high-energy γ measurement by suppressing the alpha background.

  16. An efficient procedure for tomotherapy treatment plan verification using the on-board detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaturo, O.; Miéville, F.; Tercier, P.-A.; Allal, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a fast and simple procedure for tomotherapy treatment plan verification using the on-board detector (OBD) has been developed. This procedure allows verification of plans with static and dynamic jaws (TomoEDGE). A convolution-based calculation model has been derived in order to link the leaf control sinogram from the treatment planning system to the data acquired by the OBD during a static couch procedure. The convolution kernel has been optimized using simple plans calculated in the Tomotherapy Cheese phantom. The optimal kernel has been found to be a lorentzian function, whose parameter Γ is 0.186 for the 1 cm jaw opening, 0.232 for the 2.5 cm jaw opening and 0.373 for the 5 cm jaw opening. The evaluation has been performed with a γ-index analysis. The dose criterion was 3% of the 95th percentile of the dose distribution and the distance-to-agreement criterion is 2 mm. In order to validate the procedure, it has been applied to around 50 clinical treatment plans, which had already been validated by the Delta4 phantom (Scandidos, Sweden). 96% of the tested plans have passed the criteria. Concerning the other 4%, significant discrepancies between the leaf pattern in the leaf control sinogram and the OBD data have been shown, which might be due to differences in the leaf open time. This corresponds also to a higher sensitivity of this method over the Delta4, adding the possibility of better monitoring the treatment delivery.

  17. Commissioning of the ATLAS inner detector with cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, H.

    2008-07-01

    The inner detector of the ATLAS experiment is in the process of being commissioned using cosmic ray events. First tests were performed in the SR1 assembly hall at CERN with both barrel and endcaps for all different detector technologies (pixels and microstrips silicon detectors as well as straw tubes with additional transition radiation detection). Integration with the rest of the ATLAS sub-detectors is now being done in the ATLAS cavern. The full software chain has been set up in order to reconstruct and analyse this kind of events. Final detector decoders have been developed, different pattern recognition algorithms and track fitters have been validated as well as the various alignment and calibration methods. The infrastructure to deal with conditions data coming from the data acquisition, detector control system and calibration runs has been put in place, allowing also to apply alignment and calibration constants. The software has also been essential to monitor the detector performance during data taking. Detector efficiencies, noise occupancies and resolutions have been studied in detail and compared with those obtained from simulation.

  18. Efficiency and rate capability studies of the time-of-flight detector for isochronous mass measurements of stored short-lived nuclei with the FRS-ESR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzminchuk-Feuerstein, Natalia; Fabian, Benjamin; Diwisch, Marcel; Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Geissel, Hans; Ayet San Andrés, Samuel; Dickel, Timo; Knöbel, Ronja; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Sun, Baohua; Weick, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) detector is used for Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) with the projectile fragment separator FRS and the heavy-ion storage ring ESR. Exotic nuclei are spatially separated in flight with the FRS at about 70% of the speed of light and are injected into the ESR. The revolution times of the stored ions circulating in the ESR are measured with a thin transmission foil detector. When the ions penetrate the thin detector foil, secondary electrons (SEs) are emitted from the surface and provide the timing information in combination with microchannel plate (MCP) detectors. The isochronous transport of the SEs is performed by perpendicular superimposed electric and magnetic fields. The detection efficiency and the rate capability of the TOF detector have been studied in simulations and experiments. As a result the performance of the TOF detector has been improved substantially: (i) The SE collection efficiency was doubled by use of an optimized set of electric and magnetic field values; now SEs from almost the full area of the foil are transmitted to the MCP detectors. (ii) The rate capability of the TOF detector was improved by a factor of four by the use of MCPs with 5 μm pore size. (iii) With these MCPs and a carbon foil with a reduced thickness of 10 μg/cm2 the number of recorded revolutions in the ESR has been increased by nearly a factor of 10. The number of recorded revolutions determine the precision of the IMS experiments. Heavy-ion measurements were performed with neon ions at 322 MeV/u and uranium fission fragments at about 370 MeV/u. In addition, measurements with an alpha source were performed in the laboratory with a duplicate of the TOF detector.

  19. Jamming efficiency evaluation of the IR smoke screen against high-orbit IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gui-qing; Li, Yong-xiang

    2011-08-01

    In order to lower the orientating capability of the DSP satellite, at first the paper analyzes early warning missile satellite detective system, introduces the jamming mechanism of infrared smoke screen, and a model of jamming efficiency evaluation of the IR smoke screen against early warning satellite was built from three sides of absorbency of smoke screen to infrared radiation, dispersion ability and infrared radiation from smoke screen self. At last the correlative conclusion was got based on the brief depiction of Early-warning Satellite.

  20. Large-area NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photon detectors with saturated detection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ryan P.; Grein, Matthew E.; Gudmundsen, Theodore J.; McCaughan, Adam; Najafi, Faraz; Berggren, Karl K.; Marsili, Francesco; Dauler, Eric A.

    2015-05-01

    Superconducting circuits comprising SNSPDs placed in parallel—superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors, or SNAPs—have previously been demonstrated to improve the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by increasing the critical current. In this work, we employ a 2-SNAP superconducting circuit with narrow (40 nm) niobium nitride (NbN) nanowires to improve the system detection efficiency to near-IR photons while maintaining high SNR. Additionally, while previous 2-SNAP demonstrations have added external choke inductance to stabilize the avalanching photocurrent, we show that the external inductance can be entirely folded into the active area by cascading 2-SNAP devices in series to produce a greatly increased active area. We fabricated series-2-SNAP (s2-SNAP) circuits with a nanowire length of 20 μm with cascades of 2-SNAPs providing the choke inductance necessary for SNAP operation. We observed that (1) the detection efficiency saturated at high bias currents, and (2) the 40 nm 2-SNAP circuit critical current was approximately twice that for a 40 nm non-SNAP configuration.

  1. PEST Compatible Software for More Efficient Levenburg-Marquardt Method Based Model Calibration: HEC-HMS / Watershed Model Applications for Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skahill, B. E.; Baggett, J.

    2007-12-01

    Our independent Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) implementation accommodates the PEST model independent and input control file protocol. First, to reduce the number of model calls needed to find a local minimum we use a combination of Broyden rank one updates (secant method) and central and forward finite differences to update the model sensitivity matrix at each optimization iteration. The exact combination of Broyden rank one updates and finite differences is easily specified by the user. While PEST Version 11 does include the ability to utilize Broyden updates, that implementation does not realize the complete efficiency gains that are possible. Second, we have added Multi Level Single Linkage (MLSL), a stochastic global optimization algorithm, to our PEST compatible model independent calibration software. MLSL uses the LM algorithm for local search and a minimum distance threshold to avoid repeated visits to the same local minima. The use of our MLSL implementation requires only a minor addition to a PEST input control file. Efficiencies that can be achieved for LM method based model independent calibration from a properly implemented secant version of the LM method will be demonstrated by examining the reduction in the total number of model calls for single HEC-HMS / watershed model inversion runs associated with the use of our independent LM implementation that accommodates the PEST model independent and input control file protocol. Using HEC-HMS / watershed models, we will also compare the efficiencies, in terms of the number of model calls required to achieve a given objective function value, of our implementations of Multistart, Trajectory Repulsion, and MLSL with that of Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE) and Covariance Matrix Adaption Evolutionary Strategy (CMAES), as interfaced to PEST.

  2. In situ calibration and evaluation of the accuracy of a waste water monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshimune; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2002-03-01

    A new method to estimate the reliability of a waste water monitoring system was developed and substantiated. To estimate the reliability means (1) to verify the representativeness of the sample fed into the monitoring system, and (2) to calibrate the detectors of the monitoring system. To verify the representativeness, test water spiked with 32P was prepared in a storage tank, and the monitoring system was operated. For all of the experiments, the radioactivity concentrations of the water fed into the monitoring system agreed well with those of the water in the storage tank at 725 +/- 45 s after the start of the sampling pump. Therefore, the representativeness was verified. Calibration was carried out with active water in the storage tank and in a specially designed calibration tank. The efficiency of a plastic scintillation detector (PSD), one of the detectors used in the monitoring system, for 32P was determined to be 4.91 +/- 0.10%. Using the calibration tank significantly reduced the cost and labor for calibration. In addition, calibration with natural potassium (40K) proved to be effective for periodic checks of the detector. PMID:11845835

  3. A high quantum efficiency in situ doped mid-wavelength infrared p-on-n homojunction superlattice detector grown by photoassisted molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, K. A.; Myers, T. H.; Yanka, R. W.; Mohnkern, L. M.; Otsuka, N.

    1991-10-01

    HgTe/CdTe superlattices in infrared (IR) detector structures have been theoretically shown to allow for better control over cutoff wavelength, minimize diffusion currents, and greatly reduce band-to-band tunneling currents as compared with the corresponding HgCdTe alloy. However, the few HgTe/CdTe superlattice detectors that have been fabricated exhibit little or no quantum efficiency. In this paper, we report the first high quantum efficiency mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) detectors based on HgTe/CdTe superlattices. This result is significant because it represents the first experimental verification that IR detectors with useful characteristics can in fact be fabricated from HgTe/CdTe superlattices. The MWIR detectors were fabricated from an in situ doped p-on-n MWIR homojunction superlattice epilayer grown by photoassisted molecular-beam epitaxy (PAMBE). This growth technique produces low defect growth of superlattice material, as is described in this paper. Our development of an extrinsic doping technology using indium and arsenic as the n-type and p-type dopants, respectively, led to the successful doping of the superlattice and is also discussed.

  4. Calibration aspects of the JEM-EUSO mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    The JEM-EUSO telescope will be, after calibration, a very accurate instrument which yields the number of received photons from the number of measured photo-electrons. The project is in phase A (demonstration of the concept) including already operating prototype instruments, i.e. many parts of the instrument have been constructed and tested. Calibration is a crucial part of the instrument and its use. The focal surface (FS) of the JEM-EUSO telescope will consist of about 5000 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs), which have to be well calibrated to reach the required accuracy in reconstructing the air-shower parameters. The optics system consists of 3 plastic Fresnel (double-sided) lenses of 2.5 m diameter. The aim of the calibration system is to measure the efficiencies (transmittances) of the optics and absolute efficiencies of the entire focal surface detector. The system consists of 3 main components: (i) Pre-flight calibration devices on ground, where the efficiency and gain of the PMTs will be measured absolutely and also the transmittance of the optics will be. (ii) On-board relative calibration system applying two methods: a) operating during the day when the JEM-EUSO lid will be closed with small light sources on board. b) operating during the night, together with data taking: the monitoring of the background rate over identical sites. (iii) Absolute in-flight calibration, again, applying two methods: a) measurement of the moon light, reflected on high altitude, high albedo clouds. b) measurements of calibrated flashes and tracks produced by the Global Light System (GLS). Some details of each calibration method will be described in this paper.

  5. Gigahertz-gated InGaAs/InP single-photon detector with detection efficiency exceeding 55% at 1550 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Fröhlich, B.; Dynes, J. F.; Sharpe, A. W.; Lucamarini, M.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2015-02-28

    We report on a gated single-photon detector based on InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with a single-photon detection efficiency exceeding 55% at 1550 nm. Our detector is gated at 1 GHz and employs the self-differencing technique for gate transient suppression. It can operate nearly dead time free, except for the one clock cycle dead time intrinsic to self-differencing, and we demonstrate a count rate of 500 Mcps. We present a careful analysis of the optimal driving conditions of the APD measured with a dead time free detector characterization setup. It is found that a shortened gate width of 360 ps together with an increased driving signal amplitude and operation at higher temperatures leads to improved performance of the detector. We achieve an afterpulse probability of 7% at 50% detection efficiency with dead time free measurement and a record efficiency for InGaAs/InP APDs of 55% at an afterpulse probability of only 10.2% with a moderate dead time of 10 ns.

  6. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  7. Production of high energy and low flux protons using 2D(3He,p)4He for space detector calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Tesmer, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    In this report, we want to demonstrate that besides the conventional use for elemental analysis and depth profiling by ion beam analysis (IBA), particles generated through ion-solid interactions in IBA may find other novel and important applications. Specifically, we use Rutherford backscattered and nuclear reaction produced high energy proton particles to calibrate an energetic particle subsystem (called ZEP) of the Space and Atmospheric Burst Reporting System (SABRS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). To simulate low radiation flux in the space, we have devised an experiment that uses an ultrathin (∼51.8 nm) self-support gold foil to scatter a proton beam from a 3 MV Tandem accelerator into the ZEP subsystem. Direct backscattering from the thin gold foil produces proton particles with tunable energies of 0.2-6.0 MeV and desired counting rates of <10 kHz. To extend the proton particle energy beyond the Tandem's limit of 6 MeV, a high Q-value nuclear reaction, 2D + 3He → p + 4He + 18.352 MeV, was used. This reaction allows us to obtain as high as 25.6 MeV proton particles on our 3 MV tandem accelerator, more than 4 times as high as the accelerator's maximum proton beam energy, and has greatly extended our proton energy range for this calibration activity. Preliminary ZEP subsystem calibration results are presented.

  8. Efficiency calibration of the first multilayer-coated holographic ion-etched flight grating for a sounding rocket high-resolution spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Michael P.; Barbee, Troy W. Jr.; Heidemann, Klaus F.; Gursky, Herbert; Rife, Jack C.; Hunter, William R.; Fritz, Gilbert G.; Cruddace, Raymond G.

    1999-11-01

    We have fabricated the four flight gratings for a sounding rocket high-resolution spectrometer using a holographic ion-etching technique. The gratings are spherical (4000-nm radius of curvature), large (160 mmx90 mm), and have a laminar groove profile of high density (3600 grooves/mm). They have been coated with a high-reflectance multilayer of Mo/Si. Using an atomic force microscope, we examined the surface characteristics of the first grating before and after multilayer coating. The average roughness is approximately 3 Aa rms after coating. Using synchrotron radiation, we completed in efficiency calibration map over the wavelength range 225-245 Aa. At an angle of incidence of 5 degree sign and a wavelength of 232 Aa, the average efficiency in the first inside order is 10.4{+-}0.5%, and the derived groove efficiency is 34.8{+-}1.6%. These values exceed all previously published results for a high-density grating. (c) 1999 Optical Society of America.

  9. Increasing the Accuracy in the Measurement of the Minor Isotopes of Uranium: Care in Selection of Reference Materials, Baselines and Detector Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poths, J.; Koepf, A.; Boulyga, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    The minor isotopes of uranium (U-233, U-234, U-236) are increasingly useful for tracing a variety of processes: movement of anthropogenic nuclides in the environment (ref 1), sources of uranium ores (ref 2), and nuclear material attribution (ref 3). We report on improved accuracy for U-234/238 and U-236/238 by supplementing total evaporation protocol TIMS measurement on Faraday detectors (ref 4)with multiplier measurement for the minor isotopes. Measurement of small signals on Faraday detectors alone is limited by noise floors of the amplifiers and accurate measurement of the baseline offsets. The combined detector approach improves the reproducibility to better than ±1% (relative) for the U-234/238 at natural abundance, and yields a detection limit for U-236/U-238 of <0.2 ppm. We have quantified contribution of different factors to the uncertainties associated with these peak jumping measurement on a single detector, with an aim of further improvement. The uncertainties in the certified values for U-234 and U-236 in the uranium standard NBS U005, if used for mass bias correction, dominates the uncertainty in their isotopic ratio measurements. Software limitations in baseline measurement drives the detection limit for the U-236/U-238 ratio. This is a topic for discussion with the instrument manufacturers. Finally, deviation from linearity of the response of the electron multiplier with count rate limits the accuracy and reproducibility of these minor isotope measurements. References: (1) P. Steier et al(2008) Nuc Inst Meth(B), 266, 2246-2250. (2) E. Keegan et al (2008) Appl Geochem 23, 765-777. (3) K. Mayer et al (1998) IAEA-CN-98/11, in Advances in Destructive and Non-destructive Analysis for Environmental Monitoring and Nuclear Forensics. (4) S. Richter and S. Goldberg(2003) Int J Mass Spectrom, 229, 181-197.

  10. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  11. Cascaded-systems analyses and the detective quantum efficiency of single-Z x-ray detectors including photoelectric, coherent and incoherent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Seungman; Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A.; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Theoretical models of the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of x-ray detectors are an important step in new detector development by providing an understanding of performance limitations and benchmarks. Previous cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) models accounted for photoelectric interactions only. This paper describes an extension of the CSA approach to incorporate coherent and incoherent interactions, important for low-Z detectors such as silicon and selenium. Methods: A parallel-cascade approach is used to describe the three types of x-ray interactions. The description of incoherent scatter required developing expressions for signal and noise transfer through an 'energy-labeled reabsorption' process where the parameters describing reabsorption are random functions of the scatter photon energy. The description of coherent scatter requires the use of scatter form factors that may not be accurate for some crystalline detector materials. The model includes the effects of scatter reabsorption and escape, charge collection, secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, and additive noise. Model results are validated by Monte Carlo calculations for Si and Se detectors assuming free-atom atomic form factors. Results: The new signal and noise transfer expressions were validated by showing agreement with Monte Carlo results. Coherent and incoherent scatter can degrade the DQE of Si and sometimes Se detectors</