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Sample records for detector solenoid effects

  1. Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Toprek, Dragan; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

  2. COMPENSATION OF DETECTOR SOLENOID IN SUPER-B

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Yuri; Bertsche, Kirk; Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The SUPER-B detector solenoid has a strong 1.5 T field in the Interaction Region (IR) area, and its tails extend over the range of several meters. The main effect of the solenoid field is coupling of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion which must be corrected in order to preserve the small design beam size at the Interaction Point. The additional effects are orbit and dispersion caused by the angle between the solenoid and beam trajectories. The proposed correction system provides local compensation of the solenoid effects independently for each side of the IR. It includes 'bucking' solenoids to remove the solenoid field tails and a set of skew quadrupoles, dipole correctors and anti-solenoids to cancel linear perturbations to the optics. Details of the correction system are presented.

  3. Report of the large solenoid detector group

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.; Mori, S.; Pondrom, L.G.; Williams, H.H.; Barnett, B.; Barnes, V.; Cashmore, R.; Chiba, M.; DeSalvo, R.; Devlin, T.

    1987-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design of a large solenoid for studying physics at the SSC. The parameters and nature of the detector have been chosen based on present estimates of what is required to allow the study of heavy quarks, supersymmetry, heavy Higgs particles, WW scattering at large invariant masses, new W and Z bosons, and very large momentum transfer parton-parton scattering. Simply stated, the goal is to obtain optimum detection and identification of electrons, muons, neutrinos, jets, W's and Z's over a large rapidity region. The primary region of interest extends over +-3 units of rapidity, although the calorimetry must extend to +-5.5 units if optimal missing energy resolution is to be obtained. A magnetic field was incorporated because of the importance of identifying the signs of the charges for both electrons and muons and because of the added possibility of identifying tau leptons and secondary vertices. In addition, the existence of a magnetic field may prove useful for studying new physics processes about which we currently have no knowledge. Since hermeticity of the calorimetry is extremely important, the entire central and endcap calorimeters were located inside the solenoid. This does not at the moment seem to produce significant problems (although many issues remain to be resolved) and in fact leads to a very effective muon detector in the central region.

  4. High speed data transmission for the SSC solenoidal detector

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1991-04-24

    High speed data transmission using fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider solenoidal detector has been studied. The solenoidal detector system will consist of nine subsystems involving more than a total 10{sup 7} channels of readout electronics. Consequently, a new high performance data acquisition system, incorporating high-speed optical fiber networks, will be required to process this large quantity of data. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C.

    1995-02-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0{degrees}C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0{degrees}C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length.

  6. Design of the 2 Tesla superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab D0 detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, B.; Brzezniak, J.; Fast, R.W.; Krempetz, K.; Kristalinski, A.; Lee, A.; Markley, D.; Mesin, A.; Orr, S.; Rucinski, R.

    1994-12-31

    A thin superconducting solenoid has been designed for an upgrade to the Fermilab D0 detector, one of two major hadron collider detectors at Fermilab. The original design of the D0 detector did not incorporate a central magnetic field which necessitates a retrofit within the parameters of the existing tracking volume of the detector. The two layer solenoid coil is indirectly cooled and provides a 2 T magnetic field for a central tracking system. To minimize end effects in this no iron configuration, the conductor width is varied thereby increasing current density at the ends and improving field uniformity. This paper summarizes the results of the conceptual design study for the D0 superconducting solenoid.

  7. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the SSCL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our primary interest is the detection and measurement of muons and the design of the muon detector and trigger for the SDC. We have been concentrating on the design of the forward muon system (in the approximate pseudo-rapidity region of 1.5 <{vert bar} {eta} {vert bar}<2.5 corresponding to azimuthal angles of 9.4{degrees} to 26. 0{degrees}) and at present are responsible for the engineering design of the detector support system in this rapidity region. We are also participating in the development of a liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter adapted to the bunch structure of the SSC machine. At present a LAr calorimeter still remains an option for the choice of calorimetry for the SDC. Recent measurements at BNL in a 20 GeV pion beam confirm that many of the problems associated with long signal collection times of LAr can be solved.

  8. 2 T superconducting detector solenoid for the PANDA target spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, A. A.; Koshurnikov, E. K.; Lobanov, Y. Y.; Makarov, A. F.; Orth, H.; Sissakian, A. N.; Vodopianov, A. S.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the JINR design of the large 2 T superconducting solenoid for the target spectrometer of the PANDA experiment at HESR (FAIR, GSI, Darmstadt, Germany). The solenoid coil has an inner radius of 1.08 m and a length of 2.90 m. This solenoid is non-centrally split providing a warm bore of 100 mm in diameter through the coil to accommodate sufficient space for the internal target installations. Maximally stored energy in the windings is 22.3 MJ. All tracking and calorimetric detectors surrounding the target point, with exception of a forward cone of 5∘ opening, are placed inside the lqHe-cryostat. The main features of the design and technique are as follows: a copper stabilizer and soldering technique for the superconducting cable; a stainless steel cryostat; winding technique over a mandrel; coreless type of the coil; low operational current. The details of the PANDA solenoid design including the magnetic field and stress-strain calculations are covered.

  9. Measured Effects of a Longitudinal Solenoidal Field on an Iron Quadrupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecklund, S.; Seeman, J. T.; Wolf, Z.

    1997-05-01

    We have measured the effects of a longitudinal solenoidal field on the field harmonics of an iron dominated quadrupole. These measurements are useful when designing a colliding beam interaction region where the first quadrupole is very near the solenoidal field of the physics detector. The effects of mirror plates, quadrupole excition, skew quadrupole windings, dipole windings, and solenoidal fields that enter at an angle have been measured. Conclusions and interpretations are given.

  10. Thermal design of the Mu2e detector solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj, N.; Wands, R.; Buehler, M.; Feher, S.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Schmitt, R.

    2014-12-18

    The reference design for a superconducting detector solenoid (DS) for the Mu2e experiment has been completed. In this study, the main functions of the DS are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target, which ranges from 2 to 1 T and a uniform precision magnetic field of 1 T in a volume large enough to house a tracker downstream of the stopping target. The inner diameter of the magnet cryostat is 1.9 m and the length is 10.9 m. The gradient section of the magnet is about 4 m long and the spectrometer section with a uniform magnetic field is about 6 m long. The inner cryostat wall supports the stopping target, tracker, calorimeter and other equipment installed in the DS. This warm bore volume is under vacuum during operation. It is sealed on one end by the muon beam stop, while it is open on the other end where it interfaces with the Transport Solenoid. The operating temperature of the magnetic coil is 4.7 K and is indirectly cooled with helium flowing in a thermosiphon cooling scheme. This paper describes the thermal design of the solenoid, including the design aspects of the thermosiphon for the coil cooling, forced flow cooling of the thermal shields with 2 phase LN2 (Liquid Nitrogen) and the transient studies of the cool down of the cold mass as well.

  11. Thermal design of the Mu2e detector solenoid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dhanaraj, N.; Wands, R.; Buehler, M.; Feher, S.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Schmitt, R.

    2014-12-18

    The reference design for a superconducting detector solenoid (DS) for the Mu2e experiment has been completed. In this study, the main functions of the DS are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target, which ranges from 2 to 1 T and a uniform precision magnetic field of 1 T in a volume large enough to house a tracker downstream of the stopping target. The inner diameter of the magnet cryostat is 1.9 m and the length is 10.9 m. The gradient section of the magnet is about 4 m long and the spectrometer section withmore » a uniform magnetic field is about 6 m long. The inner cryostat wall supports the stopping target, tracker, calorimeter and other equipment installed in the DS. This warm bore volume is under vacuum during operation. It is sealed on one end by the muon beam stop, while it is open on the other end where it interfaces with the Transport Solenoid. The operating temperature of the magnetic coil is 4.7 K and is indirectly cooled with helium flowing in a thermosiphon cooling scheme. This paper describes the thermal design of the solenoid, including the design aspects of the thermosiphon for the coil cooling, forced flow cooling of the thermal shields with 2 phase LN2 (Liquid Nitrogen) and the transient studies of the cool down of the cold mass as well.« less

  12. The LHC Compact Muon Solenoid experiment Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.; Beccati, B.; Behrens, U.; Biery, K.; Bouffet, O.; Branson, J.; Bukowiec, S.; Cano, E.; Cheung, H.; Ciganek, M.; Cittolin, S.; Coarasa, J. A.; Deldicque, C.; Dupont, A.; Erhan, S.; Gigi, D.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino, R.; Hatton, D.; Holzner, A.; Hwong, Y. L.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Meschi, E.; Mommsen, R. K.; Moser, R.; O'Dell, V.; Orsini, L.; Paus, C.; Petrucci, A.; Pieri, M.; Racz, A.; Raginel, O.; Sakulin, H.; Sani, M.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schwick, C.; Shpakov, D.; Simon, M.; Sumorok, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at CERN is a multi-purpose experiment designed to exploit the physics of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider collision energy (14TeV at centre of mass) over the full range of expected luminosities (up to 1034cm-2s-1). The CMS detector control system (DCS) ensures a safe, correct and efficient operation of the detector so that high quality physics data can be recorded. The system is also required to operate the detector with a small crew of experts who can take care of the maintenance of its software and hardware infrastructure. The subsystems size sum up to more than a million parameters that need to be supervised by the DCS. A cluster of roughly 100 servers is used to provide the required processing resources. A scalable approach has been chosen factorizing the DCS system as much as possible. CMS DCS has made clear a division between its computing resources and functionality by creating a computing framework allowing plugging in of functional components. DCS components are developed by the subsystems expert groups while the computing infrastructure is developed centrally. To ensure the correct operation of the detector, DCS organizes the communication between the accelerator and the experiment systems making sure that the detector is in a safe state during hazardous situations and is fully operational when stable conditions are present. This paper describes the current status of the CMS DCS focusing on operational aspects and the role of DCS in this communication.

  13. The effects of realistic pancake solenoids on particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Solenoids are widely used to transport or focus particle beams. Usually, they are assumed as being ideal solenoids with a high axial-symmetry magnetic field. Using the Vector Field Opera program, we modeled asymmetrical solenoids with realistic geometry defects, caused by finite conductor and current jumpers. Their multipole magnetic components were analyzed with the Fourier fit method; we present some possible optimized methods for them. We also discuss the effects of 'realistic' solenoids on low energy particle transport. The finding in this paper may be applicable to some lower energy particle transport system design.

  14. Conceptual design of a 2 tesla superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab D{O} detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezniak, J.; Fast, R.W.; Krempetz, K.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a superconducting solenoid to be part of a proposed upgrade for the D0 detector. This detector was completed in 1992, and has been taking data since then. The Fermilab Tevatron had scheduled a series of luminosity enhancements prior to the startup of this detector. In response to this accelerator upgrade, efforts have been underway to design upgrades for D0 to take advantage of the new luminosity, and improvements in detector technology. This magnet is conceived as part of the new central tracking system for D0, providing a radiation-hard high-precision magnetic tracking system with excellent electron identification.

  15. Development of Aluminum Stabilized Superconducting Cables for the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Vito; Buehler, M.; Lamm, M.; Page, T.; Curreli, S.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.

    2015-10-16

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to measure the rare process of direct muon-to-electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. The experiment comprises a system of three superconducting solenoids, which focus secondary muons from the production target and transport them to an aluminum stopping target, while minimizing the associated background. The Detector Solenoid (DS) is the last magnet in the transport line and its main functions are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target as well as a precision magnetic field in a volume large enough to house the tracker downstream of the stopping target. The Detector Solenoid coils are designed to be wound using NbTi Rutherford cables conformed in high purity aluminum for stabilization and then cold-worked for strength. Two types of Al-stabilized conductor are required to build the DS coils, one for the gradient section and one for the spectrometer section of the solenoid. The dimensions are optimized to generate the required field profile when the same current is transported in both conductors. The conductors contain NbTi Rutherford cables with 12 (DS1) and 8 (DS2) strands respectively and are manufactured by two different vendors. This paper describes the results of the manufacturing of production lengths of the Al-stabilized cables needed to build the Mu2e Detector Solenoid as well as the testing campaigns and main results. The main cable properties and results of electrical and mechanical tests are summarized and discussed for each stage of the cable development process. Results are compared to design values to show how the production cables satisfy all the design criteria starting from the NbTi wires to the Al-stabilized cables.

  16. Technical specification for the 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid for the BaBar detector. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, T.G.; Bell, R.; Fabbricatore, P.; Giorgi, M.; Hitlin, D.

    1997-03-07

    This document sets forth the specification of the BABAR superconducting solenoid and power supply which is being supplied to the BABAR collaboration by INSTITUTO NAZIONALE DI FISICA NUCLEARE (INFN). The solenoid will be installed in the BABAR detector which will be located at Interaction Region 2 (IR2) of the PEP II machine, a positron electron collider, presently under construction at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) located in Menlo Park, California. The solenoid will become part of the BABAR detector which will be used in SLAC`s high energy physics program. Intense beams of electrons and positrons are made to collide inside the solenoid magnet. High field uniformity quality, precise mechanical alignment and long term stability are essential characteristics of the solenoid. INFN will set up a committee that will provide contractual and technical oversight throughout the design, fabrication and installation phases of the BABAR solenoid construction. That committee will be the final authority to resolve any differences between these specifications and the INFN supplied drawings, in addition to any differences between these specifications or the INFN supplied drawings and the proposals from the vendor. All submissions for approval to INFN whether for design changes, material approval, design submissions or others as required by this specification shall be acted upon INFN within two (2) weeks of receipt of the submissions. If no answer is given the vendor may assume approval and proceed.

  17. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering closeout report for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, J.; Christensen, R.W.; Hayman, G.; Jones, D.C.; Ross, R.; Wilds, W.; Yeamans, S.; Ziock, H.J.

    1995-02-01

    The authors group at Los Alamos National Laboratory was responsible for the mechanical engineering of the silicon tracking system of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) experiment of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. The responsibility included the overall design of the system from the mechanical point of view, development and integration of the cooling system, which was required to remove the heat generated by the front-end electronics, assembly of the system to extremely tight tolerances, and verification that the construction and operational stability and alignment tolerances would be met. A detailed description of the concepts they developed and the work they performed can be found in a report titled ``Silicon Subsystem Mechanical Engineering Work for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration`` which they submitted to the SSC Laboratory. In addition to the mechanical engineering work, they also performed activation, background, and shielding studies for the SSC program. Much of the work they performed was potentially useful for other future high energy physics (HEP) projects. This report describes the closeout work that was performed for the Los Alamos SDC project. Four major tasks were identified for completion: (1) integration of the semi-automated assembly station being developed and construction of a precision part to demonstrate solutions to important general assembly problems (the station was designed to build precision silicon tracker subassemblies); (2) build a state-of-the-art TV holography (TVH) system to use for detector assembly stability tests; (3) design, build, and test a water based cooling system for a full silicon shell prototype; and (4) complete and document the activation, background, and shielding studies, which is covered in a separate report.

  18. Solenoid Fringe Field Effects for the Neutrino Factory Linac - MAD-X Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    M. Aslaninejad,C. Bontoiu,J. Pasternak,J. Pozimski,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    International Design Study for the Neutrino Factory (IDS-NF) assumes the first stage of muon acceleration (up to 900 MeV) to be implemented with a solenoid based Linac. The Linac consists of three styles of cryo-modules, containing focusing solenoids and varying number of SRF cavities for acceleration. Fringe fields of the solenoids and the focusing effects in the SRF cavities have significant impact on the transverse beam dynamics. Using an analytical formula, the effects of fringe fields are studied in MAD-X. The resulting betatron functions are compared with the results of beam dynamics simulations using OptiM code.

  19. Effect of epoxy cracking resistance on the stability of impregnated superconducting solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, H.; Moriyama, H.; Mitsui, H.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    The stability and quench positions of superconducting test solenoids impregnated with three types of epoxy resin, with different crack resistances, have been studied. Voltage signals and acoustic emission (AE) were monitored during training tests. Premature quenches in the solenoids almost occurred at the innermost layer of windings; voltage spikes and AE appeared just prior to the premature quench initiation. This suggested that premature quenches were due to friction or debonding between ground insulation and winding. The solenoid with a release film between ground insulation and winding showed high stability and reached critical current at the second charging. From the results, the effects of epoxy cracking resistance on the stability of impregnated superconducting test solenoids are discussed.

  20. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  1. Solenoid Compensation for the SuperB Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Sullivan, Michael K.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    We present an approach for compensating adverse effects of the detector solenoid in the SuperB Interaction Region (IR). We place compensating solenoids around the IR quadrupole magnets to reduce the magnetic fields nearly to zero. This allows more operational headroom for superconducting IR magnets and avoids saturation of ferric IR magnets. We place stronger compensating solenoids between IR magnets to reverse the magnetic field direction. This allows adjusting the total integrated solenoid field to zero, which eliminates coordinate plane rotation and reduces vertical beam displacements in the IR.

  2. Design report for an indirectly cooled 3-m diameter superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab Collider Detector Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, R.; Grimson, J.; Kephart, R.

    1982-10-01

    The Fermilab Collider Detector Facility (CDF) is a large detector system designed to study anti pp collisions at very high center of mass energies. The central detector for the CDF shown employs a large axial magnetic field volume instrumented with a central tracking chamber composed of multiple layers of cylindrical drift chambers and a pair of intermediate tracking chambers. The purpose of this system is to determine the trajectories, sign of electric charge, and momenta of charged particles produced with polar angles between 10 and 170 degrees. The magnetic field volume required for tracking is approximately 3.5 m long an 3 m in diameter. To provide the desired ..delta..p/sub T/p/sub T/ less than or equal to 1.5% at 50 GeV/c using drift chambers with approx. 200..mu.. resolution the field inside this volume should be 1.5 T. The field should be as uniform as is practical to simplify both track finding and the reconstruction of particle trajectories with the drift chambers. Such a field can be produced by a cylindrical current sheet solenoid with a uniform current density of 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ A/m (1200 A/mm) surrounded by an iron return yoke. For practical coils and return yokes, both central electromagnetic and central hadronic calorimetry must be located outside the coil of the magnet. This geometry requires that the coil and the cryostat be thin both in physical thickness and in radiation and absorption lengths. This dual requirement of high linear current density and minimal coil thickness can only be satisfied using superconducting technology. In this report we describe the design for an indirectly cooled superconducting solenoid to meet the requirements of the Fermilab CDF. The components of the magnet system are discussed in the following chapters, with a summary of parameters listed in Appendix A.

  3. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Kumaki, M; Kanesue, T; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL. PMID:26931976

  4. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  5. EFFECT OF SOLENOID FIELD ERRORS ON ELECTRON BEAM TEMPERATURES IN THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.KEWISCH,J.

    2003-05-12

    As part of a future upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), electron cooling is foreseen to decrease ion beam emittances. Within the electron cooling section, the ''hot'' ion beam is immersed in a ''cold'' electron beam. The cooling effect is further enhanced by a solenoid field in the cooling section, which forces the electrons to spiral around the field lines with a (Larmor) radius of 10 micrometers, reducing the effective transverse temperature by orders of magnitude. Studies of the effect of solenoid field errors on electron beam temperatures are reported.

  6. Effect of high solenoidal magnetic fields on breakdown voltages of high vacuum 805 MHz cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, A.; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Qian, Z.; Norem, J.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Errede, D.; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-10-01

    There is an on going international collaboration studying the feasibility and cost of building a muon collider or neutrino factory [1,2]. An important aspect of this study is the full understanding of ionization cooling of muons by many orders of magnitude for the collider case. An important muon ionization cooling experiment, MICE [3], has been proposed to demonstrate and validate the technology that could be used for cooling. Ionization cooling is accomplished by passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF Cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal field. To determine the effect of very large solenoidal magnetic fields on the generation of dark current, x-rays and on the breakdown voltage gradients of vacuum RF cavities, a test facility has been established at Fermilab in Lab G. This facility consists of a 12 MW 805 MHz RF station and a large warm bore 5 T solenoidal superconducting magnet containing a pill box type cavity with thin removable window apertures. This system allows dark current and breakdown studies of different window configurations and materials. The results of this study will be presented. The study has shown that the peak achievable accelerating gradient is reduced by a factor greater than 2 when solenoidal field of greater than 2 T are applied to the cavity.

  7. The Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the SSCL. Progress report, March 1, 1991--February 29, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Our primary interest is the detection and measurement of muons and the design of the muon detector and trigger for the SDC. We have been concentrating on the design of the forward muon system (in the approximate pseudo-rapidity region of 1.5 <{vert_bar} {eta} {vert_bar}<2.5 corresponding to azimuthal angles of 9.4{degrees} to 26. 0{degrees}) and at present are responsible for the engineering design of the detector support system in this rapidity region. We are also participating in the development of a liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter adapted to the bunch structure of the SSC machine. At present a LAr calorimeter still remains an option for the choice of calorimetry for the SDC. Recent measurements at BNL in a 20 GeV pion beam confirm that many of the problems associated with long signal collection times of LAr can be solved.

  8. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-08-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a ``hairline'' solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions.

  9. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A. W.; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a “hairline” solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions. PMID:25103877

  10. A solenoidal synthetic field and the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effects in neutral atoms.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Nie, Wei; Hutchinson, David A W; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Cold neutral atoms provide a versatile and controllable platform for emulating various quantum systems. Despite efforts to develop artificial gauge fields in these systems, realizing a unique ideal-solenoid-shaped magnetic field within the quantum domain in any real-world physical system remains elusive. Here we propose a scheme to generate a "hairline" solenoid with an extremely small size around 1 micrometer which is smaller than the typical coherence length in cold atoms. Correspondingly, interference effects will play a role in transport. Despite the small size, the magnetic flux imposed on the atoms is very large thanks to the very strong field generated inside the solenoid. By arranging different sets of Laguerre-Gauss (LG) lasers, the generation of Abelian and non-Abelian SU(2) lattice gauge fields is proposed for neutral atoms in ring- and square-shaped optical lattices. As an application, interference patterns of the magnetic type-I Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect are obtained by evolving atoms along a circle over several tens of lattice cells. During the evolution, the quantum coherence is maintained and the atoms are exposed to a large magnetic flux. The scheme requires only standard optical access, and is robust to weak particle interactions. PMID:25103877

  11. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  12. Thermal analysis of the cold mass of the 2T solenoid for the PANDA detector at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolando, G.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Dudarev, A.; Pais Da Silva, H.; Vodopyanov, A.; Schmitt, L.

    2015-12-01

    The superconducting solenoid of the PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt (Germany) is designed to provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a length of about 4 m in a bore of 1.9 m. To allow a warm target feed pipe oriented transversely to the solenoid axis and penetrating through the cryostat and solenoid cold mass, the magnet is split into 3 inter-connected coils fitted in a common support cylinder. During normal operation, cooling of the cold mass to the working temperature of 4.5 K will be achieved through the circulation by natural convection of two-phase helium in cooling pipes attached to the Al-alloy support cylinder. Pure aluminium strips acting as heat drains and glued to the inner surface of the three coils and thermally bonded to the cooling pipes allow minimizing the temperature gradient across the 6-layers coils. In this paper the thermal design of the cold mass during normal operation and current ramps up and down is validated using an analytical approximation and numerical simulation.

  13. Effect of ground insulation contact on stability of epoxy-impregnated superconducting solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, H.; Sekiya, H.; Mitsui, H.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    To clarify the effect of ground insulation contact on the stability of epoxy-impregnated superconducting solenoids, test coils with ground insulation between a winding and a metal former were fabricated. Aluminium and stainless steel were used as the former materials. The training effects of coils and the circumferential strains of former inner surfaces were measured. The training effects of aluminium former coils were larger than those of the stainless steel former coils. The strains of stainless steel formers became greater as the exciting current increased, but the strains of the aluminium formers did not change. These results show that the insulation of aluminium former coils became a floating state, the insulation of stainless steel former coils maintained a pressed state, and the floating state caused the large training effects.

  14. Conceptual design report for a superconducting coil suitable for use in the large solenoid detector at the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Krebs, H.J.; Kephart, R.D.; Theriot, D.; Wands, R.H.

    1989-09-15

    The conceptual design of a large superconducting solenoid suitable for a magnetic detector at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) was done at Fermilab. The magnet will provide a magnetic field of 1.7 T over a volume 8 m in diameter by 16 m long. The particle-physics calorimetry will be inside the field volume and so the coil will be bath cooled and cryostable; the vessels will be stainless steel. Predictability of performance and the ability to safely negotiate all probable failure modes, including a quench, are important items of the design philosophy. Our conceptual design of the magnet and calorimeter has convinced us that this magnet is a reasonable extrapolation of present technology and is therefore feasible. The principal difficulties anticipated are those associated with the very large physical dimensions and stored energy of the magnet. 5 figs.

  15. Self-compensating solenoid valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, Fritz H. (Inventor); Matsumoto, Yutaka (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A solenoid valve is described in which both an inlet and an outlet of the valve are sealed when the valve is closed. This double seal compensates for leakage at either the inlet or the outlet by making the other seal more effective in response to the leakage and allows the reversal of the flow direction by simply switching the inlet and outlet connections. The solenoid valve has a valve chamber within the valve body. Inlet and outlet tubes extend through a plate into the chamber. A movable core in the chamber extends into the solenoid coil. The distal end of the core has a silicone rubber plug. Other than when the solenoid is energized, the compressed spring biases the core downward so that the surface of the plug is in sealing engagement with the ends of the tubes. A leak at either end increases the pressure in the chamber, resulting in increased sealing force of the plug.

  16. Superconducting solenoids for the MICE channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Baynham, D.E.; Rockford, J.H.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinin, S.; Palmer, R.B.; Rey, J.M.

    2003-05-01

    This report describes the channel of superconductingsolenoids for the proposed international Muon Ionization CoolingExperiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channelthat is similar to that studied in the level 2 study of a neutrinofactory[1]. MICE also consists of two detector solenoids at either end ofthe cooling channel section. The superconducting solenoids for MICEperform three functions. The coupling solenoids, which are largesolenoids around 201.25 MHz RF cavities, couple the muon beam between thefocusing sections as it passes along the cooling channel. The focusingsolenoids are around the liquid hydrogen absorber that reduces themomentum of the muons in all directions. These solenoids generate agradient field along the axis as they reduce the beta of the muon beambefore it enters the absorber. Each detector solenoid system consists offive coils that match the muon beam coming to or from an absorber to a4.0 T uniform solenoidal field section that that contains the particledetectors at the ends of the experiment. There are detector solenoids atthe beginning and at the end of the experiment. This report describes theparameters of the eighteen superconducting coils that make up the MICEmagnetic channel.

  17. Simulating Electron Effects in Heavy-Ion Accelerators with Solenoid Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Grote, D P; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Seidl, P; Roy, P K; Coleman, J E; Haber, I

    2007-06-29

    Contamination from electrons is a concern for solenoid-focused ion accelerators being developed for experiments in high-energy-density physics. These electrons, produced directly by beam ions hitting lattice elements or indirectly by ionization of desorbed neutral gas, can potentially alter the beam dynamics, leading to a time-varying focal spot, increased emittance, halo, and possibly electron-ion instabilities. The electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP is used to simulate electron-cloud studies on the solenoid-transport experiment (STX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We present self-consistent simulations of several STX configurations and compare the results with experimental data in order to calibrate physics parameters in the model.

  18. Simulating Electron Effects in Heavy-Ion Accelerators with Solenoid Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W. M.; Grote, D. P.; Cohen, R. H.; Friedman, A.; Molvik, A. W.; Vay, J.-L.; Seidl, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Coleman, J. E.; Haber, I.

    2007-06-20

    Contamination from electrons is a concern for solenoid-focused ion accelerators being developed for experiments in high-energy-density physics. These electrons, produced directly by beam ions hitting lattice elements or indirectly by ionization of desorbed neutral gas, can potentially alter the beam dynamics, leading to a time-varying focal spot, increased emittance, halo, and possibly electron-ion instabilities. The electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP is used to simulate electron-cloud studies on the solenoid-transport experiment (STX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We present self-consistent simulations of several STX configurations and compare the results with experimental data in order to calibrate physics parameters in the model.

  19. Combined effects of hydrazine exposure and endurance testing on solenoid-actuated valve performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagler, R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented from a test program which was conducted to assess the capability of various solenoid-actuated valve design concepts to provide performance characteristics commensurate with long-duration (ten-year) missions to explore the outer planets. The valves were installed in a hydrazine flow test setup and periodically cycled during a nine-month test period under test conditions comparable to anticipated mission operating conditions. In situ valve performance was periodically determined, and leakage was continuously monitored.

  20. Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

  1. D0 Solenoid Commissioning September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1998-10-12

    D-Zero installed a new 2 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet into the central tracking region of the D-Zero detector. This report documents the cryogenic performance of the superconducting solenoid during its first cryogenic operation at Fermilab. By necessity, the liquid helium refrigerator was also operated. This was the second time the refrigerator plant has been operated. The refrigerator's performance is also documented herein.

  2. The superconducting solenoid magnets for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2002-12-22

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a channel of superconducting solenoid magnets. The magnets in MICE are around the RF cavities, absorbers (liquid or solid) and the primary particle detectors [1], [2]. The MICE superconducting solenoid system consists of eighteen coils that are grouped in three types of magnet assemblies. The cooling channel consists of two complete cell of an SFOFO cooling channel. Each cell consists of a focusing coil pair around an absorber and a coupling coil around a RF cavity that re-accelerates the muons to their original momentum. At the ends of the experiment are uniform field solenoids for the particle detectors and a set of matching coils used to match the muon beam to the cooling cells. Three absorbers are used instead of two in order to shield the detectors from dark currents generated by the RF cavities at high operating acceleration gradients.

  3. On the effects of solenoidal and compressive turbulence in pre-stellar cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, O.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of an ensemble of SPH simulations that follow the evolution of pre-stellar cores for 0.2 Myr. All the cores have the same mass, and start with the same radius, density profile, thermal and turbulent energy. Our purpose is to explore the consequences of varying the fraction of turbulent energy, δsol, that is solenoidal, as opposed to compressive; specifically, we consider δsol = 1, 2/3, 1/3, 1/9 and 0. For each value of δsol, we follow 10 different realizations of the turbulent velocity field, in order also to have a measure of the stochastic variance blurring any systematic trends. With low δsol(<1/3), filament fragmentation dominates and delivers relatively high-mass stars. Conversely, with high values of δsol(>1/3) disc fragmentation dominates and delivers relatively low-mass stars. There are no discernible systematic trends in the multiplicity statistics obtained with different δsol.

  4. Effects of Slip Planes on Stresses in MICE Coupling Solenoid Coil Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Cheng, Y.; Green, Michael A

    2010-06-28

    The MICE superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is made from copper matrix Nb-Ti conductors with inner radius of 750 mm, length of 285 mm and thickness of 110.4 mm at room temperature. The coil is to be wound on a mandrel made of aluminum. The peak magnetic field on the conductor is about 7.3 T when fully charged at 210 A. High magnetic field and large size make the stress inside the coupling coil assembly relatively high during cool down and full energizing. The shear stress between coil winding and aluminum casing may cause premature quench. To avoid quench potential induced by stress, slip planes were designed for the coil assembly. In this paper, FE models with and without slip planes for it have been developed to simulate the stresses during the process including winding, cooling down and charging. The stress distribution in the coil assembly with and without slip planes was investigated. The results show that slip planes with low friction coefficients can improve the stress condition in the coil, especially reduce the shear stress largely so that improve the stability.

  5. Tolerance Studies of the Mu2e Solenoid System

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Ambrosio, G.; Buehler, M.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lamm, M.; Miller, J.; Moretti, G.; Ostojic, R.; Page, T.; Popp, J.; Tartaglia, M.

    2014-01-01

    The muon-to-electron conversion experiment at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation. It is composed of three large superconducting solenoids, namely, the production solenoid, the transport solenoid, and the detector solenoid. Each subsystem has a set of field requirements. Tolerance sensitivity studies of the magnet system were performed with the objective of demonstrating that the present magnet design meets all the field requirements. Systematic and random errors were considered on the position and alignment of the coils. The study helps to identify the critical sources of errors and which are translated to coil manufacturing and mechanical support tolerances.

  6. Beam-Based Solenoid Compensation for the PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai

    1999-08-26

    Commissioning the compensation system of the solenoid in the BaBar detector presents a challenging problem due to the complexity of the system, which uses twelve normal quadrupoles and twelve skew quadrupoles in each ring. The setting of these skew quadrupoles needs to be readjusted according to the machine optical parameters since the machines always have some unknown errors. In this paper, we will describe a beam based method to match the coupling and optics in the interaction region to compensate for the optical effects due to the solenoid. The method has been successfully used to find the wrong polarities and the wrong scaling factor of the skew quadrupoles in the early stage of the commissioning. It is being refined to set the skew quadrupoles in the machines in order to reduce the beam size at the interaction point and improve the luminosity of PEP-II.

  7. Research on Key Factors and Their Interaction Effects of Electromagnetic Force of High-Speed Solenoid Valve

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Liyun; Xu, De; Ma, Xiuzhen; Song, Enzhe

    2014-01-01

    Analysis consisting of numerical simulations along with lab experiments of interaction effects between key parameters on the electromagnetic force based on response surface methodology (RSM) has been also proposed to optimize the design of high-speed solenoid valve (HSV) and improve its performance. Numerical simulation model of HSV has been developed in Ansoft Maxwell environment and its accuracy has been validated through lab experiments. Effect of change of core structure, coil structure, armature structure, working air gap, and drive current on the electromagnetic force of HSV has been analyzed through simulation model and influence rules of various parameters on the electromagnetic force have been established. The response surface model of the electromagnetic force has been utilized to analyze the interaction effect between major parameters. It has been concluded that six interaction factors including working air gap with armature radius, drive current with armature thickness, coil turns with side pole radius, armature thickness with its radius, armature thickness with side pole radius, and armature radius with side pole radius have significant influence on the electromagnetic force. Optimal match values between coil turns and side pole radius; armature thickness and side pole radius; and armature radius and side pole radius have also been determined. PMID:25243217

  8. Solenoid Magnet System for the Fermilab Mu2e Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M. J.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Brandt, J.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lopes, M.; Miller, J.; Nicol, T.; Ostojic, R.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Popp, J.; Pronskikh, V.; Tang, Z.; Tartaglia, M.; Wake, M.; Wands, R.; Yamada, R.

    2011-12-14

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoid at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.

  9. Bent Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenney, S.; Miller, J. R.; Prestemon, S.; Wang, S.T.

    1999-03-18

    This report describes some solenoid design work done for the cooling experiment for the muon collider collaboration. This report describes an analysis section of superconducting solenoids that have a center line induction of 3.0 T. The section is bent in the shape of an S. Each bend in the S bends the muon beam one radian (57.3 degrees). The warm bore diameter of the solenoid bent solenoid is 300 to 320 mm. The radius of the bend at the solenoid center line is 1000 mm. This report shows the results of three dimensional field calculations and presents a solenoid design that will include four TPC detectors that are 240 mm in diameter and 550 mm long as well as a 1300 mm long section of 1300 MHz RF cavities. The TPC sections need a solenoid wann bore diameter of about 300 320 mm while RF cavities require a warm bore diameter of 440 mm. The superconducting solenoid design must take into account the varying warm bore diameter requirements for the magnet string yet meet the stringent solenoidal field uniformity requirements within the active volume of the four TPCs.

  10. Failure Scenarios and Mitigations and for the BaBar Superconducting Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, EunJoo; Candia, A.; Craddock, W.W.; Racine, M.; Weisend, J.G., II; /SLAC

    2005-12-13

    The cryogenic department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is responsible for the operation, troubleshooting, and upgrade of the 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid detector for the BABAR B-factory experiment. Events that disable the detector are rare but significantly impact the availability of the detector for physics research. As a result, a number of systems and procedures have been developed over time to minimize the downtime of the detector, for example improved control systems, improved and automatic backup systems, and spares for all major components. Together they can prevent or mitigate many of the failures experienced by the utilities, mechanical systems, controls and instrumentation. In this paper we describe various failure scenarios, their effect on the detector, and the modifications made to mitigate the effects of the failure. As a result of these modifications the reliability of the detector has increased significantly with only 3 shutdowns of the detector due to cryogenics systems over the last 2 years.

  11. Mu2e production solenoid cryostat conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.M.; Peterson, T.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    Mu2e is a muon-to-electron conversion experiment being designed by an international collaboration of more than 65 scientists and engineers from more than 20 research institutions for installation at Fermilab. The experiment is comprised of three large superconducting solenoid magnet systems, production solenoid (PS), transport solenoid (TS) and detector solenoid (DS). A 25 kW, 8 GeV proton beam strikes a target located in the PS creating muons from the decay of secondary particles. These muons are then focused in the PS and the resultant muon beam is transported through the TS towards the DS. The production solenoid presents a unique set of design challenges as the result of high radiation doses, stringent magnetic field requirements, and large structural forces. This paper describes the conceptual design of the PS cryostat and will include discussions of the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation, cooling system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system.

  12. Solenoid magnetic fields calculated from superposed semi-infinite solenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Flax, L.

    1966-01-01

    Calculation of a thick solenoid coils magnetic field components is made by a superposition of the fields produced by four solenoids of infinite length and zero inner radius. The field produced by this semi-infinite solenoid is dependent on only two variables, the radial and axial field point coordinates.

  13. Solenoid Magnet System for the Fermilab Mu2e Experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lamm, M. J.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Brandt, J.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lopes, M.; Miller, J.; Nicol, T.; et al

    2011-12-14

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoidmore » at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.« less

  14. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface. PMID:24593624

  15. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  16. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  17. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Richardson, John G.; Albano, Richard K.; Morrison, Jr., John L.

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized.

  18. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.; Albano, R.K.; Morrison, J.L. Jr.

    1995-11-28

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized. 2 figs.

  19. Charging effects in passivated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, D. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Morley, K. B.; Renshaw Foxford, E.; Komisarcik, K.; Rader, A. J.; Viola, V. E.

    1995-02-01

    Ion-implanted passivated silicon detectors undergo a gradual, then rapid increase in leakage current when exposed to ionizing radiation in the presence of gas between 5-200 Torr. Conditions for generating this effect are discussed and a mechanism is proposed to explain this behavior. Methods for preventing this effect and for recovering detectors damaged in this way are presented.

  20. Effect of strong solenoidal focusing on beam emittance of low-energy intense proton beam in the SARAF LEBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shor, A.; Weissman, L.

    2016-07-01

    Influence of strong solenoidal beam focusing on beam emittance was studied at the SARAF LEBT beam line using 5 mA 20 keV proton quasi-DC beams. The measurements show that within the experimental uncertainties, emittance does not change over the whole focusing range. Detailed beam dynamics simulations were performed to achieve better understanding of the experimental results. The experimental and simulation results are fully consistent with the assumption of nearly full space charge neutralization for the quasi-DC proton beam.

  1. LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, John

    2010-12-10

    The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

  2. Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-11-30

    A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

  3. Study the radiation damage effects in Si microstrip detectors for future HEP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalwani, Kavita; Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh

    2016-07-01

    Silicon (Si) detectors are playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their superior tracking capabilities. In future HEP experiments, like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, the silicon tracking detectors will be operated in a very intense radiation environment. This leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors, which in turn will affect the operating performance of Si detectors. It is important to complement the measurements of the irradiated Si strip detectors with device simulation, which helps in understanding of both the device behavior and optimizing the design parameters needed for the future Si tracking system. An important ingredient of the device simulation is to develop a radiation damage model incorporating both bulk and surface damage. In this work, a simplified two-trap model is incorporated in device simulation to describe the type-inversion. Further, an extensive simulation of effective doping density as well as electric field profile is carried out at different temperatures for various fluences.

  4. The D0 solenoid NMR magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sten Uldall Hansen Terry Kiper, Tom Regan, John Lofgren et al.

    2002-11-20

    A field monitoring system for the 2 Tesla Solenoid of the D0 detector is described. It is comprised of a very small NMR probe cabled to a DSP based signal processing board. The design magnetic field range is from 1.0 to 2.2 Tesla, corresponding to an RF frequency range of 42.57 to 93.67 MHz. The desired an accuracy is one part in 10{sup 5}. To minimize material in the interaction region of the D0 detector, the overall thickness of the NMR probe is 4 mm, including its mounting plate, and its width is 10 mm. To minimize cable mass, 4mm diameter IMR-100A cables are used for transmitting the RF signals from a nearby patch panel 25 meters to each of four probes mounted within the bore of the solenoid. RG213U cables 45 meters long are used to send the RF from the movable counting house to the patch panel. With this setup, the detector signal voltage at the moving counting room is in the range of 250-400 mV.

  5. The Wisconsin Pegasus solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Lesch, B. L.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.; Intrator, T. P.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R.

    1998-05-01

    A 1.6 m long x0.1m diameter coil has just been constructed by the NHMFL for the University of Wisconsin Pegasus Tokamak. It will form the central solenoid for the high plasma energy density fusion machine. The magnet consists of two layers of Glidcop conductor, reinforced with S2 glass, carbon fiber and steel. Normal operating parameters will be 14 T in a 58 mm bore with a number of pulses to 20 T+. Current densities will approach 1 kA/mm2 and the stored energy will be >2 MJ. The philosophy behind the design will be presented and details of the construction and testing will be shown.

  6. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  7. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  8. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: Thermal Contraction Analysis for the D0 Solenoid Chimney

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-09-30

    This engineering note documents the thermal contraction analysis that was done for the D-Zero solenoid chimney. The analysis was done as support of the 'Design Report of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid for the Fermilab DO Detector upgrade.' The cryogenic LHE and LN2 lines were analyzed for combined pressure, thermal movement, and dead weight. The tubing was stress analyzed per ASME code for Pressure Piping, standard ANSI AS:ME B31.3, for eight combinations ofthermal loading. A commercial pipe stress analysis and design system by Algor{reg_sign} was used for the analysis. Stresses calculated were well below allowables. Based on the analysis, the cryogenic lines will be installed at an offset from the vacuum jacket centerline so that during steady state cold operation, the cryogenic lines will be in a proper location.

  9. Radiation effects in IRAS extrinsic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L.; Langford, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    During the calibration and testing of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) focal plane, it was observed that the extrinsic photoconductor detectors were affected by gamma radiation at dose levels of the order of one rad. Since the flight environment will subject the focal plane to dose levels of this order from protons in single pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly, an extensive program of radiation tests was carried out to measure the radiation effects and to devise a method to counteract these effects. The effects observed after irradiation are increased responsivity, noise, and rate of spiking of the detectors after gamma-ray doses of less than 0.1 rad. The detectors can be returned almost to pre-irradiation performance by increasing the detector bias to breakdown and allowing a large current to flow for several minutes. No adverse effects on the detectors have been observed from this bias boost, and this technique will be used for IRAS with frequent calibration to ensure the accuracy of observations made with the instrument.

  10. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: Vacuum Pumping Calculations for the D0 Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-08-02

    This engineering note documents the calculations done to determine the vacuum pumping speed for the D-Zero solenoid. The raw calculations are attached. A summary of the results are listed. The vacuum pumping speed of the solenoid is determined by the conductance of the pumping path. At higher pressure ranges during initial pumpdown, the conductances will be rather high. Calculations were not done for the transient pumpdown period, only the steady state type pumping situation. The pressure is assumed to be on the order of 10E-7 torr. This is the free molecular flow regime based on Knudsen number. This pressure regime is also where the pumping speed would be least. The conductances were calculated based on pumping helium gas at a temperature of 300 Kelvin. The total conductance of the pumping path from the solenoid to the inlet of the turbomolecular pump is 11.8 L/s. The effective pumping speed of a 1000 L/s turbo pump attached to this pumping path is 11.7 L/s. The minimum required pumping speed for design purposes was set at 4.3 L/s. This value was arrived at by assuming a warm leak size (10E-8 atm-cc/sec) was not detected during fabrication of the solenoid. It is then assumed that the leak leaks cold liquid helium into the vacuum space. With this leak rate, a 4.3 L/s pumping speed would be able to maintain a 2 x 10E-7 torr pressure in the solenoid vacuum jacket. The solenoid would be able to be operated with this small leak with continuous pumping.

  11. Scattering detection of a solenoidal Poynting vector field.

    PubMed

    Fardad, Shima; Salandrino, Alessandro; Samadi, Akbar; Heinrich, Matthias; Chen, Zhigang; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2016-08-01

    The Poynting vector S plays a central role in electrodynamics as it is directly related to the power and the momentum carried by an electromagnetic wave. In the presence of multiple electromagnetic waves with different polarizations and propagation directions, the Poynting vector may exhibit solenoidal components which are not associated to any power flow. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the presence of such solenoidal components has physical consequences, and it is not a mere artifact of the gauge invariance of S. In particular, we identify a simple field configuration displaying solenoidal components of S and theoretically show that a judiciously designed scatterer can act as a "Poynting vector detector" which when immersed in such field distribution would experience a transverse optical force orthogonal to the incidence plane. We experimentally validate our theoretical predictions by observing a pronounced asymmetry in the scattering pattern of a spherical nanoparticle. PMID:27472632

  12. Cylindrical magnets and ideal solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derby, Norman; Olbert, Stanislaw

    2010-03-01

    Both wire-wound solenoids and cylindrical magnets can be approximated as ideal azimuthally symmetric solenoids. We present an exact solution for the magnetic field of an ideal solenoid in an easy to use form. The field is expressed in terms of a single function that can be rapidly computed by means of a compact efficient algorithm, which can be coded as an add-in function to a spreadsheet, making field calculations accessible to introductory students. These expressions are not only accurate but are also as fast as most approximate expressions. We demonstrate their utility by simulating the dropping of a cylindrical magnet through a nonmagnetic conducting tube and comparing the calculation with data obtained from experiments suitable for an undergraduate laboratory.

  13. D0 Cryogenic System Superconducting Solenoid Platform I/O

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1997-10-09

    The Dzero detector is scheduled for a major upgrade between 1996 and 1999. This note describes the specifications and configuration of the physical Input/Output devices and instrumentation of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid. The Solenoid and the VLPC cryostats both reside on the detector platform and are cooled by the Dzero Helium Refrigerator. The cryogenic process control s for these two components will be an extension of the TI565 programmable logic controller system used for other Dzero cryogenic controls. Two Input/Output Bases will be installed on the Dzero detector platform near the cryo corner. These I/O bases will handle all the sensor input and process control output devices from the Solenoid and VLPC cryostats. Having the I/O bases installed on the detector platform makes the connecting cabl ing to the platform much easier . All the instruments are wired directly to the I/O base. The bases have only one communications network cabl e that must be routed off the platform to the South side of the Dzero building.

  14. Magnetic design constraints of helical solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-01-30

    Helical solenoids have been proposed as an option for a Helical Cooling Channel for muons in a proposed Muon Collider. Helical solenoids can provide the required three main field components: solenoidal, helical dipole, and a helical gradient. In general terms, the last two are a function of many geometric parameters: coil aperture, coil radial and longitudinal dimensions, helix period and orbit radius. In this paper, we present design studies of a Helical Solenoid, addressing the geometric tunability limits and auxiliary correction system.

  15. The Design and Construction of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bert; Wahrer, Bob; Taylor, Clyde; Xu, L.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, M.; Juang, Tiki; Zisman, Michael S.; Virostek, Steve P.; Green, Michael A.

    2008-08-02

    The purpose of the MICE spectrometer solenoid is to provide a uniform field for a scintillating fiber tracker. The uniform field is produced by a long center coil and two short end coils. Together, they produce 4T field with a uniformity of better than 1% over a detector region of 1000 mm long and 300 mm in diameter. Throughout most of the detector region, the field uniformity is better than 0.3%. In addition to the uniform field coils, we have two match coils. These two coils can be independently adjusted to match uniform field region to the focusing coil field. The coil package length is 2544 mm. We present the spectrometer solenoid cold mass design, the powering and quench protection circuits, and the cryogenic cooling system based on using three cryocoolers with re-condensers.

  16. Linear Coupling for B-Factory Tilted Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.

    2005-02-16

    In this thesis they have presented the transfer matrix for B Factory tilted solenoid with the expansion of magnetic field up to the fifth order. Starting with the general theory of linear coupling, we got the Hamiltonian for solenoid with the bending magnet and quadrupole inside. The solenoid axis is tilted by 20 mrad horizontally w.r.t. the collision axis and at the entrance and the exit of the solenoid the beam will sense transverse and longitudinal non-linear fields. To account both this effects the expansion of the magnetic field was done. The code of coordinate transformation, which relates the frame of the reference orbit to the frame of the collision axis and to the solenoid frame, has been introduced. They tried to show that not symplectic fourth-order Runge Kutta integration method, which had been used for integration of the Hamiltonian equations, might be used as a model for ''not tracking'' problems. The deviation from a symplectic transfer matrix is smaller than 10{sup -5}. Using the transfer matrix, the change in beam shape and blow up of emittance, due to the solenoid coupling, was discussed. In order to compensate this effect they used 4 tilted quadrupoles on each side of the IP. The method based on the Hamiltonian in Eq.19 integrates along a reference orbit which is defined only by the horizontal and vertical bending fields and not by the tilted solenoid. In order to get the Hamiltonian, which is associated with a non-planar curvature of the reference orbit, it is necessary to account the effect of torsion. In that case the transformation between the three different coordinate systems will become more complicated.

  17. Refrigerator and Solenoid Run Summary August/September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1999-09-20

    The helium refrigerator was cooled down and operated for the third time since its installation. D-Zero's 2 Tesla superconducting solenoid was cooled down and operated for its second time since its installation into the D-Zero detector. This engineering note summarizes the cryogenic aspects of the test run and performance measurements made. The main purpose of this run was to do field mapping of the solenoid with different combinations of field polarity on the Solenoid and CF iron magnets. This was accomplished. A second purpose was to test the lower field joint repair that was done in January 1999. This field joint had a measurable voltage drop across the soldered bus splice. The repair was an undoing of the joint, extensive cleaning of the bus, and then welding the splice. The repair was successful, no voltage drop was measured and the magnet behaved nicely. A parasitic purpose was to get some operating time on the refrigerator, measure the refrigeration performance, and measure the heat leak in the VLPC lines mounted on the detector platform. Refrigerator performance was spot checked, and was found to be 60 watts (10%) less than generic operating curves. At this level of performance, the operating margin for the full solenoid and VLPC system will be 75 watts (15%) which is somewhat uncomfortable from an operational stand point. The VLPC lines were operated and heat leak numbers of around 40 watts was measured for each pipe section including the supply u-tubes to the detector, the bayonet can, valve box on the platform and the piping back to the refrigerator valve box. Another purpose of the test run was to test the compatibility of other detector components with the new central magnetic field environment. I do not know the results of these tests.

  18. Casimir interaction between a microscopic dipole oscillator and a macroscopic solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, R.; Dechoum, K.; França, H. M.; Santos, E.

    1998-02-01

    We discuss the interaction between a microscopic electric dipole oscillator and a long solenoid which are separated by a small distance. The solenoid belongs to a simple RLC circuit and the zero point and thermal current fluctuations within the solenoid coils are taken into account. We describe how they affect the equilibrium state and the excited states of the oscillator, thus providing a description of the Casimir interaction of the system. We calculate the modification in the lifetime of the oscillator excited states as a function of the parameters of the circuit, the dipole orientation, and the distance between the dipole and the solenoid. The Casimir force between the solenoid and the electric dipole is calculated, and it is shown that this Casimir interaction always exists, that is, it occurs even when the macroscopic current in the solenoid is zero. We suggest experiments which can exhibit these effects related to the electromagnetic interactions between atoms or molecules and simple circuits.

  19. An ultra-thin-walled solenoid for the CELSIUS/WASA experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruber, R. J. M. Y.; Blom, M.; Calén, H.; Fridén, C.-J.; Larsson, A.; Norman, G.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamaoka, H.; Makida, Y.; Kimura, N.; Tanaka, K.; Iida, M.; Ohhata, H.; Hirabayashi, H.; Takasu, N.; Nawrot, A.

    2003-05-01

    An ultra-thin-walled superconducting warm bore solenoid has been developed for the WASA detector set-up at the CELSIUS accelerator of the The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL), Sweden. It gives a central magnetic field up to 1.3 T, and can be operated in persistent mode. The total thickness of the superconducting coil is 9 mm with an inner diameter of 554 mm and an energy-to-cold-mass ratio of 6 kJ/ kg. The total wall thickness is a record low 0.18 in units of the radiation length ( X0) including the material of the cryostat. The solenoid has been successfully operated in combination with the WASA detector set-up since 1998. The solenoid has a coil split in two parts with a central gap of 40 mm for a tube guiding small frozen hydrogen target pellets into the accelerator beam. The solenoid is fixed by glass-fibre supports. It has a vacuum vessel with 1 mm thick corrugated walls of aluminium and it has high-purity aluminium strips in axial direction to improve heat conduction. The solenoid is enclosed by an iron yoke which shields the detector readout electronics from the magnetic field. A diagnostics, control and safety system has been developed for the solenoid itself and for the associated cryogenics.

  20. Heavy ion physics at LHC with the Compact Muon Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Bedjidian, M.; Contardo, D.; Haroutunian, R.

    1995-07-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), is one of the two detectors proposed to achieve the primary goal of the LHC: the discovery of the Higgs boson(s). For this purpose, the detector is optimized for the precise measurement of muons, photons, electrons and jets. It is a clear motivation to investigate its ability to measure the hard processes probing the formation of a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) in ion collisions. It is the case of the heavy quark bound states, long predicted to be suppressed in a QGP. In CMS they can be detected, via their muonic decay according to the principle adopted for the p-p physics.

  1. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    An ion source which generates ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal magnetic field to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

  2. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, John Paul; Burns, Erskine John Thomas; Draper, Charles Hadley

    1997-01-01

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

  3. D0 Solenoid Chimney Routing Clearances

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1994-02-23

    This engineering note contains information about the measured clearances along the chimney route from the solenoid to the control dewar. This type of information is best conveyed by sketches and a few photos. Twelve photos taken on 2/17/94 are included which gIVe perspective views along the path. The detector was parked in the collision hall on this date. The CF iron was split open to the east and the South EF iron was rolled back. Also the South EndCap Calorimeter was rolled to the south on this day. This allowed personnel access and the photographic opportunity. A full set of raw dimensional sketches are included. These sketches were generated by me using a 25 foot tape measure and a note pad. The sketches are in chronological order with the most recent on top. The first sketch, 5/18/94, describes the 'tightest' location for the upward incline portion of the chimney. The sketches on 2/14/94 thru 2/16/94 are refinements of the early 1992 and 1993 sketches. They pick out quite a bit more detail of specific detector components along the path. The dimensional sketches of 1992 and 1993 gave information in not as much detail and therefore gave a more constrained clearance description. Most of the information of the early sketches was jotted down on the plan view dated 10-29-92. This sketch also had some information lifted from prints which later was superseded by the 1994 sketches. I tried to label components and give views either titled 'Elevation' or 'Plan' which refers to a top view looking down. Also where I could I jotted down direction, ie. South, East etc. Hopefully with a little effort one can decifer it. The curvature of the CC was determined from a three dimensional topographical survey. This survey information is stored in an electronic drawing file 3823.111-ME-317165, 'Solenoid-CC south face 3D shape survey'. The 'z' dimensions for the radial chimney path were picked off this drawing. A curvature was then generated knowing many points by radial and z

  4. Simulation of Electron Cloud Multipacting in Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A

    2004-01-27

    A simulation algorithm is based on a numerical solution of the Vlasov equation for the distribution function of an electron cloud density in a cylindrical vacuum chamber with solenoidal magnetic field. The algorithm takes into consideration space charge effects. This approach improves the simulation of multipacting effects as it is free of statistical fluctuations. Simulation studies were carried for the SLAC B-factory vacuum chamber for different bunch patterns and solenoidal field strength. Space charge and the magnetic field limit the maximum density of the electron cloud. Magnetic resonant damping of multipacting was found in special cases of positron beam parameters and magnetic field amplitude.

  5. A solenoid failure detection system for cold gas attitude control jet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, P. A.

    1970-01-01

    The development of a solenoid valve failure detection system is described. The technique requires the addition of a radioactive gas to the propellant of a cold gas jet attitude control system. Solenoid failure is detected with an avalanche radiation detector located in the jet nozzle which senses the radiation emitted by the leaking radioactive gas. Measurements of carbon monoxide leakage rates through a Mariner type solenoid valve are presented as a function of gas activity and detector configuration. A cylindrical avalanche detector with a factor of 40 improvement in leak sensitivity is proposed for flight systems because it allows the quantity of radioactive gas that must be added to the propellant to be reduced to a practical level.

  6. Studies on the Magnetic Center of the Mu2e Solenoid System

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Ambrosio, G.; Buehler, M.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Khalatian, V.; Lamm, M.; Miller, J.; Moretti, G.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.

    2014-01-01

    The definition of the magnetic center in the Mu2e solenoid system is not trivial given the S-shaped nature of the transport solenoid. Moreover, due to the fringe field of the larger bore adjacent magnets-production solenoid and the detector solenoid-the magnetic center does not coincide with the geometric center of the system. The reference magnetic center can be obtained by tracking a low-momentum charged particle through the whole system. This paper will discuss this method and will evaluate the deviations from the nominal magnetic center given the tolerances in the manufacturing and the alignment of the coils. Methods for the correction of the magnetic center will also be presented.

  7. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: D0 Solenoid Current Leads

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-10-04

    This engineering note documents information gathered and design decisions made regarding the vapor cooled current leads for the D-Zero Solenoid. The decision was made during design group meetings that the D-Zero Solenoid, rated at 4825 amps, should use vapor cooled current leads rated at 6000 amps. CDF uses 6000 amp leads from American Magnetics Inc. (AMI) and has two spares in their storage lockers. Because of the spares situation and AMI's reputation, AMI would be the natural choice of vendor. The manufacturer's listed helium consumption is 19.2 liters/hr. From experience with these types of leads, more stable operation is acheived at an increased gas flow. See attached E-Mail message from RLS. We have decided to list the design flow rate at 28.8 liquid liters/hr in the design report. This corresponds to COFs operating point. A question was raised regarding how long the current leads could last at full current should the vapor cooling flow was stopped. This issue was discussed with Scott Smith from AMI. We do not feel that there is a problem for this failure scenario.

  8. Plans for building the largest thin solenoid ever

    SciTech Connect

    Heim, J.; Bowers, J.; Deis, G.

    1993-09-08

    The superconducting solenoid magnet for the GEM detector poses unusual fabrication and handling challenges because of its extraordinary size. It will be more than 30% larger in diameter than the largest existing particle detector coils. Each of the two coil elements that compose the air-core solenoid, will be about 19 meters in diameter and 15 meters long. Major components weighing as much as 1500 Mg must be transported and manipulated at the Interaction Region 5 (IR5) fabrication site of the SSC Laboratory as the magnets are fabricated. Because of their large size, the magnets will be fabricated, assembled and tested at special purpose facilities at the IR5 site. The site-use plan must accommodate the fabrication of other detector components and the assembly of large flux shaping iron structures in a timely manner to allow subsequent testing and detector assembly. Each cold mass will be composed of twelve 45-Mg coil windings that are joined prior to assembly into the 19-m diam annular cryostat.

  9. Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Smirnov, Alexandre

    2011-09-01

    The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by

  10. Effect of space exposure of pyroelectric infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Pyroelectric detectors are one of many different types of infrared radiation detectors. The pyroelectric detectors are of interest for long term space use because they do not require cooling during operation. Also, they can detect at very long wavelengths and they have a relatively flat spectral response. A disadvantage is that the radiation must be chopped in order to be detected by a pyroelectric detector. The objective was to determine the effects of launch and space exposure on the performance of commercially available pyroelectric detectors. The approach was to measure certain detector parameters before and after flight and try to determine the amount and cause of the degradation. The experiment was passive: no data was taken during flight. It is concluded that lithium-tantalate and strontium-barium-niobate are suitable materials for pyroelectric detectors for long term space applications.

  11. ATMOSPHERIC EFFECTS ON THE PERFORMANCE OF CDZNTE SINGLE CRYSTAL DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Duff, M.; Teague, L.

    2010-05-12

    The production of high-quality ternary single-crystal materials for radiation detectors has progressed over the past 15 years. One of the more common materials being studied is CdZnTe (CZT), which can be grown using several methods to produce detector-grade materials. The work presented herein examines the effects of environmental conditions including temperature and humidity on detector performance [full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)] using the single pixel with guard detector configuration. The effects of electrical probe placement, reproducibility, and aging are also presented.

  12. R&D ERL: HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.; Muratore, J.; Plate, S.

    2010-01-01

    An innovative feature of the ERL project is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The HTS solenoid design offers many advantages because of several unique design features. Typically the solenoid is placed outside the cryostat which means that the beam gets significantly defused before a focusing element starts. In the current design, the solenoid is placed inside the cryostat which provides an early focusing structure and thus a significant reduction in the emittance of the electron beam. In addition, taking full advantage of the high critical temperature of HTS, the solenoid has been designed to reach the required field at {approx}77 K, which can be obtained with liquid nitrogen. This significantly reduces the cost of testing and allows a variety of critical pre-tests which would have been prohibitively expensive at 4 K in liquid helium because of the additional requirements of cryostat and associated facilities.

  13. Note: High temperature pulsed solenoid valve.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Sulkes, Mark

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a high temperature pulsed solenoid valve with reliable long term operation to at least 400 degrees C. As in earlier published designs, a needle extension sealing a heated orifice is lifted via solenoid actuation; the solenoid is thermally isolated from the heated orifice region. In this new implementation, superior sealing and reliability were attained by choosing a solenoid that produces considerably larger lifting forces on the magnetically actuated plunger. It is this property that facilitates easily attainable sealing and reliability, albeit with some tradeoff in attainable gas pulse durations. The cost of the solenoid valve employed is quite low and the necessary machining quite simple. Our ultimate level of sealing was attained by making a simple modification to the polished seal at the needle tip. The same sealing tip modification could easily be applied to one of the earlier high T valve designs, which could improve the attainability and tightness of sealing for these implementations. PMID:20113132

  14. Whistler Wave Excitation and Effects of Self-Focusing on Ion Beam Propagation through a Background Plasma along a Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail, Dorf A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2010-02-02

    This paper extends studies of ion beam transport through a background plasma along a solenoidal magnetic field [I. Kaganovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 103108 (2008)] to the important regime of moderate magnetic field strength satisfying ωce > 2βbωpe . Here, ωce and ω pe are the electron cyclotron frequency and electron plasma frequency, respectively, and βb = vb/ c is the directed ion beam velocity normalized to the speed of light. The electromagnetic field perturbations excited by the ion beam pulse in this regime are calculated analytically, and verified by comparison with the numerical simulations. The degrees of beam charge neutralization and current neutralization are estimated, and the transverse component of the Lorentz force associated with the excited electromagnetic field is calculated. It is found that the plasma response to the ion beam pulse is significantly different depending on whether the value of the solenoidal magnetic field is below or above the threshold value specified by ω cr ce = 2βbωpe, and corresponding to the resonant excitation of large-amplitude whistler waves. The use of intense whistler wave excitations for diagnostic purposes is also discussed.

  15. ITER central solenoid model coil impregnation optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutz, J. B.; Munshi, N. A.; Smith, K. B.

    The success of the vacuum-pressure impregnation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor central solenoid is critical to success of the magnet system. Analysis of fluid flow through a fabric bed is extremely complicated, and complete analytical solutions are not available, but semiempirical methods can be adapted to model these flows. Several of these models were evaluated to predict the impregnation characteristics of a liquid resin through a mat of reinforcing glass fabric, and an experiment was performed to validate these models. The effects of applied pressure differential, glass fibre volume fraction, resin viscosity and impregnation time were examined analytically. From the results of this optimization, it is apparent that use of elevated processing temperature resin systems offer significant advantages in large scale impregnation due to their lower viscosity and longer working life, and they may be essential for large scale impregnations.

  16. Effect of space exposure on pyroelectric infrared detectors (A0135)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J. B.; Clark, I. O.; Crouch, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of long-duration space exposure and launch environment on the performance of pyroelectric detectors which is important for the prediction of performance degradation, setting exposure limits, or determining shielding requirements was investigated. Air pollution monitoring and thermal mapping of the Earth, which includes the remote sensing of aerosols and limb scanning infrared radiometer projects, requires photodetection in the 6- to 20 micro m region of the spectrum. Pyroelectric detectors can detect radiation in the 1- to 100 micro m region while operating at room temperature. This makes tahe pyroelectric detector a prime candidate to fill the thermal infrared detector requirements.

  17. ASTRO-F/FIS observing simulation including detector effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, W.; Pak, S.; Lee, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Kim, M.; Oh, S.; Kaneda, H.; Matsuura, S.; Patrashin, M.; Shibai, H.

    Based on the present hardware specifications and configurations of the ASTRO-F/FIS (Far-Infrared Surveyor), we are developing a software that simulates the observations with this instrument. Various kinds of detector effects affect the quality of the signal obtained from the detector. In order to correct the signal exactly, we need to analyze the characteristics of the detector and simulate various detector effects. In this presentation, we will show the simulated data sets based on the experimental data measured in the laboratory. Using the simulator, we will discuss the effects of cosmic-ray hitting, transient, crosstalk and non-uniformity of detectors, and propose an appropriate methods for the data reduction.

  18. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Cryogenic Line Routing: Refrigerator to VLPC Cryostats & Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1994-10-04

    This engineering note documents the proposed cryogenic line routing from the liquid helium (LHe) refrigeration plant to the detector solenoid and VLPC cryostats. Many figures are included to aid in understanding the route. As an appendix, I include some general comments relevant to the topic. Also listed are a number of routing options that were considered before the proposed route was finalized.

  19. Interference effects in Reticon photodiode array detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, George H.; Sanders, Ryan W.; Brault, James W.

    1992-03-01

    A detector system incorporating the Reticon RL1024S photodiode array has been constructed as part of a double spectrograph to be used to study the earth's atmosphere from ground-based and aircraft-based platforms. To determine accurately the abundances of atmospheric trace gases, this new system must be able to measure spectral absorptions as small as 0.02 percent. The detector exhibits superior signal-to-noise characteristics at the light levels characteristic of scattered skylights, but interference in the passivating layer causes problems in achieving the required precision. The mechanism of the problems and the solution implemented are described in detail.

  20. Designing focusing solenoids for superconducting RF accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; Wokas, T.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    The design of a focusing solenoid for use in a superconducting RF linac requires resolving a range of problems with conflicting requirements. Providing the required focusing strength contradicts the goal of minimizing the stray field on the surfaces of adjacent superconducting RF cavities. The requirement of a compact solenoid, able to fit into a gap between cavities, contradicts the need of mechanical support necessary to restrain electromagnetic forces that can result in coil motion and subsequent quenching. In this report we will attempt to address these and other issues arising during the development of focusing solenoids. Some relevant test data will also be presented.

  1. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leonova, M.

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  2. Earth's stopping effect in directional dark matter detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-02-01

    We explore the stopping effect that results from interactions between dark matter and nuclei as the dark matter particles travel underground towards the detector. Although this effect is negligible for heavy dark matter particles, there is parameter phase space where the underground interactions of the dark matter particles with the nuclei can create observable differences in the spectrum. Dark matter particles that arrive on the detector from below can have less energy from the ones arriving from above. These differences can be potentially detectable by upcoming directional detectors. This can unveil a large amount of information regarding the type and strength of interactions between nuclei and light dark matter candidates.

  3. An Investigation into the Electromagnetic Interactions between a Superconducting Torus and Solenoid for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Fair, Ruben J.; Hogan, John P.; Kashy, David H.

    2015-06-01

    The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade in Hall B will need CLAS12 detector that requires two superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a Toroidal configuration (Torus) and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet (Solenoid). Both the torus and solenoid are located in close proximity to one another and are surrounded by sensitive detectors. This paper investigates the electromagnetic interactions between the two systems during normal operation as well as during various fault scenarios as part of a Risk Assessment and Mitigation (RAM).

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  5. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  6. Effects Of Ionizing Radiation On Cryogenic Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Lakew, B.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1988-04-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. We report here on ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  7. Optical detectors based on thermoelastic effect in crystalline quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelibanov, V. P.; Ishanin, G. G.

    2015-06-01

    Optical detectors developed on base of thermo elastic effect In quartz crystalline (PTEK) attributed to the thermal detectors group. Such detectors occurred very effective for the registration of pulsed light energy or power of harmonically modulated laser radiation flux in a wide spectral (from UV to far IR) and dynamic ranges (from 10-6 to 300 W / cm2 with cooling) with a time constant up to10-6 seconds. When exposed to electromagnetic radiation occurs at the receiver thermal field which causes mechanical stress in the transient crystalline quartz, which in turn leads to a change in the polarization of crystalline quartz and, as a consequence, to an electric potential difference at the electrodes (the front surface with a conductive coating and damper). The capacitive characteristic of the detector, based on a thermo elastic effect in crystalline quartz, eliminates the possibility of working with constant flow of radiation, which also affects at the frequency response of the detector, since the potential difference appearance in the piezoelectric plate depends on the direction of the forces relative to the axes X, Y, Z of the crystal. Therefore, a certain choice of orientation of the receiving element is necessary in accordance with the physical properties of crystalline quartz. In this paper, a calculation of the sensitivity and frequency characteristics of optical detectors based on the thermo elastic effect in crystalline quartz at the harmonic effects of electromagnetic radiation flux are reported.

  8. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  9. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Takahashi, K; Okamura, M; Horioka, K

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons. PMID:26931973

  10. Analysis of eddy current distributions in the CMS magnet yoke during the solenoid discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Klyukhin, V.I.; Campi, D.; Cure, B.; Gaddi, A.; Gerwig, H.; Grillet, J.P.; Herve, A.; Loveless, R.; Smith, R.P.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Flux loops have been installed on selected segments of the magnetic flux return yoke of the 4 T superconducting coil of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector under construction at CERN. Voltages induced in the loops during discharge of the solenoid will be sampled on-line during the entire discharge and integrated off-line to provide a measurement of the initial magnetic flux density in steel at the maximum field to an accuracy of a few percent. Although the discharge of the solenoid is rather slow (190 s time constant), the influence of eddy currents induced in the yoke elements should be estimated. The calculation of eddy currents is performed with Vector Fields program ELEKTRA. The results of calculations are reported.

  11. The upgraded DØ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S. N.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J. T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Angstadt, R.; Anosov, V.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bardon, O.; Barg, W.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Baturitsky, M. A.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Baumbaugh, B.; Beauceron, S.; Begalli, M.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Bishoff, A.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Bockenthien, E.; Bodyagin, V.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Bonamy, P.; Bonifas, D.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Boswell, C.; Bowden, M.; Brandt, A.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, D.; Butler, J. M.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Bystricky, J.; Canal, L.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Casey, D.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chi, E.; Chiche, R.; Cho, D. K.; Choate, R.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Churin, I.; Cisko, G.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Colling, D. J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Das, M.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, W.; De, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; De La Taille, C.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Del Signore, K.; DeMaat, R.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doets, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dvornikov, O.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fagan, J.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Fein, D.; Feligioni, L.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Ferreira, M. J.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Flores, R.; Foglesong, J.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, C.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Gao, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, A.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Geurkov, G.; Ginther, G.; Gobbi, B.; Goldmann, K.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Golovtsov, V.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Gomez, R.; Goodwin, R.; Gornushkin, Y.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graham, D.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Gray, K.; Greder, S.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gu, W.; Guglielmo, J.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggard, E.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hance, R.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Hazen, E.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Hou, S.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Hynek, V.; Huffman, D.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jacquier, Y.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jayanti, R.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, Y.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, P.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Jouravlev, N.; Juarez, M.; Juste, A.; Kaan, A. P.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.

    2006-09-01

    The DØ experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to DØ.

  12. Rapid-Chill Cryogenic Coaxial Direct-Acting Solenoid Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James; Castor, Jim; Sheller, Richard

    2006-01-01

    A commercially available cryogenic direct- acting solenoid valve has been modified to incorporate a rapid-chill feature. The net effect of the modifications is to divert some of the cryogenic liquid to the task of cooling the remainder of the cryogenic liquid that flows to the outlet. Among the modifications are the addition of several holes and a gallery into a valve-seat retainer and the addition of a narrow vent passage from the gallery to the atmosphere.

  13. EFFECTS OF MATERIAL IMPROVEMENT ON CZT DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CHU, M.; CARINI, G.A.; ET AL.

    2006-08-13

    CZT material quality improvement has been achieved by optimizing the crystal growth process. N-type conductivity has been measured on as-grown, undoped, Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te. Cd{sub 0.85}Zn{sub 0.15}Te crystals have been grown. for producing high resistivity CZT radiation detectors. The best FWHM of {sup 57}Co 122KeV spectrum was measured to be 3.7% and ({mu}{tau}){sub e} was 3 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}. The microscopic gamma ray response using a beam size of 10 {micro}m has been used to map the entire 4 mm x 4 mm detector. Several black spots indicating no signal responses were observed while all other areas showed an average of 65-70% collection efficiency. The black spots suggest that at those locations, the Te precipitates are larger than 10 {micro}m. Detailed microscopic infrared transmission measurement on the sample found that most Te precipitates have sizes of 4-6 {micro}m. Theoretical analysis of the results suggests that singly and doubly ionized Te{sub Cd}V{sub Cd}{sup 2} might be the shallow and deep donors previously assigned to Te{sub Cd} by us.

  14. High P/sub T/ detectors for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Trilling, G.H.

    1987-11-01

    Summarized in this report is some of the work done at the recent Workshop on Experiments, Detectors, and Experimental Areas for the Supercollider held at Berkeley. The major goal was to develop an understanding of what complement of detectors would provide the capability for a well-balanced physics program at the SSC. Unlike earlier studies which had emphasized individual components such as tracking, calorimetry, etc., the intention was to focus on complete detectors. The particular detectors discussed in this paper are: the large solenoid detectors, the compact solenoid detectors, the non-magnetic detectors, the dipole detectors and muon detectors. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs. (LSP)

  15. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  16. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled bymore » the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.« less

  17. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  18. Search for Gluino-Mediated Supersymmetry in Events With Bottom-Quark Jets and Missing Transverse Energy With the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-Proton Collisions at 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Harold

    A search is presented for physics beyond the standard model based on events with significant missing transverse energy, at least three jets, and at least one identified bottom-quark jet. The study is based on a sample of 19 fb-1 collected at 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The background from standard model processes is evaluated using data control samples, and a global likelihood fit is performed. The data are found to be consistent with standard model processes, and the results are interpreted in the context of simplified models (SMS). Upper limits on the production cross sections of the T1bbbb and T1tttt SMS new physics scenarios are determined. Gluino masses up to 1170 GeV are excluded for the T1bbbb scenario and up to 1020 GeV for the T1tttt scenario, at 95% confidence level.

  19. Comparison of activation effects in {gamma}-ray detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Truscott, P.R.; Evans, H.E.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L.; Flatman, J.C.; Cosby, M.; Knight, P.; Moss, C.E.

    1996-06-01

    Activation induced by cosmic and trapped radiation in {gamma}-ray detector materials represents a significant source of background for space-based detector systems. Selection of detector materials should therefore include consideration of this background source. Results are presented from measurements of induced radioactivity in different scintillators activated either as a result of irradiation by mono-energetic protons at accelerator facilities, or flight on board the Space Shuttle. Radiation transport computer codes are used to help compare the effects observed from the scintillators, by identifying and quantifying the influence on the background spectra from more than one hundred of the radionuclides produced by spallation. For the space experiment data, the simulation results also permit determination of the contributions to detector activation from the different sources of radiation in the Shuttle cabin.

  20. Lessons Learned for the MICE Coupling Solenoid from the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Li, S. Y.; Zheng, S. X.; Virostek, Steve P.; DeMello, Allen J.; Li, Derun; Trillaud, Frederick; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-05-30

    Tests of the spectrometer solenoids have taught us some important lessons. The spectrometer magnet lessons learned fall into two broad categories that involve the two stages of the coolers that are used to cool the magnets. On the first spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the connection of the cooler 2nd-stage to the magnet cold mass. On the first test of the second spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the cooler 1st-stage temperature and its effect on the operation of the HTS leads. The second time the second spectrometer magnet was tested; the cooling to the cold mass was still not adequate. The cryogenic designs of the MICE and MuCOOL coupling magnets are quite different, but the lessons learned from the tests of the spectrometer magnets have affected the design of the coupling magnets.

  1. Analytical Study of Stress State in HTS Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Terzini, E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    A main challenge for high field solenoids made of in High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) is the large stress developed in the conductor. This is especially constraining for BSCCO, a brittle and strain sensitive ceramic material. To find parametric correlations useful in magnet design, analytical models can be used. A simple model is herein proposed to obtain the radial, azimuthal and axial stresses in a solenoid as a function of size, i.e. self-field, and of the engineering current density for a number of different constraint hypotheses. The analytical model was verified against finite element modeling (FEM) using the same hypotheses of infinite rigidity of the constraints and room temperature properties. FEM was used to separately evaluate the effect of thermal contractions at 4.2 K for BSCCO and YBCO coils. Even though the analytical model allows for a finite stiffness of the constraints, it was run using infinite stiffness. For this reason, FEM was again used to determine how much stresses change when considering an outer stainless steel skin with finite rigidity for both BSCCO and YBCO coils. For a better understanding of the actual loads that high field solenoids made of HTS will be subject to, we have started some analytical studies of stress state in solenoids for a number of constraint hypotheses. This will hopefully show what can be achieved with the present conductor in terms of self-field. The magnetic field (B) exerts a force F = B x J per unit volume. In superconducting magnets, where the field and current density (J) are both high, this force can be very large, and it is therefore important to calculate the stresses in the coil.

  2. Muon Collider Final Cooling in 30-50 T Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Fernow, R.C.; Lederman, J.

    2011-03-28

    Muon ionization cooling to the required normalized rms emittance of 25 microns transverse, and 72 mm longitudinal, can be achieved with liquid hydrogen in high field solenoids, provided that the momenta are low enough. At low momenta, the longitudinal emittance rises from the negative slope of energy loss versus energy. Assuming initial emittances that have been achieved in six dimensional cooling simulations, optimized designs are given using solenoid fields limited to 30, 40, and 50 T. The required final emittances are achieved for the two higher field cases. Preliminary simulations of transverse cooling in hydrogen, at low energies, suggests that muon collider emittance requirements can be met using solenoid fields of 40 T or more. It might also be acceptable with 30 T. But these simulations did not include hydrogen windows,matching or reacceleration, whose performance, with one exception, was based on numerical estimates. Full simulations of more stages are planned. The design and simulation of hydrogen windows must be included, and space charge effects, and absorber heating, calculated.

  3. EFFECT OF TE PRECIPITATES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF CDZNTE DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CARINI, G.A.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; WRIGHT, G.W.; LI, L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2005-09-20

    A recent study of long-drift CdZnTe (CZT) Frisch-ring detectors showed that fluctuations of the collected charge (and device response) depend on the device dimensions and the concentration of Te precipitates in the material. This observation, which could be explained as the cumulative effect of precipitates, led to the investigation of thin (1 mm) planar detectors, where the effects of precipitates can be more clearly ascertained. To perform the investigation, a measurement facility was developed that allowed for high-resolution spatial mapping of the performance of CZT devices. New measurements emerging from this facility provided the first detailed comparisons of the micro-scale X-ray maps and infrared microscopy images for thin CZT samples. Analysis of the data showed conclusively that local deteriorations of device response fully correlate with Te precipitates seen in the IR images. Effects of surface processing conditions on the detector response were also clearly observed.

  4. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  5. High current ion beam transport using solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, R.; Spaedtke, P.

    2008-02-15

    In the framework of the future project FAIR several upgrade programs and construction of new facilities are in progress such as the U{sup 4+} upgrade for the existing high current injector and the new 70 MeV proton injector. For both injectors solenoids in the low energy beam transport section are foreseen to inject the beam into the following rf accelerator. The paper presents beam quality measurements of high current ion beams behind a solenoid using a slit-grid emittance measurement device, viewing targets, and a pepper pot measurement device at the high current test bench at GSI.

  6. Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward

    2004-06-15

    Solenoid transport of high current, heavy ion beams is considered for several stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this option is more efficient than magnetic quadrupole transport at sufficiently low kinetic energy and/or large e/m, and for this reason it has been employed in electron induction linacs. Ideally an ion beam would be transported in a state of Brillouin flow, i.e. cold in the transverse plane and spinning at one half the cyclotron frequency. The design of appropriate solenoids and the equilibrium and stability of transported ion beams are discussed. An outline of application to a fusion driver is also presented.

  7. How current loops and solenoids curve spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füzfa, André

    2016-01-01

    The curved spacetime around current loops and solenoids carrying arbitrarily large steady electric currents is obtained from the numerical resolution of the coupled Einstein-Maxwell equations in cylindrical symmetry. The artificial gravitational field associated to the generation of a magnetic field produces gravitational redshift of photons and deviation of light. Null geodesics in the curved spacetime of current loops and solenoids are also presented. We finally propose an experimental setup achievable with current technology of superconducting coils, that produces a phase shift of light of the same order of magnitude as astrophysical signals in ground-based gravitational wave observatories.

  8. Radiation damage effects in CZT drift strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Joergensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe; Jensen, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    At DSRI, in collaboration with the cyclotron facility at Copenhagen University Hospital, we have performed a study of radiation effects exposing a 2.7 mm thick CZT drift strip detector to 30 MeV protons. The detector characteristics were evaluated after exposure to a number of dose loads in the range from 2*108 to 60*108 p+/cm2. Even for the highest dose loads, which had a dramatic effect on the spectroscopic performance, we were able to recover the detectors after an appropriate annealing procedure. The radiation damage was studied as function of depth inside the detector material. A numerical model that emulates the physical processes of the charge transport in the CZT detector was used to derive the charge trapping parameter , μτe (the product of charge mobility and trapping time) as function of dose. The analysis showed that the electron trapping increased proportional with the proton dose. The radiation contribution to the electron trapping was found to obey the following relation: (μτe)-1rad =(2.5±0.2)*10-7*Φ (V/cm2) with the proton fluence, Φ in p+/cm2. The trapping depth dependence, however, did not agree well the damage profile calculated using the standard Monte Carlo simulations, TRIM for the proton induced radiation effects. The present results suggest that proton induced nuclear reactions contribute significantly to the radiation damage. Further work will elaborate on these effects. The detector energy resolution was investigated as function of proton dose. It was found that the observed degradation is well explained by the decrease of μτe when the fluctuations of the electron path length are taken into account. The proton irradiation produced In meta stable isotopes in the CZT material. Their decay and production yield as function of depth were analyzed.

  9. Some options for the muon collider capture and decay solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael A.

    1996-05-01

    This report discusses some of the problems associated with using solenoid magnets to capture the secondary particles that are created when an intense beam of 8 to 10 GeV protons interacts with the target at the center of the capture region. Hybrid capture solenoids with inductions of 28 T and a 22 T are described. The first 14 to 15 T of the solenoid induction will be generated by a superconducting magnet. The remainder of the field will be generated by a Bitter type of water cooled solenoid. The capture solenoids include a transition section from the high field solenoid to a 7 T decay channel where pions and kaons that come off of the target decay into muons. A short 7 T solenoidal decay channel between the capture solenoid system and the phase rotation system is described. A concept for separation of negative and positive pions and kaons is briefly discussed.

  10. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  11. Bent Solenoids with Superimposed Dipole Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.

    2000-03-21

    A conceptual design and manufacturing technique were developed for a superconducting bent solenoid magnet with a superimposed dipole field that would be used as a dispersion device in the cooling channel of a future Muon Collider. The considered bent solenoid is equivalent to a 180° section of a toroid with a major radius of ~610 mm and a coil aperture of ~416 mm. The required field components of this magnet are 4 tesla for the solenoid field and 1 tesla for the superimposed dipole field. A magnet of this size and shape, operating at these field levels, has to sustain large Lorentz forces resulting in a maximum magnetic pressure of about 2,000 psi. A flexible round mini-cable with 37 strands of Cu-NbTi was selected as the superconductor. Detailed magnetic analysis showed that it is possible to obtain the required superimposed dipole field by tilting the winding planes of the solenoid by ~25°. A complete structural analysis of the coil support system and the helium containment vessel under thermal, pressure, and Lorentz force loads was carried out using 3D finite element models of the structures. The main technical issues were studied and solutions were worked out so that a highly reliable magnet of this type can be produced at an affordable cost.

  12. Solenoid Valve With Self-Compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, Fritz H.; Matsumoto, Yutaka

    1987-01-01

    New solenoid-operated miniature shutoff valve provides self-compensation of differential pressure forces that cause jamming or insufficient valve closure as in single-seal valves. Dual-seal valve is bidirectional. Valve simultaneously seals both inlet and outlet tubes by pressing single disk of silicone rubber against ends of both.

  13. First experiment with the double solenoid RIBRAS system

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Condori, R. Pampa; Lepine-Szily, A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morais, M. C.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V. B.; Gasques, L. R.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Shorto, J. M. B.

    2013-05-06

    A description of the double solenoid system (RIBRAS) operating since 2004 in one of the beam lines of the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo is presented. The recent installation of the secondary scattering chamber after the second solenoid is reported and the first experiment in RIBRAS using both solenoids is described.

  14. Space-Charge Effects in a Gas Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D.D.

    2010-12-03

    Discussion of space-charge effects in a photoluminescence cell that will be used as a nondisruptive total energy monitor at the LCLS facility is presented. Regimes where primary photoelectrons will be confined within the X-ray beam aperture are identified. Effects of the space-charge on the further evolution of the electron and ion populations are discussed. Parameters of the afterglow plasma are evaluated. Conditions under which the detector output will be proportional to the pulse energy are defined.

  15. Polarization effects in thallium bromide x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozorezov, A.; Wigmore, J. K.; Gostilo, V.; Shorohov, M.; Owens, A.; Quarati, F.; Webb, M. A.

    2010-09-15

    We present the results of a detailed experimental study of polarization effects in thallium bromide planar x-ray detectors. Measurements were carried out in the range 10-100 keV by scanning a highly focused x-ray beam, 50 {mu}m in diameter, from a synchrotron source across the detector. Above a certain radiation threshold the detector response showed a systematic degradation of its spectroscopic characteristics, peak channel position, peak height, and energy resolution. Using a pump-and-probe technique, we studied the dynamics of spectral degradation, the spatial extent and relaxation of the polarized region, and the dependence of the detector response on bias voltage and temperature. For comparison, we modeled polarization effects induced by the charging of traps by both electrons and holes using a model based on recent theoretical work of Bale and Szeles. We calculated the charge collection efficiency and spectral line shapes as functions of exposure time, beam position, count rate, and photon energy, and obtained credible agreement with experimental results.

  16. Bent solenoids for spectrometers and emittance exchange sections.

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.

    1999-03-26

    Bent solenoids can be used to transport low energy beams as they provide both confinement and dispersion of particle orbits. Solenoids are being considered both as emittance exchange sections and spectrometers in the muon cooling system as part of the study of the muon collider. They present the results of a study of bent solenoids which considers the design of coupling sections between bent solenoids to straight solenoids, drift compensation fields, aberrations, and factors relating to the construction, such as field ripple, stored energy, coil forces and field errors.

  17. Shielding optimization studies for the detector systems of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.; Lillie, R.A.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1994-09-01

    Preliminary shielding optimization studies for the Superconducting Super Collider`s Solenoidal Detector Collaboration detector system were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1993. The objective of the study was to reduce the neutron and gamma-ray fluxes leaving the shield to a level that resulted in insignificant effects on the functionality of the detector system. Steel and two types of concrete were considered as components of the shield, and the shield was optimized according to thickness, weight, and cost. Significant differences in the thicknesses, weights, and costs were noted for the three optimization parameters. Results from the study are presented.

  18. Optimization of the Mu2e Production Solenoid Heat and Radiation Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronskikh, V. S.; Coleman, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Mokhov, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to study the conversion of a negative muon to electron in the field of a nucleus without emission of neutrinos. Observation of this process would provide unambiguous evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, and can point to new physics beyond the reach of the LHC. The main parts of the Mu2e apparatus are its superconducting solenoids: Production Solenoid (PS), Transport Solenoid (TS), and Detector Solenoid (DS). Being in the vicinity of the beam, PS magnets are most subjected to the radiation damage. In order for the PS superconducting magnet to operate reliably, the peak neutron flux in the PS coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude by means of sophisticatedly designed massive Heat and Radiation Shield (HRS), optimized for the performance and cost. An issue with radiation damage is related to large residual electrical resistivity degradation in the superconducting coils, especially its Al stabilizer. A detailed MARS15 analysis and optimization of the HRS has been carried out both to satisfy the Mu2e requirements to the radiation quantities (such as displacements per atom, peak temperature and power density in the coils, absorbed dose in the insulation, and dynamic heat load) and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of these radiation quantities are reported and optimized HRS models are presented; it is shown that design levels satisfy all requirements.

  19. Determining if an axially rotated solenoid will induce a radial EMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermott, Dustin R.

    The nature of the electromagnetic field of an axially rotated solenoid or magnet is investigated. The investigations reviewed suggest the possibility of a radially emitted electric field by either: axially rotated magnetic field lines, or a relativistic change in charge of the electron. For a very long solenoid a relativistic change in charge leaves no electric field inside while leaving an electric field outside. The concept of axially rotating magnetic field lines gives an opposite prediction. They both seem to be in contradiction to the standard model of induction, which gives no change in the electric field for a rotated solenoid or magnet. An experiment by Joseph B. Tate [48], [49] conducted in 1968 seemed to have measured a change in charge outside of a rotated solenoid. Another experiment by Barnett [3] in 1912 reported measuring no electric field inside of a rotated solenoid. Further experimentation was decided necessary and the method decided upon to attempt detection of the radial E or EMF induced by an axially rotating B field or change in charge is two concentric capacitor plates, one inside and the other outside an axially rotated solenoid. The solenoid was rotated on a lathe for the test. A concentric capacitor around an axially rotated permanent neodymium magnet was also used as a test. These experiments proved very challenging because of the small magnitude of the predicted effect. Nevertheless, the bulk of the evidence obtained indicates that no induced E arises when a magnetic source is rotated about its magnetic axis, thus supporting the standard field model of electromagnetic induction, and casting doubt on the alternative theories of magnetic field line rotation or relativistic charge enhancement.

  20. (Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors)

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the apple of the high energy physicist's eye.'' Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference.

  1. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  2. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi Okamura, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro

    2014-11-10

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 10{sup 11}, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  3. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  4. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, whichmore » was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.« less

  5. Simulation and analysis of solenoidal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alderwick, A. R.; Jardine, A. P.; Hedgeland, H.; MacLaren, D. A.; Allison, W.; Ellis, J.

    2008-12-15

    We present a detailed analysis and simulation of solenoidal, magnetically confined electron bombardment ion sources, aimed at molecular beam detection. The aim is to achieve high efficiency for singly ionized species while minimizing multiple ionization. Electron space charge plays a major role and we apply combined ray tracing and finite element simulations to determine the properties of a realistic geometry. The factors controlling electron injection and ion extraction are discussed. The results from simulations are benchmarked against experimental measurements on a prototype source.

  6. Restoration of the DIII-D solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.M.; Robinson, J.I.; Gonzales, E.; Rolens, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    The DIII-D tokamak has been operated since June 1995 with constrained ohmic heating capability as imposed by the abandonment of half of it`s solenoid system due to a cooling water leak. The solenoid is comprised of A and B windings with separate multiple power leads to each. The cooling water leak occurred in the lead of the B winding. This leak occurred in a remote area under the DIII-D vessel and is believed to be caused by magnetic forces developing cyclic bending loads on the conductor. Visual inspection of the lead using flexible bore scopes indicated that the structural fiberglass overwrap intended to band the supply and return leads into a primary-force canceling group had failed allowing individual conductors to become inadequately supported against bending loads. The overwrap failed as a result of poor epoxy encapsulation of the lead which was manufactured in 1978. Inspection of the A lead confirmed no overwrap failure and that the vacuum encapsulation of the A lead was proper and to specification. In order to continue operations, it was decided to abandon the B winding of the solenoid and operate under reduced (5 V-sec) capability. An in-situ repair approach was mandated by the extensive and lengthy effort required to disassemble, repair, and reassemble the tokamak. Access from outside the tokamak was severely limited. A plan to repair the damaged lead was developed and implemented over a 10 month period. This paper describes the repair of the solenoid lead. A VCR video tape of these remote installation efforts has been assembled and will be shown.

  7. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  8. The Upgraded D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  9. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01

    results obtained with it are also presented. Details of design, fabrication, installation, and operation of magnet systems are not included; here we are concerned with calculations that precede or supplement detailed design. Mathematical derivations are presented with only a moderate number of steps. While there is no claim of originality, except for various numerical approximations and a conceptual induction module design in section 20, many of the results and discussions are not readily available elsewhere. Our primary topic is axisymmetric solenoidal systems with no magnetic materials. These simplifying features allow useful analytical calculations, which occupy sections 2-13. Deviations from axisymmetry are considered in sections 14, 15, 21, 22, and 23 and the effects of magnetic materials are treated in sections 16-20. Since magnetic aberrations are mixed with geometric aberrations in computing ion orbits, section 22 on the ion equations of motion in an arbitrary field is included.

  10. The Effect of Personalization on Smartphone-Based Fall Detectors.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Carlos; Plaza, Inmaculada; Igual, Raúl; Sánchez, Ángel; Castro, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The risk of falling is high among different groups of people, such as older people, individuals with Parkinson's disease or patients in neuro-rehabilitation units. Developing robust fall detectors is important for acting promptly in case of a fall. Therefore, in this study we propose to personalize smartphone-based detectors to boost their performance as compared to a non-personalized system. Four algorithms were investigated using a public dataset: three novelty detection algorithms--Nearest Neighbor (NN), Local Outlier Factor (LOF) and One-Class Support Vector Machine (OneClass-SVM)--and a traditional supervised algorithm, Support Vector Machine (SVM). The effect of personalization was studied for each subject by considering two different training conditions: data coming only from that subject or data coming from the remaining subjects. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was selected as the primary figure of merit. The results show that there is a general trend towards the increase in performance by personalizing the detector, but the effect depends on the individual being considered. A personalized NN can reach the performance of a non-personalized SVM (average AUC of 0.9861 and 0.9795, respectively), which is remarkable since NN only uses activities of daily living for training. PMID:26797614

  11. The Effect of Personalization on Smartphone-Based Fall Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Carlos; Plaza, Inmaculada; Igual, Raúl; Sánchez, Ángel; Castro, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The risk of falling is high among different groups of people, such as older people, individuals with Parkinson's disease or patients in neuro-rehabilitation units. Developing robust fall detectors is important for acting promptly in case of a fall. Therefore, in this study we propose to personalize smartphone-based detectors to boost their performance as compared to a non-personalized system. Four algorithms were investigated using a public dataset: three novelty detection algorithms—Nearest Neighbor (NN), Local Outlier Factor (LOF) and One-Class Support Vector Machine (OneClass-SVM)—and a traditional supervised algorithm, Support Vector Machine (SVM). The effect of personalization was studied for each subject by considering two different training conditions: data coming only from that subject or data coming from the remaining subjects. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was selected as the primary figure of merit. The results show that there is a general trend towards the increase in performance by personalizing the detector, but the effect depends on the individual being considered. A personalized NN can reach the performance of a non-personalized SVM (average AUC of 0.9861 and 0.9795, respectively), which is remarkable since NN only uses activities of daily living for training. PMID:26797614

  12. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R.; Coleman, J.; Sharp, W.; Bieniosek, F.; Friedman, A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.M.; Faltens, A.; Vay, J.L.; Prost, L.

    2007-06-04

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam.

  13. Electrons in a Positive-Ion Beam with Solenoid or Quadrupole Magnet Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Seidl, P A; Bieniosek, F M; Coleman, J E; Faltens, A; Roy, P K; Vay, J L; Prost, L

    2007-06-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam.

  14. Space-Charge Effects in the Gas Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Hau-Riege, S; Bionta, R

    2007-09-24

    Discussion of space-charge effects in a photoluminescence cell that will be used as a non-disruptive total energy monitor at the LCLS facility is presented. Regimes where primary photoelectrons will be confined within the X-ray beam aperture are identified. Effects of the space-charge on the further evolution of the electron and ion populations are discussed. Parameters of the afterglow plasma are evaluated. Conditions under which the detector output will be proportional to the pulse energy are defined.

  15. Preliminary result of rapid solenoid for controlling heavy-ion beam parameters of laser ion source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Okamura, M.; Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Kanesue, T.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.

    2015-03-13

    To realize a heavy ion inertial fusion driver, we have studied a possibility of laser ion source (LIS). A LIS can provide high current high brightness heavy ion beams, however it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters. To overcome the issue, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The rapid ramping magnetic field could enhance limited time slice of the current and simultaneously the beam emittance changed accordingly. This approach may also useful to realize an ion source for HIF power plant.

  16. Functional and Genomic Analyses of Alpha-Solenoid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, David; Palidwor, Gareth A.; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Szengel, Angelika; Schaefer, Martin H.; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-solenoids are flexible protein structural domains formed by ensembles of alpha-helical repeats (Armadillo and HEAT repeats among others). While homology can be used to detect many of these repeats, some alpha-solenoids have very little sequence homology to proteins of known structure and we expect that many remain undetected. We previously developed a method for detection of alpha-helical repeats based on a neural network trained on a dataset of protein structures. Here we improved the detection algorithm and updated the training dataset using recently solved structures of alpha-solenoids. Unexpectedly, we identified occurrences of alpha-solenoids in solved protein structures that escaped attention, for example within the core of the catalytic subunit of PI3KC. Our results expand the current set of known alpha-solenoids. Application of our tool to the protein universe allowed us to detect their significant enrichment in proteins interacting with many proteins, confirming that alpha-solenoids are generally involved in protein-protein interactions. We then studied the taxonomic distribution of alpha-solenoids to discuss an evolutionary scenario for the emergence of this type of domain, speculating that alpha-solenoids have emerged in multiple taxa in independent events by convergent evolution. We observe a higher rate of alpha-solenoids in eukaryotic genomes and in some prokaryotic families, such as Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes, which could be associated to increased cellular complexity. The method is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/~ard2/. PMID:24278209

  17. Superconducting solenoid model magnet test results

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Dimarco, J.; Feher, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Hess, C.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Terechkine, I.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Superconducting solenoid magnets suitable for the room temperature front end of the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (formerly known as Proton Driver), an 8 GeV superconducting H- linac, have been designed and fabricated at Fermilab, and tested in the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We report here results of studies on the first model magnets in this program, including the mechanical properties during fabrication and testing in liquid helium at 4.2 K, quench performance, and magnetic field measurements. We also describe new test facility systems and instrumentation that have been developed to accomplish these tests.

  18. Microwave detectors based on the spin-torque diode effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopenko, O. V.; Slavin, A. N.

    2015-05-01

    The spin-transfer torque (STT) effect provides a new method of manipulation of magnetization in nanoscale objects. The STT effect manifests itself as a transfer of spin angular momentum between the parallel magnetic layers separated by a nonmagnetic spacer and traversed by a dc electric current. The transfer of the spin angular momentum from one layer to another could result in the excitation of the microwave-frequency magnetization dynamics in one of the magnetic layers. On the other hand, when a magnetization dynamics is excited in a magnetic layered structure by an external microwave signal both the structure electrical resistance and current through the structure will acquire microwave components resulting in the appearance of a rectified dc voltage on the magnetic structure. This "spin-torque diode effect" can be used for the development of ultra-sensitive spin-torque microwave detectors (STMD). Below we present a brief review of our recent work on the general properties of STMDs, analyze the performance of the "resonance-type" and "threshold-type STMD" and consider the possible applications for such microwave detectors.

  19. Engineering Sheets of 12 Metre Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Krienen, Frank

    1981-03-30

    The solenoid design follows closely the considerations qiven in {bar p} note 116. In particular we try to make the solenoid undivided, but with a centre tap for the cooling water. We found a variant for the centre tap, so that the two layers are now electrically in series. Due to the very long length, it seems better not to fill the clearance between return yoke and OD of the second layer with epoxy. Instead, we support and adjust the coil every 2 m with three bolts at 120 deqrees screwed in the return yoke. The latter is then supposed to be sufficiently stiff, so as to give the weaker mandrel the desired straightness. We give a positive pitch, i.e. somewhat more than the width of the copper section including insulation and tolerances. The precise pitch cannot be stated here, because the copper section will be somewhat trapezoidal. How much, depends on the winding procedure. The layers are epoxy impregnated and solidair with the mandrel. The Figures show an axial section and the construction of the central water tap. The dimensions shown are on the assumption of a free choice of the diameters of return yoke and mandrel. This may not be the case, and a reshuffling of the dimensions may be needed.

  20. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of new Solid State Detector Technology as Particle Detectors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shappirio, M.; Babu, S. R.; Herrero, F. A.; Yan, F.; Funsten, H. O.; Harper, R.

    2005-05-01

    There is great interest in expanding the use of solid state detectors (SSD) in the field of particle detection. For instance, extending the sensitivity of the detectors to lower energy particles could allow for simpler and thus smaller instrument designs. Several new technologies have been introduced recently in the region of semiconductor material for SSDs. This work will compare some of the more promising technologies to SSD material currently being used. In particular recent results from several laboratories make it possible to compare the properties of "100% internal quantum efficiency silicon photodiode", delta doped silicon, and silicon carbide (SiC) detectors and to compare these new technologies to pure silicon and germanium SSDs. The properties of interest are the detectors gain, ability to withstand the temperature extremes of space environments, radiation hardness, and responses to incident particles mass and energy particularly at low energies.

  1. The HERMES Recoil Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.

    2006-07-11

    The HERMES Collaboration is installing a new Recoil Detector to upgrade the spectrometer for measurements of hard exclusive electron/positron scattering reactions, in particular deeply virtual Compton scattering. These measurements will provide access to generalised parton distributions and hence to the localisation of quarks inside hadrons and to their orbital angular momentum. The HERMES Recoil Detector consists of three active components: a silicon detector surrounding the target cell inside the beam vacuum, a scintillating fibre tracker and a photon detector consisting of three layers of tungsten/scintillator. All three detectors are located inside a solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. The Recoil Detector was extensively tested with cosmic muons over the summer of 2005 and is being installed in the winter of 2005/6 for data taking until summer 2007.

  2. The Compact Muon Solenoid Heavy Ion program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Pablo Yepes

    2005-12-15

    The Pb-Pb center of mass energy at the LHC will exceed that of Au-Au collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. The interest of the Heavy Ion (HI) Physics at LHC is discussed in more detail in the LHC-USA white paper and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Heavy Ion proposal. A few highlights are presented in this document. Heavy ion collisions at LHC energies will explore regions of energy and particle density significantly beyond those reachable at RHIC. The energy density of the thermalized matter created at the LHC is estimated to be 20 times higher than at RHIC, implying an initial temperature, which is greater than at RHIC by more than a factor of two. The higher density of produced partons also allows a faster thermalization. As a consequence, the ratio of the quark-gluon plasma lifetime to the thermalization time increases by a factor of 10 over RHIC. Thus the hot, dense systems created in HI collisions at the LHC spend most of the time in a purely partonic state. The longer lifetime of the quark-gluon plasma state widens significantly the time window available to probe it experimentally. RHIC experiments have reported evidence for jet production in HI collisions and for suppression of high p{sub T} particle production. Those results open a new field of exploration of hot and dense nuclear matter. Even though RHIC has already broken ground, the production rates for jets with p{sub T} > 30 GeV are several orders of magnitude larger at the LHC than at RHIC, allowing for systematic studies with high statistics in a clean kinematic region. High p{sub T} quark and gluon jets can be used to study the hot hadronic medium produced in HI interactions. The larger Q{sup 2} causes jets to materialize very soon after the collision. They are thus embedded in and propagate through the dense environment as it forms and evolves. Through

  3. Residual magnetism holds solenoid armature in desired position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. P.

    1967-01-01

    Holding solenoid uses residual magnetism to hold its armature in a desired position after excitation current is removed from the coil. Although no electrical power or mechanical devices are used, the solenoid has a low tolerance to armature displacement from the equilibrium position.

  4. Optimum dimensions of power solenoids for magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaznacheyev, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Design optimization of power solenoids for controllable and stabilizable magnetic suspensions with force compensation in a wind tunnel is shown. It is assumed that the model of a levitating body is a sphere of ferromagnetic material with constant magnetic permeability. This sphere, with a radius much smaller than its distance from the solenoid above, is to be maintained in position on the solenoid axis by balance of the vertical electromagnetic force and the force of gravitation. The necessary vertical (axial) force generated by the solenoid is expressed as a function of relevant system dimensions, solenoid design parameters, and physical properties of the body. Three families of curves are obtained which depict the solenoid power for a given force as a function of the solenoid length with either outside radius or inside radius as a variable parameter and as a function of the outside radius with inside radius as a variable parameter. The curves indicate the optimum solenoid length and outside radius, for minimum power, corresponding to a given outside radius and inside radius, respectively.

  5. Solenoid permits remote control of stop watch and assures restarting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kodai, C.

    1964-01-01

    Stop watch which may be remotely controlled by the use of a solenoid mechanism is described. When the solenoid is energized, the coil spring pulls the lever arm and starts the balance wheel. When it is not energized, the spring pulls the lever and stops the watch.

  6. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth; Condit, William C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

  7. Performance of solenoids versus quadrupoles in focusing and energy selection of laser accelerated protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Using laser accelerated protons or ions for various applications—for example in particle therapy or short-pulse radiographic diagnostics—requires an effective method of focusing and energy selection. We derive an analytical scaling for the performance of a solenoid compared with a doublet/triplet as function of the energy, which is confirmed by TRACEWIN simulations. Generally speaking, the two approaches are equivalent in focusing capability, if parameters are such that the solenoid length approximately equals its diameter. The scaling also shows that this is usually not the case above a few MeV; consequently, a solenoid needs to be pulsed or superconducting, whereas the quadrupoles can remain conventional. It is also important that the transmission of the triplet is found only 25% lower than that of the equivalent solenoid. Both systems are equally suitable for energy selection based on their chromatic effect as is shown using an initial distribution following the RPA simulation model by Yan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 135001 (2009PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.135001].

  8. Radiation and thermal analysis of production solenoid for Mu2e experimental setup

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Muon-to-Electron (Mu2e) experiment at Fermilab, will seek the evidence of direct muon to electron conversion at the sensitivity level where it cannot be explained by the Standard Model. An 8-GeV 25-kW proton beam will be directed onto a tilted gold target inside a large-bore superconducting Production Solenoid (PS) with the peak field on the axis of {approx}5T. The negative muons resulting from the pion decay will be captured in the PS aperture and directed by an S-shaped Transport Solenoid towards the stopping target inside the Detector Solenoid. In order for the superconducting magnets to operate reliably and with a sufficient safety margin, the peak neutron flux entering the coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude that is achieved by means of a sophisticated absorber placed in the magnet aperture. The proposed absorber, consisting of W- and Cu-based alloy parts, is optimized for the performance and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of energy deposition and radiation are reported. The results of the PS magnet thermal analysis, coordinated with the coil cooling scheme, are reported as well for the selected absorber design.

  9.  Note: High temperature pulsed solenoid valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Sulkes, Mark

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a high temperature pulsed solenoid valve with reliable long term operation to at least 400 °C. As in earlier published designs, a needle extension sealing a heated orifice is lifted via solenoid actuation; the solenoid is thermally isolated from the heated orifice region. In this new implementation, superior sealing and reliability were attained by choosing a solenoid that produces considerably larger lifting forces on the magnetically actuated plunger. It is this property that facilitates easily attainable sealing and reliability, albeit with some tradeoff in attainable gas pulse durations. The cost of the solenoid valve employed is quite low and the necessary machining quite simple. Our ultimate level of sealing was attained by making a simple modification to the polished seal at the needle tip. The same sealing tip modification could easily be applied to one of the earlier high T valve designs, which could improve the attainability and tightness of sealing for these implementations.

  10. The DARHT-II-DC Final Focus Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.C.

    2000-03-06

    The baseline DARHT2 external beam uses a pulsed solenoid final focus lens. The design of this lens was presented at TOS2 and has been considered as the final focus lens in all of the Livermore beamlines for DARHT2. In this note, we consider a new alternative DC final focus solenoid. A crude comparison between the parameters of these two designs is given in table 1. The small spot size required by the radiography and the small drift distance available between the last magnetic focusing element and the final focus solenoid imposed by the close proximity between the DARHT 2 building and the DARHT 1 axis, implies a short focal length solenoid. This in turn requires that the final focus solenoid mount inside the re-entrant cavity of the containment vessel in order to accommodate the 0.9 meter conjugate: figure 1. The ID of this cavity is 13.88 inches (35.25 cm).

  11. The CMS muon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomelli, P.

    2002-02-01

    The muon detection system of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment is described. It consists of three different detector technologies: drift tubes in the barrel region, cathode strip chambers in the endcap region and resistive plate chambers in both barrel and endcap regions. The CMS muon detection system ensures excellent muon detection and efficient triggering in the pseudorapidity range 0< η<2.4. The most recent developments and some results from the R&D program will also be discussed.

  12. Ice Detector and Deicing Fluid Effectiveness Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. Lee B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An ice detector and deicing fluid effectiveness monitoring system for an aircraft is disclosed. The ice detection portion is particularly suited for use in flight to notify the flight crew of an accumulation of ice on an aircraft lifting and control surfaces, or helicopter rotors, whereas the deicing fluid effectiveness monitoring portion is particularly suited for use on the ground to notify the flight crew of the possible loss of the effectiveness of the deicing fluid. The ice detection portion comprises a temperature sensor and a parallel arrangement of electrodes whose coefficient of coupling is indicative of the formation of the ice, as well as the thickness of the formed ice. The fluid effectiveness monitoring portion comprises a temperature sensor and an ionic-conduction cell array that measures the conductivity of the deicing fluid which is indicative of its concentration and, thus, its freezing point. By measuring the temperature and having knowledge of the freezing point of the deicing fluid, the fluid effectiveness monitoring portion predicts when the deicing fluid may lose its effectiveness because its freezing point may correspond to the temperature of the ambient.

  13. D-Zero Cryogenic System VLPC & Solenoid Vacuum System Instrumentation, Control, and Logic

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1998-01-16

    The DZERO VLPC Cryostat and the Superconducting Solenoid both require an insulating Vacuum of 10{sup -5} Torr or less. There is a vacuum system on the Detector Platform consisting of 2 Turbomolecular vacuum pumps and their associated piping, valves, instrumentation that are dedicated to this task. This vacuum equipment requires an operator interface and control logic in order to function properly. The operator interface allows an operator to monitor, control and configure the proper pumping setup required at any given time. The control logic is needed to protect the Vacumm vessels and Vacuum equipment from catastrophic events that may harm them. This is typically done with interlock chains or strings.

  14. Resin Permeation Through Compressed Glass Insulation for Iter Central Solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R.; Roundy, F.; Martovetsky, N.; Miller, J.; Mann, T.

    2010-04-01

    Concern has been expressed about the ability of the resin system to penetrate the compressed dry glass of the turn and layer insulation during vacuum-pressure impregnation of ITER Central Solenoid (CS) modules. The stacked pancake layers of each module result in compression loads up to 9×104 kg (100 tons) on the lowest layers of each segment. The objective of this program was to assess the effects of this compressive load on resin permeation under resin-transfer conditions and with materials identical to that expected to be used in actual coil fabrication [45-50 °C, vacuum of 133 Pa (1 torr), DGEBF/anhydride epoxy resin system, E-glass satin weave, applied pressure of 125 kPa]. The experimental conditions and materials are detailed and the permeation results presented in this paper.

  15. A new muon-pion collection and transport system design using superconducting solenoids based on CSNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Ran; Liu, Yan-Fen; Xu, Wen-Zhen; Ni, Xiao-Jie; Pan, Zi-Wen; Ye, Bang-Jiao

    2016-05-01

    A new muon and pion capture system is proposed for the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), currently under construction. Using about 4% of the pulsed proton beam (1.6 GeV, 4 kW and 1 Hz) of CSNS to bombard a cylindrical graphite target inside a superconducting solenoid, both surface muons and pions can be acquired. The acceptance of this novel capture system - a graphite target wrapped up by a superconducting solenoid - is larger than the normal muon beam lines using quadrupoles at one side of the separated muon target. The muon and pion production at different capture magnetic fields was calculated using Geant4. The bending angle of the capture solenoid with respect to the proton beam was also optimized in simulation to achieve more muons and pions. Based on the layout of the muon experimental area reserved at the CSNS project, a preliminary muon beam line was designed with multi-purpose muon spin rotation areas (surface, decay and low-energy muons). Finally, high-flux surface muons (108/s) and decay muons (109/s) simulated by G4beamline will be available at the end of the decay solenoid based on the first phase of CSNS. This collection and transport system will be a very effective beam line at a proton current of 2.5 μA. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11527811)

  16. ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2009-06-11

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  17. ITER Central Solenoid Coil Insulation Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Mann Jr, Thomas Latta; Miller, John L; Freudenberg, Kevin D; Reed, Richard P; Walsh, Robert P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2010-01-01

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4x4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  18. Radiation damage effects by electrons, protons, and neutrons in Si/Li/ detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y. M.; Coleman, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The degradation in performance of lithium-compensated silicon nuclear particle detectors induced by irradiation at room temperature with 0.6-MeV and 1.5-MeV electrons, 1.9-MeV protons, and fast neutrons from a plutonium-beryllium source has been investigated. With increasing fluence, the irradiations produced an increase of detector leakage current, noise, capacitance, and a degradation in the performance of the detector as a charged-particle energy spectrometer. Following the irradiations, annealing effects were observed when the detectors were reverse-biased at their recommended operating voltages. Upon removal of bias, a continuous degradation of detector performance characteristics occurred. Detectors which had been damaged by electrons and protons exhibited a stabilization in their characteristics within two weeks after irradiation, whereas detectors damaged by neutrons had a continuous degradation of performance over a period of several months.

  19. Velocity effects on an accelerated Unruh-DeWitt detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolrahimi, Shohreh

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the response of an Unruh-DeWitt detector moving along an unbounded spatial trajectory in a two-dimensional spatial plane with constant independent magnitudes of both the four-acceleration and of a timelike proper time derivative of the four-accelration. In a Fermi-Walker frame moving with the detector, the direction of the acceleration rotates at a constant rate around a great circle. This is the motion of a charge in a uniform electric field when in the frame of the charge there is both an electric and a magnetic field. We compare the response of this detector to a detector moving with constant velocity in a thermal bath of the corresponding temperature for non-relativistic velocities and two regimes: ultraviolet and infrared. In the infrared regime, the detector in the Minkowski space-time moving along the spatially two-dimensional trajectory should move with a higher speed to keep up with the same excitation rate of the inertial detector in a thermal bath. In the ultraviolet regime, the dominant modification in the response of this detector compared with the blackbody spectrum of Unruh radiation is the same as the dominant modification perceived by a detector moving with constant velocity in a thermal bath.

  20. Note: A simple model for thermal management in solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, E. M. Ellis, J.

    2013-11-15

    We describe a model of the dynamical temperature evolution in a solenoid winding. A simple finite element analysis is calibrated by accurately measuring the thermally induced resistance change of the solenoid, thus obviating the need for accurate knowledge of the mean thermal conductivity of the windings. The model predicts quasi thermal runaway for relatively modest current increases from the normal operating conditions. We demonstrate the application of this model to determine the maximum current that can be safely applied to solenoids used for helium spin-echo measurements.

  1. The Results of Tests of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2009-10-19

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The spectrometer magnets are the largest magnets in both mass and surface area within the MICE ooling channel. Like all of the other magnets in MICE, the spectrometer solenoids are kept cold using 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) pulse tube coolers. The MICE spectrometer solenoid is quite possibly the largest magnet that has been cooled using small coolers. Two pectrometer magnets have been built and tested. This report discusses the results of current and cooler tests of both magnets.

  2. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Pipe Sizing for Solenoid / VLPC Cryogenic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; Sakla, Steve; /Fermilab

    1995-02-20

    The addition of a solenoid magnet and VLPC detectors are two of a number of upgrades which will occur at the D-Zero detector in the near future. Both of these upgrades will require cryogenic services for their operation. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the pipe/tube size choices made for these cryogenic services. This was done by calculating the required flow rates to cool down the magnet and VLPC's over a reasonable length of time and to determine the required piping sizes for a given allowable pressure drop. The pressure drops for steady state conditions also are addressed. The cool down requirements drove the pipe size decision. The raw engineering calculations that were done for this project are included as an appendix to this note. The body of this document discusses the methods and results of the calculations. As a quick summary, Figures 1 and 2 show the size selections. Tables 1 and 2 give a more detailed size and description of each section of Solenoid and VLPC transfer line.

  3. High intensity neutrino source superconducting solenoid cyrostat design

    SciTech Connect

    Page, T.M.; Nicol, T.H.; Feher, S.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) is involved in the development of a 100 MeV superconducting linac. This linac is part of the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) R&D Program. The initial beam acceleration in the front end section of the linac is achieved using room temperature spoke cavities, each of which is combined with a superconducting focusing solenoid. These solenoid magnets are cooled with liquid helium at 4.5K, operate at 250 A and have a maximum magnetic field strength of 7.5 T. The solenoid cryostat will house the helium vessel, suspension system, thermal shield, multilayer insulation, power leads, instrumentation, a vacuum vessel and cryogenic distribution lines. This paper discusses the requirements and detailed design of these superconducting solenoid cryostats.

  4. Solenoid valve design minimizes vibration and sliding wear problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillon, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Two-way cryogenic solenoid valve resists damage from vibration and metallic interfacial sliding. The new system features a flat-faced armature guided by a flexure disk which eliminates sliding surfaces and is less subject to contamination and wear.

  5. Solenoid operated safety valve and submersible pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, T.M.; Perkins, D.H.

    1989-01-17

    A submersible pump and solenoid operated safety valve system is described for use in a borehole, comprising: a submersible pump driven by an electric motor positioned down in a borehole and connected to conduit means to produce a flow of well fluids within the borehole toward the surface; a solenoid operated safety valve connected to interrupt the flow of well fluids toward the surface in response to the interruption of current to the solenoid holding the safety valve in an open condition; a surface control unit; a downhole control unit positioned down in the borehole and connected to the surface control unit and to the motor of the pump by means of an electrical cable; means for supplying AC electrical power from the surface unit down the conductors of the cable; and means mounted within the downhole control unit for providing electric current for operating the solenoid to open the safety valve.

  6. 25. DETAIL OF SOLENOID BOX FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DOORS ON NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF SOLENOID BOX FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DOORS ON NORTH SIDE OF SLC-3W MST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. Summary of Session 6: Aging Effects in RPC Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, Jaroslav

    2003-09-26

    Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors are a very important part of present and future large-scale experiments. The present B-factory experiments, Belle and BaBar, operate at much larger luminosity (>3 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}) compared to their predecessors at LEP, where the RPC rates were not much higher than cosmic ray rates. Both Belle and BaBar RPC detectors operate in streamer mode. On the other hand, the LHC RPC detectors will operate in proportional mode, which is advantageous in terms of lower accumulated charge per track; however, it may be offset by considerably higher rates, assuming that the aging scales simply as total accumulated charge. The fear that the LHC RPC detectors may encounter similar difficulties as the B-factory RPCs prompted a very intensive R&D effort of rate-related deterioration.

  8. Radio frequency interference effect on PN code sequence lock detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, Hyuck M.; Tu, Kwei; Loh, Y. C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors find the probabilities of detection and false alarm of the pseudonoise (PN) sequence code lock detector when strong radio frequency interference (RFI) hits the communications link. Both a linear model and a soft-limiter nonlinear model for a transponder receiver are considered. In addition, both continuous wave (CW) RFI and pulse RFI are analyzed, and a discussion is included of how strong CW RFI can knock out the PN code lock detector in a linear or a soft-limiter transponder. As an example, the Space Station Freedom forward S-band PN system is evaluated. It is shown that a soft-limiter transponder can protect the PN code lock detector against a typical pulse RFI, but it can degrade the PN code lock detector performance more than a linear transponder if CW RFI hits the link.

  9. Dispersion in a bent-solenoid channel with symmetric focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2001-08-21

    Longitudinal ionization cooling of a muon beam is essential for muon colliders and will be useful for neutrino factories. Bent-solenoid channels with symmetric focusing has been considered for beam focusing and for generating the required dispersion in the ``emittance exchange'' scheme of longitudinal cooling. In this paper, we derive the Hamiltonian that governs the linear beam dynamics of a bent-solenoid channel, solve the single-particle dynamics, and give equations for determining the latticefunctions, in particular, the dispersion functions.

  10. Effects of induced charge in the kinestatic charge detector.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, D J; Terwilliger, R A

    1995-05-01

    The principle of the kinestatic charge detector (KCD) for digital radiography depends on the synchronization of the scan velocity of a parallel plate drift chamber with the cation drift velocity. Compared with line-beam scanners, this motion-compensated imaging technique makes better use of the x-ray tube output. A Frisch grid traditionally has been used within the KCD to minimize unwanted signal contributions from both cations and negative charge carriers during irradiation. In this work the charge induction process in a parallel plate geometry was investigated for the special case of the KCD. In the limit of infinite plates, the cathode charge density due to both cations and negative charge carriers increases quadratically in time for a kinestatically scanned narrow slit. In the KCD the cathode is segmented into an array of narrow electrodes, each aligned with the incident x-ray beam. Our conformal mapping computation determined that the shape of the induced charge signal depends critically on delta x/w, the ratio of electrode width to drift gap. Our conclusion introduces the possibility of eliminating the Frisch grid from the KCD design because the value of delta x/w required for transverse sampling in the KCD is sufficiently low as to allow "self-gridding" to take effect. PMID:7643803

  11. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. A.; Smits, R. G.; Taylor, J. D.; Vanslyke, V.; Barrera, F.; Petersen, H.; Rago, C. E.; Rinta, R. I.; Talaska, D.; Watt, R. D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin.

  12. EFFECTS OF P / N IN HOMOGENEITY ON CDZNTE RADIATION DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CHU,M.; TERTERIAN,S.; TING,D.; JAMES,R.B.; SZAWLOWSKI,M.; VISSER,G.J.

    2002-07-08

    Spectrometer grade, room-temperature radiation detectors have been produced on Cd{sub 0.90}Zn{sub 0.10}Te grown by the low-pressure Bridgman technique. Small amount of indium has been used to compensate the uncompensated Cd vacancies for the crystals to be semi-insulating. The properties of the detectors are critically dependent on the amount of excess Te introduced into the growth melts of the Cd{sub 0.90}Zn{sub 0.10}Te crystals and the best detectors are fabricated from crystals grown with 1.5% excess Te. Detector resolution of {sup 57}Co and {sup 241}Am radiation peaks are observed on all detectors except the ones produced on Cd{sub 0.90}Zn{sub 0.10}Te grown from the melt in the stoichiometric condition. The lack of resolution of these stoichiometric grown detectors is explained by a p/n conduction-type inhomogeneity model.

  13. Backreaction and the Unruh effect: New insights from exact solutions of uniformly accelerated detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.-Y.; Hu, B. L.

    2007-09-15

    Using nonperturbative results obtained recently for a uniformly accelerated Unruh-DeWitt detector, we discover new features in the dynamical evolution of the detector's internal degree of freedom, and identified the Unruh effect derived originally from time-dependent perturbation theory as operative in the ultraweak coupling and ultrahigh acceleration limits. The mutual interaction between the detector and the field engenders entanglement between them, and tracing out the field leads to a mixed state of the detector even for a detector at rest in Minkowski vacuum. Our findings based on this exact solution show clearly the differences from the ordinary result where the quantum field's backreaction is ignored in that the detector no longer behaves like a perfect thermometer. From a calculation of the evolution of the reduced density matrix of the detector, we find that the transition probability from the initial ground state over an infinitely long duration of interaction derived from time-dependent perturbation theory is existent in the exact solution only in transient under special limiting conditions corresponding to the Markovian regime. Furthermore, the detector at late times never sees an exact Boltzmann distribution over the energy eigenstates of the free detector, thus in the non-Markovian regime covering a wider range of parameters the Unruh temperature cannot be identified inside the detector.

  14. Solenoid-free plasma start-up in spherical tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, R.; Shevchenko, V. F.

    2014-10-01

    The central solenoid is an intrinsic part of all present-day tokamaks and most spherical tokamaks. The spherical torus (ST) confinement concept is projected to operate at high toroidal beta and at a high fraction of the non-inductive bootstrap current as required for an efficient reactor system. The use of a conventional solenoid in a ST-based fusion nuclear facility is generally believed to not be a possibility. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is therefore an area of extensive worldwide research activity. Solenoid-free plasma start-up is also relevant to steady-state tokamak operation, as the central transformer coil of a conventional aspect ratio tokamak reactor would be located in a high radiation environment but would be needed only during the initial discharge initiation and current ramp-up phases. Solenoid-free operation also provides greater flexibility in the selection of the aspect ratio and simplifies the reactor design. Plasma start-up methods based on induction from external poloidal field coils, helicity injection and radio frequency current drive have all made substantial progress towards meeting this important need for the ST. Some of these systems will now undergo the final stages of test in a new generation of large STs, which are scheduled to begin operations during the next two years. This paper reviews research to date on methods for inducing the initial start-up current in STs without reliance on the conventional central solenoid.

  15. Dynamic magnetic shield for the CLAS12 central TOF detector photomultiplier tubes

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-01

    The Central Time-of-Flight detector for the Jefferson Laboratory 12-GeV upgrade is being designed with linear-focused photomultiplier tubes that require a robust magnetic shield against the CLAS12 main 5-T solenoid fringe fields of 100 mT (1 kG). Theoretical consideration of a ferromagnetic cylinder in an axial field has demonstrated that its shielding capability decreases with increasing length. This observation has been confirmed with finite element analysis using Poisson model software. Several shields composed of coaxial ferromagnetic cylinders have been studied. All difficulties caused by saturation effects were overcome with a novel dynamical shield, which utilizes a demagnetizing solenoid between the shielding cylinders. Basic dynamical shields for ordinary linear-focused 2-in. photomultiplier tubes were designed and tested both with models and experimental prototypes at different external field and demagnetizing current values. Our shield design reduces the 1 kG external axial field by a factor of 5000.

  16. Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

    2011-09-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

  17. On The Solenoidal Heat Flux in Quasi-Ballistic Thermal Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, Ashok; Bowers, John

    The Boltzmann transport equation for phonons is recast directly in terms of the heat-flux by means of iteration followed by truncation at the second order in the spherical harmonic expansion of the distribution function. This procedure displays the heat-flux in an explicitly coordinate-invariant form, and leads to a natural decomposition into two components, namely the solenoidal component in addition to the usual irrotational component. The solenoidal heat-flux is explicitly shown to arise in a right-circular cylinder when the transport is in the quasi-ballistic regime. These findings are important in the context of phonon resonators that utilize the strong quasi-ballistic thermal transport reported recently in silicon membranes at room temperature. Effects due to circulating heat fluxes are noted in the effective thermal conductivity of silicon discs. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation, USA under Project Number CMMI-1363207.

  18. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, Zakaria, Lambang, Lullus; Triyono, Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-03-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  19. CALCULATIONS FOR A MERCURY JET TARGET IN A SOLENOID MAGNET CAPTURE SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    GALLARDO, J.; KAHN, S.; PALMER, R.B.; THIEBERGER, P.; WEGGEL, R.J.; MCDONALD, K.

    2001-06-18

    A mercury jet is being considered as the production target for a muon storage ring facility to produce an intense neutrino beam. A 20 T solenoid magnet that captures pions for muon production surrounds the mercury target. As the liquid metal jet enters or exits the field eddy currents are induced. We calculate the effects that a liquid metal jet experiences in entering and exiting the magnetic field for the magnetic configuration considered in the Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study II.

  20. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  1. Dead-time effects in microchannel-plate imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.; Fraser, George W.

    1991-01-01

    The observed counting rates of microchannel plate (MCP) based detectors for high resolution observations of celestial EUV and X-ray sources vary over many orders of magnitude; the counting capability of an individual channel, however, is not high, and is associated with dead-times ranging from 0.1 msec to 1 sec. The dead-time increases with the area illuminated; attention is presently given to laboratory determinations of the count rate characteristics of a MCP detector as a function of illuminated area, and a model is developed for these results' use in the interpretation of space observations.

  2. The GlueX Detector

    SciTech Connect

    David Lawrence

    2009-12-01

    The GlueX detector is being built along with the new experimental Hall D at Jefferson lab as part of the 12~GeV upgrade project which received CD-3 approval in fall 2008. GlueX is a fixed target experiment built around a 2~Tesla superconducting solenoid having charged particle tracking and calorimetry with large acceptance. A high rate DAQ system consisting of pipeline electronics will allow the detector to operate at high luminosity ($10^{8}$ tagged $\\gamma$/sec on target). Details on the photon beam and GlueX detector are given including capabilities in resolutions and rates.

  3. Variable force solenoid pressure control for an automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Lemieux, G.E.

    1989-05-30

    This patent describes a hydraulic pressure control circuit for an automatic transmission having fluid pressure operated clutch and brake servo. The controlling transmission consists of: a pump and a main pressure regulator valve means for establishing a regulated pressure in the control circuit; a variable force solenoid valve means for developing a pressure proportional to engine torque including a variable force solenoid connected to pressure regulating portions of the torque proportional pressure; a torque signal passage connecting to the variable force solenoid valve means with the pressure regulator valve means whereby the regulated pressure level maintained by the main regulator valve means is controlled in response to changes in the torque proportional pressure; and a variable force solenoid pressure relief valve means communicating with the torque signal passage and with the variable force solenoid valve means whereby the variable force solenoid valve means is adapted to regulate and to develop a pressure of reduced value relative to the regulated pressure of the main pressure regulator valve means as it establishes the torque proportional pressure, the solenoid pressure relief valve means comprising a pressure regulating valve spool, a valve chamber receiving the spool. The spool and the valve chamber having registering valve lands, a valve spring on one side of the spool urging the spool in one direction, a first pressure area on the pool being exposed to the torque proportional pressure, a second pressure area on the valve spool exposed to the pressure of reduced value whereby the spring, the pressure of reduced value and the torque proportional pressure establish a balanced force on the spool.

  4. Solenoid-free startup experiments in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Leuer, J. A.; Cunningham, G.; Mueller, D.; Brooks, N. H.; Eldietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jackson, G. L.; Lohr, J.; Politzer, P. A.; Pinsker, R. I.; Prater, R.; Taylor, P. L.; Walker, M. L.; Budny, R. V.; Gates, D.A.; Nagy, Alex; Hahn, S. H.; Oh, Y. K.; Yoon, S. W.; Yu, J.H.; Murakami, Masanori; Park, J. M.; Sontag, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    A series of DIII-D experiments was performed to investigate the potential for initiating plasma current using only poloidal field coils located outside the DIII-D central solenoid, i.e. 'solenoid-free'. Plasma current to 166 kA was achieved using 2-3MW of electron cyclotron (EC) heating and was limited by coil and power supply constraints. Flux conversion to plasma current was similar to standard DIII-D startup with some degradation at higher plasma current associated with stray fields and vertical stability issues. In preliminary solenoid-free experiments, neutral beam (NB) current drive (CD) levels were small and attributed to reduced CD efficiency associated with low electron temperature produced by the low current, low confinement plasma. Lack of plasma radial position control also contributed to a reduction of NBCD. Similarly, ECCD was small owing to low plasma temperature and outside EC launch which is required in the solenoid-free scenario. Synergistic experiments were carried out using standard solenoid initiated plasmas in order to study noninductive CD in limited, Lmode plasmas, typical of that generated by solenoid-free startup. While substantial noninductive current can be driven, self-sustaining levels of noninductive current have not yet been achieved with our present six-source co-injection NB system combined with EC and fast wave systems. At low plasma current and high levels of localized EC heating, substantial MHD is generated and this was seen to severely limit plasma performance. Although further optimization is possible in the limited plasma regime, full noninductive, steady-state operation may require diverted plasma with H-mode quality confinement. Discharges obtained during the solenoid-free campaign are compared with results of previous DIII-D campaigns aimed at achieving a steady state, noninductive CD solution.

  5. Confinement physics for thermal, neutral, high-charge-state plasmas in nested-well solenoidal traps.

    PubMed

    Dolliver, D D; Ordonez, C A

    1999-06-01

    A theoretical study is presented which indicates that it is possible to confine a neutral plasma using static electric and solenoidal magnetic fields. The plasma consists of equal temperature electrons and highly stripped ions. The solenoidal magnetic field provides radial confinement, while the electric field, which produces an axial nested-well potential profile, provides axial confinement. A self-consistent, multidimensional numerical solution for the electric potential is obtained, and a fully kinetic theoretical treatment on axial transport is used to determine an axial confinement time scale. The effect on confinement of the presence of a radial electric field is explored with the use of ion trajectory calculations. A thermal, neutral, high-charge-state plasma confined in a nested-well trap opens new possibilities for fundamental studies on plasma recombination and cross-field transport processes under highly controlled conditions. PMID:11969700

  6. The effect of spacers on the performance of Micromegas detectors: A numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Purba; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Majumdar, Nayana; Bhattacharya, Sudeb

    2015-09-01

    Micromegas detector is considered to be a promising candidate for a large variety of high-rate experiments. Micromegas of various geometries have already been established as appropriate for these experiments for their performances in terms of gas gain uniformity, energy and space point resolution, and their capability to efficiently pave large read-out surfaces with minimum dead zone. The present work investigates the effect of spacers on different detector characteristics of Micromegas detectors having various amplification gaps and mesh hole pitches. Numerical simulation has been used as a tool of exploration to evaluate the effect of such dielectric material on detector performance. Some of the important and fundamental characteristics such as electron transparency, gain and signal of the Micromegas detector have been estimated.

  7. Finite mirror effects in advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Andrew P.; Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Tsang, David; Bondarescu, Mihai

    2008-02-01

    Thermal noise is expected to be the dominant source of noise in the most sensitive frequency band of second-generation, ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. Reshaping the beam to a flatter, wider profile which probes more of the mirror surface reduces this noise. The “Mesa” beam shape has been proposed for this purpose and was subsequently generalized to a family of hyperboloidal beams with two parameters: twist angle α and beam width D. Varying α allows a continuous transition from the nearly flat (α=0) to the nearly concentric (α=π) Mesa beam configurations. We analytically prove that in the limit D→∞ hyperboloidal beams become Gaussians. The ideal beam choice for reducing thermal noise is the widest possible beam that satisfies the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) diffraction loss design constraint of 1 part per million (ppm) per bounce for a mirror radius of 17 cm. In the past the diffraction loss has often been calculated using the clipping approximation that, in general, underestimates the diffraction loss. We develop a code using pseudospectral methods to compute the diffraction loss directly from the propagator. We find that the diffraction loss is not a strictly monotonic function of beam width, but has local minima that occur due to finite mirror effects and leads to natural choices of D. For an α=π Mesa beam a local minimum occurs at D=10.67cm and leads to a diffraction loss of 1.4 ppm. We then compute the thermal noise for the entire hyperboloidal family. We find that if one requires a diffraction loss of strictly 1 ppm, the α=0.91π hyperboloidal beam is optimal, leading to the coating thermal noise (the dominant source of noise for fused-silica mirrors) being lower by about 10% than for a Mesa beam while other types of thermal noise decrease as well. We then develop an iterative process that reconstructs the mirror to specifically account for finite mirror effects. This allows us to increase the

  8. Finite mirror effects in advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Andrew P.; Bondarescu, Ruxandra; Tsang, David; Bondarescu, Mihai

    2008-02-15

    Thermal noise is expected to be the dominant source of noise in the most sensitive frequency band of second-generation, ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. Reshaping the beam to a flatter, wider profile which probes more of the mirror surface reduces this noise. The 'Mesa' beam shape has been proposed for this purpose and was subsequently generalized to a family of hyperboloidal beams with two parameters: twist angle {alpha} and beam width D. Varying {alpha} allows a continuous transition from the nearly flat ({alpha}=0) to the nearly concentric ({alpha}={pi}) Mesa beam configurations. We analytically prove that in the limit D{yields}{infinity} hyperboloidal beams become Gaussians. The ideal beam choice for reducing thermal noise is the widest possible beam that satisfies the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory) diffraction loss design constraint of 1 part per million (ppm) per bounce for a mirror radius of 17 cm. In the past the diffraction loss has often been calculated using the clipping approximation that, in general, underestimates the diffraction loss. We develop a code using pseudospectral methods to compute the diffraction loss directly from the propagator. We find that the diffraction loss is not a strictly monotonic function of beam width, but has local minima that occur due to finite mirror effects and leads to natural choices of D. For an {alpha}={pi} Mesa beam a local minimum occurs at D=10.67 cm and leads to a diffraction loss of 1.4 ppm. We then compute the thermal noise for the entire hyperboloidal family. We find that if one requires a diffraction loss of strictly 1 ppm, the {alpha}=0.91{pi} hyperboloidal beam is optimal, leading to the coating thermal noise (the dominant source of noise for fused-silica mirrors) being lower by about 10% than for a Mesa beam while other types of thermal noise decrease as well. We then develop an iterative process that reconstructs the mirror to specifically account for finite

  9. Quantitative SPECT brain imaging: Effects of attenuation and detector response

    SciTech Connect

    Gilland, D.R.; Jaszczak, R.J.; Bowsher, J.E.; Turkington, T.G.; Liang, Z.; Greer, K.L.; Coleman, R.E. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-06-01

    Two physical factors that substantially degrade quantitative accuracy in SPECT imaging of the brain are attenuation and detector response. In addition to the physical factors, random noise in the reconstructed image can greatly affect the quantitative measurement. The purpose of this work was to implement two reconstruction methods that compensate for attenuation and detector response, a 3D maximum likelihood-EM method (ML) and a filtered backprojection method (FB) with Metz filter and Chang attenuation compensation, and compare the methods in terms of quantitative accuracy and image noise. The methods were tested on simulated data of the 3D Hoffman brain phantom. The simulation incorporated attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Bias and standard deviation of reconstructed voxel intensities were measured in the gray and white matter regions. The results with ML showed that in both the gray and white matter regions as the number of iterations increased, bias decreased and standard deviation increased. Similar results were observed with FB as the Metz filter power increased. In both regions, ML had smaller standard deviation than FB for a given bias. Reconstruction times for the ML method have been greatly reduced through efficient coding, limited source support, and by computing attenuation factors only along rays perpendicular to the detector.

  10. A simulation study on angular and micro pattern effects in GEM detectors.

    PubMed

    Kim, H G; Jamil, M; Rhee, J T; Ahmad, Farzana; Jeon, Y J

    2016-04-01

    A useful approach for the enhancement of thermal neutrons detection has been reported here. This technique, based on the angular and micro pattern effects, has been developed and applied to the boron-coated ((10)B) Gas Electron multiplier (GEM) detector. In the angular effect case, as a general rule, the detector device is turned at an angle which improves the device response per unit area of the detector. While for the latter case, a regular pattern in the form of micrometer deep grooves is fabricated onto the converter coating, consequently it enhances the capture probability of the detector. For the current study, both of these techniques using a (10)B-coated GEM detector have been simulated for low energy neutrons. For the evaluation of detector response thermal neutrons in the energy ranges from 25meV to 100meV were transported onto the detector surface. For this work, FLUKA MC code has been utilized. The output in both cases has been estimated as a function of incident thermal neutron energies. By employing both techniques, the angle and the micro pattern dependent efficiencies for (10)B-coated GEM detectors are presented, which indicate an improved efficiency response of the device. We anticipate that by using these modifications can lead a further forward step in the development and improvement of thermal neutron detection technology. PMID:26773818

  11. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: Solenoid Insulatiing Vacuum Vessels; Relief Path Capacity Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; Bell, D.; /Fermilab

    1993-05-26

    This engineering note documents the calculations done to determine the relief capacity of the solenoid vacuum pumping line. The calculations were done by David Bell, a co-op student from the University of Wisconsin. The calculations are attached. The conclusion is that the vacuum pumping line has a venting capacity of 129 g/s warm helium or 298 g/s warm nitrogen. Both of these capacities are much larger than the expected operating mass flow rates of the liquid helium (5 to 15 g/s) or liquid nitrogen (2 or 3 g/s) circuits. The calculations assume the solenoid vacuum vessel is at 3 psig and the relief plate is set at 1.5 psig. Additional calculations were done to prove that the venting capacity of the vacuum pumping line exceeded flowrates due to a failure mode. These calculations are attached. Since the system is not finalized, (pipe sizes not determined, components sized...) the calculations were done by first picking reasonable line sizes based on known allowed pressure drops in the system and then doing a maximum delivery rate calculation if a line was completely severed in the vacuum space of the solenoid/control dewar. The numbers from these calculations say that failure mode flow rates are 80 g/s liquid helium or 80 g/s liquid nitrogen. Both these values are less than the capacity of the relief line. In the five months since the (12/92 Dave Bell) calculations were done, some changes occured to the relief path. The most notable is that the radiation shield is now considered to be 6.625-inch O.D. instead of 6.00-inch used in the venting calculation. This change would tend to lower the capacity numbers. Another change was that for about half the venting path the chimney vacuum shell size was increased to 10-inch pipe. This change tends to increase the capacity numbers which were done assuming 8-inch pipe. These changes taken together probably offset each other or make the capacity numbers better. In either case, since the margin of safety is large, the

  12. Dense Metal Plasma in a Solenoid for Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-10-30

    Space-charge neutralization is required to compress and focus a pulsed, high-current ion beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described approaches to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary space-charge compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means, by an array of movable Langmuir probes, by a small single probe, and by evaluating Stark broadening of the Balmer H beta spectral line. In the main approach described here, the plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. It is shown that the plasma is essentially hollow, as determined by the structure of the magnetic field, though the plasma density exceeds 1014 cm-3 in practically all zones of the solenoid volume if the ring electrode is placed a few centimeters off the center of the solenoid. The plasma is non-uniform and fluctuating, however, since its density exceeds the ion beam density it is believed that this approach could provide a practical solution to the space charge neutralization challenge.

  13. Discrimination of nuclear and electronic recoil events using plasma effect in germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.-Z.; Liu, J.; Mei, D.-M.

    2016-07-01

    We report a new method of using the plasma time difference, which results from the plasma effect, between the nuclear and electronic recoil events in high-purity germanium detectors to distinguish these two types of events in the search for rare physics processes. The physics mechanism of the plasma effect is discussed in detail. A numerical model is developed to calculate the plasma time for nuclear and electronic recoils at various energies in germanium detectors. It can be shown that under certain conditions the plasma time difference is large enough to be observable. The experimental aspects in realizing such a discrimination in germanium detectors is discussed.

  14. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: Heat Load Calculations for the Solenoid Chimney

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-05-26

    This engineering note documents the calculations done to determine the chimney heat loads. These heat load numbers were reported in the D0 solenoid upgrade design report. The heat loads to the LN2 circuit were done by Andrew Stefanik, RDIMechanical Systems group. They were part of his LN2 shield calculations dated 2/23/93. Pages 1 thru 3 of his calculations that apply to the chimney are attached. The heat loads to the LHe circuit were done originally on 12/16/92 and then revised on 12/23/92 to be more conservative. The raw calculations are attached. I include both the original 12/16 version and the 12/23 revised version to document the amount of conservativeness added.

  15. Parasitic antenna effect in terahertz plasmon detector array for real-time imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Ryu, Min Woo; Rok Kim, Kyung; Han, Seong-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The performance uniformity of each pixel integrated with a patch antenna in a terahertz plasmon detector array is very important in building the large array necessary for a real-time imaging system. We found a parasitic antenna effect in the terahertz plasmon detector whose response is dependent on the position of the detector pixel in the illumination area of the terahertz beam. It was also demonstrated that the parasitic antenna effect is attributed to the physical structure consisting of signal pads, bonding wires, and interconnection lines on a chip and a printed circuit board. Experimental results show that the performance of the detector pixel is determined by the sum of the effects of each parasitic antenna and the on-chip integrated antenna designed to detect signals at the operating frequency. The parasitic antenna effect can be minimized by blocking the interconnections with a metallic shield.

  16. Improvement of terahertz field effect transistor detectors by substrate thinning and radiation losses reduction.

    PubMed

    Coquillat, Dominique; Marczewski, Jacek; Kopyt, Pawel; Dyakonova, Nina; Giffard, Benoit; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-01-11

    Phenomena of the radiation coupling to the field effect transistors based terahertz (THz) detectors are studied. We show that in the case of planar metal antennas a significant portion of incoming radiation, instead of being coupled to the transistors, is coupled to an antenna substrate leading to responsivity losses and/or cross-talk effects in the field effect based THz detector arrays. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the responsivity versus substrate thickness are performed. They clearly show how to minimize the losses by the detector/ array substrate thinning. In conclusion simple quantitative rules of losses minimization by choosing a proper substrate thickness of field effect transistor THz detectors are presented for common materials (Si, GaAs, InP, GaN) used in semiconductor technologies. PMID:26832258

  17. Space weather effects on Solid State detectors on low altitude polar orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesnes Ødegaard, Linn-Kristine; Sandanger, Marit; Søraas, Finn; Nesse Tyssøy, Hilde; Stadsnes, Johan

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the degradation of the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) on board the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) with respect to isolated events that severely accelerate the detector degradation. It is known that the proton detectors of the MEPED instrument are subjected over time to radiation damage. This is manifested with an increase in the energy thresholds of the detectors due to a thicker dead layer at the front of the detector as well as damage to the silicon lattice within the detector leading to reduced charge collection. By comparing energy spectra of old and recently launched POES the changes in the energy levels of the detectors can be monitored. Our preliminary analyses indicates that, on top of the gradually increase in the energy levels, there are rapid changes in these levels during SEP (Solar Energetic Particle) events and geomagnetic storms. These single events thus accelerate the degradation of the detectors, and can give information on Space Weather effects on satellite instrumentation.

  18. The STAR detector magnet subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.L.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    The RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) Accelerator currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory will have large detectors at two of its six intersection regions. One of these detectors, known as STAR (Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC), weighs 1100 tons and is being built around a large solenoid magnet. The magnet is 7.32 in in diameter, 7.25 m long and utilizes three different sizes of room temperature aluminum coils. The magnet will operate with a field set from 0.25 T to 0.5 T and have a field uniformity of better than 1000 ppm over a portion of its interior region. This paper describes the magnet design, fabrication and assembly requirements and presents the current construction status.

  19. Spectral line-diode registry effects with photodiode array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Eckels, D.E.

    1986-05-01

    A limitation of photodiode array detectors for spectroscopic intensity measurements relates to the spacing of the diodes and the errors generated when a spectral line is not in exact registry with the diode or diodes from which its intensity is being measured. These misregistry intensity errors, which may be as high as 25 to 30%, are documented for a range of spectral bandwidths and for single diode (pixel) intensities and multiple diode summations of intensities.

  20. Constructing a 4-TESLA Large Thin Solenoid at the Limit of what can BE Safely Operated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.

    The 4-tesla, 6 m free bore CMS solenoid has been successfully tested, operated and mapped at CERN during the autumn of 2006 in a surface hall and fully recommissioned in the underground experimental area in the autumn of 2008. The conceptual design started in 1990, the R&D studies in 1993, and the construction was approved in 1997. At the time the main parameters of this project were considered beyond what was thought possible as, in particular, the total stored magnetic energy reaches 2.6 GJ for a specific magnetic energy density exceeding 11 kJ/kg of cold mass. During this period, the international design and construction team had to make several important technical choices, particularly mechanical ones, to maximize the chances of reaching the nominal induction of 4 T. These design choices are explained and critically reviewed in the light of what is presently known to determine if better solutions would be possible today for constructing a new large high-field thin solenoid for a future detector magnet.

  1. A Superconducting Solenoid for Heavy Ion Beam Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Kawaguchi, Takeo; Imai, Yoshio; Minato, Tsuneaki; Seo, Kazutaka

    1997-05-01

    A superconducting solenoid has been constructed to use as a final focusing element at the entrance of the projectile fragment separator RIPS (T. Kubo et al, Nucl. Instr. & Meth. B70 (1992) 309) at RIKEN. The design field on axis is 6 tesla, the average current density being 9,600 A/cm^2. The overall coil length is 1.1 meter, and the coil is divided into three sections of equal length to ease winding and possibly to distribute the stored energy. A major feature of the magnet is that cooling is conductive without LHe involved, using a cryocooler directly attached onto the coil. The solenoid is currently being tested, and the test results will be presented. After magnet testing, the solenoid will be installed in the beamline. The results of beam experiment will also be presented, along with calculation results with TRANSPORT.

  2. Ohmic-heating solenoid design utilizing forced-cooled windings

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, V.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of using NbTi internally cooled cable superconductor (ICCS) in the ohmic-heating central solenoid for the fusion engineering device (FED). The ICCS conductor provides cryostable operation with liberal stability margin. The forced cooled concept has a high winding current density which reduces the size and the cost of the device. The forced-cooled concept requires complex helium manifolding, but a unique approach has been developed to solve the problem. The conductor design, the winding design, and the performance analyses are described. The solenoid is designed to operate at 8-T peak field and provides 60 MAT. The operating current for the solenoid is 21.3 kA, which is 60% of the critical current at 8 T.

  3. Precision Motion Control of Linear DC Solenoid Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeharu; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    High speed and high precision control has been required in various cases. Hence, a new linear actuator based on Linear DC Solenoid Motor (LDSM), is developed for that purpose. In addition, we propose a precision motion control for LDSM. LDSM is composed of solenoid stator and moving permanent magnet. It has simple and light structure. Moreover, the solenoid form provides small leakage and generates more power than non-linear motor. Nevertheless, the nonlinear disturbance force such as friction force prevents LDSM from controlling precisely. In this paper, the high gain disturbance observer is applied to LDSM to suppress the force. The observer is able to estimate and compensate the nonlinear disturbance force. It is confirmed that the proposed precision motion control provides LDSM with precise observer control position and force through the experiments.

  4. The magnetic design and field measurement of Fermilab collider detectors: CDF (the Collider Detector at Fermilab) and D0

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.

    1990-02-01

    General magnetic characteristics of the CDF and D0 hadron collider detectors at Fermilab are described. The method and equipment for the field measurement for both detectors are described, and their field measurement data are presented. The magnetic field distribution inside the CDF solenoid magnet was measured extensively only at the boundaries, and the field values inside the volume were reconstructed. The effects due to the joints and the return conductor were measured and are discussed. The flux distribution inside the yokes and the fringing field of the D0 toroids were calculated and compared with measured data. A proposal to generate dipole magnetic field inside the D0 toroidal magnet is discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  5. The Results of Recent MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoid Test

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-10-15

    The MICE spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The MICE spectrometer solenoids may be the largest magnets that have been cooled using small two stage coolers. During the previous test of this magnet, the cooler first stage temperatures were too high. The causes of some of the extra first stage heat load has been identified and corrected. The rebuilt magnet had a single stage GM cooler in addition to the three pulse tube coolers. The added cooler reduces the temperature of the top of the HTS leads, the shield and of the first stage of the pulse tube coolers.

  6. Note: An improved solenoid driver valve for miniature shock tubes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, P T

    2016-05-01

    A solenoid driver valve has been built to improve the operating performance of diaphragmless shock tubes, which are used for high pressure, high temperature chemical kinetics, and fluid mechanics studies. For shock tube driver application, the most important characteristics are those of sealing, strength, and quality of the generated shock waves and repeatability of opening characteristics and therefore subsequent post-shock conditions. The main features of the new driver valve are a face o-ring sealing design of the valve, the large internal volume, and through inserts near the solenoid core: adjustable opening characteristics of the valve. PMID:27250485

  7. The GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager: detector spectral response effects on thermal emissive band calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Aaron J.; Padula, Francis; Cao, Changyong; Wu, Xiangqian

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) will be aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) to supply data needed for operational weather forecasts and long-term climate variability studies, which depend on high quality data. Unlike the heritage operational GOES systems that have two or four detectors per band, ABI has hundreds of detectors per channel requiring calibration coefficients for each one. This increase in number of detectors poses new challenges for next generation sensors as each detector has a unique spectral response function (SRF) even though only one averaged SRF per band is used operationally to calibrate each detector. This simplified processing increases computational efficiency. Using measured system-level SRF data from pre-launch testing, we have the opportunity to characterize the calibration impact using measured SRFs, both per detector and as an average of detector-level SRFs similar to the operational version. We calculated the spectral response impacts for the thermal emissive bands (TEB) theoretically, by simulating the ABI response viewing an ideal blackbody and practically, with the measured ABI response to an external reference blackbody from the pre-launch TEB calibration test. The impacts from the practical case match the theoretical results using an ideal blackbody. The observed brightness temperature trends show structure across the array with magnitudes as large as 0.1 K for and 12 (9.61 µm), and 0.25 K for band 14 (11.2 µm) for a 300 K blackbody. The trends in the raw ABI signal viewing the blackbody support the spectral response measurements results, since they show similar trends in bands 12 (9.61µm), and 14 (11.2 µm), meaning that the spectral effects dominate the response differences between detectors for these bands. We further validated these effects using the radiometric bias calculated between calibrations using the external blackbody and

  8. Large area Si low-temperature light detectors with Neganov-Luke effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Capelli, S.; Cassina, L.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Faverzani, M.; Ferri, E.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giordano, C.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Margesin, B.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Puiu, A.; Sisti, M.; Terranova, F.

    2015-10-01

    Next generation calorimetric experiments for the search of rare events rely on the detection of tiny amounts of light (of the order of 20 optical photons) to discriminate and reduce background sources and improve sensitivity. Calorimetric detectors are the simplest solution for photon detection at cryogenic (mK) temperatures. The development of silicon based light detectors with enhanced performance thanks to the use of the Neganov-Luke effect is described. The aim of this research line is the production of high performance detectors with industrial-grade reproducibility and reliability.

  9. The Effect of Twin Boundaries on the Spectroscopic Performance of CdZnTe Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Roth, D.; Babu, S.; Tueller, Jack; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Most single grains in cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) grown by the high-pressure Bridgman (HPB) technique contain multiple twin boundaries. As a consequence, twin boundaries are one of the most common macroscopic material defects found in large area (400 to 700 sq mm) CdZnTe specimens obtained from HPB ingots. Due to the prevalence of twin boundaries, understanding their effect on detector performance is key to the material selection process. Twin boundaries in several 2 mm thick large area specimens were first, documented using infrared transmission imaging. These specimens were then fabricated into either 2 mm pixel or planar detectors in order to examine the effect of the twin boundaries on detector performance. Preliminary results show that twin boundaries, which are decorated with tellurium inclusions, produce a reduction in detector efficiency and a degradation in resolution. The extent of the degradation appears to be a function of the density of tellurium inclusions.

  10. Energy losses in the D0 {beta} solenoid cryostat caused by current changes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, A.T.

    1993-11-01

    The proposed D0 {beta} solenoid is a superconducting solenoid mounted inside an aluminum tube which supports the solenoid winding over it`s full length. This aluminum support tube, also called bobbin, is therefore very tightly coupled to magnetic flux changes caused by solenoid current variations. These current changes in the solenoid, will cause answer currents to flow in the resistive bobbin wall and therefore cause heat losses. The insertion of an external dump resistor in the solenoid current loop reduces energy dissipation inside the cryostat during a quench and will shorten the discharge time constant. This note presents a simple electrical model for the coupled bobbin and solenoid and makes it easier to understand the circuit behavior and losses. Estimates for the maximum allowable rate of solenoid current changes, based on the maximum permissible rate of losses can be made using this model.

  11. Single event effects and their mitigation for the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarek, Richard J.; D'Auria, Saverio; Dong, Peter; Hocker, Andy; Kordas, Kostas; McGimpsey, Susan; Nicolas, Ludovic; Wallny, Rainer; Schmitt, Wayne; Worm, Steven; /Fermilab /Toronto U. /Glasgow U. /Rutherford /UCLA

    2005-11-01

    We present an overview of radiation induced failures and operational experiences from the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). In our summary, we examine single event effects (SEE) in electronics located in and around the detector. We present results of experiments to identify the sources and composition of the radiation and steps to reduce the rate of SEEs in our electronics. Our studies have led to a better, more complete understanding of the radiation environment in a modern hadron collider experiment.

  12. The HERMES recoil detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airapetian, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Belostotski, S.; Borisenko, A.; Bowles, J.; Brodski, I.; Bryzgalov, V.; Burns, J.; Capitani, G. P.; Carassiti, V.; Ciullo, G.; Clarkson, A.; Contalbrigo, M.; De Leo, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Guler, H.; Gregor, I. M.; Hartig, M.; Hill, G.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hristova, I.; Jo, H. S.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Kisselev, A.; Krause, B.; Krauss, B.; Lagamba, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Lu, S.; Lu, X.-G.; Lumsden, S.; Mahon, D.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nowak, W.-D.; Naryshkin, Y.; Osborne, A.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Petrov, A.; Pickert, N.; Prahl, V.; Protopopescu, D.; Reinecke, M.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rubacek, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Schnell, G.; Seitz, B.; Shearer, C.; Shutov, V.; Statera, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Van Haarlem, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vilardi, I.; Vikhrov, V.; Vogel, C.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, Z.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.

    2013-05-01

    For the final running period of HERA, a recoil detector was installed at the HERMES experiment to improve measurements of hard exclusive processes in charged-lepton nucleon scattering. Here, deeply virtual Compton scattering is of particular interest as this process provides constraints on generalised parton distributions that give access to the total angular momenta of quarks within the nucleon. The HERMES recoil detector was designed to improve the selection of exclusive events by a direct measurement of the four-momentum of the recoiling particle. It consisted of three components: two layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors inside the HERA beam vacuum, a two-barrel scintillating fibre tracker, and a photon detector. All sub-detectors were located inside a solenoidal magnetic field with a field strength of 1T. The recoil detector was installed in late 2005. After the commissioning of all components was finished in September 2006, it operated stably until the end of data taking at HERA end of June 2007. The present paper gives a brief overview of the physics processes of interest and the general detector design. The recoil detector components, their calibration, the momentum reconstruction of charged particles, and the event selection are described in detail. The paper closes with a summary of the performance of the detection system.

  13. Monitoring circuit accurately measures movement of solenoid valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Solenoid operated valve in a control system powered by direct current issued to accurately measure the valve travel. This system is currently in operation with a 28-vdc power system used for control of fluids in liquid rocket motor test facilities.

  14. Three dimensional multilayer solenoid microcoils inside silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) solenoid microcoils could generate uniform magnetic field. Multilayer solenoid microcoils are highly pursued for strong magnetic field and high inductance in advanced magnetic microsystems. However, the fabrication of the 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils is still a challenging task. In this paper, 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils with uniform diameters and high aspect ratio were fabricated in silica glass. An alloy (Bi/In/Sn/Pb) with high melting point was chosen as the conductive metal to overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The inductance of the three layers microcoils was measured, and the value is 77.71 nH at 100 kHz and 17.39 nH at 120 MHz. The quality factor was calculated, and it has a value of 5.02 at 120 MHz. This approach shows an improvement method to achieve complex 3D metal microstructures and electronic components, which could be widely integrated in advanced magnetic microsystems.

  15. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-05-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  16. A unidirectional rotary solenoid as applied to stronglinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenderdine, Eugene W.

    1989-01-01

    The design goals and results of an advanced development stronglink are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on a new rotary solenoid concept to provide improved security during the handling, storage, transporting, and deployment of weapons to prevent accidental detonation of the weapons in the event of abnormal environments, such as impact, fire, crush, etc.

  17. A Computer Study of Beam Transport by Solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chun Fai; Lee, Edward P.

    1997-11-01

    Beam transport by solenoids provides an alternative to the use of electrostatic quadrupole arrays that has been less studied for applications to heavy ion fusion drivers. A 1-d code (named SALT, for Solenoid Applications to Linac Transport) has been developed to simulate the axisymmetric beam dynamics through a sequence of solenoids. The beam is modeled as a set of ringlets, with radius and momentum traced in the axial coordinate. Solenoid fringe field aberrations, envelope matching, phase space evolution and emittance growth are studied using relativistically correct equations that include the electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Initial application is to the transport of a 2 MeV, 31.10 Ampere of K^+ beam through a channel of strength 6 Tesla. This implies a line charge density of 10 μC/m, a factor of 40 above the realistic limit for electrostatic quadrupoles. A second application is to the focusing of a 20 MeV, 4 kA electron beam down to its emittance limit.

  18. Marketing solenoid power saving device. Third quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-06

    I am continuing to explore three methods of marketing the solenoid power saving device. Since the redesign reported in the last report, we are pursuing both the OEM market, the distributor market in both turf and agricultural areas, and the export market. Progress in these areas is discussed: OEM, distribution; and export.

  19. 24. VIEW OF BOXES CONTAINING SOLENOIDS AND HYDRAULIC PUMP CONTRACTORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW OF BOXES CONTAINING SOLENOIDS AND HYDRAULIC PUMP CONTRACTORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DOORS AND BREAKERS FOR RECEPTACLES ON SEVERAL STATIONS. BOXES LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SLC-3W MST STATION 63. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. Calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors and the effect on measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gookin, Ben

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a high-energy cosmic ray observatory located in Malargue, Mendoza, Argentina. It is used to probe the highest energy particles in the Universe, with energies greater than 1018 eV, which strike the Earth constantly. The observatory uses two techniques to observe the air shower initiated by a cosmic ray: a surface detector composed of an array of more than 1600 water Cherenkov tanks covering 3000 km2, and 27 nitrogen fluorescence telescopes overlooking this array. The Cherenkov detectors run all the time and therefore have high statistics on the air showers. The fluorescence detectors run only on clear moonless nights, but observe the longitudinal development of the air shower and make a calorimetric measure of its energy. The energy measurement from the the fluorescence detectors is used to cross calibrate the surface detectors, and makes the measurements made by the Auger Observatory surface detector highly model-independent. The calibration of the fluorescence detectors is then of the utmost importance to the measurements of the Observatory. Described here are the methods of the absolute and multi-wavelength calibration of the fluorescence detectors, and improvements in each leading to a reduction in calibration uncertainties to 4% and 3.5%, respectively. Also presented here are the effects of introducing a new, and more detailed, multi-wavelength calibration on the fluorescence detector energy estimation and the depth of the air shower maximum measurement, leading to a change of 1+-0.03% in the absolute energy scale at 1018 eV, and a negligible change in the measurement on shower maximum.

  1. Physics capabilities of the DO upgrade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.

    1994-11-01

    The D0 detector at Fermilab is being upgraded to meet the demands imposed by high luminosity Tevatron running planned to begin in 1998. The central tracking detectors will be replaced with silicon and scintillating fiber tracking systems inside a solenoidal magnetic field and a preshower detector will be added to aid in electron identification. The design and performance of these systems are described and detailed simulations of the physics capabilities of the upgraded detector are presented. In particular the authors focus on the study of electroweak boson properties and top quark physics and briefly describe the b-physics capabilities.

  2. THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS DETECTOR GEOMETRIES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF CZT USING ONE CRYSTAL

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Duff, M.; Teague, L.

    2011-06-21

    CdZnTe (CZT) continues to be a major thrust interest mainly due to its potential application as a room temperature radiation detector. The performance of CZT detectors is directly related to the charge collection ability which can be affected by the configuration of the electrical contact. The charge collection efficiency is determined in part by the specific geometry of the anode contact which serves as the readout electrode. In this report, contact geometries including single pixel, planar, coplanar, and dual anode will be systematically explored by comparing the performance efficiencies of the detector using both low and high energy gamma rays. To help eliminate the effect of crystal quality variations, the contact geometries were fabricated on the same crystal detector with minimal polishing between contact placements.

  3. Avalanche Effect in Si Heavily Irradiated Detectors: Physical Model and Perspectives for Application

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin V.; Li Z.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Harkonen, J.

    2011-05-07

    The model explaining an enhanced collected charge in detectors irradiated to 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} is developed. This effect was first revealed in heavily irradiated n-on-p detectors operated at high bias voltage ranging from 900 to 1700 V. The model is based on the fundamental effect of carrier avalanche multiplication in the space charge region and in our case is extended with a consideration of p-n junctions with a high concentration of the deep levels. It is shown that the efficient trapping of free carriers from the bulk generation current to the deep levels of radiation induced defects leads to the stabilization of the irradiated detector operation in avalanche multiplication mode due to the reduction of the electric field at the junction. The charge collection efficiency and the detector reverse current dependences on the applied bias have been numerically simulated in this study and they well correlate to the recent experimental results of CERN RD50 collaboration. The developed model of enhanced collected charge predicts a controllable operation of heavily irradiated detectors that is promising for the detector application in the upcoming experiments in a high luminosity collider.

  4. Compensation of the detector capacitance presented to charge-sensitive preamplifiers using the Miller effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Inyong; Kang, Taehoon; Wells, Byron T.; D'Aries, Lawrence J.; Hammig, Mark D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an integrated circuit design for a modified charge-sensitive amplifier (CSA) that compensates for the effect of capacitance presented by nuclear radiation detectors and other sensors. For applications that require large area semiconductor detectors or for those semiconductor sensors derived from high permittivity materials such as PbSe, the detector capacitance can degrade the system gain and bandwidth of a front-end preamplifier, resulting in extended rise times and attenuated output voltage signals during pulse formation. In order to suppress the effect of sensor capacitance, we applied a bootstrap technique into a traditional CSA. The technique exploits the Miller effect by reducing the effective voltage difference between the two sides of a radiation detector which minimizes the capacitance presented to the differential common-source amplifier. This new configuration is successfully designed to produce effective gain even at high detector capacitance. The entire circuit, including a core CSA with feedback components and a bootstrap amplifier, are implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS process with a 3.3 V supply voltage.

  5. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-01

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays. PMID:27607620

  6. Spillage detector for liquid chromatography systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, M. J.; Fulton, D. S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A spillage detector device for use in conjunction with fractionation of liquid chromatography systems which includes a spillage recieving enclosure beneath the fractionation area is described. A sensing device having a plurality of electrodes of alternating polarity is mounted within the spillage recieving enclosure. Detection circuitry, responsive to conductivity between electrodes, is operatively connected to the sensing device. The detection circuitry feeds into the output circuitry. The output circuit has relaying and switching circuitry directed to a solenoid, an alarm system and a pump. The solenoid is connected to the pliable conduit of the chromatography system. The alarm system comprises an audio alarm and a visual signal. A 115-volt power system interconnected with the pump, the solenoid, the sensing device, and the detection and output circuitry.

  7. The effect of symmetry on resonant and nonresonant photoresponses in a field-effect terahertz detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. D.; Qin, H. Yang, X. X.; Zhang, Z. P.; Li, X. X.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cai, Y.; Wu, D. M.; Zhang, B. S.; Lewis, R. A.; Sun, Y. F.

    2015-01-19

    The effect of the symmetries in the terahertz (THz) field distribution and the field-effect channel on THz photoresponse is examined. Resonant excitation of cavity plasmon modes and nonresonant self-mixing of THz waves are demonstrated in a GaN/AlGaN two-dimensional electron gas with symmetrically designed nanogates, antennas, and filters. We found that the self-mixing signal can be effectively suppressed by the symmetric design and the resonant response benefits from the residual asymmetry. The findings suggest that a single detector may provide both high sensitivity from the self-mixing mechanism and spectral resolution from the resonant response by optimizing the degree of geometrical and/or electronic symmetries.

  8. Cat-eye effect target recognition with single-pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Weijian; Li, Li; Zhang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    A prototype of cat-eye effect target recognition with single-pixel detectors is proposed. Based on the framework of compressive sensing, it is possible to recognize cat-eye effect targets by projecting a series of known random patterns and measuring the backscattered light with three single-pixel detectors in different locations. The prototype only requires simpler, less expensive detectors and extends well beyond the visible spectrum. The simulations are accomplished to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed prototype. We compared our results to that obtained from conventional cat-eye effect target recognition methods using area array sensor. The experimental results show that this method is feasible and superior to the conventional method in dynamic and complicated backgrounds.

  9. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de; Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A.; Sahin, D.; Driessen, E. F. C.

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  10. Small field detector correction factors: effects of the flattening filter for Elekta and Varian linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Madelaine K; Liu, Paul Z Y; Lee, Christopher; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2016-01-01

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are becoming the preferred beam type for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), as they enable an increase in dose rate and a decrease in treatment time. This work assesses the effects of the flattening filter on small field output factors for 6 MV beams generated by both Elekta and Varian linear accelerators, and determines differences between detector response in flattened (FF) and FFF beams. Relative output factors were measured with a range of detectors (diodes, ionization cham-bers, radiochromic film, and microDiamond) and referenced to the relative output factors measured with an air core fiber optic dosimeter (FOD), a scintillation dosimeter developed at Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney. Small field correction factors were generated for both FF and FFF beams. Diode measured detector response was compared with a recently published mathematical relation to predict diode response corrections in small fields. The effect of flattening filter removal on detector response was quantified using a ratio of relative detector responses in FFF and FF fields for the same field size. The removal of the flattening filter was found to have a small but measurable effect on ionization chamber response with maximum deviations of less than ± 0.9% across all field sizes measured. Solid-state detectors showed an increased dependence on the flattening filter of up to ± 1.6%. Measured diode response was within ± 1.1% of the published mathematical relation for all fields up to 30 mm, independent of linac type and presence or absence of a flattening filter. For 6 MV beams, detector correction factors between FFF and FF beams are interchangeable for a linac between FF and FFF modes, providing that an additional uncertainty of up to ± 1.6% is accepted. PMID:27167280

  11. Evidence of Dopant Type-Inversion and Other Radiation Damage Effects of the CDF Silicon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ballarin, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this document is to study the effect of radiation damage on the silicon sensors. The reflection of the effect of radiation can be observed in two fundamental parameters of the detector: the bias current and the bias voltage. The leakage current directly affects the noise, while the bias voltage is required to collect the maximum signal deposited by the charged particle.

  12. Metal Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  13. The external magnetic field created by the superposition of identical parallel finite solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Melody Xuan; Greenside, Henry

    2016-08-01

    We use superposition and numerical methods to show that the external magnetic field generated by parallel identical solenoids can be nearly uniform and substantial, even when the solenoids have lengths that are large compared to their radii. We examine both a ring of solenoids and a large hexagonal array of solenoids. In both cases, we discuss how the magnitude and uniformity of the external field depend on the length of and the spacing between the solenoids. We also discuss some novel properties of a single solenoid, e.g., that even for short solenoids the energy stored in the internal magnetic field exceeds the energy stored in the spatially infinite external magnetic field. These results should be broadly interesting to undergraduates learning about electricity and magnetism.

  14. Focusing solenoid for the front end of a linear RF accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A prototype of a superconducting focusing solenoid for use in an RF linac has been built and tested at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The solenoid is comprised of the main coil, two bucking coils, two dipole corrector windings, and a low carbon steel flux return. At the excitation current of 250 A, the magnetic field reaches 7.2 T in the center of the solenoid and is less than 5 G on the axis at a distance of 150 mm from the center. The length of the solenoid is 150 mm; the length of a cryovessel for the solenoid with a 20 mm diameter 'warm' bore is 270 mm. This paper presents the main design features of the focusing solenoid and discusses results from tests of the solenoid.

  15. Effects of the interstrip gap on the efficiency and response of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, D.; Forneris, J.; Grassi, L.; Acosta, L.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Grilj, V.; Jakic, M.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Milin, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Stanko, D.; Tokic, V.; Uroic, M.; Zadro, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this work the effects of the segmentation of the electrodes of Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are investigated. In order to characterize the response of the DSSSDs we perform a first experiment by using tandem beams of different energies directly sent on the detector and a second experiment by mean of a proton microbeam. Results show that the effective width of the inter-strip region and the efficiency for full energy detection, varies with both detected energy and bias voltage. The experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by a simplified model based on the Shockley-Ramo-Gunn framework.

  16. Transport of intense proton beams in an induction linac by solenoid lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, W.; Choe, J. Y.; Uhm, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    In the proposed proton induction linac at NSWC, a 100 A and 3 μs proton beam is accelerated to 5 MeV through a series of accelerating gaps. This beam can be effectively focused by solenoid lenses in this low energy regime and can be transported by adjusting the focusing strength in each period. For the transport channel design to reduce the number of independently controlled lenses, a theory of matched beams in the space-charge dominated regime has been developed. This study can be applied to cost efficient designs of induction accelerators for heavy ion fusion and free electron lasers.

  17. Two-dimensional Lagrangian calculation of a laser-heated solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makomaski, A. H.; Pietrzyk, Z. A.

    1980-02-01

    A two-dimensional Lagrangian code is used to model a laser-heated solenoid. The results indicate important two-dimensional effects and the global behavior of the plasma is found to be different from the predictions of one-dimensional theories. Most of the laser energy transferred to the plasma appears in the form of internal energy, suggesting that the bleaching wave approach for reactor calculations is correct. The plasma parameters are significantly changed when the peak of the laser beam profile is flattened.

  18. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Hugo Duane, Simon; Kamio, Yuji; Palmans, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  19. Photon detector configured to employ the Gunn effect and method of use

    SciTech Connect

    Cich, Michael J

    2015-03-17

    Embodiments disclosed herein relate to photon detectors configured to employ the Gunn effect for detecting high-energy photons (e.g., x-rays and gamma rays) and methods of use. In an embodiment, a photon detector for detecting high-energy photons is disclosed. The photon detector includes a p-i-n semiconductor diode having a p-type semiconductor region, an n-type semiconductor region, and a compensated i-region disposed between the p-type semiconductor region and the n-type semiconductor region. The compensated i-region and has a width of about 100 .mu.m to about 400 .mu.m and is configured to exhibit the Gunn effect when the p-i-n semiconductor diode is forward biased a sufficient amount. The compensated i-region is doped to include a free carrier concentration of less than about 10.sup.10 cm.sup.-3.

  20. Silicon field-effect transistors as radiation detectors for the Sub-THz range

    SciTech Connect

    But, D. B. Golenkov, O. G.; Sakhno, N. V.; Sizov, F. F.; Korinets, S. V.; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J. V.; Reva, V. P.; Bunchuk, S. G.

    2012-05-15

    The nonresonance response of silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (Si-MOSFETs) with a long channel (1-20 {mu}m) to radiation in the frequency range 43-135 GHz is studied. The transistors are fabricated by the standard CMOS technology with 1-{mu}m design rules. The volt-watt sensitivity and the noise equivalent power (NEP) for such detectors are estimated with the calculated effective area of the detecting element taken into account. It is shown that such transistors can operate at room temperature as broadband direct detectors of sub-THz radiation. In the 4-5 mm range of wavelengths, the volt-watt sensitivity can be as high as tens of kV/W and the NEP can amount to 10{sup -11} - 10{sup -12}W/{radical}Hz . The parameters of detectors under study can be improved by the optimization of planar antennas.

  1. Effects of Te inclusions on the performance of CdZnTe radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; Abdul-Jabber, N. M.; Babalola, O. S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A. M.; Jackson, E. M.; Jackson, H. C.; James, J. A.; Kohman, K. T.; Luryi, A. L.; James, R. B.

    2008-10-19

    Te inclusions existing at high concentrations in CdZnTe (CZT) material can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. These microscopic defects trap the free electrons generated by incident radiation, so entailing significant fluctuations in the total collected charge and thereby strongly affecting the energy resolution of thick (long-drift) detectors. Such effects were demonstrated in thin planar detectors, and, in many cases, they proved to be the dominant cause of the low performance of thick detectors, wherein the fluctuations in the charge losses accumulate along the charge's drift path. We continued studying this effect using different tools and techniques. We employed a dedicated beamline recently established at BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source for characterizing semiconductor radiation detectors, along with an IR transmission microscope system, the combination of which allowed us to correlate the concentration of defects with the devices performances. We present here our new results from testing over 50 CZT samples grown by different techniques. Our goals are to establish tolerable limits on the size and concentrations of these detrimental Te inclusions in CZT material, and to provide feedback to crystal growers to reduce their numbers in the material.

  2. Preliminary Test Results for the MICE Spectrometer Superconducting Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, Steve P.; Green, Michael A; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, S.T.; Wahrer, R.; Taylor, Clyde; Lu, X.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, Mimi; Juang, Tiki

    2008-08-02

    This report describes the MICE spectrometer solenoids as built. Each magnet consists of five superconducting coils. Two coils are used to tune the beam going from or to the MICE spectrometer from the rest of the MICE cooling channel. Three spectrometer coils (two end coils and a long center coil) are used to create a uniform 4 T field (to {+-}0.3 percent) over a length of 1.0 m within a diameter of 0.3 m. The three-coil spectrometer set is connected in series. The two end coils use small power supplies to tune the uniform field region where the scintillating fiber tracker is located. This paper will present the results of the preliminary testing of the first spectrometer solenoid.

  3. Focusing solenoids for the HINS Linac front end

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Appollinari, G.; Di-Marco, J.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Rabehl, R.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The low energy part of a linac for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project at Fermilab will use superconducting solenoids as beam focusing elements (lenses). While the lenses for the conventional DTL-type accelerating section of the front end require individual cryostats, in the superconducting accelerating sections solenoids will be installed inside RF cryomodules. Some of the lenses in the conventional and in the superconducting sections are equipped with horizontal and vertical steering dipoles. Lenses for the DTL section are in the stage of production with certification activities ongoing at Fermilab. For the superconducting sections of the linac, a prototype lens has been built and tested. Each lens will be installed in the transport channel of the accelerator so that its magnetic axis is on the beamline. Corresponding technique has been developed at Fermilab and is used during the certification process. This report summarizes design features, parameters, and test results of the focusing lenses.

  4. The solenoid muon capture system for the MELC experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djilkibaev, Rashid M.; Lobashev, Vladimir M.

    1996-05-01

    A solenoid capture system for the MELC experiment in which the efficiency of soft muon generation from the primary proton (600 MeV) is 10-4 in comparison with 10-8 for ordinary schemes has been proposed. Both signs of muons with an intensity 1011 μ-/sec for negative and 2×1011 μ+/sec for positive component can be generated by a pulse proton beam with an average current up to ≂200 μA. A detail 3-D calculation of the magnetic field for the MELC setup are presented. Production of muon from pion decay in solenoid capture system is studied. The target life time and radiation condition of the superconducting coil are considered.

  5. Design and characterization of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachmann, M.; Flöttmann, K.; Gehrke, T.; Mayet, F.

    2016-09-01

    REGAE is a small electron linear accelerator at DESY. In order to focus short and low charged electron bunches down to a few μm permanent magnetic solenoids were designed, assembled and field measurements were done. Due to a shortage of space close to the operation area an in-vacuum solution has been chosen. Furthermore a two-ring design made of wedges has been preferred in terms of beam dynamic issues. To keep the field quality of a piecewise built magnet still high a sorting algorithm for the wedge arrangement including a simple magnetic field model has been developed and used for the construction of the magnets. The magnetic field of these solenoids has been measured with high precision and compared to simulations.

  6. Integration of RFQ beam coolers and solenoidal magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavenago, M.; Romé, M.; Maggiore, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Maero, G.; Chiurlotto, F.; Comunian, M.; Galatà, A.; Cavaliere, F.

    2016-02-01

    Electromagnetic traps are a flexible and powerful method of controlling particle beams, possibly of exotic nuclei, with cooling (of energy spread and transverse oscillations) provided by collisions with light gases as in the Radio Frequency Quadrupole Cooler (RFQC). A RFQC prototype can be placed inside the existing Eltrap solenoid, capable of providing a magnetic flux density component Bz up to 0.2 T, where z is the solenoid axis. Confinement in the transverse plane is provided both by Bz and the rf voltage Vrf (up to 1 kV at few MHz). Transport is provided by a static electric field Ez (order of 100 V/m), while gas collisions (say He at 1 Pa, to be maintained by differential pumping) provide cooling or heating depending on Vrf. The beamline design and the major parameters Vrf, Bz (which affect the beam transmission optimization) are here reported, with a brief description of the experimental setup.

  7. Investigation and simulation of muon cooling rings with tilted solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Valeri I. Balbekov

    2003-05-28

    Alternating solenoid focused muon cooling ring without special bending magnets is considered and investigate in detail. Both fringe field between solenoid coils with opposite directed current, and an inclination of the coils in vertical plane are used to provide a bending and closing of the particle trajectories. Realistic (Maxwellian) magnetic field is calculated and used for a simulation. Methodic is developed and applied to find closed orbit at any energy, dispersion, region of stability, and other conventional accelerator characteristics. Earlier proposed RFOFO cooling ring with 200 MHz RF system and liquid hydrogen absorbers is investigated in detail. After an optimization, normalized 6D emittance about 20 mm{sup 3} and transmission 57% are obtained.

  8. Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

  9. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    SciTech Connect

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-04-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 {micro}m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  10. Integration of RFQ beam coolers and solenoidal magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Cavenago, M; Romé, M; Maggiore, M; Porcellato, A M; Maero, G; Chiurlotto, F; Comunian, M; Galatà, A; Cavaliere, F

    2016-02-01

    Electromagnetic traps are a flexible and powerful method of controlling particle beams, possibly of exotic nuclei, with cooling (of energy spread and transverse oscillations) provided by collisions with light gases as in the Radio Frequency Quadrupole Cooler (RFQC). A RFQC prototype can be placed inside the existing Eltrap solenoid, capable of providing a magnetic flux density component Bz up to 0.2 T, where z is the solenoid axis. Confinement in the transverse plane is provided both by Bz and the rf voltage Vrf (up to 1 kV at few MHz). Transport is provided by a static electric field Ez (order of 100 V/m), while gas collisions (say He at 1 Pa, to be maintained by differential pumping) provide cooling or heating depending on Vrf. The beamline design and the major parameters Vrf, Bz (which affect the beam transmission optimization) are here reported, with a brief description of the experimental setup. PMID:26932057

  11. Gamma-ray irradiation effects on InAs/GaSb-based nBn IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Vincent M.; Morath, Christian P.; Swift, Seth M.; Myers, Stephen; Gautam, Nutan; Krishna, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    IR detectors operated in a space environment are subjected to a variety of radiation effects while required to have very low noise performance. When properly passivated, conventional mercury cadmium telluride (MCT)-based infrared detectors have been shown to perform well in space environments. However, the inherent manufacturing difficulties associated with the growth of MCT has resulted in a research thrust into alternative detector technologies, specifically type-II Strained Layer Superlattice (SLS) infrared detectors. Theory predicts that SLS-based detector technologies have the potential of offering several advantages over MCT detectors including lower dark currents and higher operating temperatures. Experimentally, however, it has been found that both p-on-n and n-on-p SLS detectors have larger dark current densities than MCT-based detectors. An emerging detector architecture, complementary to SLS-technology and hence forth referred to here as nBn, mitigates this issue via a uni-polar barrier design which effectively blocks majority carrier conduction thereby reducing dark current to more acceptable levels. Little work has been done to characterize nBn IR detectors tolerance to radiation effects. Here, the effects of gamma-ray radiation on an nBn SLS detector are considered. The nBn IR detector under test was grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy and is composed of an InAs/GaSb SLS absorber (n) and contact (n) and an AlxGa1-xSb barrier (B). The radiation effects on the detector are characterized by dark current density measurements as a function of bias, device perimeter-to-area ratio and total ionizing dose (TID).

  12. Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-03

    1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

  13. Study of high field superconducting solenoids for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, Michael J.; Sadovskiy, Y.; Zlobin, Alexander V; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    The final beam cooling stages of a possible Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 40-50 T in an aperture of 40-50 mm. In this paper we study possible solutions towards creating DC fields of that order using available superconductors. Several magnetic and mechanical designs, optimized for the maximum performance are presented and compared in terms of cost and size.

  14. Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    SciTech Connect

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-06-06

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air in-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

  15. Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves

    SciTech Connect

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-10-23

    1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fall closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

  16. Worchester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-11-13

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in process streams within the CWF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) to prevent MCO vent drain to either reduce air In-leakage or loss of He. The valves have couplings for transverse actuator mounting.

  17. Sprag solenoid brake. [development and operations of electrically controlled brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, D. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of an electrically operated brake are discussed. The action of the brake depends on energizing a solenoid which causes internally spaced sprockets to contact the inner surface of the housing. A spring forces the control member to move to the braking position when the electrical function is interrupted. A diagram of the device is provided and detailed operating principles are explained.

  18. Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-03

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air in leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

  19. Worcester Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated MCO Isolation Valves

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-11-13

    These valves are 1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporating a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator that are used in different process streams within the CVDF hood. The valves fail closed (on loss of pressure or electrical) for MCO isolation to either reduce air leakage or loss of He. All valves have coupling for transverse actuator mounting.

  20. Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-11-13

    1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

  1. Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves

    SciTech Connect

    VAN KATWIJK, C.

    2000-06-06

    1 inch Gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

  2. First Generation Final Focusing Solenoid For NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W.

    2011-11-09

    This report describes the prototype final focus solenoid (FFS-1G), or 1st generation FFS. In order to limit eddy currents, the solenoid winding consists of Litz wire wound on a non-conductive G-10 tube. For the same reason, the winding pack was inserted into an electrically insulating, but thermally conducting Polypropylene (Cool- Poly© D1202) housing and potted with highly viscous epoxy (to be able to wick the single strands of the Litz wire). The magnet is forced-air cooled through cooling channels. The magnet was designed for water cooling, but he cooling jacket cracked, and therefore cooling (beyond natural conduction and radiation) was exclusively by forced air. Though the design operating point was 8 Tesla, for the majority of running on NDCX-1 it operated up to about 5 Tesla. This was due mostly from limitations of voltage holding at the leads, where discharges at higher pulsed current damaged the leads. Generation 1 was replaced by the 2nd generation solenoid (FFS-2G) about a year later, which has operated reliably up to 8 Tesla, with a better lead design and utilizes water cooling. At this point, FFS-1G was used for plasma source R&D by LBNL and PPPL. The maximum field for those experiments was reduced to 3 Tesla due to continued difficulty with the leads and because higher field was not essential for those experiments. The pulser for the final focusing solenoid is a SCR-switched capacitor bank which produces a half-sine current waveform. The pulse width is ~800us and a charge voltage of 3kV drives ~20kA through the magnet producing ~8T field.

  3. Field measurements in the Fermilab electron cooling solenoid prototype

    SciTech Connect

    A. C. Crawford et al.

    2003-10-02

    To increase the Tevatron luminosity, Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system [1] to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring. The schematic layout of the Recycler Electron Cooling (REC) system is shown in Figure 1. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through a cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 10{sup -4} rad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. As part of the R&D effort, a cooling section prototype consisting of 9 modules (90% of the total length of a future section) was assembled and measured. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of solenoid prototype field measurements. The design of the cooling section solenoid is discussed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes details of a dedicated measurement system, capable of measuring small transverse field components, while the system's measurement errors are analyzed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains measured field distributions of individual elements of the cooling section as well as an evaluation of the magnetic shielding efficiency. An algorithm of field adjustments for providing lowest possible electron trajectory perturbations is proposed in Chapter 6; also, this chapter shows the results of our first attempts of implementing the algorithm.

  4. Experimental results of a single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, X.J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Skaritka, J.

    1997-07-01

    A new iron dominated single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet was designed to be integrated with the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode rf Gun. This emittance compensated photoinjector is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility. It has produced a 0.329 {+-} 0.012 pC, {tau}{sub 95%} = 10.9 psec electron bunches with a normalized rms transverse emittance of {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 1.17 {+-} 0.16 {pi} mm mrad. POISSON field maps were used with PARMELA to optimize the emittance compensation solenoidal magnet design. Magnetic field measurements show that at the cathode plane B{sub z} {le} 10 G for a peak magnetic field of B{sub z,max} = 3 kG. Which is in agreement with POISSON simulation. A single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet will produces an initial angular momentum of the electron bunch that manifests itself in a initial magnetic emittance term that cannot be eliminated. This magnetic emittance {epsilon}{sub n,rms}{sup mag} scales as 0.010 {pi} mm mrad/G as the cathode, which is in agreement with PARMELA simulations. Experimental beam dynamics results are presented that shows relative angular rotation and spot size as a function of cathode magnetic field. These results are compared to theory.

  5. The generation of rolling moments with the superconducting solenoid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyear, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The superconducting solenoid model is a pilot model core for levitation in a wind tunnel magnetic suspension system. This type of core would replace the ferromagnetic core typically installed in the model fuselage. For suspension purposes, the solenoid is operated upon by a set of electromagnets surrounding the wind tunnel which are to support and restrain the model at required positions and orientations under the influence of powerful aerodynamic disturbances. The subject of providing sources of magnets rolling moment for use when spanwise magnets, which can be used for winged models, are not available is covered. Several methods have emerged for generating a rolling moment based on the use of additional superconducting loops or magnetic poles positioned around or within the solenoid. Predictions of the moment capacities of superconducting loops in models sized for a large wind tunnel are presented. An existing prototype superconducting model proved a suitable vehicle for demonstrating and calibrating, at a smaller scale, some of the other roll elements based on magnetic pole devices. Calibration data are included.

  6. Method to reduce non-specific tissue heating of small animals in solenoid coils

    PubMed Central

    KUMAR, ANANDA; ATTALURI, ANILCHANDRA; MALLIPUDI, RAJIV; CORNEJO, CHRISTINE; BORDELON, DAVID; ARMOUR, MICHAEL; MORUA, KATHERINE; DEWEESE, THEODORE L.; IVKOV, ROBERT

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Solenoid coils that generate time-varying or alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) are used in biomedical devices for research, imaging and therapy. Interactions of AMF and tissue produce eddy currents that deposit power within tissue, thus limiting effectiveness and safety. We aim to develop methods that minimise excess heating of mice exposed to AMFs for cancer therapy experiments. Materials and methods Numerical and experimental data were obtained to characterise thermal management properties of water using a continuous, custom water jacket in a four-turn simple solenoid. Theoretical data were obtained with method-of-moments (MoM) numerical field calculations and finite element method (FEM) thermal simulations. Experimental data were obtained from gel phantoms and mice exposed to AMFs having amplitude >50kA/m and frequency of 160 kHz. Results Water has a high specific heat and thermal conductivity, is diamagnetic, polar, and nearly transparent to magnetic fields. We report at least a two-fold reduction of temperature increase from gel phantom and animal models when a continuous layer of circulating water was placed between the sample and solenoid, compared with no water. Thermal simulations indicate the superior efficiency in thermal management by the developed continuous single chamber cooling system over a double chamber non-continuous system. Further reductions of heating were obtained by regulating water temperature and flow for active cooling. Conclusions These results demonstrate the potential value of a contiguous layer of circulating water to permit sustained exposure to high intensity alternating magnetic fields at this frequency for research using small animal models exposed to AMFs. PMID:23402327

  7. Effect of temperature on superconducting nanowire single-photon detector noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahgat Shehata, A.; Ruggeri, A.; Stellari, F.; Weger, Alan J.; Song, P.; Sunter, K.; Najafi, F.; Berggren, Karl K.; Anant, Vikas

    2015-08-01

    Today Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors (SNSPDs) are commonly used in different photon-starved applications, including testing and diagnostics of VLSI circuits. Detecting very faint signals in the near-infrared wavelength range requires not only good detection efficiency, but also very low Dark Count Rate (DCR) and jitter. For example, low noise is crucial to enable ultra-low voltage optical testing of integrated circuits. The effect of detector temperature and background thermal radiation on the noise of superconducting single-photon detectors made of NbN meanders is studied in this paper. It is shown that two different regimes can be identified in the DCR vs. bias current characteristics. At high bias, the dark count rate is dominated by the intrinsic noise of the detector, while at low bias current it is dominated by the detection of stray photons that get onto the SNSPD. Changing the detector temperature changes its switching current and only affects the high bias branch of the characteristics: a reduction of the DCR can be achieved by lowering the SNSPD base temperature. On the other hand, changing the temperature of the single-photon light source (e.g. the VLSI circuit under test) only affects the low bias regime: a lower target temperature leads to a smaller DCR.

  8. The effect of elemental and hydrocarbon impurities on mercuric iodide gamma ray detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Eilene S.; Buffleben, George; Soria, Ed; James, Ralph; Schieber, Michael; Natarajan, Raj; Gerrish, Vern

    Mercuric iodide is a room temperature semiconductor material that is used for gamma ray and x-ray radiation detection. Mercuric iodide is synthesized from mercuric chloride and potassium iodide and is then purified by a series of melts and sublimation steps and by zone refining. The mercuric iodide is grown into crystals and platelets and then fabricated into detectors. Elemental contamination may be a determining factor in the performance of these detectors. These contaminates may be present in the starting material or may be introduced during, or be unaffected by, the purification, growth or fabrication steps. Methods have been developed for the analysis of trace levels of elemental contamination. Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma/Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP/OES) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) are used to determine sub ppm levels of many trace elemental impurities. Trace levels of many elemental impurities in the raw mercuric iodide are significantly reduced during the purification and zone refining processes. Though the levels of impurities are reduced, poor performing mercuric iodide detectors have contamination levels remaining or reintroduced which are higher for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb and Zn than detectors with good gamma ray response. This paper will discuss the analytical methodology, the effects of purification on impurity levels, and the correlation between detector performance and impurity levels.

  9. SNR Wall Effect Alleviation by Generalized Detector Employed in Cognitive Radio Networks.

    PubMed

    Shbat, Modar Safir; Tuzlukov, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly used spectrum sensing techniques in cognitive radio (CR) networks, such as the energy detector (ED), matched filter (MF), and others, suffer from the noise uncertainty and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) wall phenomenon. These detectors cannot achieve the required signal detection performance regardless of the sensing time. In this paper, we explore a signal processing scheme, namely, the generalized detector (GD) constructed based on the generalized approach to signal processing (GASP) in noise, in spectrum sensing of CR network based on antenna array with the purpose to alleviate the SNR wall problem and improve the signal detection robustness under the low SNR. The simulation results confirm our theoretical issues and effectiveness of GD implementation in CR networks based on antenna array. PMID:26151216

  10. SNR Wall Effect Alleviation by Generalized Detector Employed in Cognitive Radio Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shbat, Modar Safir; Tuzlukov, Vyacheslav

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly used spectrum sensing techniques in cognitive radio (CR) networks, such as the energy detector (ED), matched filter (MF), and others, suffer from the noise uncertainty and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) wall phenomenon. These detectors cannot achieve the required signal detection performance regardless of the sensing time. In this paper, we explore a signal processing scheme, namely, the generalized detector (GD) constructed based on the generalized approach to signal processing (GASP) in noise, in spectrum sensing of CR network based on antenna array with the purpose to alleviate the SNR wall problem and improve the signal detection robustness under the low SNR. The simulation results confirm our theoretical issues and effectiveness of GD implementation in CR networks based on antenna array. PMID:26151216

  11. Development of a solenoid pumped in situ zinc analyzer for environmental monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, T.P.; Wanty, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A battery powered submersible chemical analyzer, the Zn-DigiScan (Zn Digital Submersible Chemical Analyzer), has been developed for near real-time, in situ monitoring of zinc in aquatic systems. Microprocessor controlled solenoid pumps propel sample and carrier through an anion exchange column to separate zinc from interferences, add colorimetric reagents, and propel the reaction complex through a simple photometric detector. The Zn-DigiScan is capable of self-calibration with periodic injections of standards and blanks. The detection limit with this approach was 30 ??g L-1. Precision was 5-10% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) below 100 ??g L-1, improving to 1% R.S.D. at 1000 ??g L-1. The linear range extended from 30 to 3000 ??g L-1. In situ field results were in agreement with samples analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). This pump technology is quite versatile and colorimetric methods with complex online manipulations such as column reduction, preconcentration, and dilution can be performed with the DigiScan. However, long-term field deployments in shallow high altitude streams were hampered by air bubble formation in the photometric detector. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Magnet Errors in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Toprek, Dragan; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2009-05-08

    The ILC baseline extraction line is designed for 14 mrad horizontal crossing angle between e{sup +} and e{sup -} colliding beams at Interaction Point (IP). The extraction optics in the Interaction Region (IR) includes a detector integrated dipole field (anti-DID) to reduce orbit perturbation caused by the detector solenoid and minimize detector background. This paper presents a study of random field and alignment errors in the extraction magnets, compensation of the induced orbit perturbation, and effects of errors on extraction beam power loss. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

  13. The photon drag effect: A fast FIR detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, H.C.; Son, P.C. van; Wenckebach, W.Th.

    1995-12-31

    The photon drag (PD) effect in solids is the electrical current generated along the path of the absorbed photons. It is a very direct transducer which is also very fast because the momentum relaxation times of the electrons are involved. We studied the PD effect in the 2D electron gas (2DEG) of a GaAs/AlGaAs multi-quantum well system using the free-electron laser source FELIX. The temporal response on a ps timescale has been observed, and the continuous spectral response through the intersubband resonance (ISR) is investigated. For high excitation intensities we observe saturation of both the PD effect and the ISR absorption. The experiments are performed on an MBE grown GaAs/AlGaAs sample with 30 8-nm-wide quantum wells, each containing 0.8 10{sup 12} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The light is coupled to the 2DEG through a single-pass internal reflection in a Ge prism pressed onto the sample surface, and the electrical signal is capacitively coupled out to a microstrip line. The measured temporal response to the 2-ps-long infrared micropulses is limited by the 34 GHz bandwidth of the sampling oscilloscope. The spectral response (ISR at 120 meV) and the saturation of the PD effect and of the optical absorption are measured real-time on the timescale of the FELIX macropulse (typically 2 {mu}). Two contributions to the PD signal an be distinguished in the spectral response: One is proportional to the absorption and the other is proportional to its derivative with respect to frequency. The relative strength of the contributions is related to the momentum relaxation times of the electrons in the lowest and first excited subbands. At high excitation intensities, the relative strength of the two contributions stays surprisingly constant, despite the strongly increased ISR linewidth and the saturation of the signal. This indicates that the limiting relaxation time relevant for the saturation of the PD effect is longer than the sub-picosecond momentum relaxation times.

  14. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO135 : Effect of Space Exposure on Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors, Tray E05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO135 : Effect of Space Exposure on Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors, Tray E05 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the integrated tray on the LDEF. The Space Exposure on Pyroelectric Infrared Detectors Experiment (AO135) consist of twenty detectors of three different types of materials, lithium-tantalate, strontium-barium-niobate and triglycine-sulfide. The Pyroelectric infrered detector experiment is an integral part of the Active Optical System Component Experiment (S0050) that contains 136 test specimen and is located in a six (6) inch deep LDEF peripheral experiment tray. The experiment tray is divided into six sections, each consisting of a 1/4 inch thick chromic anodized aluminum base plate and a 1/16th inch thick aluminum hat shaped structure for mounting the test specimen. The test specimen are typi- cally placed in fiberglass-epoxy retainer strip assemblies prior to installation on the hat shaped mounting structure. Five of the six sections are covered by a 1/8 inch thick anodized aluminum sun screen with openings that allowed 56 percent transmission over the central region. Two subexperiments, The Optical Materials and UV Detectors Experiment (S0050-01) consist of 15 optical windows, filters and detectors and occupies one of the trays six sub-sections and The Optical Substrates and Coatings Experiment (S0050-02 ) that includes 12 substrates and coatings and a secondary experiment, The Holographic Data Storage Crystal Experiment (AO044) with four crystals, are also mounted in the integrated tray. The experiment structure was assembled with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners.

  15. Parasitic Effects Affecting Responsivity of Sub-THz Radiation Detector Built of a MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopyt, P.; Salski, B.; Marczewski, J.; Zagrajek, P.; Lusakowski, J.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, an analysis of parasitic elements that are found in all typical metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) has been performed from a viewpoint of a designer of sub-THz radiation detectors. A simplified model of the extrinsic MOSFET device has been proposed. Typical values of its parameters have been assumed. The authors have also built a model of the MOSFET's channel (intrinsic device) employing the standard transmission line approach and defining a Z-matrix of the circuit in order to facilitate its integration with the parasitic elements. The full effective circuit model of the MOSFET has been employed to analyze the behavior of the detector when subjected to sub-THz radiation delivered through the Gate and Source pads. Finally, predictions of the responsivity of an example detector built of a typical MOSFET integrated with a patch antenna fabricated on a 40-μm-thick silicon membrane have been compared with measurements of several structures employing MOSFETs of various channel widths. Good agreement between the predictions and the measurements has been demonstrated, which indicates that despite its simplicity, the presented model can significantly help to better understand operation of MOSFET-based detectors and also to use the existing silicon-based manufacturing processes.

  16. Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion-Beam Pulse Propagating in a Background Plasma along a Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.

    2007-12-07

    The analytical studies show that the application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self-electric fields of the beam pulse propagating in a background plasma. Theory predicts that when {omega}{sub ce}{approx}{omega}{sub pe}{beta}{sub b}, where {omega}{sub ce} is the electron gyrofrequency, {omega}{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency, and {beta}{sub b} is the ion-beam velocity relative to the speed of light, there is a sizable enhancement of the self-electric and self-magnetic fields due to the dynamo effect. Furthermore, the combined ion-beam-plasma system acts as a paramagnetic medium; i.e., the solenoidal magnetic field inside the beam pulse is enhanced.

  17. The effect of passive material on the detection of hadrons in calorimeter configurations for the SDC detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, T.B.W.; Trost, H.J.

    1991-08-14

    We have used a flexible geometry model of a calorimeter design for SDC to study the effect of passive material in front of the calorimeter and between the barrel and endcap modules on the apparent response to hadrons. The thicknesses of the passive materials have been chosen to closely resemble the currently projected wall thicknesses of the scintillating tile-fiber and liquid-argon calorimeter designs. The liquid-argon model contains about three times the amount of material in its shells compared to the tile-fiber model. The solenoid coil reduces the relative difference somewhat in the barrel region but constitutes only a minor correction in the transition region from barrel to endcap. Correspondingly, we find a significantly worse response for the liquid-argon case which we demonstrate using beams of single {pi}{sup minus} particles of 10 GeV/c momentum. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Silicon junctionless field effect transistors as room temperature terahertz detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Marczewski, J. Tomaszewski, D.; Zaborowski, M.; Zagrajek, P.

    2015-09-14

    Terahertz (THz) radiation detection by junctionless metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (JL MOSFETs) was studied and compared with THz detection using conventional MOSFETs. It has been shown that in contrast to the behavior of standard transistors, the junctionless devices have a significant responsivity also in the open channel (low resistance) state. The responsivity for a photolithographically defined JL FET was 70 V/W and the noise equivalent power 460 pW/√Hz. Working in the open channel state may be advantageous for THz wireless and imaging applications because of its low thermal noise and possible high operating speed or large bandwidth. It has been proven that the junctionless MOSFETs can also operate in a zero gate bias mode, which enables simplification of the THz array circuitry. Existing models of THz detection by MOSFETs were considered and it has been demonstrated that the process of detection by these junctionless devices cannot be explained within the framework of the commonly accepted models and therefore requires a new theoretical approach.

  19. Collisional, radiative and total electron interaction in compound semiconductor detectors and solid state nuclear track detectors: effective atomic number and electron density.

    PubMed

    Kurudirek, Murat; Kurudirek, Sinem V

    2015-05-01

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff and electron densities, Ne are widely used for characterization of interaction processes in radiation related studies. A variety of detectors are employed to detect different types of radiations i.e. photons and charged particles. In the present work, some compound semiconductor detectors (CSCD) and solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were investigated with respect to the partial as well as total electron interactions. Zeff and Ne of the given detectors were calculated for collisional, radiative and total electron interactions in the kinetic energy region 10keV-1GeV. Maximum values of Zeff and Ne were observed at higher kinetic energies of electrons. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne up to ≈20-25% were noticed for the detectors, GaN, ZnO, Amber and CR-39 for total electron interaction. Moreover, the obtained Zeff and Ne for electrons were compared to those obtained for photons in the entire energy region. Significant variations in Zeff were also noted not only for photons (up to ≈40% for GaN) but also between photons and electrons (up to ≈60% for CR-39) especially at lower energies. Except for the lower energies, Zeff and Ne keep more or less constant values for the given materials. The energy regions where Zeff and Ne keep constant clearly show the availability of using these parameters for characterization of the materials with respect to the radiation interaction processes. PMID:25702888

  20. Time resolving detector systems for radiobiological investigations of effects of single heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.U. ||

    1993-12-31

    The combination of the properties of Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) as image sensor and as detector for energetic charged particles makes them unique for time resolved radiation experiments in which single particles are to be correlated either to their radiation effects in individual objects, or to their sources or origins respectively. The experimental set up for the calibration of a frame transfer CCD type VALVO NXA 1011 with heavy ions from accelerators is described. For low energetic heavy ions, the single particle effects observed in the pixels of the sensor show a fairly linear response with the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) of the particle. As an example for the application of these detector systems in radiobiology, radiation effects of single ionizing particles in the meristem of moving biological objects have been investigated.

  1. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Hamilton, Allister B.

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  2. Clean recoil implantation of the 100Pd/Rh TDPAC probe using a solenoidal separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiona, A. A.; Kemp, W. J.; Williams, E.; Timmers, H.

    2012-10-01

    The synthesis and recoil implantation of the 100Pd/Rh probe for time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy using the solenoidal reaction product separator SOLITAIRE has been demonstrated for the first time. The separator suppresses the co-implantation of the intense flux of elastically scattered projectile ions that can affect results obtained with the hyperfine interactions technique. Using three different fusion evaporation reactions, the solenoid field was optimised at 4.5 T to achieve a concentrated, circular focus of evaporation residue ions with a lateral FWHM of 20 mm. Employing the reaction 92Zr(12C,4n)100Pd several samples have been recoil-implanted with the 100Pd/Rh probe. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of a silver sample and a TDPAC measurement on zinc confirm that the new preparation technique is effective. The ratio function measured with TDPAC of an undoped germanium sample may indicate that palladium-defect pairs are absent when implanting with SOLITAIRE. However, a direct comparison with TDPAC results for germanium samples prepared with conventional recoil implantation, which does not suppress the flux of elastics, does not support this assertion.

  3. Optical crosstalk in CT detectors and its effects on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Kam, Soohwa; Han, Jong Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-03-01

    Detectors for computed tomography (CT) typically consist of scintillator and photodiode arrays which are coupled using optical glue. Therefore, the leakage of optical photons generated in a scintillator block to neighboring pixel photodiodes through the optical glue layer is inevitable. Passivation layers to protect the silicon photodiode as well as the silicon layer itself, which is inactive to the optical photons, are another causes for the leakage. This optical crosstalk reduces image sharpness, and eventually will blur CT images. We have quantitatively investigated the optical crosstalk in CT detectors using the Monte Carlo technique. We performed the optical Monte Carlo simulations for various thicknesses of optical components in a 129 × 129 CT detector array. We obtained the coordinates of optical photons hitting the user-defined detection plane. From the coordinate information, we calculated the collection efficiency at the detection plane and the collection efficiency at the single pixel located just below the scintillator in which the optical photons were generated. Difference between the two quantities provided the optical crosstalk. In addition, using the coordinate information, we calculated point-spread functions as well as modulation-transfer functions from which we estimated the effective aperture due to the optical photon spreading. The optical crosstalk was most severely affected by the thickness of photodiode passivation layer. The effective aperture due to the optical crosstalk was about 110% of the detector pixel aperture for a 0.1 mm-thick passivation layer, and this signal blur was appeared as a relative error of about 3-4% in mismatches between CT images with and without the optical crosstalk. The detailed simulation results are shown and will be very useful for the design of CT detectors.

  4. Effect of detector dead time on the performance of optical direct-detection communication links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-C.

    1988-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating in the Geiger mode can provide a significantly improved single-photon detection sensitivity over conventional photodiodes. However, the quenching circuit required to remove the excess charge carriers after each photon event can introduce an undesirable dead time into the detection process. The effect of this detector dead time on the performance of a binary pulse-position-modulated (PPM) channel is studied by analyzing the error probability. It is shown that, when background noise is negligible, the performance of the detector with dead time is similar to that of a quantum-limited receiver. For systems with increasing background intensities, the error rate of the receiver starts to degrade rapidly with increasing dead time. The power penalty due to detector dead time is also evaluated and shown to depend critically on badkground intensity as well as dead time. Given the expected background strength in an optical channel, therefore, a constraint must be placed on the bandwidth of the receiver to limit the amount of power penalty due to detector dead time.

  5. [Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors]. Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-09-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the ``apple of the high energy physicist`s eye.`` Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference.

  6. Radiation Effects of n-type, Low Resistivity, Spiral Silicon Drift Detector Hybrid Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen W.; De Geronimo G.; Carini, G.A.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister, J.W.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Siddons, D.P.; Smith, G.C.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2011-11-15

    We have developed a new thin-window, n-type, low-resistivity, spiral silicon drift detector (SDD) array - to be used as an extraterrestrial X-ray spectrometer (in varying environments) for NASA. To achieve low-energy response, a thin SDD entrance window was produced using a previously developed method. These thin-window devices were also produced on lower resistivity, thinner, n-type, silicon material, effectively ensuring their radiation hardness in anticipation of operation in potentially harsh radiation environments (such as found around the Jupiter system). Using the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility beam line RERS1, we irradiated a set of suitable diodes up to 5 Mrad and the latest iteration of our ASICs up to 12 Mrad. Then we irradiated two hybrid detectors consisting of newly, such-produced in-house (BNL) SDD chips bonded with ASICs with doses of 0.25 Mrad and 1 Mrad. Also we irradiated another hybrid detector consisting of previously produced (by KETEK) on n-type, high-resistivity SDD chip bonded with BNL's ASICs with a dose of 1 Mrad. The measurement results of radiated diodes (up to 5 Mrad), ASICs (up to 12 Mrad) and hybrid detectors (up to 1 Mrad) are presented here.

  7. Effect of Detector Dead Time on the Performance of Optical Direct-Detection Communication Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-C.

    1988-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating in the Geiger mode can provide a significantly improved single-photon detect ion sensitivity over conventional photodiodes. However, the quenching circuit required to remove the excess charge carriers after each photon event can introduce an undesirable dead time into the detection process. The effect of this detector dead time on the performance of a binary pulse-position-modulted (PPM) channel is studied by analyzing the error probability. It is shown that, when back- ground noise is negligible, the performance of the detector with dead time is similar to that o f a quantum-limited receiver. For systems with increasing background intensities, the error rate of the receiver starts to degrade rapidly with increasing dead time. The power penalty due to detector dead time is also evaluated and shown to depend critically on background intensity as well as dead time. Given the expected background strength in an optical channel, therefore, a constraint must be placed on the bandwidth of the receiver to limit the amount of power penalty due to detector dead time.

  8. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Transfer Line Branch Considerations for Solenoid & VLPC

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-06-16

    The transfer line for the solenoid currently has a dead branch on it. Issues regarding the solenoid transfer line also apply to the VLPC transfer line. Issues that need to be addressed are: (1) What is the heat load on the branch? (2) Would it be a good idea to run the LN2 radiation shield on the branch? (3) What are the thermal acoustic oscillation parameters of a dead headed branch? A simple remedy, although not analyzed was to install a jumper with a flow restriction at the end of the helium piping to allow a small flow to pass from supply to return. Thus eliminating a stagnant gas volume in which pressure pulses would develop. (4) Do we need to have a vapor trap to keep liquid from sloshing back and forth from the cold end to the warm end? (5) Comment: The tee that passes the 2-phase return into the nested LHe supply/return pipe should be pointed up so that the volume of transfer line acts sort of like a phase separator full of liquid. It is very difficult to predict the behavior of the dead ended branch. Therefore the conservative thing to do is to keep the Branch cold as in option A. Use a valve inside the bayonet box for the LHe. Due to space constraints, use a valve and u-tube arrangement for the LN2. The additional heat leak from keeping the section cold is very reasonable. The heat load to LHe is 0.8 W or 2.3 W and to LN2 is 13 W or 71 W when the detector is run in the collision hall or assembly hall respectively. To prevent thermal acoustic oscillation from occurring in the dead ended female bayonets, we can install male bayonet vacuum plugs. The heat load to the system and behavior of such an arrangement will not provide any surprises, unlike a dead ended branch. It also allows flexibility's such as running the helium refrigeration plant without the detector for tests or for precooling the return lines during cooldown, just to name a few. The LHe control valves should have actuators and be able to be remotely controlled. The LN2 valves can be simple

  9. The IRAC Shutter Mechanism: Residual Magnetism and the Rotary Solenoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinger, Scott; Hakun, Claef; Brown, Gary; Blumenstock, Ken

    2002-01-01

    The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shutter mechanism was originally presented in the paper, 'A Low Power Cryogenic Shutter Mechanism for Use on Infrared Imagers' at the 34th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, May 2000. At that time, the shutter was believed to be performing flawlessly and there was every indication it would continue to do so. In early spring of 2001, the calibration shutter, a rotary solenoid designed to be fail-safe open, remained in a closed state with no power to the electromagnetic coils. The ensuing investigation, subsequent testing, proposed remedy, and lessons learned are the focus of this paper.

  10. Magnetoelectric excitations in hexaferrites utilizing solenoid coil for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Saba; Izadkhah, Hessam; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Vittoria, Carmine

    2015-11-01

    We have developed techniques for H- and E-field sensors utilizing single phase magnetoelectric hexaferrite materials in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 10 MHz. Novel excitation method incorporating solenoid coils and single and multi-capacitor banks were developed and tested for sensor detections. For H-field sensing we obtained sensitivity of about 3000 V/mG and for E-field sensing the sensitivity was 10-4 G/Vm-1. Tunability of about 0.1% was achieved for tunable inductor applications. However, the proposed designs lend themselves to significant (~106) improvements in sensitivity and tunability.

  11. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  12. Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yongjian; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for

  13. Te Inclusions in CZT Detectors: New Method for Correcting Their Adverse Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S.U.; Hawrami, R.; Hossain, A.; Yang, G.; James, R.B.

    2009-10-25

    Both Te inclusions and point defects can trap the charge carriers generated by ionizing particles in CdZnTe (CZT) detectors. The amount of charge trapped by point defects is proportional to the carriers’ drift time and can be corrected electronically. In the case of Te inclusions, the charge loss depends upon their random locations with respect to the electron cloud. Consequently, inclusions introduce fluctuations in the charge signals, which cannot be easily corrected. In this paper, we describe direct measurements of the cumulative effect of Te inclusions and its influence on the response of CZT detectors of different thicknesses and different sizes and concentrations of Te inclusions. We also discuss a means of partially correcting their adverse effects.

  14. Upper bound on the secret key rate distillable from effective quantum correlations with imperfect detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moroder, Tobias; Curty, Marcos; Luetkenhaus, Norbert

    2006-01-15

    We provide a simple method to obtain an upper bound on the secret key rate that is particularly suited to analyze practical realizations of quantum key distribution protocols with imperfect devices. We consider the so-called trusted device scenario where Eve cannot modify the actual detection devices employed by Alice and Bob. The upper bound obtained is based on the available measurements results, but it includes the effect of the noise and losses present in the detectors of the legitimate users.

  15. Comparator threshold settings and the effective pixel width of the PICASSO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F. C. M.; Rigon, L.; Fardin, L.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, M.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, R.

    2014-05-01

    Charge sharing plays an important role in the performance of single-photon counting microstrip detectors, since the comparator threshold defines the effective pixel width. In this contribution, the PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) single-photon counting microstrip detector oriented in edge-on configuration has been used to study its spatial resolution as a function of the comparator threshold. The experiment was carried out with monochromatic x-rays at the SYRMEP beamline of the Elettra synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy). The Edge Spread Function (i.e. the integral of the Line spread Function, LSF) was measured by horizontally translating vertical slits from a bar-pattern test-object in front of the detector, at four different photon energies (19, 20, 22, and 25 keV) and for several different values of the comparator threshold. The effect of charge sharing between strips on the spatial resolution has been quantified by calculating the horizontal Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). Moreover, the composite LSF from neighboring pixels was obtained: this allowed estimating the optimal threshold for each photon energy by selecting the threshold at which the composite LSF would approach unity along the entire width of the pixel. The results show that at thresholds lower than half of the photon energy, charge sharing increases the effective pixel width, causing a drop of the MTF, and it is responsible for the appearance of peaks in the composite LSF. Conversely, at thresholds higher than half of the photon energy, the effective pixel width is reduced and the spatial resolution is increased, but the collection efficiency is compromised, as demonstrated by the presence of valleys in the composite LSF.

  16. HIGH CHARGE EFFECTS IN SILICON DRIFT DETECTORS WITH LATERAL CONFINEMENT OF ELECTRONS.

    SciTech Connect

    CASTOLDI,A.; REHAK,P.

    1995-10-21

    A new drift detector prototype which provides suppression of the lateral diffusion of electrons has been tested as a function of the signal charge up to high charge levels, when electrostatic repulsion is not negligible. The lateral diffusion of the electron cloud has been measured for injected charges up to 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 5} electrons. The maximum number of electrons for which the suppression of the lateral spread is effective is obtained.

  17. Study of the effect of the stress on CdTe nuclear detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ayoub, M.; Radley, I.; Mullins, J. T.; Hage-Ali, M.

    2013-09-14

    CdTe detectors are commonly used for X and γ ray applications. The performance of these detectors is strongly affected by different types of mechanical stress; such as that caused by differential expansion between the semiconductor and its intimate metallic contacts and that caused by applied pressure during the bonding process. The aim of this work was to study the effects of stress on the performance of CdTe detectors. A difference in expansion coefficients induces transverse stress under the metallic contact, while contact pressure induces longitudinal stress. These stresses have been simulated by applying known static pressures. For the longitudinal case, the pressure was applied directly to the metallic contact; while in the transverse case, it was applied to the side. We have studied the effect of longitudinal and transverse stresses on the electrical characteristics including leakage current measurements and γ-ray detection performance. We have also investigated induced defects, their nature, activation energies, cross sections, and concentrations under the applied stress by using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy and thermoelectric effect spectroscopy techniques. The operational stress limit is also given.

  18. Anomalous spectral response in heterojunction PbTe/PbSnTe infrared detectors - A new effect: Two Peak Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Shuxing; Chen Boliang; Yuan Shixin )

    1991-03-01

    In the measurements of the spectral responses of PbTe/PbSnTe p-n heterojunction infrared detectors, the authors have discovered that there is an anomalous phenomenon in a few detectors when reverse bias is applied: there is not only a response peak in the 8-14 {mu}m long-wavelength range, but also another response peak in the 3-6 {mu}m short-wavelength range. They have also discovered that when reverse bias is increased, the heights of both spectral peaks can be adjusted, and the height of short-wavelength peak may be quickly increased, even if its long-wavelength peak is exceeded. This is an unreported new phenomenon up to now. It is shortly called anomalous phenomenon,' or Two Peak Effect' (TPE). This paper describes the new effect TPE' firstly, and makes a theoretical explanation. On the basis of this effect, it would be possible to make a new type of IR detector, which is quite different from the available detectors.

  19. CZT pixel detectors equipped with effective Ohmic contacts; their spectroscopic performance and the enigma of why they thus behave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hanany, Uri; Shahar, Allon; Tsigelman, A.

    1999-10-01

    The performance of CZT pixel detectors, with dedicated ICs and electronic processors, have been demonstrated. These nuclear imaging modules, developed primarily for the medical market, may be utilized for other applications, such as large area nuclear spectrometers. An improved crystal growth technique ensures a practical supply of wafers of which high performance detectors are fabricated. We believe that the high spectroscopic quality of these detectors stems from their effective Ohmic behavior, coupled with the geometrical, 'small pixel' effect. The Ohmic operation of these detectors has been described in a schematic way only, where the detailed non-equilibrium mechanism, responsible for it, still remains to be explained in detail. The IMARAD detector type 2, with contacts which strongly limit the dark current, exhibit even improved spectroscopic behavior, due to a dynamic Ohmic behavior of these contacts.

  20. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-14

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5–3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in

  1. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-01

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5-3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion in the

  2. Assessment of diagnostic methods for solenoid-operated valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryter, R. C.; Farmer, W. S.

    Solenoid-operated valves (SOV's) were studied at Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the USNRC Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The primary objective of the study was to identify, evaluate, and recommend methods for inspection, surveillance, monitoring, and maintenance of SOV's that can help ensure their operational readiness - that is, their ability to perform required safety functions under all anticipated operating conditions, since failure of one of these small and relatively inexpensive devices could have serious consequences under certain circumstances. Intrusive techniques requiring the addition of magnetic or acoustic sensors or the application of special test signals were investigated briefly, but major emphasis was placed on the examination of condition-indicating techniques that can be applied with minimal cost and impact on plant operation. These include monitoring coil mean temperature remotely by means of coil dc resistance or ac impedance, determining valve plunger position by means of coil ac impedance, verifying unrestricted SOV plunger movement by measuring current and voltage at their critical bistable (pull-in and drop-out) values, and detecting the presence of shorted turns or insulation breakdown within the solenoid coil using interrupted-current test methods. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the technical feasibility and practicality of the monitoring techniques assessed in the study, and recommendations for further work are provided.

  3. A Sub-Millimeter Solenoid Device for Trapping Paramagnetic Microbeads

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, L D; Cheung, L C; Mikkelsen, J C; Santiago, J G; bernhardt, A F; Malba, V

    2001-08-01

    We present the design and preliminary evaluation of a paramagnetic microsphere trapping and separation device consisting of a copper solenoid wrapped around a 1.3 mm diameter glass capillary. The magnetization and subsequent dipole-dipole interaction of paramagnetic spheres under an applied magnetic field results in the formation of bead chains that persist and grow under the applied field, but quickly disperse upon field removal. The chaining of paramagnetic spheres is important to the design of magnetic-based separation devices because the viscous-drag-limited velocities of chains are typically several times larger than that of individual particles. We have performed a set of experiments designed to evaluate the performance of a sub-millimeter solenoid device including measurements of the temperature versus field strength of the device, observations of the controlled chain formation process, and preliminary observations regarding the maximum flow rate over which the bead chains can be held in place by magnetic forces. These results are applicable to the design and characterization of magnetically induced microsphere trapping and separation systems which use pressure driven flow.

  4. Qualification of the Joints for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N; Berryhill, A; Kenney, S

    2011-09-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid has 36 interpancake joints, 12 bus joints, and 12 feeder joints in the magnet. The joints are required to have resistance below 4 nOhm at 45 kA at 4.5 K. The US ITER Project Office developed two different types of interpancake joints with some variations in details in order to find a better design, qualify the joints, and establish a fabrication process. We built and tested four samples of the sintered joints and two samples with butt-bonded joints (a total of eight joints). Both designs met the specifications. Results of the joint development, test results, and selection of the baseline design are presented and discussed in the paper. The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) consists of six modules. Each module is composed of six wound hexapancakes and one quadrapancake. The multipancakes are connected electrically and hydraulically by in-line interpancake joints. The joints are located at the outside diameter (OD) of the module. Cable in conduit conductor (CICC) high-current joints are critical elements in the CICC magnets. In addition to low resistivity, the CS joints must fit a space envelope equivalent to the regular conductor cross section and must have low hydraulic impedance and enough structural strength to withstand the hoop and compressive forces during operation, including cycling. This paper is the continuation of the work reported on the intermodule joints.

  5. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas is thought to be the cause of about 1100 lung cancer related deaths each year in the UK (1). Radon concentrations can be monitored using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable microscopic analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (2, 3). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs. Six SSNTDs were placed in a chamber with a luminous dial watch for a fixed period. The detectors were etched for between 30 minutes and 4.5 hours using 6M NaOH at a temperature of 90oC. A 'LEXT' OLS4000 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 2D and 3D image datasets of CR-39 plastic SSNTDs. Confocal microscope 3D images were acquired using a x50 or x100 objective lens. Data were saved as images and also spreadsheet files with height measurements. Software was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., USA) to analyse the height data. Comparing the 30 minute and 4 hour etching time detectors, we observed that there were marked differences in track area; the lower the etching time the smaller the track area. The degree to which etching may prevent visualising adjacent tracks also requires further study as it is possible that etching could result in some tracks being subsumed in other tracks. On the other hand if there is too little etching, track sizes would be reduced and hence could be more difficult to image; thus there is a balance required to obtain suitable measurement accuracy. (1) Gray A, Read S, McGale P and Darby S. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them. BMJ 2009; 338: a3110. (2) Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in

  6. Effects of atmospheric parameters on radon measurements using alpha-track detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; Zhuo, W. Fan, D.; Yi, Y.; Chen, B.

    2014-02-15

    The calibration factors of alpha-track radon detectors (ATDs) are essential for accurate determination of indoor radon concentrations. In this paper, the effects of atmospheric parameters on the calibration factors were theoretically studied and partially testified. Based on the atmospheric thermodynamics theory and detection characteristics of the allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39), the calibration factors for 5 types of ATDs were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations under different atmospheric conditions. Simulation results showed that the calibration factor increased by up to 31% for the ATDs with a decrease of air pressure by 35.5 kPa (equivalent to an altitude increase of 3500 m), and it also increased by up to 12% with a temperature increase from 5 °C to 35 °C, but it was hardly affected by the relative humidity unless the water-vapor condensation occurs inside the detectors. Furthermore, it was also found that the effects on calibration factors also depended on the dimensions of ATDs. It indicated that variations of the calibration factor with air pressure and temperature should be considered for an accurate radon measurement with a large dimensional ATD, and water-vapor condensation inside the detector should be avoided in field measurements.

  7. Trapezoidal-shaped detector to reduce edge effects in small gamma camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Hwang, Ji Yeon; Baek, Cheol-Ha; An, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun-Il; Kim, Kwang Hyun

    2011-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in compact and high resolution small gamma cameras for the early detection of breast cancer and thyroid diseases. We proposed a new detector consisting of a trapezoidal-shaped crystal and a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) to reduce the edge effect. In this study, the imaging performance of the proposed detector was evaluated by DETECT2000 simulation. Trapezoidal-shaped NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) crystals were modeled and the 2-dimensional event positions were calculated using Anger-logic. 99mTc (140 keV) and 131I (364 keV) gamma rays were generated on evenly spaced points with 3.0 mm spacing in the X-Y plane starting 1.0 mm away from the corner surface and 10,000 gamma events were simulated at each location. The simulated results demonstrated that all the 99mTc and 131I point sources were clearly identified in the NaI(Tl) crystal. CsI(Tl) crystal could image 131I sources without edge effect but did not distinguish 99mTc points at the periphery region due to low light yield. In conclusion, our new detector with an enlarged FOV without increasing crystal size could be a useful tool in breast as well as thyroid imaging.

  8. Effects of atmospheric parameters on radon measurements using alpha-track detectors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C; Zhuo, W; Fan, D; Yi, Y; Chen, B

    2014-02-01

    The calibration factors of alpha-track radon detectors (ATDs) are essential for accurate determination of indoor radon concentrations. In this paper, the effects of atmospheric parameters on the calibration factors were theoretically studied and partially testified. Based on the atmospheric thermodynamics theory and detection characteristics of the allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39), the calibration factors for 5 types of ATDs were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations under different atmospheric conditions. Simulation results showed that the calibration factor increased by up to 31% for the ATDs with a decrease of air pressure by 35.5 kPa (equivalent to an altitude increase of 3500 m), and it also increased by up to 12% with a temperature increase from 5 °C to 35 °C, but it was hardly affected by the relative humidity unless the water-vapor condensation occurs inside the detectors. Furthermore, it was also found that the effects on calibration factors also depended on the dimensions of ATDs. It indicated that variations of the calibration factor with air pressure and temperature should be considered for an accurate radon measurement with a large dimensional ATD, and water-vapor condensation inside the detector should be avoided in field measurements. PMID:24593337

  9. NIRSpec detectors: noise properties and the effect of signal dependent inter-pixel crosstalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Giovanna; Sirianni, Marco; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Lindler, Don; Boeker, Torsten; Ferruit, Pierre; De Marchi, Guido; Stuhlinger, Martin; Jensen, Peter; Strada, Paolo

    2012-07-01

    NIRSpec (Near Infrared Spectrograph) is one of the four science instruments of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and its focal plane consists of two HAWAII-2RG sensors operating in the wavelength range 0.6-5.0μm. As part of characterizing NIRSpec, we studied the noise properties of these detectors under dark and illuminated conditions. Under dark conditions, and as already known, 1/f noise in the detector system produces somewhat more noise than can be accounted for by a simple model that includes white read noise and shot noise on integrated charge. More surprisingly, at high flux, we observe significantly lower total noise levels than expected. We show this effect to be due to pixel-to-pixel correlations introduced by signal dependent inter-pixel crosstalk, with an inter-pixel coupling factor, α, that ranges from ~ 0.01 for zero signal to ~ 0.03 close to saturation.

  10. Non-uniformity effects of the inter-foil distance on GEM detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huang; Han, YI; Zhi-Gang, Xiao; Zhao, Zhang; Wen-Jing, Cheng; Li-Ming, Lü; Wei-Hua, Yan; Ren-Sheng, Wang; Hong-Jie, Li; Yan, Zhang; Li-Min, Duan; Rong-Jiang, Hu; Chen-Gui, Lu; He-Run, Yang; Peng, Ma; Hai-Yan, Gao

    2016-04-01

    The non-uniformity effect of the inter-foil distance has been studied using a gaseous electron multiplication (GEM) detector with sensitive area of 50mm × 50mm. A gradient of the inter-foil distance is introduced by using spacers with different heights at the two ends of the foil gap. While the cluster size and the intrinsic spatial resolution show insignificant dependence on the inter-foil distance, the gain exhibits an approximately linear dependence on the inter-foil distance. From the slope, a quantitative relationship between the change of the inter-foil distance and the change of the gain is derived, which can be used as a method to evaluate the non-uniformity of the foil gap in the application of large-area GEM detectors. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375094, U1332207, 11120101004), and by Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program

  11. Hole effective masses and subband splitting in type-II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2016-05-01

    We explore band structure effects to help determine the suitability of n-type type-II superlattice (T2SL) absorbers for infrared detectors. It is often assumed that the exceedingly large growth-direction band-edge curvature hole effective mass in n-type long wavelength infrared (LWIR) T2SL would lead to low hole mobility and therefore low detector collection quantum efficiency. We computed the thermally averaged conductivity effective mass and show that the LWIR T2SL hole conductivity effective mass along the growth direction can be orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding band-edge effective mass. LWIR InAs/GaSb T2SL can have significantly smaller growth-direction hole conductivity effective mass than its InAs/InAsSb counterpart. For the InAs/InAsSb T2SL, higher Sb fraction is more favorable for hole transport. Achieving long hole diffusion length becomes progressively more difficult for the InAs/InAsSb T2SL as the cutoff wavelength increases, since its growth-direction hole conductivity effective mass increases significantly with decreasing band gap. However, this is mitigated by the fact that the splitting between the top valence subbands also increases with the cutoff wavelength, leading to reduced inter-subband scattering and increased relaxation time.

  12. Using Experiment and Computer Modeling to Determine the Off-Axis Magnetic Field of a Solenoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lietor-Santos, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    The study of the ideal solenoid is a common topic among introductory-based physics textbooks and a typical current arrangement in laboratory hands-on experiences where the magnetic field inside a solenoid is determined at different currents and at different distances from its center using a magnetic probe. It additionally provides a very simple…

  13. Temperature sensitivity of surface channel effects on high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, E. L.; Pehl, R. H.; Madden, N. W.; Luke, P. N.; Cork, C. P.; Malone, D. L.; Xing, J. S.; Komisarcik, K.; Vanderwerp, J. D.; Friesel, D. L.

    1995-02-01

    The temperature sensitivity of surface channel effects on planar high-purity germanium detectors was measured using 60-keV gamma-ray scanning techniques, as part of a radiation damage study. When measured in this manner, the surface effects on most detectors showed extreme temperature sensitivity in the 72-95 K region. The effect of the surface channel increased with increasing temperature to such an extent that the efficiency, as measured by the count rate in the 1332-keV peak from a 60Co source, decreased by a factor of over two in some cases. Since the peak efficiency for the 1332-keV gamma ray decreased as the temperature increased throughout the operating range (72-120 K) the effect of the surface channel must continue to increase beyond the temperature (95 K) at which the 60-keV scan loses its sensitivity because of the strong attenuation of these much lower energy gamma rays. Radiation damage had no measurable effect on the surface characteristics. No correlation between the surface effects and the resolution changes of the 1332-keV peak was observed.

  14. Forward Tracking with the JLab/MEIC Detector Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyde, Charles; JLab/MEIC Design Team

    2015-10-01

    At a future electron ion collider (EIC), the quark-gluon structure of the NN force can be probed in e . g . deeply virtual exclusive scattering on a tensor polarized Deuteron and diffractive DIS on the deuteron with tagging of the NN final state. The MEIC design includes two Interaction Points (IPs), each of which can operate simultaneously at full luminosity. The detector and beam-line optics for IP1 are designed to be nearly hermetic for all particles outside the presumed 10-sigma admittance (longitudinal and transverse) of the figure-8 accelerator lattice. The integration of the IP1 detector with the lattice extends 40 m downstream of the IP in both the electron and ion directions. The central region of the detector is a new 4 m long 3 m diameter 3 Tesla solenoid. Analysis in the forward ion direction is enhanced by the 50 mrad crossing angle at the IP, and a two-stage spectrometer integrated into the first 36 m of the accelerator lattice. In this talk I will present the optics and resolution of the forward ion spectrometer, including resolution effects of an initial beam pipe design. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. A theoretical model for the overlapping effect in solid state nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Coto, I.; Bolívar, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) are commonly deployed in many scientific and technological fields due to their low cost and relatively easy handling. In general, SSNTD response is considered to be linear, with exposure and efficiency supposedly constant across the entire exposure range, but in reality this response varies at high exposure levels, and efficiency diminishes as exposure rises. In high exposure measurements, this phenomenon results in an underestimation of the exposure levels and the results obtained must be treated with caution. To explain this phenomenon, this work establishes a theoretical model based on the track overlapping. Furthermore, an algorithm based on the Monte Carlo method has been used to obtain numerical results and a set of around 40 SSNTD has been exposed to three different exposure levels to validate this model. It has been demonstrated that overlapping efficiency is a linear function of the real exposure. The slope depends on the surface of the tracks, the resolution of the counting system and the reference efficiency for low exposures. The initial offset can be associated to the track background that reduces the overlapped efficiency. The recorded exposure can be modeled as a quadratic function of the real exposure without initial offset. As a result, the experimental data have been fitted to second order polynomial functions and the detectors parameters have been obtained. If detector parameters such as reference efficiency and track radio are known, the model can reliably predict the overlapping effect and enable the correction of the solid state track detector measurements. These results could also be extended to other SSNTD applications.

  16. Huntingtin's spherical solenoid structure enables polyglutamine tract-dependent modulation of its structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vijayvargia, Ravi; Epand, Raquel; Leitner, Alexander; Jung, Tae-Yang; Shin, Baehyun; Jung, Roy; Lloret, Alejandro; Singh Atwal, Randy; Lee, Hyeongseok; Lee, Jong-Min; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hebert, Hans; Song, Ji-Joon; Seong, Ihn Sik

    2016-01-01

    The polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin protein causes Huntington's disease. Here, we investigated structural and biochemical properties of huntingtin and the effect of the polyglutamine expansion using various biophysical experiments including circular dichroism, single-particle electron microscopy and cross-linking mass spectrometry. Huntingtin is likely composed of five distinct domains and adopts a spherical α-helical solenoid where the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal regions fold to contain a circumscribed central cavity. Interestingly, we showed that the polyglutamine expansion increases α-helical properties of huntingtin and affects the intramolecular interactions among the domains. Our work delineates the structural characteristics of full-length huntingtin, which are affected by the polyglutamine expansion, and provides an elegant solution to the apparent conundrum of how the extreme amino-terminal polyglutamine tract confers a novel property on huntingtin, causing the disease. PMID:27003594

  17. Quench protection analysis of the Mu2e production solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashikhin, Vadim; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nikolai; Lamm, Michael; Nicol, Thomas; Orris, Darryl; Page, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The Mu2e magnet system consists of three large superconducting solenoids. In case of a quench, the stored magnetic energy is extracted to an external dump circuit. However, because of the fast current decay, a significant fraction of the energy dissipates inside of the cryostat in the coil support shells made of structural aluminum, and in the radiation shield. A 3D finite-element model of the complete cold-mass was created in order to simulate the quench development and understand the role of the quench-back. The simulation results are reported at the normal and non-standard operating conditions.

  18. Development of the Butt Joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2006-08-23

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) requires compact and reliable joints for its Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC). The baseline design is a diffusion bonded butt joint. In such a joint the mating cables are compacted to a very low void fraction in a copper sleeve and then heat treated. After the heat treatment the ends are cut, polished and aligned against each other and then diffusion bonded under high compression in a vacuum chamber at 750 C. The jacket is then welded on the conductor to complete the joint, which remarkably does not require more room than a regular conductor. This joint design is based on a proven concept developed for the ITER CS Model Coil that was successfully tested in the previous R&D phase.

  19. The Hall D solenoid helium refrigeration system at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Laverdure, Nathaniel A.; Creel, Jonathan D.; Dixon, Kelly d.; Ganni, Venkatarao; Martin, Floyd D.; Norton, Robert O.; Radovic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Hall D, the new Jefferson Lab experimental facility built for the 12GeV upgrade, features a LASS 1.85 m bore solenoid magnet supported by a 4.5 K helium refrigerator system. This system consists of a CTI 2800 4.5 K refrigerator cold box, three 150 hp screw compressors, helium gas management and storage, and liquid helium and nitrogen storage for stand-alone operation. The magnet interfaces with the cryo refrigeration system through an LN2-shielded distribution box and transfer line system, both designed and fabricated by JLab. The distribution box uses a thermo siphon design to respectively cool four magnet coils and shields with liquid helium and nitrogen. We describe the salient design features of the cryo system and discuss our recent commissioning experience.

  20. Quench protection analysis of the Mu2e production solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vadim; Ambrosio, Giorgio; Andreev, Nikolai; Lamm, Michael; Nicol, Thomas; Orris, Darryl; Page, Thomas

    2014-01-29

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The Mu2e magnet system consists of three large superconducting solenoids. In case of a quench, the stored magnetic energy is extracted to an external dump circuit. However, because of the fast current decay, a significant fraction of the energy dissipates inside of the cryostat in the coil support shells made of structural aluminum, and in the radiation shield. A 3D finite-element model of the complete cold-mass was created in order to simulate the quench development and understand the role of the quench-back. The simulation results are reported at the normal and non-standard operating conditions.

  1. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype tests results

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lopes, Mauricio L.; G. Ambrosio; DiMarco, J.; Evbota, D.; Feher, S.; Friedsam, H.; Galt, A.; Hays, S.; Hocker, J.; Kim, M. J.; et al

    2016-02-08

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment has been developed to search for evidence of charged lepton flavor violation through the direct conversion of muons into electrons. The transport solenoid is an s-shaped magnet which guides the muons from the source to the stopping target. It consists of fifty-two superconducting coils arranged in twenty-seven coil modules. A full-size prototype coil module, with all the features of a typical module of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured by a collaboration between INFN-Genoa and Fermilab. The prototype contains two coils that can be powered independently. In order to validate the design, the magnet went throughmore » an extensive test campaign. Warm tests included magnetic measurements with a vibrating stretched wire, electrical and dimensional checks. As a result, the cold performance was evaluated by a series of power tests as well as temperature dependence and minimum quench energy studies.« less

  2. Solenoid-based focusing in a proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I; DiMarco, J.; Schappert, W.; Sergatskov, d.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Development of solenoid-based focusing lenses for the transport channel of an R&D linac front end at FNAL (HINS linac) is in its final stage. Superconducting lenses for the room temperature RF section of the linac are assembled into individual cryostats and certified using a dedicated test stand. During this certification process, the optical axis of each lens relative to the cryogenic vessel is found in the warm and cold state. Lenses for the superconducting RF sections are ready for production, and development of a cryomodule (which contains multiple superconducting lenses and RF cavities) is in progress. Studies have been conducted to measure fringe magnetic field of a lens in the cryomodule, to investigate a laser-based method of alignment, and to evaluate the extent of beam quality degradation due to imperfections in lens construction and alignment. This report presents some results of these studies.

  3. Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

  4. Application & testing of high temperature materials for solenoid coils

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.; Zich, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has designed and proven-in two new Solenoid coils for a highly-reliable electromechanical switch. Mil-Spec Magnetics Inc., Walnut CA manufactured the coils. The new design utilizes two new materials: Liquid Crystal Polymer (Vectra C130) for the bobbin and Thermal Barrier Silicone (VI-SIL V-658) for the encapsulant. The use of these two new materials solved most of the manufacturing problems inherent in the old Sandia design. The coils are easier to precision wind and more robust for handling, testing, and storage. The coils have some unique weapon related safety requirements. The most severe of these requirements is the 400{degrees}C, 1600 V test. The coils must not, and did not, produce any outgassing products to affect the voltage breakdown between contacts in the switch at these temperatures and voltages. Actual coils in switches were tested under these conditions. This paper covers the prove-in of this new coil design.

  5. Static thrust improvement of a linear proportional solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Kihara, S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Nakagawa, H.; Hagiwara, K.

    1994-11-01

    A linear proportional solenoid (LPS) is an actuator for a proportional control valve used in hydraulic pressure-control devices. The LPS thrust must be constant over a specified displacement range, and must be proportional to the current. This paper describes simulations of the thrust-displacement characteristics of LPSes as determined by FEM, conducted with the aim of improving the LPM thrust. In model P, where high flux-density permendur was used in the LPS stator and mover, the maximum thrust increased from 27 to 40 N. The range of constant thrust, however, decreased from 1.0 to 0.5 mm. In model S, where permendur was used in the stator and mover, and the salient pole of the stator in the LPS was modified, the range of constant thrust was the same as in the present model. Moreover, the static thrust in the range of constant thrust increased from 27 to 38 N.

  6. Study of HTS Insert Coils for High Field Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Vito; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Fermilab is currently working on the development of high field magnet systems for ionization cooling of muon beams. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these solenoids using Helium refrigeration. Several studies have been performed on insert coils made of BSCCO-2223 tapes and second generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors, which are tested at various temperatures and at external fields of up to 14 T. Critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of YBCO short samples are presented as a function of bending stress, magnetic field and field orientation with respect to the sample surface. An analytical fit of critical current data as a function of field and field orientation is also presented. Results from several single-layer and double-layer pancake coils are also discussed.

  7. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    SciTech Connect

    Khodak, Andrei; Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre; Titus, Peter

    2015-06-21

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagnetic simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4K, no current, (3) temperature 4K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4K, no current, and temperature 4K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Lastly, special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor material. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khodak, Andrei; Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre; Titus, Peter

    2015-06-21

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagneticmore » simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4K, no current, (3) temperature 4K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4K, no current, and temperature 4K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Lastly, special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor material. Published by Elsevier B.V.« less

  9. Proton dose distribution measurements using a MOSFET detector with a simple dose-weighted correction method for LET effects.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Hotta, Kenji; Matsuura, Taeko; Matsubara, Kana; Nishioka, Shie; Nishio, Teiji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally evaluated the proton beam dose reproducibility, sensitivity, angular dependence and depth-dose relationships for a new Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) detector. The detector was fabricated with a thinner oxide layer and was operated at high-bias voltages. In order to accurately measure dose distributions, we developed a practical method for correcting the MOSFET response to proton beams. The detector was tested by examining lateral dose profiles formed by protons passing through an L-shaped bolus. The dose reproducibility, angular dependence and depth-dose response were evaluated using a 190 MeV proton beam. Depth-output curves produced using the MOSFET detectors were compared with results obtained using an ionization chamber (IC). Since accurate measurements of proton dose distribution require correction for LET effects, we developed a simple dose-weighted correction method. The correction factors were determined as a function of proton penetration depth, or residual range. The residual proton range at each measurement point was calculated using the pencil beam algorithm. Lateral measurements in a phantom were obtained for pristine and SOBP beams. The reproducibility of the MOSFET detector was within 2%, and the angular dependence was less than 9%. The detector exhibited a good response at the Bragg peak (0.74 relative to the IC detector). For dose distributions resulting from protons passing through an L-shaped bolus, the corrected MOSFET dose agreed well with the IC results. Absolute proton dosimetry can be performed using MOSFET detectors to a precision of about 3% (1 sigma). A thinner oxide layer thickness improved the LET in proton dosimetry. By employing correction methods for LET dependence, it is possible to measure absolute proton dose using MOSFET detectors. PMID:21587191

  10. A new generation of superconducting solenoids for heavy-ion linac application.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kim, S. H.; Lessner, E. S.; Shepard, K. W.; Laxdal, R. E.; Wheatley, R.

    2002-08-22

    The beam dynamics of superconducting (SC) heavy-ion linacs operating in the velocity range below 0.4c require a compact accelerating-focusing lattice. The use of SC solenoids together with SC RF resonators within a common cryostat can solve the real-estate problem. The solenoids must have low fringe fields to avoid magnetic flux capture in the SC RF resonators. Also, incorporating dipole steering coils together with the SC solenoids in one magnet assembly can increase the compactness of the linac lattice. R&D work has been carried out to determine the feasibility of combining the three elements of high solenoid field, low fringe field, and integral dipole field, into one compact package. A 9-Tesla magnet has been initially designed and will be prototyped, with the goal of eventually developing 14-Tesla solenoids of similar design. The most important design issues are: (1) to minimize stray field in the RF cavity region using SC bucking coils and (2) to achieve adequate mechanical stability of the transverse dipole windings in the presence of forces produced by the solenoid/bucking coil assembly. The assembly, including terminals, switches, and protection circuit, are designed to fit inside a 25-cm diameter helium reservoir. The results of the preliminary design of the solenoid, including numerical simulations of the beam dynamics, are reported.

  11. Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid For Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Anerella, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Kayran, D; McIntyre, G; Muratore, J; Plate, S; Sampson, W; Cole, M

    2011-03-28

    An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at {approx}77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the design, construction and test results of this HTS solenoid. The HTS solenoid in the proposed ERL will be situated in the transition region between the superconducting cavity at {approx}4 K and the cryostat at the room temperature. Solenoid inside the cryogenic structure provides an early focusing and hence low emittance beam. The temperature in the transition region will be too high for a conventional low temperature superconductor and resistive heat load from copper coils will be too high on cryogenic system. HTS coils also allow much higher current density and significant reduction in size as compared to copper coils. Hence HTS solenoid provide a unique and technically superior solution. The use of a HTS solenoid with superconducting cavity offers a unique option as it can be placed in a cold to warm transition region to provide early focussing without using additional space. Construction and test results so far are very encouraging for its use in the ERL project.

  12. New Generation of Superconducting Solenoids for Heavy-Ion Linac Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kim, S. H.; Lessner, E. S.; Shepard, K. W.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    The beam dynamics of superconducting (SC) heavy-ion linacs operating in the velocity range below 0.4c require a compact accelerating-focusing lattice. The use of SC solenoids together with SC RF resonators within a common cryostat can solve the real-estate problem. The solenoids must have low fringe fields to avoid magnetic-flux capture in the SC RF resonators. Also, incorporating dipole steering coils together with the SC solenoids in one magnet assembly can increase the compactness of the linac lattice. R&D work has been carried out to determine the feasibility of combining the three elements of high solenoid field, low fringe field, and integral dipole field, into one compact package. A 9-Tesla magnet has been initially designed and will be prototyped, with the goal of eventually developing 14-Tesla solenoids of similar design. The most important design issues are: (1) to minimize stray field in the RF cavity region using SC bucking coils and (2) to achieve adequate mechanical stability of the transverse dipole windings in the presence of forces produced by the solenoid/bucking coil assembly. The assembly, including terminals, switches, and protection circuit, are designed to fit inside a 25-cm diameter helium reservoir. The results of the preliminary design of the solenoid, including numerical simulations of the beam dynamics, are reported.

  13. TURBULENCE IN THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM: SOLENOIDAL AND DILATATIONAL MOTIONS AND THE IMPACT OF NUMERICAL VISCOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weishan; Gu, Qiusheng; Feng, Long-long; Xia, Yinhua; Shu, Chi-Wang; Fang, Li-Zhi

    2013-11-01

    We use a suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, run by two fixed grid codes, to investigate the properties of solenoidal and dilatational motions of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the impact of numerical viscosity on turbulence in an ΛCDM universe. The codes differ only in the spatial difference discretization. We find that (1) The vortical motion grows rapidly since z = 2 and reaches ∼10 km s{sup –1}-90 km s{sup –1} at z = 0. Meanwhile, the small-scale compressive ratio r{sub CS} drops from 0.84 to 0.47, indicating comparable vortical and compressive motions at z = 0. (2) Power spectra of the solenoidal velocity possess two regimes, ∝k {sup –0.89} and ∝k {sup –2.02}, while the total and dilatational velocity follow the scaling k {sup –1.88} and k {sup –2.20}, respectively, in the turbulent range. The IGM turbulence may contain two distinct phases, the supersonic and post-supersonic phases. (3) The non-thermal pressure support, measured by the vortical kinetic energy, is comparable with the thermal pressure for ρ{sub b} ≅ 10-100, or T < 10{sup 5.5} K at z = 0.0. The deviation of the baryon fraction from the cosmic mean shows a preliminary positive correlation with the turbulence pressure support. (4) A relatively higher numerical viscosity would dissipate both the compressive and vortical motions of the IGM into thermal energy more effectively, resulting in less developed vorticity, remarkably shortened inertial range, and leading to a non-negligible uncertainty in the thermal history of gas accretion. Shocks in regions outside of clusters are significantly suppressed by numerical viscosity since z = 2, which may directly cause the different levels of turbulence between the two codes.

  14. Correction for the detector-dead-time effect on the second-order correlation of stationary sub-Poissonian light in a two-detector configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Byoung-moo; Song, Younghoon; Kim, Junki; Yang, Daeho; An, Kyungwon

    2015-08-01

    Exact measurement of the second-order correlation function g(2 )(t ) of a light source is essential when investigating the photon statistics and the light generation process of the source. For a stationary single-mode light source, the Mandel Q factor is directly related to g(2 )(0 ) . For a large mean photon number in the mode, the deviation of g(2 )(0 ) from unity is so small that even a tiny error in measuring g(2 )(0 ) would result in an inaccurate Mandel Q . In this work, we address the detector-dead-time effect on g(2 )(0 ) of stationary sub-Poissonian light. It is then found that detector dead time can induce a serious error in g(2 )(0 ) and thus in Mandel Q in those cases even in a two-detector configuration. Utilizing the cavity-QED microlaser, a well-established sub-Poissonian light source, we measured g(2 )(0 ) with two different types of photodetectors with different dead times. We also introduced prolonged dead time by intentionally deleting the photodetection events following a preceding one within a specified time interval. We found that the observed Q of the cavity-QED microlaser was underestimated by 19% with respect to the dead-time-free Q when its mean photon number was about 600. We derived an analytic formula which well explains the behavior of the g(2 )(0 ) as a function of the dead time.

  15. Monte Carlo Simulations of High-speed, Time-gated MCP-based X-ray Detectors: Saturation Effects in DC and Pulsed Modes and Detector Dynamic Range

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Kruschwitz, Ming Wu, Ken Moy, Greg Rochau

    2008-10-31

    We present here results of continued efforts to understand the performance of microchannel plate (MCP)–based, high-speed, gated, x-ray detectors. This work involves the continued improvement of a Monte Carlo simulation code to describe MCP performance coupled with experimental efforts to better characterize such detectors. Our goal is a quantitative description of MCP saturation behavior in both static and pulsed modes. We have developed a new model of charge buildup on the walls of the MCP channels and measured its effect on MCP gain. The results are compared to experimental data obtained with a short-pulse, high-intensity ultraviolet laser; these results clearly demonstrate MCP saturation behavior in both DC and pulsed modes. The simulations compare favorably to the experimental results. The dynamic range of the detectors in pulsed operation is of particular interest when fielding an MCP–based camera. By adjusting the laser flux we study the linear range of the camera. These results, too, are compared to our simulations.

  16. Orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Siberian snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2016-02-01

    Two solenoid Siberian snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in the “spin transparency” mode of the NICA collider. The field integrals of the solenoid snakes for protons and deuterons at maximum momentum of 13.5 GeV/c are equal to 2×50 T·m and 2×160 T·m respectively. The snakes introduce strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in NICA collider with solenoid snakes are presented.

  17. Study of the effect of NbN on microwave Niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liccardo, V.; França, E. K.; Aguiar, O. D.; Oliveira, R. M.; Ribeiro, K. L.; Silva, M. M. N. F.

    2016-07-01

    Superconducting reentrant cavities may be used in parametric transducers for resonant-mass gravitational wave detectors. When coupled to a spherical resonant antenna, transducers will monitor its mechanical quadrupolar modes, working as a mass-spring system. In this paper we will investigate the effect of the Niobium Nitride (NbN), produced through plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), on the quality factor of reentrant Niobium (Nb) cavities. With the PIII surface treatment unloaded electrical Q-factors (Q0) of the order of 105 were obtained in cryogenic conditions. These results indicated a significant increase in the effect of superconductivity after the cavity surfaces have been heavily attacked by a concentrated acid mixture and after suffering successive PIII processes. Q0's ~ 3.0 × 105 at 4.2 K are expected to be obtained using Nb RRR399 with a suitable surface treatment. These cavities, with high Q0, are already installed and being tested in the Gravitational Wave Detector Mario Schenberg. The experimental tests have been carried out at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE).

  18. The effect of irradiation with high-energy protons on 4H-SiC detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kazukauskas, V. Jasiulionis, R.; Kalendra, V.; Vaitkus, J.-V.

    2007-03-15

    The effect of irradiation of 4H-SiC ionizing-radiation detectors with various doses (as high as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}) of 24-GeV protons is studied. Isotopes of B, Be, Li, He, and H were produced in the nuclear spallation reactions of protons with carbon. Isotopes of Al, Mg, Na, Ne, F, O, and N were produced in the reactions of protons with silicon. The total amount of the produced stable isotopes varied in proportion with the radiation dose from 1.2 x 10{sup 11} to 5.9 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. It is shown that, at high radiation doses, the contact characteristics of the detectors change appreciably. The potential-barrier height increased from the initial value of 0.7-0.75 eV to 0.85 eV; the rectifying characteristics of the Schottky contacts deteriorated appreciably. These effects are attributed to the formation of a disordered structure of the material as a result of irradiation.

  19. Effectiveness of electrostatic shielding and electronic subtraction to correct for the hole trapping in CdZnTe semiconductor detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Hossain, A.; Cui, Y.; James, R. B.

    2007-04-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) is a very promising material for nuclear-radiation detectors. CZT detectors operate at ambient temperatures and offer high detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution, placing them ahead of high-purity Ge for those applications where cryogenic cooling is problematic. The progress achieved in CZT detectors over the past decade is founded on the developments of robust detector designs and readout electronics, both of which helped to overcome the effects of carrier trapping. Because the holes have low mobility, only electrons can be used to generate signals in thick CZT detectors, so one must account for the variation of the output signal versus the locations of the interaction points. To obtain high spectral resolution, the detector's design should provide a means to eliminate this dependence throughout the entire volume of the device. In reality, the sensitive volume of any ionization detector invariably has two regions. In the first, adjacent to the collecting electrode, the amplitude of the output signal rapidly increases almost to its maximum as the interaction point is located farther from the anode; in the rest of the volume, the output signal remains nearly constant. Thus, the quality of CZT detector designs can be characterized based on the magnitude of the signals variations in the drift region and the ratio between the volumes of the drift and induction regions. The former determines the "geometrical" width of the photopeak, i.e., the line width that affects the total energy resolution and is attributed to the device's geometry when all other factors are neglected. The latter determines the photopeak efficiency and the area under the continuum in the pulse-height spectra. In this work, we describe our findings from systematizing different designs of CZT detectors and evaluating their performance based on these two criteria.

  20. EFFECTIVENESS OF ELECTROSTATIC SHIELDING AND ELECTRONIC SUBTRACTION TO CORRECT FOR THE HOLE TRAPPING IN CDZNTE SEMICONDUCTOR DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    BOLOTNIKOV,A.E.; CAMARDA, G.S.; HOSSAIN, A.; CUI, Y.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-08-26

    CdZnTe (CZT) is a very promising material for nuclear-radiation detectors. CZT detectors operate at ambient temperatures and offer high detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution, placing them ahead of high-purity Ge for those applications where cryogenic cooling is problematic. The progress achieved in CZT detectors over the past decade is founded on the developments of robust detector designs and readout electronics, both of which helped to overcome the effects of carrier trapping. Because the holes have low mobility, only electrons can be used to generate signals in thick CZT detectors, so one must account for the variation of the output signal versus the locations of the interaction points. To obtain high spectral resolution, the detector's design should provide a means to eliminate this dependence throughout the entire volume of the device. In reality, the sensitive volume of any ionization detector invariably has two regions. In the first, adjacent to the collecting electrode, the amplitude of the output signal rapidly increases almost to its maximum as the interaction point is located farther from the anode; in the rest of the volume, the output signal remains nearly constant. Thus, the quality of CZT detector designs can be characterized based on the magnitude of the signals variations in the drift region and the ratio between the volumes of the driR and induction regions. The former determines the ''geometrical'' width of the photopeak i.e., the line width that affects the total energy resolution and is attributed to the device's geometry when all other factors are neglected. The latter determines the photopeak efficiency and the area under the continuum in the pulse-height spectra. In this work, we describe our findings from systematizing different designs of CZT detectors and evaluating their performance based on these two criteria.

  1. An effect of the networks of the subgrain boundaries on spectral responses of thick CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A.; Butcher, J.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S.; Fochuk, P.; Gul,R.; Hamade, M.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Kopach,O.; Petryk, M.; Raghothamachar, B.; Yang, G.; and James, R.B.

    2011-08-12

    CdZnTe (CZT) crystals used for nuclear-radiation detectors often contain high concentrations of subgrain boundaries and networks of poligonized dislocations that can significantly degrade the performance of semiconductor devices. These defects exist in all commercial CZT materials, regardless of their growth techniques and their vendor. We describe our new results from examining such detectors using IR transmission microscopy and white X-ray beam diffraction topography. We emphasize the roles on the devices performances of networks of subgrain boundaries with low dislocation densities, such as poligonized dislocations and mosaic structures. Specifically, we evaluated their effects on the gamma-ray responses of thick, >10 mm, CZT detectors. Our findings set the lower limit on the energy resolution of CZT detectors containing dense networks of subgrain boundaries, and walls of dislocations.

  2. Development of a Cost-Effective Modular Pixelated NaI(Tl) Detector for Clinical SPECT Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rozler, Mike; Liang, Haoning; Chang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    A new pixelated detector for high-resolution clinical SPECT applications was designed and tested. The modular detector is based on a scintillator block comprised of 2.75×2.75×10 mm3 NaI(Tl) pixels and decoded by an array of 51 mm diameter single-anode PMTs. Several configurations, utilizing two types of PMTs, were evaluated using a collimated beam source to measure positioning accuracy directly. Good pixel separation was observed, with correct pixel identification ranging from 60 to 72% averaged over the entire area of the modules, depending on the PMT type and configuration. This translates to a significant improvement in positioning accuracy compared to continuous slab detectors of the same thickness, along with effective reduction of “dead” space at the edges. The observed 10% average energy resolution compares well to continuous slab detectors. The combined performance demonstrates the suitability of pixelated detectors decoded with a relatively small number of medium-sized PMTs as a cost-effective approach for high resolution clinical SPECT applications, in particular those involving curved detector geometries. PMID:24146436

  3. Verification of the plan dosimetry for high dose rate brachytherapy using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Lu Jie; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2007-06-15

    The feasibility of a recently designed metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning was investigated. MOSFET detectors were calibrated with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} NE-2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber in water. Key characteristics of the MOSFET detectors, such as the energy dependence, that will affect phantom measurements with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources were measured. The MOSFET detector was then applied to verify the dosimetric accuracy of HDR brachytherapy treatments in a custom-made water phantom. Three MOSFET detectors were calibrated independently, with the calibration factors ranging from 0.187 to 0.215 cGy/mV. A distance dependent energy response was observed, significant within 2 cm from the source. The new MOSFET detector has a good reproducibility (<3%), small angular effect (<2%), and good dose linearity (R{sup 2}=1). It was observed that the MOSFET detectors had a linear response to dose until the threshold voltage reached approximately 24 V for {sup 192}Ir source measurements. Further comparison of phantom measurements using MOSFET detectors with dose calculations by a commercial treatment planning system for computed tomography-based brachytherapy treatment plans showed that the mean relative deviation was 2.2{+-}0.2% for dose points 1 cm away from the source and 2.0{+-}0.1% for dose points located 2 cm away. The percentage deviations between the measured doses and the planned doses were below 5% for all the measurements. The MOSFET detector, with its advantages of small physical size and ease of use, is a reliable tool for quality assurance of HDR brachytherapy. The phantom verification method described here is universal and can be applied to other HDR brachytherapy treatments.

  4. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in the Photodetachment Microscopy of Hydrogen Negative Ions in an Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dehua

    2014-09-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect in the photodetachment microscopy of the H- ions in an electric field has been studied on the basis of the semiclassical theory. After the H- ion is irradiated by a laser light, they provide a coherent electron source. When the detached electron is accelerated by a uniform electric field, two trajectories of a detached electron which run from the source to the same point on the detector, will interfere with each other and lead to an interference pattern in the photodetachment microscopy. After the solenoid is electrified beside the H- ion, even though no Lorentz force acts on the electron outside the solenoid, the photodetachment microscopy interference pattern on the detector is changed with the variation in the magnetic flux enclosed by the solenoid. This is caused by the AB effect. Under certain conditions, the interference pattern reaches the macroscopic dimensions and could be observed in a direct AB effect experiment. Our study can provide some predictions for the future experimental study of the AB effect in the photodetachment microscopy of negative ions.

  5. Non-solenoidal Plasma Startup in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sontag, Aaron

    2008-11-01

    Non-solenoidal (NS) startup will simplify the design of future tokamaks by eliminating need for a central solenoid and is required for an ST based CTF. In Pegasus, washer-stack current sources (plasma guns) are used to initiate NS discharges via point-source DC helicity injection. Current injected parallel to the helical vacuum field can relax into a tokamak-like configuration with toroidally-averaged closed flux and tokamak-like confinement. This requires no modification of the vacuum vessel and is scalable to fusion grade systems with proper geometry. Guns in the divertor region create discharges with Ip up to 50 kA, 3 times the vacuum windup. Nonlinear 3D simulation with NIMROD shows excitation of a line-tied kink, producing poloidal flux amplification. Evidence of flux amplification includes: reversal of edge poloidal magnetic flux; Ip increase over vacuum geometric windup; plasma position subject to radial force balance; and persistence of Ip after gun shut-off. Equilibria show high edge current (li = 0.2) and elevated q (qmin> 6), allowing access to high IN (IN> 12). Guns at the outboard midplane produce Ip up to 7 times the vacuum windup with large n=1 activity when edge q passes through rational surfaces. Line averaged density up to 2x10^19 m-3 after relaxation shows an increase in particle confinement over non-relaxed cases. Maximum Ip is determined by helicity and radial force balance, tokamak stability, and Taylor relaxation. Coupling midplane gun discharges to other CD is straightforward due to Ip decay times >3 ms. Poloidal field induction has been used to create NS discharges up to 80 kA and gun plasmas with Ip of 60 kA have been ramped to over 100 kA by including OH drive. Present research is aimed at understanding the physics of this technique in order to form NS targets in excess of 200 kA and design NS startup systems for larger devices.

  6. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2010-09-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  7. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Colin

    2011-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  8. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2012-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  9. NUV Detector Dark Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Justin

    2013-10-01

    Perform routine monitoring of MAMA detector dark current. The main purpose isto look for evidence of a change in the dark rates, both to track on-orbit timedependence and to check for a detector problem developing. The spatial distribution of dark rates on the detector and the effect of SAA will also be studied.

  10. Effect of an alcohol-based caries detector on the surface tension of sodium hypochlorite preparations.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Fedele, Giampiero; Guastalli, Andrea R

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an alcohol-based caries detector (Kurakay) on the surface tension of a conventional sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) preparation, and a product containing a surface-active agent (Chlor-XTRA). The surface tensions of the following solutions were tested: NaOCl, a mixture of NaOCl and Kurakay 9:1 w/w, Chlor-XTRA, a mixture of Chlor-XTRA and Kurakay 9:1 w/w. Ten measurements per test solution were made at 20°C, using an optical method called the "Pendant drop method", with a commercially available apparatus. The addition of Kurakay reduced the surface tension for NaOCl (p<0.05) whilst no significant difference was detected for Chlor-XTRA (p>0.05). Statistically significant differences between the NaOCl and Chlor-XTRA groups were found (p<0.05). The addition of an alcohol-based caries detector resulted in a reduction of the original surface tension values for NaOCl only. Taking into account the fact that mixtures of NaOCl and Kurakay have been used to assess the penetration of root canal irrigants in vitro, the related changes in surface tension are a possible source of bias. PMID:25672387

  11. Effect of SiO2 coating in bolometric Ge light detectors for rare event searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeman, J. W.; Gentils, A.; Giuliani, A.; Mancuso, M.; Pessina, G.; Plantevin, O.; Rusconi, C.

    2013-05-01

    In germanium-based light detectors for scintillating bolometers, a SiO2 anti-reflective coating is often applied on the side of the germanium wafer exposed to light with the aim to improve its light collection efficiency. In this paper, we report about a measurement, performed in the temperature range 25-35 mK, of the light-collection increase obtained thanks to this method, which resulted to be of the order of 20%. The procedure followed has been carefully selected in order to minimize systematic effects. The employed light sources have the same spectral features (peaking at ˜630 nm wavelength) that will characterize future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments on the isotope 82Se and based on ZnSe crystals, such as LUCIFER. The coupling between source and light detector reproduces the configuration used in scintillating bolometers. The present measurement clarifies the role of SiO2 coating and describes a method and a set-up that can be extended to the study of other types of coatings and luminescent materials.

  12. Using image simulation to test the effect of detector type on breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Warren, Lucy M.; Dance, David R.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Cooke, Julie; Halling-Brown, Mark D.; Looney, Padraig T.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Alexander, Gavin G.; Young, Kenneth C.

    2014-03-01

    Introduction: The effect that the image quality associated with different image receptors has on cancer detection in mammography was measured using a novel method for changing the appearance of images. Method: A set of 270 mammography cases (one view, both breasts) was acquired using five Hologic Selenia and two Hologic Dimensions X-ray sets: 160 normal cases, 80 cases with subtle real non-calcification malignant lesions and 30 cases with biopsy proven benign lesions. Simulated calcification clusters were inserted into half of the normal cases. The 270 cases (Arm 1) were converted to appear as if they had been acquired on three other imaging systems: caesium iodide detector (Arm 2), needle image plate computed radiography (CR) (Arm 3) and powder phosphor CR (Arm 4). Five experienced mammography readers marked the location of suspected cancers in the images and classified the degree of visibility of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed using JAFROC. Results: The differences in the visibility of calcification clusters between all pairs of arms were statistically significant (p<0.05), except between Arms 1 and 2. The difference in the visibility of non-calcification lesions was smaller than for calcification clusters, but the differences were still significant except between Arms 1 and 2 and between Arms 3 and 4. Conclusion: Detector type had a significant impact on the visibility of all types of subtle cancers, with the largest impact being on the visibility of calcification clusters.

  13. Low energy response of the NICER detectors and "threshold efficiency" effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigozhin, Gregory; Doty, John; LaMarr, Beverly; Malonis, Andrew; Remillard, Ronald A.; Scholze, Frank; Laubis, Christian; Krumrey, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The Neutron Star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) is an instrument that is planned to be installed on the International Space Station in 2016 to study time-resolved spectra of the rapidly changing celestial ojects. The focal plane of the instrument consists of 56 Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs). Signal from each SDD is fed to shaping amplifiers and triggering circuits that determine both amplitude and time of arrival for each "event".Zero crossing timing circuit is used in order to suppress energy dependent "time walk". That is done with a chain producing a derivative of the shaped signal, and the same chain detects threshold crossings marking the arrival of an X-ray photon. Higher noise of the differentiated signal leads to a somewhat extended band of signal amplitudes close to the threshold value, for which detection efficiency is less than 100%. Detection efficiency in this area affects the low energy portion of the detector response, and is very well described by an error function. We will present accurate measurements of this effect, show the consequences for the instrument quantum efficiency and the shape of the response function and will describe the calibration procedures that would allow selection of optimal threshold values for each observation.

  14. Progress on the Design and Fabircation of the MICE SpectrometerSolenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Lia, D.; Sizman, M.S.

    2007-06-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) willdemonstrate ionization cooling in a short section of a realistic coolingchannel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in theUK. A five-coil, superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet at each endof the cooling channel will provide a 4 T uniform field region for thescintillating fiber tracker within the magnet bore tubes. The trackermodules are used to measure the muon beam emittance as it enters andexits the cooling channel. The cold mass for the 400 mm warm bore magnetconsists of two sections: a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coilmatching section that matches the uniform field of the solenoid into theMICE cooling channel. The spectrometer solenoid detailed designandanalysis has been completed, and the fabrication of the magnets is wellunder way. The primary features of the spectrometer solenoid magnet andmechanical designs are presented along with a summary of key fabricationissues and photos of the construction.

  15. The electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC. A Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Beddo, M.E.; Bielick, E.; Dawson, J.W.; The STAR EMC Collaboration

    1993-09-22

    This report discusses the following on the electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC: conceptual design; the physics of electromagnetic calorimetry in STAR; trigger capability; integration into STAR; and cost, schedule, manpower, and funding.

  16. Non-inductive Solenoid-less Plasma Current Start-up in NSTX Using Transient CHI

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R; Jarboe, T R; Nelson, B A; Bell, M G; Ono, M; Bigelow, T; Kaita, R; LeBlanc, B; Lee, K C; Maqueda, R; Menard, J; Paul, S

    2007-05-23

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) has been successfully used in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) for a demonstration of closed flux current generation without the use of the central solenoid. The favorable properties of the Spherical Torus (ST) arise from its very small aspect ratio. However, small aspect ratio devices have very restricted space for a substantial central solenoid. Thus methods for initiating the plasma current without relying on induction from a central solenoid are essential for the viability of the ST concept. CHI is a promising candidate for solenoid-free plasma startup in a ST. The method has now produced closed flux current up to 160 kA verifying the high current capability of this method in a large ST built with conventional tokamak components.

  17. Design features of the solenoid magnets for the central cell of the MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlwend, J.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-10-23

    The 14 superconducting solenoid magnets which form the central cell of the MFTF-B are being designed and fabricated by General Dynamics for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each solenoid coil has a mean diameter of five meters and contains 600 turns of a proven conductor type. Structural loading resulting from credible fault events, cooldown and warmup requirements, and manufacturing processes consistent with other MFTF-B magnets have been considered in the selection of 304 LN as the structural material for the magnet. The solenoid magnets are connected by 24 intercoil beams and 20 solid struts which resist the longitudinal seismic and electromagnetic attractive forces and by 24 hanger/side supports which react magnet dead weight and seismic loads. A modular arrangement of two solenoid coils within a vacuum vessel segment allow for sequential checkout and installation.

  18. Confinement of laser plasma by solenoidal field for laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, M.; Kanesue,T.; Kondo, K.; Dabrowski, R.

    2010-05-23

    A laser ion source can provide high current, highly charged ions with a simple structure. However, it was not easy to control the ion pulse width. To provide a longer ion beam pulse, the plasma drift length, which is the distance between laser target and extraction point, has to be extended and as a result the plasma is diluted severely. Previously, we applied a solenoid field to prevent reduction of ion density at the extraction point. Although a current enhancement by a solenoid field was observed, plasma behavior after a solenoid magnet was unclear because plasma behavior can be different from usual ion beam dynamics. We measured a transverse ion distribution along the beam axis to understand plasma motion in the presence of a solenoid field.

  19. BEAM-BASED ALIGNMENT IN THE RHIC E-COOLING SOLENOIDS.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, P.; BEN-ZVI, I.; DAWSON, W.C.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    Accurate alignment of the electron and ion beams in the RHIC electron cooling solenoids is crucial for well-optimized cooling. Because of the greatly differing rigidities of the electron and ion beams, to achieve the specified alignment accuracy it is required that transverse magnetic fields resulting from imperfections in solenoid fabrication be down by five orders of magnitude relative to the pure solenoid fields. Shimming the solenoid field to this accuracy might be accomplished by survey techniques prior to operation with beam, or by methods of beam-based alignment. We report on the details of a method of beam-based alignment, as well as the results of preliminary measurements with the ion beam at RHIC.

  20. Solenoid-free plasma startup in NSTX using transient CHI

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R; Jarboe, T.; Mueller, D.; Maingi, R.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments in NSTX have now demonstrated the coupling of toroidal plasmas produced by the technique of coaxial helicity injection (CHI) to inductive sustainment and ramp-up of the toroidal plasma current. In these discharges, the central Ohmic transformer was used to apply an inductive loop voltage to discharges with a toroidal current of about 100 kA created by CHI. The coupled discharges have ramped up to > 700 kA and transitioned into an H-mode demonstrating compatibility of this startup method with conventional operation. The electron temperature in the coupled discharges reached over 800 eV and the resulting plasma had low inductance, which is preferred for long-pulse high-performance discharges. These results from NSTX in combination with the previously obtained record 160 kA non-inductively generated startup currents in an ST or tokamak in NSTX demonstrate that CHI is a viable solenoid-free plasma startup method for future STs and tokamaks.

  1. Compressive vs Solenoidal Turbulence and Violent Disc Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; Inoue, Shigeki; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel

    2015-08-01

    High redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs) exhibit star-formation rates (SFR) 20-100 times higher than local SFGs. This increased SFR is due to much higher gas fractions and surface densities prevalent in high redshift SFG. Such high gas fractions cause the disc to become violently unstable and undergo a phase of violent disc instability (VDI). During the VDI phase, there is rapid inflow of gas towards the galactic centre with inflow times comparable to the disc orbital time, which can lead to a compact "blue nugget". In addition, giant ~kpc scale star-forming clumps are formed, the most massive of which survive dtellar feedback and migrate towards the centre, where they coalesce in the growing bulge. While the existence of giant clumps is commonly associated with Toomre instability, high resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy formation show that active clump formation occurs even in regions where the Toomre Q parameter is well above the threshold for stability. The simulations suggest instead a non-linear instability, where frequent minor mergers and intense inflow by cold streams increase the compressive mode of turbulence relative to the solenoidal mode. We find this can induce clump formation even in regions that should be stable according to linear Toomre theory. Thus we show that mergers, smooth accretion from the cosmic web and VDI all go hand in hand in driving galaxy evolution at high redshift.

  2. An Implantable RF Solenoid for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mark S.; Clark, W. Gilbert; Chu, Allen C.; Nunnally, Ray L.; Smith, Jolinda; Mills, Dixie; Judy, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Miniature solenoids routinely enhance small volume nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy; however, no such techniques exist for patients. We present an implantable microcoil for diverse clinical applications, with a microliter coil volume. The design is loosely based on implantable depth electrodes, in which a flexible tube serves as the substrate, and a metal stylet is inserted into the tube during implantation. The goal is to provide enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of structures that are not easily accessed by surface coils. The first-generation prototype was designed for implantation up to 2 cm, and provided initial proof-of-concept for microscopy. Subsequently, we optimized the design to minimize the influence of lead inductances, and to thereby double the length of the implantable depth (4 cm). The second-generation design represents an estimated SNR improvement of over 30% as compared to the original design when extended to 4 cm. Impedance measurements indicate that the device is stable for up to 24 h in body temperature saline. We evaluated the SNR and MR-related heating of the device at 3T. The implantable microcoil can differentiate fat and water peaks, and resolve submillimeter features. PMID:22156945

  3. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  4. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    The STAR Collaboration

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it`s experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  5. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype design and manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fabbricatore, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Cheban, S.; Evbota, D.; Farinon, S.; Lamm, M.; Lopes, M.; Musenich, R.; Wands, R.; Masullo, G.

    2016-02-08

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid consists of 52 coils arranged in 27 coil modules that form the S-shaped cold mass. Each coil is wound from Al-stabilized NbTi superconductor. The coils are supported by an external structural aluminum shell machined from a forged billet. Most of the coil modules house two coils, with the axis of each coil oriented at an angle of approximately 5° with respect to each other. The coils are indirectly cooled with LHe circulating in tubes welded on the shell. In order to enhance the cooling capacity, pure aluminum sheets connect the inner bore of the coils tomore » the cooling tubes. The coils are placed inside the shell by the means of a shrink-fit procedure. A full-size prototype, with all the features of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured in a collaboration between INFN Genova and Fermilab. In order to ensure an optimal mechanical prestress at the coil-shell interface, the coils are inserted into the shell through a shrink-fitting process. We present the details of the prototype with the design choices as validated by the structural analysis. In conclusion, the fabrication steps are described as well.« less

  6. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Stephen J.; Didier, Clay

    2013-01-01

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5–3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing

  7. ConSole: using modularity of Contact maps to locate Solenoid domains in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Periodic proteins, characterized by the presence of multiple repeats of short motifs, form an interesting and seldom-studied group. Due to often extreme divergence in sequence, detection and analysis of such motifs is performed more reliably on the structural level. Yet, few algorithms have been developed for the detection and analysis of structures of periodic proteins. Results ConSole recognizes modularity in protein contact maps, allowing for precise identification of repeats in solenoid protein structures, an important subgroup of periodic proteins. Tests on benchmarks show that ConSole has higher recognition accuracy as compared to Raphael, the only other publicly available solenoid structure detection tool. As a next step of ConSole analysis, we show how detection of solenoid repeats in structures can be used to improve sequence recognition of these motifs and to detect subtle irregularities of repeat lengths in three solenoid protein families. Conclusions The ConSole algorithm provides a fast and accurate tool to recognize solenoid protein structures as a whole and to identify individual solenoid repeat units from a structure. ConSole is available as a web-based, interactive server and is available for download at http://console.sanfordburnham.org. PMID:24766872

  8. First observation of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, R.; Comis, B.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Boudou, N.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Leclercq, S.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pointecouteau, E.; Ponthieu, N.; Revéret, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Clusters of galaxies provide valuable information on the evolution of the Universe and large scale structures. Recent cluster observations via the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect have proven to be a powerful tool to detect and study them. In this context, high resolution tSZ observations (~tens of arcsec) are of particular interest to probe intermediate and high redshift clusters. Aims: Observations of the tSZ effect will be carried out with the millimeter dual-band NIKA2 camera, based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) to be installed at the IRAM 30-m telescope in 2015. To demonstrate the potential of such an instrument, we present tSZ observations with the NIKA camera prototype, consisting of two arrays of 132 and 224 detectors that observe at 140 and 240 GHz with a 18.5 and 12.5 arcsec angular resolution, respectively. Methods: The cluster RX J1347.5-1145 was observed simultaneously at 140 and 240 GHz. We used a spectral decorrelation technique to remove the atmospheric noise and obtain a map of the cluster at 140 GHz. The efficiency of this procedure has been characterized through realistic simulations of the observations. Results: The observed 140 GHz map presents a decrement at the cluster position consistent with the tSZ nature of the signal. We used this map to study the pressure distribution of the cluster by fitting a gNFW model to the data. Subtracting this model from the map, we confirm that RX J1347.5-1145 is an ongoing merger, which confirms and complements previous tSZ and X-ray observations. Conclusions: For the first time, we demonstrate the tSZ capability of KID based instruments. The NIKA2 camera with ~5000 detectors and a 6.5 arcmin field of view will be well-suited for in-depth studies of the intra cluster medium in intermediate to high redshifts, which enables the characterization of recently detected clusters by the Planck satellite.

  9. A method to simulate viscous diffusion of vorticity by convective transport of vortices at a non-solenoidal velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Kempka, S.N.; Strickland, J.H.

    1993-08-01

    A numerical method to simulate viscous diffusion of vorticity using vortex blobs (i.e., without a grid) is presented. The method consists of casting the effects of viscous diffusion into an effective ``diffusion velocity`` at which vortex blobs convect. The diffusion velocity was proposed previously by Ogami and Akamatsu, but they did not consider the effects of the divergence of the diffusion velocity. In fact, the diffusion velocity is highly non-solenoidal, which significantly affects the area over which a vortex blob diffuses. A formulation is presented that relates the area expansion to the diffusion velocity divergence. By taking into account the area expansion, more accurate simulations of diffusion are obtained, as demonstrated by a comparison of numerical and analytical diffusion solutions. Results from simulations show that vortex areas expand significantly in regions of large vorticity gradients. As a result of the area expansion, adjacent vortices remain overlapped, thereby maintaining smooth solution fields. The non-solenoidal diffusion velocity method is easily implemented in vortex blob algorithms, thus facilitating the development of vortex methods to simulate flows with finite Reynolds numbers.

  10. Design Considerations for CMOS-Integrated Hall-Effect Magnetic Bead Detectors for Biosensor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Skucha, K.; Gambini, S.; Liu, P.; Megens, M.; Kim, J.; Boser, BE

    2014-01-01

    We describe a design methodology for on-chip magnetic bead label detectors based on Hall-effect sensors. Signal errors caused by the label-binding process and other factors that limit the minimum detection area are quantified and adjusted to meet typical assay accuracy standards. The methodology is demonstrated by designing an 8192 element Hall sensor array, implemented in a commercial 0.18 μm CMOS process with single-mask postprocessing. The array can quantify a 1% surface coverage of 2.8 μm beads in 30 seconds with a coefficient of variation of 7.4%. This combination of accuracy and speed makes this technology a suitable detection platform for biological assays based on magnetic bead labels. PMID:25031503

  11. Effect of photometric detector spectral response quality on white LED spectral mismatch correction factors.

    PubMed

    Rosas, E; Estrada-Hernández, A

    2016-07-01

    Light-emitting-diode (LED)-based solid-state lighting has become a real option for private and public lighting after achieving high total luminous flux (TLF) and luminous efficacy levels, thus promoting the development of energy efficient use regulation to be fulfilled by LED lamps and LED luminaires. Here, we propose a photometer-quality-based fast-checking criterion. This allows photometric technicians to perform a quick evaluation of the photometric head spectral response quality effect on the LED source spectral mismatch correction factor-when determining the TLF and luminous efficacy minimum approved levels-performance parameters subject to mandatory verification by the conformity assessment procedures technically supporting the corresponding regulation. The proposed criterion applies for a wide range of photometric detector heads' qualities (2.6%≤f1'≤36.4%). PMID:27409220

  12. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna García, R.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, A.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-09-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density (ρ∝P/T), affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ˜10% seasonal modulation and ˜2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of P and ρ. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Molière radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  13. Continuous monitoring of the dynamical Casimir effect with a damped detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, A. S. M.; Dodonov, V. V.

    2014-06-01

    We consider the problem of photon creation from vacuum inside an ideal cavity with harmonically vibrating walls in the resonance case, taking into account the interaction between the resonant field mode and a detector, modeled by a quantum damped harmonic oscillator. The frequency of wall vibrations is chosen to be exactly twice the cavity normal frequency. The field and detector modes are supposed to be initially in thermal quantum states with different temperatures. We analyze different regimes of excitation, characterized by the competition of three parameters: the modulation depth of the time-dependent cavity eigenfrequency, the cavity-detector coupling strength, and the detector damping coefficient. We show that statistical properties of the detector quantum state (variances of the photon numbers, photon distribution function, and the degree of quadrature squeezing) can be quite different from that of the field mode. In addition, the mean number of quanta in the detector mode increases with some time delay, compared with the field mode.

  14. Carrier Transport and Related Effects in Detectors of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Sundqvist, Kyle Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is searching for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPS), which could explain the dark matter problem in cosmology and particle physics. By simultaneously measuring signals from deposited charge and the energy in nonequilibrium phonons created by particle interactions in intrinsic germanium crystals at a temperature of 40 mK, a signature response for each event is produced. This response, combined with phonon pulse-shape information, allows CDMS to actively discriminate candidate WIMP interactions with nuclei from electromagnetic radioactive background which interacts with electrons. The challenges associated with these techniques are unique. Carrier scattering is dominated by the spontaneous emission of Luke-Neganov phonons due to zeropoint fluctuations of the lattice ions. Drift fields are maintained at only a few V/cm, else these emitted phonons would dominate the phonons of the original interaction. The dominant systematic issues with CDMS detectors are due to the effects of space charge accumulation. It has been an open question how space charge accrues, and by which of several potential recombination and ionization processes. In this work, we have simulated the transport of electrons and holes in germanium under CDMS conditions. We have implemented both a traditional Monte Carlo technique based on carrier energy, followed later by a novel Monte Carlo algorithm with scattering rates defined and sampled by vector momentum. This vector-based method provides for a full anisotropic simulation of carrier transport including free-fight acceleration with an anisotropic mass, and anisotropic scattering rates. With knowledge of steady state carrier dynamics as a function of applied field, the results of our Monte Carlo simulations allow us to make a wide variety of predictions for energy dependent processes for both electrons and holes. Such processes include carrier capture by charged impurities, neutral impurities, static

  15. Carrier Transport and Related Effects in Detectors of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, Kyle Michael

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is searching for weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPS), which could explain the dark matter problem in cosmology and particle physics. By simultaneously measuring signals from deposited charge and the energy in non-equilibrium phonons created by particle interactions in intrinsic germanium crystals at a temperature of 40 mK, a signature response for each event is produced. This response, combined with phonon pulse-shape information, allows CDMS to actively discriminate candidate WIMP interactions with nuclei from electromagnetic radioactive background which interacts with electrons. The challenges associated with these techniques are unique. Carrier scattering is dominated by the spontaneous emission of Luke-Neganov phonons due to zero-point fluctuations of the lattice ions. Drift fields are maintained at only a few V/cm, else these emitted phonons would dominate the phonons of the original interaction. The dominant systematic issues with CDMS detectors are due to the effects of space charge accumulation. It has been an open question how space charge accrues, and by which of several potential recombination and ionization processes. In this work, we have simulated the transport of electrons and holes in germanium under CDMS conditions. We have implemented both a traditional Monte Carlo technique based on carrier energy, followed later by a novel Monte Carlo algorithm with scattering rates defined and sampled by vector momentum. This vector-based method provides for a full anisotropic simulation of carrier transport including free-flight acceleration with an anisotropic mass, and anisotropic scattering rates. With knowledge of steady state carrier dynamics as a function of applied field, the results of our Monte Carlo simulations allow us to make a wide variety of predictions for energy dependent processes for both electrons and holes. Such processes include carrier capture by charged

  16. The Use of a Multichannel Analyzer to Investigate Effects of Experimental Factors on Gross-Counting Gamma and Neutron Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Volz, Heather M.; Rennie, John A.; Lovejoy, Christopher M.; Martinez, Diana E. R; Dempsey, Michael A.; Livesay, Jake; Lousteau, Angela

    2012-07-12

    Radiation detection technology is invaluable to many fields of study in identifying nuclear materials. However, many detectors use gross-counting methods that give only a relative count rate. Without a spectrum (information on counts over time vs energy), it can be more difficult to discern if an alarm is false, innocent, or real. In particular, we would like to understand better the effect of experimental factors (i.e., external conditions and equipment parameters) on detector data, with possible implications for false alarms. To more thoroughly characterize detector technology, a multichannel analyzer (MCA) was used to record spectra from neutron (helium-3 tubes) and gamma (photomultiplier tubes) gross-counting detectors. Several factors could affect the signal-to-noise ratio of sources. For example, we examined the effects of neutron detector high voltage setting on the appearance of a californium-252 spectrum, the effect of discriminator values on integrated counts in neutron detection, and the effect of gain changes on the gamma spectra from several sources. Possible implications of ambient temperature of the experiment on the data collected will be discussed. The input impedance of the MCA must be considered to ensure that data are not affected by the measurement itself. Moreover, a calibration on the MCA was performed to verify the conversion of a MCA channel number to a voltage. In summary, the series of source spectra collected on an MCA with a variety of experimental conditions allow us to understand factors that affect data better, and assure us that gross-counting neutron and gamma detectors will have minimal false alarms.

  17. Recent developments on the STAR detector system at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wieman, H.; Adams, D.L.; Added, N.

    1997-12-01

    The STAR detector system is designed to provide tracking, momentum analysis and particle identification for many of the mid-rapidity charged particles produced in collisions at the RHIC collider. A silicon vertex detector (SVT) provides three layers of tracking near the interaction point. This is followed by the main time projection chamber (TPC), which continues tracking out to 200 cm radial distance from the interaction region. The detector design also includes an electromagnetic calorimeter, various trigger detectors, and radial TPCs in the forward region. The entire system is enclosed in a 0.5 T solenoid magnet. A progress report is given for the various components of the STAR detector system. The authors report on the recent developments in the detector proto-typing and construction, with an emphasis on the main TPC, recent TPC cosmic ray testing and shipping to Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  18. Oblique incidence effects in direct x-ray detectors: A first-order approximation using a physics-based analytical model

    SciTech Connect

    Badano, Aldo; Freed, Melanie; Fang Yuan

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the modifications to a previously developed analytical model of indirect CsI:Tl-based detector response required for studying oblique x-ray incidence effects in direct semiconductor-based detectors. This first-order approximation analysis allows the authors to describe the associated degradation in resolution in direct detectors and compare the predictions to the published data for indirect detectors. Methods: The proposed model is based on a physics-based analytical description developed by Freed et al. [''A fast, angle-dependent, analytical model of CsI detector response for optimization of 3D x-ray breast imaging systems,'' Med. Phys. 37(6), 2593-2605 (2010)] that describes detector response functions for indirect detectors and oblique incident x rays. The model, modified in this work to address direct detector response, describes the dependence of the response with x-ray energy, thickness of the transducer layer, and the depth-dependent blur and collection efficiency. Results: The authors report the detector response functions for indirect and direct detector models for typical thicknesses utilized in clinical systems for full-field digital mammography (150 {mu}m for indirect CsI:Tl and 200 {mu}m for a-Se direct detectors). The results suggest that the oblique incidence effect in a semiconductor detector differs from that in indirect detectors in two ways: The direct detector model produces a sharper overall PRF compared to the response corresponding to the indirect detector model for normal x-ray incidence and a larger relative increase in blur along the x-ray incidence direction compared to that found in indirect detectors with respect to the response at normal incidence angles. Conclusions: Compared to the effect seen in indirect detectors, the direct detector model exhibits a sharper response at normal x-ray incidence and a larger relative increase in blur along the x-ray incidence direction with respect to the blur in the

  19. Development of the bus joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Irick, David Kim; Kenney, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    The terminations of the Central Solenoid (CS) modules are connected to the bus extensions by joints located outside the CS in the gap between the CS and Torodial Field (TF) assemblies. These joints have very strict space limitations. Low resistance is a common requirement for all ITER joints. In addition, the CS bus joints will experience and must be designed to withstand significant variation in the magnetic field of several tenths of a Tesla per second during initiation of plasma. The joint resistance is specified to be less than 4 nOhm. The joints also have to be soldered in the field and designed with the possibility to be installed and dismantled in order to allow cold testing in the cold test facility. We have developed coaxial joints that meet these requirements and have demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate and assemble them in the vertical configuration. We introduced a coupling cylinder with superconducting strands soldered to the surface of the cable that can be installed in the ITER assembly hall and at the Cold Test Facility. This cylinder serves as a transition area between the CS module and the bus extension. We made two racetrack samples and tested four bus joints in our Joint Test Apparatus. Resistance of the bus joints was measured by a decay method and by a microvoltmeter; the value of the current was measured by the Hall probes. This measurement method was verified in the previous tests. The resistance of the joints varied insignificantly from 1.5 to 2 nOhm. One of the challenges associated with a soldered joint is the inability to use corrosive chemicals that are difficult to clean. This paper describes our development work on cable preparation, chrome removal, compaction, soldering, and final assembly and presents the test results.

  20. Local Helicity Injection Systems for Non-solenoidal Startup in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, J. M.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Lewicki, B. T.; Redd, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Local helicity injection is being developed in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment for non-solenoidal startup in spherical tokamaks. The effective loop voltage due to helicity injection scales with the area of the injectors, requiring the development of electron current injectors with areas much larger than the 2 cm2 plasma arc injectors used to date. Solid and gas-effused metallic electrodes were found to be unusable due to reduced injector area utilization from localized cathode spots and narrow operational regimes. An integrated array of 8 compact plasma arc sources is thus being developed for high current startup. It employs two monolithic power systems, for the plasma arc sources and the bias current extraction system. The array effectively eliminates impurity fueling from plasma-material interaction by incorporating a local scraper-limiter and conical-frustum bias electrodes to mitigate the effects of cathode spots. An energy balance model of helicity injection indicates that the resulting 20 cm2 of total injection area should provide sufficient current drive to reach 0.3 MA. At that level, helicity injection drive exceeds that from poloidal induction, which is the relevant operational regime for large-scale spherical tokamaks. Future placement of the injector array near an expanded boundary divertor region will test simultaneous optimization of helicity drive and the Taylor relaxation current limit. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  1. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Small Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.

    2007-08-01

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self-electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytical model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite-length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytical studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to influence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce ≥ ωpeβb, where ωce = eΒ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytical theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  2. Controlling charge and current neutralization of an ion beam pulse in a background plasma by application of a solenoidal magnetic field: Weak magnetic field limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-15

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self-electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite-length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to influence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when {omega}{sub ce} > or approx. {omega}{sub pe}{beta}{sub b}, where {omega}{sub ce}=eB/m{sub e}c is the electron gyrofrequency, {omega}{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency, and {beta}{sub b}=V{sub b}/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100 G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  3. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D., Startsev, E. A., Sefkow, A. B., Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-10

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite- length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to infuence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce > ωpeβb, where ωce = eβ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  4. STAR Images: Image gallery from the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    DOE Data Explorer

    The primary physics task of STAR is to study the formation and characteristics of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a state of matter believed to exist at sufficiently high energy densities. STAR consists of several types of detectors, each specializing in detecting certain types of particles or characterizing their motion. These detectors allow final statements to be made about the collision. The gallery of STAR images makes available a small collection of event-generated images from Gold-Beam experiments, a simulation of TCP Drift, and a library of STAR instrument and construction photos.

  5. Improving the spatial resolution in CZT detectors using charge sharing effect and transient signal analysis: Simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Zeng; Deen, M. Jamal; Peng, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors are capable of providing superior energy resolution and three-dimensional position information of gamma ray interactions in a large variety of fields, including nuclear physics, gamma-ray imaging and nuclear medicine. Some dedicated Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems, for example, for breast cancer detection, require higher contrast recovery and more accurate event location compared with a whole-body PET system. The spatial resolution is currently limited by electrode pitch in CZT detectors. A straightforward approach to increase the spatial resolution is by decreasing the detector electrode pitch, but this leads to higher fabrication cost and a larger number of readout channels. In addition, inter-electrode charge spreading can negate any improvement in spatial resolution. In this work, we studied the feasibility of achieving sub-pitch spatial resolution in CZT detectors using two methods: charge sharing effect and transient signal analysis. We noted that their valid ranges of usage were complementary. The dependences of their corresponding valid ranges on electrode design, depth-of-interaction (DOI), voltage bias and signal triggering threshold were investigated. The implementation of these two methods in both pixelated and cross-strip configuration of CZT detectors were discussed. Our results show that the valid range of charge sharing effect increases as a function of DOI, but decreases with increasing gap width and bias voltage. For a CZT detector of 5 mm thickness, 100 μm gap and biased at 400 V, the valid range of charge sharing effect was found to be about 112.3 μm around the gap center. This result complements the valid range of the transient signal analysis within one electrode pitch. For a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ~17 and preliminary measurements, the sub-pitch spatial resolution is expected to be ~30 μm and ~250 μm for the charge sharing and transient signal analysis methods

  6. Effect of the soil on the metal detector signature of a buried mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druyts, Pascal; Das, Yogadhish; Craeye, Christophe; Acheroy, Marc

    2006-05-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of the soil on the response of a metal detector (MD). The total response is first decomposed in a direct coupling between the transmitter and the receiver, the mine contribution and the soil contribution. The mine contribution is further related to its free space signature by introducting a number of transfer functions (TFs). Those TFs characterize the effect of the soil on the field propagation, from the transmit coil to the mine and back to the receiver, and on the mine signature. The expressions derived are quite general. However the TFs and other quantities of interest can only be computed if the scattering problem has been solved. For this it is usually necessary to resort to numerical techniques. Such techniques are computationally expensive, especially to analyze the various effects of the soil as they require to compute the solution for a large set of parameters. Therefore, we propose to model a buried mine by a multilayered sphere. From outside to inside, the layers represent the air, the soil, the mine explosive and the mine metallic content. Further, the analytic solution for such a multilayered sphere is used to compute the mine and soil responses, the mine free space signature and the various TFs as a function of the parameters of interest such as the soil electromagnetic (EM) properties or the mine depth. Finally, the validity domain of a number of practical approximations is discussed.

  7. Effects of detector geometry on measured lineshapes and intensities in surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinch, B. J.; Frankl, D. R.; Allison, W.

    1987-02-01

    A general expression for the detector response to a given beam flux distribution is given. Illustrative examples are worked out for some simple idealized cases and it is shown that both the measured lineshape and the measured intensity depend on the details of incident beam and detector geometry.

  8. Design, fabrication and characterization of multi-guard-ring furnished p+n-n+ silicon strip detectors for future HEP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalwani, Kavita; Jain, Geetika; Dalal, Ranjeet; Ranjan, Kirti; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh

    2016-07-01

    Si detectors, in various configurations (strips and pixels), have been playing a key role in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments due to their excellent vertexing and high precision tracking information. In future HEP experiments like upgrade of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment (CMS) at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN and the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), the Si tracking detectors will be operated in a very harsh radiation environment, which leads to both surface and bulk damage in Si detectors which in turn changes their electrical properties, i.e. change in the full depletion voltage, increase in the leakage current and decrease in the charge collection efficiency. In order to achieve the long term durability of Si-detectors in future HEP experiments, it is required to operate these detectors at very high reverse biases, beyond the full depletion voltage, thus requiring higher detector breakdown voltage. Delhi University (DU) is involved in the design, fabrication and characterization of multi-guard-ring furnished ac-coupled, single sided, p+n-n+ Si strip detectors for future HEP experiments. The design has been optimized using a two-dimensional numerical device simulation program (TCAD-Silvaco). The Si strip detectors are fabricated with eight-layers mask process using the planar fabrication technology by Bharat Electronic Lab (BEL), India. Further an electrical characterization set-up is established at DU to ensure the quality performance of fabricated Si strip detectors and test structures. In this work measurement results on non irradiated Si Strip detectors and test structures with multi-guard-rings using Current Voltage (IV) and Capacitance Voltage (CV) characterization set-ups are discussed. The effect of various design parameters, for example guard-ring spacing, number of guard-rings and metal overhang on breakdown voltage of test structures have been studied.

  9. The B AB AR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Boucham, A.; Boutigny, D.; De Bonis, I.; Favier, J.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Le Flour, T.; Lees, J. P.; Lieunard, S.; Petitpas, P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zachariadou, K.; Palano, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Stugu, B.; Abbott, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Amerman, L.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Clark, A. R.; Dardin, S.; Day, C.; Dow, S. F.; Fan, Q.; Gaponenko, I.; Gill, M. S.; Goozen, F. R.; Gowdy, S. J.; Gritsan, A.; Groysman, Y.; Hernikl, C.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jared, R. C.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Karcher, A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kipnis, I.; Kluth, S.; Kral, J. F.; Lafever, R.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, S. A.; Lionberger, C.; Liu, T.; Long, M.; Luo, L.; Lynch, G.; Luft, P.; Mandelli, E.; Marino, M.; Marks, K.; Matuk, C.; Meyer, A. B.; Minor, R.; Mokhtarani, A.; Momayezi, M.; Nyman, M.; Oddone, P. J.; Ohnemus, J.; Oshatz, D.; Patton, S.; Pedrali-Noy, M.; Perazzo, A.; Peters, C.; Pope, W.; Pripstein, M.; Quarrie, D. R.; Rasson, J. E.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Stone, R.; Strother, P. D.; Telnov, A. V.; von der Lippe, H.; Weber, T. F.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zizka, G.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Hawkes, C. M.; Kirk, A.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Koch, H.; Krug, J.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Andress, J. C.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; De Groot, N.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; Mass, A.; McFall, J. D.; Wallom, D.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Camanzi, B.; Harrison, T. J.; McKemey, A. K.; Tinslay, J.; Antohin, E. I.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kolachev, G. M.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Mikhailov, S. F.; Onuchin, A. P.; Salnikov, A. A.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Booth, J.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Pier, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Zioulas, G.; Ahsan, A.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Faccini, R.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Prell, S. A.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Burke, S.; Callahan, D.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hale, D.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kyre, S.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; May, J.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S.; Beringer, J.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Eisner, A. M.; Frey, A.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Kroeger, W.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Rowe, W.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. N.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hanson, J. E.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Jayatilleke, S. M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P.; Broomer, B.; Erdos, E.; Fahey, S.; Ford, W. T.; Gaede, F.; van Hoek, W. C.; Johnson, D. R.; Michael, A. K.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Sen, S.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Warner, D. W.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kocian, M. L.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Behr, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; Fouque, G.; Gastaldi, F.; Matricon, P.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Renard, C.; Roussot, E.; T'Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Falbo, M.; Bozzi, C.; Dittongo, S.; Folegani, M.; Piemontese, L.; Ramusino, A. C.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musenich, R.; Pallavicini, M.; Parodi, R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Priano, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Bartoldus, R.; Dignan, T.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P. A.; Lamsa, J.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Albert, J. N.; Beigbeder, C.; Benkebil, M.; Breton, D.; Cizeron, R.; Du, S.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; LePeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.

    2002-02-01

    B AB AR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e +e - B Factory operating at the ϒ(4 S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagnetic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by d E/d x measurements in the tracking detectors and by a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  10. Performance measurements of a pilot superconducting solenoid model core for a wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.; Britcher, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    The results of experimental demonstrations of a superconducting solenoid model core in the Southampton University Magnetic Suspension and Balance System are detailed. Technology and techniques relevant to large-scale wind tunnel MSBSs comprise the long term goals. The magnetic moment of solenoids, difficulties peculiar to superconducting solenoid cores, lift force and pitching moment, dynamic lift calibration, and helium boil-off measurements are discussed.

  11. Ultrafast Response p-Si/n-ZnO Heterojunction Ultraviolet Detector Based on Pyro-Phototronic Effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaona; Yu, Ruomeng; Wang, Xingfu; Wu, Wenzhuo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-08-01

    A light-self-induced pyro-phototronic effect in wurtzite ZnO nanowires is proposed as an effective approach to achieve ultrafast response ultraviolet sensing in p-Si/n-ZnO heterostructures. The relatively long response/recovery time of zinc-oxide-based ultraviolet sensors in air/vacuum has long been an obstacle to developing such detectors for practical applications. The response/recovery time and photoresponsivity are greatly improved by the pyro-phototronic effect. PMID:27219114

  12. Effects of Surface Processing on the Response of CZT Gamma Detectors: Studies with a Collimated Synchrotron X-Ray Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain,A.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Babalola, S.; Burger, A.; James, R.

    2008-01-01

    Using a microscale X-ray mapping technique incorporating a synchrotron beam, we are able to reveal the fine details of the surface properties in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors. A detector, with various degrees of surface roughness, was irradiated by a high-spatial-resolution X-ray beam. The detector's response was analyzed and displayed as a two-dimensional (2-D) map, and the charge collection was obtained from the peak positions in the spectra versus the beam's location, which reflects the local material properties. We noted the correlation between the 2-D image and the spectral response of the charge collection at different locations on the surface area, which indicates that a rough surface tends to contain trapping centers, thereby enhancing leakage current and distorting the signal. We also discuss our observations on the transition effect at the boundary area of a rough and a smooth surface under identical conditions.

  13. Flatbed scanner simulation to analyze the effect of detector's size on color artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefhussien, Mohammed; Easton, Roger L.; Ptucha, Raymond; Shaw, Mark; Bradburn, Brent; Wagner, Jerry; Larson, David; Saber, Eli

    2015-03-01

    Simulations of flatbed scanners can shorten the development cycle of new designs, estimate image quality, and lower manufacturing costs. In this paper, we present a flatbed scanner simulation a strobe RGB scanning method that investigates the effect of the sensor height on color artifacts. The image chain model from the remote sensing community was adapted and tailored to fit flatbed scanning applications. This model allows the user to study the relationship between various internal elements of the scanner and the final image quality. Modeled parameters include: sensor height, intensity and duration of illuminant, scanning rate, sensor aperture, detector modulation transfer function (MTF), and motion blur created by the movement of the sensor during the scanning process. These variables are also modeled mathematically by utilizing Fourier analysis, functions that model the physical components, convolutions, sampling theorems, and gamma corrections. Special targets were used to validate the simulation include single frequency pattern, a radial chirp-like pattern, or a high resolution scanned document. The simulation is demonstrated to model the scanning process effectively both on a theoretical and experimental level.

  14. Accelerator Measurments of the Askaryan Effect in Rock Salt: A Roadmap Toward Teraton Underground Neutrino Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.

    2004-12-15

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large scale ultra-high energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of cubic km of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over two orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. We have also made the first observations of coherent transition radiation from the Askaryan charge excess, and the result agrees well with theoretical predictions. Based on these results we have performed detailed and conservative simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino telescope array within a salt-dome, and we find it capable of detecting 10 or more contained events per year from even the most conservative GZK neutrino models.

  15. Accelerator measurements of the Askaryan effect in rock salt: A roadmap toward teraton underground neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.W.; Guillian, E.; Milincic, R.; Miocinovic, P.; Saltzberg, D.; Williams, D.; Field, R.C.; Walz, D.

    2005-07-15

    We report on further SLAC measurements of the Askaryan effect: coherent radio emission from charge asymmetry in electromagnetic cascades. We used synthetic rock salt as the dielectric medium, with cascades produced by GeV bremsstrahlung photons at the Final Focus Test Beam. We extend our prior discovery measurements to a wider range of parameter space and explore the effect in a dielectric medium of great potential interest to large-scale ultra-high-energy neutrino detectors: rock salt (halite), which occurs naturally in high purity formations containing in many cases hundreds of km{sup 3} of water-equivalent mass. We observed strong coherent pulsed radio emission over a frequency band from 0.2-15 GHz. A grid of embedded dual-polarization antennas was used to confirm the high degree of linear polarization and track the change of direction of the electric-field vector with azimuth around the shower. Coherence was observed over 4 orders of magnitude of shower energy. The frequency dependence of the radiation was tested over 2 orders of magnitude of UHF and microwave frequencies. We have also made the first observations of coherent transition radiation from the Askaryan charge excess, and the result agrees well with theoretical predictions. Based on these results we have performed a detailed and conservative simulation of a realistic GZK neutrino telescope array within a salt dome, and we find it capable of detecting 10 or more contained events per year from even the most conservative GZK neutrino models.

  16. Room-temperature terahertz detectors based on semiconductor nanowire field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Miriam S; Coquillat, Dominique; Viti, Leonardo; Ercolani, Daniele; Teppe, Frederic; Pitanti, Alessandro; Beltram, Fabio; Sorba, Lucia; Knap, Wojciech; Tredicucci, Alessandro

    2012-01-11

    The growth of semiconductor nanowires (NWs) has recently opened new paths to silicon integration of device families such as light-emitting diodes, high-efficiency photovoltaics, or high-responsivity photodetectors. It is also offering a wealth of new approaches for the development of a future generation of nanoelectronic devices. Here we demonstrate that semiconductor nanowires can also be used as building blocks for the realization of high-sensitivity terahertz detectors based on a 1D field-effect transistor configuration. In order to take advantage of the low effective mass and high mobilities achievable in III-V compounds, we have used InAs nanowires, grown by vapor-phase epitaxy, and properly doped with selenium to control the charge density and to optimize source-drain and contact resistance. The detection mechanism exploits the nonlinearity of the transfer characteristics: the terahertz radiation field is fed at the gate-source electrodes with wide band antennas, and the rectified signal is then read at the output in the form of a DC drain voltage. Significant responsivity values (>1 V/W) at 0.3 THz have been obtained with noise equivalent powers (NEP) < 2 × 10(-9) W/(Hz)(1/2) at room temperature. The large existing margins for technology improvements, the scalability to higher frequencies, and the possibility of realizing multipixel arrays, make these devices highly competitive as a future solution for terahertz detection. PMID:22149118

  17. The forward muon detector of L3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, A.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alarcon, J.; Alberdi, J.; Alexandrov, V.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Anderhub, H.; Ariza, M.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakker, F.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barcala, J.; Becker, U.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Betev, B. L.; Biland, A.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borissov, V.; Bosseler, K.; Bouvier, Ph.; Brambilla, E.; Burger, J. D.; Burgos, C.; Buskens, J.; Carlier, J. C.; Carlino, G.; Casaus, J.; Cavallo, N.; Cerjak, I.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, H. S.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Chvatchkine, V.; Daniel, M.; de Asmundis, R.; Decreuse, G.; Deiters, K.; Djambazov, L.; Duraffourg, P.; Erné, F. C.; Esser, H.; Ezekiev, S.; Faber, G.; Fabre, M.; Fernandez, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Fritschi, M.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Haller, Ch.; Herold, W. D.; Herrmann, J.; Hervé, A.; Hofer, H.; Hofer, H.; Hofer, M.; Hofer, T.; Homma, J.; Horisberger, U.; Horvath, I.; Ingenito, P.; Innocente, V.; Ioudine, I.; Jaspers, M.; de Jong, P.; Kaestli, W.; Kaspar, H.; Kitov, V.; König, A. C.; Koutsenko, V.; Lanzano, S.; Lapoint, C.; Lebedev, A.; Lecomte, P.; Lista, L.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, J. M.; Milesi, M.; Molinero, A.; Montero, A.; Moore, R.; Nahn, S.; Navarrete, J.; Okle, M.; Orlinov, I.; Ostojic, D.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Parascandolo, P.; Passeggio, G.; Patricelli, S.; Peach, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pigni, L.; Postema, H.; Puras, C.; Ren, D.; Rewiersma, P.; Rietmeyer, A.; Riles, K.; Risco, J.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roeser, U.; Romero, L.; van Rossum, W.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sassowsky, M.; Schegelsky, V.; Scholz, N.; Schultze, K.; Schuylenburg, H.; Sciacca, C.; Seiler, P. G.; Siedenburg, T.; Siedling, R.; Smith, B.; Soulimov, V.; Sudhakar, K.; Syben, O.; Tonutti, M.; Udovcic, A.; Ulbricht, J.; Veillet, L.; Vergain, M.; Viertel, G.; von Gunten, H. P.; Vorobyov, An. A.; Vrankovic, V.; de Waard, A.; Waldmeier-Wicki, S.; Wallraff, W.; Walter, H. C.; Wang, J. C.; Wei, Z. L.; Wetter, R.; Weverling, I.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, R. J.; Yang, K. S.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Y.; Zuang, H. L.

    1996-02-01

    The forward-backward muon detector of the L3 experiment is presented. Intended to be used for LEP 200 physics, it consists of 96 self-calibrating drift chambers of a new design enclosing the magnet pole pieces of the L3 solenoid. The pole pieces are toroidally magnetized to form two independent analyzing spectrometers. A novel trigger is provided by resistive plate counters attached to the drift chambers. Details about the design, construction and performance of the whole system are given together with results obtained during the 1995 running at LEP.

  18. Effects of the energy-separation filter on the performance of each detector layer in the sandwich detector for single-shot dual-energy imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, D. W.; Kam, S.; Park, E.; Youn, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-02-01

    A novel sandwich-style single-shot detector has been built by stacking two indirect-conversion flat-panel detectors for preclinical dual-energy mouse imaging. Although this single-shot method is more immune to motion artifacts compared with the conventional dual-shot method (i.e., fast kVp switching), it may suffer from reduced image quality because of poor spectral separation between the two detectors. Spectral separation can be improved by using an intermediate filter between the two detector layers. Adversely, the filter reduces the number of x-ray photons reaching the rear detector, hence probably increasing image noise. For a better design and practical use of the sandwich detector for single-shot dual-energy imaging, imaging performances of each detector layer in the sandwich detector are investigated for various spectral-separation extents and applied tube voltages. The imaging performances include the modulation-transfer function, the Wiener noise-power spectrum, and the detective quantum efficiency. According to the experimental results, impacts of the intermediate filter on the imaging performances of each detector layer are marginal. The detailed experimental results are shown in this study.

  19. Investigation of the Effect of Temperature and Light Emission from Silicon Photomultiplier Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Castruita, Daniel; Ramos, Daniel; Hernandez, Victor; Niduaza, Rommel; Konx, Adrian; Fan, Sewan; Fatuzzo, Laura; Ritt, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is an extremely sensitive light detector capable of measuring very dim light and operates as a photon-number resolving detector. Its high gain comes from operating at slightly above the breakdown voltage, which is also accompanied by a high dark count rate. At this conference poster session we describe our investigation of using SiPMs, the multipixel photon counters (MPPC) from Hamamatsu, as readout detectors for development in a cosmic ray scintillating detector array. Our research includes implementation of a novel design that automatically adjusts for the bias voltage to the MPPC detectors to compensate for changes in the ambient temperature. Furthermore, we describe our investigations for the MPPC detector characteristics at different bias voltages, temperatures and light emission properties. To measure the faint light emitted from the MPPC we use a photomultiplier tube capable of detecting single photons. Our data acquisition setup consists of a 5 Giga sample/second waveform digitizer, the DRS4, triggered to capture the MPPC detector waveforms. Analysis of the digitized waveforms, using the CERN package PAW, would be discussed and presented. US Department of Education Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  20. Effects of high energy protons on the E771 silicon microstrip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Antoniazzi, L.; Arenton, M.; Ballagh, C.; Bingham, H.; Blankman, A.; Block, M.; Boden, A.; Borodin, S.; Budagov, J.; Cao, Z. L.; Cataldi, G.; Chen, T. Y.; Clark, K.; Cline, D.; Conetti, S.; Cooper, M.; Corti, G.; Cox, B.; Creti, P.; Dukes, E.; Durandet, C.; Elia, V.; Erwin, A.; Fortney, L.; Golovatyuk, S.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Haire, M.; Hanlet, P.; He, M.; Introzzi, G.; Jenkins, M.; Jennings, J.; Judd, D.; Kaeding, T.; Kononenko, W.; Kowald, W.; lanza, A.; Lau, K.; Liguori, G.; Lys, J.; Mazur, P.; McManus, A.; Misawa, S.; Mo, G.; Murphy, T.; Nelson, K.; Newcomer, M.; Panareo, M.; Ramachandran, S.; Recagni, M.; Rhoades, J.; Segal, J.; Selove, W.; Smith, R.; Spiegel, L.; Sun, J.; Tokar, S.; Torre, P.; Trischuk, J.; Trojak, T.; Tsyganov, E.; Turnbull, L.; VanBerg, R.; Wagoner, D.; Wang, C.; Wang, H. C.; Wei, C.; Yang, W.; Yao, N.; Zhang, N.; Zhang, S. N.; Zou, B.

    1993-01-01

    A silicon strip detector (SSD) system for use in very high rate experiments has been operated in Experiment E771 (Cox, 1989) at the Fermi National Accelerator laboratory. The detector electronics were designed (Swoboda, 1990; Bowden, 1990; Zimmerman, 1989; Christian, 1991) to meet the specific needs of Fermilab experiment E771 using ASIC chip sets where commercial circuits were not suitable. The electronics for the SSD were designed to operate at rates up to 60 Mhz and were operated at interaction rates up to 10 7 interaction/sec (beam rates of 2 × 10 8 proton/sec). In addition to being very fast, the detector for the 1991 run was very compact with 10000 channels of active detector in a volume fo 5cm × 5cm × 10cm. An expansion of the system to 16000 channels is planned for the next Fermilab fixed target run. The strip pitch ranged from 25 μ m in the center of the detector near the target to 100 μ m pitch at the most downstream, outer edges of the detector. The readout is a latch design with pipelined readout and appears to have single strip efficiencies of ≈ 75% even in the presence of a high radiation dose (∽ 10 14 protons/cm 2) and high leakage currents(≈ 1 nA/strip). The detector and associated amplifier electronics has presently been operated at 17° C and is designed to operate as low as 8° C.

  1. Commissioning report of the MuCool 5 Tesla solenoid coupled with helium refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, Michael; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    MuCool 5T solenoid was successfully cooled down and operated coupled with MTA 'Brown' refrigerator. The system performed as designed with substantial performance margin. All process alarms and interlocks, as well as ODH and fire alarms, were active and performed as designed. The cooldown of the refrigerator started from warm conditions and took 44 hours to accumulate liquid helium level and solenoid temperature below 5K. Average liquid nitrogen consumption for the refrigerator precool and solenoid shield was measured as 20 gal/hr (including boil-off). Helium losses were small (below 30 scfh). The system was stable and with sufficient margin of performance and ran stably without wet expansion engine. Quench response demonstrated proper operation of the relieving devices and pointed to necessity of improving tightness of the relieving manifolds. Boil-off test demonstrated average heat load of 3 Watts for the unpowered solenoid. The solenoid can stay up to 48 hours cold and minimally filled if the nitrogen shield is maintained. A list of improvements includes commencing into operations the second helium compressor and completion of improvements and tune-ups for system efficiency.

  2. Effects of light on scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Manho; Margulies, Seymour

    1993-10-01

    Tracking detectors based on scintillating-fiber technology are being developed for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the Superconducting Super Collider and for the D0 collaboration at Fermilab. An important part of the work is to insure that the fibers will not be damaged by environmental conditions in the course of detector construction. This paper presents preliminary results of the effects of ambient fluorescent light on scintillating fibers containing 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) waveshifter. Six fiber types having 3HF concentrations between 100 ppm and 6000 ppm were studied; both single-clad fibers from Bicron and Kuraray and a new Kuraray multiclad fiber were included. A blue fiber containing no 3HF was used to provide a comparison.

  3. Investigation of the internal electric field in cadmium zinc telluride detectors using the Pockels effect and the analysis of charge transients

    SciTech Connect

    Groza, Michael; Cui Yunlong; Buliga, Vladimir; Guo, Mingsheng; Coca, Constantine; Burger, Arnold; Krawczynski, Henric; Garson, Alfred III; Martin, Jerrad W.; Lee, Kuen; Li Qiang; Beilicke, Matthias

    2010-01-15

    The Pockels electro-optic effect can be used to investigate the internal electric field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) single crystals that are used to fabricate room temperature x and gamma radiation detectors. An agreement is found between the electric field mapping obtained from Pockels effect images and the measurements of charge transients generated by alpha particles. The Pockels effect images of a CZT detector along two mutually perpendicular directions are used to optimize the detector response in a dual anode configuration, a device in which the symmetry of the internal electric field with respect to the anode strips is of critical importance. The Pockels effect is also used to map the electric field in a CZT detector with dual anodes and an attempt is made to find a correlation with the simulated electric potential in such detectors. Finally, the stress-induced birefringence effects seen in the Pockels images are presented and discussed.

  4. Investigation of the Internal Electric Field in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors Using the Pockels Effect and the Analysis of Charge Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groza, Michael; Krawczynski, Henic; Garson, Alfred, III; Martin, Jerrad W.; Lee, Kuen; Li, Qiang; Beilicke, Matthias; Cui, Yunlong; Buliga, Vladimir; Guo, Mingsheng; Coca, Constantine; Burger, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    The Pockels electro-optic effect can be used to investigate the internal electric field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) single crystals that are used to fabricate room temperature x and gamma radiation detectors. An agreement is found between the electric field mapping obtained from Pockels effect images and the measurements of charge transients generated by alpha particles. The Pockels effect images of a CZT detector along two mutually perpendicular directions are used to optimize the detector response in a dual anode configuration, a device in which the symmetry of the internal electric field with respect to the anode strips is of critical importance. The Pockels effect is also used to map the electric field in a CZT detector with dual anodes and an attempt is made to find a correlation with the simulated electric potential in such detectors. Finally, the stress-induced birefringence effects seen in the Pockels images are presented and discussed.

  5. Development of a solenoid actuated planar valveless micropump with single and multiple inlet–outlet arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; George, D.; Sajeesh, P.; Manivannan, P. V.; Sen, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    We report a planar solenoid actuated valveless micropump with multiple inlet–outlet configurations. The self-priming characteristics of the multiple inlet–multiple outlet micropump are studied. The filling dynamics of the micropump chamber during start-up and the effects of fluid viscosity, voltage and frequency on the dynamics are investigated. Numerical simulations for multiple inlet–multiple outlet micropumps are carried out using fluid structure algorithm. With DI water and at 5.0 Vp-p, 20 Hz frequency, the two inlet–two outlet micropump provides a maximum flow rate of 336 μl min‑1 and maximum back pressure of 441 Pa. Performance characteristics of the two inlet–two outlet micropump are studied for aqueous fluids of different viscosity. Transport of biological cell lines and diluted blood samples are demonstrated; the flow rate-frequency characteristics are studied. Viability of cells during pumping with multiple inlet multiple outlet configuration is also studied in this work, which shows 100% of cells are viable. Application of the proposed micropump for simultaneous pumping, mixing and distribution of fluids is demonstrated. The proposed integrated, standalone and portable micropump is suitable for drug delivery, lab-on-chip and micro-total-analysis applications.

  6. Photon production from the scattering of axions out of a solenoidal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Shilon, Idan; Cantatore, Giovanni; Zioutas, Konstantin E-mail: silon@bgu.ac.il E-mail: Konstantin.Zioutas@cern.ch

    2010-06-01

    We calculate the total cross section for the production of photons from the scattering of axions by a strong inhomogeneous magnetic field in the form of a 2D δ-function, a cylindrical step function and a 2D Gaussian distribution, which can be approximately produced by a solenoidal current. The theoretical result is used to estimate the axion-photon conversion probability which could be expected in a reasonable experimental situation. Comparison between the 2D conversion probabilities for QCD inspired axions and those derived by applying the celebrated 1D calculation of the (inverse) coherent Primakoff effect is made using an averaging prescription procedure of the 1D case. We also consider scattering at a resonance E{sub axion} ∼ m{sub axion}, which corresponds to the scattering from a δ-function and gives the most enhanced results. Finally, we analyze the results of this work in the astrophysical extension to suggest a way in which they may be directed to a solution to some basic solar physics problems and, in particular, the coronal heating problem.

  7. Non-solenoidal Startup via Local Helicity Injection on Pegasus: Progress and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, J. A.; Barr, J. L.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Hinson, E. T.; Lewicki, B. T.; Perry, J. M.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2015-11-01

    Non-solenoidal plasma startup via local helicity injection (LHI) at the Pegasus toroidal experiment now provides routine operation at Ip ~ 0.17MA with Iinj ~ 5kA and Vinj ~ 1kV from four active arc injectors. Experiments in the past year have advanced the understanding of the governing physics of LHI and its supporting technology. Injector impedance scales as Vinj3/ 2 and is governed by two effects: a quasineutrality constraint on electron beam propagation, related to the tokamak edge density, and double-layer sheath expansion, related to narc. Injector design improvements permit operation at Vinj >= 1 kV without deleterious PMI or impurity generation. Discharges with varied shape, Ip(t), and helicity input test a predictive 0D power-balance model for LHI startup. Anomalous, reconnection-driven Ti >800 eV and strong MHD activity localized near the injectors are observed during LHI. Preliminary core Thomson scattering measurements indicate surprisingly high Te >300 eV, which if verified may indicate the dominance of high-energy electron fueling from the injector current streams. A new divertor injector system has been designed to substantially increase the available helicity input rate and support critical studies of confinement during LHI and reconnection activity at high Ip. A proposed upgrade to the Pegasus experiment will extend these studies to NSTX-U relevant parameters. Support: US DOE grants DE-FG02-96ER54375; and DE-SC0006928.

  8. STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) Figures and Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The STAR Collaboration

    The primary physics task of STAR is to study the formation and characteristics of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a state of matter believed to exist at sufficiently high energy densities. STAR consists of several types of detectors, each specializing in detecting certain types of particles or characterizing their motion. These detectors work together in an advanced data acquisition and subsequent physics analysis that allows final statements to be made about the collision. The STAR Publications page provides access to all published papers by the STAR Collaboration, and many of them have separate links to the figures and data found in or supporting the paper. See also the data-rich summaries of the research at http://www.star.bnl.gov/central/physics/results/. [See also DDE00230

  9. Effects of high-energy x-ray irradiation of selected scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulies, Seymour; Chung, Manho

    1993-10-01

    Tracking detectors based on scintillating-fiber technology are being developed for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the Superconducting Super Collider and for the D0 collaboration at Fermilab. An important aspect of this work is the effect of the intense radiation environment existing in the detector cores on the fibers. This paper presents preliminary results of a 2 MeV x-ray irradiation of selected fibers to a dose of 140 Krad, corresponding to some ten years of detector operation. Primary emphasis was placed on studying new Kuraray multiclad scintillating and clear fibers which have superior brightness, attenuation lengths, and mechanical robustness. Two types of Bicron single-clad scintillating fibers were also investigated.

  10. Proton radiation effect on performance of InAs/GaSb complementary barrier infrared detector

    SciTech Connect

    Soibel, Alexander; Rafol, Sir B.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Fisher, Anita M.; Keo, Sam. A.; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2015-12-28

    In this work, we investigated the effect of proton irradiation on the performance of long wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb photodiodes (λ{sub c} = 10.2 μm), based on the complementary barrier infrared detector design. We found that irradiation with 68 MeV protons causes a significant increase of the dark current from j{sub d} = 5 × 10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2} to j{sub d} = 6 × 10{sup −3} A/cm{sup 2}, at V{sub b} = 0.1 V, T = 80 K and fluence 19.2 × 10{sup 11 }H{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Analysis of the dark current as a function of temperature and bias showed that the dominant contributor to the dark current in these devices changes from diffusion current to tunneling current after proton irradiation. This change in the dark current mechanism can be attributed to the onset of surface leakage current, generated by trap-assisted tunneling processes in proton displacement damage areas located near the device sidewalls.

  11. Novel Electrokinetic Microfluidic Detector for Evaluating Effectiveness of Microalgae Disinfection in Ship Ballast Water.

    PubMed

    Maw, Myint Myint; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Fabo; Jiang, Jinhu; Song, Younan; Pan, Xinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Ship ballast water treatment methods face many technical challenges. The effectiveness of every treatment method usually is evaluated by using large scale equipment and a large volume of samples, which involves time-consuming, laborious, and complex operations. This paper reports the development of a novel, simple and fast platform of methodology in evaluating the efficiency and the best parameters for ballast water treatment systems, particularly in chemical disinfection. In this study, a microfluidic chip with six sample wells and a waste well was designed, where sample transportation was controlled by electrokinetic flow. The performance of this microfluidic platform was evaluated by detecting the disinfection of Dunaliella salina (D. salina) algae in ballast water treated by sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) solution. Light-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) intensity was used to determine the viability of microalgae cells in the system, which can be operated automatically with the dimension of the detector as small as 50 mm × 24 mm × 5 mm. The 40 µL volume of sample solution was used for each treatment condition test and the validity of detection can be accomplished within about five min. The results show that the viability of microalgae cells under different treatment conditions can be determined accurately and further optimal treatment conditions including concentrations of NaClO and treatment time can also be obtained. These results can provide accurate evaluation and optimal parameters for ballast water treatment methods. PMID:26516836

  12. Proton radiation effect on performance of InAs/GaSb complementary barrier infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Rafol, B., Sir; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Fisher, Anita M.; Keo, Sam. A.; Ting, David Z.-Y.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we investigated the effect of proton irradiation on the performance of long wavelength infrared InAs/GaSb photodiodes (λc = 10.2 μm), based on the complementary barrier infrared detector design. We found that irradiation with 68 MeV protons causes a significant increase of the dark current from jd = 5 × 10-5 A/cm2 to jd = 6 × 10-3 A/cm2, at Vb = 0.1 V, T = 80 K and fluence 19.2 × 1011 H+/cm2. Analysis of the dark current as a function of temperature and bias showed that the dominant contributor to the dark current in these devices changes from diffusion current to tunneling current after proton irradiation. This change in the dark current mechanism can be attributed to the onset of surface leakage current, generated by trap-assisted tunneling processes in proton displacement damage areas located near the device sidewalls.

  13. Combined effects of frequency and layer removal on background track characteristics of ECE polycarbonate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Soltani, Zahra; Hakimi, Amir

    2016-02-01

    Polycarbonate track detectors (PCTD) when electrochemically etched (ECE) provide excellent characteristics for registering relatively lower-LET charged particles (e.g. alphas, fast-neutron-induced recoils) for many health physics and ion detection applications.The layer removal method of PCTDs by ethylenediamine (EDA) developed in our laboratory reduces the background track (BGT) density significantly. The frequency of the applied electric field strongly affects the BGT density and diameter and thus affects the minimum detection limit (MDL). In order to study the combined effects of the frequency and layer removal on the BGT density and thus on the MDL, this research was conducted. The BGT density versus the layer thickness removed at frequencies up to 12 kHz decrease rapidly to about 10-20 μm above which they reach a minimum constant level, while the mean BGT diameter verses layer removed at all frequencies are constant with flat responses. On the other hand the BGT density and diameter versus frequency at different layers removed up to ~50 μm increase till 4 kHz above which they reach plateaus. The PCTDs with ~20 μm layer removal at frequencies up 1 to 2 kHz showed the lowest MDL. The results are presented and discussed.

  14. Novel Electrokinetic Microfluidic Detector for Evaluating Effectiveness of Microalgae Disinfection in Ship Ballast Water

    PubMed Central

    Maw, Myint Myint; Wang, Junsheng; Li, Fabo; Jiang, Jinhu; Song, Younan; Pan, Xinxiang

    2015-01-01

    Ship ballast water treatment methods face many technical challenges. The effectiveness of every treatment method usually is evaluated by using large scale equipment and a large volume of samples, which involves time-consuming, laborious, and complex operations. This paper reports the development of a novel, simple and fast platform of methodology in evaluating the efficiency and the best parameters for ballast water treatment systems, particularly in chemical disinfection. In this study, a microfluidic chip with six sample wells and a waste well was designed, where sample transportation was controlled by electrokinetic flow. The performance of this microfluidic platform was evaluated by detecting the disinfection of Dunaliella salina (D. salina) algae in ballast water treated by sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) solution. Light-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) intensity was used to determine the viability of microalgae cells in the system, which can be operated automatically with the dimension of the detector as small as 50 mm × 24 mm × 5 mm. The 40 µL volume of sample solution was used for each treatment condition test and the validity of detection can be accomplished within about five min. The results show that the viability of microalgae cells under different treatment conditions can be determined accurately and further optimal treatment conditions including concentrations of NaClO and treatment time can also be obtained. These results can provide accurate evaluation and optimal parameters for ballast water treatment methods. PMID:26516836

  15. HST/WFC3: Understanding and Mitigating Radiation Damage Effects in the CCD Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.; Anderson, J.; Sosey, M.; MacKenty, J.; Gosmeyer, C.; Noeske, K.; Gunning, H.; Bourque, M.

    2015-09-01

    At the heart of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) UVIS channel resides a 4096x4096 pixel e2v CCD array. While these detectors are performing extremely well after more than 5 years in low-earth orbit, the cumulative effects of radiation damage cause a continual growth in the hot pixel population and a progressive loss in charge transfer efficiency (CTE) over time. The decline in CTE has two effects: (1) it reduces the detected source flux as the defects trap charge during readout and (2) it systematically shifts source centroids as the trapped charge is later released. The flux losses can be significant, particularly for faint sources in low background images. Several mitigation options exist, including target placement within the field of view, empirical stellar photometric corrections, post-flash mode and an empirical pixel-based CTE correction. The application of a post-flash has been remarkably effective in WFC3 at reducing CTE losses in low background images for a relatively small noise penalty. Currently all WFC3 observers are encouraged to post-flash images with low backgrounds. Another powerful option in mitigating CTE losses is the pixel-based CTE correction. Analagous to the CTE correction software currently in use in the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) pipeline, the algorithm employs an empirical observationally-constrained model of how much charge is captured and released in order to reconstruct the image. Applied to images (with or without post-flash) after they are acquired, the software is currently available as a standalone routine. The correction will be incorporated into the standard WFC3 calibration pipeline.

  16. Effects of variation of environmental parameters on the performance of Resistive Plate Chamber detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meghna, K. K.; Biswas, S.; Jash, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Saha, S.

    2016-04-01

    Performance of single gap Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors is investigated under variation of environmental parameters, such as temperature and relative humidity. Operational characteristics of the RPCs depend on both the environmental temperature and the relative humidity. Sensitivity to such dependence is found to be more on temperature rather than the relative humidity. Qualitative interpretation of some of the results obtained is given based on the known properties of the electrode materials and gases used in the detectors.

  17. Commissioning of the CMS Forward Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is scheduled for physics data taking in summer 2009 after the commissioning of high energy proton-proton collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the core of the CMS all-silicon tracker is the silicon pixel detector, comprising three barrel layers and two pixel disks in the forward and backward regions, accounting for a total of 66 million channels. The pixel detector will provide high-resolution, 3D tracking points, essential for pattern recognition and precise vertexing, while being embedded in a hostile radiation environment. The end disks of the pixel detector, known as the Forward Pixel detector, has been assembled and tested at Fermilab, USA. It has 18 million pixel cells with dimension 100 x 150 {micro}m{sup 2}. The complete forward pixel detector was shipped to CERN in December 2007, where it underwent extensive system tests for commissioning prior to the installation. The pixel system was put in its final place inside the CMS following the installation and bake out of the LHC beam pipe in July 2008. It has been integrated with other sub-detectors in the readout since September 2008 and participated in the cosmic data taking. This report covers the strategy and results from commissioning of CMS forward pixel detector at CERN.

  18. A Seemingly Simple Task: Filling a Solenoid Volume in Vacuum with Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Roy, Prabir; Oks, Efim

    2010-06-24

    Space-charge neutralization of a pulsed, high-current ion beam is required to compress and focus the beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described attempts to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary charge-compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from four pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means and by an array of movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. Beam neutralization and compression are accomplished, though issues of density, uniformity, and pulse-to-pulse reproducibly remain to be solved.

  19. Ferrite-Cored Solenoidal Induction Coil Sensor for BUD (MM-1667)

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, F.; Becker, A.; Conti, U.; Gasperikova, E.

    2011-06-15

    We have designed and lab tested a new ferrite cored induction coil sensor for measuring the secondary fields from metallic UXO with the BUD system. The objective was to replace the 5-inch diameter air-cored coils in the BUD system with smaller sensors that would allow the placement of multiple sensors in the smaller package of the new BUD hand-held system. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil of length L can easily be made to have sensitivity and noise level roughly the same as an air-cored coil of a diameter on the same order as L. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil can easily have a feedback configuration to achieve critical damping. The feedback configuration leads to a very stable response. Feedback ferrite-cored solenoidal coils show very little interaction as long as they are separated by one half their length.

  20. The effect of amorphous selenium detector thickness on dual-energy digital breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yue-Houng Zhao, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Contrast enhanced (CE) imaging techniques for both planar digital mammography (DM) and three-dimensional (3D) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) applications requires x-ray photon energies higher than the k-edge of iodine (33.2 keV). As a result, x-ray tube potentials much higher (>40 kVp) than those typical for screening mammography must be utilized. Amorphous selenium (a-Se) based direct conversion flat-panel imagers (FPI) have been widely used in DM and DBT imaging systems. The a-Se layer is typically 200 μm thick with quantum detective efficiency (QDE) >87% for x-ray energies below 26 keV. However, QDE decreases substantially above this energy. To improve the object detectability of either CE-DM or CE-DBT, it may be advantageous to increase the thickness (d{sub Se}) of the a-Se layer. Increasing the d{sub Se} will improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at the higher energies used in CE imaging. However, because most DBT systems are designed with partially isocentric geometries, where the gantry moves about a stationary detector, the oblique entry of x-rays will introduce additional blur to the system. The present investigation quantifies the effect of a-Se thickness on imaging performance for both CE-DM and CE-DBT, discussing the effects of improving photon absorption and blurring from oblique entry of x-rays. Methods: In this paper, a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) was used to investigate the effect of d{sub Se} on the imaging performance (i.e., MTF, NPS, and DQE) of FPI in CE-DM and CE-DBT. The results from the model are used to calculate the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio, d′, which is used as a figure-of-merit to determine the total effect of increasing d{sub Se} for CE-DM and CE-DBT. Results: The results of the CLSM show that increasing d{sub Se} causes a substantial increase in QDE at the high energies used in CE-DM. However, at the oblique projection angles used in DBT, the increased length of penetration through a

  1. The effect of amorphous selenium detector thickness on dual-energy digital breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue-Houng; Zhao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Contrast enhanced (CE) imaging techniques for both planar digital mammography (DM) and three-dimensional (3D) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) applications requires x-ray photon energies higher than the k-edge of iodine (33.2 keV). As a result, x-ray tube potentials much higher (>40 kVp) than those typical for screening mammography must be utilized. Amorphous selenium (a-Se) based direct conversion flat-panel imagers (FPI) have been widely used in DM and DBT imaging systems. The a-Se layer is typically 200 μm thick with quantum detective efficiency (QDE) >87% for x-ray energies below 26 keV. However, QDE decreases substantially above this energy. To improve the object detectability of either CE-DM or CE-DBT, it may be advantageous to increase the thickness (dSe) of the a-Se layer. Increasing the dSe will improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at the higher energies used in CE imaging. However, because most DBT systems are designed with partially isocentric geometries, where the gantry moves about a stationary detector, the oblique entry of x-rays will introduce additional blur to the system. The present investigation quantifies the effect of a-Se thickness on imaging performance for both CE-DM and CE-DBT, discussing the effects of improving photon absorption and blurring from oblique entry of x-rays. Methods: In this paper, a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) was used to investigate the effect of dSe on the imaging performance (i.e., MTF, NPS, and DQE) of FPI in CE-DM and CE-DBT. The results from the model are used to calculate the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio, d′, which is used as a figure-of-merit to determine the total effect of increasing dSe for CE-DM and CE-DBT. Results: The results of the CLSM show that increasing dSe causes a substantial increase in QDE at the high energies used in CE-DM. However, at the oblique projection angles used in DBT, the increased length of penetration through a-Se introduces additional image blur

  2. Conceptual design of the Mu2e production solenoid cold mass

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Lamm, M.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nicol, T.H.; Page, T.M.; Pronskikh, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The required magnetic field is produced by a series of superconducting solenoids of various apertures and lengths. This paper describes the conceptual design of the 5 T, 4 m long solenoid cold mass with 1.67 m bore with the emphasis on the magnetic, radiation and thermal analyses.

  3. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline. PMID:22380298

  4. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.; Okamura, M.

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (˜100 μA) with high charge (˜10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  5. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  6. Precise Measurements of a Magnetic Field at the Solenoids for Low Energy Coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharov, V.; Bubley, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Panasyuk, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    2006-03-20

    Description of equipment developed at BINP SB RAS for precision solenoid magnetic field measurement is presented in the paper. Transversal field components are measured by small compass-based sensor during its motion along the field line. The sensor sensitivity is a few tenth parts of mG and is limited in this range by external noise sources only. Scope of the device application is illustrated by results obtained at BINP during tests of cooling solenoids for electron coolers built at the Institute recently.

  7. LHe Flow Regime/Pressure Drop for D0 Solenoid at Steady State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-03-03

    This paper describes in a note taking format what was learned from several sources on two phase liquid helium flow regimes and pressure drops as applied to the D-Zero solenoid upgrade project. Calculations to estimate the steady state conditions for the D-Zero solenoid at 5, 10 and 15 g/s are also presented. For the lower flow rates a stratified type regime can be expected with a pressure drop less than 0.5 psi. For the higher flow rate a more homogeneous flow regime can be expected with a pressure drop between 0.4 to 1.5 psi.

  8. RF and Magnetic Measurements on the SPARC Photoinjector and Solenoid at UCLA

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cook, A.M.; Dunning, M.P.; Frigola, P.; Travish, G.; Sanelli, C.; Tazzioli, F.; Palmer, D.T.; /SLAC

    2006-01-30

    The rf photocathode gun and the solenoid for the SPARC project at INFN-LNF (Frascati) have been fabricated and undergone initial testing at UCLA. The advanced aspects of the design of these devices are detailed. Final diagnosis of the tuning of the RF gun performance, including operating mode frequency and field balance, is described. The emittance compensating solenoid magnet, which is designed to be tuned in longitudinal position by differential excitation of the coils, has been measured using Hall probe scans for field profiling, and pulsed wire methods to determine the field center. Comparisons between measurements and the predictions of design codes are made.

  9. Jefferson Lab CLAS12 Superconducting Solenoid magnet Requirements and Design Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Hogan, John P.; Fair, Ruben J.; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Luongo, Cesar; Elouadrhiri, Latifa

    2014-12-01

    As part of the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade project, one of the experimental halls (Hall B) requires two superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet system consisting of 5 coils. In this presentation the physics requirements for the 5 T solenoid magnet, design constraints, conductor decision, and cooling choice will be discussed. The various design iterations to meet the specification will also be discussed in this presentation.

  10. An Active Radiation Screen Design Based on Superconducting Double-Helix Solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battiston, R.; Burger, W. J.; Calvelli, V.; Musenich, R.; Choutko, V.; Datskov, V. I.; Della Torre, A.; Venditti, F.; Gargiulo, C.; Hovland, S.; Laurenti, G.; Lucidi, S.; Meinke, R.

    2012-01-01

    The ionizing radiation of galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic protons represents currently a practical limitation for the duration of manned space missions. A mag- netic shield for an interplanetary manned mission composed of superconducting double-helix solenoids is presented. The performance of the magnetic shield has been studied using a physics simulation based on the GEANT3 program developed at CERN. Annual equivalent doses of solenoid and toroid magnet configurations are compared to the simulation results for free space and non-shielded spacecraft doses.

  11. Optimization of a Mu2e production solenoid heat and radiation shield using MARS15

    SciTech Connect

    Pronskikh, V.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    A Monte-Carlo study of several Mu2e Production Solenoid (PS) absorber (heat shield) versions using the MARS15 code has been performed. Optimizations for material as well as cost (amount of tungsten) have been carried out. Studied are such quantities as the number of displacements per atom (DPA) in the helium-cooled solenoid superconducting coils, power density and dynamic heat load in various parts of the PS and its surrounding structures. Prompt dose, residual dose, secondary particle flux are also simulated in the PS structures and the experimental hall. A preliminary choice of the PS absorber design is made on the ground of these studies.

  12. Perspectives of a mid-rapidity dimuon program at the RHIC: a novel and compact muon telescope detector

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Ruan, L.; Lin, G.; Xu, Z.; Asselta, K.; Chen, H.F.; Christie, W.; Crawford, H.k.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Hallman, T.J.; Li, C.; Liu, J.; Llope, W.J.; Majka, R.; Nussbaum, T.; Scheblein, J.; Shao, M.; Soja, R.; Sun, Y.; Tang, Z.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.

    2009-07-17

    We propose a large-area, cost-effective Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) at mid-rapidity for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) and for the next generation of detectors at a possible electron-ion collider. We utilize large Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chambers with long readout strips (long-MRPC) in the detector design. The results from cosmic ray and beam tests show the intrinsic timing and spatial resolution for a long-MRPC are 60-70 ps and {approx} 1 cm, respectively. The performance of the prototype muon telescope detector at STAR indicates that muon identification at a transverse momentum of a few GeV/c can be achieved by combining information from track matching with the MTD, ionization energy loss in the Time Projection Chamber, and time-of-flight measurements. A primary muon over secondary muon ratio of better than 1/3 can be achieved. This provides a promising device for future quarkonium programs and primordial dilepton measurements at RHIC. Simulations of the muon efficiency, the signal-to-background ratio of J/{psi}, the separation of {Upsilon} 1S from 2S+3S states, and the electron-muon correlation from charm pair production in the RHIC environment are presented.

  13. EFFECT OF SURFACE PREPARATION TECHNIQUE ON THE RADIATION DETECTOR PERFORMANCEOF CDZNTE

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M

    2007-05-23

    Synthetic CdZnTe (CZT) semiconducting crystals are highly suitable for the room temperature-based detection of gamma radiation. The surface preparation of Au contacts on surfaces of CZT detectors is typically conducted after (1) polishing to remove artifacts from crystal sectioning and (2) chemical etching, which removes residual mechanical surface damage however etching results in a Te rich surface layer that is prone to oxidize. Our studies show that CZT surfaces that are only polished (as opposed to polished and etched) can be contacted with Au and will yield lower surface currents. Due to their decreased dark currents, these as-polished surfaces can be used in the fabrication of gamma detectors exhibiting a higher performance than polished and etched surfaces with relatively less peak tailing and greater energy resolution. CdZnTe or ''CZT'' crystals are attractive to use in homeland security applications because they detect radiation at room temperature and do not require low temperature cooling as with silicon- and germanium-based detectors. Relative to germanium and silicon detectors, CZT is composed of higher Z elements and has a higher density, which gives it greater ''stopping power'' for gamma rays making a more efficient detector. Single crystal CZT materials with high bulk resistivity ({rho}>10{sup 10} {Omega} x cm) and good mobility-lifetime products are also required for gamma-ray spectrometric applications. However, several factors affect the detector performance of CZT are inherent to the as grown crystal material such as the presence of secondary phases, point defects and the presence of impurities (as described in a literature review by R. James and researchers). These and other factors can limit radiation detector performance such as low resistivity, which causes a large electronic noise and the presence of traps and other heterogeneities, which result in peak tailing and poor energy resolution.

  14. New Physics Search in Dijet Mass Spectrum with Compact Muon Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Chiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Many extensions of the SM predict the existence of new massive objects that couple to quarks and gluons and result in resonances in the dijet mass spectrum. In this thesis we present a search for narrow resonances in the dijet mass spectrum using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a proton-proton collision energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $TeV$. %This dijet analysis is searching for new particles in the dijet mass spectrum decaying to dijets. These new particles are predicted by new physics beyond Standard Model. This thesis presents a dijet analysis performed at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $TeV$ for an integrated luminosities of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$. The dijet mass distribution of two leading jets is measured and compared to QCD predictions, simulated by PYTHIA with the CMS detector simulation. We select events which have two leading jets with $\\mid \\Delta\\eta \\mid < 1.3$ and $\\mid \\eta \\mid < 2.5$. We fit the dijet mass spectrum with QCD parameters. Since no evidence of new physics was found, we set upper limits at 95\\% CL on the resonance cross section and compare to the theoretical prediction for several models of new particles: string resonances, axigluons, colorons, excited quarks, $E_{6}$ diquarks, Randall-Sundrum gravitons, W' and Z'. We exclude at 95\\% CL string resonances in the mass range $1.0 < M(S) < 4.00$ TeV, excited quarks in the mass range $1.0

  15. The effect of detector size and energy resolution on image quality in multi-projection Compton scatter tomography.

    PubMed

    Chighvinadze, Tamar; Pistorius, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The reconstructed electron density image quality is sensitive to the detector size and energy resolution, which contribute to the blurring and noise in the image. This work evaluates optimal values of the detector parameters for a realistic system through analytical simulations of the transverse slice of the dedicated breast CT system geometry. This study introduces a spectroscopic x-ray tomography technique which uses multiple projections to reconstruct electron density images by backprojecting scattered photons over isogonic curves. The reconstruction can be obtained using a single projection yet its quality degrades as the acquisition conditions i.e. detector size and energy resolution deviate from the ideal. The reconstruction quality becomes inconsistent throughout the image due to the data under sampling caused by the finite resolution of the detector. The extension to the multi-projection mode effectively fills-in the missing data space and improves the ability to reconstruct an object. This work demonstrates the possibility to obtain images in the presence of noise. PMID:24463390

  16. Wire bond vibration of forward pixel tracking detector of CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.; Gobbi, B.; Kwan, S.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Spencer, E.; Sellberg, G.; Pavlicek, V.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    Wire bonds of the Forward Pixel (FPix) tracking detectors are oriented in the direction that maximizes Lorentz Forces relative to the 4 Tesla field of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Detector's magnet. The CMS Experiment is under construction at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. We were concerned about Lorentz Force oscillating the wires at their fundamental frequencies and possibly fracturing or breaking them at their heels, as happened with the CDF wire bonds. This paper reports a study to understand what conditions break such bonds.

  17. Interesting aspects of the STAR detector and physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, T.J.; STAR Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) is a large acceptance collider detector scheduled to begin operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the fall of 1999. Simply stated, the physics goals of STAR are, (1) to study the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density; (2) to search for signatures of a deconfined partonic phase of matter; and (3) to study the importance of spin as a fundamental property of QCD interactions and measure the spin-dependent parton distributions (gluon, valence quark, sea quark) of the proton. The detector design and methods of accomplishing the physics goals are addressed in this report.

  18. Electromotive force and current in a superconducting solenoid with limited length induced by a bar magnet and a monopole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lianxi

    The magnetic flux ΦB, electromotive force, EMF, and current Iin, induced by a moving magnetic bar and an imaginary magnetic monopole in a superconducting solenoid of multiple turns and length L, are numerically calculated. The magnetic field of the bar magnet is approximated with the magnetic field along z axis of a solenoid with length l and radius a and current I, while the magnetic field of the monopole is supposed to be inversely proportional to r2. Calculations show that, for a bar magnet, ΦB and Iin essentially saturate when the bar moves inside superconducting solenoid, so EMF is zero while Iin is constant. EMF is only induced when the bar enters and exits the solenoid and Iin is zero after the bar leaves the solenoid. For a magnetic monopole, ΦB is discontinuous (from positive maximum to negative maximum) when the it moves through each turn of the superconducting solenoid, but EMF caused by dΦB /dt is continuous while the EMF induced by the a moving monopole is a delta function (moving monopole produces a ring-shaped E field). The total EMFTot in solenoid is the superposition of EMF of each turn of coil and the plateau appears. The current Iin continues to grow while the monopole leaves the solenoid. Thanks to Dr. Liancun Zheng and Mr. Lin Liu for verifying my calculation.

  19. Design and Development of a Miniaturized Double Latching Solenoid Valve for the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James T.

    2008-01-01

    The development of the in-house Miniaturized Double Latching Solenoid Valve, or Microvalve, for the Gas Processing System (GPS) of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite is described. The Microvalve is a double latching solenoid valve that actuates a pintle shaft axially to hermetically seal an orifice. The key requirements and the design innovations implemented to meet them are described.

  20. Status of the CMS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focardi, Ettore

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is one of the two largest and most powerful particle physics detectors ever built. CMS is installed in P5 at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and as of early 2011 has completed nearly a year of operation in which it recorded products of interactions produced in protonproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. The proton-proton run 2010 lasted 7 months and was followed by Pb-Pb ion collisions in November. During the first few months of 2011 the LHC has delivered higher luminosity. The LHC machine is performing extremely well, allowing CMS to record enough data to perform a large number of studies of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics in this new energy domain for the first time and to search for evidence of new physics in regions of phase space that have never before been entered. The CMS detector components, the operational experience and the performance with colliding beams will be described.

  1. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  2. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-07-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  3. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-02-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  4. Detectors of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzella, G.

    Gravitational waves Motion of test bodies in a g.w. field Energy carried by gravitational waves Gravitational-wave sources Spinning star Double-star systems Fall into a Schwarzschild black hole Radiation from gravitational collapse Gravitational-wave detectors The nonresonant detectors The resonant detectors Electromechnical transducers Piezoelectric ceramic The capacitor The inductor Data analysis The Brownian noise The back-action The wide-band noise, data analysis and optimization The resonant transducer The Wiener-Kolmogoroff filter The cross-section and the effective temperature The antenna bandwidth The gravitational-wave experiments in the world The laser interferometers The resonant detectors

  5. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  6. Evaluation of charge -sharing effects on the spatial resolution of the PICASSO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon, L.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Menk, R.-H.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2010-05-01

    A double -layer "edge-on" silicon microstrip detector has been designed and realized in the frame of the PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) project at the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) beamline of Elettra (Trieste, Italy). The detector meets the requirements for synchrotron radiation mammography with patients inregarding: (a) size, since it covers the full beam width (210 mm); (b) spatial resolution, determined by the 0.05 mm strip pitch; (c) single-photon counting capabilities, because it is able to handle more than 10 6 photons/(pixel×s); (d) contrast resolution, thanks to a threshold trim DAC that equalizes the channel sensitivity; (e) efficiency, due to the high absorption in the 15-20 mm sensor depth. Experimental measurements evidence charge sharing, though not compromising the spatial resolution.

  7. Effect of extreme radiation fluences on parameters of SiC nuclear particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. M. Lebedev, A. A.; Strokan, N. B.

    2006-10-15

    Detectors based on modern CVD-grown films were irradiated with 8 MeV protons at a fluence of 3 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. The concentration of primary radiation defects was {approx}10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, which is three orders of magnitude higher than the concentration of the initially present uncompensated donors. The resulting deep compensation of SiC enabled measurements of detector parameters in two modes: under reverse and forward bias. The basic parameters of the detectors degraded by no more than a factor of 1.7, compared with the fluence of 1 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. However, there appeared a polarization voltage, which indicates that a space charge is accumulated by radiation defects.

  8. Results from a 20 scintillator bar time-of-flight test system located inside the 1.4 T CDF solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukegawa, F.; Heinrich, J. G.; Lockyer, N. S.; Long, O.; Kononenko, W.; Gao, T.; Newcomer, F. M.; Van Berg, R.; Kephart, R.; Mori, S.; Kondo, K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on a test time-of-flight (TOF) system that operated in the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) during pp¯ Tevatron collider operation at s=1.8 TeV in the fall 1995 running period. The TOF system consisted of 20 130×4×4 cm3 long Bicron BC408 scintillator bars, with each end of the bars fitted with a small compound parabolic concentrator and a 16-stage R5946 Hamamatsu fine-mesh photomultiplier. The electronics chain consisted of a custom designed preamplifier, constant fraction discriminator, and commercial TDC and ADC FASTBUS modules read out with the CDF data acquisition system. The counters were installed between the Central Tracking Chamber and the 1.4 T superconducting solenoid at a mean radius of 140 cm. We report a procedure for calculating the t0 time from all tracks in an event, the timing resolution, and the particle identification performance of this system.

  9. The study of the Z boson transverse momentum spectrum recorded by the Compact Muon Solenoid from 2010 Large Hadron Collider data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartner, Joseph A., III

    This dissertation describes the full details of 2 studies of Z0 bosons performed using the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider of proton on proton collisions with center of mass energy of 7TeV. The first study searches for physics beyond the Standard Model by looking for an excess in production of Z0 bosons by examining the Z 0pT spectrum. As no excess is found, limits on new physics models are presented as a function of mass and other free parameters. The second study focuses on a precision measurement of the Z 0pT distribution, and is compared to theoretical calculations for the purposes of testing high order QCD calculations in addition to probing the predictions of various tunes of the underlying event. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  10. A low temperature gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, W. O.

    1971-01-01

    The beginning design of an experiment is discussed for studying gravitational radiation by using massive detectors which are cooled to ultralow temperatures in order to improve the signal to noise ratios and the effective range and stability of the detectors. The gravitational detector, a low detection system, a cooled detector, magnetic support, superconducting shielding, and superconducting accelerometer detector are described.

  11. Micro-inhomogeneity effects and radiation damage in semi-insulating GaAs radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, R.; O`Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Smith, K.M.; Didziulis, R.; Kazukauskas, V.; Rinkevicius, V.; Storasta, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    1998-06-01

    Thermally-stimulated current (TSC) measurements and a detailed analysis of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics have been made on semi-insulating GaAs (SI-GaAs) Schottky diode particle detectors, fabricated on substrates from several supplies, before and after irradiation with 24 GeV protons and 300 MeV pions. The analysis of I-V characteristics allows the determination of the barrier height and bulk resistance in detectors. Changes observed in I-V characteristics and TSC spectra after irradiation are described and a dislocation-net model of radiation-damaged devices is proposed.

  12. Frequency discriminator/phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Circuit provides dual function of frequency discriminator/phase detector which reduces frequency acquisition time without adding to circuit complexity. Both frequency discriminators, in evaluated frequency discriminator/phase detector circuits, are effective two decades above and below center frequency.

  13. Characterization of the KATRIN Focal Plane Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodine, Laura; Leber, Michelle; Myers, Allan; Tolich, Kazumi; Vandevender, Brent; Wall, Brandon

    2008-10-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment is a next generation tritium beta decay experiment designed to measure directly the electron neutrino mass with a sensitivity of 0.2 eV. In the experiment, electrons from tritium decay of a gaseous source are magnetically guided through analyzing solenoidal retarding electrostatic spectrometers and detected via a focal plane detector. The focal plane detector is a 90mm diameter, 500 micron thick monolithic silicon pin-diode array with 148 pixels. The diode contacts have a titanium nitride overlayer and are connected to preamplifiers via an array of spring-loaded pogo pins. This novel connection scheme minimizes backgrounds from radioactive materials near the detector, facilitates characterization and replacement of the detector wafer, but requires a unique mounting design. The force of the pins strains the silicon, possibly altering the detector properties and performance. Results on the mechanical, thermal and electrical performance of a prototype detector under stress from pogo pin readouts will be presented.

  14. The CMS Tracker Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf Shah, S.; Tsirou, Andromachi; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Hartmann, Frank; Masetti, Lorenzo; Dirkes, Guido H.; Stringer, Robert; Fahrer, Manuel

    2009-06-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid DCS (CMS) Silicon Strip Tracker is by far the largest detector ever built in micro-strip technology. It has an active surface area of 198 m 2 consisting of 15,148 silicon modules with 9,316,352 readout channels read via 75,376 Analog Pipeline Voltage (APV) front-end chips and a total of 24,244 sensors. The Detector Control System (DCS) for the Tracker is a distributed control system that operates ˜2000 power supplies for the silicon modules and also monitors its environmental sensors. The DCS receives information from about 10 3 environmental probes (temperature and humidity sensors) located inside the detector's volume and values from these probes are driven through the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) of the Detector Safety System (DSS). A total of 10 5 parameters are read out from the dedicated chips in the front-end electronics of the detector via the data acquisition system, and a total of 10 5 parameters are read from the power supply modules. All these parameters are monitored, evaluated and correlated with the detector layout; actions are taken under specific conditions. The hardware for DCS consists of 10 PCs and 10 PLC systems that are continuously running the necessary control and safety routines. The DCS is a fundamental tool for the Tracker operation and its safety.

  15. X-ray irradiation effects on the trapping properties of Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fraboni, B.; Pasquini, L.; Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.

    2009-11-01

    CdZnTe-based detectors possess unique properties as room-temperature x- and gamma-ray detectors. We report on the effects of x-ray irradiation on CdZnTe and CdTe:Cl detectors with increasing x-ray doses. We correlate the 'macroscopic' performance of the detectors, investigated by gamma-ray spectroscopy to the 'microscopic' effects induced by the impinging radiation, i.e., the defective states introduced in the crystal lattice. The electrical activity of the defects and their activation energy have been investigated by photo induced current transient spectroscopy and by space charge limited current analyses. We identify the x-ray dose that induces a significant degradation in the detector performance, and by cross-correlating the results obtained, we achieve a reliable estimate of the actual concentration of electrically active deep states and assess the potentiality of these experimental methods as tools for quantitative analyses of high resistivity materials.

  16. The effects of Doppler broadening and detector resolution on the performance of three-stage Compton cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, Dennis; Polf, Jerimy; Peterson, Steve; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated how the characteristics of the detectors used in a three-stage Compton camera (CC) affect the CC's ability to accurately measure the emission distribution and energy spectrum of prompt gammas (PG) emitted by nuclear de-excitations during proton therapy. The detector characteristics they studied included the material (high-purity germanium [HPGe] and cadmium zinc telluride [CZT]), Doppler broadening (DB), and resolution (lateral, depth, and energy). Methods: The authors simulated three-stage HPGe and CZT CCs of various configurations, detecting gammas from point sources with energies ranging from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. They also simulated a proton pencil beam irradiating a tissue target to study how the detector characteristics affect the PG data measured by CCs in a clinical proton therapy setting. They used three figures of merit: the distance of closest approach (DCA) and the point of closest approach (PCA) between the measured and actual position of the PG emission origin, and the calculated energy resolution. Results: For CCs with HPGe detectors, DB caused the DCA to be greater than 3 mm for 14% of the 6.13 MeV gammas and 20% of the 0.511 MeV gammas. For CCs with CZT detectors, DB caused the DCA to be greater than 3 mm for 18% of the 6.13 MeV gammas and 25% of the 0.511 MeV gammas. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the PCA in the z-caret direction for HPGe and CZT detectors ranged from 1.3 to 0.4 mm for gammas with incident energy ranging from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For CCs composed of HPGe detectors, the resolution of incident gamma energy calculated by the CC ranged from 6% to 1% for gammas with true incident energies from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For CCs composed of CZT detectors, the resolution of gamma energy calculated by the CC ranged from 10% to 1% for gammas with true incident energies from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For HPGe and CZT CCs in which all detector effect were included, the DCA was less than 3 mm for 75% and 68% of the

  17. The effects of Doppler broadening and detector resolution on the performance of three-stage Compton cameras

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Dennis; Polf, Jerimy; Peterson, Steve; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    V. For CCs composed of CZT detectors, the resolution of gamma energy calculated by the CC ranged from 10% to 1% for gammas with true incident energies from 0.511 to 7.12 MeV. For HPGe and CZT CCs in which all detector effect were included, the DCA was less than 3 mm for 75% and 68% of the detected gammas, respectively, and restricting gammas to those having energy greater than 2.0 MeV increased these percentages to 83% and 77% for HPGe and CZT, respectively. Distributions of the true gamma origins and the PCA after detector characteristics had been included showed good agreement on beam range and some loss of resolution for the lateral profile of the PG emission. Characteristic energy lines were evident in the calculated gamma energy spectrum. Conclusions: The authors found the following: (1) DB is the dominant source of spatial and energy resolution loss in the CCs at all energy levels; (2) the largest difference in the spatial resolution of HPGe and CZT CCs is that the spatial resolution distributions of CZT have broader tails. The differences in the FWHM of these distributions are small; (3) the energy resolution of both HPGe and CZT three-stage CCs is adequate for PG spectroscopy; and (4) restricting the gammas to those having energy greater than 2.0 MeV can improve the achievable image resolution. PMID:23298111

  18. Weather induced effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleve, Carla

    The rate of events measured with the surface detector (SD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory is found to be modulated by the weather conditions. This effect, observed in different ranges of S(1000), the signal measured at 1000 m from the shower core, is due to the increasing amount of matter traversed by a shower as the ground pressure increases and to the inverse proportionality of the Moliere radius to the air density near ground. The latter effect results in a modulation of the lateral spread of the shower with T and P. Air- shower simulations with different realistic profiles of the atmosphere support this interpretation of the observed effects.

  19. Huntingtin’s spherical solenoid structure enables polyglutamine tract-dependent modulation of its structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvargia, Ravi; Epand, Raquel; Leitner, Alexander; Jung, Tae-Yang; Shin, Baehyun; Jung, Roy; Lloret, Alejandro; Singh Atwal, Randy; Lee, Hyeongseok; Lee, Jong-Min; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hebert, Hans; Song, Ji-Joon; Seong, Ihn Sik

    2016-01-01

    The polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin protein causes Huntington’s disease. Here, we investigated structural and biochemical properties of huntingtin and the effect of the polyglutamine expansion using various biophysical experiments including circular dichroism, single-particle electron microscopy and cross-linking mass spectrometry. Huntingtin is likely composed of five distinct domains and adopts a spherical α-helical solenoid where the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal regions fold to contain a circumscribed central cavity. Interestingly, we showed that the polyglutamine expansion increases α-helical properties of huntingtin and affects the intramolecular interactions among the domains. Our work delineates the structural characteristics of full-length huntingtin, which are affected by the polyglutamine expansion, and provides an elegant solution to the apparent conundrum of how the extreme amino-terminal polyglutamine tract confers a novel property on huntingtin, causing the disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11184.001 PMID:27003594

  20. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    SciTech Connect

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV

  1. Progress on the Fabrication and Testing of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, Steve; Green, M.A.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael

    2009-05-19

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an international collaboration that will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of a realistic cooling channel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. At each end of the cooling channel a spectrometer solenoid magnet consisting of five superconducting coils will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region. The scintillating fiber tracker within the magnet bore will measure the muon beam emittance as it enters and exits the cooling channel. The 400 mm diameter warm bore, 3 meter long magnets incorporate a cold mass consisting of two coil sections wound on a single aluminum mandrel: a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coil section that matches the solenoid uniform field into the MICE cooling channel. The fabrication of the first of two spectrometer solenoids has been completed, and preliminary testing of the magnet is nearly complete. The key design features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets are presented along with a summary of the progress on the training and testing of the first magnet.

  2. The Magnetic Field inside a Long Solenoid--A New Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, David; Carlton, Kevin; Lisgarten, David

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a technique for measuring the magnetic field inside a long solenoid using computer data logging. This is a new approach to a standard student practical. The design and construction of the sensors is described; they significantly reduce the cost of the apparatus. The approach of the practical is for the students to…

  3. Over Voltage in a Multi-sectioned Solenoid during a Quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinglong; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Liu, Xiaokun; Chen, Anbin; Green, M.A.; Xu, F.Y.

    2009-06-21

    Accurate analysis of over voltage in the superconducting solenoid during a quench is one of the bases for quench protection system design. Classical quench simulation methods can only give rough estimation of the over voltage within a magnet coil. In this paper, for multi-sectioned superconducting solenoid, based on the classical assumption of ellipsoidal normal zone, three-dimension al temperature results are mapped to the one-dimension of the wire, the temperature distribution along the wire and the resistances of each turn are obtained. The coil is treated as circuit comprised of turn resistances, turn self and mutual inductances. The turn resistive voltage, turn inductive voltage, and turn resultant voltage along the wire are calculated. As a result, maximum internal voltages, the layer-to-layer voltages and the turn-to-turn voltages are better estimated. Utilizing this method, the over voltage of a small solenoid and a large solenoid during quenching have been studied. The result shows that this method can well improve the over voltage estimate, especially when the coil is larger.

  4. HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLENOID COIL NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE PROBE FOR SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET SPECTROMETERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A broadband probe having a tuning range of 20 to 65 MHz has been designed and built specifically to give maximum sensitivity per unit volume of sample. This is accomplished through use of a solenoid rf coil instead of the usual Helmholtz coil found in commercial probes for superc...

  5. D0 Superconducting Solenoid Quench Data and Slow Dump Data Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1998-06-09

    This Dzero Engineering note describes the method for which the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid Fast Dump and Slow Dump data are accumulated, tracked and stored. The 2 Tesla Solenoid has eleven data points that need to be tracked and then stored when a fast dump or a slow dump occur. The TI555(Texas Instruments) PLC(Programmable Logic Controller) which controls the DC power circuit that powers the Solenoid, also has access to all the voltage taps and other equipment in the circuit. The TI555 constantly logs these eleven points in a rotating memory buffer. When either a fast dump(dump switch opens) or a slow dump (power supply turns off) occurs, the TI555 organizes the respective data and will down load the data to a file on DO-CCRS2. This data in this file is moved over ethernet and is stored in a CSV (comma separated format) file which can easily be examined by Microsoft Excel or any other spreadsheet. The 2 Tesla solenoid control system also locks in first fault information. The TI555 decodes the first fault and passes it along to the program collecting the data and storing it on DO-CCRS2. This first fault information is then part of the file.

  6. Predictions for Non-Solenoidal Startup in Pegasus with Lower Divertor Helicity Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, J. M.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.

    2014-10-01

    Non-solenoidal startup in Pegasus has focused on using arrays of local helicity injectors situated on the outboard midplane to leverage PF induction. In contrast, injector assemblies located in the lower divertor region can provide improved performance. Higher toroidal field at the injector increases the helicity injection rate, providing a higher effective loop voltage. Poloidal flux expansion in the divertor region will increase the Taylor relaxation current limit. Radial position control requirements are lessened, as plasma expansion naturally couples to injectors in the divertor region. Advances in cathode design and plasma-facing guard rings allow operation at bias voltages over 1.5 kV, three times higher than previously available. This results in increased effective loop voltage and reduced impurity generation. Operation of helicity injectors in the high field side elevates the current requirements for relaxation to a tokamak-like state, but these are met through the improved injector design and increased control over the poloidal field structure via the addition of new coil sets. These advances, combined with the relocation of the injectors to the divertor region, will allow access to the operational regime where helicity injection current drive, rather the poloidal induction, dominates the discharge--a prerequisite for scaling to larger devices. Initial estimates indicate that plasma currents of 0.25-0.30 MA are attainable at full toroidal field with 4 injectors of 2 cm2 each and 8 kA total injected current. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  7. A 3-D Theoretical Model for Calculating Plasma Effects in Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenzhao; Liu, Jing; Mei, Dongming; Cubed Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    In the detection of WIMP-induced nuclear recoil with Ge detectors, the main background source is the electron recoil produced by natural radioactivity. The capability of discriminating nuclear recoil (n) from electron recoil (γ) is crucial to WIMP searches. Digital pulse shape analysis is an encouraging approach to the discrimination of nuclear recoil from electron recoil since nucleus is much heavier than electron and heavier particle generates ionization more densely along its path, which forms a plasma-like cloud of charge that shields the interior from the influence of the electric field. The time needed for total disintegration of this plasma region is called plasma time. The plasma time depends on the initial density and radius of the plasma-like cloud, diffusion constant for charge carriers, and the strength of electric field. In this work, we developed a 3-D theoretical model for calculating the plasma time in Ge detectors. Using this model, we calculated the plasma time for both nuclear recoils and electron recoils to study the possibility for Ge detectors to realize n/ γ discrimination and improve detector sensitivity in detecting low-mass WIMPs. This work is supported by NSF in part by the NSF PHY-0758120, DOE Grant DE-FG02-10ER46709, and the State of South Dakota.

  8. Radiation effects on floating rings of voltage terminating structure in Si p-on-n detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, V.; Egorov, N.; Eremin, I.; Fadeeva, N.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2013-12-01

    In the 1990s a suggestion was put forward that the space charge limited current mechanism is responsible for stabilization of the I-V characteristics in irradiated Si p-on-n detectors. This mechanism is switched on in the case of high concentration of radiation induced deep traps which via holes accumulation will reduce the electric field in the regions of breakdown. The present study shows that voltage terminating structure (VTS) consisting of the floating p+ rings as a main element for stabilization of I-V characteristics in nonirradiated detectors is still active being irradiated to the fluence beyond space charge sign inversion. This characteristic of VTS can be accounted for by the double peak electric field distribution in heavily irradiated detectors and the punch-through mechanism of current flow between the floating p+ rings in the silicon bulk with high concentration of deep traps. It is shown that VTS operates as a potential divider up to the fluence of 1×1015 neq/cm2 and it is at higher fluences that the detector stability is maintained only by the space charge limited current mechanism.

  9. Metal Detector Searches: An Effective Means To Help Keep Weapons Out of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    Disagrees with Ferraraccio's views and argues that: (1) students do bring illegal weapons to school; (2) metal detectors do detect weapons and help schools to disarm students; (3) disarming students reduces the threat of violence; and (4) courts have repeatedly approved the constitutionality of weapon-related suspicionless student searches…

  10. Development of a MHD code satisfying solenoidal magnetic field condition and its application to Mercury's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.; Seki, K.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The MHD simulation is one of the powerful methods to understand global structure of the magnetosphere. However, in the Mercury's magnetosphere, kinetic effects of plasma might not be negligible because of its small scale. Statistical trajectory tracing of test particles is an important scheme to investigate the kinetic effects of particles. Previous studies by Delcourt et al. [2003; 2005] used analytical models of electric and magnetic fields that are obtained by rescaling the Earth's magnetosphere and calculated the motion of planetary sodium ions. While this approach is efficient to see the dynamics of heavy ions, resultant properties largely depend on the field models. In order to verify the particle dynamics in the more realistic global configuration of the Mercury's magnetosphere, a self-consistent electric and magnetic field configuration such as that obtained from MHD simulations is required. For studies of the kinetic effects, it is important that the resultant magnetic field (B) satisfies solenoidal condition, i.e., divB=0, to avoid artificial acceleration/deceleration. Aiming at global simulation of the Mercury's magnetosphere, we developed a MHD simulation code that automatically satisfies solenoidal condition for B. To implement the condition, we used vector potential (A) instead of magnetic field itself in the MHD equations. The usage of A automatically guaranteed divB=div(rotA)=0. For an accurate simulation of high Reynolds number magnetofluid, we adopted R-CIP algorithm [Yabe et al., 1991; Xiao et al., 1996] to solve the advection term in the simulation code. The non-advection terms are solved by 4th order Runge-Kutta method or 3rd order Adams-Moulton predictor-corrector method. The code assessment by comparison with previous simulations with TVD algorithm or analytical solutions shows reasonably good ability of energy and mass conservation, and description of MHD discontinuities. A remarkable feature of the new code with A is the precise description

  11. A study of the effect of Al2O3 reflector on response function of NaI(Tl) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Hoang Duc; Chuong, Huynh Dinh; Thanh, Tran Thien; Van Tao, Chau

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to assess the effect of Al2O3 reflector surrounding the NaI(Tl) crystal on the detector response function, based on Monte Carlo simulation, which can verify the precise model of the NaI(Tl) detector. The method used in determining the suitable thickness of Al2O3 reflector is to compare the calculated and experimental values of full-energy peak efficiency. The results show that the Al2O3 reflector should have a thickness of 0.8-1.2 mm for the maximum deviation between the experimental and simulated efficiency of 3.2% at all concerning energies. In addition, the obtained results are in good agreement with the response function of simulation and experimental spectra.

  12. The effect of guard ring on leakage current and spectroscopic performance of TlBr planar detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargar, Alireza; Kim, Hadong; Cirignano, Leonard; Shah, Kanai

    2014-09-01

    Four thallium bromide planar detectors were fabricated from materials grown at RMD Inc. The TlBr samples were prepared to investigate the effect of guard ring on device gamma-ray spectroscopy performance, and to investigate the leakage current through surface and bulk. The devices' active area in planar configuration were 4.4 × 4.4 × 1.0 mm3. In this report, the detector fabrication process is described and the resulting energy spectra are discussed. It is shown that the guard ring improves device spectroscopic performance by shielding the sensing electrode from the surface leakage current, and by making the electric filed more uniform in the active region of the device.

  13. SOI metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor photon detector based on single-hole counting.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Inokawa, Hiroshi; Satoh, Hiroaki; Ono, Atsushi

    2011-08-01

    In this Letter, a scaled-down silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is characterized as a photon detector, where photogenerated individual holes are trapped below the negatively biased gate and modulate stepwise the electron current flowing in the bottom channel induced by the positive substrate bias. The output waveforms exhibit clear separation of current levels corresponding to different numbers of trapped holes. Considering this capability of single-hole counting, a small dark count of less than 0.02 s(-1) at room temperature, and low operation voltage of 1 V, SOI MOSFET could be a unique photon-number-resolving detector if the small quantum efficiency were improved. PMID:21808317

  14. Effect of Te inclusions on internal electric field of CdMnTe gamma-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babalola, Oluseyi Stephen; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Egarievwe, Stephen U.; Hossain, Anwar M.; Burger, Arnold; James, Ralph B.

    2009-08-01

    We studied two separate as-grown CdMnTe crystals by Infrared (IR) microscopy and Pockels effect imaging, and then developed an algorithm to analyze and visualize the electric field within the crystals' bulk. In one of the two crystals the size and distribution of inclusions within the bulk promised to be more favorable in terms of efficiency as a detector crystal. However, the Te inclusions were arranged in characteristic 'planes'. Pockels imaging revealed an accumulation of charges in the region of these planes. We demonstrated that the planes induced stress within the bulk of the crystal that accumulated charges, thereby causing non-uniformity of the internal electric field and degrading the detector's performance.

  15. Effects of sub-bandgap illumination on electrical properties and detector performances of CdZnTe:In

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lingyan; Jie, Wanqi Zha, Gangqiang Feng, Tao; Wang, Ning; Xi, Shouzhi; Fu, Xu; Zhang, Wenlong; Xu, Yadong; Wang, Tao

    2014-06-09

    The effects of sub-bandgap illumination on electrical properties of CdZnTe:In crystals and spectroscopic performances of the fabricated detectors were discussed. The excitation process of charge carriers through thermal and optical transitions at the deep trap could be described by the modified Shockley-Read-Hall model. The ionization probability of the deep donor shows an increase under illumination, which should be responsible for the variation of electrical properties within CdZnTe bulk materials with infrared (IR) irradiation. By applying Ohm's law, diffusion model and interfacial layer-thermionic-diffusion theory, we obtain the decrease of bulk resistivity and the increase of space charge density in the illuminated crystals. Moreover, the illumination induced ionization will further contribute to improving carrier transport property and charge collection efficiency. Consequently, the application of IR irradiation in the standard working environment is of great significance to improve the spectroscopic characteristics of CdZnTe radiation detectors.

  16. Non-cooled (Cd,Hg)Te detectors of middle and far infrared, based on the Dember effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedziela, T.; Piotrowski, J.

    Using Piotrowski and Rogalski (1985) data on the material parameters of (Cd,Hg)Te, the voltage responsivity and normalized detectivity of (Cd,Hg)Te Dember photodetectors of middle IR and FIR were analyzed on the basis of the formulation by Niedziela and Piotrowski (1987) of the Dember effect in homogeneous layers of (Cd,HG)Te. It is shown that, for middle IR, a necessary condition for reaching the ultimate value of the normalized detectivity by (Cd,Hg)Te Dember detectors is the use of photosensitive elements of type p with thicknesses equivalent to the diffusion length (ad of about 1) and with recombination velocities that are high (s2 = 1000/msec) on the nonirradiated surface and low (s1 about 0) on the irradiated surface. For FIR, the ultimate normalized detectivity of these detectors are attainable in somewhat thicker photosensitive elements (ad = 2), and with higher recombination velocities (s2 = 100,000/msec) at the nonirradiated surface.

  17. Topographic Evaluation of the Effect of Passivation in Improving the Performance of CdZnTe Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, A.; Dowdy, A.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Roy, U. N.; Tappero, R.; Tong, X.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2014-08-01

    Surface passivation reportedly is an effective technique for controlling surface leakage current and its related electronic noise. Several chemical agents have been effectively used for passivating cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) surfaces; however, the long-term stability and the adverse effect on the metal contacts remain questionable. In this study, we reviewed two popular passivating agents, viz. hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and a mixture of ammonium fluoride and hydrogen peroxide (NH4F + H2O2). Our aim was to identify an ideal one that can effectively and permanently lower surface leakage currents without adversely affecting the metal contacts. We characterized their topographic features and their long-term effectiveness in terms of detector performance, and compared the results to understand their nature. We determined which chemical species were formed, and recorded the peaks of elemental Cd and Te via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micron-scale spatial resolution x-ray fluorescence ( μ-XRF). We describe in detail the formation of new chemical species and the material nonuniformity of differently treated surfaces. Their effectiveness was assessed from experimental findings of their electrical properties and the spectral response. Our results imply that both passivating agents lowered the surface leakage current, and improved the detection efficiency of the CZT detectors, but their effectiveness was unstable over time.

  18. SU-D-213-02: Characterization of the Effect of a New Commercial Transmission Detector On Radiotherapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J; Morin, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiotherapy beams of various energies. Methods: A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6MV, 6FFF, 10MV, and 10FFF beams. Measurements of beam characteristics including percentage depth doses (PDDs), inplane and crossplane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired at field sizes of 3×3cm, 5×5m, 10×10cm, and 20×20cm at 100cm and 80cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were taken with and without the transmission detector in the path of the beam. A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100cm, 90cm, and 80cm SSD and using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers, and OSLD). Results: The PDDs showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for both 100cm and 80cm SSD (≤4mm dmax difference and <1.2% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and at larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. The penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the central 80% of the profile showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 0.756% (1.535%) and 0.739% (3.682%) for 100cm and 80cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose at 100cm (80cm) SSD for 10×10cm field size was <4% (<35%) dose increase for all energies. For 20×20cm field size, this value increased to <10% (≤45%). Conclusion: The transmission detector has minimal effect on the clinically relevant radiotherapy beams for IMRT and VMAT (field sizes 10×10cm and less). For larger field sizes, some perturbations are observable which would need to be assessed for clinical impact. The authors of this publication has research support from IBA Dosimetry.

  19. Increasing the effective aperture of a detector and enlarging the receiving field of view in a 3D imaging lidar system through hexagonal prism beam splitting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xiaobao; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cui, Tianxiang; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Yunxi; Li, Hailong; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-11

    The detector in a highly accurate and high-definition scanning 3D imaging lidar system requires high frequency bandwidth and sufficient photosensitive area. To solve the problem of small photosensitive area of an existing indium gallium arsenide detector with a certain frequency bandwidth, this study proposes a method for increasing the receiving field of view (FOV) and enlarging the effective photosensitive aperture of such detector through hexagonal prism beam splitting. The principle and construction of hexagonal prism beam splitting is also discussed in this research. Accordingly, a receiving optical system with two hexagonal prisms is provided and the splitting beam effect of the simulation experiment is analyzed. Using this novel method, the receiving optical system's FOV can be improved effectively up to ±5°, and the effective photosensitive aperture of the detector is increased from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm. PMID:27410800

  20. Enhanced collective focusing of intense neutralized ion beam pulses in the presence of weak solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2012-05-31

    In this study, the design of ion drivers for warm dense matter and high energy density physics applications and heavy ion fusion involves transverse focusing and longitudinal compression of intense ion beams to a small spot size on the target. To facilitate the process, the compression occurs in a long drift section filled with a dense background plasma, which neutralizes the intense beam self-fields. Typically, the ion bunch charge is better neutralized than its current, and as a result a net self-pinching (magnetic) force is produced. The self-pinching effect is of particular practical importance, and is used in various ion driver designs in order to control the transverse beam envelope. In the present work we demonstrate that this radial self-focusing force can be significantly enhanced if a weak (B~100 G) solenoidal magnetic field is applied inside the neutralized drift section, thus allowing for substantially improved transport. It is shown that in contrast to magnetic self-pinching, the enhanced collective self-focusing has a radial electric field component and occurs as a result of the overcompensation of the beam charge by plasmaelectrons, whereas the beam current becomes well-neutralized. As the beam leaves the neutralizing drift section, additional transverse focusing can be applied. For instance, in the neutralized drift compression experiments (NDCX) a strong (several Tesla) final focus solenoid is used for this purpose. In the present analysis we propose that the tight final focus in the NDCX experiments may possibly be achieved by using a much weaker (few hundred Gauss) magnetic lens, provided the ion beam carries an equal amount of co-moving neutralizing electrons from the preceding drift section into the lens. In this case the enhanced focusing is provided by the collective electrondynamics strongly affected by a weak applied magnetic field.