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Sample records for detectors radiation

  1. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  2. Radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  3. Radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  4. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  5. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  6. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  7. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  8. Mossbauer spectrometer radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A Mossbauer spectrometer with high efficiencies in both transmission and backscattering techniques is described. The device contains a sodium iodide crystal for detecting radiation caused by the Mossbauer effect, and two photomultipliers to collect the radiation detected by the crystal. When used in the transmission technique, the sample or scatterer is placed between the incident radiation source and the detector. When used in a backscattering technique, the detector is placed between the incident radiation source and the sample of scatterer such that the incident radiation will pass through a hole in the crystal and strike the sample. Diagrams of the instrument are provided.

  9. Microwave Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  10. Electromagnetic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Benson, Jay L.; Hansen, Gordon J.

    1976-01-01

    An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

  11. Underwater radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W.; McKnight, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.

  12. Radiation Detectors and Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Andrea

    The use of radiation detectors in the analysis of art objects represents a very special application in a true interdisciplinary field. Radiation detectors employed in this field detect, e.g., x-rays, γ-rays, β particles, and protons. Analyzed materials range from stones, metals, over porcelain to paintings. The available nondestructive and noninvasive analytical methods cover a broad range of techniques. Hence, for the sake of brevity, this chapter will concentrate on few techniques: Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Induced γ-ray Emission (PIGE).

  13. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  14. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  15. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  16. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  17. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Tull, Carolyn R.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2002-01-01

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  18. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  19. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane W.; Burger, Arnold

    2010-03-30

    A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

  20. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Radiation Hazard Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has made commercially available a new, inexpensive, conveniently-carried device for protection, of people exposed to potentially dangerous levels of microwave radiation. Microwaves are radio emissions of extremely high frequency. They can be hazardous but the degree of hazard is not yet well understood. Generally, it is believed that low intensity radiation of short duration is not harmful but that exposure to high levels can induce deep internal burns, affecting the circulatory and nervous systems, and particularly the eyes. The Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established an allowable safe threshold of exposure. However, people working near high intensity sources of microwave energy-for example, radar antennas and television transmitters-may be unknowingly exposed to radiation levels beyond the safe limit. This poses not only a personal safety problem but also a problem for employers in terms of productivity loss, workman's compensation claims and possible liability litigation. Earlier-developed monitoring devices which warn personnel of dangerous radiation levels have their shortcomings. They can be cumbersome and awkward to use while working. They also require continual visual monitoring to determine if a person is in a dangerous area of radiation, and they are relatively expensive, another deterrent to their widespread adoption. In response to the need for a cheaper and more effective warning system, Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed, under NASA auspices, a new, battery-powered Microwave Radiation Hazard Detector. To bring the product to the commercial market, California Institute Research Foundation, the patent holder, granted an exclusive license to Cicoil Corporation, Chatsworth, California, an electronic components manufacturer.

  2. Radiation damage of germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Energetic particles can produce interstitial-vacancy pairs in a crystal by knocking the atoms from their normal positions. Detectors are unique among semiconductor devices in depending on very low concentrations of electrically active impurities, and also on efficient transport of holes and electrons over relatively large distances. Because the dense regions of damage produced by energetic particles may result in donors and/or acceptors, and also provide trapping sites for holes and electrons, detectors are very sensitive to radiation damage. In addition to these effects occurring within the detector, radiation may also change the characteristics of the exposed surfaces causing unpredictable effects on the detector leakage current. Radiation-induced surface degradation has rarely, if ever, been observed for germanium detectors. The possibility of minimizing hole trapping in charge collection by the use of a high-purity germanium coaxial detector configured with the p (+) contact on the coaxial periphery is discussed.

  3. Simple dynamic electromagnetic radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Been, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Detector monitors gamma dose rate at particular position in a radiation facility where a mixed neutron-gamma environment exists, thus determining reactor power level changes. Device also maps gamma intensity profile across a neutron-gamma beam.

  4. Radiation hard cryogenic silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrande, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Bell, W. H.; Berglund, P.; de Boer, W.; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Chapuy, S.; Cindro, V.; Collins, P.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Da Vi, C.; Devine, S.; Dezillie, B.; Dimcovski, Z.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Konorov, I.; Li, Z.; Loureno, C.; Mikuz, M.; Niinikoski, T. O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Palmieuri, V. G.; Paul, S.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Verbitskaya, E.; Watts, S.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently observed that heavily irradiated silicon detectors, no longer functional at room temperature, "resuscitate" when operated at temperatures below 130 K. This is often referred to as the "Lazarus effect". The results presented here show that cryogenic operation represents a new and reliable solution to the problem of radiation tolerance of silicon detectors.

  5. Broadband optical radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Hong, S. D.; Moacanin, J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting optical radiation by optically monitoring temperature changes in a microvolume caused by absorption of the optical radiation to be detected is described. More specifically, a thermal lens forming material is provided which has first and second opposite, substantially parallel surfaces. A reflective coating is formed on the first surface, and a radiation absorbing coating is formed on the reflective coating. Chopped, incoming optical radiation to be detected is directed to irradiate a small portion of the radiation absorbing coating. Heat generated in this small area is conducted to the lens forming material through the reflective coating, thereby raising the temperature of a small portion of the lens forming material and causing a thermal lens to be formed therein.

  6. Radiation energy detector and analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, T.G.

    1981-09-15

    A radiation detector array and a method for measuring the spectral content of radiation. The radiation sensor or detector is an array or stack of thin solid-electrolyte batteries. The batteries, arranged in a stack, may be composed of independent battery cells or may be arranged so that adjacent cells share a common terminal surface. This common surface is possible since the polarity of the batteries with respect to an adjacent battery is unrestricted, allowing a reduction in component parts of the assembly and reducing the overall stack length. Additionally, a test jig or chamber for allowing rapid measurement of the voltage across each battery is disclosed. A multichannel recorder and display may be used to indicate the voltage gradient change across the cells, or a small computer may be used for rapidly converting these voltage readings to a graph of radiation intensity versus wavelength or energy. The behavior of the batteries when used as a radiation detector and analyzer are such that the voltage measurements can be made at leisure after the detector array has been exposed to the radiation, and it is not necessary to make rapid measurements as is now done.

  7. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, D.C.; Fox, R.J.

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semi-conductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  8. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.; Fox, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semiconductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  9. Portable Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, General Pneumatics Corporation's Western Research Center satisfied a NASA need for a non-clogging Joule-Thomson cryostat to provide very low temperature cooling for various sensors. This NASA-supported cryostat development played a key part in the development of more portable high-purity geranium gamma-ray detectors. Such are necessary to discern between the radionuclides in medical, fuel, weapon, and waste materials. The outcome of the SBIR project is a cryostat that can cool gamma-ray detectors, without vibration, using compressed gas that can be stored compactly and indefinitely in a standby mode. General Pneumatics also produces custom J-T cryostats for other government, commercial and medical applications.

  10. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  11. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art (SOA) instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  12. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  13. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  14. Flexible composite radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Wrobleski, Debra A.; Orler, Edward B.

    2006-12-05

    A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

  15. Advanced Radiation Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    The University of Michigan

    1998-07-01

    Since our last progress report, the project at The University of Michigan has continued to concentrate on the development of gamma ray spectrometers fabricated from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). This material is capable of providing energy resolution that is superior to that of scintillation detectors, while avoiding the necessity for cooling associated with germanium systems. In our past reports, we have described one approach (the coplanar grid electrode) that we have used to partially overcome some of the major limitations on charge collection that is found in samples of CZT. This approach largely eliminates the effect of hole motion in the formation of the output signal, and therefore leads to pulses that depend only on the motion of a single carrier (electrons). Since electrons move much more readily through CZT than do holes, much better energy resolution can be achieved under these conditions. In our past reports, we have described a 1 cm cube CZT spectrometer fitted with coplanar grids that achieved an energy resolution of 1.8% from the entire volume of the crystal. This still represents, to our knowledge, the best energy resolution ever demonstrated in a CZT detector of this size.

  16. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  17. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Michael A.; Crowell, John M.

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  18. A low temperature gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, W. O.

    1971-01-01

    The beginning design of an experiment is discussed for studying gravitational radiation by using massive detectors which are cooled to ultralow temperatures in order to improve the signal to noise ratios and the effective range and stability of the detectors. The gravitational detector, a low detection system, a cooled detector, magnetic support, superconducting shielding, and superconducting accelerometer detector are described.

  19. High resistivity silicon radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Julie Diane

    This work addresses the use of silicon detectors both for charged particles in a high energy physics application, and for electromagnetic radiation, specifically x-ray and γ-ray detectors. The second generation of a PIN diode array pixel detector integrated with full twin well CMOS was developed for high energy particle physics. A new vertical high voltage diode termination structure was developed and compared to other diode termination structures through simulations. The new structure reduced the process complexity and improved the yield and robustness to mechanical damage to the backside, allowing us to build a much larger detector with denser frontside patterning, implementing a new sparse-field read-out design. Radiation measurements from this pixel detector are presented, which represent the first integrated sparse-field read-out results ever reported. A prototype 1mm thick PIN diode array x-ray detector with a depletion voltage of 800V was simulated, designed and fabricated for protein crystallography. Using 2D simulations, an optimized 5 floating ring high voltage structure was designed and implemented. Preliminary measurements indicate that the detector can be operated successfully up to 1000V. A new cylindrical drift detector was developed for x-ray absorbtion spectroscopy. To minimize the drift time, an analytic expression for drift field and 2D simulations were used to optimize the applied surface potential for a uniform drift field. Three novel integrated transistors for first stage amplification were designed and fabricated, which show promise of working with fairly straightforward optimization. A new technique for controlling dark current due to surface generation was introduced and implemented successfully. Instead of collecting the surface current at a guard anode, surface generation is suppressed by putting n+ diffusion rings between the p+ rings, dramatically reducing the depleted oxide interface area which is the site for surface generation. Using this technique, we built an 8mm diameter drift detector with full volume sensitivity. Two- and three-dimension transient simulations were used to study charge cloud evolution during the drift period. A problem was discovered which is common to PISCES based simulators: when a drift field is present, diffusion spread of the charge cloud is erroneously enhanced in the direction of and proportional to the drift field.

  20. Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Varner Jr, Robert L; Ball, Robert; Beene, James R; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Bentefour, E; Levin, Daniel S.; Moshe, M.; Silver, Yiftah; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

  1. Direct detector for terahertz radiation

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.; Lee, Mark; Shaner, Eric A.; Allen, S. James

    2008-09-02

    A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

  2. Hybrid anode for semiconductor radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ge; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E; Camarda, Guiseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; James, Ralph B

    2013-11-19

    The present invention relates to a novel hybrid anode configuration for a radiation detector that effectively reduces the edge effect of surface defects on the internal electric field in compound semiconductor detectors by focusing the internal electric field of the detector and redirecting drifting carriers away from the side surfaces of the semiconductor toward the collection electrode(s).

  3. Pocket-size microwave radiation hazard detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight unit is easily carried in coat pocket or attached to belt, detector sounds alarm in presence of dangerous microwave radiation levels. Unit consists of antenna, detector, level sensor, keyed oscillator, and speaker. Antenna may be single equiangular spiral or set of orthogonal slot dipoles. Signal detector is simple diode in small package.

  4. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  5. Electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    An electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detector (EGGSRAD) useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems is described. The radiation detector employs doping of the semiconductor and variation of the semiconductor detector material to form a two-dimensional electron gas, and to allow transistor action within the detector. This radiation detector provides superior energy resolution and radiation detection sensitivity over the conventional semiconductor radiation detector and the "electron-only" semiconductor radiation detectors which utilize a grid electrode near the anode. In a first embodiment, the EGGSRAD incorporates delta-doped layers adjacent the anode which produce an internal free electron grid well to which an external grid electrode can be attached. In a second embodiment, a quantum well is formed between two of the delta-doped layers, and the quantum well forms the internal free electron gas grid to which an external grid electrode can be attached. Two other embodiments which are similar to the first and second embodiment involve a graded bandgap formed by changing the composition of the semiconductor material near the first and last of the delta-doped layers to increase or decrease the conduction band energy adjacent to the delta-doped layers.

  6. Metamaterials for Cherenkov Radiation Based Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tyukhtin, A. V.; Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Antipov, S.

    2009-01-22

    Measurement of Cherenkov radiation (CR) has long been a useful technique for charged particle detection and beam diagnostics. We are investigating metamaterials engineered to have refractive indices tailored to enhance properties of CR that are useful for particle detectors and that cannot be obtained using conventional media. Cherenkov radiation in dispersive media with a large refractive index differs significantly from the same effect in conventional detector media, like gases or aerogel. The radiation pattern of CR in dispersive metamaterials presents lobes at very large angles with respect to particle motion. Moreover, the frequency and particle velocity dependence of the radiated energy can differ significantly from CR in a conventional dielectric medium.

  7. Superconductive tunnel structures as radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, A.; Gray, K.E.

    1985-08-01

    A brief review is given on various aspects of the potential of superconducting tunnel junctions as detectors for atomic and nuclear radiations. On the basis of recent results main advantages and drawbacks are indicated providing a preliminary comparison with the presently used semiconductor detectors. The basic ideas underlying the physics of the interaction of nuclear particles and other radiations with superconducting junctions are outlined. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Processing circuitry for single channel radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Samuel D. (Inventor); Delaune, Paul B. (Inventor); Turner, Kathryn M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Processing circuitry is provided for a high voltage operated radiation detector. An event detector utilizes a comparator configured to produce an event signal based on a leading edge threshold value. A preferred event detector does not produce another event signal until a trailing edge threshold value is satisfied. The event signal can be utilized for counting the number of particle hits and also for controlling data collection operation for a peak detect circuit and timer. The leading edge threshold value is programmable such that it can be reprogrammed by a remote computer. A digital high voltage control is preferably operable to monitor and adjust high voltage for the detector.

  9. Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems. The detector is fabricated using wafer fusion to insert an electrically conductive grid, typically comprising a metal, between two solid semiconductor pieces, one having a cathode (negative electrode) and the other having an anode (positive electrode). The wafer fused semiconductor radiation detector functions like the commonly used Frisch grid radiation detector, in which an electrically conductive grid is inserted in high vacuum between the cathode and the anode. The wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector can be fabricated using the same or two different semiconductor materials of different sizes and of the same or different thicknesses; and it may utilize a wide range of metals, or other electrically conducting materials, to form the grid, to optimize the detector performance, without being constrained by structural dissimilarity of the individual parts. The wafer-fused detector is basically formed, for example, by etching spaced grooves across one end of one of two pieces of semiconductor materials, partially filling the grooves with a selected electrical conductor which forms a grid electrode, and then fusing the grooved end of the one semiconductor piece to an end of the other semiconductor piece with a cathode and an anode being formed on opposite ends of the semiconductor pieces.

  10. Enhanced radiation detectors using luminescent materials

    DOEpatents

    Vardeny, Zeev V.; Jeglinski, Stefan A.; Lane, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    A radiation detecting device comprising a radiation sensing element, and a layer of luminescent material to expand the range of wavelengths over which the sensing element can efficiently detect radiation. The luminescent material being selected to absorb radiation at selected wavelengths, causing the luminescent material to luminesce, and the luminescent radiation being detected by the sensing element. Radiation sensing elements include photodiodes (singly and in arrays), CCD arrays, IR detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Luminescent materials include polymers, oligomers, copolymers and porphyrines, Luminescent layers include thin films, thicker layers, and liquid polymers.

  11. CVD diamond detectors for ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Adam, W.; Bauer, C.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredi, P. F.; Manfredotti, C.; Marshall, R. D.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Palmieri, V. G.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Pretzl, K.; Re, V.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Roff, D.; Rudge, A.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Speziali, V.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Thomson, G. B.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Ziock, H.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    1999-10-01

    In future HEP accelerators, such as the LHC (CERN), detectors and electronics in the vertex region of the experiments will suffer from extreme radiation. Thus radiation hardness is required for both detectors and electronics to survive in this harsh environment. CVD diamond, which is investigated by the RD42 Collaboration at CERN, can meet these requirements. Samples of up to 2×4 cm2 have been grown and refined for better charge collection properties, which are measured with a β source or in a testbeam. A large number of diamond samples has been irradiated with hadrons to fluences of up to 5×10 15 cm-2 to study the effects of radiation. Both strip and pixel detectors were prepared in various geometries. Samples with strip metallization have been tested with both slow and fast readout electronics, and the first diamond pixel detector proved fully functional with LHC electronics.

  12. Gamma radiation detectors for safeguards applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carchon, R.; Moeslinger, M.; Bourva, L.; Bass, C.; Zendel, M.

    2007-08-01

    The IAEA uses extensively a variety of gamma radiation detectors to verify nuclear material. These detectors are part of standardized spectrometry systems: germanium detectors for High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (HRGS); Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for Room Temperature Gamma Spectrometry (RTGS); and NaI(Tl) detectors for Low Resolution Gamma Spectrometry (LRGS). HRGS with high-purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen is widely used in nuclear safeguards to verify the isotopic composition of plutonium or uranium in non-irradiated material. Alternative cooling systems have been evaluated and electrically cooled HpGe detectors show a potential added value, especially for unattended measurements. The spectrometric performance of CZT detectors, their robustness and simplicity are key to the successful verification of irradiated materials. Further development, such as limiting the charge trapping effects in CZT to provide improved sensitivity and energy resolution are discussed. NaI(Tl) detectors have many applications—specifically in hand-held radioisotope identification devices (RID) which are used to detect the presence of radioactive material where a lower resolution is sufficient, as they benefit from a generally higher sensitivity. The Agency is also continuously involved in the review and evaluation of new and emerging technologies in the field of radiation detection such as: Peltier-cooled CdTe detectors; semiconductor detectors operating at room temperature such as HgI 2 and GaAs; and, scintillator detectors using glass fibres or LaBr 3. A final conclusion, proposing recommendations for future action, is made.

  13. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    Mc Fee, Matthew C.; Kirkham, Tim J.; Johnson, Tippi H.

    1994-01-01

    A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

  14. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

  15. Radiation and particle detector and amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, K. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A radiation or charged particle detector is described which incorporates a channel multiplier structure to amplify the detected rays or particles. The channel multiplier structure has a support multiplying element with a longitudinal slot along one side. The element supports a pair of plates positioned contiguous with the slot. The plates funnel the particles or rays to be detected into the slotted aperture and the element, thus creating an effectively wide aperture detector of the windowless type.

  16. Multiple-mode radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Claus, Liam D.; Derzon, Mark S.; Kay, Randolph R.; Bauer, Todd; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Henry, Michael David

    2015-08-25

    An apparatus for detecting radiation is provided. In embodiments, at least one sensor medium is provided, of a kind that interacts with radiation to generate photons and/or charge carriers. The apparatus also includes at least one electrode arrangement configured to collect radiation-generated charge from a sensor medium that has been provided. The apparatus also includes at least one photodetector configured to produce an electrical output in response to photons generated by radiation in such a sensor medium, and an electronic circuit configured to produce an output that is jointly responsive to the collected charge and to the photodetector output. At least one such electrode arrangement, at least one such photodetector, and at least one such sensor medium are combined to form an integral unit.

  17. Radiation hardness characteristics of Si-PIN radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Manhee; Jo, Woo Jin; Kim, Han Soo; Ha, Jang Ho

    2015-06-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has fabricated Si-PIN radiation detectors with low leakage current, high resistivity (>11 kΩ cm) and low capacitance for high-energy physics and X-ray spectroscopy. Floating-zone (FZ) 6-in. diameter N-type silicon wafers, with <1 1 1> crystal orientation and 675 μm thick, were used in the detector fabrication. The active areas are 3 mm×3 mm, 5 mm×5 mm and 10 mm×10 mm. We used a double deep-diffused structure at the edge of the active area for protection from the surface leakage path. We also compared the electrical performance of the Si-PIN detector with anti-reflective coating (ARC). For a detector with an active area of 3 mm×3 mm, the leakage current is about 1.9 nA and 7.4 nA at a 100 V reverse bias voltage, and 4.6 pF and 4.4 pF capacitance for the detector with and without an ARC, respectively. In addition, to compare the energy resolution in terms of radiation hardness, we measured the energy spectra with 57Co and 133Ba before the irradiation. Using developed preamplifiers (KAERI-PA1) that have ultra-low noise and high sensitivity, and a 3 mm×3 mm Si-PIN radiation detector, we obtained energy resolutions with 122 keV of 57Co and 81 keV of 133Ba of 0.221 keV and 0.261 keV, respectively. After 10, 100, 103, 104 and 105 Gy irradiation, we tested the characteristics of the radiation hardness on the Si-PIN radiation detectors in terms of electrical and energy spectra performance changes. The fabricated Si-PIN radiation detectors are working well under high dose irradiation conditions.

  18. Low-Power Multi-Aspect Space Radiation Detector System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave; Freeman, Jon C.; Burkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of all of these detector technologies will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art (SOA) instruments for the detection and monitoring of the deep space radiation field.

  19. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1982-07-21

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  20. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1984-01-01

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  1. Radiation effects in IRAS extrinsic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L.; Langford, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    During the calibration and testing of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) focal plane, it was observed that the extrinsic photoconductor detectors were affected by gamma radiation at dose levels of the order of one rad. Since the flight environment will subject the focal plane to dose levels of this order from protons in single pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly, an extensive program of radiation tests was carried out to measure the radiation effects and to devise a method to counteract these effects. The effects observed after irradiation are increased responsivity, noise, and rate of spiking of the detectors after gamma-ray doses of less than 0.1 rad. The detectors can be returned almost to pre-irradiation performance by increasing the detector bias to breakdown and allowing a large current to flow for several minutes. No adverse effects on the detectors have been observed from this bias boost, and this technique will be used for IRAS with frequent calibration to ensure the accuracy of observations made with the instrument.

  2. Radiation damage in barium fluoride detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Woody, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To develop radiation hard detectors, particularly for high energy physics studies, radiation damage is being studied in BaF/sub 2/, both undoped and doped with La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd and Tm. Some dopants reduce radiation damage. In La doped BaF/sub 2/ they reduce the unwanted long lifetime luminescence which interferes with the short-lived fluorescence used to detect particles. Radiation induced coloring is being studied with facilities for making optical measurements before, during and after irradiation with /sup 60/C0 gamma rays. Doses of 10/sup 6/ rad, or less, create only ionization induced charge transfer effects since lattice atom displacement damage is negligible at these doses. All crystals studied exhibit color center formation, between approximately 200 and 800 nm, during irradiation and color center decay after irradiation. Thus only measurements made during irradiation show the total absorption present in a radiation field. Both undoped and La doped BaF/sub 2/ develop damage at minimum detectable levels in the UV---which is important for particle detectors. For particle detector applications these studies must be extended to high dose irradiations with particles energetic enough to cause lattice atom displacement damage. In principle, the reduction in damage provided by dopants could apply to other applications requiring radiation damage resistant materials.

  3. Radiation detectors: needs and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Armantrout, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Important applications for x- and ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy are found in prospecting, materials characterization, environmental monitoring, the life sciences, and nuclear physics. The specific requirements vary for each application with varying degrees of emphasis on either spectrometer resolution, detection efficiency, or both. Since no one spectrometer is ideally suited to this wide range of needs, compromises are usually required. Gas and scintillation spectrometers have reached a level of maturity, and recent interest has concentrated on semiconductor spectrometers. Germanium detectors are showing continuing refinement and are the spectrometers of choice for high resolution applications. The new high-Z semiconductors, such as CdTe and HgI/sub 2/, have shown steady improvement but are limited in both resolution and size and will likely be used only in applications which require their unique properties.

  4. Integrator Circuitry for Single Channel Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Samuel D. (Inventor); Delaune, Paul B. (Inventor); Turner, Kathryn M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Input circuitry is provided for a high voltage operated radiation detector to receive pulses from the detector having a rise time in the range of from about one nanosecond to about ten nanoseconds. An integrator circuit, which utilizes current feedback, receives the incoming charge from the radiation detector and creates voltage by integrating across a small capacitor. The integrator utilizes an amplifier which closely follows the voltage across the capacitor to produce an integrator output pulse with a peak value which may be used to determine the energy which produced the pulse. The pulse width of the output is stretched to approximately 50 to 300 nanoseconds for use by subsequent circuits which may then use amplifiers with lower slew rates.

  5. Workshop on detectors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2000-11-22

    Forefront experiments in many scientific areas for which synchrotron sources provide sufficient flux are nonetheless hindered because detectors cannot collect data fast enough, do not cover sufficiently solid angle, or do no have adequate resolution. Overall, the synchrotron facilities, each of which represents collective investments from funding agencies and user institutions ranging from many hundreds of millions to more than a billion dollars, are effectively significantly underutilized. While this chronic and growing problem plagues facilities around the world, it is particularly acute in the United States, where detector research often has to ride on the coat tails of explicitly science-oriented projects. As a first step toward moving out of this predicament, scientists from the U.S. synchrotron facilities held a national workshop in Washington, DC, on October 30-31, 2000. The Workshop on Detectors for Synchrotron Research aimed to create a national ''roadmap'' for development of synchrotron-radiation detectors.

  6. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  7. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  8. Radiation detectors for occupational safety measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaase, Heinrich; Chen, Mai; Grothmann, Knut

    1995-09-01

    The effective radiant exposures for artificial and natural UV-sources are determined by temporal integration over an 8 h working day. Therefore the spectrally weighted integration of the spectral irradiance from the radiation source in the plane of the exposure is to measure. Such measaurements are made with two different detector systems: measurements of UV radiation according to the integral method should be possible according to a quasi partial filtering method using different individually filtered photodiodes. A spectroradiometer for UV radiation analysis was tested due to its application in field measurements for meteorology, medicin, and occupational safety. The optical part of this compact instrument consists of a cosentrance optic, a monochromator and detector system. A comparison with commercial instruments is described.

  9. Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Joseph Mauger, G.; Anderson, Eric H.

    1999-02-01

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++ [1], GAMANL [2], GRPANL [3]and MGAU [4], typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service [5]. The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted.

  10. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented. PMID:26256630

  11. The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Böttcher, S.; Martin, C.; Andrews, J.; Böhm, E.; Brinza, D. E.; Bullock, M. A.; Burmeister, S.; Ehresmann, B.; Epperly, M.; Grinspoon, D.; Köhler, J.; Kortmann, O.; Neal, K.; Peterson, J.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S.; Seimetz, L.; Smith, K. D.; Tyler, Y.; Weigle, G.; Reitz, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-09-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is an energetic particle detector designed to measure a broad spectrum of energetic particle radiation. It will make the first-ever direct radiation measurements on the surface of Mars, detecting galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, secondary neutrons, and other secondary particles created both in the atmosphere and in the Martian regolith. The radiation environment on Mars, both past and present, may have implications for habitability and the ability to sustain life. Radiation exposure is also a major concern for future human missions. The RAD instrument combines charged- and neutral-particle detection capability over a wide dynamic range in a compact, low-mass, low-power instrument. These capabilities are required in order to measure all the important components of the radiation environment. RAD consists of the RAD Sensor Head (RSH) and the RAD Electronics Box (REB) integrated together in a small, compact volume. The RSH contains a solid-state detector telescope with three silicon PIN diodes for charged particle detection, a thallium doped Cesium Iodide scintillator, plastic scintillators for neutron detection and anti-coincidence shielding, and the front-end electronics. The REB contains three circuit boards, one with a novel mixed-signal ASIC for processing analog signals and an associated control FPGA, another with a second FPGA to communicate with the rover and perform onboard analysis of science data, and a third board with power supplies and power cycling or "sleep"-control electronics. The latter enables autonomous operation, independent of commands from the rover. RAD is a highly capable and highly configurable instrument that paves the way for future compact energetic particle detectors in space.

  12. Alpha-beta radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Dale M.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Froelich, Thomas J.; Carter, Gregory L.

    1998-01-01

    The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws.

  13. Alpha-beta radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, D.M.; Simmons, K.L.; Froelich, T.J.; Carter, G.L.

    1998-08-18

    The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws. 16 figs.

  14. Development of a plasma panel radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Robert; Beene, James R; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Bensimon, B; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Levin, Daniel S.; Silver, Yiftah; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Wetzel, R.; Zhou, Bing; Anderson, T; McKinny, K; Bentefour, E

    2014-11-01

    This article reports on the development and experimental results of commercial plasma display panels adapted for their potential use as micropattern gas radiation detectors. The plasma panel sensor (PPS) design and materials include glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures which provide a physically robust, hermetically sealed device. Plasma display panels used as detectors were tested with cosmic ray muons, beta rays and gamma rays, protons, and thermal neutrons. The results demonstrated rise times and time resolution of a few nanoseconds, as well as sub-millimeter spatial resolution compatible with the pixel pitch.

  15. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  16. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  17. Window for radiation detectors and the like

    DOEpatents

    Sparks, C.J. Jr.; Ogle, J.C.

    1975-10-28

    An improved x- and gamma-radiation and particle transparent window for the environment-controlling enclosure of various types of radiation and particle detectors is provided by a special graphite foil of a thickness of from about 0.1 to 1 mil. The graphite must have very parallel hexagonal planes with a mosaic spread no greater than 5$sup 0$ to have the necessary strength in thin sections to support one atmosphere or more of pressure. Such graphite is formed by hot- pressing and annealing pyrolytically deposited graphite and thereafter stripping off layers of sufficient thickness to form the window.

  18. Nano structural anodes for radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Serkiz, Steven M.; McWhorter, Christopher S.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-07-07

    Anodes for proportional radiation counters and a process of making the anodes is provided. The nano-sized anodes when present within an anode array provide: significantly higher detection efficiencies due to the inherently higher electric field, are amenable to miniaturization, have low power requirements, and exhibit a small electromagnetic field signal. The nano-sized anodes with the incorporation of neutron absorbing elements (e.g., .sup.10B) allow the use of neutron detectors that do not use .sup.3He.

  19. Miniature detector measures deep space radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-08-01

    The 1972 journey of Apollo 17 marked not only the last time a human walked on the Moon but also the most recent manned venture beyond the outer reaches of the Earth's atmosphere. With preparations being made for humans to once again explore deep space, important steps are under way to quantify the hazards of leaving low-Earth orbit. One significant risk for long-distance missions is the increased exposure to ionizing radiation—energetic particles that can strip electrons off of otherwise neutral materials, affecting human health and the functioning of spacecraft equipment. The deep space probes that are being sent to measure the risks from ionizing radiation and other hazards can be costly, so maximizing the scientific value of each launch is important. With this goal in mind, Mazur et al. designed and developed a miniature dosimeter that was sent into lunar orbit aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in 2009. Weighing only 20 grams, the detector is able to measure fluctuations in ionizing radiation as low as 1 microrad (equivalent to 1.0 × 10-8 joules of energy deposited into 1 kilogram) while requiring minimal power and computer processing. The postage stamp-sized detector tracked radiation dosages for the first year of LRO's mission, with the results being confirmed by other onboard and near-Earth detectors. (Space Weather, doi:10.1029/2010SW000641, 2011)

  20. CVD diamond detectors for radiation pulse characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, F.; Bergonzo, P.; Jany, C.; Gicquel, A.; Pochet, T.

    Polycrystalline diamond films deposited by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) have been used for the fabrication of resistive photoconductors. Such detectors can be used to measure the intensity and the temporal shape of pulsed radiation such as IR, visible, UV and X-rays. The photodetector response times were characterised under fast Nd:Yag laser pulses ( λ = 266 nm, τL = 30 ps at FWHM). The detector sensitivities were measured under both pulsed UV laser and steady-state X-ray excitations (40 keV). The detector response time strongly depends on the CVD diamond film structural and physical properties, i.e., the film growth conditions. They exhibit a response signal presenting full widths at half maximum down to about 100 ps and decay times down to about 130 ps. The diamond detector responses are compared to the responses measured on typical ultrafast photoconductors made from gallium arsenide pre-irradiated at 3 × 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 as well as from natural type IIa bulk diamond.

  1. A new transition radiation detector for cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lheureux, J.; Meyer, P.; Muller, D.; Swordy, S.

    1981-01-01

    Test measurements on materials for transition radiation detectors at a low Lorentz factor are reported. The materials will be based on board Spacelab-2 for determining the composition and energy spectra of nuclear cosmic rays in the 1 TeV/nucleon range. The transition radiation detectors consist of a sandwich of radiator-photon detector combinations. The radiators emit X-rays and are composed of polyolefin fibers used with Xe filled multiwired proportional chamber (MWPC) detectors capable of detecting particle Lorentz factors of several hundred. The sizing of the detectors is outlined, noting the requirement of a thickness which provides a maximum ratio of transition radiation to total signal in the chambers. The fiber radiator-MWPC responses were tested at Fermilab and in an electron cyclotron. An increase in transition radiation detection was found as a square power law of Z, and the use of six radiator-MWPC on board the Spacelab-2 is outlined.

  2. Radiation detector having a multiplicity of individual detecting elements

    DOEpatents

    Whetten, Nathan R.; Kelley, John E.

    1985-01-01

    A radiation detector has a plurality of detector collection element arrays immersed in a radiation-to-electron conversion medium. Each array contains a multiplicity of coplanar detector elements radially disposed with respect to one of a plurality of positions which at least one radiation source can assume. Each detector collector array is utilized only when a source is operative at the associated source position, negating the necessity for a multi-element detector to be moved with respect to an object to be examined. A novel housing provides the required containment of a high-pressure gas conversion medium.

  3. Device for attaching a collimator to a radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gosis, A.I.; Fialko, M.; Hanz, G.J.

    1986-10-28

    A device is described for attaching a collimator to a radiation detector which consists of: a. a cleat means at the radiation detector for cleating the collimator to the radiation detector; b. a latch means for latching the cleated collimator against rotation; c. a collimator cleating detection means associated with the cleat means for detecting incorrect cleating of the collimator; and d. a collimator latching detection means associated with the latch means for detecting incorrect latching of the collimator.

  4. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  5. Radiation measurements inside the CDF detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, R.J.

    1989-07-20

    During the last CDF experimental period from 6/88 to 6/1/89, radiation measurements were made inside the detector on or near the beampipe using various types of monitors. The purpose of the tests was to help predict the radiation levels for future electronics which must be located close to the interaction area. The results from two different types of monitors, PIN diodes and TLD's are reported in this paper. The TLD's (Harshaw/Filtrol type 700) are sensitive to x-rays, gammas, alphas, electrons, and protons. They are calibrated against a cesium source and corrected for nonlinear effects at higher radiation levels. The PIN diodes (Harshaw/Filtrol type DN-156) are sensitive only to neutrons. The devices are calibrated for 1 MeV neutrons and require correction factors for neutrons at other energy levels. All of the monitors were placed just outside of the VTPC, but still inside the CDF magnetic field. The monitors were located 68 inches from the center of the interaction region. The beam pipe is 2 inches in diameter. Therefore the closest monitoring points were on the beampipe or 1 inch from the beam. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P. H.; Gomolchuk, P.; Chen, H.; Beitz, D.; Grosser, A. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper described improvements in the ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for use in radiation detection applications. Research included experimenting with various conductive and underfill adhesive material systems suitable for CZT substrates. A detector design with encapsulation patterning was developed to protect detector surfaces and to control spacing between CZT anode and PCB carrier. Robustness of bare detectors was evaluated through temperature cycling and metallization shear testing. Attachment processes using well-chosen adhesives and PCB carrier materials were optimized to improve reliability of detector assemblies, resulted in Improved Attachment Detector Assembly. These detector assemblies were subjected to aggressive temperature cycling, and varying levels of drop/shock and vibration, in accordance with modified JEDEC, ANSI and FedEx testing standards, to assess their ruggedness. Further enhanced detector assembly ruggedization methods were investigated involving adhesive conformal coating, potting and dam filling on detector assemblies, which resulted in the Enhanced Ruggedization Detector Assembly. Large numbers of CZT detectors and detector assemblies with 5 mm and 15 mm thick, over 200 in total, were tested. Their performance was evaluated by exposure to various radioactive sources using comprehensive predefined detector specifications and testing protocols. Detector assemblies from improved attachment and enhanced ruggedization showed stable performances during the harsh environmental condition tests. In conclusion, significant progress has been made in improving the reliability and enhancing the ruggedness of CZT detector assemblies for radiation detection applications deployed in operational environments.

  7. Space Radiation Detector with Spherical Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A particle detector is provided, the particle detector including a spherical Cherenkov detector, and at least one pair of detector stacks. In an embodiment of the invention, the Cherenkov detector includes a sphere of ultraviolet transparent material, coated by an ultraviolet reflecting material that has at least one open port. The Cherenkov detector further includes at least one photodetector configured to detect ultraviolet light emitted from a particle within the sphere. In an embodiment of the invention, each detector stack includes one or more detectors configured to detect a particle traversing the sphere.

  8. Space Radiation Detector with Spherical Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A particle detector is provided, the particle detector including a spherical Cherenkov detector, and at least one pair of detector stacks. In an embodiment of the invention, the Cherenkov detector includes a sphere of ultraviolet transparent material, coated by an ultraviolet reflecting material that has at least one open port. The Cherenkov detector further includes at least one photodetector configured to detect ultraviolet light emitted from a particle within the sphere. In an embodiment of the invention, each detector stack includes one or more detectors configured to detect a particle traversing the sphere.

  9. The HERMES dual-radiator RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, H. E.

    2003-04-01

    The HERMES experiment emphasizes measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. Most of the hadrons produced lie between 2 and 10 GeV, a region in which it had not previously been feasible to separate pions, kaons, and protons with standard particle identification (PID) techniques. The recent development of new clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic silica aerogel material with a low index of refraction offered the means to apply RICH PID techniques to this difficult momentum region. The HERMES instrument uses two radiators, C 4F 10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. A lightweight spherical mirror constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality provides optical focusing on a photon detector consisting of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half. The PMT array is held in a soft steel matrix to provide shielding against the residual field of the main spectrometer magnet. Ring reconstruction is accomplished with pattern recognition techniques based on a combination of inverse and direct ray tracing.

  10. Real-time self-networking radiation detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Edward; Lemley, James; Tsang, Thomas Y.; Milian, Laurence W.

    2007-06-12

    The present invention is for a radiation detector apparatus for detecting radiation sources present in cargo shipments. The invention includes the features of integrating a bubble detector sensitive to neutrons and a GPS system into a miniaturized package that can wirelessly signal the presence of radioactive material in shipping containers. The bubble density would be read out if such indicated a harmful source.

  11. Pyroelectric detector development for the Radiation Measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, G. S.; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.; Hanel, R. P.; Dominguez, D. E.; Valero, F. P. J.; Baumann, Hilary; Hansen, W. L.; Haller, E. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of high detectivity pyroelectric detectors developed for optimization of the radiation measurement system within the framework of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is described. These devices are intended to provide detectivities of up to about 10 exp 11 cm Hz exp 0.5/W with cooling to about 100 K required for the detector focal plane.

  12. Wire chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Mulera, Terrence A.

    1984-01-01

    A wire chamber radiation detector (11) has spaced apart parallel electrodes (16) and grids (17, 18, 19) defining an ignition region (21) in which charged particles (12) or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges (93) and defining an adjacent memory region (22) in which sustained glow discharges (94) are initiated by the primary discharges (93). Conductors (29, 32) of the grids (18, 19) at each side of the memory section (22) extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles (12) were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors (29) of one grid (18) while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors (36) of the other grid (19) through glow discharges (94). One of the grids (19) bounding the memory region (22) is defined by an array of conductive elements (32) each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor (36) through a separate resistance (37). The wire chamber (11) avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or near simultaneous charged particles (12) have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

  13. Uncooled reflective shield for cryogenically-cooled radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, W.H.

    1989-04-11

    This patent describes an uncooled reflective shield for a cryogenically cooled detector comprising: a reflector having a concave surface and reflective to radiation, the surface facing the detector; the surface having a shape of a substantially toroidal segment as defined by the pivoting of a vector diagonally across a centerline axis of symmetry, the vector having a terminus substantially on or near a plane of the detector; and means for mounting the reflector relative to the detector such that a ray originating from a point upon the detector and impinging on the reflector is reflected back to a ring-like region surrounding the detector.

  14. Radiation field mapping using a mechanical-electronic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czayka, M.; Fisch, M.

    2010-04-01

    A method of radiation field mapping of a scanned electron beam using a Faraday-type detector and an electromechanical linear translator is presented. Utilizing this arrangement, fluence and fluence rate measurements can be made at different locations within the radiation field. The Faraday-type detector used in these experiments differs from most as it consists of a hollow stainless steel sphere. Results are presented in two- and three-dimensional views of the radiation field.

  15. Radiation Effect On Gas Electron Multiplier Detector Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kwang June; Baldeloma, Edwin; Park, Seongtae; White, Andrew P.; Yu, Jaehoon

    2011-06-01

    Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector is a gas device with high gain and high efficiency. These detectors use chemically perforated 65 {mu}m thick copper clad Kapton polyimide foils. Given its potential for detecting X-rays and other radiations, GEM detectors may be used in an environment with high radioactivity. The Kapton foils manufacturer, Du Pont Inc., claims that the foils are radioactive resistant. To verify whether the GEM detector performance is affected by the exposure to radiation, several GEM foils were irradiated to a {sup 60}Co source at the gamma-ray irradiation facility at Sterigenics, Tustin, CA. Four sets of GEM foils were exposed to the level of 10 kGy, 100 kGy, 1,000 kGy and 10,000 kGy. The output signal from the GEM detectors with irradiated GEM foils were measured and compared to the detector with no irradiation. We observed that the shapes of the peaks from 5.9 KeV {sup 55}Fe X-ray were distorted and that the detector gain increased compared to that of the un-irradiated detector. In particular, the detector with 10,000 kGy irradiation appeared to have the biggest peak distortion and increased gain. It was also found from that additional electrons from radiation-induced free radicals in the Kapton film contribute to output signal of the irradiated GEM detectors. Further studies are needed to explain the mechanism of these detector performance changes.

  16. Radiation environment and shielding for a high luminosity collider detector

    SciTech Connect

    Diwan, M.V.; Fisyak, Y.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1995-12-01

    Detectors now under design for use in the proposed high energy high luminosity colliders must deal with unprecedented radiation levels. We have performed a comprehensive study for the GEM detector at the SSC to determine the best way to shield critical detector components from excessive radiation, with special attention paid to the low energy neutrons and photons. We have used several detailed Monte-Carlo simulations to calculate the particle fluxes in the detector. We describe these methods and demonstrate that two orders of magnitude reduction in the neutron and photon fluxes can be obtained with appropriate shielding of critical forward regions such as the low beta quadrupoles and the forward calorimeter.

  17. Large dynamic range radiation detector and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Marrs, Roscoe E. (Livermore, CA); Madden, Norman W. (Sparks, NV)

    2012-02-14

    According to one embodiment, a radiation detector comprises a scintillator and a photodiode optically coupled to the scintillator. The radiation detector also includes a bias voltage source electrically coupled to the photodiode, a first detector operatively electrically coupled to the photodiode for generating a signal indicative of a level of a charge at an output of the photodiode, and a second detector operatively electrically coupled to the bias voltage source for generating a signal indicative of an amount of current flowing through the photodiode.

  18. A Xylophone Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1997-01-01

    We discuss spacecraft Doppler tracking searches for gravitational waves in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. By using the four-link radio system first proposed by Vessot and Levine, we describe a new method for removing from the combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. This technique provides also a way for reducing by several orders of magnitude, at selected Fourier components, the frequency fluctuations due to other noise sources, such as the clock on board the spacecraft or the antenna and buffeting of the probe by nongravitational forces. In this respect spacecraft Doppler tracking can be regarded as a xylophone detector of gravitational radiation. In the assumption of calibrating the frequency fluctuations induced by the interplanetary plasma, a strain sensitivity equal to 4.7 x 10(exp -18) at 10(exp -3) Hz is estimated. This experimental technique could be extended to other tests of the theory of relativity, and to radio science experiments that rely on high-precision Doppler measurements.

  19. Flame detector operable in presence of proton radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D. J.; Turnage, J. E.; Linford, R. M. F.; Cornish, S. D. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A detector of ultraviolet radiation for operation in a space vehicle which orbits through high intensity radiation areas is described. Two identical ultraviolet sensor tubes are mounted within a shield which limits to acceptable levels the amount of proton radiation reaching the sensor tubes. The shield has an opening which permits ultraviolet radiation to reach one of the sensing tubes. The shield keeps ultraviolet radiation from reaching the other sensor tube, designated the reference tube. The circuitry of the detector subtracts the output of the reference tube from the output of the sensing tube, and any portion of the output of the sensing tube which is due to proton radiation is offset by the output of the reference tube. A delay circuit in the detector prevents false alarms by keeping statistical variations in the proton radiation sensed by the two sensor tubes from developing an output signal.

  20. Heat Transfer Issues in Thin-Film Thermal Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Mamadou Y.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Radiation Group at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University has been working closely with scientists and engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center to develop accurate analytical and numerical models suitable for designing next generation thin-film thermal radiation detectors for earth radiation budget measurement applications. The current study provides an analytical model of the notional thermal radiation detector that takes into account thermal transport phenomena, such as the contact resistance between the layers of the detector, and is suitable for use in parameter estimation. It was found that the responsivity of the detector can increase significantly due to the presence of contact resistance between the layers of the detector. Also presented is the effect of doping the thermal impedance layer of the detector with conducting particles in order to electrically link the two junctions of the detector. It was found that the responsivity and the time response of the doped detector decrease significantly in this case. The corresponding decrease of the electrical resistance of the doped thermal impedance layer is not sufficient to significantly improve the electrical performance of the detector. Finally, the "roughness effect" is shown to be unable to explain the decrease in the thermal conductivity often reported for thin-film layers.

  1. Radiation damage measurements in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, L.A.; Olsen, R.W.; James, R.B.; Brunett, B.A. |; Walsh, D.S.; Doyle, B.L.; Vizkelethy, G. |; Trombka, J.I.

    1998-12-01

    The literature of radiation damage measurements on cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), cadmium telluride (CT), and mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) is reviewed and in the case of CZT supplemented by new alpha particle data. CZT strip detectors exposed to intermediate energy (1.3 MeV) proton fluences exhibit increased interstrip leakage after 10{sup 10} p/cm{sup 2} and significant bulk leakage after 10{sup 12} p/cm{sup 2}. CZT exposed to 200 MeV protons shows a two-fold loss in energy resolution after a fluence of 5 {times} 10{sup 9} p/cm{sup 2} in thick (3 mm) planar devices but little effect in 2 mm devices. No energy resolution effects were noted from moderated fission spectrum of neutrons after fluences up to 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}, although activation was evident. Exposures of CZT to 5 MeV alpha particle at fluences up to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 10} {alpha}/cm{sup 2} produced a near linear decrease in peak position with fluence and increases in FWHM beginning at about 7.5 {times} 10{sup 9} {alpha}/cm{sup 2}. CT detectors show resolution losses after fluences of 3 {times} 10{sup 9} p/cm{sup 2} at 33 MeV for chlorine-doped detectors. Indium doped material may be more resistant. Neutron exposures (8 MeV) caused resolution losses after fluences of 2 {times} 10{sup 10} n/cm{sup 2}. Mercuric iodide has been studied with intermediate energy protons (10 to 33 MeV) at fluences up to 10{sup 12} p/cm{sup 2} and with 1.5 GeV protons at fluences up to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 8} p/cm{sup 2}. Neutron exposures at 8 MeV have been reported at fluences up to 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}. No radiation damage was reported under these irradiation conditions.

  2. Diamond radiation detectors I. Detector properties for IIa diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, D.R.

    1997-05-16

    The detector properties and carrier dynamics of type IIa diamonds are reasonably well understood. The trends in the electron and hole mobilities have been characterized as a function of temperature, impurity content, electric field and carrier density. The carrier lifetimes are coupled through the nitrogen impurity. This leaves us with typical samples with collection distances of 20 to 50 micrometers. The detailed dynamics of the carriers can be modeled using a rate equation analysis. Much progress has been made in understanding the detector properties of diamond, but continued progress has been limited by the geologic processes used to make the material, for example sample size and no synthesis control. CVD diamond promises to eliminate these restrictions.

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  4. Studies of exotic nuclei with advanced radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolyák, Zsolt

    2014-02-01

    Contemporary key nuclear physics questions are introduced. The role of radiation detection in the study of exotic nuclei is illustrated with examples related to NuSTAR at the FAIR facility. The discussed detection systems include: Si-tracker for light charged particle detection, the AGATA gamma-ray tracking detector, diamond detectors for heavy ion measurements, the AIDA implantation and decay detector, and the LaBr3(Ce) fast-timing array. Due to technology transfer, applications related to radiation physics are expected to benefit from these developments.

  5. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Koerfer, M.; Waenke, H.; Schroeder, A. N. F.; Filges, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P. A. J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1991-01-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process, several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific and engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation, all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage, the detectors were stepwise-annealed at temperatures below 110 C, while kept in their specially designed cryostats. This study shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged-particle environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  6. Design of a transition radiation detector for cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, G.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T.

    1975-01-01

    Transition radiation detectors consisting of sandwiches of plastic foam radiators and multiwire proportional chambers can be used to identify cosmic ray particles with energies gamma ? E/mc-squared is greater than 10 to the 3rd and to measure their energy in the region gamma is roughly equal to 10 to the 3rd

  7. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    DOEpatents

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  8. UTILIZATION OF PHOSWICH DETECTORS FOR SIMULTANEOUS, MULTIPLE RADIATION DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Miller; Manuel Diaz de Leon

    2003-04-15

    A phoswich radiation detector is comprised of a phosphor sandwich in which several different phosphors are viewed by a common photomultiplier. By selecting the appropriate phosphors, this system can be used to simultaneously measure multiple radiation types (alpha, beta, gamma and/or neutron) with a single detector. Differentiation between the signals from the different phosphors is accomplished using digital pulse shape discrimination techniques. This method has been shown to result in accurate discrimination with highly reliable and versatile digital systems. This system also requires minimal component count (i.e. only the detector and a computer for signal processing). A variety of detectors of this type have been built and tested including: (1) a triple phoswich system for alpha/beta/gamma swipe counting, (2) two well-type detectors for measuring low levels of low energy photons in the presence of a high energy background, (3) a large area detector for measuring beta contamination in the presence of a photon background, (4) another large area detector for measuring low energy photons from radioactive elements such as uranium in the presence of a photon background. An annular geometry, triple phoswich system optimized for measuring alpha/beta/gamma radiation in liquid waste processing streams is currently being designed.

  9. Recent progress in the development of transition radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Hartmann, G.; Prince, T.; Mueller, D.

    1978-01-01

    Transition-radiation detectors have been used in several recent cosmic-ray experiments for particle identification at energies E/mc-squared of at least about 1000. In order to optimize the design of such detectors and to use them for energy measurements over a broad energy range, it is necessary to study the details of the transition-radiation process. Experimental results are presented which test the theoretical predictions more precisely and at higher energies than in previous experiments. The dependence of the interference pattern in the frequency spectrum on the radiator dimensions is studied, and the total transition-radiation yield generated by electrons in various radiators is measured over a very wide energy range, from 5 to 300 GeV. The significance of the individual experimental parameters in the design of transition radiation detectors is reviewed, and the characteristics of transition-radiation detectors capable of measuring particle energies over the range E/mc-squared from about 300 to 100,000 are discussed.

  10. Experimental studies of radiation damage of silicon detectors. Internal report

    SciTech Connect

    Angelescu, T.; Ghete, V.M.; Ghiordanescu, N.; Lazanu, I.; Mihul, A.; Golutvin, I.; Lazanu, S.; Savin, I.; Vasilescu, A.; Biggeri, U.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M. |; Li, Z.; Kraner, H.W.

    1994-02-01

    New particle physics experiments are correlated with high luminosity and/or high energy. The new generation of colliding beam machines which will be constructed will make an extrapolation of a factor of 100 in the center of mass energy and of 1000 in luminosity beyond present accelerators. The scientific community hopes that very exciting physics results could be achieved this way, from the solution to the problem of electroweak symmetry breaking to the possible discovery of new, unpredicted phenomena. The particles which compose the radiation field are: electrons, pions, neutrons, protons and photons. It has become evident that the problem of the radiation resistance of detectors in this severe environment is a crucial one. This situation is complicated more by the fact that detectors must work all the run time of the machine, and better all the time of the experiment, without replacement (part or whole). So, studies related to the investigation of the radiation hardness of all detector parts, are developing. The studies are in part material and device characterization after irradiation, and in part technological developments, made in order to find harder, cheaper technologies, for larger surfaces. Semiconductor detectors have proven to be a good choice for vertex and calorimeter. Both fixed target machines and colliders had utilized in the past silicon junction detectors as the whole or part of the detection system. Precision beam hodoscopes and sophisticated trigger devices with silicon are equally used. The associated electronics in located near the detectors, and is subjected to the same radiation fields. Studies of material and device radiation hardness are developing in parallel. Here the authors present results on the radiation hardness of silicon, both as a bulk material and as detectors, to neutron irradiation at high fluences.

  11. Radiation hardness of three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, Stefano Sciortino, Silvio; Bellini, Marco; Corsi, Chiara; Cindro, Vladimir; Kanxheri, Keida; Servoli, Leonello; Morozzi, Arianna; Passeri, Daniele; Schmidt, Christian J.

    2015-05-11

    The three-dimensional concept in particle detection is based on the fabrication of columnar electrodes perpendicular to the surface of a solid state radiation sensor. It permits to improve the radiation resistance characteristics of a material by lowering the necessary bias voltage and shortening the charge carrier path inside the material. If applied to a long-recognized exceptionally radiation-hard material like diamond, this concept promises to pave the way to the realization of detectors of unprecedented performances. We fabricated conventional and three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors, and tested them before and after neutron damage up to 1.2 ×10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, 1 MeV-equivalent neutron fluence. We found that the signal collected by the three-dimensional detectors is up to three times higher than that of the conventional planar ones, at the highest neutron damage ever experimented.

  12. Three-axis asymmetric radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Mario Pierangelo; Gedcke, Dale A.; Raudorf, Thomas W.; Sangsingkeow, Pat

    2000-01-01

    A three-axis radiation detection system whose inner and outer electrodes are shaped and positioned so that the shortest path between any point on the inner electrode and the outer electrode is a different length whereby the rise time of a pulse derived from a detected radiation event can uniquely define the azimuthal and radial position of that event, and the outer electrode is divided into a plurality of segments in the longitudinal axial direction for locating the axial location of a radiation detection event occurring in the diode.

  13. The Dielectric Bolometer, A New Type of Thermal Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1960-01-01

    Thermal detectors for the infrared, such as thermocouples and bolometers, are limited in their ultimate sensitivity predominantly by Johnson noise rather than temperature noise. Low noise figures are hard to achieve since Johnson noise preponderates temperature noise, which is the only essential noise for thermal detectors. The dielectric constants of some materials are sufficiently temperature dependent to make a new type of bolometer feasible. The basic theory of a dielectric bolometer, as shown here, promises noise figures below 3 decibels even at chopper frequencies well above the 1/tau value of the detector. Ferroelectrics such as barium-strontium titanate and others seem to be well suited for radiation-cooled dielectric bolometers.

  14. R&D for Better Nuclear Security: Radiation Detector Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kammeraad, J E

    2009-04-02

    I am going to talk about the need for better materials for radiation detectors. I believe that government investment in this area can enable transformational technology change that could impact domestic nuclear security and also national nuclear security in some very positive and powerful ways. I'm not going to give you a lecture on how radiation detectors work, but I am going to tell you a bit about today's off-the-shelf technology and why it is not sufficient, what we need, and what security benefit you could get from improvements. I think we're at a critical point in time for some very impactful investments. In particular I'm going to focus on the use of gamma-ray radiation detectors at ports of entry. Not long before DHS was formed, Congress decreed that counter measures against the delivery of radiological and nuclear threats would be put in place at US ports of entry, under the authority of US Customs (later Customs and Border Protection in DHS). This included the screening of all cars and trucks passing through a port of entry. Existing off-the-shelf radiation detectors had to be selected for this purpose. Plans were made to make the most of the available technologies, but there are some inherent limitations of these detectors, plus the operational setting can bring out other limitations.

  15. Transition-radiation-Compton-scattering detector for very relativistic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, W. Z.; Mack, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents the design and predicted performance of a large acceptance (2 sq m sr) transition-radiation-Compton-scattering detector system which can be used to measure energy spectra up to several thousand Gev/nucleon for nuclei with Z between 6 and 28, as well as up to 40,000 GeV/nucleon for He. The following circumstances made such a detector system practicable: (1) transition radiation output is proportional to the square of particle charge; (2) output varies at least as rapidly as the square of Lorentz factor over the range from several hundred to several thousand.

  16. Semiconductor radiation detector with internal gain

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan; Patt, Bradley E.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2003-04-01

    An avalanche drift photodetector (ADP) incorporates extremely low capacitance of a silicon drift photodetector (SDP) and internal gain that mitigates the surface leakage current noise of an avalanche photodetector (APD). The ADP can be coupled with scintillators such as CsI(Tl), NaI(Tl), LSO or others to form large volume scintillation type gamma ray detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy, photon counting, gamma ray counting, etc. Arrays of the ADPs can be used to replace the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) used in conjunction with scintillation crystals in conventional gamma cameras for nuclear medical imaging.

  17. Radiation damage effects in CZT drift strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Joergensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe; Jensen, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    At DSRI, in collaboration with the cyclotron facility at Copenhagen University Hospital, we have performed a study of radiation effects exposing a 2.7 mm thick CZT drift strip detector to 30 MeV protons. The detector characteristics were evaluated after exposure to a number of dose loads in the range from 2*108 to 60*108 p+/cm2. Even for the highest dose loads, which had a dramatic effect on the spectroscopic performance, we were able to recover the detectors after an appropriate annealing procedure. The radiation damage was studied as function of depth inside the detector material. A numerical model that emulates the physical processes of the charge transport in the CZT detector was used to derive the charge trapping parameter , μτe (the product of charge mobility and trapping time) as function of dose. The analysis showed that the electron trapping increased proportional with the proton dose. The radiation contribution to the electron trapping was found to obey the following relation: (μτe)-1rad =(2.5±0.2)*10-7*Φ (V/cm2) with the proton fluence, Φ in p+/cm2. The trapping depth dependence, however, did not agree well the damage profile calculated using the standard Monte Carlo simulations, TRIM for the proton induced radiation effects. The present results suggest that proton induced nuclear reactions contribute significantly to the radiation damage. Further work will elaborate on these effects. The detector energy resolution was investigated as function of proton dose. It was found that the observed degradation is well explained by the decrease of μτe when the fluctuations of the electron path length are taken into account. The proton irradiation produced In meta stable isotopes in the CZT material. Their decay and production yield as function of depth were analyzed.

  18. Recent progress in the transition radiation detector techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, L. C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A list of some of the major experimental achievements involving charged particles in the relativistic region are presented. With the emphasis mainly directed to the X-ray region, certain modes of application of the transition radiation for the identification and separation of relativistic charged particles are discussed. Some recent developments in detection techniques and improvements in detector performances are presented. Experiments were also carried out to detect the dynamic radiation, but no evidence of such an effect was observed.

  19. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wave length shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event.

  20. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-02-22

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wavelength shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event. 6 figures.

  1. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310 Section 173.310 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND...

  2. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310 Section 173.310 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND...

  3. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310 Section 173.310 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND...

  4. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310 Section 173.310 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND...

  5. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310 Section 173.310 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND...

  6. Radiation Response of Emerging High Gain, Low Noise Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Farr, William H; Zhu, David Q.

    2007-01-01

    Data illustrating the radiation response of emerging high gain, low noise detectors are presented. Ionizing dose testing of silicon internal discrete avalanche photodiodes, and 51-MeV proton testing of InGaAs/InAlAs avalanche photodiodes operated in Geiger mode are discussed.

  7. Research on radiation detectors, boiling transients, and organic lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The accomplishments of a space projects research facility are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) a study of radiation resistant semiconductor devices, (2) synthesis of high temperature organic lubricants, (3) departure from phase equilibrium during boiling transients, (4) effects of neutron irradiation on defect state in tungsten, and (5) determination of photon response function of NE-213 liquid scintillation detectors.

  8. Synchrotron radiation applications of charge coupled device detectors (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R. ); Lowe, W.P.; MacHarrie, R.A. ); Brizard, C.; Rodricks, B.G. )

    1992-01-01

    Scientific charge coupled devices (CCDs) offer many opportunities for high brightness synchrotron radiation applications where good spatial resolution and fast data acquisition are important. We describe the use of virtual-phase CCD pixel arrays as two-dimensional area detectors illustrating the techniques with results from recent x-ray scattering, imaging, and absorption spectroscopy studies at NSLS, CHESS, SRC, and LURE DCI. The virtual phase architecture allows direct frontside illumination of the CCD detector chips giving advantages in the speed and sensitivity of the detector. Combining developments in x-ray optics (dispersive geometry), position sensitive area detectors (CCDs), and fast data acquisition, we have been able to perform time-resolved measurements at the microsecond level. Current developments include faster data transfer rates so that the single bunch timing structure of third generation synchrotron sources can be exploited.

  9. A radiation detector design mitigating problems related to sawed edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurola, A.; Marochkin, V.; Tuuva, T.

    2014-12-01

    In pixelated silicon radiation detectors that are utilized for the detection of UV, visible, and in particular Near Infra-Red (NIR) light it is desirable to utilize a relatively thick fully depleted Back-Side Illuminated (BSI) detector design providing 100% Fill Factor (FF), low Cross-Talk (CT), and high Quantum Efficiency (QE). The optimal thickness of such detectors is typically less than 300μm and above 40μm and thus it is more or less mandatory to thin the detector wafer from the backside after the front side of the detector has been processed and before a conductive layer is formed on the backside. A TAIKO thinning process is optimal for such a thickness range since neither a support substrate on the front side nor lithographic steps on the backside are required. The conductive backside layer should, however, be homogenous throughout the wafer and it should be biased from the front side of the detector. In order to provide good QE for blue and UV light the conductive backside layer should be of opposite doping type than the substrate. The problem with a homogeneous backside layer being of opposite doping type than the substrate is that a lot of leakage current is typically generated at the sawed chip edges, which may increase the dark noise and the power consumption. These problems are substantially mitigated with a proposed detector edge arrangement which 2D simulation results are presented in this paper.

  10. Three-dimensional architecture for solid state radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Sherwood

    1999-01-01

    A radiation-damage resistant radiation detector is formed on a substrate formed of a material doped with a first conductivity type dopant. The detector includes at least one first electrode formed of first conductivity type dopant, and at least one second electrode that is spaced-apart from the first electrode and formed of a second conductivity type dopant. Each first and second electrode penetrates into the substrate from a substrate surface, and one or more electrodes may penetrate entirely through the substrate, that is traversing from one surface to the other surface. Particulate and/or electromagnetic radiation penetrating at least a surface of the substrate releases electrons and holes in substrate regions. Because the electrodes may be formed entirely through the substrate thickness, the released charges will be a relatively small distance from at least a portion of such an electrode, e.g., a distance less than the substrate thickness. The electrons and/or holes traverse the small distance and are collected by said electrodes, thus promoting rapid detection of the radiation. By providing one or more electrodes with a dopant profile radially graded in a direction parallel to a substrate surface, an electric field results that promotes rapid collection of released electrons and said holes. Monolithic combinations of such detectors may be fabricated including CMOS electronics to process radiation signals.

  11. Three-dimensional architecture for solid state radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Parker, S.

    1999-03-30

    A radiation-damage resistant radiation detector is formed on a substrate formed of a material doped with a first conductivity type dopant. The detector includes at least one first electrode formed of first conductivity type dopant, and at least one second electrode that is spaced-apart from the first electrode and formed of a second conductivity type dopant. Each first and second electrode penetrates into the substrate from a substrate surface, and one or more electrodes may penetrate entirely through the substrate, that is traversing from one surface to the other surface. Particulate and/or electromagnetic radiation penetrating at least a surface of the substrate releases electrons and holes in substrate regions. Because the electrodes may be formed entirely through the substrate thickness, the released charges will be a relatively small distance from at least a portion of such an electrode, e.g., a distance less than the substrate thickness. The electrons and/or holes traverse the small distance and are collected by said electrodes, thus promoting rapid detection of the radiation. By providing one or more electrodes with a dopant profile radially graded in a direction parallel to a substrate surface, an electric field results that promotes rapid collection of released electrons and said holes. Monolithic combinations of such detectors may be fabricated including CMOS electronics to process radiation signals. 45 figs.

  12. Examination results of the Three Mile Island radiation detector HP-R-212

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Area radiation detector HP-R-212 was removed from the Three Mile Island containment building on November 13, 1981. The detector apparently started to fail during November 1979 and by the first part of December 1979 the detector readings had degraded from 1 R/h to 20 mR/h. This report discusses the cause of ailure, detector radiation measurement characteristics, and our estimates of the total gamma radiation dose received by the detector electronics.

  13. Examination results of the Three Mile Island radiation detector HP-R-212

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, G.M.

    1983-12-01

    Area radiation detector HP-R-212 was removed from the Three Mile Island containment building on November 13, 1981. The detector apparently started to fail during November 1979 and by the first part of December 1979 the detector readings had degraded from 1 R/hr to 20 mR/hr. This report discusses the cause of failure, detector radiation measurement characteristics, and our estimates of the total gamma radiation dose received by the detector electronics.

  14. Radiation physical chemistry effects on organic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, C. H.; Duarte, C. L.; Hamada, M. M.

    2003-06-01

    The radiation damage effect on a liquid scintillating system was evaluated in the PPO and POPOP solutes. Samples containing PPO (1%w/v) and POPOP (0.2%w/v) diluted in toluene were irradiated at different doses, using a 60Co irradiator at 1.8 Gy/s. The transmittance and the chemical degradation of those solutes were evaluated as a function of dose. The PPO transmittance at 360 nm decayed exponentially with the dose, while the POPOP transmittance at 420 nm decayed linearly. The chemical degradation on the PPO and POPOP was fitted to a bi-exponential mathematical model as a function of dose. The first exponential (fast slope) was interpreted as damage produced by toluene radiolytics whereas the second exponential (slow slope) was interpreted as the damage caused by primary interaction of the γ-radiation with targets, i.e., γ photons that hit PPO and POPOP directly. The w (eV/damage molecule) and G (damaged molecules/100 eV) parameters were estimated in this paper.

  15. Multi-directional radiation detector using photographic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junet, L. K.; Majid, Z. A. Abdul; Sapuan, A. H.; Sayed, I. S.; Pauzi, N. F.

    2014-11-01

    Ionising radiation has always been part of our surrounding and people are continuously exposed to it. Ionising radiation is harmful to human health, thus it is vital to monitor the radiation. To monitor radiation, there are three main points that should be observed cautiously, which are energy, quantity, and direction of the radiation sources. A three dimensional (3D) dosimeter is an example of a radiation detector that provide these three main points. This dosimeter is able to record the radiation dose distribution in 3D. Applying the concept of dose detection distribution, study has been done to design a multi-directional radiation detector of different filter thicknesses. This is obtained by designing a cylinder shaped aluminum filter with several layers of different thickness. Black and white photographic material is used as a radiation-sensitive material and a PVC material has been used as the enclosure. The device is then exposed to a radiation source with different exposure factors. For exposure factor 70 kVp, 16 mAs; the results have shown that optical density (OD) value at 135 is 1.86 higher compared with an OD value at 315 which is 0.71 as the 135 area received more radiation compare to 315 region. Furthermore, with an evidence of different angle of film give different value of OD shows that this device has a multidirectional ability. Materials used to develop this device are widely available in the market, thus reducing the cost of development and making it suitable for commercialisation.

  16. Background radiation studies for future, above ground antineutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, L. E.; Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N. S.; Dazeley, S.; Lund, J.; Mrowka, S.; Reyna, D.

    2008-11-01

    We will describe an assembly of radiation detectors that quantifies the gamma, muon, and fast and thermal neutron fluxes present at potential above ground antineutrino detector sites. Antineutrino detectors show great promise for reactor safeguards applications, due to their ability to monitor thermal power and/or fissile content. One of the major technical challenges that this safeguard application faces is the ability to distinguish signals from antineutrinos originating in a reactor core from noise due to background created by terrestrial and cosmogenic radiation. To date, antineutrino experiments have increased the signal to noise in their detectors by surrounding the experiments with significant shielding and placing them underground. For the safeguards agency, this is less than optimal, as it increases the overall size of the device and limits the range of possible deployment locations. Placing reactor monitoring antineutrino detectors at, or near, the surface would greatly increase the range of possible deployment locations. In order to investigate designs that would allow this, we must understand the backgrounds found above ground that can mimic the antineutrino signal so that these can be easily identified, separated, and subtracted rather than shielded. The design, construction, calibration, and results from the deployment of this background measurement system at a variety of sites will be presented.

  17. Device for detachably securing a collimator to a radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hanz, G.J.; Jung, G.; Pflaum, M.

    1986-12-16

    A device is described for detachably securing a collimator to a radiation detector, comprising: (a) a first annular groove means secured to the radiation detector; (b) a second annular groove means secured to the collimator; (c) a split ring having a first and second ring ends, the ring being received in the first annular groove means; and (d) a ring diameter control system, including (d1) a first lever system having two ends; (d2) a second lever system having two ends; and (d3) a rotating hub being rotatably secured to the detector head; wherein the first lever system is rotatably mounted with one end linked to the first ring end and with the other end linked to the rotating hub. The second lever system is rotatably mounted with one end linked to the second ring end and with the other end linked to the rotating hub, such that rotation of the rotating hub moves the first and second lever systems in opposite directions thereby moving the first and second ring ends between a first position, in which the split ring is positioned only in the first annular groove means, and a second position, in which the split ring is located in both the first annular groove means and the second annular groove means, thus attaching the collimator to the radiation detector.

  18. Advanced technology lunar telescopes III. Radiation resistant detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, L.J.; Kimble, R.A.; Smith, A.M.; Haas, J.P.; Sturgell, C.C. Jr.; Wentink, R.E.; Carbone, J.; Chen, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    A practical lunar telescope requires high resolution imaging array detectors that are immune to (or can be easily shielded from) solar flare particle radiation and cosmic rays. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs), the detectors of choice for ground-based applications, fall short in this respect because of their high susceptibility to radiation induced bulk traps and loss of charge transfer efficiency (CTE). Blooming in CCDs also limits the dynamic range and degrades resolution, while the well known red leak problem hinders observations in the ultraviolet. The authors describe an ongoing program at NASA GSFC to develop intensified random-access Charge-Injection Devices (CIDs), a new generation of space uv detectors which do not have the shortcomings of CCDs. CIDs, like CCDs, are silicon array detectors. Unlike CCDs, however, CIDs have more than 100x greater tolerance to ionizing particle radiation. Since CIDs do not transfer charge, CTE degradation has very little effect on the overall sensitivity and noise level. CIDs can perform extremely fast windowing of selected regions of interest with high signal levels (e.g. bright cores of galaxies or strong emission lines, etc) while monitoring the remainder of the array at lower rates. This selective readout ability plus the lack of blooming give CIDs a high dynamic range of operation but with minimal demands on the memory storage and telemetry data bandwidth. The authors demonstrate the operation of a row-windowing CID and discuss the potential applications of these devices to astronomical research from the moon.

  19. Advanced Technology Lunar Telescopes III. Radiation Resistant Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, L. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Smith, A. M.; Haas, J. P.; Sturgell, C. C., Jr.; Wentink, R. E.; Carbone, J.; Chen, P. C.

    1993-12-01

    A practical lunar telescope requires high resolution imaging array detectors that are immune to (or can be easily shielded from) solar flare particle radiation and cosmic rays. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs), the detectors of choice for ground-based applications, fall short in this respect because of their high susceptibility to radiation induced bulk traps and loss of charge transfer efficiency (CTE). Blooming in CCDs also limits the dynamic range and degrades resolution, while the well known red leak problem hinders observiations in the ultraviolet. We describe an ongoing program at NASA GSFC to develop intensified random-access Charge-Injection Devices (CIDs), a new generation of space uv detectors which do not have the shortcomings of CCDs. CIDs, like CCDs, are silicon array detectors. Unlike CCDs, however, CIDs have more than 100x greater tolerance to ionizing particle radiation. Since CIDs do not transfer charge, CTE degradation has very little effect on the overall sensitivity and noise level. CIDs can perform extremely fast windowing of selected regions of interest with high signal levels (e.g. bright cores of galaxies or strong emission lines, etc) while monitoring the remainder of the array at lower rates. This selective readout ability plus the lack of blooming give CIDs a high dynamic range of operation but with minimal demands on the memory storage and telemetry data bandwidth. We demonstrate the operation of a row-windowing CID and discuss the potential applications of these devices to astronomical research from the moon.

  20. Design of a wire imaging synchrotron radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, J.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Hogan, A.; King, M.; Rowe, W.; Watson, S.; Von Zanthier, C. ); Briggs, D.D. ); Levi, M. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper documents the design of a detector invented to measure the positions of synchrotron radiation beams for the precision energy spectrometers of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The energy measurements involve the determination, on a pulse-by-pulse basis, of the separation of pairs of intense beams of synchrotron photons in the MeV energy range. The detector intercepts the beams with arrays of fine wires. The ejection of Compton recoil electrons results in charges being developed in the wires, thus enabling a determination of beam positions. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  1. A neural network for positron identification by transition radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, R.; Castellano, M.; De Marzo, C.; Pasquariello, G.; Satalino, G.; Spinelli, P.

    1994-11-01

    A neural network algorithm has been applied in order to distinguish positrons from protons by a transition radiation detector (TRD). New variables are introduced, that simultaneously take into account spatial and energy TRD information. This method is found to be better than the one based on classical analysis: the results improve the detector performance in particle identification for efficiency higher than 90%. The high accuracy achieved with this method is used to identify positrons versus protons with 3 × 10 -3 contamination, as required by TRAMP-SI cosmic ray space experiment on the NASA Balloon-Borne Magnet Facility.

  2. Examination results of the Three Mile Island radiation detector HP-R-213

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.M.

    1982-11-01

    Area radiation detector HP-R-213 was removed from the Three Mile island containment building on May 28, 1981. The detector apparently failed at the time of the hydrogen burn, and afterwards indicated radiation levels of less than 0.1 mR/h. This report discusses the cause of failure, detector radiation measurement characteristics, and our estimates of the total gamma radiation dose received by the detector electronics.

  3. Variable-Temperature Cryostat For Radiation-Damage Testing Of Germanium Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, Samuel R.; Puc, Bernard P.

    1992-01-01

    Variable-temperature cryostats developed to study radiation damage to, and annealing of, germanium gamma-ray detectors. Two styles: one accommodates large single detector and one accommodates two medium-sized detectors. New cryostats allow complete testing of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detectors without breaking cryostat vacuum and removing detectors for annealing.

  4. A contactless, microwave-based radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Gary; Losee, Jon

    2001-02-01

    The performance of conventional radiation spectrometers is currently limited by fundamental problems associated with extracting secondary particles such as electrons, holes or scintillation photons from within a detection medium. Some of these problems are impurity attachment, recombination, non-uniform electric fields, grid shielding inefficiency, hole trapping, inefficient light collection and self-absorption. All of these problems can be reduced or even eliminated if the ionization process can be measured directly within the bulk medium without actually collecting the secondary particles. We have detected the absorption of single, high-energy photons in CdZnTe and HPGe crystals using a contactless, microwave cavity perturbation technique. Photo-induced transient changes in semiconductor conductivity in the microwave region (10 9 Hz) produce a momentary increase in the power reflected from a critically coupled resonant cavity of quality factor Q. The magnitude of the reflected microwave pulse is a measure of the excitation energy and the duration of the pulse is related to the semiconductor carrier lifetime. Here we present an overview of the technique including an analysis of the factors affecting sensitivity and response time and the feasibility of performing pulse-height spectroscopy on the reflected microwave pulses.

  5. Detector measures power in 50 to 30,000 GHz radiation band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arams, F. R.; Wang, M. T.

    1966-01-01

    Broadband power detector assembly measures electromagnetic radiation in the 50 to 30,000 GHz band. The assembly includes a matched pair of detectors which incorporate thin-film radiation absorbers. The detector is effective with either coherent or incoherent radiation.

  6. Development and fabrication of an in situ Cherenkov radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, I. L.; Chiles, M. M.; Miller, C.

    1989-07-01

    A detector has been developed for field surveillance of radioactivity in groundwater in wells that are 7.6 cm in diameter or larger, but it can be adapted to on-line monitoring of industrial waste effluents and municipal water treatment plants, as well as facilities that process chemical and nuclear wastes. The detector utilizes the principle of direct Cherenkov radiation counting of energetic betas and gamma-rays in an aqueous medium. For 90Y in equilibrium with its parent 90Sr, the response of the detector was linear with increased concentrations. The estimated detection limit for 90Y supported by the parent 90Sr is ˜ 1 pCi/ml for a 1000 s counting internal.

  7. Charge transport properties of CdMnTe radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim K.; Rafiel, R.; Boardman, M.; Reinhard, I.; Sarbutt, A.; Watt, G.; Watt, C.; Uxa, S.; Prokopovich, D.A.; Belas, E.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; James, R.B.

    2012-04-11

    Growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe)radiation detectors have been described. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements and time resolved current transient measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100 %. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of tellurium inclusions within the detector bulk. Further, it has been shown that the role of tellurium inclusions in degrading chargecollection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. The electron transit time was determined from time of flight measurements. From the dependence of drift velocity on applied electric field the electron mobility was found to be n = (718 55) cm2/Vs at room temperature.

  8. Super-thin single crystal diamond membrane radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorski, Michal; Caylar, Benoit; Bergonzo, Philippe

    2013-09-09

    We propose to use the non-electronic grade (nitrogen content 5 ppb < [N] < 5 ppm) single crystal (sc) chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond as a thin-membrane radiation detector. Using deep Ar/O{sub 2} plasma etching it is possible to produce self-supported few micrometres thick scCVD membranes of a size approaching 7 mm × 7 mm, with a very good surface quality. After metallization and contacting, electrical properties of diamond membrane detectors were probed with 5.486 MeV α-particles as an ionization source. Despite nitrogen impurity, scCVD membrane detectors exhibit stable operation, charge collection efficiency close to 100%, with homogenous response, and extraordinary dielectric strength up to 30 V/μm.

  9. Experiences with radiation portal detectors for international rail transport

    SciTech Connect

    Stromswold, David C.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Evans, J. C.

    2006-08-30

    Radiation detectors monitored trains at two international borders to evaluate the performance of NaI(Tl) and plastic (polyvinyltoluene: PVT) gamma-ray detectors to characterize rail cargo. The detectors included a prototype NaI(Tl) radiation-portal-monitor panel having four large detectors (10-cm × 10-cm × 41-cm) and a PVT panel with a 41 cm × 173 cm × 3.8-cm detector. Spectral data from the NaI(Tl) and PVT detectors were recorded. Of particular emphasis was the identification of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) and the resultant frequency of nuisance alarms. For rail monitoring, the difficulty in stopping trains to perform secondary inspection on alarming cars creates a need for reliable identification of NORM during initial screening. Approximately 30 trains were monitored, and the commodities in individual railcars were ascertained from manifest information. At one test site the trains carried inter-modal containers that had been unloaded from ships, and at the other site the trains contained bulk cargo or individual items in boxcars or flatbeds. NORM encountered included potash, liquefied petroleum gas, fireworks, televisions, and clay-based products (e.g., pottery). Analysis of the spectral data included the use of the template-fitting program GADRAS/FitToDB from Sandia National Laboratories. For much of the NORM the NaI(Tl) data produced a correct identification of the radionuclides present in the railcars. The same analysis was also used for PVT data in which the spectral information (no peaks but only gradual spectral changes including Compton edges) was limited. However, the PVT analysis provided correct identification of 40K and 226Ra in many cases.

  10. Plastic scintillator-based radiation detector for mobile radiation detection system against nuclear/radiological terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sung-Woo; Yoo, Ho-Sik; Jang, Sung Soon; Kim, Jung Soo; Yoon, Wan-Ki; Jun, In Sub; Kim, Kwang Hyun

    2009-06-01

    Illicit trafficking of nuclear or radioactive materials has become a serious world wide problem. Due to operational constraints of radiation detection system for such nuclear security application, a radiation detector with large effective area is needed to maximize its sensitivity. This paper suggests a new method of using plastic scintillation detector as a cost-effective mobile radiation detection system. Monte Carlo simulation code, MCNPX, has been used to analyze spectral distribution available from the plastic detector and to derive algorithmic process with a view to discriminating targeted sources from ambient background radiation. Theoretical results in present work showed that the targeted sources which might be used for nuclear/radiological terrorism could be discriminated from Nationally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) or background.

  11. Radiation Tolerance of Aluminum Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatsu, K.; Dominjon, A.; Fujino, T.; Funaki, T.; Hazumi, M.; Irie, F.; Ishino, H.; Kida, Y.; Matsumura, T.; Mizukami, K.; Naruse, M.; Nitta, T.; Noguchi, T.; Oka, N.; Sekiguchi, S.; Sekimoto, Y.; Sekine, M.; Shu, S.; Yamada, Y.; Yamashita, T.

    2016-02-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) is one of the candidates of focal plane detector for future satellite missions such as LiteBIRD. For the space use of MKIDs, the radiation tolerance is one of the challenges to be characterized prior to the launch. Aluminum (Al) MKIDs with 50 nm thickness on silicon substrate and on sapphire substrate were irradiated with a proton beam of 160 MeV at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. The total water-equivalent absorbed dose was ˜ 10 krad which should simulate the worst radiation absorption of 5 years observation at the Lagrange point L2. We measured characteristics of these MKIDs before and after the irradiation. We found no significant changes on resonator quality factor, responsivity, and recombination time of quasi-particles. The change on electrical noise equivalent power was also evaluated, and no significant increase was found at the noise level of O(10^{-18}) W/√{Hz}.

  12. Modeling radiation loads to detectors in a SNAP mission

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov et al.

    2004-05-12

    In order to investigate degradation of optical detectors of the Supernova Acceleration Project (SNAP) space mission due to irradiation, a three-dimensional model of the satellite has been developed. Realistic radiation environment at the satellite orbit, including both galactic and trapped in radiation belts cosmic rays, has been taken into account. The modeling has been performed with the MARS14 Monte Carlo code. In a current design, the main contribution to dose accumulated in the photodetectors is shown to be due to trapped protons. A contribution of primary {alpha}-particles is estimated. Predicted performance degradation for the photo-detector for a 4-year space mission is 40% and can be reduced further by means of shielding optimization.

  13. Radiation damage of the HEAO C-1 germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, W. A.; Ling, J. C.; Jacobson, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of radiation damage from proton bombardment of the four HEAO C-1 high purity germanium detectors have been measured and compared to predictions. Because of the presence of numerous gamma-ray lines in the detector background spectra and because of the relatively long exposure time of the HEAO 3 satellite to cosmic-ray and trapped protons, it has been possible to measure both the energy and time dependence of radiation damage. After 100 d in orbit, each of the four detectors has been exposed to approximately 3 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm, and the average energy resolution at 1460 keV had degraded from 3.2 keV fwhm to 8.6 keV fwhm. The lines were all broadened to the low energy side although the line profile was different for each of the four detectors. The damage-related contribution to the degradation in energy resolution was found to be linear in energy and proton influence.

  14. A precision synchrotron radiation detector using phosphorescent screens

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J. ); Butler, J. ); Wormser, G. . Lab. de l'Accelerateur Lineaire); Levi, M.; Rouse, F. )

    1990-01-01

    A precision detector to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions has been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 {mu}m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Radiation damage of pixelated photon detector by neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Isamu

    2009-10-01

    Radiation Damage of Pixelated Photon Detector by neutron irradiation is reported. MPPC, one of PPD or Geiger-mode APD, developed by Hamamatsu Photonics, is planned to be used in many high energy physics experiments. In such experiments radiation damage is a serious issue. A series of neutron irradiation tests is performed at the Reactor YAYOI of the University of Tokyo. MPPCs were irradiated at the reactor up to 1012 neutron/cm2. In this paper, the effect of neutron irradiation on the basic characteristics of PPD including gain, noise rate, photon detection efficiency is presented.

  16. Calibration of the active radiation detector for Spacelab-One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The flight models of the active radiation detector (ARD) for the ENV-01 environmental monitor were calibrated using gamma radiation. Measured sensitivities of the ion chambers were 6.1 + or - 0.3 micron rad per count for ARD S/N1, and 10.4 + or - 0.5 micron rad per count for ARD S/N2. Both were linear over the measured range 0.10 to 500 m/rad hour. The particle counters (proportional counters) were set to respond to approximately 85% of minimum ionizing particles of unit charge passing through them. These counters were also calibrated in the gamma field.

  17. Dielectric Resonators as Radiation Detectors at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, N. Y.; Sekiya, N.; Kikuchi, T.; Hoshino, M.; Mitsuda, K.; Sato, K.

    2015-10-01

    GHz LC resonators whose resonance frequency depends on temperature may be put to use as radiation detectors. We have demonstrated that a resonator utilizing STO (SrTiO) at 4 and 2 K detected infrared light emitting diode (LED) light, by a shift of resonance frequency around 2 GHz. A suitable design of a resonator array with temperature-dependent dielectric material will be used as a large-format microcalorimeter array without or with only very small Johnson noise.

  18. Search for gravitational radiation with the Allegro and Explorer detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astone, P.; Bassan, M.; Bonifazi, P.; Carelli, P.; Coccia, E.; Cosmelli, C.; Fafone, V.; Frasca, S.; Geng, K.; Hamilton, W. O.; Johnson, W. W.; Mauceli, E.; McHugh, M. P.; Merkowitz, S.; Minenkov, Y.; Modena, I.; Modestino, G.; Moleti, A.; Morse, A.; Pallottino, G. V.; Papa, M. A.; Pizzella, G.; Solomonson, N.; Terenzi, R.; Visco, M.; Zhu, N.

    2000-06-01

    The results of a search for short bursts of gravitational radiation coincident between the Allegro and Explorer cryogenic resonant mass detectors with strain amplitudes greater than 3×10-18 are reported for data taken from June until December of 1991. While no significant excess of coincident events was found, an improved upper limit to the rate of gravitational wave bursts incident on the Earth has been set. .

  19. Search for gravitational radiation with the Allegro and Explorer detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astone, P.; Bassan, M.; Bonifazi, P.; Carelli, P.; Coccia, E.; Cosmelli, C.; Fafone, V.; Frasca, S.; Geng, K.; Hamilton, W. O.; Johnson, W. W.; Mauceli, E.; McHugh, M. P.; Merkowitz, S.; Modena, I.; Modestino, G.; Morse, A.; Pallottino, G. V.; Papa, M. A.; Pizzella, G.; Solomonson, N.; Terenzi, R.; Visco, M.; Zhu, N.

    1999-06-01

    The results of a search for short bursts of gravitational radiation coincident between the Allegro and Explorer cryogenic resonant mass detectors with strain amplitudes greater than 3×10-18 are reported for data taken from June until December of 1991. While no significant excess of coincident events was found, an improved upper limit to the rate of gravitational wave bursts incident on Earth has been set.

  20. Virtual detector of synchrotron radiation (VDSR) - A C++ parallel code for particle tracking and radiation calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Rykovanov, S. G.; Chen, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation (VDSR) is a parallel C++ code developed to calculate the incoherent radiation from a single charged particle or a beam moving in given external electro-magnetic fields. In this proceedings the code structure and features are introduced. An example of radiation generation from the betatron motion of a beam in the focusing fields of the wake in a laser-plasma accelerator is presented.

  1. Radiation tests for a single-GEM-loaded gaseous detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyong Sei; Hong, Byungsik; Park, Sung Keun; Kim, Sang Yeol

    2014-11-01

    We report on a systematic study of a single-gas-electron-multiplier (GEM)-loaded gaseous detector developed for precision measurements of high-energy particle beams and for dose verification in particle therapy. In the present study, a 256-channel prototype detector having an active area of 16 × 16 cm2 and operating using a continuous current-integration-mode signal-processing method was manufactured and tested with X-rays emitted from a 70-kV X-ray generator and 43-MeV protons provided by the MC50 proton cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The amplified detector response was measured for X-rays with an intensity of about 5 × 106 Hz cm-2. The linearity of the detector response to the particle flux was examined and validated by using 43-MeV proton beams. The non-uniform development of the amplification for the gas electrons in space was corrected by applying a proper calibration to the channel responses of the measured beam-profile data. We conclude from the radiation tests that the detector developed in the present study will allow us to perform quality measurements of various high-energy particle beams and to apply the technology to dose-verification measurements in particle therapy.

  2. A transition radiation detector for kaon/pion separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, M.; Diekmann, B.; Gebert, F.; Heinloth, K.; Holzkamp, S.; Körsgen, G.; Voigtlaender-Tetzner, A.; Bagdassarian, L.; Kazarian, C.; Oganessian, A.

    1989-09-01

    The experiment WA69 at the CERN Omega spectrometer facility has studied fixed target photon and hadron production of inclusive hadronic final states with tagged photon beams of 65-175 GeV in comparison to charged hadron beams (π and K) of 80 and 140 GeV fixed energies. For the identification of final state pions and kaons above 100 GeV/c a transition radiation detector (TRAD) has been developed. This detector was constructed of 12 modules, each consisting of a polypropylene fibre radiator and a proportional chamber with a xenon/methane gas mixture to detect the transition radiation produced by fast moving charged particles. We give a description of the detector setup and working conditions. As a first result obtained with the TRAD the ratio of photoproduced kaons and pions in the extreme forward regime ( xF > 0.7 and - t < 1 GeV 2) is measured to be 10.2(±1.7)% which is in agreement with VDM predictions.

  3. Degradation of silicon ac-coupled microstrip detectors induced by radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, N.; Gotra, Yu.; Bisello, D.; Canali, C.; Fuochi, P.G.; Paccagnella, A.; Verzellesi, G.

    1993-12-01

    Results are presented showing the radiation response of ac-coupled FOXFET biased microstrip detectors and related test patterns to be used in the microvertex detector of the CDF experiment at Fermi National Laboratory. Radiation tolerance of detectors to gamma and proton irradiation has been tested and the radiation induced variations of the dc electrical parameters have been analyzed. Long term post-irradiation behavior of detector characteristics have been studied, and the relevant room temperature annealing phenomena have been discussed.

  4. Influence of Detector Radiation Damage on CR Mammography Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Atsumi; Ishii, Mie; Terazono, Shiho; Arao, Keiko; Ishii, Rie; Sanada, Taizo; Yoshida, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Recently, radiation damage to the detector apparatus employed in computed radiography (CR) mammography has become problematic. The CR system and the imaging plate (IP) applied to quality control (QC) program were also used in clinical mammography in our hospital, and the IP to which radiation damage has occurred was used for approximately 5 years (approximately 13,000 exposures). We considered using previously acquired QC image data, which is stored in a server, to investigate the influence of radiation damage to an IP. The mammography unit employed in this study was a phase contrast mammography (PCM) Mermaid (KONICA MINOLTA) system. The QC image was made newly, and it was output in the film, and thereafter the optical density of the step-phantom image was measured. An input (digital value)-output (optical density) conversion curve was plotted using the obtained data. The digital values were then converted to optical density values using a reference optical density vs. digital value curve. When a high radiation dose was applied directly, radiation damage occurred at a position on the IP where no object was present. Daily QC for mammography is conducted using an American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom and acrylic disc, and an environmental background density measurement is performed as one of the management indexes. In this study, the radiation damage sustained by the acrylic disc was shown to differ from that of the background. Thus, it was revealed that QC results are influenced by radiation damage. PMID:27211088

  5. Novel semiconductor radiation detector based on mercurous halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Henry; Kim, Joo-Soo; Amarasinghe, Proyanthi; Palosz, Withold; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir; Burger, Arnold; Marsh, Jarrod C.; Litz, Marc S.; Wiejewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.; Gupta, Neelam; Jensen, Janet; Jensen, James

    2015-08-01

    The three most important desirable features in the search for room temperature semiconductor detector (RTSD) candidate as an alternative material to current commercially off-the-shelf (COTS) material for gamma and/or thermal neutron detection are: low cost, high performance and long term stability. This is especially important for pager form application in homeland security. Despite years of research, no RTSD candidate so far can satisfy the above 3 features simultaneously. In this work, we show that mercurous halide materials Hg2X2 (X= I, Cl, Br) is a new class of innovative compound semiconductors that is capable of delivering breakthrough advances to COTS radiation detector materials. These materials are much easier to grow thicker and larger volume crystals. They can detect gamma and potentially neutron radiation making it possible to detect two types of radiation with just one crystal material. The materials have wider bandgaps (compared to COTS) meaning higher resistivity and lower leakage current, making this new technology more compatible with available microelectronics. The materials also have higher atomic number and density leading to higher stopping power and better detector sensitivity/efficiency. They are not hazardous so there are no environmental and health concerns during manufacturing and are more stable making them more practical for commercial deployment. Focus will be on Hg2I2. Material characterization and detector performance will be presented and discussed. Initial results show that an energy resolution better than 2% @ 59.6 keV gamma from Am-241 and near 1% @ 662 keV from Cs-137 source can be achieved at room temperature.

  6. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  7. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William H.; Berliner, Ronald R.

    1994-01-01

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation.

  8. System for determining the type of nuclear radiation from detector output pulse shape

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.H.; Berliner, R.R.

    1994-09-13

    A radiation detection system determines the type of nuclear radiation received in a detector by producing a correlation value representative of the statistical cross correlation between the shape of the detector signal and pulse shape data previously stored in memory and characteristic of respective types of radiation. The correlation value is indicative of the type of radiation. The energy of the radiation is determined from the detector signal and is used to produce a spectrum of radiation energies according to radiation type for indicating the nature of the material producing the radiation. 2 figs.

  9. SENTIRAD—An innovative personal radiation detector based on a scintillation detector and a silicon photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osovizky, A.; Ginzburg, D.; Manor, A.; Seif, R.; Ghelman, M.; Cohen-Zada, I.; Ellenbogen, M.; Bronfenmakher, V.; Pushkarsky, V.; Gonen, E.; Mazor, T.; Cohen, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The alarming personal radiation detector (PRD) is a device intended for Homeland Security (HLS) applications. This portable device is designed to be worn or carried by security personnel to detect photon-emitting radioactive materials for the purpose of crime prevention. PRD is required to meet the scope of specifications defined by various HLS standards for radiation detection. It is mandatory that the device be sensitive and simultaneously small, pocket-sized, of robust mechanical design and carriable on the user's body. To serve these specialized purposes and requirements, we developed the SENTIRAD, a new radiation detector designed to meet the performance criteria established for counterterrorist applications. SENTIRAD is the first commercially available PRD based on a CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal that is optically coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) serving as a light sensor. The rapidly developing technology of SiPM, a multipixel semiconductor photodiode that operates in Geiger mode, has been thoroughly investigated in previous studies. This paper presents the design considerations, constraints and radiological performance relating to the SENTIRAD radiation sensor.

  10. Applications of Noble Gas Radiation Detectors to Counter-terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanier, Peter E.; Forman, Leon

    2002-10-01

    Radiation detectors are essential tools in the detection, analysis and disposition of potential terrorist devices containing hazardous radioactive and/or fissionable materials. For applications where stand-off distance and source shielding are limiting factors, large detectors have advantages over small ones. The ability to distinguish between Special Nuclear Materials and false-positive signals from natural or man-made benign sources is also important. Ionization chambers containing compressed noble gases, notably xenon and helium-3, can be scaled up to very large sizes, improving the solid angle for acceptance of radiation from a distant source. Gamma spectrometers using Xe have a factor of three better energy resolution than NaI scintillators, allowing better discrimination between radioisotopes. Xenon detectors can be constructed so as to have extremely low leakage currents, enabling them to operate for long periods of time on batteries or solar cells. They are not sensitive to fluctuations in ambient temperature, and are therefore suitable for deployment in outdoor locations. Position-sensitive 3He chambers have been built as large as 3000 cm2, and with spatial resolution of less than 1 mm. Combined with coded apertures made of cadmium, they can be used to create images of thermal neutron sources. The natural background of spallation neutrons from cosmic rays generates a very low count rate, so this instrument could be quite effective at identifying a man-made source, such as a spontaneous fission source (Pu) in contact with a moderator (high explosive).

  11. Radiation effects in Low Gain Avalanche Detectors after hadron irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramberger, G.; Baselga, M.; Cindro, V.; Fernandez-Martinez, P.; Flores, D.; Galloway, Z.; Gorišek, A.; Greco, V.; Hidalgo, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Quirion, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Studen, A.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2015-07-01

    Novel silicon detectors with charge gain were designed (Low Gain Avalanche Detectors - LGAD) to be used in particle physics experiments, medical and timing applications. They are based on a n++-p+-p structure where appropriate doping of multiplication layer (p^+) is needed to achieve high fields and impact ionization. Several wafers were processed with different junction parameters resulting in gains of up to 16 at high voltages. In order to study radiation hardness of LGAD, which is one of key requirements for future high energy experiments, several sets of diodes were irradiated with reactor neutrons, 192 MeV pions and 800 MeV protons to the equivalent fluences of up to Φeq=1016 cm-2. Transient Current Technique and charge collection measurements with LHC speed electronics were employed to characterize the detectors. It was found that the gain decreases with irradiation, which was attributed to effective acceptor removal in the multiplication layer. Other important aspects of operation of irradiated detectors such as leakage current and noise in the presence of charge multiplication were also investigated.

  12. PERDaix -Proton Electron Radiation Detector Aix-la-Chapelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schug, David; Schael, Stefan; Yearwood Roper, Gregorio; Bachlechner, Andreas; Beischer, Bastian; Deckenhoff, Mirco; Greim, Roman; Jenniches, Laura; Kucirek, Philipp; Lewke, Ronja; Mai, Carsten; Schug, David; Shchutska, Lesya; Tholen, Heiner; Ulrich, Jascha; Wienkenhoever, Jens; Zimmermann, Nikolas

    For the purpose of understanding recent cosmic ray measurements in the energy region below 10 GeV it is important to obtain good knowledge of the charge-sign dependent modulation caused by interplanetary magnetic fields. Existing three-dimensional time-dependent models of the heliosphere can be constrained further using series of measurements of the low-energy cosmic ray fluxes over the course of a solar cycle. Following the measurements of the positron fraction from AESOP in 2006 and 2009, we present a new light-weighted spectrometer which is under construction in Aachen for measuring helium, proton, positron and electron fluxes. The detector is designed to measure in the energy range between 0.5 GeV and 5 GeV and identify helium, protons, electrons and positrons. The detector consists of a spectrometer made up of a permanent magnet and a scintillating fiber tracking detector, a transition radiation detector and a time of flight system with a total weight of approximately 30kg. We applied successfully for a flight on a stratosphere balloon in late 2010 as part of the German-Swedish Balloon-Borne Experiments for University Students (BEXUS) Program.

  13. Infrared radiation detector using a pair of fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renoirt, J.-M.; Caucheteur, C.; Mégret, P.; Debliquy, M.

    2010-04-01

    A novel infrared radiation detector based on a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is described. In the proposed configuration, the two FBGs are distant by a few centimeters and are characterized by Bragg resonances separated by a few nanometers. One FBG of the pair is coated with an IR-absorbing layer which converts the radiation into heat. Therefore, exposure to IR radiations will increase the temperature of the coated FBG, which in turn induces a Bragg wavelength shift to higher values. To take into account the ambient temperature fluctuations, the second grating is protected by an IR-reflecting tube which prevents heating of this grating that can then be used as temperature reference. IR radiation measurements are finally obtained through the monitoring of the differential shift between both Bragg wavelengths. This shift shows a monotonic behavior as a function of the IR radiations. This sensor shows a strong potential for early fire detection as it detects radiation emitted during the fire instead of the temperature increase when the fire is fully developed.

  14. Porous Silicon-Based Quantum Dot Broad Spectrum Radiation Detector

    PubMed Central

    Urdaneta, M.; Stepanov, P.; Weinberg, I. N.; Pala, I. R.; Brock, S.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon is a convenient and inexpensive platform for radiation detection, but has low stopping power for x-rays and gamma-rays with high energy (e.g., 100 keV, as used in computed tomography and digital radiography, or 1 MeV, as desired for detection of nuclear materials). We have effectively increased the stopping power of silicon detectors by producing a layer of porous or micro-machined silicon, and infusing this layer with semiconductor quantum dots made of electron-dense materials. Results of prototype detectors show sensitivity to infrared, visible light, and x-rays, with dark current of less than 1 nA/mm2. PMID:24432047

  15. IceCube: A Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer R; Klein, S.R.

    2008-06-01

    IceCube is a 1 km{sup 3} neutrino detector now being built at the Amudsen-Scott South Pole Station. It consists of 4800 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) which detect Cherenkov radiation from the charged particles produced in neutrino interactions. IceCube will observe astrophysical neutrinos with energies above about 100 GeV. IceCube will be able to separate {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub t}, and {nu}{sub {tau}} interactions because of their different topologies. IceCube construction is currently 50% complete.

  16. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  17. Low Energy Electron Detector for Space Radiation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdas, Wojtek

    Low Energy Electron Detector LEED is a miniature particle monitor for measurements in space. It is based on the MYTHEN Si-microstrip system made at Paul Scherrer Institut PSI for X-ray detection at the Synchrotron Light Source SLS. It was designed in collaboration with the European Space Agency ESA in order to provide a new instrument covering an unexplored energy range of space electrons below few tens of keV. A lack of measurements and realtime data both at low and high energies of particle as well as difficulties in radiation belts modeling are still persisting even after 40 years from their discovery. In particular the low energy electrons, up to few hundred keV are particularly poorly studied. Such electrons can shed a new light on the acceleration and trapping processes and on the dynamics of radiation belts. Measurements of electrons in wide range of energies can provide a link between hot plasma and trapped higher energy particles. The long term observations can probe and verify a coupling between Sun and Earth magnetosphere. On the spacecraft environment side, the electrons with energies of tens of keV can create radiation hazard for on-board instruments, induce spacecraft charging and increase the background in precise X-ray observations. Therefore the requirements put on monitors devoted for above studies are very demanding and often opposing. A special care in construction of LEED - the space version of MYTHEN was optimizing it for very high fluxes and harsh radiation environment. The device aims to monitor Space Weather, map planetary Radiation Belts and study hot plasmas and particle acceleration. It will detect electrons with energies from few up to few hundred keV with energy resolution of several keV. The detector is characterized by ability to deal with very high counting rate of up to 1.4 million counts per second per strip. Its core is a PSI developed radiation hard ASIC read-out chip serving for 128 detection channels. The main design features of LEED are small size and weight as well as minimized power consumption. This makes it also very beneficial for radiation detection at remote locations like peripheries of other planets of the solar system. The LEED demonstration model has been constructed and first qualification measurements with electron beams are being performed. In parallel, the radiation hardness tests of electronic components are prepared at the PSI Proton Irradiation Facility PIF to qualify its critical parts for the flight version. The full computer model of the detector was constructed using GEANT4 package from CERN. It allowed for improvement of the detector response and study background rejection methods. Development of LEED is supported by the Swiss Space Office and ESA. Future possible implementation on-board of the International Space Station and on micro-satellites is currently investigated.

  18. Development of Radiation Hard Silicon Detectors:. the Smart Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messineo, A.; Borrello, L.; Segneri, G.; Sentenac, D.; Creanza, D.; Depalma, M.; Manna, N.; Radicci, V.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M.; Focardi, E.; Macchiolo, A.; Menichelli, D.; Scaringella, M.; Tosi, C.; Bisello, D.; Candelori, A.; Khomenkov, V.; Petasecca, M.; Pignatel, G. U.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Piemonte, C.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N.

    2006-04-01

    The research actitvity of the SMART project, a collaboration of Italian research institutes funded by the I.N.F.N., has been focused on the development of radiation hard silicon position sensitive detectors for the CERN Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. Electrical characterization of pad and micro-strip devices as well as study of microscopic defects on the bulk material have been carried out on silicon 4" wafers of n- and p-type, grown with Standard Float Zone (SFz), high resistivity Magnetic Czochralski (MCz) and epitaxial (EPI) techniques. Manufactured devices have been irradiated with 24 GeV/c and 26 MeV protons up to ~ 3·1015 cm-2 1 MeV neutrons eq. (neq/cm2) and with reactor neutrons up to ~8·1015 neq/cm2. Preliminary results of measurements before and after irradiations as well as material radiation hardness are shown and discussed.

  19. Measurement of the radiation field surrounding the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    K. Kordas et al.

    2004-01-28

    We present here the first direct and detailed measurements of the spatial distribution of the ionizing radiation surrounding a hadron collider experiment. Using data from two different exposures we measure the effect of additional shielding on the radiation field around the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Employing a simple model we parameterize the ionizing radiation field surrounding the detector.

  20. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, James H.; Lavietes, Anthony D.

    1998-05-29

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  1. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  2. Processing and characterization of epitaxial GaAs radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Peltola, T.; Arsenovich, T.; Gädda, A.; Härkönen, J.; Junkes, A.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kostamo, P.; Lipsanen, H.; Luukka, P.; Mattila, M.; Nenonen, S.; Riekkinen, T.; Tuominen, E.; Winkler, A.

    2015-10-01

    GaAs devices have relatively high atomic numbers (Z=31, 33) and thus extend the X-ray absorption edge beyond that of Si (Z=14) devices. In this study, radiation detectors were processed on GaAs substrates with 110 - 130 μm thick epitaxial absorption volume. Thick undoped and heavily doped p+ epitaxial layers were grown using a custom-made horizontal Chloride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (CVPE) reactor, the growth rate of which was about 10 μm / h. The GaAs p+/i/n+ detectors were characterized by Capacitance Voltage (CV), Current Voltage (IV), Transient Current Technique (TCT) and Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. The full depletion voltage (Vfd) of the detectors with 110 μm epi-layer thickness is in the range of 8-15 V and the leakage current density is about 10 nA/cm2. The signal transit time determined by TCT is about 5 ns when the bias voltage is well above the value that produces the peak saturation drift velocity of electrons in GaAs at a given thickness. Numerical simulations with an appropriate defect model agree with the experimental results.

  3. Large area radiation detectors based on II VI thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    The development of low temperature device technologies that have enabled flexible displays also present opportunities for flexible electronics and flexible integrated systems. Of particular interest are possible applications in flexible, low metal content, sensor systems for unattended ground sensors, smart medical bandages, electronic ID tags for geo-location, conformal antennas, neutron/gamma-ray/x-ray detectors, etc. In this talk, our efforts to develop novel CMOS integration schemes, circuits, memory, sensors as well as novel contacts, dielectrics and semiconductors for flexible electronics are presented. In particular, in this presentation we discuss fundamental materials properties including crystalline structure, interfacial reactions, doping, etc. defining performance and reliability of II-VI-based radiation sensors. We investigate the optimal thickness of a semiconductor diode for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors. Besides II-VI materials, we also evaluated several diode materials, Si, CdTe,GaAs, C (diamond), and ZnO, and two neutron converter materials,10B and 6LiF. We determine the minimum semiconductor thickness needed to achieve maximum neutron detection efficiency. By keeping the semiconductor thickness to a minimum, gamma rejection is kept as high as possible. In this way, we optimize detector performance for different thin-film semiconductor materials.

  4. Methodology for Assessing Radiation Detectors Used by Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Wasiolek; April Simpson

    2008-03-01

    The threat of weapons of mass destruction terrorism resulted in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security deploying large quantities of radiation detectors throughout the emergency responder community. However, emergency responders specific needs were not always met by standard health physics instrumentation used in radiation facilities. Several American National Standards Institute standards were developed and approved to evaluate the technical capabilities of detection equipment. Establishing technical capability is a critical step, but it is equally important to emergency responders that the instruments are easy to operate and can withstand the rugged situations they encounter. The System Assessment and Validation for Emergency Responders (SAVER) Program (managed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Grants and Training, Systems Support Division) focuses predominantly on the usability, ergonomics, readability, and other features of the detectors, rather than performance controlled by industry standards and the manufacturers. National Security Technologies, LLC, as a SAVER Technical Agent, conducts equipment evaluations using active emergency responders who are familiar with the detection equipment and knowledgeable of situations encountered in the field, which provides more relevant data to emergency responders.

  5. Laser system for testing radiation imaging detector circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrzycka, Weronika; Kasinski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Performance and functionality of radiation imaging detector circuits in charge and position measurement systems need to meet tight requirements. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly test sensors as well as read-out electronics. The major disadvantages of using radioactive sources or particle beams for testing are high financial expenses and limited accessibility. As an alternative short pulses of well-focused laser beam are often used for preliminary tests. There are number of laser-based devices available on the market, but very often their applicability in this field is limited. This paper describes concept, design and validation of laser system for testing silicon sensor based radiation imaging detector circuits. The emphasis is put on keeping overall costs low while achieving all required goals: mobility, flexible parameters, remote control and possibility of carrying out automated tests. The main part of the developed device is an optical pick-up unit (OPU) used in optical disc drives. The hardware includes FPGA-controlled circuits for laser positioning in 2 dimensions (horizontal and vertical), precision timing (frequency and number) and amplitude (diode current) of short ns-scale (3.2 ns) light pulses. The system is controlled via USB interface by a dedicated LabVIEW-based application enabling full manual or semi-automated test procedures.

  6. Room temperature aluminum antimonide radiation detector and methods thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Lordi, Vincenzo; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Aberg, Daniel; Erhart, Paul; Coombs, III, Arthur W; Sturm, Benjamin W

    2015-03-03

    In one embodiment, a method for producing a high-purity single crystal of aluminum antimonide (AlSb) includes providing a growing environment with which to grow a crystal, growing a single crystal of AlSb in the growing environment which comprises hydrogen (H.sub.2) gas to reduce oxide formation and subsequent incorporation of oxygen impurities in the crystal, and adding a controlled amount of at least one impurity to the growing environment to effectively incorporate at least one dopant into the crystal. In another embodiment, a high energy radiation detector includes a single high-purity crystal of AlSb, a supporting structure for the crystal, and logic for interpreting signals obtained from the crystal which is operable as a radiation detector at a temperature of about 25.degree. C. In one embodiment, a high-purity single crystal of AlSb includes AlSb and at least one dopant selected from a group consisting of selenium (Se), tellurium (Te), and tin (Sn).

  7. Performance limiting processes in room temperature thallium bromide radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amlan; Becla, Piotr; Moed, Demi; Motakef, Shariar

    2015-09-01

    Thallium Bromide (TlBr) is a promising room-temperature radiation detector candidate with excellent charge transport properties. However, several critical issues are needed to be addressed before deployment of this material for long-term field applications. In this paper, the relevance and, scientific and technological progress made towards solving these challenges for TlBr have been discussed. The possible research pathways to mitigate the concerns related to this material have been analyzed and clearly established. Findings from novel experiments performed at CapeSym have revealed that the most significant factors for achieving long-term performance stability for TlBr devices involve physical and chemical conditions of the surface, residual stress, and choice of metal contacts. Palladium electrodes on TlBr devices resulted in a 20-fold improvement in the device lifetime when compared to its Br-etched Pt counterpart. Electron and hole contributions towards the spectroscopic response of the TlBr detector significantly depend on the interaction position of the incoming radiation and was clearly observed in this study. TlBr device fabrication techniques need significant improvement in order to attain reliable, repeatable, and stable, long-term performance.

  8. Advanced radiation detector development: Advanced semiconductor detector development: Development of a oom-temperature, gamma ray detector using gallium arsenide to develop an electrode detector

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    The advanced detector development project at the University of Michigan has completed the first full year of its current funding. Our general goals are the development of radiation detectors and spectrometers that are capable of portable room temperature operation. Over the past 12 months, we have worked primarily in the development of semiconductor spectrometers with {open_quotes}single carrier{close_quotes} response that offer the promise of room temperature operation and good energy resolution in gamma ray spectroscopy. We have also begun a small scale effort at investigating the properties of a small non-spectroscopic detector system with directional characteristics that will allow identification of the approximate direction in which gamma rays are incident. These activities have made use of the extensive clean room facilities at the University of Michigan for semiconductor device fabrication, and also the radiation measurement capabilities provided in our laboratory in the Phoenix Building on the North Campus. In addition to our laboratory based activities, Professor Knoll has also been a participant in several Department of Energy review activities held in the Forrestal Building and at the Germantown site. The most recent of these has been service on a DOE review panel chaired by Dr. Hap Lamonds that is reviewing the detector development programs supported through the Office of Arms Control and International Security.

  9. Self-occluding quad NaI directional gamma radiation detector for standoff radiation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnoy, David; Mattson, John

    2011-09-01

    Currently there is a significant amount of interest in standoff radiation detection. One of the biggest challenges is to separate small radiation signals from large varying background radiation. Many systems have been developed to address this problem that rely on coded-aperture and/or Compton imaging. These imaging systems tend to be large, heavy, complex, and therefore expensive. In this paper we report on the development of a self-occluding directional gamma radiation sensor that is relatively small (<40 kg), inexpensive, and simple in design. Laboratory and field measurements suggest that these sensors will work as well as the gamma imaging systems for many radiation detection applications at a fraction of the cost, weight, and complexity. An azimuth can be resolved with a standard deviation of 7 in 10 seconds for a source yielding 45 CPS at the detector in a 300 CPS background radiation field. This paper describes the self-occluding quad NaI directional gamma radiation detector, the impact of gamma energy and distance on angular precision and accuracy, and potential applications.

  10. Micro-inhomogeneity effects and radiation damage in semi-insulating GaAs radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, R.; O`Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Smith, K.M.; Didziulis, R.; Kazukauskas, V.; Rinkevicius, V.; Storasta, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    1998-06-01

    Thermally-stimulated current (TSC) measurements and a detailed analysis of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics have been made on semi-insulating GaAs (SI-GaAs) Schottky diode particle detectors, fabricated on substrates from several supplies, before and after irradiation with 24 GeV protons and 300 MeV pions. The analysis of I-V characteristics allows the determination of the barrier height and bulk resistance in detectors. Changes observed in I-V characteristics and TSC spectra after irradiation are described and a dislocation-net model of radiation-damaged devices is proposed.

  11. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-01

    Recently, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial off-the-shelf and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time, and reach-back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron's identiFINDER{trademark}, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18 x 2.54cm cylinders) as gamma detectors, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack{trademark} that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity, better resolution, and faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation, and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system automatically triggers the saving of relevant spectral data and software-triggers the digital camera to take a snapshot. The spectral data including in situ analysis and the imagery data will be packaged in a suitable format and sent to a command post using an imbedded cell phone.

  12. Field Deployable Gamma Radiation Detectors for DHS Use

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay

    2007-08-31

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has integrated all nuclear detection research, development, testing, evaluation, acquisition, and operational support into a single office: the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The DNDO has specific requirements set for all commercial and government off-the-shelf radiation detection equipment and data acquisition systems. This article would investigate several recent developments in field deployable gamma radiation detectors that are attempting to meet the DNDO specifications. Commercially available, transportable, handheld radio isotope identification devices (RIID) are inadequate for DHS’s requirements in terms of sensitivity, resolution, response time and reach back capability. The leading commercial vendor manufacturing handheld gamma spectrometer in the United States is Thermo Electron Corporation. Thermo Electron’s identiFINDER™, which primarily uses sodium iodide crystals (3.18-cm x 2.54-cm cylinders) as gamma detector, has a Full-Width-at-Half-Maximum energy resolution of 7 percent at 662 keV. Thermo Electron has just recently come up with a reach-back capability patented as RadReachBack™ that enables emergency personnel to obtain real-time technical analysis of radiation samples they find in the field. The current project has the goal to build a prototype handheld gamma spectrometer, equipped with a digital camera and an embedded cell phone to be used as an RIID with higher sensitivity (comparable to that of a 7.62-cm x 7.62-cm sodium iodide crystal at low gamma energy ranging from 30 keV to 3,000 keV), better resolution (< 3.0 percent at 662 keV), faster response time (able to detect the presence of gamma-emitting radio isotopes within 5 seconds of approach), which will make it useful as a field deployable tool. The handheld equipment continuously monitors the ambient gamma radiation and, if it comes across any radiation anomalies with higher than normal gamma gross counts, it sets an alarm condition. When a substantial alarm level is reached, the system auto triggers saving of relevant spectral data and software-triggers the digital camera to take a snapshot. The spectral data including in situ analysis and the imagery data will be packaged in a suitable format and sent to a command post using an imbedded cell phone.

  13. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-04-01

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ∼243 ps FWHM to ∼272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is flexible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors.

  14. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ~ 243 ps FWHM to ~272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is exible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors. PMID:25768002

  15. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors.

    PubMed

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S

    2015-04-01

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ∼243 ps FWHM to ∼272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is flexible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors. PMID:25768002

  16. Multiple cell radiation detector system, and method, and submersible sonde

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Larry O.; McIsaac, Charles V.; Lawrence, Robert S.; Grafwallner, Ervin G.

    2002-01-01

    A multiple cell radiation detector includes a central cell having a first cylindrical wall providing a stopping power less than an upper threshold; an anode wire suspended along a cylindrical axis of the central cell; a second cell having a second cylindrical wall providing a stopping power greater than a lower threshold, the second cylindrical wall being mounted coaxially outside of the first cylindrical wall; a first end cap forming a gas-tight seal at first ends of the first and second cylindrical walls; a second end cap forming a gas-tight seal at second ends of the first and second cylindrical walls; and a first group of anode wires suspended between the first and second cylindrical walls.

  17. BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hodge

    2008-03-01

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  18. Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

    2007-07-09

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  19. Improved gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Maxey, D.V.; Carter, J.G.

    1980-03-28

    Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  20. Gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Maxey, David V.; Carter, James G.

    1982-01-05

    Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 eV and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 eV, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 eV where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of E/P (pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient E/P ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  1. Gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.G.; Christophorou, L.G.; Maxey, D.V.; Mccorkle, D.L.

    1982-01-05

    Improved binary and ternary gas mixtures for gas-filled radiation detectors are provided. The components are chosen on the basis of the principle that the first component is one molecular gas or mixture of two molecular gases having a large electron scattering cross section at energies of about 0.5 ev and higher, and the second component is a noble gas having a very small cross section at and below about 1.0 ev, whereby fast electrons in the gaseous mixture are slowed into the energy range of about 0.5 ev where the cross section for the mixture is small and hence the electron mean free path is large. The reduction in both the cross section and the electron energy results in an increase in the drift velocity of the electrons in the gas mixtures over that for the separate components for a range of e/p (Pressure-reduced electric field) values. Several gas mixtures are provided that provide faster response in gas-filled detectors for convenient e/p ranges as compared with conventional gas mixtures.

  2. Examination system utilizing ionizing radiation and a flexible, miniature radiation detector probe

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Kross, Brian J.; Zorn, Carl J.; Majewski, Lukasz A.

    1996-01-01

    An optimized examination system and method based on the Reverse Geometry X-Ray.RTM. (RGX.RTM.) radiography technique are presented. The examination system comprises a radiation source, at least one flexible, miniature radiation detector probe positioned in appropriate proximity to the object to be examined and to the radiation source with the object located between the source and the probe, a photodetector device attachable to an end of the miniature radiation probe, and a control unit integrated with a display device connected to the photodetector device. The miniature radiation detector probe comprises a scintillation element, a flexible light guide having a first end optically coupled to the scintillation element and having a second end attachable to the photodetector device, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible light guide. The probe may be portable and insertable, or may be fixed in place within the object to be examined. An enclosed, flexible, liquid light guide is also presented, which comprises a thin-walled flexible tube, a liquid, preferably mineral oil, contained within the tube, a scintillation element located at a first end of the tube, closures located at both ends of the tube, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible tube. The examination system and method have applications in non-destructive material testing for voids, cracks, and corrosion, and may be used in areas containing hazardous materials. In addition, the system and method have applications for medical and dental imaging.

  3. Examination system utilizing ionizing radiation and a flexible, miniature radiation detector probe

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, S.; Kross, B.J.; Zorn, C.J.; Majewski, L.A.

    1996-10-22

    An optimized examination system and method based on the Reverse Geometry X-Ray{trademark} (RGX{trademark}) radiography technique are presented. The examination system comprises a radiation source, at least one flexible, miniature radiation detector probe positioned in appropriate proximity to the object to be examined and to the radiation source with the object located between the source and the probe, a photodetector device attachable to an end of the miniature radiation probe, and a control unit integrated with a display device connected to the photodetector device. The miniature radiation detector probe comprises a scintillation element, a flexible light guide having a first end optically coupled to the scintillation element and having a second end attachable to the photodetector device, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible light guide. The probe may be portable and insertable, or may be fixed in place within the object to be examined. An enclosed, flexible, liquid light guide is also presented, which comprises a thin-walled flexible tube, a liquid, preferably mineral oil, contained within the tube, a scintillation element located at a first end of the tube, closures located at both ends of the tube, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible tube. The examination system and method have applications in non-destructive material testing for voids, cracks, and corrosion, and may be used in areas containing hazardous materials. In addition, the system and method have applications for medical and dental imaging. 5 figs.

  4. Charge-trap correction and radiation damage in orthogonal-strip planar germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, E. L.; Jackson, E. G.; Lister, C. J.; Pehl, R. H.

    2014-10-01

    A charge-carrier trap correction technique was developed for orthogonal strip planar germanium gamma-ray detectors. The trap corrector significantly improves the gamma-ray energy resolution of detectors with charge-carrier trapping from crystal-growth defects and radiation damage. Two orthogonal-strip planar germanium detectors were radiation damaged with 2-MeV neutron fluences of ~8109 n/cm2. The radiation-damaged detectors were studied in the 60-80 K temperature range.

  5. Radiation detector device for rejecting and excluding incomplete charge collection events

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Vernon, Emerson; Yang, Ge; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; James, Ralph B.

    2016-05-10

    A radiation detector device is provided that is capable of distinguishing between full charge collection (FCC) events and incomplete charge collection (ICC) events based upon a correlation value comparison algorithm that compares correlation values calculated for individually sensed radiation detection events with a calibrated FCC event correlation function. The calibrated FCC event correlation function serves as a reference curve utilized by a correlation value comparison algorithm to determine whether a sensed radiation detection event fits the profile of the FCC event correlation function within the noise tolerances of the radiation detector device. If the radiation detection event is determined to be an ICC event, then the spectrum for the ICC event is rejected and excluded from inclusion in the radiation detector device spectral analyses. The radiation detector device also can calculate a performance factor to determine the efficacy of distinguishing between FCC and ICC events.

  6. Performance characteristics of a silicon photomultiplier based compact radiation detector for Homeland Security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2015-05-01

    A next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and for improvement of detector reliability for the purpose of developing radiation protection technology and military applications. The previously used radiation detector had some limitations due to its bulky size, limited range and its environment for radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector examined in this study utilizes a silicon photomultiplier which appears to be more suitable for this application because of its physical superiority characterized by its small size, high sensitivity, and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based scintillation detector has been developed as part of this basic study of military radiation detectors. The detector has been tested for its ability to obtain the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variations of parameter values and for efficiency of detection in accordance with its ability to measure radiation in the environment. Two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators were developed and the detectors were analyzed by a number of operating characteristics such as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field, that depend on environmental changes in radiation measurement. The Photon count rate and spectra were compared for these three scintillators. We found that there were variations in the radiation detection which were characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. It was also found that there was an 11.9% energy resolution for the LYSO, 15.5% for BGO and 13.5% for CsI:Tl using Array SiPM, and 18% for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for 22Na. These results demonstrate the potential widespread use of SiPM based compact radiation detectors for Homeland Security applications.

  7. A conductive surface coating for Si-CNT radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Antonio; Valentini, Marco; Ditaranto, Nicoletta; Melisi, Domenico; Aramo, Carla; Ambrosio, Antonio; Casamassima, Giuseppe; Cilmo, Marco; Fiandrini, Emanuele; Grossi, Valentina; Guarino, Fausto; Angela Nitti, Maria; Passacantando, Maurizio; Santucci, Sandro; Ambrosio, Michelangelo

    2015-08-01

    Silicon-Carbon Nanotube radiation detectors need an electrically conductive coating layer to avoid the nanotube detachment from the silicon substrate and uniformly transmit the electric field to the entire nanotube active surface. Coating material must be transparent to the radiation of interest, and must provide the drain voltage necessary to collect charges generated by incident photons. For this purpose various materials have been tested and proposed in photodetector and photoconverter applications. In this article interface properties and electrical contact behavior of Indium Tin Oxide films on Carbon Nanotubes have been analyzed. Ion Beam Sputtering has been used to grow the transparent conductive layer on the nanotubes. The films were deposited at room temperature with Oxygen/Argon mixture into the sputtering beam, at fixed current and for different beam energies. Optical and electrical analyses have been performed on films. Surface chemical analysis and in depth profiling results obtained by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Indium Tin Oxide layer on nanotubes have been used to obtain the interface composition. Results have been applied in photodetectors realization based on multi wall Carbon Nanotubes on silicon.

  8. Wire-chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Mulera, T.A.

    1982-03-29

    A wire chamber; radiation detector has spaced apart parallel electrodes and grids defining an ignition region in which charged particles or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges and defining an adjacent memory region in which sustained glow discharges are initiated by the primary discharges. Conductors of the grids at each side of the memory section extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors of one grid while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors of the other grid through glow discharges. One of the grids bounding the memory region is defined by an array of conductive elements each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor through a separate resistance. The wire chamber avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or; near simultaneous charged particles have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

  9. Grad-Level Radiation Damage of SIO2 Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Atoian, G.; Ludewig, H; White, S; O'Conor, J; Mokhov, N.V.

    2009-05-04

    Radiation effects and levels to detectors. SiO{sub 2} quartz fibers of the LHC ATLAS Zero-degree Calorimeter (ZDC) anticipated to experience integrated doses of a few Grad at their closest position were exposed to 200 MeV protons and neutrons at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Linac. Specifically, 1 mm- and 2mm-diameter quartz (GE 124) rods were exposed to direct 200 MeV protons during the first phase of exposure leading to peak integrated dose of {approx}28 Grad. Exposure to a primarily neutron flux of 1mm-diameter SiO{sub 2} fibers was also achieved with a special neutron source arrangement. In a post-irradiation analysis the quartz fiber transmittance was evaluated as a function of the absorbed dose. Dramatic degradation of the transmittance property was observed with increased radiation damage. In addition, detailed evaluation of the fibers under the microscope revealed interesting micro-structural damage features and irradiation-induced defects.

  10. A cylindrical xenon ionization chamber detector for high resolution, room temperature gamma radiation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Gary; Losee, Jon; Palmer, Robert

    A 0.75 l gridded cylindrical ionization chamber gamma radiation detector using highly purified xenon near the critical point as the detection medium is described. The detector operates at room temperature with a noise subtracted intrinsic energy resolution of 1.8% at 662 keV. The detector design and performance variables are discussed in comparison to previous planar and cylindrical xenon detectors.

  11. Method and system for determining depth distribution of radiation-emitting material located in a source medium and radiation detector system for use therein

    DOEpatents

    Benke, Roland R.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2004-04-27

    A radiation detector system includes detectors having different properties (sensitivity, energy resolution) which are combined so that excellent spectral information may be obtained along with good determinations of the radiation field as a function of position.

  12. Quantum capacitance detector: A pair-breaking radiation detector based on the single Cooper-pair box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. D.; Bueno, J.; Day, P.; Bradford, C. M.; Echternach, P. M.

    2009-04-01

    We present a proposed design for a pair-breaking photodetector for far-infrared and submillimeter radiation. Antenna-coupled radiation generates quasiparticles in a superconducting absorber, the density of which are measured using a single Cooper-pair box. Readout is performed using an electromagnetic oscillator or a microwave resonator, which is well suited for frequency multiplexing in large arrays. Theoretical limits to detector sensitivity are discussed and modeled, with predicted sensitivities on the order of 10-21W/Hz . We anticipate that this detector can be used to address key scientific goals in far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy.

  13. Plural-wavelength flame detector that discriminates between direct and reflected radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Gregory H. (Inventor); Barnes, Heidi L. (Inventor); Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Simpson, Howard J. (Inventor); Smith, Harvey S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flame detector employs a plurality of wavelength selective radiation detectors and a digital signal processor programmed to analyze each of the detector signals, and determine whether radiation is received directly from a small flame source that warrants generation of an alarm. The processor's algorithm employs a normalized cross-correlation analysis of the detector signals to discriminate between radiation received directly from a flame and radiation received from a reflection of a flame to insure that reflections will not trigger an alarm. In addition, the algorithm employs a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) frequency spectrum analysis of one of the detector signals to discriminate between flames of different sizes. In a specific application, the detector incorporates two infrared (IR) detectors and one ultraviolet (UV) detector for discriminating between a directly sensed small hydrogen flame, and reflections from a large hydrogen flame. The signals generated by each of the detectors are sampled and digitized for analysis by the digital signal processor, preferably 250 times a second. A sliding time window of approximately 30 seconds of detector data is created using FIFO memories.

  14. A liquid radiation detector with high spatial resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L.

    1972-01-01

    Detector, using point anode, minimizes problem of oblique tracks by permitting construction of very thin counter. Detector is useful in cosmic ray and high energy physics research and X-ray and neutron diffraction technology.

  15. Ion Microbeam Studies of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Radiation Detectors by IBICC

    SciTech Connect

    Brunett, B.A.; Doyle, B.L.; James, R.B.; Olsen, R.W.; Vizkelethy, G.; Walsh, D.S.

    1998-10-26

    Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) and Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) techniques were e for imaging electronic properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) room temperature radiation detectors. The detectors were bombarded with a scanned 5.4 MeV He microbeam and the detector response was analyzed at each point. The electron mobility (A) and Metime (z.), and charge collection efficiency maps were calculated from the data. In order to determine the radiation damage to the detectors, the signal deteriomtion was measured as the function of dose.

  16. Charged Particle Induced Radiation damage of Germanium Detectors in Space: Two Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruekner, J.; Koenen, M.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Bailey, S. H.; Boynton W. V.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (MO GRS) was designed to measure gamma-rays emitted by the Martian surface. This gamma-ray emission is induced by energetic cosmic-ray particles penetrating the Martian surface and producing many secondary particles and gamma rays. The MO GRS consisted of an high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a passive cooler. Since radiation damage due to permanent bombardment of energetic cosmic ray particles (with energies up to several GeV) was expected for the MO GRS HPGe crystal, studies on radiation damage effects of HPGe crystals were carried on earth. One of the HPGe crystals (paradoxically called FLIGHT) was similar to the MO GRS crystal. Both detectors, MO GRS and FLIGHT, contained closed-end coaxial n-type HPGe crystals and had the same geometrical dimensions (5.6 x 5.6 cm). Many other parameters, such as HV and operation temperature, differed in space and on earth, which made it somewhat difficult to directly compare the performance of both detector systems. But among other detectors, detector FLIGHT provided many useful data to better understand radiation damage effects.

  17. Effect of radiation induced deep level traps on Si detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Li, Z.

    2002-01-01

    The main factor, which leads to semiconductor detector degradation in high-energy physics experiments, is the introduction of lattice defects in the detector material produced by radiation. Based on the spectrum of radiation induced defects in the silicon bulk, the overview of effects and mechanisms responsible for the changes in the main detector parameters such as effective concentration of the space charge in the depleted region, space charge sign inversion, charge collection efficiency, and detector breakdown voltage are considered. Special attention is paid to the electric field distortion related with high concentration of radiation induced deep traps, which is the key question for the design of detectors operating at cryogenic temperature. In particular, the charge collection recovery at low temperature, often refereed as the Lazarus effect, and the limitation for the detection rate related to the polarization effect are considered.

  18. Novel radiation hard microfabricated scintillation detectors with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, A.; Gorini, B.; Haguenauer, M.; Jiguet, S.; Vico Triviño, N.; Renaud, P.

    2010-05-01

    A novel liquid scintillation detector with high spatial resolution is being developed with standard microfabrication techniques. It consists of a dense array of scintillating waveguides obtained by filling microfluidic channels with an organic liquid scintillator and optically coupled to a pixellated photodetector. Such a microfluidic device can be designed and processed to meet the requirements of a wide range of applications like medical imaging, homeland security and high-energy physics. High-spatial resolution miniaturized detectors as well as large-area detectors can easily be fabricated. The fabrication process of a prototype detector and experimental results are presented in this paper.

  19. Dynamic Electrothermal Model of a Sputtered Thermopile Thermal Radiation Detector for Earth Radiation Budget Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weckmann, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a program sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aimed at evaluating the global energy balance. Current scanning radiometers used for CERES consist of thin-film thermistor bolometers viewing the Earth through a Cassegrain telescope. The Thermal Radiation Group, a laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, is currently studying a new sensor concept to replace the current bolometer: a thermopile thermal radiation detector. This next-generation detector would consist of a thermal sensor array made of thermocouple junction pairs, or thermopiles. The objective of the current research is to perform a thermal analysis of the thermopile. Numerical thermal models are particularly suited to solve problems for which temperature is the dominant mechanism of the operation of the device (through the thermoelectric effect), as well as for complex geometries composed of numerous different materials. Feasibility and design specifications are studied by developing a dynamic electrothermal model of the thermopile using the finite element method. A commercial finite element-modeling package, ALGOR, is used.

  20. Liquid radiation detectors based on nanosilver surface plasmon resonance phenomena.

    PubMed

    Puiso, Judita; Laurikaitiene, Jurgita; Adliene, Diana; Prosycevas, Igoris

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development of micro- and nanostructures containing silver nanoparticles is based on their unique physical properties. Despite the new applications of silver nanoparticles in nanomedicine are under heavy discussions, silver nanoparticles could be used in liquid radiation detectors thanks to the irradiation-induced surface plasmon resonance (SPR) phenomena observed in the colloidal solutions. Silver nitrate (1 mM AgNO(3)) and sodium citrate (1 wt% and 5 wt% C(6)H(5)O(7)Na(3)) were used as precursors for the fabrication of colloidal solutions. Prepared solutions were exposed to gamma-rays from a (60)Co gamma therapy unit 'Rokus-M' to varying absorbed doses, from 2 to 250 Gy. A UV/VIS/NIR spectrometer (Avantes-2048) was used for the measurement of the optical properties (absorbance) of the silver solutions. It was found that an initial absorbed dose of 2 Gy induced the formation of spherical silver nanoparticles as it was indicated in the absorbance spectrum of the solution, which had a well-pronounced absorption maximum at the wavelength of 410 nm. There is a potential to measure absorbed doses down to around 20 mGy. The SPR peaks at the wavelengths of 500-700 nm were found at the highest investigated doses >100 Gy, indicating the presence of silver nanorods. The colour of colloidal solutions ranged from pale yellow to green and was dependent on the absorbed dose. The investigation has shown that density, size and shape of synthesised silver nanoparticles are dependent on the absorbed dose and that shape transformations of the particles due to irradiation are possible. Application of colloidal solutions containing silver nanoparticles for dosimetric purposes is discussed on the basis of the obtained results. PMID:20159913

  1. Terahertz spectroscopy with a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer plus array detector using coherent synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolay I. Agladz, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Albert J. Sievers

    2010-06-01

    By use of coherent terahertz synchrotron radiation, we experimentally tested a holographic Fourier transform spectrometer coupled to an array detector to determine its viability as a spectral device. Somewhat surprisingly, the overall performance strongly depends on the absorptivity of the birefringent lithium tantalate pixels in the array detector.

  2. DIRC, the internally reflecting ring imaging Cerenkov detector for BABAR: Properties of the quartz radiators

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiening, Jochen

    1998-02-01

    A description of DIRC, a particle identification detector for the BABAR experiment at the Standard Linear Collider B Factory is given. It is the barrel region of the detector and its name is an acronym for detection of internally reflected Cherenkov radiation. It is a Cherenkov ring imaging device which utilizes totally internally reflected Cherenkov light in the visible and ultraviolet regions.

  3. Radiation-detector optical-imaging device is of simplified construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    A simplified radiation detector was designed which employs an activated continuous front surface consisting of either the diffused or barrier type of semiconducting material with a grid structure on the nonactivated side of the detector. Its form may be either a rectangular coordinate or a polar coordinate system.

  4. Radiation detection system using semiconductor detector with differential carrier trapping and mobility

    DOEpatents

    Whited, Richard C.

    1981-01-01

    A system for obtaining improved resolution in relatively thick semiconductor radiation detectors, such as HgI.sub.2, which exhibit significant hole trapping. Two amplifiers are used: the first measures the charge collected and the second the contribution of the electrons to the charge collected. The outputs of the two amplifiers are utilized to unfold the total charge generated within the detector in response to a radiation event.

  5. Pulse-shape discrimination techniques for correcting the effects of radiation damage in germanium coaxial detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, W. C. G.; Boggs, S. E.; Lin, R. P.; Slassi-Sennou, S.; Madden, N. W.; Pehl, R. H.; Hull, E. L.

    Pusle-shape discrimination (PSD) techniques on current pulses from coaxial germanium detectors can significantly correct for charge losses due to hole trapping caused by radiation damage. Numerical simulations of PSD indicate that by measuring the two largest photon interaction locations and correcting the energy depositions separately, a significant recovery of the energy resolution and the Gaussian line shape of narrow lines in radiation damaged detectors can be obtained.

  6. Characterizing the radiation response of Cherenkov glass detectors with isotopic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, J P; Hobbs, C. L.; Bell, Zane W; Boatner, Lynn A; Johnson, Rose E; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Lillard, Cole R; Ramey, Lucas A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cherenkov detectors are widely used for particle identification and threshold detectors in high-energy physics. Glass Cherenkov detectors that are sensitive to beta emissions originating from neutron activation have been demonstrated recently as a potential replacement for activation foils. In this work, we set the groundwork to evaluate large Cherenkov glass detectors for sensitivity to MeV photons through first understanding the measured response of small Cherenkov glass detectors to isotopic gamma-ray sources. Counting and pulse height measurements are acquired with reflected glass Cherenkov detectors read out with a photomultiplier tube. Simulation was used to inform our understanding of the measured results. This simulation included radioactive source decay, radiation interaction, Cherenkov light generation, optical ray tracing, and photoelectron production. Implications for the use of Cherenkov glass detectors to measure low energy gammaray response are discussed.

  7. Radiation tolerance of a dual-band IR detector based on a pBp architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Vincent M.; Morath, Christian P.; Myers, Stephen; Plis, Elena; Krishna, Sanjay

    2012-06-01

    Infrared (IR) detectors operated in the space environment are required to have high performance while being subjected to a variety of radiation effects. Sources of radiation in space include the trapped particles in the Van Allen belts and transient events such as solar events and galactic cosmic rays. Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT)-based IR detectors are often used in space applications because they have high performance and are generally relatively tolerant of the space environment when passivated with CdTe; often, the readout-integrated circuit is far more susceptible to radiation effects than the detector materials themselves. However, inherent manufacturing issues with the growth of MCT have led to interest in alternative detector technologies including type-II strained-layer superlattice (T2SLS) infrared detectors with unipolar barriers. Much less is known about the radiation tolerance properties of these SLS-based detectors compared to MCT. Here, the effects of 63 MeV protons on variable area, single element, dual-band InAs/GaSb SLS detectors in the pBp architecture are considered. When semiconductors devices are irradiated with protons with energies of 63 MeV the protons are capable of displacing atoms within their crystalline lattice. The SLS detectors tested here utilize a pBp architecture, which takes advantage of the higher mobility electrons as the minority photocarrier. These detectors are also dual-band, implying two absorbing regions are present and separated by the unipolar barrier. The absorbers have cutoff wavelengths of roughly 5 and 9 μm allowing for mid-wave (MWIR) and long-wave (LWIR) infrared detection, respectively. The radiation effects on these detectors are characterized by dark current and quantum efficiency as a function of total ionizing dose (TID) or, equivalently, the incident proton fluence.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF CdZnTe RADIATION DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    BOLOTNIKOV, A.; CAMARDA, G.; HOSSAIN, A.; KIM, K.H.; YANG, G.; GUL, R.; CUI, Y.; AND JAMES, R.B.

    2011-10-23

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a very attractive material for room-temperature semiconductor detectors because of its wide band-gap and high atomic number. Despite these advantages, CZT still presents some material limitations and poor hole mobility. In the past decade most of the developing CZT detectors focused on designing different electrode configurations, mainly to minimize the deleterious effect due to the poor hole mobility. A few different electrode geometries were designed and fabricated, such as pixelated anodes and Frisch-grid detectors developed at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). However, crystal defects in CZT materials still limit the yield of detector-grade crystals, and, in general, dominate the detector's performance. In the past few years, our group's research extended to characterizing the CZT materials at the micro-scale, and to correlating crystal defects with the detector's performance. We built a set of unique tools for this purpose, including infrared (IR) transmission microscopy, X-ray micro-scale mapping using synchrotron light source, X-ray transmission- and reflection-topography, current deep level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS), and photoluminescence measurements. Our most recent work on CZT detectors was directed towards detailing various crystal defects, studying the internal electrical field, and delineating the effects of thermal annealing on improving the material properties. In this paper, we report our most recent results.

  9. Rework of flip chip bonded radiation pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vähänen, S.; Heikkinen, H.; Pohjonen, H.; Salonen, J.; Savolainen-Pulli, S.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, some practical aspects of reworking flip chip hybridized pixel detectors are discussed. As flip chip technology has been advancing in terms of placement accuracy and reliability, large-area hybrid pixel detectors have been developed. The area requirements are usually fulfilled by placing several readout chips (ROCs) on single sensor chip. However, as the number of ROCs increases, the probability of failure in the hybridization process and the ROC operation also increases. Because high accuracy flip chip bonding takes time, a significant part of the price of a pixel detector comes from the flip chip assembly process itself. As large-area detector substrates are expensive, and many flip chip placements are required, the price of an assembled detector can become very high. In a typical case, there is just one bad ROC (out of several) on a faulty detector to be replaced. Considering the high price of pixel detectors and the fact that reworking faulty ROCs does not take much longer than the original placement, it is worthwhile to investigate the feasibility of a rework process.

  10. Diurnal Variations of Energetic Particle Radiation Dose Measured by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Ehresmann, Bent; Köhler, Jan; Guo, Jingnan; Kahanpää, Henrik; Hassler, Don; -Gomez, Javier E.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Brinza, David; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckhard; Burmeister, Sonka; Martin, Cesar; Müller-Mellin, Robert; Appel, Jan; Posner, Arik; Reitz, Gunter; Kharytonov, Aliksandr; Cucinotta, Francis

    2013-04-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has collected data on the interplanetary radiation environment during cruise from Earth to Mars and at the surface of Mars since its landing in August 2012. RAD's particle detection capabilities are achieved with a solid-state detector (SSD) stack (A, B, C), a CsI(Tl) scintillator (D), and a plastic scintillator (E) for neutron detection. The D and E detectors are surrounded by an anticoincidence shield (F), also made of plastic scintillator. All scintillators are optically coupled to silicon diodes which convert scintillation light to electrons. RAD is capable of measuring both Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) thought to be produced by supernovae outside the heliosphere and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs). GCRs are relativistic particles (100 MeV/nuc to >10 GeV/nuc) composed of roughly 89% protons, 10% alpha particles (He), and 1% heavier nuclei [1]. Because of their high energies and continuous nature, GCRs are the dominant source of background radiation at the Martian surface, and are responsible for the production of secondary particles (notably neutrons) via complex interactions in the atmosphere and regolith. SEPs are produced by coronal mass ejections. These intermittent storms are most likely to occur near solar maximum and typical fluxes are dominated by protons with energies lower than 100 MeV/nuc. Unlike the GCR flux, the SEP flux can vary by five or more orders of magnitude over timescales of a day. Even under a constant flux of energetic particle radiation at the top of the atmosphere, the radiation dose at the surface should vary as a function of surface elevation [2]. This variation is directly related to the change in the shielding provided by the total atmospheric mass column, which is to a very good approximation directly related to surface pressure. Thus, the flux of primary energetic particles should increase with altitude, all other things being equal. At present, MSL has been at a nearly constant altitude of ~-4.4 km MOLA so that no elevation-induced changes are expected and none have been observed. However, any process that changes the column mass of atmosphere should change the dose at the surface. On Mars there are two major processes that substantially change column atmospheric mass. The first is the seasonal condensation cycle during which ~25% of the dominant atmospheric constituent (CO2) condenses onto the winter pole. This seasonal signal is very strong and has been observed by surface pressure measurements from the Viking Landers up through MSL [3,4]. The second major process is related to the thermal tide. The direct heating of the Martian atmosphere by the Sun produces global scale waves that redistribute mass [5]. The two most dominant tidal modes are the diurnal and semidiurnal tide. Together, the thermal tide can produce a variation of 10-15% over a Martian day (sol). Here, we report on the dose measured by the RAD E detector and the variation of this dose over the diurnal cycle. Further, we show that the variation in the E dose rate is very likely due to the variation of column mass, as measured by the pressure sensor on the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS), driven by the thermal tide. While changes in dose were expected from changes in altitude or season, the discovery of a diurnal variation was not anticipated, although it should have been reasonably expected in hindsight.

  11. Radiation hardness of a single crystal CVD diamond detector for MeV energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuki; Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Ochiai, Kentaro; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shinichi

    2015-06-01

    We have fabricated a particle detector using single crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition. The irradiation dose dependence of the output pulse height from the diamond detector was measured using 3 MeV protons. The pulse height of the output signals from the diamond detector decreases as the amount of irradiation increases at count rates of 1.6-8.9 kcps because of polarization effects inside the diamond crystal. The polarization effect can be cancelled by applying a reverse bias voltage, which restores the pulse heights. Additionally, the radiation hardness performance for MeV energy protons was compared with that of a silicon surface barrier detector.

  12. Methods for radiation detection and characterization using a multiple detector probe

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas William; Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2014-11-04

    Apparatuses, methods, and systems relating to radiological characterization of environments are disclosed. Multi-detector probes with a plurality of detectors in a common housing may be used to substantially concurrently detect a plurality of different radiation activities and types. Multiple multi-detector probes may be used in a down-hole environment to substantially concurrently detect radioactive activity and contents of a buried waste container. Software may process, analyze, and integrate the data from the different multi-detector probes and the different detector types therein to provide source location and integrated analysis as to the source types and activity in the measured environment. Further, the integrated data may be used to compensate for differential density effects and the effects of radiation shielding materials within the volume being measured.

  13. Low radioactivity material for use in mounting radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Marshall; Metzger, Albert E.; Fox, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    Two materials, sapphire and synthetic quartz, have been found for use in Ge detector mounting assemblies. These materials combine desirable mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties with the radioactive cleanliness required to detect minimal amounts of K, Th, and U.

  14. Measurement of gamma and neutron radiations inside spent fuel assemblies with passive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Voljanskij, A.; Klupák, V.; Koleška, M.; Cabalka, M.; Turek, K.

    2011-10-01

    During operation of a fission nuclear reactor, many radionuclides are generated in fuel by fission and activation of 235U, 238U and other nuclides present in the assembly. After removal of a fuel assembly from the core, these radionuclides are sources of different types of radiation. Gamma and neutron radiation emitted from an assembly can be non-destructively detected with different types of detectors. In this paper, a new method of measurement of radiation from a spent fuel assembly is presented. It is based on usage of passive detectors, such as alanine dosimeters for gamma radiation and track detectors for neutron radiation. Measurements are made on the IRT-2M spent fuel assemblies used in the LVR-15 research reactor. During irradiation of detectors, the fuel assembly is located in a water storage pool at a depth of 6 m. Detectors are inserted into central hole of the assembly, irradiated for a defined time interval, and after the detectors removed from the assembly, gamma dose or neutron fluence are evaluated. Measured profiles of gamma dose rate and neutron fluence rate inside of the spent fuel assembly are presented. This measurement can be used to evaluate relative fuel burn-up.

  15. Radiation Measurements in Cruise and on Mars by the MSL Radiation Assessment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitlin, C. J.; Hassler, D.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Appel, J. K.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S.; Brinza, D.; Burmeister, S.; Cucinotta, F.; Ehresmann, B.; Guo, J.; Kohler, J.; Lohf, H.; Martin, C.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) is one of ten science instruments on the Curiosity rover. The RAD team's science objectives include the measurement of radiation dose (a purely physical quantity) and dose equivalent (a derived quantity that can be related to cancer risk) on the surface of Mars. In addition, RAD acquired data for most of the cruise to Mars, from Dec. 2011 through July 2012, providing a measurement of the radiation environment under conditions similar to those expected on a human trip to Mars or other deep space destinations. The dose and dose equivalent measurements made during cruise have been published, but are presented in more detail here. Rates measured in cruise are compared to similar measurements made during Curiosity's first 269 sols on the surface of Mars. In the simplest picture, one expects rates to be a factor of two lower on the surface of a large airless body compared to free space, owing to the two-pi shielding geometry. The situation on Mars is complicated by the non-negligible shielding effects of the atmosphere, particularly in Gale Crater where diurnal variations in atmospheric column depth are significant. The diurnal variations - caused by the well-known thermal tides on Mars - result in reduced shielding of the surface in the afternoon as compared to the night and early morning hours. A major challenge in analyzing the surface data is the treatment of the background radiation dose coming from Curiosity's Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). Prior to launch, RAD acquired data in the full cruise configuration so that this background could be measured with only sea-level cosmic ray muons present - that is, almost all of what was measured was due to the RTG. Those effects could therefore be subtracted from the cruise measurements in a straightforward way. However, the situation on the surface is somewhat different than in cruise, in that the mass that was present above RAD - and caused scattering of particles into the detector - is no longer there. The RTG-induced dose rate in the surface configuration must therefore be less than it was in the cruise configuration, but there is no way to get a direct measurement of the background. Quantifying the change in RTG background is difficult but essential, as the subtraction affects every aspect of the dosimetry. Two approaches have been developed and yield roughly similar results. The differences allow us to estimate the uncertainties arising from the RTG subtraction, and propagate those into the dosimetry results.

  16. A program in detector development for the US synchrotron radiation community

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.; Mills, D.; Naday, S.; Gruner, S.; Siddons, P.; Arthur, J.; Wehlitz, R.; Padmore, H.

    2001-07-14

    There is a clear gulf between the capabilities of modern synchrotrons to deliver high photon fluxes, and the capabilities of detectors to measure the resulting photon, electron or ion signals. While a huge investment has been made in storage ring technology, there has not to date been a commensurate investment in detector systems. With appropriate detector technology, gains in data rates could be 3 to 4 orders of magnitude in some cases. The US community working in detector technology is under-funded and fragmented and works without the long term funding commitment required for development of the most advanced detector systems. It is becoming apparent that the US is falling behind its international competitors in provision of state-of-the-art detector technology for cutting edge synchrotron radiation based experiments.

  17. Results of neutron irradiation of GEM detector for plasma radiation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jednorog, S.; Bienkowska, B.; Chernyshova, M.; Łaszynska, E.; Prokopowicz, R.; Ziołkowski, A.

    2015-09-01

    The detecting devices dedicated for plasma monitoring will be exposed for massive fluxes of neutron, photons as well as other rays that are components of fusion reactions and their product interactions with plasma itself or surroundings. In result detecting module metallic components will be activated becoming a source of radiation. Moreover, electronics components could change their electronic properties. The prototype GEM detector constructed for monitoring soft X-ray radiation in ITER oriented tokamaks was used for plasma monitoring during experimental campaign on tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. After that it became a source of gamma radiation caused by neutrons. The present work contains description of detector activation in the laboratory conditions.

  18. Smoke detector with a radiation source operated in a pulse-like or intermittent mode

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, J.; Guttinger, H.

    1985-03-19

    A smoke detector contains a pulse-operated radiation source and a radiation receiver arranged externally of the region directly irradiated by the radiation source. The radiation receiver, in the presence of smoke in the radiation region, is impinged by scattered radiation and delivers output pulses. There is provided an evaluation circuit which generates a blocking pulse, and which inputs a resetting signal to a counter device in consequence of the difference of the blocking pulse and output pulse of the radiation receiver. The counter or counting device, in the absence of a resetting signal, is switched further and upon reaching a predetermined counter state triggers an alarm signal. High-frequency electrical disturbances which arise, as long as the radiation source delivers radiation pulses, at most can generate an additional resetting signal for the counter, so that the integrity of the smoke detector against triggering of false alarms is enhanced. If there is connected in parallel to the radiation receiver a NTC-resistor, then there is obtained a smoke detector which responds to a further combustion criterion (temperature).

  19. Simulation of ion beam induced current in radiation detectors and microelectronic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2009-10-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause Single Event Effects (SEE) in a variety of electronic devices. The mechanism that leads to these SEEs is current induced by the radiation in these devices. While this phenomenon is detrimental in ICs, this is the basic mechanism behind the operation of semiconductor radiation detectors. To be able to predict SEEs in ICs and detector responses we need to be able to simulate the radiation induced current as the function of time. There are analytical models, which work for very simple detector configurations, but fail for anything more complex. On the other end, TCAD programs can simulate this process in microelectronic devices, but these TCAD codes costs hundreds of thousands of dollars and they require huge computing resources. In addition, in certain cases they fail to predict the correct behavior. A simulation model based on the Gunn theorem was developed and used with the COMSOL Multiphysics framework.

  20. Diurnal Variations of Energetic Particle Radiation Dose Measured by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafkin, Scot

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has collected data on the interplanetary radiation environment during cruise from Earth to Mars and at the surface of Mars since its landing in August 2012. Any process that changes the column mass of atmosphere should change the dose at the surface due to the shielding effect of the atmosphere. On Mars there are two major processes that substantially change column atmospheric mass. The first is the seasonal condensation cycle during which 25% of the dominant atmospheric constituent (CO2) condenses onto the winter pole. The second major process is related to thermal tides forced by the direct heating of the Martian atmosphere by the Sun. The thermal tide can produce a column mass variation of 10-15% over a Martian day (sol). Here, we report on the total dose rate and neutral count rate measured by MSL RAD and the variation of these dose rates over the diurnal cycle. Further, we show that the variation in the dose rates is very likely due to the variation of column mass, as measured by the pressure sensor on the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS). While changes in dose were expected from changes in altitude or season, the discovery of a diurnal variation was not anticipated, although it should have been reasonably expected in hindsight.

  1. Radiation tolerance of the FOXFET biasing scheme for AC-coupled Si microstrip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bacchetta, N.; Gotra, Yu. ); Bisello, D.; Da Ros, R.; Giraldo, A. Univ. di Padova . Dipt. di Fisica); Canali, C. Univ. di Modena . Facolta di Ingegneria); Fuochi, P.G. ); Fusaro, G. . Dept. di Elettronica e Informatica); Paccagnella, A. Univ. di Cagliari . Instituto di Elettrotecnica); Verzellesi, G. Univ. di Padova . Dept. di Elettronica e Informatica)

    1993-12-01

    The radiation response of FOXFETs has been studied for proton, gamma and neutron exposures. The punch-through behavior, which represents the normal FET operating conditions in Si microstrip detectors, has been found to be much less sensitive to radiation damage than threshold voltage. The device performance has been elucidated by means of two-dimensional simulations. The main radiation effects have been also taken into account in the numerical analysis and separately examined.

  2. Material parameters in thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.; Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Street, R.A.; Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA )

    1989-07-01

    Transient photoconductivity measurements of basic material parameters: carrier mobility, mobility-lifetime product and the ionized dangling bind density of thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon detectors are presented. We found that only a fraction ({approximately}30--35%) of the total defect density as measured by ESR is ionized when the detector is biased into deep depletion. The measurements on annealed samples done to relate the ionized dangling bond density and the ESR spin density also showed that this fraction is about 0.3. The time dependence of defect relaxation was found to be a stretched exponential. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Technical Note: Response measurement for select radiation detectors in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, M.; Fallone, B. G.; Rathee, S.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose response to applied magnetic fields for ion chambers and solid state detectors has been investigated previously for the anticipated use in linear accelerator–magnetic resonance devices. In this investigation, the authors present the measured response of selected radiation detectors when the magnetic field is applied in the same direction as the radiation beam, i.e., a longitudinal magnetic field, to verify previous simulation only data. Methods: The dose response of a PR06C ion chamber, PTW60003 diamond detector, and IBA PFD diode detector is measured in a longitudinal magnetic field. The detectors are irradiated with buildup caps and their long axes either parallel or perpendicular to the incident photon beam. In each case, the magnetic field dose response is reported as the ratio of detector signals with to that without an applied longitudinal magnetic field. The magnetic field dose response for each unique orientation as a function of magnetic field strength was then compared to the previous simulation only studies. Results: The measured dose response of each detector in longitudinal magnetic fields shows no discernable response up to near 0.21 T. This result was expected and matches the previously published simulation only results, showing no appreciable dose response with magnetic field. Conclusions: Low field longitudinal magnetic fields have been shown to have little or no effect on the dose response of the detectors investigated and further lend credibility to previous simulation only studies.

  4. Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

  5. Radiation Hard AlGaN Detectors and Imager

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-01

    Radiation hardness of AlGaN photodiodes was tested using a 65 MeV proton beam with a total proton fluence of 3x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. AlGaN Deep UV Photodiode have extremely high radiation hardness. These new devices have mission critical applications in high energy density physics (HEDP) and space explorations. These new devices satisfy radiation hardness requirements by NIF. NSTec is developing next generation AlGaN optoelectronics and imagers.

  6. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  7. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  8. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    New and highly sensitive method of detecting infrared irradiation makes possible solid state infrared detector which is more sensitive near room temperature than usual photoconductive low band gap semiconductor devices. Reconfiguration of high field domains in cadmium sulphide crystals provides basis for discovery.

  9. Improvement of terahertz field effect transistor detectors by substrate thinning and radiation losses reduction.

    PubMed

    Coquillat, Dominique; Marczewski, Jacek; Kopyt, Pawel; Dyakonova, Nina; Giffard, Benoit; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-01-11

    Phenomena of the radiation coupling to the field effect transistors based terahertz (THz) detectors are studied. We show that in the case of planar metal antennas a significant portion of incoming radiation, instead of being coupled to the transistors, is coupled to an antenna substrate leading to responsivity losses and/or cross-talk effects in the field effect based THz detector arrays. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the responsivity versus substrate thickness are performed. They clearly show how to minimize the losses by the detector/ array substrate thinning. In conclusion simple quantitative rules of losses minimization by choosing a proper substrate thickness of field effect transistor THz detectors are presented for common materials (Si, GaAs, InP, GaN) used in semiconductor technologies. PMID:26832258

  10. Measurement of the radiation field at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    K. Kordas et al.

    2003-01-12

    We present direct measurements of the spatial distribution of both ionizing radiation and low energy neutrons (E{sub n} < 200 keV) inside the tracking volume of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Using data from multiple exposures we are able to separate the contributions from beam losses and proton-antiproton collisions. Initial measurements of leakage currents in the CDF silicon detectors show patterns consistent with predictions based on our measurements.

  11. Review on the characteristics of radiation detectors for dosimetry and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Joao; Clasie, Ben; Partridge, Mike

    2014-10-01

    The enormous advances in the understanding of human anatomy, physiology and pathology in recent decades have led to ever-improving methods of disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Many of these achievements have been enabled, at least in part, by advances in ionizing radiation detectors. Radiology has been transformed by the implementation of multi-slice CT and digital x-ray imaging systems, with silver halide films now largely obsolete for many applications. Nuclear medicine has benefited from more sensitive, faster and higher-resolution detectors delivering ever-higher SPECT and PET image quality. PET/MR systems have been enabled by the development of gamma ray detectors that can operate in high magnetic fields. These huge advances in imaging have enabled equally impressive steps forward in radiotherapy delivery accuracy, with 4DCT, PET and MRI routinely used in treatment planning and online image guidance provided by cone-beam CT. The challenge of ensuring safe, accurate and precise delivery of highly complex radiation fields has also both driven and benefited from advances in radiation detectors. Detector systems have been developed for the measurement of electron, intensity-modulated and modulated arc x-ray, proton and ion beams, and around brachytherapy sources based on a very wide range of technologies. The types of measurement performed are equally wide, encompassing commissioning and quality assurance, reference dosimetry, in vivo dosimetry and personal and environmental monitoring. In this article, we briefly introduce the general physical characteristics and properties that are commonly used to describe the behaviour and performance of both discrete and imaging detectors. The physical principles of operation of calorimeters; ionization and charge detectors; semiconductor, luminescent, scintillating and chemical detectors; and radiochromic and radiographic films are then reviewed and their principle applications discussed. Finally, a general discussion of the application of detectors for x-ray nuclear medicine and ion beam imaging and dosimetry is presented.

  12. Internal Electric Field Behavior of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Radiation Detectors Under High Carrier Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.H.; Gul, R.; and James, R.B.

    2010-10-26

    The behavior of the internal electric-field of nuclear-radiation detectors substantially affects the detector's performance. We investigated the distribution of the internal field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors under high carrier injection. We noted the build-up of a space charge region near the cathode that produces a built-in field opposing the applied field. Its presence entails the collapse of the electric field in the rest of detector, other than the portion near the cathode. Such a space-charge region originates from serious hole-trapping in CZT. The device's operating temperature greatly affects the width of the space-charge region. With increasing temperature from 5 C to 35 C, its width expanded from about 1/6 to 1/2 of the total depth of the detector.

  13. Gamma-ray escape peak characteristics of radiation-damaged reverse-electrode germanium coaxial detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehl, Richard H.; Hull, Ethan L.; Madden, Norman W.; Xing, Jingshu; Friesel, Dennis L.

    1996-02-01

    A comparison of the characteristics of full-energy gamma-ray peaks and their corresponding escape peaks when high energy photons interact in radiation damaged reverse-electrode (n-type) germanium coaxial detectors is presented. Coaxial detector geometry is the dominant factor, causing charge collection to be dramatically better for interactions occurring near the outer periphery of the detector as well as increasing of the probability of escape events occurring in this region. It follows that the resolution of escape peaks is better than that of ordinary gamma-ray peaks. This is experimentally verified. A nearly identical but undamaged detector exhibited significant Doppler broadening of single escape peaks. Because double escape events preferentially occur at outer radii, energy shifts of double escape reflect extremely small amounts of charge trapping in undamaged detectors.

  14. A transition radiation detector for RHIC featuring accurate tracking and dE/dx particle identification

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, E.; Lissauer, D.; McCorkle, S.; Polychronakos, V.; Takai, H.; Chi, C.Y.; Nagamiya, S.; Sippach, W.; Toy, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.F.; Wiggins, C.; Willis, W.; Cherniatin, V.; Dolgoshein, B.; Bennett, M.; Chikanian, A.; Kumar, S.; Mitchell, J.T.; Pope, K.

    1991-12-31

    We describe the results of a test ran involving a Transition Radiation Detector that can both distinguish electrons from pions which momenta greater titan 0.7 GeV/c and simultaneously track particles passing through the detector. The particle identification is accomplished through a combination of the detection of Transition Radiation from the electron and the differences in electron and pion energy loss (dE/dx) in the detector. The dE/dx particle separation is most, efficient below 2 GeV/c while particle ID utilizing Transition Radiation effective above 1.5 GeV/c. Combined, the electron-pion separation is-better than 5 {times} 10{sup 2}. The single-wire, track-position resolution for the TRD is {approximately}230 {mu}m.

  15. Development of passive radiation detectors of improved sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    The future development of a solid track high energy particle detector is discussed. The goal is to improve the sensitivity and lower the threshold of the detector. One most widely used material for such purpose is a plastic commercially known as CR-39. A scheme is presented which involves changing the formula of the monomer, diethylene glycol-bis-allyl carbonate. This is to be accomplished by substituting some heteroatoms for H and substituting sulfur atoms for oxygen in the ether linkages. Use of a new plasticizer to make the etched surface clearer than what has been accomplished as of today is suggested. Possible improvement in acquiring better tracks and increasing the ratio of V sub T/V sub B was planned. This is to be accomplished by changing the composition of the etchants, etching time, and etching temperature.

  16. Use of Sub-bandgap Illumination to Improve Radiation Detector Resolution of CdZnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, Martine C.; Washington, Aaron L.; Teague, Lucile C.; Wright, Jonathan S.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael; Buliga, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    The performance of Cd1- x Zn x Te (CZT) materials for room-temperature gamma/x-ray radiation detection continues to improve in terms of material quality and detector design. In our prior publications, we investigated the use of multiple wavelengths of light (in the visible and infrared) to target charge carriers at various trap energies and physical positions throughout crystals. Light exposure significantly alters the charge mobility and improves carrier collection at the anode contact. This study presents an investigation of material performance as a radiation detector during such illumination. The decrease in charge trapping and increase in charge collection due to a higher probability of free electron release from traps contributed to an increase in the resolution-based performance of the detector through controlled illumination. We investigated the performance improvement of CZT crystals with previously known levels of intrinsic defects and secondary phases, at various voltages, light-emitting diode (LED) light wavelengths, and shaping times. Although our setup was clearly not optimized for radiation detector performance, it demonstrated substantial resolution improvements (based on full-width at half-maximum using 662-keV gamma rays from 137Cs upon illumination with 950-nm light) of 16% to 38% in comparison with unilluminated CZT under similar conditions. This manuscript includes discussion of the electrooptic behavior and its effect on performance. Additional testing and fabrication of a detector that incorporates such LED light optimization could lead to improved performance with existing detector-grade materials.

  17. Dependence of Thickness of Lead Zirconate Titanate Material Used as Radiation Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takechi, Seiji; Morinaga, Shin-ya; Kurozumi, Atsuma; Miyachi, Takashi; Fujii, Masayuki; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Hiromi; Murakami, Takeshi; Uchihori, Yukio; Okada, Nagaya

    2009-10-01

    The characteristics of a radiation detector fabricated with stacks of piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) elements were studied by irradiation with a 400 MeV/n xenon (Xe) beam. The detector was designed to monitor the output voltage formed on the surface of each element. Three additional PZT elements were placed in front of the detector to increase the thickness of the PZT target. It seemed that the individual output voltage observed at a position beyond the range was dependent on the amount of strain generated by the ionization loss energy of Xe ions within the range.

  18. High-energy cosmic-ray electrons - A new measurement using transition-radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, G.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T.

    1977-01-01

    A new detector for cosmic-ray electrons, consisting of a combination of a transition-radiation detector and a shower detector, has been constructed, calibrated at accelerator beams, and exposed in a balloon flight under 5 g/sq cm of atmosphere. The design of this instrument and the methods of data analysis are described. Preliminary results in the energy range 9-300 GeV are presented. The energy spectrum of electrons is found to be significantly steeper than that of protons, consistent with a long escape lifetime of cosmic rays in the galaxy.

  19. Radiation damage and charge collection effects in Si(Li) gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Tindall, Craig; Luke, Paul N.; Kurfess, James D.

    2003-01-01

    The spectroscopy performance of 6-mm thick Si(Li) planar detectors was studied as a function of operating temperature and electric field. The energy resolution of the 662-keV gamma-ray peak from a 137Cs source was used to monitor the spectroscopy performance of the detectors. The efficiency, depletion voltage, leakage current, and noise were also monitored. The effects of radiation damage caused by 200-MeV protons were studied to determine the viability of operation in space. Four detectors, two maintained at 88 K and two maintained at 212 K, were irradiated to a fluence of 8.710 8 p/cm 2. No effects were observed. The two detectors irradiated at 212 K were subsequently irradiated with an additional 8.710 9 p/cm 2, again at 212 K. These detectors then exhibited slight energy resolution degradation. No other radiation damage effects were observed. The resolution degradation increased at higher operating temperature and decreased with higher electric field. Cycling the detectors to room temperature for 14 h eliminated the resolution degradation. The resolution of these detectors is limited by the combination of ballistic deficit and parallel noise in the 220 K range. A significant decrease in the gamma-ray peak count rate, almost certainly caused by surface channel effects, was the most dramatic temperature-dependent effect observed.

  20. Characterization of a novel two dimensional diode array the ''magic plate'' as a radiation detector for radiation therapy treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J. H. D.; Fuduli, I.; Carolan, M.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Perevertaylo, V. L.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) utilizes the technology of multileaf collimators to deliver highly modulated and complex radiation treatment. Dosimetric verification of the IMRT treatment requires the verification of the delivered dose distribution. Two dimensional ion chamber or diode arrays are gaining popularity as a dosimeter of choice due to their real time feedback compared to film dosimetry. This paper describes the characterization of a novel 2D diode array, which has been named the ''magic plate'' (MP). It was designed to function as a 2D transmission detector as well as a planar detector for dose distribution measurements in a solid water phantom for the dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment delivery. Methods: The prototype MP is an 11 x 11 detector array based on thin (50 {mu}m) epitaxial diode technology mounted on a 0.6 mm thick Kapton substrate using a proprietary ''drop-in'' technology developed by the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong. A full characterization of the detector was performed, including radiation damage study, dose per pulse effect, percent depth dose comparison with CC13 ion chamber and build up characteristics with a parallel plane ion chamber measurements, dose linearity, energy response and angular response. Results: Postirradiated magic plate diodes showed a reproducibility of 2.1%. The MP dose per pulse response decreased at higher dose rates while at lower dose rates the MP appears to be dose rate independent. The depth dose measurement of the MP agrees with ion chamber depth dose measurements to within 0.7% while dose linearity was excellent. MP showed angular response dependency due to the anisotropy of the silicon diode with the maximum variation in angular response of 10.8% at gantry angle 180 deg. Angular dependence was within 3.5% for the gantry angles {+-} 75 deg. The field size dependence of the MP at isocenter agrees with ion chamber measurement to within 1.1%. In the beam perturbation study, the surface dose increased by 12.1% for a 30 x 30 cm{sup 2} field size at the source to detector distance (SDD) of 80 cm whilst the transmission for the MP was 99%. Conclusions: The radiation response of the magic plate was successfully characterized. The array of epitaxial silicon based detectors with ''drop-in'' packaging showed properties suitable to be used as a simplified multipurpose and nonperturbing 2D radiation detector for radiation therapy dosimetric verification.

  1. Information-Based Development of New Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2006-12-31

    With our present concern for a secure environment, the development of new radiation detection materials has focused on the capability of identifying potential radiation sources at increased sensitivity levels. As the initial framework for a materials-informatics approach to radiation detection materials, we have explored the use of both supervised (Support Vector Machines – SVM and Linear Discriminant Analysis – LDA) and unsupervised (Principal Component Analysis – PCA) learning methods for the development of structural signature models. Application of these methods yields complementary results, both of which are necessary to reduce parameter space and variable degeneracy. Using a crystal structure classification test, the use of the nonlinear SVM significantly increases predictive performance, suggesting trade-offs between smaller descriptor spaces and simpler linear models.

  2. Physical design and Monte Carlo simulations of a space radiation detector onboard the SJ-10 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Qing; Wang, Huan-Yu; Cui, Xing-Zhu; Peng, Wen-Xi; Fan, Rui-Rui; Liang, Xiao-Hua; Gao, Ming; Zhang, Yun-Long; Zhang, Cheng-Mo; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Wang, Jin-Zhou; Zhang, Fei; Dong, Yi-Fan; Guo, Dong-Ya; Zhou, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    A radiation gene box (RGB) onboard the SJ-10 satellite is a device carrying mice and drosophila cells to determine the biological effects of space radiation environment. The shielded fluxes of different radioactive sources were calculated and the linear energy transfers of γ-rays, electrons, protons and α-particles in the tissue were acquired using A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic. Then, a conceptual model of a space radiation instrument employing three semiconductor sub-detectors for deriving the charged and uncharged radiation environment of the RGB was designed. The energy depositions in the three sub-detectors were classified into 15 channels (bins) in an algorithm derived from the Monte Carlo method. The physical feasibility of the conceptual instrument was also verified by Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. RADIATION HARDNESS / TOLERANCE OF SI SENSORS / DETECTORS FOR NUCLEAR AND HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    LI,Z.

    2002-09-09

    Silicon sensors, widely used in high energy and nuclear physics experiments, suffer severe radiation damage that leads to degradations in sensor performance. These degradations include significant increases in leakage current, bulk resistivity, and space charge concentration. The increase in space charge concentration is particularly damaging since it can significantly increase the sensor full depletion voltage, causing either breakdown if operated at high biases or charge collection loss if operated at lower biases than full depletion. Several strategies can be used to make Si detectors more radiation had tolerant to particle radiations. In this paper, the main radiation induced degradations in Si detectors will be reviewed. The details and specifics of the new engineering strategies: material/impurity/defect engineering (MIDE); device structure engineering (DSE); and device operational mode engineering (DOME) will be given.

  4. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Hamilton, Allister B.

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  5. Response of CVD diamond detectors to alpha radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souw, E.-K.; Meilunas, R. J.

    1997-02-01

    This article describes some results from an experiment with CVD diamond films used as α particle detectors. It demonstrates that bulk polarization can be effectively stopped within a reasonable time interval. This will enable detector calibration and quantitative measurement. A possible mechanism for the observed polarization quenching is discussed. It involves two types of carrier traps and a tentative band-gap model derived from the results of photoconductive current measurements. The experiment was set up mainly to investigate α detection properties of polycrystalline diamond films grown by the technique of microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. For comparison, two commercially purchased diamond wafers were also investigated, i.e., one grown by the DC arc jet method, and the other, a type-IIa natural diamond wafer (not preselected). The best response to α particles was obtained using diamond thin-films grown by the microwave PECVD method, followed by the type-IIa natural diamond, and finally, the CVD diamond grown by the DC arc jet technique.

  6. Optimized digital filtering techniques for radiation detection with HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salathe, Marco; Kihm, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes state-of-the-art digital filtering techniques that are part of GEANA, an automatic data analysis software used for the GERDA experiment. The discussed filters include a novel, nonlinear correction method for ballistic deficits, which is combined with one of three shaping filters: a pseudo-Gaussian, a modified trapezoidal, or a modified cusp filter. The performance of the filters is demonstrated with a 762 g Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detector, produced by Canberra, that measures γ-ray lines from radioactive sources in an energy range between 59.5 and 2614.5 keV. At 1332.5 keV, together with the ballistic deficit correction method, all filters produce a comparable energy resolution of ~1.61 keV FWHM. This value is superior to those measured by the manufacturer and those found in publications with detectors of a similar design and mass. At 59.5 keV, the modified cusp filter without a ballistic deficit correction produced the best result, with an energy resolution of 0.46 keV. It is observed that the loss in resolution by using a constant shaping time over the entire energy range is small when using the ballistic deficit correction method.

  7. Radiation detectors and sources enhanced with micro/nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Chad Michael

    The ongoing threat of nuclear terrorism presents major challenges to maintaining national security. Currently, only a small percentage of the cargo containers that enter America are searched for fissionable bomb making materials. This work reports on a multi-channel radiation detection platform enabled with nanoparticles that is capable of detecting and discriminating all types of radiation emitted from fissionable bomb making materials. Typical Geiger counters are limited to detecting only beta and gamma radiation. The micro-Geiger counter reported here detects all species of radiation including beta particles, gamma/X-rays, alpha particles, and neutrons. The multi-species detecting micro-Geiger counter contains a hermetically sealed and electrically biased fill gas. Impinging radiation interacts with tailored nanoparticles to release secondary charged particles that ionize the fill gas. The ionized particles collect on respectively biased electrodes resulting in a characteristic electrical pulse. Pulse height spectroscopy and radiation energy binning techniques can then be used to analyze the pulses to determine the specific radiation isotope. The ideal voltage range of operation for energy discrimination was found to be in the proportional region at 1000VDC. In this region, specific pulse heights for different radiation species resulted. The amplification region strength which determines the device sensitivity to radiation energy can be tuned with the electrode separation distance. Considerable improvements in count rates were achieved by using the charge conversion nanoparticles with the highest cross sections for particular radiation species. The addition of tungsten nanoparticles to the microGeiger counter enabled the device to be four times more efficient at detecting low level beta particles with a dose rate of 3.2uR/hr (micro-Roentgen per hour) and just under three times more efficient than an off the shelf Geiger counter. The addition of lead nanoparticles enabled the gamma/X-ray microGeiger counter channel to be 28 times more efficient at detecting low level gamma rays with a dose rate of 10uR/hr when compared to a device without nanoparticles. The addition of 10B nanoparticles enabled the neutron microGeiger counter channel to be 17 times more efficient at detecting neutrons. The device achieved a neutron count rate of 9,866 counts per minute when compared to a BF3 tube which resulted in a count rate of 9,000 counts per minute. By using a novel micro-injection ceramic molding and low temperature (950C) silver paste metallizing process, the batch fabrication of essentially disposable micro-devices can be achieved. This novel fabrication technique was then applied to a MEMS neutron gun and water spectroscopy device that also utilizes the high voltage/temperature insulating packaging.

  8. Measurement of thermal radiation using regular glass optics and short-wave infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, H W; Eppeldauer, G P

    2008-01-21

    The measurement of thermal radiation from ambient-temperature objects using short-wave infrared detectors and regular glass optics is described. The detectors are chosen to operate in the 2.0 microm to 2.5 microm atmospheric window. Selection of detectors with high shunt resistance along with the 4-stage thermo-electric cooling of the detectors to -85 degrees C results in detectivity, D*, of 4 x 10(13) cm Hz(1/2)/W which is near the background limited performance at 295 K. Furthermore, the use of regular-glass commercial optics to collect the thermal radiation results in diffraction-limited imaging. The use of a radiation thermometer constructed with these elements for the measurement of a blackbody from 20 degrees C to 50 degrees C results in noise-equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of < 3 mK at 50 degrees C. The operation at shorter wavelengths than traditional thermal sensors also leads to lower sensitivity to the emissivity of the object in determining the temperature of the object. These elements are used to construct a calibrator for an infrared collimator, and such a system demonstrates noise-equivalent irradiances of < 5 fW/cm(2). These results indicate that radiometers using short-wave infrared sensors could be constructed utilizing commercial glass optics with possible better performance and lower NETD than existing radiometers using cryogenically-cooled mid-infrared or thermal infrared detectors. PMID:18542168

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Silicon carbide and its use as a radiation detector material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, F.; Bertuccio, G.; Cavallini, A.; Vittone, E.

    2008-10-01

    We present a comprehensive review of the properties of the epitaxial 4H silicon carbide polytype (4H-SiC). Particular emphasis is placed on those aspects of this material related to room, high-temperature and harsh environment ionizing radiation detector operation. A review of the characterization methods and electrical contacting issues and how these are related to detector performance is presented. The most recent data on charge transport parameters across the Schottky barrier and how these are related to radiation spectrometer performance are presented. Experimental results on pixel detectors having equivalent noise energies of 144 eV FWHM (7.8 electrons rms) and 196 eV FWHM at +27 C and +100 C, respectively, are reported. Results of studying the radiation resistance of 4H-SiC are analysed. The data on the ionization energies, capture cross section, deep-level centre concentrations and their plausible structures formed in SiC as a result of irradiation with various particles are reviewed. The emphasis is placed on the study of the 1 MeV neutron irradiation, since these thermal particles seem to play the main role in the detector degradation. An accurate electrical characterization of the induced deep-level centres by means of PICTS technique has allowed one to identify which play the main role in the detector degradation.

  10. Radiation hardness of semiconductor avalanche detectors for calorimeters in future HEP experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushpil, V.; Mikhaylov, V.; Kugler, A.; Kushpil, S.; Ladygin, V. P.; Svoboda, O.; Tlustý, P.

    2016-02-01

    During the last years, semiconductor avalanche detectors are being widely used as the replacement of classical PMTs in calorimeters for many HEP experiments. In this report, basic selection criteria for replacement of PMTs by solid state devices and specific problems in the investigation of detectors radiation hardness are discussed. The design and performance of the hadron calorimeters developed for the future high energy nuclear physics experiments at FAIR, NICA, and CERN are discussed. The Projectile Spectator Detector (PSD) for the CBM experiment at the future FAIR facility, the Forward Calorimeter for the NA61 experiment at CERN and the Multi Purpose Detector at the future NICA facility are reviewed. Moreover, new methods of data analysis and results interpretation for radiation experiments are described. Specific problems of development of detectors control systems and possibilities of reliability improvement of multi-channel detectors systems are shortly overviewed. All experimental material is based on the investigation of SiPM and MPPC at the neutron source in NPI Rez.

  11. Intercomparison of luminescence detectors for space radiation dosimetry within Proton-ICCHIBAN experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihori, Yukio; Ploc, Ondrej; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Berger, Thomas; Hajek, Michael; Kodaira, Satoshi; Benton, Eric; Ambrozova, Iva; Kitamura, Hisashi

    2012-07-01

    Luminescence detectors for space radiation dosimetry are frequently used to estimate personal and environmental doses in the International Space Station and other space vehicles. Detector responses for cosmic rays and their secondaries were investigated for a long time and it is well-known that luminescence detectors have dependencies of response on LET (Linear Energy Transfer). Some of luminescence detectors show over-response to gamma rays (used for routine calibration) and others have similar responses to gamma rays. But, because of lack of sufficient and reliable calibration data in the low LET region (about 1 keV/μm), it is the responses of these detectors at LET is poorly known. Protons make up the dominant portion of the fluence from space radiation, so the LET region corresponding to energetic protons must be characterized very well. For that purpose, calibration and intercomparison experiments were performed using relatively low energy (30 to 80 MeV) proton beams at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan. In this paper, the results of these intercomparison experiments, including high energy protons and light ions, are reported and illustrate the response of luminescence detectors in the low LET region. This research will help improve our understanding of space dosimeters and reliable dose measurement for astronauts and cosmonauts in low earth orbit.

  12. Preliminary Results from an Investigation into Nanostructured Nuclear Radiation Detectors for Non-Proliferation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the concept of embedding composite scintillators consisting of nanosized inorganic crystals in an organic matrix has been actively pursued. Nanocomposite detectors have the potential to meet many of the homeland security, non-proliferation, and border and cargo-screening needs of the nation and, by virtue of their superior nuclear identification capability over plastic, at roughly the same cost as plastic, have the potential to replace all plastic detectors. Nanocomposites clearly have the potential of being a gamma ray detection material that would be sensitive yet less expensive and easier to produce on a large scale than growing large, whole crystals of similar sensitivity. These detectors would have a broad energy range and a sufficient energy resolution to perform isotopic identification. The material can also be fabricated on an industrial scale, further reducing cost. This investigation focused on designing and fabricating prototype core/shell and quantum dot (QD) detectors. Fourteen core/shell and four QD detectors, all with the basic consistency of a mixture of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix with different densities of nanoparticles, were prepared. Nanoparticles with sizes <10 nm were fabricated, embedded in a polystyrene matrix, and the resultant scintillators’ radiation detector properties were characterized. This work also attempted to extend the gamma energy response on both low- and high-energy regimes by demonstrating the ability to detect low-energy and high-energy gamma rays. Preliminary results of this investigation are consistent with a significant response of these materials to nuclear radiation.

  13. Detectors and electronics for real time measurement of radiation dose and quality using the variance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wen-Hsing

    The product of the radiation dose and radiation quality indicates the biological consequences of radiation exposure. Therefore, quantifying both radiation dose and radiation quality is important to biological experiments as well as radiation protection. A small, specialized amplifier based on commercial ICs was developed to measure the radiation dose and quality in real-time using a microdosimetric detector, operated in the current mode, and the variance method. The random nature of radiation induces variance in the dose (in a small volume such as that of cell or DNA) for a specific radiation field that is proportional to the radiation quality. The charges from the microdosimetric detector, operated in the current mode, were repeatedly collected for a fixed period of time for 20 cycles of 100 integrations, and processed by the specialized amplifier to produce signals of pulse height between 0 and 10 volts. These signals with various amplitudes, which are proportional to the channel number, were then recorded by the MCA and stored in a computer. FORTRAN programs written in this study then calculated the average dose and the average dose variance from the stored data. Benchmarks of different brand's ICs were conducted to select a component with the best performance versus cost. The specialized amplifier showed the following characteristics: low input capacitance, low output impedance, adjustable integration time for controlling the amount of charge collected from the detector, linearity of system response to input currents, adjustable gain control, and low background noise. Standardized procedures of constructing a functional device (the specialized amplifier) were established, including arrangements of circuit diagram, processing of a printed circuit board, and construction of an aluminum-shielding box that served as a united ground point. In addition, procedures for determining the inner dimensions of the detector using radiography are also presented along with procedures for calibration and measurement. Measurements of the radiation dose and quality of x-ray, gamma and mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields with various geometries were taken. The dose rates ranged from 4 to 60 Gy/hr. Results showed the specialized amplifier is capable of distinguishing differences of radiation quality in various high dose rate radiation fields.

  14. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, Marion M.; Mihalczo, John T.; Blakeman, Edward D.

    1989-01-01

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation even count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  15. High-efficiency scintillation detector for combined detection of thermal and fast neutrons and gamma radiation

    DOEpatents

    Chiles, M.M.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1987-02-27

    A scintillation based radiation detector for the combined detection of thermal neutrons, high-energy neutrons and gamma rays in a single detecting unit. The detector consists of a pair of scintillators sandwiched together and optically coupled to the light sensitive face of a photomultiplier tube. A light tight radiation pervious housing is disposed about the scintillators and a portion of the photomultiplier tube to hold the arrangement in assembly and provides a radiation window adjacent the outer scintillator through which the radiation to be detected enters the detector. The outer scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by thermal-neutrons and the inner scintillator is formed of a material in which scintillations are produced by high-energy neutrons and gamma rays. The light pulses produced by events detected in both scintillators are coupled to the photomultiplier tube which produces a current pulse in response to each detected event. These current pulses may be processed in a conventional manner to produce a count rate output indicative of the total detected radiation event count rate. Pulse discrimination techniques may be used to distinguish the different radiations and their energy distribution.

  16. Comparison of cosmic rays radiation detectors on-board commercial jet aircraft.

    PubMed

    Kubančák, Ján; Ambrožová, Iva; Brabcová, Kateřina Pachnerová; Jakůbek, Jan; Kyselová, Dagmar; Ploc, Ondřej; Bemš, Július; Štěpán, Václav; Uchihori, Yukio

    2015-06-01

    Aircrew members and passengers are exposed to increased rates of cosmic radiation on-board commercial jet aircraft. The annual effective doses of crew members often exceed limits for public, thus it is recommended to monitor them. In general, the doses are estimated via various computer codes and in some countries also verified by measurements. This paper describes a comparison of three cosmic rays detectors, namely of the (a) HAWK Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter; (b) Liulin semiconductor energy deposit spectrometer and (c) TIMEPIX silicon semiconductor pixel detector, exposed to radiation fields on-board commercial Czech Airlines company jet aircraft. Measurements were performed during passenger flights from Prague to Madrid, Oslo, Tbilisi, Yekaterinburg and Almaty, and back in July and August 2011. For all flights, energy deposit spectra and absorbed doses are presented. Measured absorbed dose and dose equivalent are compared with the EPCARD code calculations. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of all detectors are discussed. PMID:25979739

  17. Radiation tolerance of the readout chip for the Phase I upgrade of the CMS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoss, J.; Kästli, H.-C.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Starodumov, A.

    2016-01-01

    For the Phase I upgrade of the CMS pixel detector a new digital readout chip (ROC) has been developed. An important part of the design verification are irradiation studies to ensure sufficient radiation tolerance. The paper summarizes results of the irradiation studies on the final ROC design for the detector layers 2 – 4. Samples have been irradiated with 23 MeV protons to accumulate the expected lifetime dose of 0.5 MGy and up to 1.1 MGy to project the performance of the ROC for layer 1 of the detector. It could be shown that the design is sufficiently radiation tolerant and that all performance parameters stay within their specifications. Additionally, very high doses of up to 4.2 MGy have been tested to explore the limits of the current chip design on 250 nm CMOS technology. The study confirmed that samples irradiated up to the highest dose could be successfully operated with test pulses.

  18. Dichroic filters to protect milliwatt far-infrared detectors from megawatt ECRH radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertschinger, G.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Endres, C. P.; Lewen, F.

    2008-10-15

    Dichroic filters have been used to shield effectively the far infrared (FIR) detectors at the interferometer/polarimeter on TEXTOR. The filters consist of metal foils with regular holes, the hole diameter, the mutual spacing and the thickness of the foils are chosen to transmit radiation at the design frequency with transmission >90%. The attenuation at the low frequency end of the bandpass filter is about 30 dB per octave, the high frequency transmission is between 20% and 40%. The filters have been used to block the stray radiation from the megawatt microwave heating beam to the detectors of the FIR interferometer, operating with power on the detector in the milliwatt range. If required, the low frequency attenuation can be still enhanced, without compromising the transmission in the passband. The FIR interferometer used for plasma density and position control is no longer disturbed by electromagnetic waves used for plasma heating.

  19. Investigations on radiation hardness of DEPFET sensors for the Belle II detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Andreas; Andricek, Ladislav; Kleinohl, Tobias; Koffmane, Christian; Lütticke, Florian; Marinas, Carlos; Moser, Hans-Günther; Ninkovic, Jelena; Richter, Rainer; Schaller, Gerhard; Schnecke, Martina; Schopper, Florian

    2013-12-01

    In the upgrade of the Belle detector at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) the two innermost layers of the vertex detector will be realized by a pixel detector (PXD) consisting of DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) matrices. As the position of the detector will be very close to the beam pipe, it will suffer from intense radiation levels. The main radiation background is the luminosity related 4-fermion final state radiation, which damages the silicon bulk material and the silicon dioxide from the gate contacts. With the dose expected at Belle II, the DEPFET suffers mainly from additional leakage current and increase in noise. In addition, defects in the silicon dioxide change transistor parameters, e.g. the threshold voltage. We will show results on the hardness factor of electrons after a 10 MeV electron irradiation which was performed in the dose and energy range relevant for the PXD. In addition, we present X-ray irradiations of DEPFET equivalent test structures and compare radiation hardness for different oxide parameters in the prototype production.

  20. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    SciTech Connect

    B. A. Brunett; J. C. Lund; J. M. Van Scyoc; N. R. Hilton; E. Y. Lee; R. B. James

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors.

  1. A new thermal radiation detector using optical heterodyne detection of absorbed energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. C.; Petuchowski, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The operating principles of a new kind of room-temperature thermal radiation detector are described. In this device modulated light heats a gas, either directly or by conduction from a thin absorbing membrane, and the resultant change in density of the gas is detected by optical heterodyning. The performance of a membrane device of this kind agrees well with the predictions of theory.

  2. Using Ionizing Radiation Detectors. Module 11. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on using ionizing radiation detectors. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming and telling the function…

  3. Spacecraft to Spacecraft Coherent Laser Tracking as a Xylophone Interferometer Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, M.

    1998-01-01

    Searches for gravitational radiation can be performed in space with two spacecraft tracking each other with coherent laser light. This experimental technique could be implemented with two spacecraft carrying an appropriate optical payload, or with the proposed broad-band, space-based laser interferometer detectors of gravitational waves operated in this non-interferometric mode.

  4. Mixed ionic-electronic conductor-based radiation detectors and methods of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Adam; Beck, Patrick R; Graff, Robert T; Nelson, Art; Nikolic, Rebecca J; Payne, Stephen A; Voss, Lars; Kim, Hadong

    2015-04-07

    A method of fabricating a mixed ionic-electronic conductor (e.g. TlBr)-based radiation detector having halide-treated surfaces and associated methods of fabrication, which controls polarization of the mixed ionic-electronic MIEC material to improve stability and operational lifetime.

  5. Calibration of modified Liulin detector for cosmic radiation measurements on-board aircraft.

    PubMed

    Kyselová, D; Ambrožová, I; Krist, P; Kubančák, J; Uchihori, Y; Kitamura, H; Ploc, O

    2015-06-01

    The annual effective doses of aircrew members often exceed the limit of 1 mSv for the public due to the increased level of cosmic radiation at the flight altitudes, and thus, it is recommended to monitor them. Aircrew dosimetry is usually performed using special computer programs mostly based on results of Monte Carlo simulations. Contemporary, detectors are used mostly for validation of these computer codes, verification of effective dose calculations and for research purposes. One of such detectors is active silicon semiconductor deposited energy spectrometer Liulin. Output quantities of measurement with the Liulin detector are the absorbed dose in silicon D and the ambient dose equivalent H*(10); to determine it, two calibrations are necessary. The purpose of this work was to develop a calibration methodology that can be used to convert signal from the detector to D independently on calibration performed at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility in Chiba, Japan. PMID:25979744

  6. State-of-the-art radiation detectors for medical imaging: Demands and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darambara, Dimitra G.

    2006-12-01

    Over the last half-century a variety of significant technical advances in several scientific fields has been pointing to an exploding growth in the field of medical imaging leading to a better interpretation of more specific anatomical, biochemical and molecular pathways. In particular, the development of novel imaging detectors and readout electronics has been critical to the advancement of medical imaging allowing the invention of breakthrough platforms for simultaneous acquisition of multi-modality images at molecular level. The present paper presents a review of the challenges, demands and constraints on radiation imaging detectors imposed by the nature of the modality and the physics of the imaging source. This is followed by a concise review and perspective on various types of state-of-the-art detector technologies that have been developed to meet these requirements. Trends, prospects and new concepts for future imaging detectors are also highlighted.

  7. Gamma-Ray Escape Peak Characteristics of Radiation Damaged Reverse-Electrode Germanium Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, E. L.; Xing, J. S.; Friesel, D. L.; Pehl, R. H.; Madden, N. M.

    1996-05-01

    A comparison between the characteristics of escape peaks and ordinary, multiple Compton and photoelectrically interacting, full-energy gamma-ray peaks from radiation damaged reverse-electrode (n-type) germanium coaxial detectors is presented. Coaxial detector geometry is the dominant factor, causing charge collection to be dramatically better near the outer periphery of the detector as well as increasing the probability of escape events occurring in this region. It follows that the resolution of escape peaks is better than that of ordinary gamma-ray peaks. This is experimentally verified. However, a nearly identical but undamaged detector exhibited significant Doppler broadening of single escape peaks. Because double escape events preferentially occur at outer radii, energy shifts in double escape peaks reflect extremely small amounts of charge trapping.

  8. Weakly superconducting, thin-film structures as radiation detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschman, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements were taken with weakly superconducting quantum structures of the Notarys-Mercereau type, representing a thin superconductor film with a short region that is weakened in the sense that its transition temperature is lower than in the remaining portion of the film. The structure acts as a superconducting relaxation oscillator in which the supercurrent increases with time until the critical current of the weakened section is attained, at which moment the supercurrent decays and the cycle repeats. Under applied radiation, a series of constant-voltage steps appears in the current-voltage curve, and the size of the steps varies periodically with the amplitude of applied radiation. Measurements of the response characteristics were made in the frequency range of 10 to 450 MHz.

  9. Pulse height distribution and radiation tolerance of CVD diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; Dangelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Grigoriev, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Karl, C.; Kass, R.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Pirollo, S.; Polesello, P.; Procario, M.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Trawick, M.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; Fenyvesi, A.; Molnar, J.; Sohler, D.; RD42 Collaboration

    2000-06-01

    The paper reviews measurements of the radiation tolerance of CVD diamond for irradiation with 24 GeV/ c protons, 300 MeV/ c pions and 1 MeV neutrons. For proton and neutron irradiation, the measured charge signal spectrum is compared with the spectrum calculated by a model. Irradiation by particles causes radiation damage leading to a decrease of the charge signal. However, both the measurements and the outcome from the model shows that for tracker applications this drawback is at least partly counterbalanced by a narrowing of the distribution curve of the charge signal. In addition, we observed after proton irradiation at the charge signal spectrum a decrease of the number of small signals. As a result, the efficiency of a CVD diamond tracker is less affected by irradiation than the mean charge signal.

  10. EFFECT OF SURFACE PREPARATION TECHNIQUE ON THE RADIATION DETECTOR PERFORMANCEOF CDZNTE

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M

    2007-05-23

    Synthetic CdZnTe (CZT) semiconducting crystals are highly suitable for the room temperature-based detection of gamma radiation. The surface preparation of Au contacts on surfaces of CZT detectors is typically conducted after (1) polishing to remove artifacts from crystal sectioning and (2) chemical etching, which removes residual mechanical surface damage however etching results in a Te rich surface layer that is prone to oxidize. Our studies show that CZT surfaces that are only polished (as opposed to polished and etched) can be contacted with Au and will yield lower surface currents. Due to their decreased dark currents, these as-polished surfaces can be used in the fabrication of gamma detectors exhibiting a higher performance than polished and etched surfaces with relatively less peak tailing and greater energy resolution. CdZnTe or ''CZT'' crystals are attractive to use in homeland security applications because they detect radiation at room temperature and do not require low temperature cooling as with silicon- and germanium-based detectors. Relative to germanium and silicon detectors, CZT is composed of higher Z elements and has a higher density, which gives it greater ''stopping power'' for gamma rays making a more efficient detector. Single crystal CZT materials with high bulk resistivity ({rho}>10{sup 10} {Omega} x cm) and good mobility-lifetime products are also required for gamma-ray spectrometric applications. However, several factors affect the detector performance of CZT are inherent to the as grown crystal material such as the presence of secondary phases, point defects and the presence of impurities (as described in a literature review by R. James and researchers). These and other factors can limit radiation detector performance such as low resistivity, which causes a large electronic noise and the presence of traps and other heterogeneities, which result in peak tailing and poor energy resolution.

  11. Method and system for determining depth distribution of radiation-emitting material located in a source medium and radiation detector system for use therein

    DOEpatents

    Benke, Roland R.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2003-03-04

    A method, system and a radiation detector system for use therein are provided for determining the depth distribution of radiation-emitting material distributed in a source medium, such as a contaminated field, without the need to take samples, such as extensive soil samples, to determine the depth distribution. The system includes a portable detector assembly with an x-ray or gamma-ray detector having a detector axis for detecting the emitted radiation. The radiation may be naturally-emitted by the material, such as gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, or emitted when the material is struck by other radiation. The assembly also includes a hollow collimator in which the detector is positioned. The collimator causes the emitted radiation to bend toward the detector as rays parallel to the detector axis of the detector. The collimator may be a hollow cylinder positioned so that its central axis is perpendicular to the upper surface of the large area source when positioned thereon. The collimator allows the detector to angularly sample the emitted radiation over many ranges of polar angles. This is done by forming the collimator as a single adjustable collimator or a set of collimator pieces having various possible configurations when connected together. In any one configuration, the collimator allows the detector to detect only the radiation emitted from a selected range of polar angles measured from the detector axis. Adjustment of the collimator or the detector therein enables the detector to detect radiation emitted from a different range of polar angles. The system further includes a signal processor for processing the signals from the detector wherein signals obtained from different ranges of polar angles are processed together to obtain a reconstruction of the radiation-emitting material as a function of depth, assuming, but not limited to, a spatially-uniform depth distribution of the material within each layer. The detector system includes detectors having different properties (sensitivity, energy resolution) which are combined so that excellent spectral information may be obtained along with good determinations of the radiation field as a function of position.

  12. Digital configurable instrument for emulation of signals from radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abba, A.; Caponio, F.; Geraci, A.

    2014-01-15

    The paper presents a digital instrument characterized by a specially designed architecture that is able to emulate in real time signals from a generic radiation detection system. The instrument is not a pulse generator of recorded shapes but a synthesizer of random pulses compliant to programmable statistics for height and starting time of events. Completely programmable procedures for emulation of noise, disturbances, and reference level variation are implemented.

  13. Advanced radiation detector development: Advanced semiconductor detector development: Development of a room-temperature, gamma ray detector using gallium arsenide to develop an electrode detector. Annual progress report, September 30, 1994--September 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    The advanced detector development project at the University of Michigan has completed the first full year of its current funding. The general goals are the development of radiation detectors and spectrometers that are capable of portable room temperature operation. Over the past 12 months, the authors have worked primarily in the development of semiconductor spectrometers with ``single carrier`` response that offer the promise of room temperature operation and good energy resolution in gamma ray spectroscopy. They have also begun a small scale effort at investigating the properties of a small non-spectroscopic detector system with directional characteristics that will allow identification of the approximate direction in which gamma rays are incident. These activities have made use of the extensive clean room facilities at the University of Michigan for semiconductor device fabrication, and also the radiation measurement capabilities provided in the laboratory in the Phoenix Building on the North Campus.

  14. Intravascular radiation detectors for the detection of vulnerable atheroma.

    PubMed

    Strauss, H William; Mari, Carina; Patt, Bradley E; Ghazarossian, Vartan

    2006-04-18

    An intravascular catheter was developed to identify inflammation in coronary atheroma. Inflammation in atheroma is associated with large numbers of macrophages. These cells have increased metabolism, increased expression of chemotactic receptors, and a high frequency of apoptosis-associated phosphatidylserine expression. Each of these parameters can be identified in vivo using specific radiolabeled agents: metabolism can be identified with 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), receptor expression with 99mTc monocyte chemotactic peptide-1, and apoptosis with 99mTc annexin V. The locally increased concentration of these tracers is readily demonstrable in experimental lesions by ex vivo autoradiography; however, the small lesion size makes it difficult to identify atheroma in the coronaries with conventional imaging equipment. In contrast, with a radiation-sensitive catheter, optimized to sense charged particle rather than gamma or x-radiation, specific lesions could be identified and localized. Charged particle radiation is emitted as a byproduct of nearly all radioactive decay but is typically most abundant in radionuclides that decay by beta emission (either positrons or negatrons). Prototype catheters, using a plastic scintillator mated to an optical fiber, have been tested in the laboratory with the positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical 18FDG. The catheter had sufficient sensitivity to detect lesions concentrating nanocurie concentrations of 18FDG. Ex vivo experiments in apo-e-/- mice confirmed the ability of the catheter to detect 18FDG in aortic lesions. These feasibility studies demonstrate the sensitivity of a beta-sensitive catheter system. Additional mechanical refinements are needed to optimize the system in anticipation of in vivo animal studies. PMID:16631517

  15. Radiation tolerance of CVD diamond detectors for pions and protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Noomen, J.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper gives new results on the radiation tolerance of CVD diamond for irradiation with 300 MeV/ c pions and 24 GeV/ c protons. The measured charge signal spectrum is compared at several irradiation levels with the spectrum calculated by a model. Irradiation by particles causes damage leading to a decrease of the charge signal. However, both the measurements and the outcome from the model show that for tracker applications this drawback is at least partly counterbalanced by a narrowing of the distribution curve of the charge signal. As a result, the efficiency of a CVD diamond tracker is less affected by irradiation than the mean charge signal.

  16. A prototype of radiation imaging detector using silicon strip sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, S.; Hyun, H. J.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, H. D.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Kyeryung; Kim, Y. I.; Park, H.; Son, D. H.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the performance of a strip sensor with a single photon counting data acquisition system based on VA1 readout chips to study the feasibility of a silicon microstrip detector for medical application. The sensor is an AC-coupled single-sided microstrip sensor and the active area of the sensor is 32.0 mm×32.0 mm with a thickness of 380 μm. The sensor has 64 readout strips with a pitch of 500 μm. The sensor was biased at 45 V and the experiment was performed at room temperature. Two silicon strip sensors were mounted perpendicularly one another to get two-dimensional position information with a 5 mm space gap. Two low noise analog ASICs, VA1 chips, were used for signal readout of the strip sensor. The assembly of sensors and readout electronics was housed in an Al light-tight box. A CsI(Tl) scintillation crystal and a 2-in. photomultiplier tube were used to trigger signal events. The data acquisition system was based on a 64 MHz FADC and control softwares for the PC-Linux platform. Imaging tests were performed by using a lead phantom with a 90Sr radioactive source and a 45 MeV proton beam at Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science in Seoul, respectively. Results of the S/ N ratio measurement and phantom images are presented.

  17. A single-photon counting “edge-on” silicon detector for synchrotron radiation mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigon, L.; Arfelli, F.; Astolfo, A.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Menk, R.-H.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2009-09-01

    The Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn (PICASSO) project is developing an "edge-on" silicon microstrip detector for mammography with synchrotron radiation. The sensor is equipped with a fast single-photon counting electronics based on the Mythen-II application-specific integrated circuit. A first prototype has been assembled and tested at the SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics (SYRMEP) beamline at Elettra in Trieste, Italy. The first results are presented in this study including evidence of high-rate single-photon counting with negligible losses up to 1.2×10 6 incident photons per pixel per second; spatial resolution consistent with the pixel aperture (0.3 mm×0.05 mm); high-quality imaging of test-objects, obtained with a dose comparable to the one delivered in modern full-field digital mammographic systems.

  18. Radiation Measurements Performed with Active Detectors Relevant for Human Space Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Narici, Livio; Berger, Thomas; Matthiä, Daniel; Reitz, Günther

    2015-01-01

    A reliable radiation risk assessment in space is a mandatory step for the development of countermeasures and long-duration mission planning in human spaceflight. Research in radiobiology provides information about possible risks linked to radiation. In addition, for a meaningful risk evaluation, the radiation exposure has to be assessed to a sufficient level of accuracy. Consequently, both the radiation models predicting the risks and the measurements used to validate such models must have an equivalent precision. Corresponding measurements can be performed both with passive and active devices. The former is easier to handle, cheaper, lighter, and smaller but they measure neither the time dependence of the radiation environment nor some of the details useful for a comprehensive radiation risk assessment. Active detectors provide most of these details and have been extensively used in the International Space Station. To easily access such an amount of data, a single point access is becoming essential. This review presents an ongoing work on the development of a tool that allows obtaining information about all relevant measurements performed with active detectors providing reliable inputs for radiation model validation. PMID:26697408

  19. Development of an alpha/beta/gamma detector for radiation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2011-11-15

    For radiation monitoring at the site of nuclear power plant accidents such as Fukushima Daiichi, radiation detectors not only for gamma photons but also for alpha and beta particles are needed because some nuclear fission products emit beta particles and gamma photons and some nuclear fuels contain plutonium that emits alpha particles. We developed a radiation detector that can simultaneously monitor alpha and beta particles and gamma photons for radiation monitoring. The detector consists of three-layered scintillators optically coupled to each other and coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The first layer, which is made of a thin plastic scintillator (decay time: 2.4 ns), detects alpha particles. The second layer, which is made of a thin Gd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (GSO) scintillator with 1.5 mol.% Ce (decay time: 35 ns), detects beta particles. The third layer made of a thin GSO scintillator with 0.4 mol.% Ce (decay time: 70 ns) detects gamma photons. By using pulse shape discrimination, the count rates of these layers can be separated. With individual irradiation of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons, the count rate of the first layer represented the alpha particles, the second layer represented the beta particles, and the third layer represented the gamma photons. Even with simultaneous irradiation of the alpha and beta particles and the gamma photons, these three types of radiation can be individually monitored using correction for the gamma detection efficiency of the second and third layers. Our developed alpha, beta, and gamma detector is simple and will be useful for radiation monitoring, especially at nuclear power plant accident sites or other applications where the simultaneous measurements of alpha and beta particles and gamma photons are required.

  20. Effects of Te inclusions on the performance of CdZnTe radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov,A.E.; Abdul-Jabber, N. M.; Babalola, O. S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A. M.; Jackson, E. M.; Jackson, H. C.; James, J. A.; Kohman, K. T.; Luryi, A. L.; James, R. B.

    2008-10-19

    Te inclusions existing at high concentrations in CdZnTe (CZT) material can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. These microscopic defects trap the free electrons generated by incident radiation, so entailing significant fluctuations in the total collected charge and thereby strongly affecting the energy resolution of thick (long-drift) detectors. Such effects were demonstrated in thin planar detectors, and, in many cases, they proved to be the dominant cause of the low performance of thick detectors, wherein the fluctuations in the charge losses accumulate along the charge's drift path. We continued studying this effect using different tools and techniques. We employed a dedicated beamline recently established at BNL's National Synchrotron Light Source for characterizing semiconductor radiation detectors, along with an IR transmission microscope system, the combination of which allowed us to correlate the concentration of defects with the devices performances. We present here our new results from testing over 50 CZT samples grown by different techniques. Our goals are to establish tolerable limits on the size and concentrations of these detrimental Te inclusions in CZT material, and to provide feedback to crystal growers to reduce their numbers in the material.

  1. Effects of radiations on the characteristics of alpha and fission tracks in CR-39 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, R. C.; Padalkar, S. K.; Kalsi, P. C.; Iyer, R. H.

    1994-06-01

    The effects of neutron, gamma and alpha radiations on the alpha and fission fragment tracks registration and revelation properties of CR-39 detectors (CR-39 and CR-39(DOP) were studied. It was found that the ratio of the bulk etch rate of irradiated to unirradiated (VG(irr.)/VG(unirr.) detectors is linearly dependent on dose. An exponential decrease in fission track densities with increase in neutron fluence was observed. The ratio of VG(irr.)/VG(unirr.) was found to be high in CR-39 than that in CR-39(DOP) exposed to the same reactor neutron fluence. The decrease in fission track densities with increase in neutron fluence was observed to be faster in CR-39 than in CR-39(DOP). This indicates that doping with dioctyl phthalate improves the radiation resistance of CR-39 detectors. It was observed that in detectors exposed to an alpha flux of the order of 9.36 ? 106 / cm2, the fission track density was reduced by 11% and thereafter it remained constant. The results also indicate that thermal neutron fluence up to 7.01 ?1011 neutrons/cm2 does not affect the alpha and fission track densities. I.R. spectra were also studied to find out the nature of chemical changes produced by these radiations on CR-39.

  2. Prototype Radiation Detector Positioning System For The Automated Nondestructive Assay Of Uf6 Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Orton, Christopher R.; Mace, Emily K.

    2011-08-07

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors currently perform periodic inspections at uranium enrichment plants to verify UF6 cylinder enrichment declarations. Measurements are typically performed with handheld high-resolution sensors on a sampling of cylinders taken to be representative of the facility’s entire cylinder inventory. These measurements are time-consuming, expensive, and assay only a small fraction of the total cylinder volume. An automated nondestructive assay system capable of providing enrichment measurements over the full volume of the cylinder could improve upon current verification practices in terms of efficiency and assay accuracy. This paper describes an approach denoted the Integrated Cylinder Verification Station (ICVS) that supports 100% cylinder verification, provides volume-averaged cylinder enrichment assay, and reduces inspector manpower needs. To allow field measurements to be collected to validate data collection algorithms, a prototype radiation detector positioning system was constructed. The system was designed to accurately position an array of radiation detectors along the length of a cylinder to measure UF6 enrichment. A number of alternative radiation shields for the detectors were included with the system. A collimated gamma-ray spectrometer module that allows translation of the detectors in the surrounding shielding to adjust the field of view, and a collimating plug in the end to further reduce the low-energy field of view, were also developed. Proof-of-principle measurements of neutron and high-energy gamma-ray signatures, using moderated neutron detectors and large-volume spectrometers in a fixed-geometry, portal-like configuration, supported an early assessment of the viability of the concept. The system has been used successfully on two testing campaigns at an AREVA fuel fabrication plant to scan over 30 product cylinders. This paper will describe the overall design of the detector positioning system and provide an overview of the Integrated Cylinder Verification Station (ICVS) approach.

  3. The simulation of the LANFOS-H food radiation contamination detector using Geant4 package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Lech Wiktor; Casolino, Marco; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Higashide, Kazuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Recent incident in the Fukushima power plant caused a growing concern about the radiation contamination and resulted in lowering the Japanese limits for the permitted amount of 137Cs in food to 100 Bq/kg. To increase safety and ease the concern we are developing LANFOS (Large Food Non-destructive Area Sampler)-a compact, easy to use detector for assessment of radiation in food. Described in this paper LANFOS-H has a 4 π coverage to assess the amount of 137Cs present, separating it from the possible 40K food contamination. Therefore, food samples do not have to be pre-processed prior to a test and can be consumed after measurements. It is designed for use by non-professionals in homes and small institutions such as schools, showing safety of the samples, but can be also utilized by specialists providing radiation spectrum. Proper assessment of radiation in food in the apparatus requires estimation of the γ conversion factor of the detectors-how many γ photons will produce a signal. In this paper we show results of the Monte Carlo estimation of this factor for various approximated shapes of fish, vegetables and amounts of rice, performed with Geant4 package. We find that the conversion factor combined from all the detectors is similar for all food types and is around 37%, varying maximally by 5% with sample length, much less than for individual detectors. The different inclinations and positions of samples in the detector introduce uncertainty of 1.4%. This small uncertainty validates the concept of a 4 π non-destructive apparatus.

  4. Modeling of radiation damage recovery in particle detectors based on GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Ceponis, T.; Pavlov, J.

    2015-12-01

    The pulsed characteristics of the capacitor-type and PIN diode type detectors based on GaN have been simulated using the dynamic and drift-diffusion models. The drift-diffusion current simulations have been implemented by employing the commercial software package Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus. The bipolar drift regime has been analyzed. The possible internal gain in charge collection through carrier multiplication processes determined by impact ionization has been considered in order to compensate carrier lifetime reduction due to radiation defects introduced into GaN material of detector.

  5. Earth radiation budget measurement from a spinning satellite: Conceptual design of detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Suomi, V. E.

    1975-01-01

    The conceptual design, sensor characteristics, sensor performance and accuracy, and spacecraft and orbital requirements for a spinning wide-field-of-view earth energy budget detector were investigated. The scientific requirements for measurement of the earth's radiative energy budget are presented. Other topics discussed include the observing system concept, solar constant radiometer design, plane flux wide FOV sensor design, fast active cavity theory, fast active cavity design and error analysis, thermopile detectors as an alternative, pre-flight and in-flight calibration plane, system error summary, and interface requirements.

  6. Evaluation of radiation interference in the Voyager Sun Sensor's cadmium sulfide detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, T. C.; Divita, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The simulation of radiation interference effects and the results of a radiation interference test on two Voyager Sun Sensor prototype detector assemblies are reported. The derivation of test levels and requirements are discussed and show that cobalt 60 gamma radiation is an effective and practical simulator of the ionization dose rate effects induced by high-energy electron flux incident on the spacecraft at a rate of 3.7 x 10 to the 8th e/sq cm-sec (10 rad(Si)/s) during closest approach to Jupiter. The test results provide information that is used to confirm an analytic correlation, and to predict satisfactory performance of a spacecraft sun sensing device having stringent angular resolution requirements. The measured detector response shows that at dose rates incident on the detector elements of 2 rad(Si)/sec, which is four times that expected during Jupiter encounter, the radiation-induced angle error is almost an order of magnitude less than that allowed by the acceptance criteria.

  7. Advanced data readout technique for Multianode Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tube applicable in radiation imaging detectors

    SciTech Connect

    V. Popov

    2011-01-01

    Most of the best performing PSPMT tubes from Hamamatsu and Burle are designed with a pad-matrix anode layout. However, for obtaining a high resolution, a small-sized anode photomultiplier tubes are preferable; these tubes may have 64, 256 or 1024 anodes per tube. If the tubes are used in array to get a larger area detector, the number of analog channels may range from hundreds to thousands. Multichannel analog readout requires special electronics ICs, ASICs etc., which are attached to multichannel DAQ system. As a result, the data file and data processing time will be increased. Therefore, this readout could not be performed in a small project. Usually, most of radiation imaging applications allow the use of analog data processing in front-end electronics, significantly reducing the number of the detector's output lines to data acquisition without reducing the image quality. The idea of pad-matrix decoupling circuit with gain correction was invented and intensively tested in JLab. Several versions of PSPMT readout electronics were produced and studied. All developments were done and optimized specifically for radiation imaging projects. They covered high resolution SPECT, high speed PET, fast neutron imaging, and single tube and multi tube array systems. This paper presents and discusses the summary of the observed results in readout electronics evaluation with different PSPMTs and radiation imaging systems, as well as the advantages and limitations of the developed approach to radiation imaging detectors readout.

  8. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, R.B.; Van Scyoc, J.M. III; Schlesinger, T.E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material is disclosed. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI{sub 2} and preferably HgI{sub 2}, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected. 4 figs.

  9. Polymerconcrete for Radiation Background Shielding of Detectors at Hadron Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapov, A. A.; Zaitsev, L. N.; Zaitsev, S. L.

    1997-05-01

    New shielding material - polymerconcrete with density 1.2dots 3.6 g\\cdotcm-3 and H, Li or B contents (4dots6.6)\\cdot10^22 H\\cdotcm-3, 1.3\\cdot10^22 Li\\cdotcm-3 or 3.3\\cdot10^21 B\\cdotcm-3, respectively, is developed. Granular polythene, lead powder, lithium salts or boron carbide are cemented by the special cement, dissolved in the liquid polymer. Material samples have lower limits of the resistance to compression 42 MPa, the resistance to rupture 6 MPa and the dynamic coefficient of elasticity 10^3 MPa. Radiation resistance, tested at the reactor IBR-2 and accelerators at JINR, IHEP and ITEP is 10^3 Mrad at 10 krad\\cdots-1 and 1 Mrad at 10 rad\\cdots-1. It is enough for a future colliders. Our experimental results demonstrate, that the induced radioactivity levels for the polymerconcrete are lower than ones for a ordinary concretes. It is shown that density 3.2dots 3.6 g\\cdotcm-3 of a steel-concrete composition is optimum to get the minimum shielding thickness and cost. Polymerconcrete can be used as bricks or for the filling in any forms. It is suggesting to use this material instead CH2 and Pb for shielding of the setups D0 and CDF at the Tevatron and CMS, ATLAS, ALICE at the LHC.

  10. Electrodrift purification of materials for room temperature radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    James, Ralph B.; Van Scyoc, III, John M.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.

    1997-06-24

    A method of purifying nonmetallic, crystalline semiconducting materials useful for room temperature radiation detecting devices by applying an electric field across the material. The present invention discloses a simple technology for producing purified ionic semiconducting materials, in particular PbI.sub.2 and preferably HgI.sub.2, which produces high yields of purified product, requires minimal handling of the material thereby reducing the possibility of introducing or reintroducing impurities into the material, is easy to control, is highly selective for impurities, retains the stoichiometry of the material and employs neither high temperatures nor hazardous materials such as solvents or liquid metals. An electric field is applied to a bulk sample of the material causing impurities present in the sample to drift in a preferred direction. After all of the impurities have been transported to the ends of the sample the current flowing through the sample, a measure of the rate of transport of mobile impurities, falls to a low, steady state value, at which time the end sections of the sample where the impurities have concentrated are removed leaving a bulk sample of higher purity material. Because the method disclosed here only acts on the electrically active impurities, the stoichiometry of the host material remains substantially unaffected.

  11. High-speed, multi-channel detector readout electronics for fast radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, Wolfgang

    2012-06-22

    In this project, we are developing a high speed digital spectrometer that a) captures detector waveforms at rates up to 500 MSPS b) has upgraded event data acquisition with additional data buffers for zero dead time operation c) moves energy calculations to the FPGA to increase spectrometer throughput in fast scintillator applications d) uses a streamlined architecture and high speed data interface for even faster readout to the host PC These features are in addition to the standard functions in our existing spectrometers such as digitization, programmable trigger and energy filters, pileup inspection, data acquisition with energy and time stamps, MCA histograms, and run statistics. In Phase I, we upgraded one of our existing spectrometer designs to demonstrate the key principle of fast waveform capture using a 500 MSPS, 12 bit ADC and a Xilinx Virtex-4 FPGA. This upgraded spectrometer, named P500, performed well in initial tests of energy resolution, pulse shape analysis, and timing measurements, thus achieving item (a) above. In Phase II, we are revising the P500 to build a commercial prototype with the improvements listed in items (b)-(d). As described in the previous report, two devices were built to pursue this goal, named the Pixie-500 and the Pixie-500 Express. The Pixie-500 has only minor improvements from the Phase I prototype and is intended as an early commercial product (its production and part of its development were funded outside the SBIR). It also allows testing of the ADC performance in real applications.The Pixie-500 Express (or Pixie-500e) includes all of the improvements (b)-(d). At the end of Phase II of the project, we have tested and debugged the hardware, firmware and software of the Pixie-500 Express prototype boards delivered 12/3/2010. This proved substantially more complex than anticipated. At the time of writing, all hardware bugs have been fixed, the PCI Express interface is working, the SDRAM has been successfully tested and the SHARC DSP has been booted with preliminary code. All new ICs and circuitry on the prototype are working properly, however some of the planned firmware and software functions have not yet been completely implemented and debugged. Overall, due to the unanticipated complexity of the PCI Express interface, some aspects of the project could not be completed with the time and funds available in Phase II. These aspects will be completed in self-funded Phase III.

  12. Coherent sychrotron radiation detector for a non-invasive subpicosecond bunch length monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Krafft, G.A.; Wang, D.; Price, E.; Feldl, E.; Porterfield, D.; Wood, P.; Crowe, T.

    1995-12-31

    This CSR detector was developed to monitor nondestructively the length of a subpicosecond bunch with high sensitivity. The monitor uses a state of the art GaAs Schottky whisker diode which is operated at room temperature at a wavelength of a few hundred microns. The detector is capable of detecting radiation power as low as 10 nW, depending on wavelength. This paper describes design specifications, parameter ranges, and monitor features and also reports its performance and comparison between measurement and calculation. The measurement results are cross-compared with an independent bunch length measurement using phase modulation. It was found that the output power varies with bunch length and that detectors at shorter wavelengths are preferred.

  13. A high spatial resolution computerized electro-optic radiation detector array.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, K J; Murty, K N

    1990-01-01

    A novel computerized electro-optic detector was designed, constructed, and characterized. The results of the experiments performed were as follows: (1) To obtain a maximum SNR when operating at any radiation intensity, the designed detector must be operated at the lowest temperature-- -5 degrees C in this configuration. This temperature permits a maximum integration time of 9.7 s without signal distortion. (2) The detector was found to be linear in the range of operation studied, 2.8 X 10(-3) to 2.0 X 10(-2) C kg-1 h-1 (11-78 R h-1), with a sensitivity of 4.2 X 10(4) mV per C kg-1 h-1 (10.8 mV per R h-1). (3) A simulated stepped phantom was imaged, illustrating the possibility of positional measurements. (4) Very little blooming was noticed. PMID:2294081

  14. Current-driven detection of terahertz radiation using a dual-grating-gate plasmonic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Boubanga-Tombet, S. Tanimoto, Y.; Satou, A.; Suemitsu, T.; Otsuji, T.; Wang, Y.; Minamide, H.; Ito, H.; Fateev, D. V.; Popov, V. V.

    2014-06-30

    We report on the detection of terahertz radiation by an on-chip planar asymmetric plasmonic structure in the frequency region above one terahertz. The detector is based on a field-effect transistor that has a dual grating gate structure with an asymmetric unit cell, which provides a geometrical asymmetry within the structure. Biasing the detector with a dc source-to-drain current in the linear region of the current-voltage characteristic introduces an additional asymmetry (electrical asymmetry) that enhances the detector responsivity by more than one order of magnitude (by a factor of 20) as compared with the unbiased case due to the cooperative effect of the geometrical and electrical asymmetries. In addition to the responsivity enhancement, we report a relatively low noise equivalent power and a peculiar non-monotonic dependence of the responsivity on the frequency, which results from the multi-plasmonic-cavity structure of the device.

  15. Irradiation of thin diamond detectors and radiation hardness tests using MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.

    2013-07-01

    Although numerous studies have confirmed the superb radiation hardness of diamond for high-energy (above 100 MeV) protons, almost no data have been reported in the MeV energy range. Because the interaction mechanism that dominates the displacement damage cross section is different for these two energy regimes, it could be misleading to simply extrapolate the results of previous papers down to low energies. Therefore, the radiation tolerance of a 50 μm thick single-crystal CVD diamond detector was tested by irradiating it with 4.5 MeV protons. The scanning microbeam allowed for the selective introduction of damage to a small area of the detector. The ion beam-induced current (IBIC) was used to monitor the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation due to the electrically active defects produced. The irradiation was stopped when a signal degradation of nearly 3% was observed. For comparison, the procedure was repeated on a 50 μm thick silicon surface barrier detector (SSBD), for which a significantly higher proton fluence was required to reach the same signal decrease as in the diamond detector. This result can be explained by the different recombination rates of the vacancies and interstitials created in the two materials. The transport properties of electrons and holes in the damaged and virgin areas of the diamond detector were also investigated by 500 keV protons and 6 MeV carbon ions as short-range IBIC probes. The mobility-lifetime products calculated for both charge carriers after fitting the single-carrier Hecht equation indicated that there was more pronounced electron trapping by the radiation-induced defects. The frequently reported effect of polarization in diamond was successfully avoided for 500 keV protons but still remained for 6 MeV carbon ions because an order of magnitude higher ionization rate.

  16. Modeling the response of thermoluminescence detectors exposed to low- and high-LET radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Olko, Pawel; Bilski, Pawel; Budzanowski, Maciej; Waligórski, Michael Patrick Russell; Reitz, Guenther

    2002-12-01

    Lithium fluoride thermoluminescence (TL) detectors, with different Li composition (Li-6 and Li-7) and various activators (LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P), are widely used for dosimetry in space. The primary radiation field in space is composed of fast electrons, protons and heavy charged particles (HCP). By its interaction with the structures of the spacecraft, this field may be modified inside the crew cabin. Therefore, calibration of TL detectors against a dose of gamma-rays is not sufficient for relating the TL readout to absorbed dose or to quantities relevant in radiation protection, without suitable correction. We introduce and calculate the detection efficiency, eta, relative to gamma-ray dose, of lithium fluoride detectors after proton and heavy charged particle (HCP) irradiation. We calculate eta for MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and for MTS-N (LiF:Mg,Ti) using microdosimetric models. The microdosimetric distributions used in these models (for HCP of charges between Z=1 to Z=8 and in the energy range between 0.3 MeV/amu and 20 MeV/amu) are calculated using an analytical model, based on the results of Monte Carlo simulated charged particle tracks using the MOCA-14 code. The ratio etaMCP-N/etaMTS-N for protons of stopping power (in water) below 10 keV/microm lies in the range between 0.65 and 1.0 and for HCP with Z>1--between 0.3 and 0.6. The stopping power of the particle is found not to be a unique parameter to scale the response of TL detectors. The combination of response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors can be more suitable for a dose correction in space radiation fields. PMID:12793731

  17. Comparison of Direct Normal Irradiance Derived from Silicon and Thermopile Global Hemispherical Radiation Detectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrating solar applications utilize direct normal irradiance (DNI) radiation, a measurement rarely available. The solar concentrator industry has begun to deploy numerous measurement stations to prospect for suitable system deployment sites. Rotating shadowband radiometers (RSR) using silicon photodiodes as detectors are typically deployed. This paper compares direct beam estimates from RSR to a total hemispherical measuring radiometer (SPN1) multiple fast thermopiles. These detectors simultaneously measure total and diffuse radiation from which DNI can be computed. Both the SPN1 and RSR-derived DNI are compared to DNI measured with thermopile pyrheliometers. Our comparison shows that the SPN1 radiometer DNI estimated uncertainty is somewhat greater than, and on the same order as, the RSR DNI estimates for DNI magnitudes useful to concentrator technologies.

  18. A high rate, low radiation length Micro-Vertex-Detector for the PANDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmanns, Tobias

    2011-09-01

    The Micro-Vertex-Detector (MVD) of the PANDA experiment is the innermost tracking detector. Its most challenging task is the identification of D-meson pairs by their delayed decay point which is about 100- 500 ?m from the production point. In addition to the necessary high spatial resolution, it needs a time resolution on the order of 10 ns, a moderate radiation hardness, an untriggered readout of hit data up to 500 MBit/s and a low radiation length. To meet these challenging requirements an intense R&D program is ongoing on all parts of the MVD. This article gives an overview of the ongoing technical developments with a focus on the pixel part of the project.

  19. Simulation of active-edge pixelated CdTe radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, D. D.; Lipp, J. D.; Schneider, A.; Seller, P.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Baker, M. A.; Sellin, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The edge surfaces of single crystal CdTe play an important role in the electronic properties and performance of this material as an X-ray and γ-ray radiation detector. Edge effects have previously been reported to reduce the spectroscopic performance of the edge pixels in pixelated CdTe radiation detectors without guard bands. A novel Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) model based on experimental data has been developed to investigate these effects. The results presented in this paper show how localized low resistivity surfaces modify the internal electric field of CdTe creating potential wells. These result in a reduction of charge collection efficiency of the edge pixels, which compares well with experimental data.

  20. The SNAP 27 gamma radiation spectrum obtained with a Ge/Li/ detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1976-01-01

    The pulse height distribution, obtained experimentally using a Ge(Li) detector, was employed to determine the photon emission rate characteristic of a PuO2 fuel source known as the SNAP 27 heat source. The selfshielding parameters of the photon emitter, the efficiency of the detector and the geometry of the experiment were utilized to determine the unscattered photon emission rate of the source and the unscattered flux spectrum at a certain specified distance from the source. For the scattered part of the flux spectrum a Monte Carlo technique was employed so that the total flux spectrum could be determined at any point in the radiation field. As a result of this work, a technique was developed to obtain the unfolded radiation spectrum of the SNAP 27 heat source.

  1. Infrared response measurements on radiation-damaged Si/Li/ detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A. H.; Liu, Y. M.; Keery, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The improved infrared response (IRR) technique has been used to qualitatively compare radiation effects on Si(Li) detectors with energy levels reported for silicon in the literature. Measurements have been made on five commercial silicon detectors and one fabricated in-house, both before and after irradiation with fast neutrons, 1.9-MeV protons, and 1.6-MeV electrons. Effects dependent upon the extent of radiation damage have been observed. It seems likely that the photo-EMF, or photo-voltage, effect is the basic mechanism for the observation of IRR in p-i-n diodes with a wide i-region. Experimental characteristics of the IRR measurement are in agreement with those of the photovoltage effect.

  2. Response function of planar Cd(Zn)Te detectors to beta radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharchenko, Alexandr A.; Rybka, Alexandr V.; Davydov, Leonid N.; Kutny, Vladimir E.; Khazhmuradov, Manap A.; Fochuk, Petro M.; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; James, Ralph B.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the response function of a planar Cd(Zn)Te detector designed for measurement of electron energy spectra and experimentally measured the response of Cd(Zn)Te detector to radiation of 90Sr/90Y reference radiation source. The obtained experimental spectra were compared with the spectra simulated by the Monte-Carlo method with Geant4 package. We managed to agree the simulated response with the experimental one using only two fitting parameters: products of mobility and average lifetime for electrons and holes. Thereby determined transport parameters of charge carriers were independently verified through the measurement of the positions of low energy 133Ba photopeaks of a reference gamma-ray source.

  3. Parasitic Effects Affecting Responsivity of Sub-THz Radiation Detector Built of a MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopyt, P.; Salski, B.; Marczewski, J.; Zagrajek, P.; Lusakowski, J.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, an analysis of parasitic elements that are found in all typical metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) has been performed from a viewpoint of a designer of sub-THz radiation detectors. A simplified model of the extrinsic MOSFET device has been proposed. Typical values of its parameters have been assumed. The authors have also built a model of the MOSFET's channel (intrinsic device) employing the standard transmission line approach and defining a Z-matrix of the circuit in order to facilitate its integration with the parasitic elements. The full effective circuit model of the MOSFET has been employed to analyze the behavior of the detector when subjected to sub-THz radiation delivered through the Gate and Source pads. Finally, predictions of the responsivity of an example detector built of a typical MOSFET integrated with a patch antenna fabricated on a 40-?m-thick silicon membrane have been compared with measurements of several structures employing MOSFETs of various channel widths. Good agreement between the predictions and the measurements has been demonstrated, which indicates that despite its simplicity, the presented model can significantly help to better understand operation of MOSFET-based detectors and also to use the existing silicon-based manufacturing processes.

  4. Deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors for the diagnosis of pulsed radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Shiyang; Song, Peng; Pei, Wenbing; Guo, Liang

    2013-09-15

    Based on the conjugate gradient method, a simple algorithm is presented for deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors (XRDs) to reconstruct the resolved time-dependent x-ray fluxes. With this algorithm, we have studied the impact of temporal response of XRD on the radiation diagnosis of hohlraum heated by a short intense laser pulse. It is found that the limiting temporal response of XRD not only postpones the rising edge and peak position of x-ray pulses but also smoothes the possible fluctuations of radiation fluxes. Without a proper consideration of the temporal response of XRD, the measured radiation flux can be largely misinterpreted for radiation pulses of a hohlraum heated by short or shaped laser pulses.

  5. Micro-Fabricated Solid-State Radiation Detectors for Active Personal Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Chen, Liang-Yu

    2007-01-01

    Active radiation dosimetry is important to human health and equipment functionality for space applications outside the protective environment of a space station or vehicle. This is especially true for long duration missions to the moon, where the lack of a magnetic field offers no protection from space radiation to those on extravehicular activities. In order to improve functionality, durability and reliability of radiation dosimeters for future NASA lunar missions, single crystal silicon carbide devices and scintillating fiber detectors are currently being investigated for applications in advanced extravehicular systems. For many years, NASA Glenn Research Center has led significant efforts in silicon carbide semiconductor technology research and instrumentation research for sensor applications under extreme conditions. This report summarizes the technical progress and accomplishments toward characterization of radiation-sensing components for the recommendation of their fitness for advanced dosimetry development.

  6. Radiation detector using a bulk high T[sub c] superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Artuso, J.F.; Franks, L.A.; Hull, K.L.; Symko, O.G.

    1993-12-07

    A radiation detector is provided, wherein a bulk high T[sub c] superconducting sample is placed in a magnetic field and maintained at a superconducting temperature. Photons of incident radiation will cause localized heating in superconducting loops of the sample destroying trapped flux and redistributing the fluxons, and reducing the critical current of the loops. Subsequent cooling of the sample in the magnetic field will cause trapped flux redistributed Abrikosov fluxons and trapped Josephson fluxons. The destruction and trapping of the fluxons causes changes in the magnetization of the sample inducing currents in opposite directions in a pickup coil which is coupled by an input coil to an rf SQUID. 4 figures.

  7. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Lee, J. -S.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L.; et al

    2013-01-12

    We subjected device-grade TlBr to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl2, Br:MeOH and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response.

  8. X-ray photoemission analysis of chemically modified TlBr surfaces for improved radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A. J.; Voss, L. F.; Beck, P. R.; Graff, R. T.; Conway, A. M.; Nikolic, R. J.; Payne, S. A.; Lee, J. -S.; Kim, H.; Cirignano, L.; Shah, K.

    2013-01-12

    We subjected device-grade TlBr to various chemical treatments used in room temperature radiation detector fabrication to determine the resulting surface composition and electronic structure. As-polished TlBr was treated separately with HCl, SOCl2, Br:MeOH and HF solutions. High-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and Tl 4f, Br 3d, Cl 2p and S 2p core lines were used to evaluate surface chemistry and shallow heterojunction formation. Surface chemistry and valence band electronic structure were correlated with the goal of optimizing the long-term stability and radiation response.

  9. Charged Particle Measurements on Mars and during Cruise with the Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Appel, J. K.; Brinza, D.; Burmeister, S.; Boehm, E.; Boettcher, S.; Guo, J.; Kohler, J.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), has been successfully measuring the energetic particle radiation on the Martian surface since the landing of the Curiosity rover in Gale crater. Furthermore, RAD was already operating for large parts of the ~250-day cruise to Mars, measuring the radiation environment inside the spacecraft. Detailed knowledge of particle-type-dependent energy spectra is important for several reasons. E.g., for one measured differential particle fluxes can be used to validate and evaluate transport models currently used to estimate the radiation exposure on the Martian surface. Another important point of knowing the energy spectra of individual ion species is their differing biological effectiveness in terms of assessing radiation exposure risks for future manned missions to Mars. Here, we will present differential fluxes for different ion species, both for the cruise and the surface phase. As the energy range of these spectra is limited by the maximum energy with that a particle can stop in one of RAD's detectors, we will show integral fluxes for energies above these upper limits where the total energy of the detected particle is not known.

  10. Control of electric field in CdZnTe radiation detectors by above-bandgap light

    SciTech Connect

    Franc, J.; Dědič, V.; Rejhon, M.; Zázvorka, J.; Praus, P.; Touš, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-04-28

    We have studied the possibility of above bandgap light induced depolarization of CdZnTe planar radiation detector operating under high flux of X-rays by Pockels effect measurements. In this contribution, we show a similar influence of X-rays at 80 kVp and LED with a wavelength of 910 nm irradiating the cathode on polarization of the detector due to an accumulation of a positive space charge of trapped photo-generated holes. We have observed the depolarization of the detector under simultaneous cathode-site illumination with excitation LED at 910 nm and depolarization above bandgap LED at 640 nm caused by trapping of drifting photo-generated electrons. Although the detector current is quite high during this depolarization, we have observed that it decreases relatively fast to its initial value after switching off the depolarizing light. In order to get detailed information about physical processes present during polarization and depolarization and, moreover, about associated deep levels, we have performed the Pockels effect infrared spectral scanning measurements of the detector without illumination and under illumination in polarized and optically depolarized states.

  11. High-energy proton radiation damage of high-purity germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.; Varnell, L. S.; Metzger, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative studies of radiation damage in high-purity germanium gamma-ray detectors due to high-energy charged particles have been carried out; two 1.0 cm thick planar detectors were irradiated by 6 GeV/c protons. Under proton bombardment, degradation in the energy resolution was found to begin below 7 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm and increased proportionately in both detectors until the experiment was terminated at a total flux of 5.7 x 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm, equivalent to about a six year exposure to cosmic-ray protons in space. At the end of the irradiation, the FWHM resolution measured at 1332 keV stood at 8.5 and 13.6 keV, with both detectors of only marginal utility as a spectrometer due to the severe tailing caused by charge trapping. Annealing these detectors after proton damage was found to be much easier than after neutron damage.

  12. Towards thin-film self-powered radiation detectors employing disparate conductive layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brivio, D.; Sajo, E.; Zygmanski, P.

    2015-06-01

    A new class of self-powered thin film radiation detectors is experimentally explored via their IV-curve characteristics. These detectors are parallel-plane microstructures composed of disparate atomic number (Z) thin-film electrodes separated by air gaps. Large radiation-induced electron currents (RIC) are observed for zero external voltage bias. Compared to ionization chambers (composed of macroscopic non-disparate low-Z electrodes), this anomalous behavior is due to two independent effects: traversal of fast electrons leaking from the high-Z cathodes and the auto-collection of ionization electrons from the air gap due to the presence of contact potential. The zero voltage current reaches up to 80% of the saturation current measured for non-zero bias voltages. The magnitude of saturation currents increases with the total anode and cathode atomic numbers. The stopping potentials (i.e., external voltage bias resulting in zero RIC current) correspond to the differences in the electrodes’ work functions (the contact potential) modified by the contributions from the fast electron current formed by the leaking electrons. These features make the thin film detector attractive for applications in x-ray medical or industrial imaging, dosimetry and radiation protection.

  13. Opto-electrical characterization and X-ray mapping of large-volume cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Yao, H.W.; Kim, K.; and James, R.B.

    2009-04-13

    Large-volume cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) radiation detectors would greatly improve radiation detection capabilities and, therefore, attract extensive scientific and commercial interests. CZT crystals with volumes as large as hundreds of centimeters can be achieved today due to improvements in the crystal growth technology. However, the poor performance of large-volume CZT detectors is still a challenging problem affecting the commercialization of CZT detectors and imaging arrays. We have employed Pockels effect measurements and synchrotron X-ray mapping techniques to investigate the performance-limiting factors for large-volume CZT detectors. Experimental results with the above characterization methods reveal the non-uniform distribution of internal electric field of large-volume CZT detectors, which help us to better understand the responsible mechanism for the insufficient carrier collection in large-volume CZT detectors.

  14. Computer and laboratory modeling of radiation-acoustic detector for charged particles pulse beams and plasma parameters measuring

    SciTech Connect

    Kresnin, Yu.A.; Stervoedov, N.G.

    1996-12-31

    Model investigations and laboratory tests of detectors for charged particles pulse beams and plasma parameters measuring are presented. Detector represents combination of classic Faraday cup with electrical way of signal getting and radiation-acoustic meter of pulse beams parameters. Radiation-acoustic meter consists of two parts--thin detector, transparent for beams of high energy particles, and thick detector with full absorption. Ultrasonic oscillations, which arise during interaction of charged particles pulse beams or plasma with detector material, are transformed by piezoelectric detector into electric signals, whose amplitude-frequency and time characteristics functionally depended on beams parameters. All the signals come into microcontroller device Intel MSC51. This device produces calculations of following beam parameters: average energy, pulse charge, pulse currents, density, beam size and pulse time. Calculated characteristics of meter well coincide with experimental measurements, carried out at accelerators in particles energy range from 1 to 100 Mev.

  15. Collisional, radiative and total electron interaction in compound semiconductor detectors and solid state nuclear track detectors: effective atomic number and electron density.

    PubMed

    Kurudirek, Murat; Kurudirek, Sinem V

    2015-05-01

    Effective atomic numbers, Zeff and electron densities, Ne are widely used for characterization of interaction processes in radiation related studies. A variety of detectors are employed to detect different types of radiations i.e. photons and charged particles. In the present work, some compound semiconductor detectors (CSCD) and solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were investigated with respect to the partial as well as total electron interactions. Zeff and Ne of the given detectors were calculated for collisional, radiative and total electron interactions in the kinetic energy region 10keV-1GeV. Maximum values of Zeff and Ne were observed at higher kinetic energies of electrons. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne up to ≈20-25% were noticed for the detectors, GaN, ZnO, Amber and CR-39 for total electron interaction. Moreover, the obtained Zeff and Ne for electrons were compared to those obtained for photons in the entire energy region. Significant variations in Zeff were also noted not only for photons (up to ≈40% for GaN) but also between photons and electrons (up to ≈60% for CR-39) especially at lower energies. Except for the lower energies, Zeff and Ne keep more or less constant values for the given materials. The energy regions where Zeff and Ne keep constant clearly show the availability of using these parameters for characterization of the materials with respect to the radiation interaction processes. PMID:25702888

  16. Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

    2011-09-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

  17. Radiation measurement platform for balloon flights based on the TriTel silicon detector telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabori, Balazs; Hirn, Attila; Pazmandi, Tamas; Apathy, Istvan; Szanto, Peter; Deme, Sandor

    Several measurements have been performed on the cosmic radiation field from the surface of the Earth up to the maximum altitudes of research airplanes. However the cosmic radiation field is not well known between 15 km and 30 km. Our experiment idea based on to study the radiation environment in the stratosphere. The main technical goals of our experiment were to test at first time the TriTel 3D silicon detector telescope system for future ISS missons and to develop a balloon technology platform for advanced cosmic radiation and dosimetric measurements. The main scientific goals were to give an assessment of the cosmic radiation field at the altitude of the BEXUS balloons, to use the TriTel system to determine dosimetric and radiation quantities during the ballon flight and to intercompare the TriTel and Pille results to provide a correction factor definition method for the Pille ISS measurements. To fulfil the scientific and technological objectives several different dosimeter systems were included in the experiment: an advanced version of the TriTel silicon detector telescope, Geiger-Müller counters, Pille passive thermoluminescent dosimeters and Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. The experiment was built by students from Hungarian universities and flew on board the BEXUS stratospheric balloon in Northern Sweden (from ESRANGE Space Center). The float altitude was approximately 28.6 km and the total flight time was about 4 hours. The active instruments measured in real time and the ground team received the collected data continuously during the mission. The main technical goals were received since the operation of the TriTel experienced no failures and the experiment worked as it expected. This paper presents the scientific goals and results. From the TriTel measurements the deposited energy spectra, the Linear Energy Transfer spectra, the average quality factor of the cosmic radiation as well as the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were determined for the three axis. TriTel data evaluation and error estimations were studied in details. The evaluated deposited energy spectra measured with the improved TriTel instrument were compared with the count rates measured with the GM counters to calibrate them for dose rate in the cosmic radiation field at the altitude of the stratospheric balloons. From the SSNTD results the contribution of thermal neutrons was determined. In the frame of the TriTel and Pille intercomparison a correction factor calculation method was determined for future ISS data evaluation. The results will be used in the future scientific data evaluation in case of the ISS measurements. As a future outlook a short overview will be given about planned rocket radiation experiments.

  18. Radiation tolerance of ultra-thin PIN silicon detectors evaluated with a MeV proton microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel, Naseem S.; Pallon, Jan; Elfman, Mikael; Kristiansson, Per; Nilsson, E. J. Charlotta; Ros, Linus

    2015-08-01

    A focused MeV proton beam at the Lund Ion Beam Analysis Facility has been used to induce radiation damage in transmission semiconductor detectors. The damage alters the response of detectors and degrades their charge transport properties. In this work, the radiation tolerance of ultra-thin silicon PIN detectors was studied as a function of proton fluences and detector thickness using a scanning proton microprobe. The investigated detectors had thicknesses ranging between 6.5 and 22 μm, and different selected regions of each detector were irradiated with fluence up to 2 × 1015 protons/cm2. The results show that the charge collection efficiency (CCE) decreases as a function of the proton fluence. Compared with non-irradiated regions, the CCE was above 94% at the lowest fluence of 2 × 1012 protons/cm2 for all the detectors studied. Degradation of the devices caused spectral peak shifting toward lower energies. The highest possible fluence of 2.55 MeV protons that could be used, causing only minor radiation damage, was 2 × 1013 cm-2 for the thinnest detectors (6.5 and 10 μm) and 2 × 1012 cm-2 for the thickest detectors (15 and 22 μm).

  19. Mammography of a phantom and breast tissue with synchrotron radiation and a linear-array silicon detector.

    PubMed

    Arfelli, F; Bonvicini, V; Bravin, A; Cantatore, G; Castelli, E; Dalla Palma, L; Di Michiel, M; Longo, R; Olivo, A; Pani, S; Pontoni, D; Poropat, P; Prest, M; Rashevsky, A; Tromba, G; Vacchi, A

    1998-09-01

    A linear-array, silicon pixel detector, capable of counting single photons, was applied to mammography by using a synchrotron radiation beam. Images were obtained of both a mammographic phantom and a breast-tissue sample. The phantom image was acquired with a mean glandular dose of 0.32 mGy. This detector combined with a synchrotron radiation beam allows acquisition of high-contrast, low-dose images of soft tissues. PMID:9722850

  20. Development of a fast radiation detector based on barium fluoride scintillation crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hetong; School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University, XJTU, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi ; Zhang, Zichuan; Weng, Xiufeng; Liu, Junhong; Zhang, Kan; Li, Gang; Guan, Xingyin

    2013-07-15

    Barium fluoride (BaF{sub 2}) is an inorganic scintillation material used for the detection of X/gamma radiation due to its relatively high density, equivalent atomic number, radiation hardness, and high luminescence. BaF{sub 2} has a potential capacity to be used in gamma ray timing experiments due to the prompt decay emission components. It is known that the light output from BaF{sub 2} has three decay components: two prompt of those at approximately 195 nm and 220 nm with a decay constant around 600-800 ps and a more intense, slow component at approximately 310 nm with a decay constant around 630 ns which hinders fast timing experiments. We report here the development of a fast radiation detector based on a BaF{sub 2} scintillation crystal employing a special optical filter device, a multiple reflection multi-path ultraviolet region short-wavelength pass light guides (MRMP-short pass filter) by using selective reflection technique, for which the intensity of the slow component is reduced to less than 1%. The methods used for this study provide a novel way to design radiation detector by utilizing scintillation crystal with several emission bands.

  1. Nuclear reactor pulse tracing using a CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kyle A.; Geuther, Jeffrey A.; Neihart, James L.; Riedel, Todd A.; Rojeski, Ronald A.; Ugorowski, Philip B.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2012-07-01

    CdZnTe has previously been shown to operate as an electro-optic radiation detector by utilizing the Pockels effect to measure steady-state nuclear reactor power levels. In the present work, the detector response to reactor power excursion experiments was investigated. Peak power levels during an excursion were predicted to be between 965 MW and 1009 MW using the Fuchs-Nordheim and Fuchs-Hansen models and confirmed with experimental data from the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor. The experimental arrangement of the Pockels cell detector includes collimated laser light passing through a transparent birefringent crystal, located between crossed polarizers, and focused upon a photodiode. The birefringent crystal, CdZnTe in this case, is placed in a neutron beam emanating from a nuclear reactor beam port. After obtaining the voltage-dependent Pockels characteristic response curve with a photodiode, neutron measurements were conducted from reactor pulses with the Pockels cell set at the 1/4 and 3/4 wave bias voltages. The detector responses to nuclear reactor pulses were recorded in real-time using data logging electronics, each showing a sharp increase in photodiode current for the 1/4 wave bias, and a sharp decrease in photodiode current for the 3/4 wave bias. The polarizers were readjusted to equal angles in which the maximum light transmission occurred at 0 V bias, thereby, inverting the detector response to reactor pulses. A high sample rate oscilloscope was also used to more accurately measure the FWHM of the pulse from the electro-optic detector, 64 ms, and is compared to the experimentally obtained FWHM of 16.0 ms obtained with the 10B-lined counter.

  2. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Bradford Barber, H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector's response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  3. The iQID Camera An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, Bradford H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-06-11

    Abstract We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  4. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Gyuseong.

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was {approximately}400 MHz and the noise charge {approximately}1000 electrons at a 1 {mu}sec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of {approximately}0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB.

  5. Soft X-Ray Spectrometer Using 100-Pixel STJ Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiki, Shigetomo; Zen, Nobuyuki; Ukibe, Masahiro; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2009-12-16

    Fluorescent X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) is an important tool for material analysis, especially for the measurement of chemical states or local structures of elements. Semiconductor detectors are usually used for separating the fluorescent of elements in question from background fluorescence. However, the semiconductor detectors cannot always discriminate K-lines of light elements and L-lines of various elements as different X-ray peaks at an energy range below about 3 keV. Superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors are promising device for the soft X-ray at synchrotron radiation beam lines because of excellent energy resolution, high detection efficiency, and high counting rate. We are constructing a fluorescent X-ray spectrometer having 100-pixel array of STJs with 200 {mu}m square. The array detector is mounted on a liquid cryogen-free {sup 3}He cryostat. The sensitive area is the largest among the superconducting X-ray spectrometers operating at synchrotron beam lines. Each pixel is connected to a room temperature readout circuit that consists of a charge sensitive amplifier and a pulse height analyzer. The spectrometer will achieve a total solid angle of {approx}0.01 sr and a maximum counting rate of more than 1 M count per second. The present status of developments of our fluorescent X-ray spectrometer was reported.

  6. Next Generation Semiconductor-Based Radiation Detectors Using Cadmium Magnesium Telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, Sudhir B; Kutcher, Susan W; Palsoz, Witold; Berding, Martha; Burger, Arnold

    2014-11-17

    The primary objective of Phase I was to perform extensive studies on the purification, crystal growth and annealing procedures of CdMgTe to gain a clear understanding of the basic material properties to enable production of detector material with performance comparable to that of CdZnTe. Brimrose utilized prior experience in the growth and processing of II-VI crystals and produced high purity material and good quality single crystals of CdMgTe. Processing techniques for these crystals including annealing, mechanical and chemical polishing, surface passivation and electrode fabrication were developed. Techniques to characterize pertinent electronic characteristics were developed and gamma ray detectors were fabricated. Feasibility of the development of comprehensive defect modeling in this new class of material was demonstrated by our partner research institute SRI International, to compliment the experimental work. We successfully produced a CdMgTe detector that showed 662 keV gamma response with energy resolution of 3.4% (FWHM) at room temperature, without any additional signal correction. These results are comparable to existing CdZnTe (CZT) technology using the same detector size and testing conditions. We have successfully demonstrated detection of gamma-radiation from various isotopes/sources, using CdMgTe thus clearly proving the feasibility that CdMgTe is an excellent, low-cost alternative to CdZnTe.

  7. Analysis of laser-generated plasma ionizing radiation by synthetic single crystal diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Krasa, J.; Krousky, E.

    2013-05-01

    Diamond based detectors have been used in order to analyze the ionizing radiation emitted from the laser-generated plasma. High energy proton/ion beams were generated at Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) Centre by the sub-nanosecond kJ-class laser at intensities above 1016 W/cm2. The tested detectors consisted of a photoconductive device based on high quality chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single crystal diamond, produced at Rome "Tor Vergata" University. They have been operated in planar configuration, having inter-digitized electrodes. The proposed diamond detectors were able to measure UV, X-rays, electrons and ions. They have been employed in time-of-flight (TOF) configuration and their reliability was checked by comparison with standard ion collectors (mostly used at PALS). Both the forward and backward expanding plasma was characterized in the experiment. The results indicate that diamond detectors are very promising for the characterization of fast proton and ion beams produced by high power laser systems.

  8. Atmospheric measurements by Medipix-2 and Timepix Ionizing Radiation Imaging Detectors on BEXUS stratospheric balloon campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbar, Jaroslav; Scheirich, Jan; Jakubek, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Results of the first two experiments using semiconductor pixel detectors of the Medipix family for cosmic ray imaging in the stratospheric environment are presented. The original detecting device was based on the hybrid pixel detectors of Medipix-2 and Timepix developed at CERN with USB interface developed at Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics of Czech Technical University in Prague. The detectors were used in tracking mode allowing them to operate as an "active nuclear emulsion". The actual flight time of BEXUS7 with Medipix-2 on 8th October 2008 was over 4 hours, with 2 hours at stable floating altitude of 26km. BEXUS9 measurements of similar duration by Timepix, Medipix-2 and ST-6 Geiger telescope instruments took place in arctic atmosphere below 24km altitude on 11th October 2009. This balloon platform is quite ideal for such in-situ measurements. Not only because of the high altitudes reached, but also due to its slow ascent velocity for statistically relevant sampling of the ambient environment for improving cosmic ray induced ionisation rate model inputs. The flight opportunity for BEXUS student projects was provided by Education department of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Eurolaunch - Collaboration of Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) and German Space Agency (DLR). The scientific goal was to check energetic particle type altitudinal dependencies, also testing proper detector calibration by detecting fluxes of ionizing radiation, while evaluating instrumentation endurance and performance.

  9. Laboratory tests of pulse shape discrimination techniques for correcting the effects of radiation damage in germanium coaxial detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, S. E.; Hull, E. L.; Lin, R. P.; Madden, N. W.; McBride, S.; Pehl, R. H.; Primbsch, J. H.; Slassi-Sennou, S.

    2000-04-01

    A reverse-electrode closed-end germanium coaxial detector was irradiated with 183-MeV neutrons to evaluate the value of Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) techniques in restoring the energy resolution and line shape of the radiation damaged detector. Two consecutive irradiations were performed for total fluences of 5.010 8 and 10.410 8 n/ cm2, with PSD tests performed after each irradiation. These irradiations degraded the energy resolution and line shapes; however, PSD corrections significantly restored the performance, even after severe damage. These PSD techniques delay and potentially eliminate, in some experimental situations, the need to anneal germanium detectors in damaging radiation environments.

  10. Comparison of high-dose dosimetry systems for radiation damage studies in collider detectors and accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coninckx, F.; Schönbacher, H.; Tavlet, M.; Paic, G.; Razem, D.

    1993-10-01

    Measurements of absorbed dose in accelerator tunnels around primary beam areas are carried out on a routine basis at CERN. Dosimetric surveillance of high-energy particle accelerators has a great importance for the assessment of the radiation induced damage to materials and components used in high-level radiation areas. Standard dosimeters used at CERN for this purpose are polymer-alanine dosimeters (PAD) and radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters (RPL). Ethanol-chlorobenzene dosimeters (ECB) for high-dose dosimetry, developed at the Ruder Boskovic Institute (RBI), have several interesting properties making their use in future multi-TeV colliders and detectors promising. These and RPL dosimeters were compared using the CERN alanine dosimetry as the reference system and 60Co gamma rays as the reference radiation. A very good agreement between the ECB and PAD was obtained for 60Co gamma irradiation whereas RPL overestimated the dose by about 15%. In mixed accelerator radiation fields the combination of the three dosimeters opens the possibility to estimate the total dose and the quality of the principal radiations contributing to the total radiation field.

  11. Charged Particle Measurements with the Mars Science Laboratory's Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Kohler, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Appel, J. K.; Boehm, E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Brinza, D. E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Matthiae, D.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Since the Curiosity rover's landing in Gale crater on the surface of Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the rover has been conducting the first-ever measurements of the Martian surface radiation field. This field is induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and their interactions with the atoms of the Martian atmosphere and soil. Furthermore, sporadic Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events can lead to large, but short-term enhancements in the intensity of the radiation field. A large part of the radiation environment is made up of charged particles, e.g., ions and their isotopes, electrons, and positrons amongst others. There are mainly two factors influencing the surface radiation field: the modulation of the incoming GCR flux due to the solar magnetic field correlating with the solar cycle; the amount of atmospheric column mass above Gale crater resulting in changes of GCR penetration depth into the atmosphere, as well as influencing the secondary particle production rate. Here, we focus on the temporal evolution of the radiation environment since the landing, analyzing changes in the measured particle spectra for different phases in the Martian seasonal cycle and solar activity. Furthermore, we present enhancements in the proton flux during directly observed SEP events.

  12. Light scattering apparatus and method for determining radiation exposure to plastic detectors

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved system and method of analyzing cumulative radiation exposure registered as pits on track etch foils of radiation dosimeters. The light scattering apparatus and method of the present invention increases the speed of analysis while it also provides the ability to analyze exposure levels beyond that which may be properly measured with conventional techniques. Dosimeters often contain small plastic sheets that register accumulated damage when exposed to a radiation source. When the plastic sheet from the dosimeter is chemically etched, a track etch foil is produced wherein pits or holes are created in the plastic. The number of these pits, or holes, per unit of area (pit density) correspond to the amount of cumulative radiation exposure which is being optically measured by the apparatus. To measure the cumulative radiation exposure of a track etch foil a high intensity collimated beam is passed through foil such that the pits and holes within the track etch foil cause a portion of the impinging light beam to become scattered upon exit. The scattered light is focused with a lens, while the primary collimated light beam (unscattered light) is blocked. The scattered light is focused by the lens onto an optical detector capable of registering the optical power of the scattered light which corresponds to the cumulative radiation to which the track etch foil has been exposed.

  13. Investigation of epitaxial silicon layers as a material for radiation hardened silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.

    1997-11-01

    Epitaxial grown thick layers (>100 {mu}m) of high resistivity silicon (Epi-Si) have been investigated as a possible candidate of radiation hardened material for detectors for high-energy physics. As grown Epi-Si layers contain high concentration (up to 2{center_dot}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) of deep levels compared with that in standard high resistivity bulk Si. After irradiation of test diodes by protons (E{sub p} = 24 GeV) with a fluence of 1.5{center_dot}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, no additional radiation induced deep traps have been detected. A reasonable explanation is that there is a sink of primary radiation induced defects, in epitaxial layers. The {open_quotes}sinking{close_quotes} process, however, becomes non-effective at high radiation fluences (10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}) due to saturation of epitaxial defects by high concentration of radiation induced ones. As a result, at neutron fluence of 1{center_dot}10{sup 14}cm{sup {minus}2} the deep level spectrum corresponds to well-known spectrum of radiation induced defects in high resistivity bulk Si. The net effective concentration in the space charge region equals to 3{center_dot}10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} after 3 months of room temperature storage and reveals similar annealing behavior for epitaxial as compared to bulk silicon.

  14. Effects of radiation-induced defects on the charge collection efficiency of a silicon carbide particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Naoya; Onoda, Shinobu; Makino, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takeshi; Kojima, Kazutoshi; Nozaki, Shinji

    2013-05-01

    Radiation hardness of 6H silicon carbide (SiC) p+n diode particle detectors has been studied. The charge collection efficiency (CCE) of the detectors decreases with the increased fluence of electrons with energies of 0.2 MeV and higher. Defect X2 with an activation energy of 0.5 eV was found in all detectors which showed the decreased CCE. The decreased CCE was restored to the initial value by thermal annealing of defect X2. It is concluded that defect X2 is responsible for the decreased CCE of 6H-SiC p+n diode particle detectors.

  15. Development of a high-resolution room-temperature compressed-xenon cylindrical ionization-chamber gamma radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Gary C.; Losee, Jon R.; Palmer, Robert L.

    1998-07-01

    Highly compressed and purified xenon is emerging as an important detection medium for high resolution, room temperature gamma radiation spectroscopy. Detectors based on compressed xenon offer a unique combination of thermal stability, high energy resolution and large volume. Furthermore, fluid based detectors are not susceptible to radiation damage, and can be constructed in a variety of geometries. However, some important factors have delayed the development of practical xenon detectors for widespread use. These factors include the relatively high operational pressures and voltages and the need to maintain extremely high xenon purity. We have recently developed a 0.7 liter gridded ionization chamber xenon gamma radiation detector in a cylindrical geometry. The detector operates at room temperature and provides an intrinsic energy resolution of 1.8% at 662 keV which is five times greater than scintillation based spectrometers. The detector design and performance variables are discussed in comparison to a previous detector constructed in a planar geometry. Our results indicate that practical xenon detectors can now be developed for a wide variety of applications.

  16. Re-evaluating Galileo Energetic Particle Detector data based on radiation detector decay; for use in estimating Sputtering Erosion rates on Europa.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Payne, Z.; Grande, M.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Roussos, E.; Kollmann, P.

    2015-10-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) launched in 1989 on the Galileo satellite took data on the Jovian Particle environment for 6 years before its demise [1]. Over the course of the mission the detectors in the Composition Measurement System (CMS) have visibly decayed with higher mass particles, specifically Oxygen and Sulphur, reading far lower energies at later epochs. By considering the non-steady accumulation of damage in the detector, as well as the operation of the priority channel data recording system in place on the EPD, an evolving correction can be made. Adjusting the data to account for the damage to the detectors will improve our understanding of the Jovian radiation environment. In particular, we can use the revised fluxes to re-evaluate the effect of the particle environment on the surfaces of the icy moons.

  17. Energy cross-calibration from the first CREAM flight : transition radiation detector versus calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestro, P.; Ahn, H.S.; Allison, P.S.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Beatty, J.J.; Bigongiari, G.; Boyle, P.J.; Brandt, T.J.; Childers, J.T.; Conklin, N.B.; Coutu, S.; DuVernois, M.A.; Ganel, O.; Han, J.H.; Hyun, H.J.; Jeon, J.A.; Kim, K.C.; Lee, J.K.; Lee, M.H.; Lutz, L.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Malinine, A.; Minnick, S.; Mognet, S.I.; Nam, S.; Nutter, S.; Park, H.; Park, I.H.; Park, N.H.; Seo, E.S.; Sina, R.; Swordy, S.; Wakely, S.P.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Yoon, Y.S.; Zei, R.; Zinn, S.Y.

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) balloon experiment had two successful flights in 2004/05 and 2005/06. It was designed to perform energy measurements from a few GeV up to 1000 TeV, taking advantage of different detection techniques. The first instrument, CREAM-I, combined a transition radiation detector (equipped with an array of proportional tubes and an acrylic Cherenkov device) with a calorimeter to provide independent energy measurements of cosmic ray nuclei. Each detector was calibrated with particle beams in a limited range of energies. In order to assess the absolute energy scale of the whole instrument and to investigate the systematic effects of each technique, a cross-calibration was performed by comparing the independent energy estimates on selected samples of Oxygen and Carbon nuclei.

  18. Influence of CVD diamond film textures on the electrical response of radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jany, C.; Foulon, F.; Bergonzo, P.; Brambilla, A.; Gicquel, A.; Pochet, T.

    1996-10-01

    The influence of the texture of polycrystalline CVD diamond films on their electrical properties was studied. The films were deposited by a microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique (MPCVD). <110> and <100> textured films, and non-textured films were produced under different growth conditions. Extensive measurements were carried out in order to probe the electrical properties of the films: resistivity, carrier lifetimes, mobility and carrier drift length before trapping. The influence of nitrogen impurities on the film electrical properties is addressed. CVD diamond detectors were characterised electrically in photo-current mode at room temperature under X-ray radiation at 40 keV. The results give evidence of a strong influence of the texture, nitrogen impurities and polycrystalline structural defects of the films on their use as X-ray detectors.

  19. An HEMT-Based Cryogenic Charge Amplifier for Sub-kelvin Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, A.; Sadoulet, B.; Juillard, A.; Jin, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present the design and noise performance of a fully cryogenic (T=4 K) high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT)-based charge amplifier for readout of sub-kelvin semiconductor radiation detectors. The amplifier is being developed for use in direct detection dark matter searches such as the cryogenic dark matter search and will allow these experiments to probe weakly interacting massive particle masses below 10 GeV/c^2 while retaining background discrimination. The amplifier dissipates ≈ 1 mW of power and provides an open loop voltage gain of several hundreds. The measured noise performance is better than that of JFET-based charge amplifiers and is dominated by the noise of the input HEMT. An optimal filter calculation using the measured closed loop noise and typical detector characteristics predicts a charge resolution of σ _q =106 eV (35 electrons) for leakage currents below 4 × 10^{-15} A.

  20. High-performance diamond radiation detectors produced by lift-off method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shin-ichi

    2016-03-01

    For stable semiconductor detector operation under harsh environments, an ideal single-crystal diamond without a charge trapping centre is required. For this study, a self-standing single-crystal CVD diamond was fabricated using a lift-off method. The reduction of charge trapping factors such as structural defects, point defects, and nitrogen impurities, was attempted using 0.2% of low-methane concentration growth and using a full metal seal chamber. A high-quality self-standing diamond with strong free-exciton recombination emission was obtained. Charge collection efficiencies were 100.1% for holes and 99.8% for electrons, provided that \\varepsilon{diamond}= 13.1 \\text{eV} and \\varepsilon{Si}=3.62 \\text{eV} . Energy resolutions were 0.38% for both holes and electrons. We produced a high-performance diamond radiation detector using the productive lift-off method.

  1. Measurement of a high electrical quality factor in a niobium resonator for a gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical quality factors of a 10-g niobium resonator were measured at 4.4 K and were found to be 8.1 x 10 to the 6th, and 3.8 x 10 to the 6th, respectively. The value for the electrical quality factor is high enough for a system operating at 50 mK at a sensitivity level of one phonon. The resonator's low damping properties make it suitable for use as a transducer for a cryogenic three-mode gravitational radiation detector. A practical design is given for the mounting of the resonator on a 2400-kg aluminum-bar detector. Projections are made for the sensitivity of a 2400-kg bar instrumented as a three-mode system with this resonator inductively coupled to a SQUID.

  2. Response of a hybrid pixel detector (MEDIPIX3) to different radiation sources for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumacero, E. Miguel; De Celis Alonso, B.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Vargas, G.; Moreno Barbosa, F.; Moreno Barbosa, E.

    2014-11-01

    The development in semiconductor CMOS technology has enabled the creation of sensitive detectors for a wide range of ionizing radiation. These devices are suitable for photon counting and can be used in imaging and tomography X-ray diagnostics. The Medipix[1] radiation detection system is a hybrid silicon pixel chip developed for particle tracking applications in High Energy Physics. Its exceptional features (high spatial and energy resolution, embedded ultra fast readout, different operation modes, etc.) make the Medipix an attractive device for applications in medical imaging. In this work the energy characterization of a third-generation Medipix chip (Medipix3) coupled to a silicon sensor is presented. We used different radiation sources (strontium 90, iron 55 and americium 241) to obtain the response curve of the hybrid detector as a function of energy. We also studied the contrast of the Medipix as a measure of pixel noise. Finally we studied the response to fluorescence X rays from different target materials (In, Pd and Cd) for the two data acquisition modes of the chip; single pixel mode and charge summing mode.

  3. Radiation-hard active CMOS pixel sensors for HL-LHC detector upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, Malte

    2015-02-01

    The luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be increased during the Long Shutdown of 2022 and 2023 (LS3) in order to increase the sensitivity of its experiments. A completely new inner detector for the ATLAS experiment needs to be developed to withstand the extremely harsh environment of the upgraded, so-called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). High radiation hardness as well as granularity is mandatory to cope with the requirements in terms of radiation damage as well as particle occupancy. A new silicon detector concept that uses commercial high voltage and/or high resistivity full complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes as active sensor for pixel and/or strip layers has risen high attention, because it potentially provides high radiation hardness and granularity and at the same time reduced price due to the commercial processing and possibly relaxed requirements for the hybridization technique. Results on the first prototypes characterized in a variety of laboratory as well as test beam environments are presented.

  4. Influence of solvothermal synthesis conditions in BiSI nanostructures for application in ionizing radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, I.; Mombrú, M.; Pérez Barthaburu, M.; Bentos Pereira, H.; Fornaro, L.

    2016-02-01

    BiSI belongs to the A V B VI C VII chalcohalides group of compounds. These compounds show several interesting properties such as ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity along the c axis, and photoconductivity. Moreover, BiSI is a potential semiconductor material for room-temperature gamma and x-ray detection, given its band gap of 1.57 eV and its high density, 6.41 g cm-3. In this work we present BiSI nanostructures synthesized by the solvothermal method with the intention of using them for ionizing radiation detection. The solvent was varied to study its influence in morphology, particle size and size distribution. Three different conditions were tested, using either water, monoethylene glycol and a mixture of both solvents. Nanostructures were characterized by XRD to determine the phase obtained and reaction completeness; TEM was used to observe nanostructures morphology, size, size distribution and crystallinity; and finally FT-IR diffuse reflectance was used to study monoethylene glycol presence in the samples. Nanorods in the range of 100-200 nm width were obtained in all samples, but round nanoparticles of around 10 nm in diameter were also detected in samples synthesized only with monoethylene glycol. Samples synthesized in monoethylene glycol were used to fabricate pellets to construct detectors. The detectors responded to ionizing radiation and a resistivity in the order of 1013 Ω cm was estimated. This work proposes, to our knowledge, the first study of BiSI for its application in ionizing radiation detection.

  5. Performance of radiation-hard HV/HR CMOS sensors for the ATLAS inner detector upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Barbero, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Breugnon, P.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Pangaud, P.; Rozanov, A.

    2016-03-01

    A major upgrade (Phase II Upgrade) to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), scheduled for 2022, will be brought to the machine so as to extend its discovery potential. The upgraded LHC, called High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will run with a nominal leveled instantaneous luminosity of 5×1034 cm-2s-1, more than twice the expected luminosity. This unprecedented luminosity will result in higher occupancy and background radiations, which will request the design of a new Inner Tracker (ITk) which should have higher granularity, reduced material budget and improved radiation tolerance. A new pixel sensor concept based on High Voltage and High Resistivity CMOS (HV/HR CMOS) technology targeting the ATLAS inner detector upgrade is under exploration. With respect to the traditional hybrid pixel detector, the HV/HR CMOS sensor can potentially offer lower material budget, reduced pixel pitch and lower cost. Several prototypes have been designed and characterized within the ATLAS upgrade R&D effort, to investigate the detection and radiation hardness performance of various commercial technologies. An overview of the HV/HR CMOS sensor operation principle is described in this paper. The characterizations of three prototypes with X-ray, proton and neutron irradiation are also given.

  6. Response of a hybrid pixel detector (MEDIPIX3) to different radiation sources for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chumacero, E. Miguel; De Celis Alonso, B.; Martínez Hernández, M. I.; Vargas, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E.; Moreno Barbosa, F.

    2014-11-07

    The development in semiconductor CMOS technology has enabled the creation of sensitive detectors for a wide range of ionizing radiation. These devices are suitable for photon counting and can be used in imaging and tomography X-ray diagnostics. The Medipix[1] radiation detection system is a hybrid silicon pixel chip developed for particle tracking applications in High Energy Physics. Its exceptional features (high spatial and energy resolution, embedded ultra fast readout, different operation modes, etc.) make the Medipix an attractive device for applications in medical imaging. In this work the energy characterization of a third-generation Medipix chip (Medipix3) coupled to a silicon sensor is presented. We used different radiation sources (strontium 90, iron 55 and americium 241) to obtain the response curve of the hybrid detector as a function of energy. We also studied the contrast of the Medipix as a measure of pixel noise. Finally we studied the response to fluorescence X rays from different target materials (In, Pd and Cd) for the two data acquisition modes of the chip; single pixel mode and charge summing mode.

  7. Comparison of Martian Surface Radiation Predictions to the Measurements of Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Boettcher, Stephan; Boehm, Eckart; Guo, Jingnan; Koehler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Posner, Erik

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, detailed knowledge of particle spectra is an important factor. Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL-RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012, and particle fluxes for a wide range of ion species (up to several hundred MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (8 - 1000 MeV) have been available for the first 200 sols. Although the data obtained on the surface of Mars for 200 sols are limited in the narrow energy spectra, the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code are compared to the data. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used, which includes direct knockout, evaporation and nuclear coalescence. Daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station are implemented into transport calculations for describing the daily column depth of atmosphere. Particles impinging on top of the Martian atmosphere reach the RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere that depend on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD by the rest of the instrument. Calculations of stopping particle spectra are in good agreement with the RAD measurements for the first 200 sols by accounting changing heliospheric conditions and atmospheric pressure. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and thus increase the accuracy of the predictions of future radiation environments on Mars. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to astronauts for the planning of various mission scenarios.

  8. Comparison of Martian Surface Radiation Predictions to the Measurements of Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. H. Y.; Cucinotta, F.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Hassler, D.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S. C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Böttcher, S. I.; Boehm, E.; Guo, J.; Kohler, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Reitz, G.; Posner, A.

    2014-12-01

    For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, detailed knowledge of particle spectra is an important factor. Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL-RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012, and particle fluxes for a wide range of ion species (up to several hundred MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (8 - 1000 MeV) have been available for the first 200 sols. Although the data obtained on the surface of Mars for 200 sols are limited in the narrow energy spectra, the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code are compared to the data. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used, which includes direct knockout, evaporation and nuclear coalescence. Daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station are implemented into transport calculations for describing the daily column depth of atmosphere. Particles impinging on top of the Martian atmosphere reach the RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere that depend on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD by the rest of the instrument. Calculations of stopping particle spectra are in good agreement with the RAD measurements for the first 200 sols by accounting changing heliospheric conditions and atmospheric pressure. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and thus increase the accuracy of the predictions of future radiation environments on Mars. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to astronauts for the planning of various mission scenarios.

  9. Photodiode radiation hardness, lyman-alpha emitting galaxies and photon detection in liquid argon neutrino detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Brian

    My dissertation is comprised of three projects: 1) studies of Lyman-alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs), 2) radiation hardness studies of InGaAs photodiodes (PDs), and 3) scintillation photon detection in liquid argon (LAr) neutrino detectors. I began work on the project that has now become WFIRST, developing a science case that would use WFIRST after launch for the observation of LAEs. The radiation hardness of PDs was as an effort to support the WFIRST calibration team. When WFIRST was significantly delayed, I joined an R&D effort that applied my skills to work on photon detection in LAr neutrino detectors. I report results on a broadband selection method developed to detect high equivalent width (EW) LAEs. Using photometry from the CFHT-Legacy Survey Deep 2 and 3 fields, I have spectroscopically confirmed 63 z=2.5-3.5 LAEs using the WIYN/Hydra spectrograph. Using UV continuum-fitting techniques I computed properties such as EWs, internal reddening and star formation rates. 62 of my LAEs show evidence to be normal dust-free LAEs. Second, I present an investigation into the effects of ionizing proton radiation on commercial off-the-shelf InGaAs PDs. I developed a monochromator-based test apparatus that utilized NIST-calibrated reference PDs. I tested the PDs for changes to their dark current, relative responsivity as a function of wavelength, and absolute responsivity. I irradiated the test PDs using 30, 52, and 98 MeV protons at the IU Cyclotron Facility. I found the InGaAs PDs showed increased dark current as the fluence increased with no evidence of broadband response degradation at the fluences expected at an L2 orbit and a 10-year mission lifetime. Finally, I detail my efforts on technology development of both optical detector technologies and waveshifting light guide construction for LAr vacuum UV scintillation light. Cryogenic neutrino detectors use photon detection for both accelerator based science and for SNe neutrino detection and proton decay. I have developed waveshifter doped cast acrylic light guides that convert scintillation light and guide the waveshifted light to SiPMs detectors.

  10. High spatial resolution radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, T

    1995-05-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as a large-area thin film semiconductor with ease of doping and low-cost fabrication capability has given a new impetus to the field of imaging sensors; its high radiation resistance also makes it a good material for radiation detectors. In addition, large-area microelectronics based on a-Si:H or polysilicon can be made with full integration of peripheral circuits, including readout switches and shift registers on the same substrate. Thin a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes coupled to suitable scintillators are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. The response speed of CsI/a-Si:H diode combinations to individual particulate radiation is limited by the scintillation light decay since the charge collection time of the diode is very short (< 10ns). The reverse current of the detector is analyzed in term of contact injection, thermal generation, field enhanced emission (Poole-Frenkel effect), and edge leakage. A good collection efficiency for a diode is obtained by optimizing the p layer of the diode thickness and composition. The CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an a-Si:H photodiode detector shows a capability for detecting minimum ionizing particles with S/N {approximately}20. In such an arrangement a p-i-n diode is operated in a photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). In addition, a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3--8 for shaping times of 1 {micro}s. The mechanism of the formation of structured CsI scintillator layers is analyzed. Initial nucleation in the deposited layer is sensitive to the type of substrate medium, with imperfections generally catalyzing nucleation. Therefore, the microgeometry of a patterned substrate has a significant effect on the structure of the CsI growth.

  11. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  12. (Cd,Mn)Te Crystal Plates for Radiation Detectors: Electrical Contacts and Surface Passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowska-Baran, M.; Kochanowska, D.; Mycielski, A.; Szadkowski, A. J.; Juchniewicz, M.; Kami?ska, E.

    2015-09-01

    The development of a reliable technique for making good electrical contacts to semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te monocrystalline plates meant for x- and gamma radiation detectors, a technique of crystal surface preparation and a technique of passivation of the surfaces between electrodes were the main objectives of the studies. The investigations of the electrical contacts were focused on the amorphous/nanocrystalline contact layers. The effects of passivation of the inter-electrode surfaces on the magnitude of the surface leakage currents were studied.

  13. Improved Growth Methods for LaBr3 Scintillation Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S

    2011-05-01

    The objective is to develop advanced materials for deployment as high-resolution gamma ray detectors. Both LaBr3 and CeBr3 are advanced scintillation materials, and will be studied in this research. Prototype devices, in collaboration Sandia National Laboratories, will be demonstrated along with recommendations for mass production and deployment. It is anticipated that improved methods of crystal growth will yield larger single crystals of LaBr3 for deployable room-temperature operated gamma radiation spectrometers. The growth methods will be characterized. The LaBr3 and CeBr3 scintillation crystals will be characterized for light yield, spectral resolution, and for hardness.

  14. A Versatile Hemispherical Great Area X-ray Detector for Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Rodolfo; Belmar, Felipe

    2009-01-29

    This work presents an X-ray detector with fullerene C60 semi spherical geometry constituted by a set of small cylindrical proportional counter units with needles anodes, which are located in the surface of an hemispherical plastic support. The sample to be analyzed is placed on the center of the hemisphere base. The radiation may enter by one of its flanks or through the hemisphere top. The hemispherical zone that exists between the holder sample base and the proportional counters can be vacuumed, aired or filled with counter gas.

  15. Cryogenic and radiation hard ASIC design for large format NIR/SWIR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Dupont, Benoit; Dierickx, Bart; Müller, Eric; Verbruggen, Geert; Gielis, Stijn; Valvekens, Ramses

    2014-10-01

    An ASIC is developed to control and data quantization for large format NIR/SWIR detector arrays. Both cryogenic and space radiation environment issue are considered during the design. Therefore it can be integrated in the cryogenic chamber, which reduces significantly the vast amount of long wires going in and out the cryogenic chamber, i.e. benefits EMI and noise concerns, as well as the power consumption of cooling system and interfacing circuits. In this paper, we will describe the development of this prototype ASIC for image sensor driving and signal processing as well as the testing in both room and cryogenic temperature.

  16. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Because the liquid hydrogen which NASA stores for the space shuttle engines is easily ignited, a hand held ultraviolet fire detector was developed by detector electronics under NASA contract. The system was commercialized by Detector Electronics for use in other hydrogen handling facilities. The detector sensors spot a hydrogen flame at 100 feet, show radiation levels and provide an aural fire alert.

  17. Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Radiation Detectors: Science Fiction, Horror Story, or Headlines (460th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    James, Ralph

    2010-08-18

    With radiation constantly occurring from natural sources all around us -- from food, building materials, and rays from the sun, to name a few -- detecting radiotracers for medical procedures and other radiation to keep people safe is not easy. In order to make better use of radiation to diagnose or treat certain health conditions, or to track radiological materials being transported, stored, and used, the quest is on to develop improved radiation detectors. James gives a brief introduction on radiation detection and explain how it is used in applications ranging from medical to homeland security. He then discusses how new materials and better ways to analyze them here at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and the future NSLS-II will lead to a new class of radiation detectors that will provide unprecedented advances in medical and industrial imaging, basic science, and the nonproliferation of nuclear materials.

  18. Research progress in radiation detectors, pattern recognition programs, and radiation damage determination in DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    The radiological implications of statistical variations in energy deposition by ionizing radiation were investigated in the conduct of the following experiments: (1) study of the production of secondary particles generated by the passage of the primary radiation through bone and muscle; (2) the study of the ratio of nonreparable to reparable damage in DNA as a function of different energy deposition patterns generated by X rays versus heavy fast charged particles; (3) the use of electronic radiography systems for direct fluoroscopic tomography and for the synthesis of multiple planes and; (4) the determination of the characteristics of systems response to split fields having different contrast levels, and of minimum detectable contrast levels between the halves under realistic clinical situations.

  19. Radiation detector using a bulk high T.sub.c superconductor

    DOEpatents

    Artuso, Joseph F.; Franks, Larry A.; Hull, Kenneth L.; Symko, Orest G.

    1993-01-01

    A radiation detector (10) is provided, wherein a bulk high T.sub.c superconducting sample (11) is placed in a magnetic field and maintained at a superconducting temperature. Photons of incident radiation will cause localized heating in superconducting loops of the sample destroying trapped flux and redistributing the fluxons, and reducing the critical current of the loops. Subsequent cooling of the sample in the magnetic field will cause trapped flux redistributed Abrikosov fluxons and trapped Josephson fluxons. The destruction and trapping of the fluxons causes changes in the magnetization of the sample inducing currents in opposite directions in a pickup coil (12) which is coupled by an input coil (15) to an rf SQUID (16).

  20. A radiotelemetry pill for the measurement of ionising radiation using a mercuric iodide detector.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M A; Pearce, G; Edwards, J P

    1978-03-01

    A small radiation measuring pill is briefly described which utilises the principles of radiotelemetry and the properties of a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector such as mercuric iodide. By transmitting a radio signal to a remote receiver the pill could be an effective tool in localising bleeding sites along the gastrointestinal tract and also possibly in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal carcinoma. Other uses of the radiopill are suggested. The size of the pill is 27 mm x 10 mm diameter and consists of a mercuric iodide crystal, an amplifier, a frequency modulated transmitter and one battery. The radiotransmitter operates at about 106 MHz and has a range of about 10m, and the sensitivity of the pill has been found for 99Tcm, 131I and 32P. PMID:306112

  1. Radiation doses and estimated risk from angiographic projections during coronary angiography performed using novel flat detector.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna; Livingstone, Roshan S; Varghese, Lijo; Kumar, Parveen; Srinath, Sirish Chandra; George, Oommen K; George, Paul V

    2016-01-01

    Coronary angiography (CA) procedure uses various angiographic projections to elicit detailed information of the coronary arteries with some steep projections involving high radiation dose to patients. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses and estimated risk from angiographic projections during CA procedure performed using novel flat detector (FD) system with improved image processing and noise reduction techniques. Real-time monitoring of radiation doses using kerma-area product (KAP) meter was performed for 140 patients using Philips Clarity FD system. The CA procedure involved seven standard projections, of which five were extensively selected by interventionalists. Mean fluoroscopic time (FT), KAP, and reference air kerma (Ka,r) for CA procedure were 3.24 min (0.5-10.51), 13.99Gycm2 (4.02-37.6), and 231.43 mGy (73.8-622.15), respectively. Effective dose calculated using Monte Carlo-based PCXMC software was found to be 4.9mSv. Left anterior oblique (LAO) 45° projection contributed the highest radiation dose (28%) of the overall KAP. Radiation-induced risk was found to be higher in females compared to males with increased risk of lung cancer. An increase of 10%-15% in radiation dose was observed when one or more additional projections were adopted along with the seven standard projections. A 14% reduction of radiation dose was achieved from novel FD system when low-dose protocol during fluoroscopy and medium-dose protocol during cine acquisitions were adopted, compared to medium-dose protocol. PMID:27167263

  2. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector’s response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications. PMID:26166921

  3. Surface passivation of cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors by potassium hydroxide solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Kaushik; Hayes, Miguel; Ndap, Jean-Olivier; Burger, Arnold; Lu, W. J.; McWhinney, Hylton G.; Grady, Tony; James, Ralph B.

    2000-06-01

    The spectral resolution of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) room temperature nuclear radiation detectors is often limited by the presence of conducting surface species that increase the surface leakage current. Surface passivation plays an important role in reducing this surface leakage current and thereby decreasing the noise of the detectors and improving the spectral energy resolution. Chemical etching with a Br-MeOH solution leaves CZT surfaces rich in Te and is considered as one of the primary causes of the increased surface leakage current. Previous studies have shown that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) forms oxides of tellurium on the CZT surface and thus acts as a good passivating agent. In this study we will present results on the use of potassium hydroxide (KOH) as an alternative passivating agent. The KOH aqueous solution leaves a more stoichiometric (evaluated from the trends in the surface Cd:Te ratio) and smoother CZT surface. The passivation effects of KOH solution on the surface of the CZT have been characterized by current-voltage measurements for different KOH concentrations and etching times for both parallel strip electrodes as well as a metal-semiconductor-metal configuration. The surface chemical composition and its morphology were studied by scanning x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The comparison and demonstration of improvements in the spectral resolution of the CZT detectors (based on 241Am spectra) with and without the KOH treatment are presented.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation for the electron cascade due to gamma rays in semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, Raman D.; Miranda, Ryan; Rez, Peter

    2012-03-15

    A Monte Carlo code was developed for simulating the electron cascade in radiation detector materials. The electron differential scattering cross sections were derived from measured electron energy-loss and optical spectra, making the method applicable for a wide range of materials. The detector resolution in a simplified model system shows dependence on the bandgap, the plasmon strength and energy, and the valence band width. In principle, these parameters could be optimized to improve detector performance. The intrinsic energy resolution was calculated for three semiconductors: silicon (Si), gallium arsenide (GaAs), and zinc telluride (ZnTe). Setting the ionization thresholds for electrons and holes is identified as a critical issue, as this strongly affects both the average electron-hole pair energy w and the Fano factor F. Using an ionization threshold from impact ionization calculations as an effective bandgap yields pair energies that are well matched to measured values. Fano factors of 0.091 (Si), 0.100 (GaAs), and 0.075 (ZnTe) were calculated. The Fano factor calculated for silicon using this model was lower than some results from past simulations and experiments. This difference could be attributed to problems in simulating inter-band transitions and the scattering of low-energy electrons.

  5. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  6. Performance of the Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector in PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiz Silva, Cesar

    2004-10-01

    The Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector (TEC/TRD) in the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC measures ionization losses (dE/dX) and transition radiation from charged particles produced by beam collisions. It is designed to perform tracking and identification for charged particles on very high particle multiplicity environment. The TEC/TRD consists of 24 wire chambers readout on both sides filled with recycled Xe-based gas mixture. This wire chamber configuration, besides providing measurements of ionization losses for charged particles, can absorb X-Ray photons generated by transition radiation from incident particles with γ>1000 crossing fiber radiators placed at the entrance of the chambers. This allows TEC/TRD to distinguish electrons from the huge pion signal produced over a broad momentum range (1GeV/c

  7. A Micro-Cantilever Based Photoacoustic Detector of Terahertz Radiation for Chemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauvitz, Nathan E.; Coutu, Ronald A. Coutu, Jr.; Kistler, Michael N.; Hamilton, Ryan F.; Petkie, Douglas T.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we describe a novel photoacoustic detector that can detect radiation in the Terahertz/sub-millimeter (THz/smm) spectral range, is immune to the effect of standing waves, and potentially can have spectral response that is independent of the absorption path length, thus offering crucial advantages for acquisition of THz/smm molecular spectra. The photoacoustic effect occurs when the energy from electromagnetic waves is absorbed by molecules and collisionally transferred into translational energy, thus resulting in local heating induced by the radiation. If radiation produced by the source is modulated, an acoustic wave results which can be detected by a pressure sensitive device such as a microphone or a cantilever. This transduction of the THz signal into a photoacoustic wave is what makes this approach insensitive to the detrimental standing waves associated with traditional THz sensors and allows for a significant reduction in the size of the absorption cell. A Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) cantilever pressure sensor was designed, modeled, fabricated, and tested for sensing the photoacoustic response of gases to THz/smm radiation. Here we present our manufacturing, experimental set-up and most recent spectroscopic results, which demonstrate the capabilities of this spectroscopic technique.

  8. Radiation tolerance of prototype BTeV pixel detector readout chips

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriele Chiodini et al.

    2002-07-12

    High energy and nuclear physics experiments need tracking devices with increasing spatial precision and readout speed in the face of ever-higher track densities and increased radiation environments. The new generation of hybrid pixel detectors (arrays of silicon diodes bump bonded to arrays of front-end electronic cells) is the state of the art technology able to meet these challenges. We report on irradiation studies performed on BTeV pixel readout chip prototypes exposed to a 200 MeV proton beam at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Prototype pixel readout chip preFPIX2 has been developed at Fermilab for collider experiments and implemented in standard 0.25 micron CMOS technology following radiation tolerant design rules. The tests confirmed the radiation tolerance of the chip design to proton total dose up to 87 MRad. In addition, non destructive radiation-induced single event upsets have been observed in on-chip static registers and the single bit upset cross section has been extensively measured.

  9. Development of radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wan-Shick

    1995-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon and related materials have been applied to radiation detectors, utilizing their good radiation resistance and the feasibility of making deposits over a large area at low cost. Effects of deposition parameters on various material properties of a-Si:H have been studied to produce a material satisfying the requirements for specific detection application. Thick(-{approximately}50 {mu}m), device quality a-Si:H p-i-n diodes for direct detection of minimum ionizing particles have been prepared with low internal stress by a combination of low temperature growth, He-dilution of silane, and post annealing. The structure of the new film contained voids and tiny crystalline inclusions and was different from the one observed in conventional a-Si:H. Deposition on patterned substrates was attempted as an alternative to controlling deposition parameters to minimize substrate bending and delamination of thick a-Si:H films. Growth on an inversed-pyramid pattern reduced the substrate bending by a factor of 3{approximately}4 for the same thickness film. Thin (0.1 {approximately} 0.2 {mu}m) films of a-Si:H and a-SiC:H have been applied to microstrip gas chambers to control gain instabilities due to charges on the substrate. Light sensitivity of the a-Si:H sheet resistance was minimized and the surface resistivity was successfully` controlled in the range of 10{sup 12} {approximately} 10{sup 17} {Omega}/{four_gradient} by carbon alloying and boron doping. Performance of the detectors with boron-doped a-Si:C:H layers was comparable to that of electronic-conducting glass. Hydrogen dilution of silane has been explored to improve electrical transport properties of a-Si:H material for high speed photo-detectors and TFT applications.

  10. Observation and analysis of microcirculation using high-spatial-resolution image detectors and synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Yagi, Naoto; Suzuki, Yoshio; Ogasawara, Yasuo; Kajiya, Fumihiko; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Goto, Masami; Yamashita, Takenori; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa

    2000-04-01

    A microangiography system using monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been investigated as a diagnostic tool for circulatory disorders and early stage malignant tumors. The monochromatized X-rays with energies just above the contrast agent K-absorption edge energy can produce the highest contrast image of the contrast agent in small blood vessels. At SPring-8, digital microradiography with 6 - 24 micrometer pixel sizes has been carried out using two types of detectors designed for X-ray indirect and direct detection. The indirect-sensing detectors are fluorescent-screen optical-lens coupling systems using a high-sensitivity pickup-tube camera and a CCD camera. An X-ray image on the fluorescent screen is focused on the photoconductive layer of the pickup tube and the photosensitive area of the CCD by a small F number lens. The direct-sensing detector consists of an X-ray direct- sensing pickup tube with a beryllium faceplate for X-ray incidence to the photoconductive layer. Absorbed X-rays in the photoconductive layer are directly converted to photoelectrons and then signal charges are readout by electron beam scanning. The direct-sensing detector was expected to have higher spatial resolution in comparison with the indict-sensing detectors. Performance of the X-ray image detectors was examined at the bending magnet beamline BL20B2 using monochromatized X-ray at SPring-8. Image signals from the camera are converted into digital format by an analog-to- digital converter and stored in a frame memory with image format of 1024 X 1024 pixels. In preliminary experiments, tumor vessel specimens using barium contrast agent were prepared for taking static images. The growth pattern of tumor-induced vessels was clearly visualized. Heart muscle specimens were prepared for imaging of 3-dimensional microtomography using the fluorescent-screen CCD camera system. The complex structure of small blood vessels with diameters of 30 - 40 micrometer was visualized as a 3- dimensional CT image.

  11. Highly localized in vivo measurement of myocardial perfusion with avalanche radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsberg, R.P.; Gelezunas, V.L.; Lyons, K.P.

    1982-01-01

    A problem in accurately measuring regional myocardial blood flow by radiation washout techniques is the inability to localize precisely the origin of radiation in tissue. We developed a new approach for in vivo localization and quantification of regional blood flow. A miniature, silicon, solid-state, avalanche radiation detector, which measures the low-penetrating radiation from commonly available radionuclides, was constructed. Low-penetrating radiation has a limited range in tissue, and by selecting appropriate tracers, we vary the volume that our probe detects. The volume of the heat monitored by the avalanche probe ranges from less than 0.01 to 1 cm/sup 3/, depending on the radionuclide used and the collimator design. In open-chest dogs, 2-5 mCi of xenon-133 dissolved in saline were injected into coronary arteries and the probe was placed over regions of interest to measure regional myocardial blood flow by the Kety-Schmidt formula. Detection of xenon-133 decreased as an exponential function of distance, with less than 10% of radioactivity detected at 0.6 cm away from the radiation source. The measured detection volume for xenon-133 was approximated at 0.5 cm/sup 3/. Measurements of regional blood flow with the probe correlated closely to epicardial flow measured with radioactive microspheres (r = 0.88 +/- 0.04(SD)) in five dogs, and to proximal coronary flow measured with electromagnetic meters (r = 0.87 +/- 0.05) in five dogs. Repetitive measurements during stable hemodynamics were reproducible.

  12. Detection of Coherent Terahertz Radiation from a High-Temperature Superconductor Josephson Junction by a Semiconductor Quantum-Dot Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikhaidarov, R.; Antonov, V. N.; Casey, A.; Kalaboukhov, A.; Kubatkin, S.; Harada, Y.; Onomitsu, K.; Tzalenchuk, A.; Sobolev, A.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the application of Josephson radiation emitters to spectral calibration of single-photon-resolving detectors. Josephson junctions are patterned in a YBCO film on a bicrystal sapphire substrate and are voltage controlled to generate radiation in the frequency range of 0.05-1 THz. The detector used in this work consists of a gate-defined quantum-dot photon-to-charge transducer coupled to a single-electron transistor. Both the emitter and the detector are equipped with a matching on-chip wide-band antenna. The combination of a tuneable emitter and detector allows us to determine the efficacy of the YBCO emitter and also to analyze the elementary processes involved in the detection.

  13. Detectors on base of scintillation structures for registration of volumetric activities of gaseous and liquid media gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Yurov, V. N.; Ryabeva, E. V.; Samossadny, V. T.; Lupar, E. E.; Trofimov, Yu A.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Chebishev, S. B.; Nebolsin, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    The main aim of this research is the development and prototyping of the ionizing radiation detectors for the diagnosis of the physical processes used for monitoring the radiation situation at the thermal or fast neutrons reactors. In this article we present the experimental verification of applicability of the scintillation detectors based on LaBr3(Ce) and YAlO3(Ce). The experimental studies of the gamma-ray detection with several designs of the crystal scintillation detectors in gas and liquid are considered. It was shown that the measurement range in the liquid medium at the duration of one measurement of 100 seconds for 137Cs equals from 3.79·102 Bq/l to 1.08·108 Bq/l for detector prototype based on YAlO3(Ce).

  14. Neutron Radiation Shielding For The NIF Streaked X-Ray Detector (SXD) Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Holder, J; Young, B; Kalantar, D; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2006-11-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is preparing for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) scheduled in 2010. The NIC is comprised of several ''tuning'' physics subcampaigns leading up to a demonstration of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition. In some of these experiments, time-resolved x-ray imaging of the imploding capsule may be required to measure capsule trajectory (shock timing) or x-ray ''bang-time''. A capsule fueled with pure tritium (T) instead of a deutriun-tritium (DT) mixture is thought to offer useful physics surrogacy, with reduced yields of up to 5e14 neutrons. These measurements will require the use of the NIF streak x-ray detector (SXD). The resulting prompt neutron fluence at the planned SXD location ({approx}1.7 m from the target) would be {approx}1.4e9/cm{sup 2}. Previous measurements suggest the onset of significant background at a neutron fluence of {approx} 1e8/cm{sup 2}. The radiation damage and operational upsets which starts at {approx}1e8 rad-Si/sec must be factored into an integrated experimental campaign plan. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to predict the neutron and gamma/x-ray fluences and radiation doses for the proposed diagnostic configuration. A possible shielding configuration is proposed to mitigate radiation effects. The primary component of this shielding is an 80 cm thickness of Polyethylene (PE) between target chamber center (TCC) and the SXD diagnostic. Additionally, 6-8 cm of PE around the detector provide from the large number of neutrons that scatter off the inside of the target chamber. This proposed shielding configuration reduces the high-energy neutron fluence at the SXD by approximately a factor {approx}50.

  15. Absolute measurements of radiation sources spectral brightness and detectors quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penin, Alexander N.; Klyshko, David N.

    1991-12-01

    In this paper we present schemes of experimental setups for the radiation spectral brightness measurements in the range of 0.6 - 5 (mu) for N varying from 10-1 to 102 (if, for example, (lambda) equals 1 (mu) , this range of N corresponds to the brightness temperature range from 6 (DOT) 103 to 106 K), and for photomultipliers quantum efficiency measurements in the range of 0.4 - 5 (mu) with a dynamical range 10 - 1012 photon/sec and accuracy not worse than 1%. The new measurement methods are based on the utilization of the parametric light scattering phenomenon which is a spontaneous decay of laser pump photons in correlated photon pairs in crystals with quadratic nonlinear susceptibility. The first of two methods allows measurement of the radiation spectral brightness N in absolute units ('photons per mode') in visible and infrared range. The quantity N is related to the energetic brightness spectral density B through the equation B equals (hc2/(lambda) 5)N, where h is the Plank constant, c - the light velocity, (lambda) - the wavelength. The method is absolute and does not require any reference source or detector of radiation. Quantum noise of a parametric down-convertor, caused by the zero vacuum fluctuations with an effective brightness Nvac equals 1 photon per mode, is the reference in this case. The second method concerns the quantum efficiency of photodetectors determination, and it is based on the connection between the statistics of photocurrent and the radiation which causes it. The parametric scattering is a unique source of rather intensive and directed radiation flow consisting of photon pairs. Such a flow can be used to determine the absolute quantum efficiency of photodetectors.

  16. Transition from image intensifier to flat panel detector in interventional cardiology: Impact of radiation dose

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Chase, David; Varghese, Anna; George, Paul V.; George, Oommen K.

    2015-01-01

    Flat panel detector (FPD) technology in interventional cardiology is on the increase due to its varied advantages compared to the conventional image intensifier (II) systems. It is not clear whether FPD imparts lower radiation doses compared to II systems though a few studies support this finding. This study intends to compare radiation doses from II and FPD systems for coronaryangiography (CAG) and Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA) performed in a tertiary referral center. Radiation doses were measured using dose area product (DAP) meter from patients who underwent CAG (n = 222) and PTCA (n = 75) performed using FPD angiography system. The DAP values from FPD were compared with earlier reported data using II systems from the same referral center where the study was conducted. The mean DAP values from FPD system for CAG and PTCA were 24.35 and 63.64 Gycm2 and those from II system were 27.71 and 65.44 Gycm2. Transition from II to FPD system requires stringent dose optimization strategies right from the initial period of installation. PMID:26150684

  17. A Low-Power, Radiation-Resistant, Silicon-Drift-Detector Array for Extraterrestrial Element Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey B. D.; De Geronimo G.; Gaskin, J.A.; Elsner, R.F.; Chen, W.; Carini, G.A.; Keister, J.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Siddons, D.P.; Smith, G.

    2012-02-08

    We are developing a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) for measuring the abundances of light surface elements (C to Fe) fluoresced by ambient radiation on remote airless bodies. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is demonstrated by its inclusion on three recent lunar missions and by exciting new data that have recently been announced from the Messenger Mission to Mercury. The SDD-XRS instrument that we have been developing offers excellent energy resolution and an order of magnitude lower power requirement than conventional CCDs, making much higher sensitivities possible with modest spacecraft resources. In addition, it is significantly more radiation resistant than x-ray CCDs and therefore will not be subject to the degradation that befell recent lunar instruments. In fact, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it applicable even to the harsh environment of the Jovian system where it can be used to map the light surface elements of Europa. In this paper, we first discuss our element-mapping science-measurement goals. We then derive the necessary instrument requirements to meet these goals and discuss our current instrument development status with respect to these requirements.

  18. Study of Rare Radiative B Decay to K*(1430) Meson Using the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qinghua; /Pennsylvania U.

    2005-09-14

    Radiative B Meson decay through the b {yields} s{gamma} process has been one of the most sensitive probe of new physics beyond the Standard Model, because of its importance in understanding the phenomenon of CP violation, which is believed to be necessary to explain the excess of matter over anti-matter in our universe. The inclusive picture of the b {yields} s{gamma} process is well established; however, our knowledge of the exclusive final states in radiative B meson decays is rather limited. We have investigated one of them, the exclusive, radiative B decay to the charmless K*{sub 2}(1430) meson, in a sample of 88.5 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring. We present a measurement of the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){sup 0}{gamma}) = (1.22 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){sup +}){gamma} = (1.45 {+-} 0.40 {+-} 0.15) x 10{sup -5}, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, we have performed the first search for direct CP violation in this decay with the measured asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sub 2}(1430){sup 0}{gamma} of {Alpha}{sub CP} = -0.08 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.01.

  19. Complete suppression of reverse annealing of neutron radiation damage during active gamma irradiation in MCZ Si detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Verbitskaya, E.; Chen, W.; Eremin, V.; Gul, R.; Hrknen, J.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Kierstead, J.; Metcalfe, J.; Seidel, S.

    2013-01-01

    For the development of radiation-hard Si detectors for the SiD BeamCal (Si Detector Beam Calorimeter) program for International Linear Collider (ILC), n-type Magnetic Czochralski Si detectors have been irradiated first by fast neutrons to fluences of 1.51014 and 31014 neq/cm2, and then by gamma up to 500 Mrad. The motivation of this mixed radiation project is to test the radiation hardness of MCZ detectors that may utilize the gamma/electron radiation to compensate the negative effects caused by neutron irradiation, all of which exists in the ILC radiation environment. By using the positive space charge created by gamma radiation in MCZ Si detectors, one can cancel the negative space charge created by neutrons, thus reducing the overall net space charge density and therefore the full depletion voltage of the detector. It has been found that gamma radiation has suppressed the room temperature reverse annealing in neutron-irradiated detectors during the 5.5 month of time needed to reach a radiation dose of 500 Mrad. The room temperature annealing (RTA) was verified in control samples (irradiated to the same neutron fluences, but going through this 5.5 month RTA without gamma radiation). This suppression is in agreement with our previous predictions, since negative space charge generated during the reverse annealing was suppressed by positive space charge induced by gamma radiation. The effect is that regardless of the received neutron fluence the reverse annealing is totally suppressed by the same dose of gamma rays (500 Mrad). It has been found that the full depletion voltage for the two detectors irradiated to two different neutron fluences stays the same before and after gamma radiation. Meanwhile, for the control samples also irradiated to two different neutron fluences, full depletion voltages have gone up during this period. The increase in full depletion voltage in the control samples corresponds to the generation of negative space charge, and this increase in concentration of negative space charge goes up with the neutron fluence. If we assume the reverse annealing is also taking place for the two gamma-irradiated samples with similarly different concentrations of negative space charge generated, the observed effect of no changes in space charge (no changes in Vfd) in these two gamma-irradiated samples would imply that concentrations of positive space charge created in these two control samples are different at the same gamma dose, and gamma irradiation effectively "switched off", the RT (room temperature) reverse annealing of neutron irradiation. It has also been found that as soon as the gamma irradiation stops, the RT reverse annealing of neutron irradiation-induced defects resumes with same rate as that of the control detectors. This behavior in mixed radiation samples (neutron plus gamma) would suggest some nonlinear effect (defects induced by mixed-radiations are not additive of those by individual radiation alone), or interaction of radiation induced acceptor-type and donor-type defects.

  20. The C shell, an active detector of UH nuclei. [in cosmic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Clinton, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the current status of the present program to develop a modular array of large electronic particle detectors. These modules were designed to study the UH nuclei in the cosmic radiation with eventual deployment on the Space Station or at a lunar base. This array would determine the abundances of elements from iron to the actinides and directly measure the energies of the lower energy nuclei. If the array was deployed on the Space Station, it would use the geomagnetic threshold to place limits on the higher energy nuclei, thus studying the energy spectrum up to about 10 GeV/n. Deployed at a lunar base, it would detect nuclei with energies down to the instrumental limit. Smaller versions could be flown on balloons to test and refine the modules.

  1. Method and apparatus for electron-only radiation detectors from semiconductor materials

    DOEpatents

    Lund, James C.

    2000-01-01

    A system for obtaining improved resolution in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors such as CdZnTe and Hgl.sub.2, which exhibit significant hole-trapping. A electrical reference plane is established about the perimeter of a semiconductor crystal and disposed intermediately between two oppositely biased end electrodes. The intermediate reference plane comprises a narrow strip of wire in electrical contact with the surface of the crystal, biased at a potential between the end electrode potentials and serving as an auxiliary electrical reference for a chosen electrode--typically the collector electrode for the more mobile charge carrier. This arrangement eliminates the interfering effects of the less mobile carriers as these are gathered by their electrode collector.

  2. Current response of a TlBr detector to {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gazizov, I. M.; Zaletin, V. M.; Kukushkin, V. M.; Khrunov, V. S.

    2011-05-15

    The current response of a TlBr detector to {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-ray radiation has been studied in the dose-rate range 0.033-3.84 Gy/min and within the voltage range 1-300 V; the detectors are based on pure and doped TlBr crystals grown from the melt by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method. The mass fraction of Pb or Ca introduced into the TlBr crystals was 1-10 ppm for Pb and 150 ppm for Ca. The current response of nominally undoped TlBr samples was nearly linear over two decades of studied dose rates. Deep hole levels associated with cationic vacancies V{sub c}{sup -} determine the dependence of the current response on the voltage in the high electric fields. The parameters of the carriers' transport {mu}{tau} are determined. The TlBr crystals grown in vacuum and in the bromine vapor exhibit a large mobility-lifetime product of 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 6.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}, respectively. The value of {mu}{tau} is in the range (4-9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}V{sup -1} for crystals doped with a divalent cation.

  3. Evaluation of detector material and radiation source position on Compton camera's ability for multitracer imaging.

    PubMed

    Uche, C Z; Round, W H; Cree, M J

    2012-09-01

    We present a study on the effects of detector material, radionuclide source and source position on the Compton camera aimed at realistic characterization of the camera's performance in multitracer imaging as it relates to brain imaging. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation software was used to model the physics of radiation transport and interactions with matter. Silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) detectors were evaluated for the scatterer, and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr(3):Ce) were considered for the absorber. Image quality analyses suggest that the use of Si as the scatterer and CZT as the absorber would be preferred. Nevertheless, two simulated Compton camera models (Si/CZT and Si/LaBr(3):Ce Compton cameras) that are considered in this study demonstrated good capabilities for multitracer imaging in that four radiotracers within the nuclear medicine energy range are clearly visualized by the cameras. It is found however that beyond a range difference of about 2 cm for (113m)In and (18)F radiotracers in a brain phantom, there may be a need to rotate the Compton camera for efficient brain imaging. PMID:22829298

  4. SU-E-T-553: Characterization of Plastic Scintillator Detectors for Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H; Lin, H; Darafsheh, A; Finlay, J; Both, S; Zhu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize basic performance of plastic scintillator detectors (PSD) designed for dosimetry of radiation therapy. Methods: The Exradin W1 Scintillator is a plastic scintillating fiber-based detector designed for highly accurate measurement of small radiotherapy fields used in patient plan verification and machine commissioning and QA procedures. The Cerenkov emissions were corrected using spectral separation. The optical signal was converted to electronic signal with a photodiode. We measured its dosimetry performance, including percentage depth dose, output factor, dose and dose rate linear response. We compared the dosimetry results with reference ion chamber measurements. Results: The dosimetry results of PSD agree well with reference ion chamber measurements. For percentage depth dose, the differences between PSD and ion chamber results are on average 1.7±1.1% and 0.8±0.8% with a maximum of 3.5% and 2.7% for 6MV and 15MV beams, respectively. For the output factors, PSD measurements are within 2% from ion chamber results. The dose linear response is within 1% when dose is larger than 20 MU for both 6 MV and 15 MV. The dose rate linear response is within 1% for the entire dose rate used (100 MU/min to 600MU/min). Conclusions: The current design of PSD is feasible for the dosimtry measurement in radiation therapy. This combination of PSD and photodiode system could be extended to multichannel array detection of dose distribution. It might as well be used as range verification in proton therapy. The work is partially supported by: DOD (W81XWH-09-2-0174) and American Cancer Society (IRG-78-002-28)

  5. Improved fabrication of HgI/sub 2/ nuclear radiation detectors by machine-cleaving

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, A.; Burger, A.; Schieber, M.; Vandenberg, L.; Yellon, W.B.; Alkire, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The perfection of machine-cleaved sections from HgI/sub 2/ bulk crystals was examined. The perfection of the machine-cleaved sections as established by gamma diffraction rocking curves was found to be much better than the perfection of hand-cleaved sections or as grown thin platelets, reaching a perfection similar to that of the wire-sawn sections of HgI/sub 2/. A correlation between the perfection and the thickness of the machine-cleaved section was also found, i.e., the thicker the cleaved-section the more perfect it is. The reproducibility of the fabrication was significantly improved by using machine cleaving in the process of fabrication. Large single crystals of HgI/sub 2/ weighing 20 to 200 g, can be grown from the vapor phase using the TOM Technique. In order to fabricate nuclear radiation detectors from these single crystals, thin sections of about 0.4 to 0.8 mm thickness have to be prepared. Up till now, the state-of-the-art of fabricating HgI/sub 2/ nuclear radiation detectors involved two methods to get thin sections from the large single crystals: (1) hand-cleaving using a razor-blade and (2) solution wire sawing. The chemical wire sawing method involves a loss of about 50% of the crystal volume and is usually followed by a chemical polishing process which involves a significant loss of volume of the original volume. This procedure is complicated and wasteful. The traditional fabrication method, i.e., hand-cleaving followed by rapid nonselective chemical etching, is simpler and less wasteful.

  6. Development of Micro and Nano Crystalline CVD Diamond TL/OSL Radiation Detectors for Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza-Flores, Marcelino

    2015-03-01

    Modern radiotherapy methods requires the use of high photon radiation doses delivered in a fraction to small volumes of cancer tumors. An accurate dose assessment for highly energetic small x-ray beams in small areas, as in stereotactic radiotherapy, is necessary to avoid damage to healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. Recent advances on the controlled synthesis of CVD diamond have demonstrated the possibility of using high quality micro and nano crystalline CVD as an efficient detector and dosimeter suitable for high energy photons and energetic particle beams. CVD diamond is a very attractive material for applications in ionizing radiation dosimetry, particularly in the biomedical field since the radiation absorption by a CVD diamond is very close to that of soft tissue. Furthermore, diamond is stable, non-toxic and radiation hard. In the present work we discuss the CVD diamond properties and dosimeter performance and discuss its relevance and advantages of various dosimetry methods, including thermally stimulated luminescence (TL) as well as optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The recent CVD improved method of growth allows introducing precisely controlled impurities into diamond to provide it with high dosimetry sensitivity. For clinical dosimetry applications, high accuracy of dose measurements, low fading, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and linear dose response characteristics are very important parameters which all are found in CVD diamonds specimens. In some cases, dose linearity and reproducibility in CVD diamond have been found to be higher than standard commercial TLD materials like LiF. In the present work, we discuss the state-of-the art developments in dosimetry applications using CVD diamond. The financial support from Conacyt (Mexico) is greatly acknowledged

  7. The ADAQ framework: An integrated toolkit for data acquisition and analysis with real and simulated radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.

    2016-04-01

    The ADAQ framework is a collection of software tools that is designed to streamline the acquisition and analysis of radiation detector data produced in modern digital data acquisition (DAQ) systems and in Monte Carlo detector simulations. The purpose of the framework is to maximize user scientific productivity by minimizing the effort and expertise required to fully utilize radiation detectors in a variety of scientific and engineering disciplines. By using a single set of tools to span the real and simulation domains, the framework eliminates redundancy and provides an integrated workflow for high-fidelity comparison between experimental and simulated detector performance. Built on the ROOT data analysis framework, the core of the ADAQ framework is a set of C++ and Python libraries that enable high-level control of digital DAQ systems and detector simulations with data stored into standardized binary ROOT files for further analysis. Two graphical user interface programs utilize the libraries to create powerful tools: ADAQAcquisition handles control and readout of real-world DAQ systems and ADAQAnalysis provides data analysis and visualization methods for experimental and simulated data. At present, the ADAQ framework supports digital DAQ hardware from CAEN S.p.A. and detector simulations performed in Geant4; however, the modular design will facilitate future extension to other manufacturers and simulation platforms.

  8. Measurement of secondary radiation during ion beam therapy with the pixel detector Timepix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martišíková, Mária; Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Hartmann, Bernadette; Opálka, Lukáš; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Jäkel, Oliver

    2011-11-01

    In ion beam therapy the finite range of the ion beams in tissue and the presence of the Bragg-peak are exploited. Unpredictable changes in the patient`s condition can alter the range of the ion beam in the body. Therefore it is desired to verify the actual ion range during the treatment, preferably in a non-invasive way. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used successfully to monitor the applied dose distributions. This method however suffers from limited applicability and low detection efficiency. In order to increase the detection efficiency and to decrease the uncertainties, in this study we investigate the possibility to measure secondary charged particles emerging from the patient during irradiation. An initial experimental study to register the particle radiation coming out of a patient phantom during the therapy was performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) in Germany. A static narrowly-focused beam of carbon ions was directed into a head phantom. The emerging secondary radiation was measured with the position-sensitive Timepix detector outside of the phantom. The detector, developed by the Medipix Collaboration, consists of a silicon sensor bump bonded to a pixelated readout chip (256 × 256 pixels with 55 μm pitch). Together with the USB-based readout interface, Timepix can operate as an active nuclear emulsion registering single particles online with 2D-track visualization. In this contribution we measured the signal behind the head phantom and investigated its dependence on the beam energy (corresponding to beam range in water 2-30 cm). Furthermore, the response was measured at four angles between 0 and 90 degrees. At all investigated energies some signal was registered. Its pattern corresponds to ions. Differences in the total amount of signal for different beam energies were observed. The time-structure of the signal is correlated with that of the incoming beam, showing that we register products of prompt processes. Such measurements are less likely to be influenced by biological washout processes than the signal registered by the PET technique, coming from decays of beam-induced radioactive nuclei. This work demonstrates that the Timepix detector is able to register ions emerging from the patient during the treatment by carbon ion beams. In future work it will be investigated which information about the incoming beam can be gained from the analysis of the measured data.

  9. Development of a fast read-out system of a single photon counting detector for mammography with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F. C.; Rigon, L.; Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Chen, R. C.; Dreossi, D.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Castelli, E.

    2011-12-01

    A single-photon counting detector read-out system for mammography with synchrotron radiation has been developed with the aim to meet the needs of the mammographic imaging station of the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA. The system called PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) is a modular detector that implements a read-out system with MYTHEN II ASICs, an embedded Linux-based controller board and a Scientific Linux acquisition workstation. The system architecture and characteristics are herein presented. The system was tested at the SYRMEP beamline and achieved a frame rate of 33 Hz for 8448 channels at 24-bit dynamic range, and it is capable of continuously acquiring up to 2000 frames. Standard mammographic phantoms were imaged and good quality images were obtained at doses comparable with what is delivered in conventional full field mammographic systems.

  10. First results of experiments with a medical one-coordinate X-ray detector on synchrotron radiation of VEPP-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dementyev, E. N.; Dovga, E. Ya.; Kulipanov, G. N.; Medvedko, A. S.; Mezentsev, N. A.; Pindyurin, V. F.; Sheromov, M. A.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Sokolov, A. S.; Ushakov, V. A.; Zagorodnikov, E. I.; Kaidorin, A. G.; Neugodov, Yu. V.

    1986-05-01

    The first results of studying the performance of a fast X-ray one-coordinate detector on the SR beam from VEPP-4 are presented. The detector consists of 128 independent channels, each being a scintillation counter on the basis of NaI(Tl) crystals. The spatial resolution of the detector constitutes 1.5 mm and its speed of response is 128 × 1 MHz. The main purpose of the detector is to examine the human circulatory system by the method of difference angiography at an energy of quanta corresponding to the K-absorption edge of iodine (33.2 keV). The first results on radiation exposure of the blood vessels of a live dog with a spatial resolution of 0.75 mm are given.

  11. Data-driven exploration of the ionization-phonon partitioning in scintillating radiation detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jordan, David V.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2008-06-01

    An information-based approach to scintillating materials development has been applied to ranking the alkali halide and alkali earth halide series in terms of their energy conversion efficiency. The efficiency of scintillating radiation detection materials can be viewed as the product of a consecutive series of electronic processes (energy conversion, transfer, and luminescence) as outlined by Lempicki and others. Relevant data are relatively sparse, but sufficient for the development of forward mapping of materials properties through materials signatures. These mappings have been used to explore the limits of the K ratio in the Lempicki model with chemical composition, and examine its relationship with another common design objective, density. The alkali halides and alkali earth halide compounds separate themselves into distinct behavior classes favoring heavier cations and anions for improved K ratio. While the coupling of ionization is strongly related to the optical phonon modes, both dielectric and band gap contributions cannot be ignored. When applied within a candidate screen, the resulting model for K imposes design rules—simple structural restrictions—on scintillating radiation detector materials.

  12. Gd2O3:Eu3+/PPO/POPOP/PS composites for digital imaging radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J.; Martins, P. M.; Martins, P.; Correia, V.; Rocha, J. G.; Lanceros-Mendez, S.

    2015-11-01

    Polymer-based scintillator composites have been produced by combining polystyrene (PS) and Gd2O3:Eu3+ scintillator nanoparticles. Polystyrene has been used since it is a flexible and stable binder matrix, resistant to thermal and light deterioration and with suitable optical properties. Gd2O3:Eu3+ has been selected as scintillator material due to its wide band gap, high density and visible light yield. The optical, thermal and electrical characteristics of the composites were studied as a function of filler content, together with their performance as scintillator material. Additionally 1 wt.% of 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 0.01 wt.% of 1,4 di[2-(5phenyloxazolyl)]benzene (POPOP) were introduced in the polymer matrix in order to strongly improve light yield, i.e., the measured intensity of the output visible radiation, under X-ray irradiation. Increasing scintillator filler concentration (from 0.25 to 7.5 wt.%) increases scintillator light yield and decreases the optical transparency of the composite. The addition of PPO and POPOP strongly increased the overall transduction performance of the composite due to specific absorption and re-emission processes. It is thus shown that Gd2O3:Eu3+/PPO/POPOP/PS composites with 0.25 wt.% of scintillator content with fluorescence molecules are suitable for the development of innovative large-area X-ray radiation detectors with huge demand from the industries.

  13. Thin silicon strip detectors for beam monitoring in Micro-beam Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povoli, M.; Alagoz, E.; Bravin, A.; Cornelius, I.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Fournier, P.; Hansen, T. E.; Kok, A.; Lerch, M.; Monakhov, E.; Morse, J.; Petasecca, M.; Requardt, H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Röhrich, D.; Sandaker, H.; Salomé, M.; Stugu, B.

    2015-11-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an emerging cancer treatment that is currently being developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. This technique uses a highly collimated and fractionated X-ray beam array with extremely high dose rate and very small divergence, to benefit from the dose-volume effect, thus sparing healthy tissue. In case of any beam anomalies and system malfunctions, special safety measures must be installed, such as an emergency safety shutter that requires continuous monitoring of the beam intensity profile. Within the 3DMiMic project, a novel silicon strip detector that can tackle the special features of MRT, such as the extremely high spatial resolution and dose rate, has been developed to be part of the safety shutter system. The first prototypes have been successfully fabricated, and experiments aimed to demonstrate their suitability for this unique application have been performed. Design, fabrication and the experimental results as well as any identified inadequacies for future optimisation are reported and discussed in this paper.

  14. Results of radiation tests performed on the ISOCAM infrared detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, P.; Engelmann, J. J.; Mottier, P.

    1991-08-01

    Extensive radiation tests have been performed on the long-wavelength IR detector array for the ISOCAM camera, to be launched on the European ISO satellite. Transient and memory effects, induced by gamma-rays, protons, and heavy ions have been investigated. Each time a pixel is traversed by a particle, an ionization pulse is generated. The results of different deglitching techniques have been compared. Among them, the half Gauss method seems to be the best. In addition to the transient effect, a memory effect is induced by the radiation: an increase of the photoconductive gain is observed. For 2 rad, the raise in responsivity is about 60 percent. The relaxation time is the order of 1 h. The relativistic Fe ions present in cosmic rays have been simulated by Argon ions of 70 MeV/nucleon energy. These very heavily ionizing particles induce a large responsivity change, not only in the pixels directly hit by the particles, but also in their neighbors.

  15. Recent results of CERN RD39 collaboration on development of radiation hard Si detectors operated at low to cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, W.; Eremin, V.; Ha¨rko¨nen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2013-08-01

    Recent results of CERN RD39 collaboration on the development of radiation hard Si detectors operated at low to cryogenic temperatures will be presented in this paper. It has been found, in comparisons of results of simulation and charge collection data of pad and strip detectors, the charge-injected-diode (CID) operation mode of Si detectors reduces the free carrier trapping, resulting in a much higher charge collection at the SLHC fluence than that in a standard Si detector. The reduction in free carrier trapping by almost a factor of 3 is due to the fact that the CID mode pre-fills the traps, making them neutral and not active in trapping of particle-induced free carriers (signal). It has been found that, electron traps can be pre-filled by injection of electrons from the n+ contact. The CID mode of detector operation can be achieved by a modestly low temperature of ≤-40 °C and a operation bias of <600 V. Results of one CID detector application as LHC beam-loss-monitor (BLM) will be presented. Non-irradiated Si detectors has been shown, with tests by laser using our cryogenic transient-current-technique (TCT), to work quite well at LHe temperature (4 K), which are very stable with no polarization and good charge collection efficiency.

  16. Comparison of dose accuracy between film and two-dimensional detectors in intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, Yuichi; Nakayama, Shinichi; Watanabe, Shinsaku; Kaneshige, Souichirou; Monzen, Hajime; Matsumoto, Kenji; Shintani, Naoya; Kamomae, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    We constructed seven intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for prostate cancer (49 irradiation fields which contained seven randomly-sampled patients and seven fields) and evaluated the dose distributions by using a radiochromic film (EBT3 film) and a 2D detector. We superposed the calculated dose distribution of the IMRT treatment plan on EBT3 film and the 2D detector results and then compared those with the γ-analysis pass rate. The relative positions of the beam and the detector were varied; the results of the analysis of the superior-inferior (SI) direction potentially differed, depending on the detector position, under an irradiation beam with the same fluence map. The detector was moved over a range of' 8 mm in the SI direction in 1-mm step increments, measurement were made at each position, and the results were analyzed. The γ-analysis compared the dose distributions from EBT3 film and the radiation treatment planning system (RTPS) for each patient and field; the pass rate with the γ-analysis from 98 to 100% was 2.04%. When we compared the dose distributions of the 2D detector and the RTPS, the pass rate from 98 to 100% was 63.2%. The mean values for the ?-analysis pass rates for EBT3 film and the 2D detector were 94.2 and 97.6%, respectively. Volume averaging of the data indicated a mean pass rate and standard deviation of 98.6 and 0.91%, respectively, and a pass rate of more than 96% for all positions. A 2D detector can, therefore, be used as an alternative apparatus for IMRT dose verification.

  17. Comparative studies on PADC polymeric detector treated by gamma radiation and Ar ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Saftawy, A. A.; Abdel Reheem, A. M.; Kandil, S. A.; Abd El Aal, S. A.; Salama, S.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, a comparative analysis and evaluation of the induced defects in polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) polymeric detector exposed to Ar+ and gamma radiation were made. To get insight into the structure defects due to irradiation, X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was employed. The PADC surface structure changed after irradiation due to the reduction in the surface crystalline structure and the formation of disordered systems. Also, surface morphology changes were traced using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and showed minor surface irregularities after gamma irradiation and large changes upon Ar+ irradiation. Additionally, micro-hardness and friction coefficient of the irradiated samples were investigated and found to increase after irradiation. UV-vis spectroscopy was used to estimate the optical band gap energy which considered as the basis for calculating the number of conjugated carbon atoms responsible for the blackening effect and color changes took place over the PADC surface. It was found that as the applied dose increased, the band gap decreased and the number of carbon clusters get larger. The refractive index and the dispersion parameters for the studied polymer were calculated and discussed. Also, the induced defects on the polymer surface which serve as a non-radiative centers resulting in reduced photoluminescence (PL) intensity. For nearly all the measured parameters, gamma irradiated samples showed a significant changes compared to that induced by ions. But, low energy Ar+ prove efficiency in controlling surface properties of PADC polymer without affecting its sensitive bulk properties, besides that the obtained results are reasonable and comparable to that induced by gamma radiation.

  18. Radiation hardness studies of CdTe thin films for clinical high-energy photon beam detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvydka, Diana; Parsai, E. I.; Kang, J.

    2008-02-01

    In radiation oncology applications, the need for higher-quality images has been driven by recent advances in radiation delivery systems that require online imaging. The existing electronic imaging devices commonly used to acquire portal images implement amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector, which exhibits poor image quality. Efforts for improvement have mostly been in the areas of noise and scatter reduction through software. This has not been successful due to inherent shortcomings of a-Si material. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) semiconductor has long been recognized as highly suitable for use in X-ray detectors in both spectroscopic and imaging applications. Development of such systems has mostly concentrated on single crystal CdTe. Recent advances in thin-film deposition technology suggest replacement of crystalline material with its polycrystalline counterpart, offering ease of large-area device fabrication and achievement of higher resolution as well as a favorable cost difference. While bulk CdTe material was found to have superior radiation hardness, thin films have not been evaluated from that prospective, in particular under high-energy photon beam typical of radiation treatment applications. We assess the performance of thin-film CdTe devices utilizing 6 MeV photon beam and find no consistent trend for material degradation under doses far exceeding the typical radiation therapy detector lifetime dose.

  19. Growth of CdZnTe Crystals for Radiation Detector Applications by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Cadmium Zinc Telluride (Cd(sub 1-x)Zn(sub x)Te) growth techniques are needed for the production of large-scale arrays of gamma and x-ray astronomy. The research objective is to develop crystal growth recipes and techniques to obtain large, high quality CdZnTe single crystal with reduced defects, such as charge trapping, twinning, and tellurium precipitates, which degrade the performance of CdZnTe and, at the same time, to increase the yield of usable material from the CdZnTe ingot. A low gravity material experiment, "Crystal Growth of Ternary Compound Semiconductors in Low Gravity Environment", will be performed in the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR) on International Space Station (ISS). One section of the flight experiment is the melt growth of CdZnTe ternary compounds. This talk will focus on the ground-based studies on the growth of Cd(sub 0.80)Zn(sub 0.20)Te crystals for radiation detector applications by directional solidification. In this investigation, we have improved the properties that are most critical for the detector applications (electrical properties and crystalline quality): a) Electrical resistivity: use high purity starting materials (with reproducible impurity levels) and controlled Cd over pressure during growth to reproducibly balance the impurity levels and Cd vacancy concentration b) Crystalline quality: use ultra-clean growth ampoule (no wetting after growth), optimized thermal profile and ampoule design, as well as a technique for supercool reduction to growth large single crystal with high crystalline quality

  20. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good agreement between the measured dose profile data and the fitted Gaussian functions. The solid-state detector had no energy dependence--within the energy range of interest--and the analytical model succeeded in reproducing the absolute dose values obtained with the pencil ion chamber. For the case of large cone-beam single axial scans, the quantity that better characterizes the total energy imparted to the patient is the weighted dose profile integral (DPI{sub w}). The DPI{sub w} can be easily determined from the two parameters that define the Gaussian functions: f(0) and {sigma}. The authors found that the DLP underestimated the total energy imparted to the patient by more than 20%. The authors also found that the calculated CT dosimetric quantities were higher than those displayed on the scanner console. Conclusions: The authors described and validated a method to assess radiation dose in large cone-beam single axial scans. This method offers a simple and more accurate estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient, thus offering the possibility to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose for cone-beam CT examinations in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy.

  1. Characterization of Thallium Bromide (TlBr) for Room Temperature Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Holland McTyeire

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) has emerged as a remarkably well-suited material for room temperature radiation detection. The unique combination of high-Z elements, high density, suitable band gap, and excellent electrical transport properties present in TlBr have brought device performance up to par with CdZnTe (CZT), the current market-leading room temperature radiation detector material. TlBr research is at an earlier stage than that of CZT, giving hope that the material will see even further improvement in electronic properties. Improving a resistive semiconductor material requires knowledge of deep levels present in the material and the effects of these deep levels on transport properties. Very few deep level studies have been conducted on TlBr, and none with the depth required to generate useful growth suggestions. In this dissertation, deep levels in nominally undoped and doped TlBr samples are studied with electrical and optical methods. Photo-Induced Conductivity Transient Spectroscopy (PICTS) is used to discover many deep levels in TlBr electrically. These levels are compared to sub-band gap optical transitions originating from defects observed in emission spectra. The results of this research indicate that the origin of resistivity in TlBr is likely due to deep level defects pinning the Fermi level at least ˜0.7 eV from either the conduction or valence band edge. The effect of dopants and deep levels on transport in TlBr is assessed with microwave photoconductivity decay analysis. It is found that Pb-, Se-, and O-doping decreases carrier lifetime in TlBr, whereas C-doping does not. TlBr exhibits weak ionic conductivity at room temperature, which both negatively affects the leakage current of detectors and leads to device degradation over time. Researchers are actively looking for ways to reduce or eliminate the ionic conductivity, but are faced with an intriguing challenge of materials engineering: is it possible to mitigate the ionic conduction of TlBr without harming the excellent electronic transport properties? Doping TlBr in order to control the ionic conductivity has been proposed and shown to be effective in reducing dark ionic current, but the electronic effects of the dopants has not been previously studied in detail. In this dissertation, the electronic effects of dopants introduced for ionic reasons are evaluated.

  2. An experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces for thermal radiation in cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2015-07-01

    In cryogenic gravitational-wave detectors, one of the most important issues is the fast cooling of their mirrors and keeping them cool during operation to reduce thermal noise. For this purpose, the correct estimation of thermal-radiation heat transfer through the pipe-shaped radiation shield is vital to reduce the heat load on the mirrors. However, the amount of radiation heat transfer strongly depends on whether the surfaces reflect radiation rays diffusely or specularly. Here, we propose an original experiment to distinguish between diffusive and specular surfaces. This experiment has clearly shown that the examined diamond-like carbon-coated surface is specular. This result emphasizes the importance of suppressing the specular reflection of radiation in the pipe-shaped shield.

  3. The use of electronic area detectors for synchrotron X-radiation protein crystallography with particular reference to the Daresbury SRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helliwell, J. R.

    1982-10-01

    The application of synchrotron X-radiation to protein crystallography is briefly reviewed and the need for electronic area detection instead of photographic film is established. A quantitative assessment is then performed of wire chambers and TV detector systems applied to different data collection strategies especially for optimised anomalous dispersion measurements and for studies of very large unit cell systems at ultimate diffraction resolutions. The demand of high accuracy measurements up to cell limits of 150 Å for optimised anomalous dispersion measurements and high count rate studies of large unit cells 250 Å or more cannot be reconciled ideally by a single detector type.

  4. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  5. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivan, H.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Erasmus, R.; Liao, S.; Madhuku, M.; Peters, G.; Sekonya, K.; Solvyanov, O.

    2015-10-01

    The radiation damage in polyvinyl toluene based plastic scintillator EJ200 obtained from ELJEN technology was investigated. This forms part of a comparative study conducted to aid in the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector during which the Gap scintillators will be replaced. Samples subjected to 6 MeV proton irradiation using the tandem accelerator of iThemba LABS, were irradiated with doses of approximately 0.8 MGy, 8 MGy, 25 MGy and 80 MGy. The optical properties were investigated using transmission spectroscopy and light yield analysis whilst structural damage was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Findings indicate that for the dose of 0.8 MGy, no structural damage occurs and light loss can be attributed to a breakdown in the light transfer between base and fluor dopants. For doses of 8 MGy to 80 MGy, structural damage leads to possible hydrogen loss in the benzene ring of the PVT base which forms free radicals. This results in an additional absorptive component causing increased transmission loss and light yield loss with increasing dose.

  6. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivan, H.; Mellado, B.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Erasmus, R.; Liao, S.; Madhuku, M.; Peters, G.; Solvyanov, O.

    2015-06-01

    The radiation damage in polyvinyl toluene based plastic scintillator EJ200 obtained from ELJEN technology was investigated. This forms part of a comparative study conducted to aid in the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector during which the Gap scintillators will be replaced. Samples subjected to 6 MeV proton irradiation using the tandem accelerator of iThemba LABS, were irradiated with doses of approximately 0.8 MGy, 8 MGy, 25 MGy and 80 MGy. The optical properties were investigated using transmission spectroscopy whilst structural damage was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Findings indicate that for the dose of 0.8 MGy, no structural damage occurs but a breakdown in the light transfer between base and fluor dopants is observed. For doses of 8 MGy to 80 MGy, structural damage leads to hydrogen loss in the benzene ring of the PVT base which forms free radicals. This results in an additional absorptive component causing increased transmission loss as dose is increased.

  7. Entropy as a measure of the performance of phosphor materials used in medical imaging radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavouras, D.; Kandarakis, I.; Maris, T.; Panayiotakis, G. S.; Nomicos, C. D.

    2001-03-01

    In information theory, entropy expresses the information gain obtained after detection of a signal concerning the state of a parameter of interest. In this study, entropy has been expressed in terms of physical quantities (emitted optical fluence and MTF) related to the imaging performance of phosphor materials, which are employed in medical imaging radiation detectors. Four phosphor materials, used in the form of laboratory-prepared fluorescent layers (screens), were compared on the basis of their entropy performance. Measurements were performed using 30- and 80-kVp X-ray beams often employed in X-ray imaging. Results showed that phosphor materials with high density and effective atomic number exhibit high entropy performance, especially at the higher X-ray tube voltage of 80 kVp. Entropy values are also affected by the type of activator, which determines the intrinsic X-ray-to-light conversion efficiency, and the spectrum of emitted light. The proximity of the incident X-ray quanta energy to the energy of the K-shell threshold for photoelectric absorption is an additional important factor which increases entropy. This effect was more apparent in the performance of yttrium-based phosphors at the lower voltage of 30 kVp.

  8. Gamma Radiation Detectors of the TA-55 Waste Line Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Jack E. Malcom

    1999-06-01

    This report covers the gamma detectors, measurement instrumentation, and testing results of a system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system monitors the process liquid waste streams at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) for the presence of radioactive contamination. The detectors are at various points on the acid, caustic, and industrial waste lines. Two of the detectors are on the sanitary sewer lines from the facility. A custom interface unit associated with these two detectors furnishes the facility operation center with a notification of the detection of material. All of the detectors furnish measurement information to a central computer system for storage and trending.

  9. Energy resolution in semiconductor gamma radiation detectors using heterojunctions and methods of use and preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Nelson, Art J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2012-09-04

    In one embodiment, a system comprises a semiconductor gamma detector material and a hole blocking layer adjacent the gamma detector material, the hole blocking layer resisting passage of holes therethrough. In another embodiment, a system comprises a semiconductor gamma detector material, and an electron blocking layer adjacent the gamma detector material, the electron blocking layer resisting passage of electrons therethrough, wherein the electron blocking layer comprises undoped HgCdTe. In another embodiment, a method comprises forming a hole blocking layer adjacent a semiconductor gamma detector material, the hole blocking layer resisting passage of holes therethrough. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  10. Development of stable nuclear radiation detectors based on n-silicon/cobalt-phthalocyanine heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A.; Prasad, R.; Betty, C. A.; Chandrasekhar Rao, T. V.

    2016-03-01

    n-silicon/cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPc) heterojunction based nuclear detectors have been fabricated using thermally evaporated CoPc films. Two different thicknesses of CoPc film (viz. 100 nm and 200 nm) were tried out to make detectors by depositing on chemically polished n-Si wafers. Gold film on CoPc was used as electrical contact. The detectors were characterized by measuring their current-voltage (I-V) and leakage current-time (I-t) characteristics, followed by alpha energy spectra obtained on exposure to α-particles. Variation of alpha energy resolution with applied reverse bias voltage for each of the detectors was also studied. The detectors showed very low leakage current and high breakdown voltage as compared to conventional Au/n-Si surface barrier detectors. Finally, the durability of the detectors was established by measuring their I-V characteristics and energy resolution for nearly 15 months.

  11. Radiation damage effects by electrons, protons, and neutrons in Si/Li/ detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y. M.; Coleman, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The degradation in performance of lithium-compensated silicon nuclear particle detectors induced by irradiation at room temperature with 0.6-MeV and 1.5-MeV electrons, 1.9-MeV protons, and fast neutrons from a plutonium-beryllium source has been investigated. With increasing fluence, the irradiations produced an increase of detector leakage current, noise, capacitance, and a degradation in the performance of the detector as a charged-particle energy spectrometer. Following the irradiations, annealing effects were observed when the detectors were reverse-biased at their recommended operating voltages. Upon removal of bias, a continuous degradation of detector performance characteristics occurred. Detectors which had been damaged by electrons and protons exhibited a stabilization in their characteristics within two weeks after irradiation, whereas detectors damaged by neutrons had a continuous degradation of performance over a period of several months.

  12. High rate, high resolution, two-dimensional gas proportional detectors for x-ray synchrotron radiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Yu, B.; Fischer, J.; Radeka, V.; Harder, J.A.

    1992-02-01

    Two-dimensional, gas proportional detectors are being developed for use with X-ray synchrotron radiation. Two new types of interpolating cathode structures have been investigated, both of which can operate with a significantly smaller number of readout nodes along each sensing axis than previous cathodes. Lumped parameter delay lines are used as the position encoders. Timing signals from fast, low noise shaping electronics are fed to a new, dual TDC system developed for this purpose. Operating with a clock frequency of 500 MHz, the TDCs have an intrinsic differential non-linearity of 0.1%. The complete system can handle X-ray fluxes in excess of 10{sup 6} per sec without distortion of the position information. A resolution of approximately 100 {mu}m FWHM and differenfial non-linearity of {plus minus}4% have been achieved. Application of a detector with active area 10 cm {times} 10 cm using synchrotron radiation is described.

  13. SU-E-T-390: Characterization of the PTW Synthetic Diamond Detector for Radiation Therapy Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stathakis, S; Markovic, M; Mavroidis, P; Papanikolaou, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric properties of new commercially available synthetic single crystal diamond detector under irradiation with therapeutic photon beams from linear accelerators. Methods: A single crystal diamond detector was tested using 6MV photon beam. The detector performance was evaluated for reproducibility, linearity with dose, dose rate dependence, angular dependence, collection efficiency, and measurement of output factors. Lateral field profiles, and percentage depth dose profiles were measured and compared against commercially available detectors. Results: Reproducibility of the detector measurement has a standard deviation of 0.1%. A good linear behavior of the detector response as a function of the delivered dose is observed with deviations below ±0.03% in the dose range from 0.1 to 5Gy. In addition, the detector response is dose rate independent, with deviations below 0.1% in the investigated dose rate range from 1 to 10Gy per min. Charge collection efficiency deviations were within 0.07% from 1 to 10Gy. No angular dependence along the radial direction while up to 1.3% angular dependence was observed in the axial direction. Percentage depth dose curves obtained from the diamond detector are in good agreement with the ones from the reference dosimeters. Lateral beam profile measurements show an overall good agreement among detectors, taking into account their respective geometrical features. The spatial resolution of solid state detectors is confirmed to be better than that of ionization chambers, being the one from the diamond detector comparable to that of the silicon diode. Conclusions: The observed dosimetric properties indicate that the tested diamond detector is a suitable candidate for clinical photon beam dosimetry. The agreement with reference dosimeters show that the detector is suitable for measurements for large fields as well as small fields as the ones used for stereotactic radiotherapy.

  14. 3D sensitive voxel detector of ionizing radiation based on Timepix device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, P.; Jakubek, J.; Vykydal, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors are evolving towards higher segmentation geometries from 0D (single pad) over 1D (strip) to 2D (pixel) detectors. Each step has brought up substantial expansion in the field of applications. The next logical step in this evolution is to design a 3D, i.e. voxel detector. The voxel detector can be constructed from 2D volume element detectors arranged in layers forming a 3D matrix of sensitive elements — voxels. Such detectors can effectively record tracks of energetic particles. By proper analysis of these tracks it is possible to determine the type, direction and energy of the primary particle. One of the prominent applications of such device is in the localization and identification of gamma and neutron sources in the environment. It can be also used for emission and transmission radiography in many fields where standard imagers are currently utilized. The qualitative properties of current imagers such as: spatial resolution, efficiency, directional sensitivity, energy sensitivity and selectivity (background suppression) can be improved. The first prototype of a voxel detector was built using a number of Timepix devices. Timepix is hybrid semiconductor detector consisting of a segmented semiconductor sensor bump-bonded to a readout chip. Each sensor contains 256x256 square pixels of 55 μm size. The voxel detector prototype was successfully tested to prove the concept functionality. The detector has a modular architecture with a daisy chain connection of the individual detector layers. This permits easy rearrangement due to its modularity, while keeping a single readout system for a variable number of detector layers. A limitation of this approach is the relatively large inter-layer distance (4 mm) compared to the pixel thickness (0.3 mm). Therefore the next step in the design is to decrease the space between the 2D detectors.

  15. Effects of 1-MeV gamma radiation on a multi-anode microchannel array detector tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector tube without a photocathode was exposed to a total dose of 1,000,000 rads of 1-MeV gamma radiation from a Co-60 source. The high-voltage characteristic of the microchannel array plate, average dark count, gain, and resolution of pulse height distribution characteristics showed no degradation after this total dose. In fact, the degassing of the microchannels induced by the high radiation flux had the effect of cleaning up the array plate and improving its characteristics.

  16. High quantum efficiency megavoltage imaging with thick scintillator detectors for image guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Arun

    In image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), imaging devices serve as guidance systems to aid patient set-up and tumor volume localization. Traditionally, 2-D megavoltage x-ray imagers, referred to as electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs), have been used for planar target localization, and have recently been extended to perform 3-D volumetric reconstruction via cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). However, current EPIDs utilize thin and inefficient phosphor screen detectors and are subsequently limited by poor soft tissue visualization, which limits their use for CBCT. Therefore, the use of thick scintillation media as megavoltage x-ray detectors for greater x-ray sensitivity and enhanced image quality has recently been of significant interest. In this research, two candidates for thick scintillators: CsI(Tl) and terbium doped scintillation glass were investigated in separate imaging configurations. In the first configuration, a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) consisting of a thick, monolithic slab of CsI(Tl) was coupled to a mirror-lens-camera system. The second configuration is based on a fiber-optic scintillation glass array (FOSGA), wherein the scintillation glass is drawn into long fiber-optic conduits, inserted into a grid-type housing constructed out of polymer-tungsten alloy, and coupled to an array of photodiodes for digital read-out. The imaging prototypes were characterized using theoretical studies and imaging measurements to obtain fundamental metrics of imaging performance. Spatial resolution was measured based on a modulation transfer function (MTF), noise was evaluated in terms of a noise power spectrum (NPS), and overall contrast was characterized in the form of detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The imaging studies were used to optimize the TSC and FOSGA imagers and propose prototype configurations for order-of-magnitude improvements in overall image quality. In addition, a fast and simple technique was developed to measure the MTF, NPS, and DQE metrics for clinical EPID and CBCT systems based on a novel adaptation of a traditional line-pair resolution bar-pattern. This research provides two significant benefits to radiotherapy: the characterization of a new generation of thick scintillator based megavoltage x-ray imagers for CBCT based IGRT, and the novel adaptation of fundamental imaging metrics from imaging research to routine clinical performance monitoring.

  17. Stratospheric Radiation Environment measurements, calibrations and pattern recognition by CERN MEDIPIX-2 and TIMEPIX Radiation Imaging Detectors on ESA BEXUS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbar, J.; Jakubek, J.; Scheirich, J.

    2009-12-01

    Results of the first two experiments using a MEDIPIX-2 and TIMEPIX detector for cosmic ray imaging in stratospheric environment are presented. The detecting device was based on hybrid pixel detector of MEDIPIX-2/TIMEPIX developed at CERN with USB interface developed at Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics of Czech Technical University in Prague. The detector was used in its tracking mode allowing it to operate as an ''active nuclear emulsion'' The actual flight time of BEXUS7 on 8th October 2008 was over 4 hours, with 2 hours at stable floating altitude of 26km. The flight opportunity was provided by Education dept. of European Space Agency (ESA) and Eurolaunch (Collaboration of SSC and DLR, German Space Agency). The motivation was to check proper calibration by detecting height-dependent profiles of ionizing radiation, also testing detector endurance and performance. BEXUS is quite ideal platform for such in-situ measurements. Not only because of the high altitudes reached, but also due to its slow ascent velocity for statistically relevant sampling of the ambient environment. Detector performance was evaluated for further design implications of advanced concept focusing on Cosmic Ray Induced Ionization rate measurements prepared for flight with additional instrumentation in October 2009 on BEXUS8. The preliminary results of the second campaign to be presented in scope of the outcomes of first campaign.

  18. A simulation study investigating a radiation detector utilizing the prompt gamma range verification technique for proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Andrew David

    Proton therapy has shown to be a viable therapy for radiation oncology applications. The advantages of using protons as compared to photons in the treatments of diseases with radiation are numerous including the ability to deliver overall lower amounts of lethal radiation doses to the patient. This advantage is due to the fundamental interaction mechanism of the incident therapeutic protons with the patient, which produces a characteristic dose-distribution unique only to protons. Unlike photons, the entire proton beam is absorbed within the patent and the dose-distribution's maximum occurs near the end of the proton's path. Protons deliver less dose on the skin and intervening tissues, tighter dose conformality to the disease site, as well as no dose past the target volume, sparring healthy tissue distally in the patient. Current research in proton therapy is geared towards minimizing proton range uncertainty and monitoring in-vivo the location of the proton's path. Monitoring the beam's path serves also to verify which healthy structures/tissues were irradiated and whether the target volume has met the prescription dose. Among the many techniques used for in-vivo proton monitoring, the technique based on the emitted secondary particles, specifically the Prompt Gamma (PG) method, can be used for clinical implementation. This work focuses on developing a radiation detector system for using the PG method by investigating the characterizing the secondary particle field emitted from plastic and water phantoms as well as a radiation detector based on glass materials that exploits the Cherenkov phenomenon.

  19. An evaluation of the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM), a radiation detector constructed from commonly available household materials.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J T; West, W G; Kearfott, K J

    2004-11-01

    A radiation detector constructed of common household materials was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by Cresson H. Kearny and has been referred to as the Kearny Fallout Meter (KFM). Developed during the height of the Cold War, the KFM was intended to place a radiation meter capable of measuring fallout from nuclear weapons in the hands of every U.S. citizen. Instructions for the construction of the meter, as well as information about radiation health effects, were developed in the form of multi-page newspaper insert. Subsequently, the sensitivity of the meter was refined by a high school teacher, Dr. Paul S. Lombardi, for use in demonstrations about radiation. The meter is currently being marketed for survivalists in light of potential radiation terrorist concerns. The KFM and Lombardi's variation of it are constructed and evaluated for this work. Calibrated tests of the response and variations in response are reported. A critique of the multi-page manual is made. In addition, the suitability of using such a detector, in terms of actual ease of construction and practical sensitivity, is discussed for its use in demonstrations and introductory classes on nuclear topics. PMID:15551780

  20. Development and studies of a novel microfabricated radiation hard scintillation particle detector with high spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, A.; Gorini, B.; Haguenauer, M.; Jiguet, S.; Renaud, P.

    2009-12-01

    A novel scintillation detector is being developed with standard microfabrication techniques. It consists of a dense array of scintillating waveguides obtained by filling microfluidic channels with an organic liquid scintillator. Such a microfluidic device can be designed and processed to meet the requirements of a wide range of applications like medical imaging, homeland security and high-energy physics. High-spatial resolution miniaturized detectors as well as large-area detectors can easily be fabricated. This paper presents the fabrication process of a prototype detector with 200 μm × 50 μm microchannels obtained by photolithography of the SU-8 photoresist. Preliminary experimental results are presented.

  1. Development of wide-ranged diamond-based detector unit for gamma radiation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, M. A.; Boyko, A. V.; Chebyshev, S. B.; Cherkashin, I. I.; Kireev, V. P.; Petrov, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    In the article the description of wide-ranged diamond-based detector unit is given. Characteristics of the diamond detector were studied in current and in impulse mode. As well it was studied how detector's sensitivity depends on power doze within the limits from 10-3 to 0,4Gy/h (impulse mode) and from 10-1to 2 104Gy/h (current mode). On the basis of the obtained data it is possible to estimate about the possibility of using the detector to prevent emergency accident on a nuclear power plant and for everyday control at a nuclear power plant.

  2. HST/WFC3: Understanding and Mitigating Radiation Damage Effects in the CCD Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, S.; Anderson, J.; Sosey, M.; MacKenty, J.; Gosmeyer, C.; Noeske, K.; Gunning, H.; Bourque, M.

    2015-09-01

    At the heart of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3) UVIS channel resides a 4096x4096 pixel e2v CCD array. While these detectors are performing extremely well after more than 5 years in low-earth orbit, the cumulative effects of radiation damage cause a continual growth in the hot pixel population and a progressive loss in charge transfer efficiency (CTE) over time. The decline in CTE has two effects: (1) it reduces the detected source flux as the defects trap charge during readout and (2) it systematically shifts source centroids as the trapped charge is later released. The flux losses can be significant, particularly for faint sources in low background images. Several mitigation options exist, including target placement within the field of view, empirical stellar photometric corrections, post-flash mode and an empirical pixel-based CTE correction. The application of a post-flash has been remarkably effective in WFC3 at reducing CTE losses in low background images for a relatively small noise penalty. Currently all WFC3 observers are encouraged to post-flash images with low backgrounds. Another powerful option in mitigating CTE losses is the pixel-based CTE correction. Analagous to the CTE correction software currently in use in the HST Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) pipeline, the algorithm employs an empirical observationally-constrained model of how much charge is captured and released in order to reconstruct the image. Applied to images (with or without post-flash) after they are acquired, the software is currently available as a standalone routine. The correction will be incorporated into the standard WFC3 calibration pipeline.

  3. Implementation of a preamplifier-amplifier system for radiation detectors used in Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez, A. A.; Arroyave, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the assembly and testing of a preamplification and amplification system for pulses produced by gaseous radiation detectors commonly used in Mössbauer spectroscopy. The system is composed by a pair of commercial integrated circuits A203 and A206, which operate as charge sensitive preamplifier-shaping amplifier and linear amplifier-low level discriminator, respectively. The integrated circuits were interconnected in the unipolar output mode and placed inside a metallic shielding, which prevents noise amplification for a suitable signal-noise ratio. The system was tested by irradiating a proportional counter LND-45431 with characteristic X rays of 6.3 keV and gamma rays of 14.4 keV emitted by a Mössbauer radioactive source of 57Co (Rh). Unipolar pulses with Gaussian profile were obtained at the output of the linear amplifier, whose amplitudes were close to 0.4 V for 6.3 keV X rays and 1.4 V for 14.4 keV gamma rays. Pulse height spectra showed that the system allows a satisfactory identification of the X-rays and gamma rays emitted by the 57Co source, giving the possibility to make a good selection of the 14.4 keV peak for having a suitable signal-noise ratio in the Mössbauer spectra. Absorption percentages of 14 % were found by taking the Mössbauer spectra of a natural iron absorber. The assembly and tests of the system are presented through this paper.

  4. Clinical radiation therapy measurements with a new commercial synthetic single crystal diamond detector.

    PubMed

    Laub, Wolfram U; Crilly, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A commercial version of a synthetic single crystal diamond detector (SCDD) in a Schottky diode configuration was recently released as the new type 60019 microDiamond detector (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). In this study we investigate the dosimetric properties of this detector to independently confirm that findings from the developing group of the SCDDs still hold true for the commercial version of the SCDDs. We further explore if the use of the microDiamond detector can be expanded to high-energy photon beams of up to 15 MV and to large field measure- ments. Measurements were performed with an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator delivering 6, 10, and 15 MV X-rays, as well as 6, 9, 12, 15, and 20 MeV electron beams. The dependence of the microdiamond detector response on absorbed dose after connecting the detector was investigated. Furthermore, the dark current of the diamond detector was observed after irradiation. Results are compared to similar results from measurements with a diamond detector type 60003. Energy dependency was investigated, as well. Photon depth-dose curves were measured for field sizes 3 × 3, 10 × 10, and 30 × 30 cm2. PDDs were measured with the Semiflex type 31010 detector, microLion type 31018 detector, P Diode type 60016, SRS Diode type 60018, and the microDiamond type 60019 detector (all PTW-Freiburg). Photon profiles were measured at a depth of 10 cm. Electron depth-dose curves normalized to the dose maximum were measured with the 14 × 14 cm2 electron cone. PDDs were measured with a Markus chamber type 23343, an E Diode type 60017 and the microDiamond type 60019 detector (all PTW-Freiburg). Profiles were measured with the E Diode and microDiamond at half of D90, D90, D70, and D50 depths and for electron cone sizes of 6 × 6 cm2, 14 × 14 cm2, and 20 × 20 cm2. Within a tol- erance of 0.5% detector response of the investigated detector was stable without any preirradiation. After preirradition with approximately 250 cGy the detector response was stable within 0.1%. A dark current after irradiation was not observed. The microDiamond detector shows no energy dependence in high energy photon or electron dosimetry. Electron PDD measurements with the E Diode and micro- Diamond are in good agreement. However, compared to E Diode measurements, dose values in the bremsstrahlungs region are about 0.5% lower when measured with the microDiamond detector. Markus detector measurements agree with E Diode measurements in the bremsstrahlungs region. For depths larger than dmax, depth-dose curves of photon beams measured with the microDiamond detector are in close agreement to those measured with the microLion detector for small fields and with those measured with a Semiflex 0.125 cc ionization chamber for large fields. Differences are in the range of 0.25% and less. For profile measurements, microDiamond detector measurements agree well with microLion and P Diode measurements in the high-dose region of the profile and the penumbra region. For areas outside the open field, P Diode measurements are about 0.5%-1.0% higher than microDiamond and microLion measurements. Thus it becomes evident that the investigated diamond detector (type 60019) is suitable for a wide range of applications in high-energy photon and electron dosimetry and is interesting for relative, as well as absolute, dosimetry.  PMID:25493512

  5. Properties of thin film radiation detectors and their application to dosimetry and quality assurance in x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshahat, Bassem

    The characteristics of two different types of thin-film radiation detectors are experimentally investigated: organic photovoltaic cells (OPV) and a new self-powered detector that operates based on high-energy secondary electrons (HEC). Although their working principles are substantially different, they both can be used for radiation detection and image formation in medical applications. OPVs with different active layer material thicknesses and aluminum electrode areas were fabricated. The OPV cell consisted of P3HT: PCBM photoactive materials, composed of donor and acceptor semiconducting organic materials, sandwiched between an aluminum electrode as anode and an indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode as a cathode. The detectors were exposed to 60150 kVp x rays, which generated photocurrent in the active layer. The electric charge production in the OPV cells was measured. The net current as function of beam energy (kVp) was proportional to ~1/kVp0.45 when adjusted for x-ray beam output. The best combination of parameters for these cells was 270-nm active layer thicknesses for 0.7cm-2 electrode area. The measured current ranged from about 0.7 to 2.4 nA/cm2 for 60-150 kVp, corresponding to about 0.09 -- 0.06 nA/cm2/mGy, respectively, when adjusted for the output x-ray source flux. The HEC detection concept was recently proposed and experimentally demonstrated by a UML/HMS research group. HEC detection employs direct conversion of high-energy electron current to detector signal without external power and amplification. The potential of using HEC detectors for diagnostic imaging application was investigated by using a heterogeneous phantom consisting of a water cylinder with Al and wax rod inserts.

  6. Project W-151 flexible receiver radiation detector system acceptance test plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Troyer, G.L.

    1994-12-06

    The attached document is the Acceptance Test Plan for the portion of Project W-151 dealing with acceptance of gamma-ray detectors and associated electronics manufactured at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The document provides a written basis for testing the detector system, which will take place in the 305 building (300 Area).

  7. Radiation Hard Hybrid Pixel Detectors, and a bb¯ Cross-Section Measurement at the CMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibille, Jennifer A.

    Measurements of heavy flavor quark production at hadron colliders provide a good test of the perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD) theory. It is also essential to have a good understanding of the heavy quark production in the search for new physics. Heavy quarks contribute to backgrounds and signals in measurements of higher mass objects, such as the Higgs boson. A key component to each of these measurements is good vertex resolution. In order to ensure reliable operation of the pixel detector, as well as confidence in the results of analyses utilizing it, it is important to study the effects of the radiation on the detector. In the first part of this dissertation, the design of the CMS silicon pixel detector is described. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the high radiation environment on the detector operation. Measurements of the charge collection efficiency, interpixel capacitance, and other properties of the pixel sensors as a function of the radiation damage are presented. In the second part, a measurement of the inclusive bb¯ production cross section using the b → muD 0X, D0 → Kpi decay chain with data from the CMS experiment at the LHC is presented. The data were recorded with the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (CERN) in 2010 using unprescaled single muon triggers corresponding to a total luminosity of 25 pb-1. The differential cross section is measured for pD0mT > 6 GeV/c and |eta| < 2.4 corresponding to a total cross section of 4.36+/-0.54(stat.) +0.28-0.25 (sys.)+/-0.17( B )+/-0.23( L ) mu b.

  8. Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions for nuclear radiation detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Hong, W.S.; Luke, P.N.; Wang, N.W.; Ziemba, F.P.

    1996-10-01

    Results on characterization of electrical properties of amorphous Si films for the 3 different growth methods (RF sputtering, PECVD [plasma enhanced], LPCVD [low pressure]) are reported. Performance of these a-Si films as heterojunctions on high resistivity p-type and n- type crystalline Si is examined by measuring the noise, leakage current, and the alpha particle response of 5mm dia detector structures. It is demonstrated that heterojunction detectors formed by RF sputtered films and PECVD films are comparable in performance with conventional surface barrier detectors. Results indicate that the a-Si/c-Si heterojunctions have the potential to greatly simplify detector fabrication. Directions for future avenues of nuclear particle detector development are indicated.

  9. Processing and characterization of edgeless radiation detectors for large area detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalliopuska, J.; Wu, X.; Jakubek, J.; Eränen, S.; Virolainen, T.

    2013-12-01

    The edgeless or active edge silicon pixel detectors have been gaining a lot of interest due to improved silicon processing capabilities. At VTT, we have recently triggered a multi-project wafer process of edgeless silicon detectors. Totally 80 pieces of 150 mm wafers were processed to provide a given number of detector variations. Fabricated detector thicknesses were 100, 200, 300 and 500 μm. The polarities of the fabricated detectors on the given thicknesses were n-in-n, p-in-n, n-in-p and p-in-p. On the n-in-n and n-in-p wafers the pixel isolation was made either with a common p-stop grid or with a shallow p-spray doping. The wafer materials were high resistivity Float Zone and Magnetic Czochralski silicon with crystal orientation of <100>. In this paper, the electric properties on various types of detectors are presented. The results from spectroscopic measurement show a good energy resolution of the edge pixels, indicating an excellent charge collection near the edge pixels of the edgeless detector.

  10. Development of a novel radiation imaging detector system for in vivo gene imaging in small animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenberger, A.G.; Bradley, E.L.; Saha, M.S.; Majewski, S.

    1998-06-01

    The authors report preliminary results from a prototype of radiation imaging technology which takes advantage of the emission properties of the radioisotope iodine 125 ({sup 125}I) as the probe. The detector system utilizes crystal scintillators and a position sensitive photomultiplier tube. Iodine 125 decays via electron capture emitting a 35-keV gamma ray with the prompt emission of several 27-32-keV {Kappa} {alpha} and {Kappa} {beta} shell X rays. Because of this, a coincidence condition can be set to detect the {sup 125}I decay, thus reducing background radiation contribution to the image. The prototype detector the authors report has a limited sensitivity and detection area because of the size of the scintillators and photomultiplier tubes, yet it performed well enough to demonstrate the viability of this method for imaging {sup 125}I in a mouse. Mouse imaging studies of iodine uptake by the thyroid and melatonin binding have been done with this detector system using doses of {sup 125}I alone or attached to the melatonin. Many studies in molecular biology follow the expression and regulation of a gene at different stages of an organism`s development or under different physiological conditions. Molecular biology research could benefit from this detection system by utilizing {sup 125}I-labeled gene probes.

  11. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detectors at high energy ion beams for cosmic radiation measurements: HAMLET results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J.; Pálfalvi, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    The MATROSHKA experiments and the related HAMLET project funded by the European Commission aimed to study the dose burden of the crew working on the International Space Station (ISS). During these experiments a human phantom equipped with several thousands of radiation detectors was exposed to cosmic rays inside and outside the ISS. Besides the measurements realized in Earth orbit, the HAMLET project included also a ground-based program of calibration and intercomparison of the different detectors applied by the participating groups using high-energy ion beams. The Space Dosimetry Group of the Centre for Energy Research (formerly Atomic Energy Research Institute) participated in these experiments with passive solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The paper presents the results of the calibration experiments performed in the years 2008-2011 at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. The data obtained serve as update and improvement for the previous calibration curves which are necessary for the evaluation of the SSNTDs exposed in unknown space radiation fields.

  12. Radiation-hard Active Pixel Sensors for HL-LHC Detector Upgrades based on HV-CMOS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miucci, A.; Gonella, L.; Hemperek, T.; Hügging, F.; Krüger, H.; Obermann, T.; Wermes, N.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Backhaus, M.; Capeans, M.; Feigl, S.; Nessi, M.; Pernegger, H.; Ristic, B.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Ferrere, D.; Iacobucci, G.; La Rosa, A.; Muenstermann, D.; George, M.; Große-Knetter, J.; Quadt, A.; Rieger, J.; Weingarten, J.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Hynds, D.; Kreidl, C.; Peric, I.; Breugnon, P.; Pangaud, P.; Godiot-Basolo, S.; Fougeron, D.; Bompard, F.; Clemens, J. C.; Liu, J.; Barbero, M.; Rozanov, A.; HV-CMOS Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    Luminosity upgrades are discussed for the LHC (HL-LHC) which would make updates to the detectors necessary, requiring in particular new, even more radiation-hard and granular, sensors for the inner detector region. A proposal for the next generation of inner detectors is based on HV-CMOS: a new family of silicon sensors based on commercial high-voltage CMOS technology, which enables the fabrication of part of the pixel electronics inside the silicon substrate itself. The main advantages of this technology with respect to the standard silicon sensor technology are: low material budget, fast charge collection time, high radiation tolerance, low cost and operation at room temperature. A traditional readout chip is still needed to receive and organize the data from the active sensor and to handle high-level functionality such as trigger management. HV-CMOS has been designed to be compatible with both pixel and strip readout. In this paper an overview of HV2FEI4, a HV-CMOS prototype in 180 nm AMS technology, will be given. Preliminary results after neutron and X-ray irradiation are shown.

  13. Novel Surface Preparation and Contacts for CdZnTe Nuclear Radiation Detectors Using Patterned Films of Semiconductors and Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael; Conway, Adam; Payne, Steve

    2013-04-01

    The semiconductor Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has emerged as the material of choice for room temperature detection of X-rays and gamma-rays. The detectors will cover the energy range from 30 keV to several MeV, and will achieve excellent 662 keV energy resolution. The development of high resolution gamma ray detectors based on CZT is dependent on low electronic noise levels. One common source of noise is the surface leakage current, which limits the performance of advanced readout schemes such as the coplanar grid and pixelated architectures with steering grids. Excessive bulk leakage current can result from one of several surface effects: leaky native oxides, unsatisfied bonds, and surface damage. We propose to fabricate and test oriented [111] CZT crystals with thicknesses up to 1.5 cm with an innovative detection technique based on co-planar or other electron only transport designs using plasma processing, thin film sputtering, chemical passivation and wet etching techniques. Compared to conventional pixel detectors, the proposed contact configuration needs lower power consumption and a lower cost. The detector design can be used for building very low-cost handheld radiation detection devices.

  14. A detector system for SPIDR, A mission to perform spectroscopy and photometry of the IGM's diffuse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, Jonathan S.; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy A.; Goeke, Robert F.; Gsell, J. C.; Gsell, V. T.

    2003-02-01

    The primary goal of the Spectroscopy and Photometry of the IGM's Diffuse Radiation (SPIDR) Mission is to detect and map the huge filamentary structures, the "cosmic web", predicted to be present in the IGM. The SPIDR instrument comprises six imaging spectrographs providing 8 x 8 and 2.5 x 2.5 high-resolution spatial maps of IGM features in the OVI and CIV wavelength bands. For simplicity and economy all six spectrographs utilize virtually identical detector systems. Each detector records a two-dimensional image whose axes represent spectral and one-dimensional spatial information, the second spatial axis being obtained by tomographic reconstruction. We describe the design of the prototype detector built for the SPIDR mission. The detector uses a conventional microchannel plate (MCP) arrangement with a charge division readout anode used in the image charge configuration. The image charge technique provides enhanced resolution, linearity and stability in a more compact mechanical design. The predictable distribution of the induced image charge footprint has allowed us to accurately simulate the readout performance in software. The conservative requirements of the SPIDR spectrograph allow the use of a conventional wedge and strip anode which benefits from the design improvements generated using our software simulation. Redesign of the boundary electrodes has enabled us to improve overall linearity and increase useful imaging area. We describe the integrated electronics system for the SPIDR prototype, designed for low mass and power consumption. A single printed circuit board is used to house analog signal processing, digital processing, and power systems.

  15. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Diener, P.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-01

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 ± 0.2.

  16. Photon noise limited radiation detection with lens-antenna coupled microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S. J. C.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Diener, P.; Endo, A.; Janssen, R. M. J.; Ferrari, L.; Baryshev, A. M.

    2011-08-15

    Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) have shown great potential for sub-mm instrumentation because of the high scalability of the technology. Here, we demonstrate for the first time in the sub-mm band (0.1-2 mm) a photon noise limited performance of a small antenna coupled MKID detector array and we describe the relation between photon noise and MKID intrinsic generation-recombination noise. Additionally, we use the observed photon noise to measure the optical efficiency of detectors to be 0.8 {+-} 0.2.

  17. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    SciTech Connect

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H. Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Cartier, S.; Medjoubi, K.

    2015-12-15

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10{sup 4} photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm{sup 2} pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm{sup 2}. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  18. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Bergamaschi, A.; Brückner, M.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jaggi, A.; Maliakal, D.; Mayilyan, D.; Medjoubi, K.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Ramilli, M.; Ruder, Ch.; Schädler, L.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 104 photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm2 pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm2. Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines.

  19. Radiation hardness assessment of the charge-integrating hybrid pixel detector JUNGFRAU 1.0 for photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Jaggi, A; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2015-12-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications in free electron lasers, particularly SwissFEL, and synchrotron light sources. JUNGFRAU is an automatic gain switching, charge-integrating detector which covers a dynamic range of more than 10(4) photons of an energy of 12 keV with a good linearity, uniformity of response, and spatial resolving power. The JUNGFRAU 1.0 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) features a 256 × 256 pixel matrix of 75 × 75 μm(2) pixels and is bump-bonded to a 320 μm thick Si sensor. Modules of 2 × 4 chips cover an area of about 4 × 8 cm(2). Readout rates in excess of 2 kHz enable linear count rate capabilities of 20 MHz (at 12 keV) and 50 MHz (at 5 keV). The tolerance of JUNGFRAU to radiation is a key issue to guarantee several years of operation at free electron lasers and synchrotrons. The radiation hardness of JUNGFRAU 1.0 is tested with synchrotron radiation up to 10 MGy of delivered dose. The effect of radiation-induced changes on the noise, baseline, gain, and gain switching is evaluated post-irradiation for both the ASIC and the hybridized assembly. The bare JUNGFRAU 1.0 chip can withstand doses as high as 10 MGy with minor changes to its noise and a reduction in the preamplifier gain. The hybridized assembly, in particular the sensor, is affected by the photon irradiation which mainly shows as an increase in the leakage current. Self-healing of the system is investigated during a period of 11 weeks after the delivery of the radiation dose. Annealing radiation-induced changes by bake-out at 100 °C is investigated. It is concluded that the JUNGFRAU 1.0 pixel is sufficiently radiation-hard for its envisioned applications at SwissFEL and synchrotron beam lines. PMID:26724009

  20. Gamma radiation induced background determination for (n,γ) measurements with 4π detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Reifarth, R.; Browne, J. C.; Esch, E. I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2003-07-29

    The main focus of this report is to investigate possibilities to disentangle the target originating γ- background from background caused by scattered neutrons at the sample assuming a DANCE like detector to measure detect the capture events.

  1. Power monitoring in space nuclear reactors using silicon carbide radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Patel, Jagdish U.; Williams, John G.

    2005-01-01

    Space reactor power monitors based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor neutron detectors are proposed. Detection of fast leakage neutrons using SiC detectors in ex-core locations could be used to determine reactor power: Neutron fluxes, gamma-ray dose rates and ambient temperatures have been calculated as a function of distance from the reactor core, and the feasibility of power monitoring with SiC detectors has been evaluated at several ex-core locations. Arrays of SiC diodes can be configured to provide the required count rates to monitor reactor power from startup to full power Due to their resistance to temperature and the effects of neutron and gamma-ray exposure, SiC detectors can be expected to provide power monitoring information for the fill mission of a space reactor.

  2. Progress in the development of two-dimensional multiwire detectors for X-ray synchrotron radiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Yu, B.; Capel, M.

    1993-06-01

    A report is presented of the developments in two-dimensional, multiwire detectors for X-ray synchrotron radiation experiments, using delay line position readout. Advances have been made in methods of cathode design and fabrication, a description is given of the trade-off between position resolution and count rate capability, and the importance of low dead-time TDCs is illustrated. A detector has been operating successfully for well over a year at the time resolved, scattering station of the National Synchrotron Light Source; results are presented from this which illustrate the very good resolution (100 {mu}m FWHM), differential non-linearity ({plus_minus}4%) and absolute position stability of these devices, and the importance of low differential non-linearity for these types of experiment.

  3. Field calibration of PADC track etch detectors for local neutron dosimetry in man using different radiation qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen; Boschung, Markus; Mayer, Sabine; Clasie, Benjamin; Kry, Stephen F.; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-12-01

    In order to quantify the dose from neutrons to a patient for contemporary radiation treatment techniques, measurements inside phantoms, representing the patient, are necessary. Published reports on neutron dose measurements cover measurements performed free in air or on the surface of phantoms and the doses are expressed in terms of personal dose equivalent or ambient dose equivalent. This study focuses on measurements of local neutron doses inside a radiotherapy phantom and presents a field calibration procedure for PADC track etch detectors. An initial absolute calibration factor in terms of Hp(10) for personal dosimetry is converted into neutron dose equivalent and additional calibration factors are derived to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence for different radiation therapy beam qualities and depths in the phantom. The neutron spectra used for the calculation of the calibration factors are determined in different depths by Monte Carlo simulations for the investigated radiation qualities. These spectra are used together with the energy dependent response function of the PADC detectors to account for the spectral changes in the neutron fluence. The resulting total calibration factors are 0.76 for a photon beam (in- and out-of-field), 1.00 (in-field) and 0.84 (out-of-field) for an active proton beam and 1.05 (in-field) and 0.91 (out-of-field) for a passive proton beam, respectively. The uncertainty for neutron dose measurements using this field calibration method is less than 40%. The extended calibration procedure presented in this work showed that it is possible to use PADC track etch detectors for measurements of local neutron dose equivalent inside anthropomorphic phantoms by accounting for spectral changes in the neutron fluence.

  4. Charged particle spectra obtained with the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD) on the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehresmann, Bent; Zeitlin, Cary; Hassler, Donald M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Böhm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Brinza, David E.; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Posner, Arik; Rafkin, Scot; Reitz, Günther

    2014-03-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD)—situated inside the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover—is the first ever instrument to measure the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars. To fully understand the influence of this surface radiation field in terms of potential hazard to life, a detailed knowledge of its composition is necessary. Charged particles are a major component of this environment, both galactic cosmic rays propagating to the Martian surface and secondary particles created by interactions of these cosmic rays with the atoms of the Martian atmosphere and soil. Here we present particle fluxes for a wide range of ion species, providing detailed energy spectra in the low-energy range (up to several hundred MeV/nucleon particle energy), and integral fluxes for higher energies. In addition to being crucial for the understanding of the hazards of this radiation to possible future manned missions to Mars, the data reported here provide valuable input for evaluating and validating particle transport models currently used to estimate the radiation environment on Mars and elsewhere in space. It is now possible for the first time to compare model results for expected surface particle fluxes with actual ground-based measurements.

  5. Investigation of the Charge Collection Efficiency of CdMnTe Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov A.; Rafiei, R.; Boardman, D.; Sarbutt, A.; Prokopovich, A.; Kim, K.; Reinhard, M.I.; James, R.B.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the growth, fabrication and characterization of indium-doped cadmium manganese telluride (CdMnTe) crystals grown by the vertical Bridgman technique. The 10 x 10 x 1.9 mm{sup 3} samples have been fabricated, and the charge collection properties of the CdMnTe detectors have been measured. Alpha-particle spectroscopy measurements have yielded an average charge collection efficiency approaching 100%. Ion beam induced charge (IBIC) measurements have been performed by raster scanning focused 5.5 MeV {sup 4}He beams onto the detectors. Spatially resolved charge collection efficiency maps have been produced for a range of detector bias voltages. Inhomogeneities in the charge transport of the CdMnTe crystals have been associated with chains of Te inclusions within the detector bulk, and the reduction in charge collection efficiency in their locality has been quantified. It has been shown that the role of Te inclusions in degrading charge collection is reduced with increasing values of bias voltage. IBIC measurements for a range of low biases have highlighted the evolution of the charge collection uniformity across the detectors.

  6. Detective quantum efficiency of an amorphous selenium detector to megavoltage radiation.

    PubMed

    Mah, D; Rawlinson, J A; Rowlands, J A

    1999-05-01

    The spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE(f)) of a high-resolution selenium-based imaging system has been measured at megavoltage energies. These results have been compared with theoretical calculations. The imaging system was a video tube with a 5 microm amorphous selenium (a-Se) target which was irradiated by 1.25 MeV gamma-rays. The modulation transfer function (MTF) decreased rapidly with spatial frequency (determined by spread of electrons in the build-up material) while the noise power spectrum was constant as a function of spatial frequency. The DQE obtained from these MTF and noise power measurements was compared with a Monte Carlo model of the pulse height spectrum of the detector. The DQE(0) model accounted for the interaction of x rays with the detector as well as the energy-dependent gain (charge generated/energy deposition). Good agreement between the calculated and measured DQE(0) was found. The model was also used to estimate the DQE(f) of a metal plate + a-Se detector which was compared with a metal plate + phosphor system of the same mass thickness. The DQE(f) s of both detectors are very similar, indicating that the choice of which detector is better will be based upon criteria other than DQE(f), such as read-out approach, ease of manufacture or sensitivity. PMID:10368025

  7. Pulse-shape analysis for gamma background rejection in thermal neutron radiation using CVD diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavrigin, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Pappalardo, A.; Weiss, C.

    2015-09-01

    A novel technique for the rejection of gamma background from charged-particle spectra was demonstrated using a CVD diamond detector with a 6Li neutron converter installed at a thermal neutron beamline of the TRIGA research reactor at the Atominstitut (Vienna University of Technology). Spectra of the alpha particles and tritons of 6Li(n,T)4He thermal neutron capture reaction were separated from the gamma background by a new algorithm based on pulse-shape analysis. The thermal neutron capture in 6Li is already used for neutron flux monitoring, but the ability to remove gamma background allows using a CVD diamond detector for thermal neutron counting. The pulse-shape analysis can equally be applied to all cases where the charged products of an interaction are absorbed in the diamond and to other background particles that fully traverse the detector.

  8. De-polarization of a CdZnTe radiation detector by pulsed infrared light

    SciTech Connect

    Dědič, V. Franc, J.; Rejhon, M.; Grill, R.; Zázvorka, J.; Sellin, P. J.

    2015-07-20

    This work is focused on a detailed study of pulsed mode infrared light induced depolarization of CdZnTe detectors operating at high photon fluxes. This depolarizing effect is a result of the decrease of positive space charge that is caused by the trapping of photogenerated holes at a deep level. The reduction in positive space charge is due to the optical transition of electrons from a valence band to the deep level due to additional infrared illumination. In this paper, we present the results of pulse mode infrared depolarization, by which it is possible to keep the detector in the depolarized state during its operation. The demonstrated mechanism represents a promising way to increase the charge collection efficiency of CdZnTe X-ray detectors operating at high photon fluxes.

  9. The ICARE-NG detectors' family: a new set of data for Earth's radiation belt characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscher, Daniel; Lazaro, Didier; Maget, Vincent; Rolland, Guy; Lorfevre, Eric; Ecoffet, Robert

    10 years ago, CNES and ONERA have developed a new low mass and low power solid state detector named ICARE-NG. This monitor is currently flying in the frame of CARMEN-1 & 2 missions respectively on SAC-D and JASON-2 satellites. The next mission, CARMEN-3, corresponds to the same instrument planned to be mounted onboard the upcoming JASON-3 satellite. Different papers have already highlighted the quality of the measurements obtained thanks to the high energy resolution of the instrument, for both electrons and protons. This talk aims at reviewing the benefits of such a detector (much simpler than a scientific one) providing multi-spacecraft measurements in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). In particular, these monitors are a rare opportunity to observe both long term variations in LEO and gradients between orbits. Finally, we will present data comparison and highlights from these detectors during recent magnetic storms.

  10. Radiation hard position-sensitive cryogenic silicon detectors: the Lazarus effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, V. G.; Abreu, M. C.; Bell, W. H.; Berglund, P.; de Boer, W.; Borchi, E.; Borer, K.; Bruzzi, M.; Buontempo, S.; Casagrande, L.; Chapuy, S.; Cindro, V.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Vi, C. Da; Devine, S.; Dezillie, B.; Dimcovski, Z.; Eremin, V.; Esposito, A.; Granata, V.; Grigoriev, E.; Hauler, F.; Heijne, E.; Heising, S.; Janos, S.; Jungermann, L.; Konorov, I.; Li, Z.; Loureno, C.; Miku?, M.; Niinikoski, T. O.; O'Shea, V.; Pagano, S.; Paul, S.; Pirollo, S.; Pretzl, K.; Rato, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Smith, K.; Sonderegger, P.; Sousa, P.; Verbitskaya, E.; Watts, S.; Zavrtanik, M.; (RD39 Collaboration)

    2000-05-01

    The discovery of the so-called Lazarus effect, namely the recovery of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) of irradiated silicon detectors by means of cryogenic cooling has entailed an increasing interest in the behavior of silicon detectors at cryogenic temperatures. We have measured the CCE of a silicon p-i-n diode detector previously irradiated with an equivalent fluence of 110 15 n/ cm2 neutrons of 1 MeV energy. The charge collection efficiency has been measured at 77 K, showing that the low-temperature operation considerably decreases the bias current. This is also the case when forward voltage bias is applied, which then becomes a suitable option. In this condition, the sample shows a charge collection efficiency in excess of 65% at 250 V corresponding to a most probable signal for a minimum ionizing particle of 21 000 e-.

  11. On the possibility to use semiconductive hybrid pixel detectors for study of radiation belt of the Earth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskov, A.; Shelkov, G.; Smolyanskiy, P.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2016-02-01

    The scientific apparatus GAMMA-400 designed for study of electromagnetic and hadron components of cosmic rays will be launched to an elliptic orbit with the apogee of about 300 000 km and the perigee of about 500 km. Such a configuration of the orbit allows it to cross periodically the radiation belt and the outer part of magnetosphere. We discuss the possibility to use hybrid pixel detecters based on the Timepix chip and semiconductive sensors on board the GAMMA-400 apparatus. Due to high granularity of the sensor (pixel size is 55 mum) and possibility to measure independently an energy deposition in each pixel, such compact and lightweight detector could be a unique instrument for study of spatial, energy and time structure of electron and proton components of the radiation belt.

  12. Aperture and detector cavity considerations for wide and medium field-of-view radiometers. [onboard Earth Radiation Budget Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, R. A.; Devereux, W.

    1978-01-01

    Design constraints regarding the ERBSS nonscanning radiometers are related to the necessity to exclude, as much as possible, unwanted radiation from the detectors. The usual approach to accomplish this is to provide an aperture which is both blackened and serrated on its interior surfaces. However, such an approach is not entirely satisfactory for a number of reasons. A somewhat different method to aperture design is, therefore, considered. This method minimizes the three sources of unwanted radiation and alleviates also the problem of aperture temperature variations. To achieve the potential accuracy of the considered type of radiometer, it is essential to design the cavity in such a way that any entering photon will experience at least five reflections before it is allowed to exit the radiometer. A number of feasible cavity configurations are considered.

  13. Laser-processed three dimensional graphitic electrodes for diamond radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caylar, Benoît; Pomorski, Michal; Bergonzo, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    We have used an original approach for diamond detectors where three dimensional buried graphitic electrodes are processed in the bulk of a diamond substrate via laser-induced graphitization. Prototype made of polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond was fabricated using a nanosecond UV laser. Its charge collection efficiency was evaluated using α-particles emitted by a 241-Americium source. An improved charge collection efficiency was measured proving that laser micro-machining of diamond is a valid option for the future fabrication of three dimensional diamond detectors.

  14. Nanostructured LaF{sub 3}:Ce Quantum Dot Nuclear Radiation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P., Guise, R., Reed, M., Mukhopadhyay, S., Yuan, D.

    2010-11-01

    Many radioactive isotopes have low energy X-rays and high energy gamma rays of interest for detection. The goal of the work presented was to demonstrate the possibility of measuring both low-energy X-rays and relatively high-energy gamma rays simultaneously using the nano-structured lanthanum bromide, lanthanum fluoride, or cerium bromide. The key accomplishments of the project was the building and acquisition of the LaF3:Ce nanocomposite detectors. Nanocomposite detectors are sensitive to {gamma}s as well as ns and X-rays.

  15. Laser-processed three dimensional graphitic electrodes for diamond radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Caylar, Benoı-carett; Pomorski, Michal; Bergonzo, Philippe

    2013-07-22

    We have used an original approach for diamond detectors where three dimensional buried graphitic electrodes are processed in the bulk of a diamond substrate via laser-induced graphitization. Prototype made of polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond was fabricated using a nanosecond UV laser. Its charge collection efficiency was evaluated using α-particles emitted by a 241-Americium source. An improved charge collection efficiency was measured proving that laser micro-machining of diamond is a valid option for the future fabrication of three dimensional diamond detectors.

  16. Effect of electron transport properties on unipolar CdZnTe radiation detectors: LUND, SpectrumPlus, and Coplanar Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph B. James

    2000-01-07

    Device simulations of (1) the laterally-contacted-unipolar-nuclear detector (LUND), (2) the SpectrumPlus, (3) and the coplanar grid made of Cd{sub 0.9}Zn{sub 0.1}Te (CZT) were performed for {sup 137}Cs irradiation by 662.15 keV gamma-rays. Realistic and controlled simulations of the gamma-ray interactions with the CZT material were done using the MCNP4B2 Monte Carlo program, and the detector responses were simulated using the Sandia three-dimensional multielectrode simulation program (SandTMSP). The simulations were done for the best and the worst expected carrier nobilities and lifetimes of currently commercially available CZT materials for radiation detector applications. For the simulated unipolar devices, the active device volumes were relatively large and the energy resolutions were fairly good, but these performance characteristics were found to be very sensitive to the materials properties. The internal electric fields, the weighting potentials, and the charge induced efficiency maps were calculated to give insights into the operation of these devices.

  17. Resonant nuclear scattering of synchrotron radiation: Detector development and specular scattering from a thin layer of {sup 57}Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, A.Q.R.

    1995-04-01

    This thesis explores resonant nudear scattering of synchrotron radiation. An introductory chapter describes some useful concepts, such as speedup and coherent enhancement, in the context of some basic physical principles. Methods of producing highly monochromatic synchrotron beams usmg either electronic or nuclear scattering are also discussed. The body of the thesis concentrates on detector development and specular scattering from iynthetic layered materials. A detector employing n-dcrochannel plate electron multipliers is shown to have good ({approximately}50%) effidency for detecting 14.4 key x-rays incident at small ({approximately}0.5 degree) grazing angles onto Au or CsI photocathodes. However, being complicated to use, it was replaced with a large area (>=lan2) avalanche photodiode (APD) detector. The APD`s are simpler to use and have comparable (30--70%) efficiencies at 14.4 key, subnanosecond time resolution, large dynan-dc range (usable at rates up to {approximately}10{sup 8} photons/second) and low (<{approximately}0.01 cts/sec) background rates. Maxwell`s equations are used to derive the specular x-ray reflectivity of layered materials with resonant transitions and complex polarization dependencies. The effects of interfadal roughness are treated with some care, and the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) used to describe electronic scattering is generalized to the nuclear case. The implications of the theory are discussed in the context of grazing incidence measurements with emphasis on the kinematic and dynamical aspects of the scattering.

  18. Field ionization of alkali-metal Rydberg states formed by resonance absorption of sunlight: Application as an ultraviolet radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, T.; Bekov, G.

    1995-04-01

    In order to assess the long-term threat posed to plant and animal life by ozone depletion and the resulting increase of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, the United States Department of Agriculture has established a UV irradiance monitoring program, with emphasis on the UV-B wavelength region between 290 nm and 320 nanometers. However, there is serious concern over the long-term stability of conventional instruments used to measure the UV-B flux. We have recently demonstrated the feasibility of using resonance ionization to monitor specific wavelengths in the UV-B band. However, instead of using high-intensity lasers to detect a few atoms as is typically done in resonance ionization experiments, the UV-B monitor is based upon using a relatively high pressure (about 10{sup -5} Torr) of vapor-phase cesium, rubidium, and/or potassium to detect photons. Specific Rydberg states formed by resonant absorption of UV-B radiation in these vapors can be identified by their unique voltage threshold for ionization. Our initial work has established that there is a high correlation between the detected Rydberg state and the wavelength of the absorbed light, so that it should be possible to construct a UV-B detector with an internal, absolute wavelength calibration. The initial work will be discussed and the prospect for making a UV-B detector will be examined.

  19. Radiation hardness investigation of avalanche photodiodes for the Projectile Spectator Detector readout at the Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushpil, Vasilij; Mikhaylov, Vasily; Kushpil, Svetlana; Tlustý, Pavel; Svoboda, Ondrej; Kugler, Andrej

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss results of avalanche photodiodes radiation tests for Projectile Spectator Detector at future Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment. The tests were carried out in Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR in Řež using the cyclotron facility. Secondary neutron beam was used for irradiation because the main radiation damage in the Projectile Spectator Detector is caused by neutrons. Two types of the avalanche photodiodes from Zecotek and Ketek manufacturers were investigated. Special attention was given to the noise investigation and self-annealing after the irradiation. We have irradiated two Ketek PM3375 diodes with equivalent dose for 1 MeV neutrons equal to 2.5±0.2×1012 n/cm2, and single Zecotek MAPD-3N diode with equivalent dose for 1 MeV neutrons equal to 3.4±0.2×1012 n/cm2. All the types of the diodes have shown an increasing level of the noise after the irradiation. From that we can conclude that those avalanche photodiodes are not able to detect single photons anymore due to high noise levels.

  20. Scintillating plastic optical fiber radiation detectors in high energy particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1991-10-26

    We describe the application of scintillating optical fiber in instrumentation for high energy particle physics. The basic physics of the scintillation process in polymers is discussed first and then we outline the fundamentals of scintillating fiber technology. Fiber performance, optimization, and characterization measurements are given. Detector applications in the areas of particle tracking and particle energy determination are then described. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, D. N.; Ayyappan, R.; Kamble, L. P.; Singh, J. P.; Muralikrishna, L. V.; Alex, M.; Balagi, V.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.

    2008-05-01

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ~1 × 10-5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mm×160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face & diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6×10-9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2×10-7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5×10-5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4×10-6mbar in the same time under the same conditions.

  2. Results from the Medipix-2 and Timepix Ionizing Radiation Imaging Detectors on BEXUS stratospheric balloon student campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbar, Jaroslav; Scheirich, Jan; Jakubek, Jan

    Results of the first two experiments using the semiconductor pixel detectors of the Medipix fam-ily for energetic particle imaging in the stratospheric environment are presented. The original detecting device was based on the hybrid pixel detectors of Medipix-2 and Timepix developed at CERN with USB interface developed at Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics of Czech Technical University in Prague. The detectors were used in tracking mode allowing them to operate as an active nuclear emulsion". The actual flight time of BEXUS7 with Medipix-2 on 8th October 2008 was over 4 hours, with 2 hours at stable floating altitude of 26km. BEXUS9 measurements of 3.5 hour duration by Timepix, Medipix-2 and ST-6 Geiger telescope instruments took place in arctic atmosphere till ceiling altitude of 24km on 11th October 2009. Stratospheric balloon platform is the optimal realization for all in-situ measurements of atmo-spheric electricity. Not only because of the high altitudes reached, but also due to its slow ascent velocity for statistically relevant sampling of the ambient environment for improving cosmic ray induced ionisation rate model inputs. The flight opportunity for BEXUS student projects was provided by Education department of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Eu-rolaunch -Collaboration of Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) and German Space Agency (DLR). The scientific goal was to check energetic particle type altitudinal dependencies, si-multaneously testing proper detector calibration by detecting fluxes of ionizing radiation while evaluating instrumentation endurance and performance.

  3. Ionizing Radiation Detectors Based on Ge-Doped Optical Fibers Inserted in Resonant Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Avino, Saverio; D’Avino, Vittoria; Giorgini, Antonio; Pacelli, Roberto; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Cella, Laura; De Natale, Paolo; Gagliardi, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of ionizing radiation (IR) is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. Optical fiber sensors have recently proven good candidates as radiation dosimeters. Here we investigate the effect of IR on germanosilicate optical fibers. A piece of Ge-doped fiber enclosed between two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is irradiated with gamma radiation generated by a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. With respect to other FBG-based IR dosimeters, here the sensor is only the bare fiber without any special internal structure. A near infrared laser is frequency locked to the cavity modes for high resolution measurement of radiation induced effects on the fiber optical parameters. In particular, we observe a variation of the fiber thermo-optic response with the radiation dose delivered, as expected from the interaction with Ge defect centers, and demonstrate a detection limit of 360 mGy. This method can have an impact in those contexts where low radiation doses have to be measured both in small volumes or over large areas, such as radiation therapy and radiation protection, while bare optical fibers are cheap and disposable. PMID:25686311

  4. Tests of the radiation hardness of VLSI Integrated Circuits and Silicon Strip Detectors for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) under neutron, proton, and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.J.; Milner, C.; Sommer, W.F. ); Carteglia, N.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Ellison, J.A. ); Ferguson, P. ); Giubellino

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop a silicon strip central tracking detector system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) we are studying the effects of radiation damage in silicon detectors and their associated front-end readout electronics. We report on the results of neutron and proton irradiations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and {gamma}-ray irradiations at UC Santa Cruz (UCSC). Individual components on single-sided AC-coupled silicon strip detectors and on test structures were tested. Circuits fabricated in a radiation hard CMOS process and individual transistors fabricated using dielectric isolation bipolar technology were also studied. Results indicate that a silicon strip tracking detector system should have a lifetime of at least one decade at the SSC. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of beta radiation response function for semiconductor Si detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujić, Selena; Milošević, Miodrag; Kozmidis-Luburić, Uranija; Bikit, Ištvan

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the modeling of the Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detector for the beta particles response function simulations with the MCNP-5 code. The simulated and measured energy response functions were compared and a good agreement was found in the entire range of energies. The verified model of a PIPS detector was applied in a non-destructive method that determines the activity of beta emitters in the sample with a known geometry and atomic number densities. The procedure for the identification of beta emitters in the samples was also described. Finally, the application of the proposed method for the determination of 137Cs and 90Sr activity in water samples taken from the RA reactor spent fuel storage pools and from the paper filter taken from an air monitor operated during repackaging of spent fuel elements, was presented.

  6. Application of fission track detectors to californium-252 neutron dosimetry in tissue near the radiation source.

    PubMed

    Oswald, R A; Lanzl, L H; Rozenfeld, M

    1981-01-01

    Fission track detectors were applied to a unique problem in neutron dosimetry. Measurements of neutron doses were required at locations within a tumor of 1 cm diameter implanted on the back of a mouse and surrounded by a square array of four 252Cf medical sources. Measurements made in a tissue-equivalent mouse phantom showed that the neutron dose rate to the center of the tumor was 2.18 rads micrograms-1 h-1 +/- 8.4%. The spatial variation of neutron dose to the tumor ranged from 1.88 to 2.55 rads micrograms-1 h-1. These measurements agree with calculated values of neutron dose to those locations in the phantom. Fission track detectors have been found to be a reliable tool for neutron dosimetry for geometries in which one wishes to know neutron dose values which may vary considerably over distances of 1 cm or less. PMID:7322053

  7. Transient and steady-state dark current mechanisms in amorphous selenium avalanche radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kabir, M. Z.; Imam, Safayat-Al

    2013-04-15

    A theoretical model for describing bias-dependent transient and steady-state behaviors of dark current in amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche detector structures has been developed. The analytical model considers bulk thermal generation current from mid-gap sates, transient carrier depletion, and carrier injection from the electrodes incorporating avalanche multiplication. The proposed physics-based dark current model is compared with the published experimental results on three potential a-Se avalanche detector structures. The steady-state dark current is the minimum for the structures that have effective blocking layers for both holes and electrons. The transient decay time to reach a plateau decreases considerably with increasing electric field.

  8. GEM detector development for tokamak plasma radiation diagnostics: SXR poloidal tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, Maryna; Malinowski, Karol; Ziółkowski, Adam; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, Ewa; Czarski, Tomasz; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Zabołotny, Wojciech; Wojeński, Andrzej; Kolasiński, Piotr; Krawczyk, Rafał D.

    2015-09-01

    An increased attention to tungsten material is related to a fact that it became a main candidate for the plasma facing material in ITER and future fusion reactor. The proposed work refers to the studies of W influence on the plasma performances by developing new detectors based on Gas Electron Multiplier GEM) technology for tomographic studies of tungsten transport in ITER-oriented tokamaks, e.g. WEST project. It presents current stage of design and developing of cylindrically bent SXR GEM detector construction for horizontal port implementation. Concept to overcome an influence of constraints on vertical port has been also presented. It is expected that the detecting unit under development, when implemented, will add to the safe operation of tokamak bringing creation of sustainable nuclear fusion reactors a step closer.

  9. Stabilized thallium bromide radiation detectors and methods of making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Leao, Cedric Rocha; Lordi, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    According to one embodiment, a crystal includes thallium bromide (TlBr), one or more positively charged dopants, and one or more negatively charged dopants. According to another embodiment, a system includes a monolithic crystal including thallium bromide (TlBr), one or more positively charged dopants, and one or more negatively charged dopants; and a detector configured to detect a signal response of the crystal.

  10. Development of a 144-channel Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector for Belle II ring-imaging Cherenkov counter with an aerogel radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, S.; Adachi, I.; Hamada, N.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Iwata, S.; Kakuno, H.; Kawai, H.; Korpar, S.; Kriz^an, P.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Ŝantelj, L.; Seljak, A.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Tahirovic, E.; Yoshida, K.; Yusa, Y.

    2015-07-01

    The Belle II detector, a follow up of the very successful Belle experiment, is under construction at the SuperKEKB electron-positron collider at KEK in Japan. For the PID system in the forward region of the spectrometer, a proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov counter with an aerogel radiator is being developed. For the position sensitive photon sensor, a 144-channel Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector has been developed with Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. In this report, we describe the specification of the Hybrid Avalanche Photo-Detector and the status of the mass production.

  11. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors implemented as near-perfect absorbers of coherent radiation.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Mohsen K; Schelew, Ellen; Young, Jeff F

    2015-01-01

    At the core of an ideal single-photon detector is an active material that absorbs and converts every incident photon to a discriminable signal. A large active material favours efficient absorption, but often at the expense of conversion efficiency, noise, speed and timing accuracy. In this work, short (8.5 μm long) and narrow (8 × 35 nm(2)) U-shaped NbTiN nanowires atop silicon-on-insulator waveguides are embedded in asymmetric nanobeam cavities that render them as near-perfect absorbers despite their small volume. At 2.05 K, when biased at 0.9 of the critical current, the resulting superconducting single-photon detectors achieve a near-unity on-chip quantum efficiency for ∼1,545 nm photons, an intrinsic dark count rate <0.1 Hz, a reset time of ∼7 ns, and a timing jitter of ∼55 ps full-width at half-maximum. Such ultracompact, high-performance detectors are essential for progress in integrated quantum optics. PMID:26359204

  12. Characterization of thin p-on-p radiation detectors with active edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, T.; Wu, X.; Kalliopuska, J.; Granja, C.; Jakubek, J.; Jakubek, M.; Härkönen, J.; Gädda, A.

    2016-03-01

    Active edge p-on-p silicon pixel detectors with thickness of 100 μm were fabricated on 150 mm float zone silicon wafers at VTT. By combining measured results and TCAD simulations, a detailed study of electric field distributions and charge collection performances as a function of applied voltage in a p-on-p detector was carried out. A comparison with the results of a more conventional active edge p-on-n pixel sensor is presented. The results from 3D spatial mapping show that at pixel-to-edge distances less than 100 μm the sensitive volume is extended to the physical edge of the detector when the applied voltage is above full depletion. The results from a spectroscopic measurement demonstrate a good functionality of the edge pixels. The interpixel isolation above full depletion and the breakdown voltage were found to be equal to the p-on-n sensor while lower charge collection was observed in the p-on-p pixel sensor below 80 V. Simulations indicated this to be partly a result of a more favourable weighting field in the p-on-n sensor and partly of lower hole lifetimes in the p-bulk.

  13. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons.

  14. Radiation-Hardened Gallium Nitride Detector and Arrays for Fusion Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, K. X., and MacNeil, L.

    2011-09-08

    This poster reports testing to confirm that GaN devices exhibit the extreme radiation hardness needed for use at the NIF, functioning properly after 1x10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2} proton irradiation in one year.

  15. A Radiation-Hard Silicon Drift Detector Array for Extraterrestrial Element Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Chen, Wei; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Keister, Jeff; Li, Shaouri; Li, Zhen; Siddons, David P.; Smith, Graham

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of x-rays from the surface of objects can tell us about the chemical composition Absorption of radiation causes characteristic fluorescence from material being irradiated. By measuring the spectrum of the radiation and identifying lines in the spectrum, the emitting element (s) can be identified. This technique works for any object that has no absorbing atmosphere and significant surface irradiation : Our Moon, the icy moons of Jupiter, the moons of Mars, the planet Mercury, Asteroids and Comets

  16. Extended mode in blocked impurity band detectors for terahertz radiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, K. S.; Li, N.; Wang, C.; Li, L.; Jing, Y. L.; Wen, J.; Li, M. Y.; Wang, H.; Zhou, X. H. Li, Z. F.; Lu, W.

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate the existence of an interfacial barrier in blocked impurity band (BIB) detectors using temperature-dependent dark current and corresponding theoretical calculations. Considering the effects of the interfacial barrier, the calculated photoresponse is in good agreement with the experimental results. A dual-excitation model, including the direct excitation over the full barrier and excitation to the band minimum with subsequent tunneling into the blocking layer, is proposed to quantitatively explain the observed photoresponse extension. A concept of extended-mode detection is developed to suggest the option for some selective photoresponse in the terahertz region and open the possibility of extending BIB photoresponse to lower frequency.

  17. Vocational education training in environmental health sciences: using ionizing radiation detectors, module 11

    SciTech Connect

    May, F.C.

    1981-07-01

    In this instructional module, students learn to operate a geiger counter and read a pocket ion chamber dosimeter in demonstrating how radiation levels are affected by distance, shielding, and time. Training Prerequisites: Before beginning this module, students should be, or have been, enrolled in a course on radiation safety or its equivalent at the 2-year technical-school or college level. Upon completion of this module, students will be able to perform the following functions: (1) Name and tell the function of the major components of a geiger counter and check its operation using a sealed check source of low radioactivity. (2) Read a pocket ion chamber dosimeter and recharge the dosimeter using a dosimeter charger. (3) Demonstrate what effects distance, shielding, and time have on radiation levels.

  18. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  19. Multipurpose Radiation Resistant Semiconductor Detectors for Alpha, Neutron & Low Energy Gamma Ray Measurements at High Temperatures in High-Intensity Gamma Ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, Frank H.

    2005-06-01

    Work scheduled under year two of DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER63734 is on schedule and all year-two milestones have or will be met. Results to date demonstrate that unprecedented silicon carbide (SiC) energy resolution has been obtained, and that SiC detectors may achieve energy resolution that exceeds that obtainable with the best silicon alpha spectrometers. Fast-neutron energy spectrometry measurements indicate that recoil-ion energy spectrometry should be possible with SiC detectors. Furthermore, SiC detectors have been demonstrated to perform well even after gamma-ray exposures of 1.E09 Rad. This result and the previously demonstrated capability of SiC detectors to operate in elevated-temperature environments are very promising for potential DOE EMSP applications. A new class of multipurpose, radiation-resistant semiconductor detectors that can be used in elevated-temperature and high-radiation environments is being developed under this grant. These detectors, based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor are designed to have larger active volumes than previously available SiC detectors, and are being tested for their response to alpha particles, X-rays and low energy gamma rays, and fast neutrons. Specifically, SiC radiation detectors with larger areas and 100-micrometer thick active regions have been designed and manufactured according to detector-design specifications. Detectors based on a Schottky diode design were specified in order to minimize the effects of the detector entrance window on alpha particle measurements. During manufacture of the Schottky diodes, the manufacturer also provided a set of large-volume SiC p-i-n diodes for testing Extensive alpha particle measurements have been carried out to test and quantify the response of the SiC Schottky diodes. Exposures to 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, 221-Fr, 225-Ac, 237-Np, 238-Pu, 240-Pu, and 242-Pu sources were used to obtain detailed alpha response data in the alpha energy range from 3182.787 keV to 8375.9 keV. The 148-Gd, 213-Po, 217-At, and 221-Fr sources provide energy-separated, mono-energetic alpha particle peaks which can be analyzed to provide detailed information on the energy response characteristics of the detectors.

  20. SPECTROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF (NH4)2S TREATED GaSeTe FOR RADIATION DETECTOR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A; Laurence, T; Conway, A; Behymer, E; Sturm, B; Voss, L; Nikolic, R; Payne, S; Mertiri, A; Pabst, G; Mandal, K; Burger, A

    2009-08-04

    The surface of the layered III-VI chalcogenide semiconductor GaSeTe was treated with (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S at 60 C to modify the surface chemistry and determine the effect on transport properties. Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to assess the effect of the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treatment on surface defect states. Evaluation of the subsequent surface chemistry was performed with high-resolution core-level photoemission measurements. Metal overlayers were deposited on the (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treated surfaces and the I-V characteristics were measured. The measurements were correlated to understand the effect of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S modification of the interfacial electronic structure with the goal of optimizing the metal/GaSeTe interface for radiation detector devices.